WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-stroke cycle engines

  1. The Tracer Gas Method of Determining the Charging Efficiency of Two-stroke-cycle Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, P H; Deluca, Frank, Jr

    1942-01-01

    A convenient method has been developed for determining the scavenging efficiency or the charging efficiency of two-stroke-cycle engines. The method consists of introducing a suitable tracer gas into the inlet air of the running engine and measuring chemically its concentration both in the inlet and exhaust gas. Monomethylamine CH(sub 3)NH(sub 2) was found suitable for the purpose as it burns almost completely during combustion, whereas the "short-circuited" portion does not burn at all and can be determined quantitatively in the exhaust. The method was tested both on four-stroke and on two-stroke engines and is considered accurate within 1 percent.

  2. A discussion of the several types of two-stroke-cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venediger, Herbert J

    1935-01-01

    This report discusses different types of two-stroke engines as well as the three most important design factors: volume of scavenge and charge delivery, scavenging process (scavenging result), and result of charge. Some of the types of engines discussed include: single cylinder with crank-chamber scavenge pump and auxiliary suction piston linked to working connecting rod; and two cylinder engines with a rotary scavenge pump arrangement. Three and four cylinder engines are also discussed in various designs.

  3. Small Engine Repair. Two-Stroke and Four-Stroke Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hires, Bill; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist persons teaching a course in repairing two- and four-stroke cycle small engines. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: safety, tools, fasteners, and measurement techniques; basic small engine theory (engine identification and inspection, basic engine principles and…

  4. U.S. Coast Guard pollution abatement program - Two-stroke cycle outboard engine emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-09-01

    This report documents the results of emissions tests performed on three old and two new outboard engines. Tests of the emissions were made before and after water contact. Older engines were tested in as-received condition, tuned to factory specificat...

  5. Experimental investigation of the influence of internal and external EGR on the combustion characteristics of a controlled auto-ignition two-stroke cycle engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andwari, Amin Mahmoudzadeh; Aziz, Azhar Abdul; Said, Mohd Farid Muhamad; Latiff, Zulkarnain Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigate the effect of In-EGR, Ex-EGR and octane number on a CAI 2-stroke engine. • Effect of In-EGR, Ex-EGR and octane number on combustion phasing of the engine. • Effect of In-EGR, Ex-EGR and octane number on cyclic variability of the engine. • Identify the CAI combustion upper and lower boundary for operating regions. - Abstract: A two-stroke cycle engine incorporated with a controlled auto-ignition combustion approach presents a high thermodynamic efficiency, ultra-low exhaust emissions and high power-to-weight ratio features for future demand of prime movers. The start of auto-ignition, control of the auto-ignition and its cyclic variability, are major concerns that should be addressed in the combustion timing control of controlled auto-ignition engines. Several studies have been performed to examine the effect of internal exhaust gas recirculation utilization on auto-ignited two-stroke cycle engines. However, far too little attention has been devoted to study on the influence of external exhaust gas recirculation on the cyclic variation and the combustion characteristics of controlled auto-ignition two-stroke cycle engines. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of external exhaust gas recirculation in combination with internal exhaust gas recirculation on the combustion characteristics and the cyclic variability of a controlled auto-ignition two-stroke engine using fuel with different octane numbers. In a detailed experimental investigation, the combustion-related and pressure-related parameters of the engine are examined and statistically associated with the coefficient of variation and the standard deviation. The outcomes of the investigation indicates that the most influential controlled auto-ignition combustion phasing parameters can be managed appropriately via regulating the internal and external exhaust gas recirculation and fuel octane number. In general, start of auto-ignition and its cyclic variability are

  6. Expansion of organic Rankine cycle working fluid in a cylinder of a low-speed two-stroke ship engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Wronski, Jorrit; Andreasen, Jesper Graa

    2017-01-01

    presents the thermodynamic analysis of a concept that aims at reducing the cost of an organic Rankine cycle unit by using one of the cylinders in a large diesel engine as expansion device. Numerical models were used to optimise the process parameters and thereby determine the power potential...... for this concept. The evaluation of 104 working fluids points to cyclopropane, R245fa and R1234ze(z) as the most promising. The results suggest that the power produced by the organic Rankine cycle cylinder is at least equivalent to that of the cylinders operating with the diesel process. This enables potential...

  7. The two-stroke poppet valve engine. Part 1: Intake and exhaust ports flow experimental assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamili Zahidi, M.; Razali Hanipah, M.; Ramasamy, D.; Noor, M. M.; Kadirgama, K.; Rahman, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    A two-stroke poppet valve engine is developed to overcome the common problems in conventional two-stroke engine designs. However, replacing piston control port with poppet valve will resulted different flow behaviour. This paper is looking at experimental assessment on a two-stroke poppet valve engine configuration to investigate the port flow performance. The aims are to evaluate the intake and exhaust coefficient of discharge and assess the twostroke capability of the cylinder head. The results has shown comparable coefficient of discharge values as production engine for the intake while the exhaust has higher values which is favourable for the two-stroke cycle operation.

  8. Swirling flow in a two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Casper Schytte; Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations are performed for the turbulent swirling flow in a scale model of a low-speed two-stroke diesel engine with a moving piston. The purpose of the work is to investigate the accuracy of different turbulence models including two-equation Reynolds- Averaged Navier...

  9. MODELING OF ELECTRONIC GASOLINE INJECTION PROCESSES IN TWO STROKE ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hraivoronskyi, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic provision of the processes developed mode, occurring in ignition fuel system with electronically controlled two stroke engine with positive ignition are given. Fuel injection process’ calculation results for the case of placing fuel injector into intake system presented.

  10. The first of a series of high efficiency, high bmep, turbocharged two-stroke cycle diesel engines; the general motors EMD 645FB engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlin, J.J.; Dunteman, N.R.; Scott, D.I.; Williams, H.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The current Electro-Motive Division 645 Series turbocharged engines are the Model FB and EC. The FB engine combines the highest thermal efficiency with the highest specific output of any EMD engine to date. The FB Series incorporates 16:1 compression ratio with a fire ring piston and an improved turbocharger design. Engine components included in the FB engine provide very high output levels with exceptional reliability. This paper also describes the performance of the lower rated Model EC engine series which feature high thermal efficiency and utilize many engine components well proven in service and basic to the Model FB Series.

  11. Four-Stroke and Two-Stroke Marine Engines Comparison and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Eng. Waleed Alturki

    2017-01-01

    Marine engines have evolved a lot through time. From the earliest instances of rowing equipment to the advanced machinery, propulsion engines have become a critical part in the efficiency of marine vessels. These engines can be classified and selected using various characteristics and types, such as its operating cycle. Engines can come in either the four-stroke or the two-stroke version. Four-stroke engines are primarily used in cars, buses, and trucks due to their lower noise production and...

  12. Production of syngas and oil at biomass refinery and their application in low speed two stroke engines for combined cycle electric energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinatti, Daltro Garcia [Universidade do Sul de Santa Catarina (UNISUL), Tubarao, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: pinatti@demar.eel.usp.br; Oliveira, Isaias de; Ferreira, Joao Carlos; Romao, Erica Leonor [RM Materiais Refratarios Ltd., Lorena, SP (Brazil)], Emails: isaias@rm-gpc.com.br, joaocarlos@rm-gpc.com.br, ericaromao@rm-gpc.com.br; Conte, Rosa Ana [University of Sao Paulo (DEMAR/EEL/USP), SP (Brazil). Lorena School of Engineering. Dept. of Materials Engineering], E-mail: rosaconte@demar.eel.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    Low speed two stroke engines burn fuels of medium quality with high efficiency (47%) and allows a flexible use of oil (> 8% of total power) and syngas (< 92%, low heating value-LHV>11.2MJ/m{sup 3}). Biomass refinery (BR) generates oil from sludge and oleaginous biomass by low temperature conversion and syngas from lignocellulosic biomass treated by diluted acidic prehydrolysis. BR has low investment cost (US$1,500.00/kW) compared with hydroelectric plants (US$2,500.00/kW) and both generate electric energy with sales price below US$75.00/MWh. It allows distributed generation from 30 MW up to 170 MW or centralized power of 1 GW with six motor generator sets. BR matrix, mass and energy balance, fuels compositions, modulations and scope of supply will be presented. Besides electric energy BR can be tailored to supply other products such as ethanol, H{sub 2} for fuel cells, biodiesel, fertilizer recycling, char and simultaneously maximizes the production of animal protein. (author)

  13. Carbonaceous species emitted from handheld two-stroke engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckens, John; Olson, David A.; Hays, Michael D.

    Small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work (e.g., string trimmers, leaf blowers, etc.) can emit a variety of potentially toxic carbonaceous air pollutants. Yet, the emissions effluents from these machines go largely uncharacterized, constraining the proper development of human exposure estimates, emissions inventories, and climate and air quality models. This study samples and evaluates chemical pollutant emissions from the dynamometer testing of six small, handheld spark-ignition engines—model years 1998-2002. Four oil-gas blends were tested in each engine in duplicate. Emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and gas-phase hydrocarbons were predominant, and the PM emitted was organic matter primarily. An ANOVA model determined that engine type and control tier contributed significantly to emissions variations across all identified compound classes; whereas fuel blend was an insignificant variable accounting for engines were generally intermediate in magnitude compared with other gasoline-powered engines, numerous compounds traditionally viewed as motor vehicle markers are also present in small engine emissions in similar relative proportions. Given that small, handheld two-stroke engines used for lawn and garden work account for 5-10% of total US emissions of CO, CO 2, NO x, HC, and PM 2.5, source apportionment models and human exposure studies need to consider the effect of these small engines on ambient concentrations in air polluted environments.

  14. Numerical Modelling of the Operation of a Novel Two Stroke V4 Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Boretti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents simulations of the operation of a novel two-stroke engine for road Super Sport motorcycles. Two-stroke engines were preferred to four-stroke engines in Grand Prix motorcycle racing until the start of the Moto GP era when new rules phased out the two-stroke engines. Reasons for the change were the poor fuel economy and significant pollutant emissions. The paper discusses the opportunity of a came back at least in road Super Sport motorcycles thanks to the recent advantages in direct injection and precise lubrication for two-stroke engines, plus the opportunity to use jet ignition, based on performance simulations.

  15. Direct Fuel Injection of LPG in Small Two-Stroke Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Yew Heng Teoh; Horizon Gitano-Briggs

    2011-01-01

    The commonly used carburetted two-stroke engines in developing countries have high exhaust emission and poor fuel efficiency. To meet more rigid emissions requirements, two-stroke vehicles are typically phase out in favour of four-stroke engines. The problems of ubiquitous legacy two-stroke vehicles remain unsolved by these measures and they are likely to be a major source of transport for many years to come. A number of technologies are available for solving the problems associated with two-...

  16. Some investigations in design of low cost variable compression ratio two stroke petrol engine

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivas, A.; Venkatasubbaiah, G.; rao, P. Venkateswar; Reddy, M. Penchal

    2012-01-01

    Historically two stroke engine petrol engines find wide applications in construction of two wheelers worldwide, however due to stringent environmental laws enforced universally; these engines are fading in numbers. In spite of the tight norms, internationally these engines are still used in agriculture, gensets etc. Several designs of variable compression ratio two stroke engines are commercially available for analysis purpose. In this present investigation a novel method of changing the comp...

  17. Numerical Modelling of the Operation of a Novel Two Stroke V4 Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Albert Boretti

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents simulations of the operation of a novel two-stroke engine for road Super Sport motorcycles. Two-stroke engines were preferred to four-stroke engines in Grand Prix motorcycle racing until the start of the Moto GP era when new rules phased out the two-stroke engines. Reasons for the change were the poor fuel economy and significant pollutant emissions. The paper discusses the opportunity of a came back at least in road Super Sport motorcycles thanks to the recent advantages i...

  18. Measurement and Calculation of Frictional Loss in Large Two-Stroke Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vølund, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The total frictional loss in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is rather well determined. However, the contribution (size and distribution) from the different machine elements are not well known. The aim of this study is to establish methods to measure and calculate friction in the piston...... assembly and guide shoe system for a large two-stroke marine diesel engine. These components are the two major contributors to the total friction in a two-stroke marine diesel engine. The piston pack represents approximately 60% of the total mechanical loss at full load and the guide shoe system 23...

  19. Impact of banning of two-stroke engines on airborne particulate matter concentrations in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Bilkis A; Biswas, Swapan K; Hopke, Philip K

    2006-01-01

    Vehicular air pollution is common in growing metropolitan areas throughout the world. Vehicular emissions of fine particles are particularly harmful because they occur near ground level, close to where people live and work. Two-stroke engines represented an important contribution to the motor vehicle emissions where they constitute approximately half of the total vehicle fleet in Dhaka city. Two-stroke engines have lower fuel efficiency than four-stroke engines, and they emit as much of an order of magnitude and more particulate matter (PM) than four-stroke engines of similar size. To eliminate their impact on air quality, the government of Bangladesh promulgated an order banning all two-stroke engines from the roads in Dhaka starting on December 31, 2002. The effect of the banning of two-stroke engines on airborne PM was studied at the Farm Gate air quality-monitoring station in Dhaka (capital of Bangladesh), a hot spot with very high-pollutant concentrations because of its proximity to major roadways. The samples were collected using a "Gent" stacked filter unit in two fractions of 0-2.2 microm and 2.2-10 microm sizes. Samples of fine and coarse fractions of airborne PM collected from 2000 to 2004 were studied. It has been found that the fine PM and black carbon concentrations decreased from the previous years because of the banning of two-stroke engine baby taxies.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of sprays in two stroke diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Bjarke Skovgård

    2007-01-01

    The control of the injected spray is important when optimizing performance and reducing emissions from diesel engines. The research community has conducted extensive research especially on smaller four stroke engines, but so far only little has been done on sprays in large two stroke engines...... physical quantities have an effect on the spray characteristics, but there are some discrepancies. It is found that small differences in setup have large effects on the spray characteristics, especially differences in nozzle layout have shown a large effect. The nozzles of large two stroke engines both...... and an injection system identical to those of large two stroke diesel engines. Specially designed single hole nozzles enables in nozzle pressure measurements. A number of experimental methods are successfully tested, including a high speed imaging system using reflected light, a low cost shadowgraph system...

  1. Parametric Study of the Scavenging Process in Marine Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Mayer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Large commercial ships such as container vesselsand bulk carriers are propelled by low-speed, uniflowscavenged two-stroke diesel engines. The integral in-cylinderprocess in this type of engine is the scavenging process,where the burned gas from the combustion process isevacuated through the exhaust...... in axial velocity and the formation ofcentral recirculation zones, known as vortex breakdown. Thispaper will present a CFD analysis of the scavenging process ina MAN B&W two-stroke diesel engine. The study include aparameter sweep where the operating conditions such as airamount, port timing and scavenging...

  2. CFD analysis of the scavenging process in marine two-stroke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Hult, Johan; Nogenmyr, Karl-Johan

    2014-01-01

    /charge before the subsequent compression stroke. This implies that the scavenging process is integral to engine performance as it influence the initial condition for the combustion process, thus affecting the fuel economy, power output and emission of hazardous gases. Two-stroke diesel engines for marine......The scavenging process is an integral part of any two-stroke internal combustion engine regardless of being spark ignited (SI) or compression ignited (CI). The scavenging process is responsible for replacing the burned gas from the combustion process from the previous working stroke with fresh air...

  3. ACUTE BEHAVORIAL EFFECTS FROM EXPOSURE TO TWO-STROKE ENGINE EXHAUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benefits of changing from two-stroke to four-stroke engines (and other remedial requirements) can be evaluated (monetized) from the standpoint of acute behavioral effects of human exposure to exhaust from these engines. The monetization process depends upon estimates of the magn...

  4. Parametric Study of the Scavenging Process in Marine Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Mayer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Large commercial ships such as container vesselsand bulk carriers are propelled by low-speed, uniflowscavenged two-stroke diesel engines. The integral in-cylinderprocess in this type of engine is the scavenging process,where the burned gas from the combustion process isevacuated through the exhaust...

  5. Side branch absorber for exhaust manifold of two-stroke internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ralph E [San Antonio, TX; Broerman, III, Eugene L.; Bourn, Gary D [Laramie, WY

    2011-01-11

    A method of improving scavenging operation of a two-stroke internal combustion engine. The exhaust pressure of the engine is analyzed to determine if there is a pulsation frequency. Acoustic modeling is used to design an absorber. An appropriately designed side branch absorber may be attached to the exhaust manifold.

  6. Heat Transfer in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent

    and up to 9.5 MW/m2 with the actual value probably being in the lower part of this interval. This is about the same magnitude as that previously reported for automotive size diesel engines. The obtained interval is relatively large, but a more accurate prediction is difficult to achieve with the applied...

  7. Novel Tribotester for Cylinder Liner/Piston Ring Contacts of Two Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Torben; Imran, Tajammal; Klit, Peder

    2009-01-01

    A good tribological description for the cylinder liner and piston ring materials is always desired in order to achieve an improved combination of the materials. The piston ring package in a two-stroke-diesel engine operates in three lubrication regimes and the materials must be characterized...... in relation to this before a final selection is made. A tribo-test-apparatus is developed to study the tribological performance and to rank the different combinations of cylinder liner and piston ring materials of two stroke marine diesel engines. The test apparatus is based on the block-on-ring principle...

  8. Novel Tribotester for Cylinder Liner/Piston Ring Contacts of Two Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Torben; Imran, Tajammal; Klit, Peder

    2009-01-01

    in relation to this before a final selection is made. A tribo-test-apparatus is developed to study the tribological performance and to rank the different combinations of cylinder liner and piston ring materials of two stroke marine diesel engines. The test apparatus is based on the block-on-ring principle......A good tribological description for the cylinder liner and piston ring materials is always desired in order to achieve an improved combination of the materials. The piston ring package in a two-stroke-diesel engine operates in three lubrication regimes and the materials must be characterized...

  9. Two Stroke Diesel Engines for Large Ship Propulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad

    on characterizing the confined swirling flow during the scavenging process. A simplified experimental model of an engine cylinder is developed. Smoke visualization results show that at fully open intake port there is a well-defined vortex core. The core size increases in a hollow conical shape along the flow...... downstream. As the port closes, the mixing of smoke particles in the core with surrounding regions is enhanced. The hollow conical smoke pattern disappears and resembles to a jet. Laser Doppler Anemometry measurements are conducted in the swirl generator and at the entrance to the test cylinder. The results...... experiment, the intake port is kept fully open and three different cylinder lengths are investigated. The results indicate that the incylinder flow is a concentrated vortex decaying downstream due to wall friction. The mean axial velocity has a wake-like profile. The radial velocity is very small compared...

  10. Reaction of Sulfuric Acid in Lube Oil: Implications for Large Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejre, Kasper Hartvig; Kiil, Søren; Glarborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Slow-steaming operation and an increased pressure in the combustion chamber have contributed to increased sulfuric acid (H2SO4) condensation on the cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines, thus causing increased corrosion wear. To cope with this, lube oils are formulated...

  11. Recent Development of the Two-Stroke Engine. II - Design Features. 2; Design Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, J.

    1945-01-01

    Completing the first paper dealing with charging methods and arrangements, the present paper discusses the design forms of two-stroke engines. Features which largely influence piston running are: (a) The shape and surface condition of the sliding parts. (b) The cylinder and piston materials. (c) Heat conditions in the piston, and lubrication. There is little essential difference between four-stroke and two-stroke engines with ordinary pistons. In large engines, for example, are always found separately cast or welded frames in which the stresses are taken up by tie rods. Twin piston and timing piston engines often differ from this design. Examples can be found in many engines of German or foreign make. Their methods of operation will be dealt with in the third part of the present paper, which also includes the bibliography. The development of two-stroke engine design is, of course, mainly concerned with such features as are inherently difficult to master; that is, the piston barrel and the design of the gudgeon pin bearing. Designers of four-stroke engines now-a-days experience approximately the same difficulties, since heat stresses have increased to the point of influencing conditions in the piston barrel. Features which notably affect this are: (a) The material. (b) Prevailing heat conditions.

  12. Measuring Scaling Effects in Small Two-Stroke Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-20

    manufacturer. Being two-stroke engines, the crankcases are void of an oil sump, so needle roller bearings are used on both ends of the connecting...This energy is dispersed among several different paths including to the engine’s cooling medium, surface friction (piston- cylinder, bearings , etc...linked to the dynamometer driveshaft with a one-way bearing in order to start the engine and not dissipate power unnecessarily during testing. The

  13. CFD analysis of the scavenging process in marine two-stroke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Hult, Johan; Nogenmyr, Karl-Johan

    2014-01-01

    The scavenging process is an integral part of any two-stroke internal combustion engine regardless of being spark ignited (SI) or compression ignited (CI). The scavenging process is responsible for replacing the burned gas from the combustion process from the previous working stroke with fresh air....../charge before the subsequent compression stroke. This implies that the scavenging process is integral to engine performance as it influence the initial condition for the combustion process, thus affecting the fuel economy, power output and emission of hazardous gases. Two-stroke diesel engines for marine...... with the swirling air in the combustion chamber during fuel injection. A known characteristic of swirling flows is an adverse pressure gradient in the center of the rotating flow which might lead to a local deficit in axial velocity and the formation of central recirculation zones, known as vortex breakdown...

  14. Laser-induced breakdown ignition in a gas fed two-stroke engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktionov, E. Y.; Pasechnikov, N. A.; Telekh, V. D.

    2018-01-01

    Laser-induced ignition for internal combustion engines is investigated intensively after demonstration of a compact ‘laser plug’ possibility. Laser spark benefits as compared to traditional spark plugs are higher compression rate, and possibility of almost any fuel ignition, so lean mixtures burning with lower temperatures could reduce harmful exhausts (NO x , CH, etc). No need in electrode and possibility for multi-point, linear or circular ignition can make combustion even more effective. Laser induced combustion wave appears faster and is more stable in time, than electric one, so can be used for ramjets, chemical thrusters, and gas turbines. To the best of our knowledge, we have performed laser spark ignition of a gas fed two-stroke engine for the first time. Combustion temperature and pressure, exhaust composition, ignition timing were investigated at laser and compared to a regular electric spark ignition in a two-stroke model engine. Presented results show possibility for improvement of two-stroke engines performance, in terms of rotation rate increase and NO x emission reduction. Such compact engines using locally mined fuel could be highly demanded in remote Arctic areas.

  15. Charging process analysis of an opposed-piston two-stroke aircraft Diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabowski Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research results on a 1D model of an opposed-piston two-stroke aircraft Diesel engine. The research aimed at creating a model of the engine in question to investigate how engine performance is affected by the compressor gear ratio. The power was constant at all the operating points. The research results are presented as graphs of power consumed by the compressor, compressor efficiency and brake specific fuel consumption. The optimal range of compressor gear ratio in terms of engine efficiency was defined from the research results.

  16. Scavenge flow analysis of opposed-piston two-stroke engine based on dynamic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-kang Ma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Opposed-piston two-stroke engine has been proposed by Beijing Institute of Technology to improve power density and complete machine balance relative to conventional engines. In order to study opposed-piston two-stroke engine scavenging flow, a scavenging system was configured using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model effectively coupled to experiments. The boundary conditions are obtained through one-dimensional working process simulation results and experiments. As the opposed-piston relative dynamic characteristics of opposed-piston two-stroke engine depend on different design and operating parameters including the opposed-piston motion phase difference and crank-connecting rod ratio, a numerical simulation program was built using MATLAB/Simulink to define opposed-piston motion profiles based on equivalent crank angle of opposed crank-connecting rod mechanism. The opposed-piston motion phase difference only affects scavenging timing while crank-connecting rod ratio affects scavenging timing and duration. Scavenging timing and duration are the main factors which affect scavenging performance. The results indicate that a match of opposed-piston motion phase difference and crank-connecting rod ratio has the potential to achieve high scavenging and trapping efficiency with a right flow in cylinder.

  17. Heat transfer modeling in exhaust systems of high-performance two-stroke engines

    OpenAIRE

    Lujan Martinez, José Manuel; Climent Puchades, Héctor; Olmeda González, Pablo Cesar; JIMENEZ MACEDO, VICTOR DANIEL

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from the hot gases to the wall in exhaust systems of high-performance two-stroke engines is underestimated using steady state with fully developed flow empirical correlations. This fact is detected when comparing measured and modeled pressure pulses in different positions in the exhaust system. This can be explained taking into account that classical expressions have been validated for fully developed flows, a situation that is far from the flow behavior in reciprocating interna...

  18. TOPSIS Multi-Criteria Decision Modeling Approach for Biolubricant Selection for Two-Stroke Petrol Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Dehghani Soufi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust pollutants from two-stroke petrol engines are a problem for the environment. Biolubricants are a new generation of renewable and eco-friendly vegetable-based lubricants, which have attracted a lot of attention in recent years. In this paper, the applicability of the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS method to support the process of building the scoring system for selecting an appropriate two-stroke lubricant has been analyzed. For this purpose, biolubricants (TMP-triesters based on castor oil, palm oil, and waste cooking oil were produced and then utilized in a 200 cc two-stroke gasoline engine to investigate their effects on its performance and exhaust emissions. The results obtained from the use of the entropy technique in the TOPSIS algorithm showed that palm oil-based lubricant took up the greatest distance from the Negative Ideal Solution (NIS and was selected as the most optimal lubricant for these types of engines.

  19. Testing of bearing materials for large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vølund, Anders; Klit, Peder; Persson, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    In large two-stroke marine diesel engines, bearings are designed to last the lifetime of the engine. The design has shown very good service experiences. The design parameters of the main bearings are, among others, based on the average maximum specific load which the bearing should operate under....... In general, the frictional loss is less than 1% of the nominal power of the engine but is still a target for optimization. Fatigue mechanisms of bearing lining material are not fully understood and the design limits with regards to minimum oil film thickness, max oil film pressure and oil film pressure...

  20. Testing of Bearing Materials for Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Persson, Sebastian; Vølund, Anders

    2013-01-01

    In large two-stroke marine diesel engines bearings are designed with the intention that these need not be replaced during the life of the engine. The design has shown very good service experiences. The design parameters of the main bearings are, among others, based on the average maximum specific...... load which the bearing should operate under. In general, the frictional loss is less than 1% of the nominal power of the engine but is still a target for optimization. Fatigue mechanisms of bearing lining material are not fully understood and the design limits with regards to minimum oil film thickness...

  1. Enhanced electrohydrodynamic force generation in a two-stroke cycle dielectric-barrier-discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shintaro; Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2017-05-01

    An approach for electrohydrodynamic (EHD) force production is proposed with a focus on a charge cycle on a dielectric surface. The cycle, consisting of positive-charging and neutralizing strokes, is completely different from the conventional methodology, which involves a negative-charging stroke, in that the dielectric surface charge is constantly positive. The two-stroke charge cycle is realized by applying a DC voltage combined with repetitive pulses. Simulation results indicate that the negative pulse eliminates the surface charge accumulated during constant voltage phase, resulting in repetitive EHD force generation. The time-averaged EHD force increases almost linearly with increasing repetitive pulse frequency and becomes one order of magnitude larger than that driven by the sinusoidal voltage, which has the same peak-to-peak voltage.

  2. Exhaust emissions of low level blend alcohol fuels from two-stroke and four-stroke marine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevik, James M., Jr.

    The U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard mandates that by 2022, 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels must be produced on a yearly basis. Ethanol production is capped at 15 billion gallons, meaning 21 billion gallons must come from different alternative fuel sources. A viable alternative to reach the remainder of this mandate is iso-butanol. Unlike ethanol, iso-butanol does not phase separate when mixed with water, meaning it can be transported using traditional pipeline methods. Iso-butanol also has a lower oxygen content by mass, meaning it can displace more petroleum while maintaining the same oxygen concentration in the fuel blend. This research focused on studying the effects of low level alcohol fuels on marine engine emissions to assess the possibility of using iso-butanol as a replacement for ethanol. Three marine engines were used in this study, representing a wide range of what is currently in service in the United States. Two four-stroke engine and one two-stroke engine powered boats were tested in the tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay, near Annapolis, Maryland over the course of two rounds of weeklong testing in May and September. The engines were tested using a standard test cycle and emissions were sampled using constant volume sampling techniques. Specific emissions for two-stroke and four-stroke engines were compared to the baseline indolene tests. Because of the nature of the field testing, limited engine parameters were recorded. Therefore, the engine parameters analyzed aside from emissions were the operating relative air-to-fuel ratio and engine speed. Emissions trends from the baseline test to each alcohol fuel for the four-stroke engines were consistent, when analyzing a single round of testing. The same trends were not consistent when comparing separate rounds because of uncontrolled weather conditions and because the four-stroke engines operate without fuel control feedback during full load conditions. Emissions trends from the baseline test to each

  3. Performance optimization of a Two-Stroke supercharged diesel engine for aircraft propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, Antonio Paolo; Ficarella, Antonio; Trullo, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A Two-Stroke diesel engine for aircraft propulsion was modeled with a 0D/1D approach. • The results of the 0D/1D model are compared with those resulting from a 3D model. • The effect of several design and thermodynamic parameters have been analyzed. • Guidelines for the optimization of engine performance are provided. - Abstract: In Two-Stroke engines, the cylinder filling efficiency is antithetical to the cylinder scavenging efficiency; moreover, both of them are influenced by geometric and thermodynamic parameters characterizing the design and operation of both the engine and the related supercharging system. Aim of this work is to provide several guidelines about the definition of design and operation parameters for a Two-Stroke two banks Uniflow diesel engine, supercharged with two sequential turbochargers and an aftercooler per bank, with the goal of either increasing the engine brake power at take-off or decreasing the engine fuel consumption in cruise conditions. The engine has been modeled with a 0D/1D modeling approach. Then, the model capability in describing the effect of several parameters on engine performance has been assessed comparing the results of 3D simulations with those of 0D/1D model. The validated 0D/1D model has been used to simulate the engine behavior varying several design and operation engine parameters (exhaust valves opening and closing angles and maximum valve lift, scavenging ports opening angle, distance between bottom edge of the scavenging ports and bottom dead center, area of the single scavenging port and number of ports, engine volumetric compression ratio, low and high pressure compressor pressure ratios, air/fuel ratio) on a wide range of possible values. The parameters most influencing the engine performance are then recognized and their effect on engine thermodynamic behavior is discussed. Finally, the system configurations leading to best engine power at sea level and lowest fuel consumption in cruise

  4. Devices to improve the performance of a conventional two-stroke spark ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poola, R. B.; Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K. V.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents research efforts made in three different phases with the objective of improving the fuel economy of and reducing exhaust emissions from conventional, carbureted, two-stroke spark ignition (SI) engines, which are widely employed in two-wheel transportation in India. A review concerning the existing two-stroke engine technology for this application is included. In the first phase, a new scavenging system was developed and tested to reduce the loss of fresh charge through the exhaust port. In the second phase, the following measures were carried out to improve the combustion process: (1) using an in-cylinder catalyst, such as copper, chromium, and nickel, in the form of coating; (2) providing moderate thermal insulation in the combustion chamber, either by depositing thin ceramic material or by metal inserts; (3) developing a high-energy ignition system; and (4) employing high-octane fuel, such as methanol, ethanol, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil, as a blending agent with gasoline. Based on the effectiveness of the above measures, an optimized design was developed in the final phase to achieve improved performance. Test results indicate that with an optimized two-stroke SI engine, the maximum percentage improvement in brake thermal efficiency is about 31%, together with a reduction of 3400 ppm in hydrocarbons (HC) and 3% by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions over the normal engine (at 3 kW, 3000 rpm). Higher cylinder peak pressures (3-5 bar), lower ignition delay (2-4 degrees CA), and shorter combustion duration (4-10 degrees CA) are obtained. The knock-limited power output is also enhanced by 12.7% at a high compression ratio (CR) of 9:1. The proposed modifications in the optimized design are simple, low-cost, and easy to adopt for both production and existing engines.

  5. Devices to improve the performance of a conventional two-stroke spark ignition engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poola, R.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K.V. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents research efforts made in three different phases with the objective of improving the fuel economy of and reducing exhaust emissions from conventional, carbureted, two-stroke spark ignition (SI) engines, which are widely employed in two-wheel transportation in India. A review concerning the existing two-stroke engine technology for this application is included. In the first phase, a new scavenging system was developed and tested to reduce the loss of fresh charge through the exhaust port. In die second phase, the following measures were carried out to improve the combustion process: (1) using an in-cylinder catalyst, such as copper, chromium, and nickel, in the form of coating; (2) providing moderate thermal insulation in the combustion chamber, either by depositing thin ceramic material or by metal inserts; (3) developing a high-energy ignition system; and (4) employing high-octane fuel, such as methanol, ethanol, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil, as a blending agent with gasoline. Based on the effectiveness of the above measures, an optimized design was developed in the final phase to achieve improved performance. Test results indicate that with an optimized two-stroke SI engine, the maximum percentage improvement in brake thermal efficiency is about 31%, together with a reduction of 3400 ppm in hydrocarbons (HC) and 3% by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions over the normal engine (at 3 kW, 3000 rpm). Higher cylinder peak pressures (3-5 bar), lower ignition delay (2-4{degrees}CA){degrees} and shorter combustion duration (4-10 {degrees}CA) are obtained. The knock-limited power output is also enhanced by 12.7% at a high compression ratio (CR) of 9:1. The proposed modifications in the optimized design are simple, low-cost and easy to adopt for both production and existing engines.

  6. The two-stroke poppet valve engine. Part 2: Numerical investigations of intake and exhaust flow behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamili Zahidi, M.; Razali Hanipah, M.

    2017-10-01

    A two-stroke poppet valve engine is developed to overcome the common problems in conventional two-stroke engine designs. However, replacing piston control port with poppet valve will resulted different flow behaviour. This paper presents the model and simulation result of three-dimensional (3D) port flow investigation of a two-stroke poppet valve engine. The objective of the investigation is to conduct a numerical investigation on port flow performance of two-stroke poppet valve engine and compare the results obtained from the experimental investigation. The model is to be used for the future numerical study of the engine. The volume flow rate results have been compared with the results obtained experimentally as presented in first part of this paper. The model has shown good agreement in terms of the flow rate at initial and final valve lifts but reduced by about 50% during half-lift region.

  7. Bearings for high performance requirements in two-stroke and four-stroke diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ederer, U.G.

    1983-11-01

    Most measures to reduce fuel consumption in diesel engines lead, directly or indirectly, to more severe operating conditions for the engine bearings. In ever more instances the bearings become the components which limit useful engine life and the time between overhauls. Bearings with improved performance characteristics are required. During recent years, Miba Gleitlager AG has developed several solutions to meet these requirements. They consist of either material improvements, such as a cast white metal (SnSb 12Cu 3 NiCd) with higher fatigue strength, or an electroplated overlay (PbSn 18 Cu) with improved fatigue and wear resistance. New design solutions found included the steel-Al Sn 6-WM 85 bearing for two-stroke engines, the steel-Al Sn 6 PbSn 18 Cu bearing applied to two-stroke crosshead bearings, the steel-AlZn 4,5 PbSn 18 Cu bearing for high bearing loads in four-stroke engines, and the Miba-Rillenlager with its radically new running-surface structure for extreme load and wear conditions. The application potential of these bearings and the operating experience with them are discussed in this article.

  8. Simulation of a two-stroke diesel engine for propulsion in waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Koosup Yum

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Propulsion in waves is a complex physical process that involves interactions between a hull, a propeller, a shaft and a prime mover which is often a diesel engine. Among the relevant components, the diesel engine plays an important role in the overall system dynamics. Therefore, using a proper model for the diesel engine is essential to achieve the reasonable accuracy of the transient simulation of the entire system. In this paper, a simulation model of a propulsion system in waves is presented with emphasis on modeling a two-stroke marine diesel engine: the framework for building such a model and its mathematical descriptions. The models are validated against available measurement data, and a sensitivity analysis for the transient performance of the diesel engine is carried out. Finally, the results of the system simulations under various wave conditions are analyzed to understand the physical processes and compare the efficiency for different cases.

  9. Investigation of intake airflow for a novel uniflow-scavenged two-stroke GDI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, S.; Ciccarelli, G. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    This paper described a newly developed uniflow-scavenged, two-stroke gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine that has a unique cylinder head design that contains check valves to control the airflow into the cylinder and improve engine performance. The intake airflow in two-stroke engines must displace the combustion products and fill the cylinder with a fresh air charge during scavenging. A numerical model was used to simulate the airflow through the cylinder head in an effort to understand the flow and ultimately improve the head design. A flowbench test was also performed to obtain steady flow data used to calculate a flow coefficient associated with the airflow through the cylinder head. The experimental flowbench data also provided a useful tool to validate the numerical model. The mass flow rates and flow coefficients derived both experimentally and by simulation were presented. The engine is functional and has the potential to be commercialized. The advantages and disadvantages for each retaining plate within the check valves were discussed with particular emphasis on practical implementation. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Influence of piston displacement on the scavenging and swirling flow in two-stroke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obeidat, Anas; Haider, Sajjad; Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark

    We study the effect of piston motion on the in-cylinder swirling flow in a low speed, large two-stroke marine diesel engine. The work involves experimental, and numerical simulation using OpenFOAM platform, Large Eddy Simulation was used with three different models, One equation Eddy, Dynamic One...... equation Eddy, and Ta Phouc Loc model, to study the transient phenomena of the flow. The results are conducted at six cross sectional planes along the axis of the cylinder and with the piston displaced at four fixed piston positions covering the air intake ports by 0%,25%, 50%, and 75% respectively...

  11. Swirling flow in model of large two-stroke diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Schnipper, Teis

    2012-01-01

    A scale model of a simplified cylinder in a uniflow scavenged large two-stroke marine diesel engine is constructed to investigate the scavenging process. Angled ports near the bottom of the cylinder liner are uncovered as the piston reaches the bottom dead center. Fresh air enters through the ports...... Velocimetry (PIV) is used to investigate the scavenging flow for cases with both static and moving piston. Measurements are carried out for several cross-sectional planes covering the majority of the cylinder length. The effect of swirl intensity is investigated using four different port angles going from 0...

  12. Exhaust Recirculation Control for Reduction of NOx from Large Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kræn Vodder

    the automotive industry, but have only recently been introduced commercially to large two-stroke diesel engines. Recirculation of exhaust gas to the cylinders lowers the oxygen availability and increases the heat capacity during combustion, which in turn leads to less formation of NOx. Experience shows...... for the scavenge oxygen fraction is designed. This observer compensates for a significant delay in the oxygen sensor, and observer errors are proven to converge exponentially. By inverting part of the reduced model and using the parameter observer, a novel scavenge oxygen controller based on nonlinear adaptive...

  13. Turbulent swirling flow in a dynamic model of a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Walther, Jens Honore

    2014-01-01

    It is desirable to use computational fluid dynamics for optimization of the in-cylinder processes in low-speed two-stroke uniflow-scavenged marine diesel engines. However, the complex nature of the turbulent swirling in-cylinder flow necessitates experimental data for validation of the used...... in wake-like axial velocity profiles and the occurrence of a vortex breakdown. After scavenge port closing, the axial velocity profiles indicate that large transient swirl-induced structures exist in the cylinder. Comparison with profiles obtained under steady-flow conditions shows that the scavenge flow...... cannot be assumed to be quasi-steady. The temporal development of the swirl strength is investigated by computing the angular momentum. The swirl strength shows an exponential decay from scavenge port closing to scavenge port opening corresponding to a reduction of 34 %, which is in good agreement...

  14. Improvement of Fatigue Life of Welded Structural Components of a Large Two-Stroke Diesel Engine by Grinding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Hansen, Anders V.; Bjørnbak-Hansen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The crankshaft housings of large two-stroke diesel engines are welded structures subjected to constant amplitude loading and designed for infinite life at full design load. A new design of the so-called frame box has been introduced in the engine using butt weld joints of thick plates, welded from...

  15. Development of a novel passive top-down uniflow scavenged two-stroke GDI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Reynolds, Steve; Oliver, Phillip [Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7P 2M4 (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    The design and performance characteristics of a novel top-down uniflow scavenged gasoline direct-injection two-stroke engine are presented. The novelty of the engine lies in the cylinder head that contains multiple check valves that control scavenging airflow into the cylinder from a supercharged air plenum. When the cylinder pressure drops below the intake plenum pressure during the expansion stroke, air flows into the cylinder through the check valves. During compression the cylinder pressure increases to a level above the intake plenum pressure and the check valves close preventing back-flow into the intake plenum. The engine head design provides asymmetrical intake valve timing without the use of poppet valves and the associated valve-train. In combination with an external Roots-type supercharger that supplies the plenum and exhaust ports at the bottom of the cylinder wall, the novel head provides top-down uniflow air scavenging. Motoring tests indicated that the check valves seal and the peak pressure is governed by the compression ratio. The only drawback observed is that valve closing is delayed as the engine speed increases. In order to investigate the valve dynamics, additional tests were performed in an optically-accessible cold flow test rig that enabled the direct measurement of valve opening and closing time under various conditions. (author)

  16. Research on the Common Rail Pressure Overshoot of Opposed-Piston Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The common rail pressure has a direct influence on the working stability of Opposed-Piston Two-Stroke (OP2S diesel engines, especially on performance indexes such as power, economy and emissions. Meanwhile, the rail pressure overshoot phenomenon occurs frequently due to the operating characteristics of OP2S diesel engines, which could lead to serious consequences. In order to solve the rail pressure overshoot problem of OP2S diesel engines, a nonlinear concerted algorithm adding a speed state feedback was investigated. First, the nonlinear Linear Parameter Varying (LPV model was utilized to describe the coupling relationship between the engine speed and the rail pressure. The Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR optimal control algorithm was applied to design the controller by the feedback of speed and rail pressure. Second, cooperating with the switching characteristics of injectors, the co-simulation of MATLAB/Simulink and GT-Power was utilized to verify the validity of the control algorithm and analyze workspaces for both normal and special sections. Finally, bench test results showed that the accuracy of the rail pressure control was in the range of ±1 MPa, in the condition of sudden 600 r/min speed increases. In addition, the fuel mass was reduced 76.3% compared with the maximum fuel supply quantity and the rail pressure fluctuation was less than 20 MPa. The algorithm could also be appropriate for other types of common rail system thanks to its universality.

  17. Direct injection of gaseous LPG in a two-stroke SI engine for improved performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeep, V.; Bakshi, Shamit; Ramesh, A.

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in a two-stroke, spark-ignition (2S–SI) engine can be realized by curtailing short-circuiting losses effectively through direct injection of the fuel. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is an alternative transportation fuel that is used in several countries. However, limited information is available on LPG fuelled direct injected engines. Hence, there is a need to study these systems as applied to 2S–SI engines in order to bring out their potential benefits. A manifold injected 2S–SI engine is modified for direct injection of LPG, in gaseous form, from the cylinder head. This engine is evaluated for performance, emission and combustion. Evaluation at various throttle positions and constant speed showed that this system can significantly improve the thermal efficiency and lower the hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. Up to 93% reduction in HC emissions and improved combustion rates are observed compared to the conventional manifold injection system with LPG. CO emissions are higher and peak NO emissions are lower with this system due to the presence of richer in–cylinder trapped mixtures and charge stratification. This system can operate with similar injection timings at different throttle positions which make electronic control simpler. It can work with low injection pressures in the range of 4–5 bars. All these advantages are attractive for commercial viability of this engine. - Highlights: • Energy saving, low pressure, direct gaseous LPG injection in engine. • Significant reduction in HC emissions at all operating conditions. • No significant changes in injection timings for different throttle positions.

  18. Modeling the Distribution of Sulfur Compounds in a Large Two Stroke Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Lage; Schramm, Jesper; Andreasen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    In many years large low speed marine diesel engines have consumed heavy fuel oils with sulfur contents in the order of 2.5 - 4.5wt%. Present legislations require that the fuel sulfur is reduced and in near future the limit will be 0.5wt% globally. During combustion most of the sulfur is oxidized...... conditions and sulfur feed. This work presents a computational model of a large low speed two-stroke diesel engine where a 0D multi-zone approach including a detailed reaction mechanism is employed in order to investigate in cylinder formation of gaseous SO3 where fuel injection rates are determined using...... to SO2 from which a fraction is further oxidized to SO3. SO3 may combine with H2O and condense as liquid sulfuric acid that promotes corrosive wear on e.g. cylinder liners. To extend engine lifetime and reduce costs for lubrication it is pivotal to identify formation of SO3 with respect to operational...

  19. Swirling flow in model of large two-stroke diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K. E.; Ingvorsen, K. M.; Mayer, S.; Walther, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    In large two-stroke uniflow scavenged marine diesel engines fresh air is blown in through angled ports in the bottom of the cylinder liner forcing the burned gas out through an exhaust valve in the cylinder head. The scavenging flow is a transient (opening/closing ports) confined port-generated turbulent swirling flow, with complex phenomena such as central recirculation zones, vortex breakdown and vortex precession. A scale model of a simplified cylinder is created with a transparent cylinder five diameters long. The flow in the experiment has a Reynolds number of 50,000 based on the cylinder diameter and bulk velocity. Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used to investigate the flow for cases with both static and moving piston. Port angles of 0, 10, 20 and 30 degrees are considered. Although the flow has a relatively low swirl number of around 0.4, a central recirculation zone is observed indicating a vortex breakdown. The steady flow is analyzed with proper orthogonal decomposition revealing systematic variations in the shape and location of the vortex core. Transient measurements using phase-locked PIV are carried out with moving piston. The transient measurements reveal a sudden rapid change in flow topology as a central recirculation zone is formed. Also at: Computational Science and Engineering Laboratory, ETH Zurich, Universitatsstrasse 6, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland.

  20. Investigation of different piston ring curvatures on lubricant transport along cylinder liner in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, H; Klit, P; Vølund, A

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the hydrodynamic lubrication of the top compression piston ring in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is presented. The groove mounted piston ring is driven by the reciprocal motion of the piston. The ring shape follows a circular geometry and the effect...

  1. Investigation of Different Piston Ring Curvatures on Lubricant Transport along Cylinder Liner in Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Hannibal Christian; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the hydrodynamic lubrication of the top compression piston ring in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is presented. The groove mounted piston ring is driven by the reciprocal motion of the piston. The ring shape follows a circular geometry and the effect...

  2. Numerical investigation of a scavenging flow in a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, P.; Ciccarelli, G. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    A numerical model has been developed for an innovative uniflow-scavenged, two-stroke engine with complex air flow through a series of check valves found in the cylinder head. Various two-equation turbulence models were investigated using Fluent 6.2. Enhanced wall treatments were considered since the flow through the cylinder head involves complex wall-bounded geometry. A numerical model was used to simulate the airflow through the cylinder head and the performance of the computational fluid dynamics model was verified against experimental data gathered downstream of the cylinder head. Meshes containing nearly 1.2 million cells were used to evaluate the turbulence models quantitatively using the flow coefficient, and qualitatively by examining the size of the predicted recirculation regions. All turbulence models revealed that the effects of the recirculation zone is negligible at four diameters downstream of the constriction. The most robust and cost-effective turbulence model for high-RE internal flows was found to be the standard {kappa}-{epsilon}e model. 13 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  3. Validation of a zero-dimensional model for prediction of NOx and engine performance for electronically controlled marine two-stroke diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scappin, Fabio; Stefansson, Sigurður H.; Haglind, Fredrik; Andreasen, Anders; Larsen, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to derive a methodology suitable for energy system analysis for predicting the performance and NO x emissions of marine low speed diesel engines. The paper describes a zero-dimensional model, evaluating the engine performance by means of an energy balance and a two zone combustion model using ideal gas law equations over a complete crank cycle. The combustion process is divided into intervals, and the product composition and flame temperature are calculated in each interval. The NO x emissions are predicted using the extended Zeldovich mechanism. The model is validated using experimental data from two MAN B and W engines; one case being data subject to engine parameter changes corresponding to simulating an electronically controlled engine; the second case providing data covering almost all model input and output parameters. The first case of validation suggests that the model can predict specific fuel oil consumption and NO x emissions within the 95% confidence intervals given by the experimental measurements. The second validation confirms the capability of the model to match measured engine output parameters based on measured engine input parameters with a maximum 5% deviation. - Highlights: ► A fast realistic model of a marine two-stroke low speed diesel engine was derived. ► The model is fast and accurate enough for future complex energy systems analysis. ► The effects of engine tuning were validated with experimental tests. ► The model was validated while constrained by experimental input and output data.

  4. Effects of valve timing, valve lift and exhaust backpressure on performance and gas exchanging of a two-stroke GDI engine with overhead valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Nora, Macklini; Lanzanova, Thompson Diórdinis Metzka; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-stroke operation was achieved in a four-valve direct injection gasoline engine. • Shorter valve opening durations improved torque at lower engine speeds. • The longer the valve opening duration, the lower was the air trapping efficiency. • Higher exhaust backpressure and lower valve lift reduced the compressor work. - Abstract: The current demand for fuel efficient and lightweight powertrains, particularly for application in downsized and hybrid electric vehicles, has renewed the interest in two-stroke engines. In this framework, an overhead four-valve spark-ignition gasoline engine was modified to run in the two-stroke cycle. The scavenging process took place during a long valve overlap period around bottom dead centre at each crankshaft revolution. Boosted intake air was externally supplied at a constant pressure and gasoline was directly injected into the cylinder after valve closure. Intake and exhaust valve timings and lifts were independently varied through an electrohydraulic valve train, so their effects on engine performance and gas exchanging were investigated at 800 rpm and 2000 rpm. Different exhaust backpressures were also evaluated by means of exhaust throttling. Air trapping efficiency, charging efficiency and scavenge ratio were calculated based on air and fuel flow rates, and exhaust oxygen concentration at fuel rich conditions. The results indicated that longer intake and exhaust valve opening durations increased the charge purity and hence torque at higher engine speeds. At lower speeds, although, shorter valve opening durations increased air trapping efficiency and reduced the estimated supercharger power consumption due to lower air short-circuiting. A strong correlation was found between torque and charging efficiency, while air trapping efficiency was more associated to exhaust valve opening duration. The application of exhaust backpressure, as well as lower intake/exhaust valve lifts, made it possible to increase

  5. ESTIMATION OF GAS EXCHANGE INDICATORS AT 3-D MODELING OF THE WORKING PROCESS OF THE TWO-STROKE PETROL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Korohodskyi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the help of 3-D modeling of the workflow of a two-stroke engine with spark ignition, crank-chamber scavenging and a carburetor feeding system in the modes of external speed characteristic the indices of gas exchange were evaluated. The simulation results are consistent with the experimental data and 3D simulation results in the AVL FIRE and MTFS® software complexes. The model allows performing optimized calculations of multiphase flow in ICE during experimental design work.

  6. Effects of Surface Irregularities on Piston Ring-Cylinder Tribo Pair of a Two Stroke Motor Engine in Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zavos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tribological parameters such as friction, lubrication and wear influence strongly the engine component's life. In this study, a piston ring-cylinder system simulated taking into account the surface modifications under fully flooded lubrication and normal engine conditions. The hydrodynamic pressure field solved based on the Navier Stokes equations by Fluid Structure Interaction analysis. A real experimental data of piston ring-cylinder was used from a two stroke motor engine 50 cc. The surface irregularities are measured by 3D coordinate measurement machine while the engine has been worked about 4000 hours. The friction force, the hydrodynamic pressure, the oil film and the mechanical stresses were predicted for different engine conditions. Results show that the worn profile ring reduces the friction as well as the mechanical stresses increased. Surface condition of worn top ring was observed after a metallurgical profile analysis.

  7. Gasoline-related organics in Lake Tahoe before and after prohibition of carbureted two-stroke engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lico, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    On June 1, 1999, carbureted two-stroke engines were banned on waters within the Lake Tahoe Basin of California and Nevada. The main gasoline components MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) were present at detectable concentrations in all samples taken from Lake Tahoe during 1997-98 prior to the ban. Samples taken from 1999 through 2001 after the ban contained between 10 and 60 percent of the pre-ban concentrations of these compounds, with MTBE exhibiting the most dramatic change (a 90 percent decrease). MTBE and BTEX concentrations in water samples from Lake Tahoe and Lower Echo Lake were related to the amount of boat use at the sampling sites. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds are produced by high-temperature pyrolytic reactions. They were sampled using semipermeable membrane sampling devices in Lake Tahoe and nearby Donner Lake, where carbureted two-stroke engines are legal. PAHs were detected in all samples taken from Lake Tahoe and Donner Lake. The number of PAH compounds and their concentrations are related to boat use. The highest concentrations of PAH were detected in samples from two heavily used boating areas, Tahoe Keys Marina and Donner Lake boat ramp. Other sources of PAH, such as atmospheric deposition, wood smoke, tributary streams, and automobile exhaust do not contribute large amounts of PAH to Lake Tahoe. Similar numbers of PAH compounds and concentrations were found in Lake Tahoe before and after the ban of carbureted two-stroke engines. ?? by the North American Lake Management Society 2004.

  8. Numerical analysis of the scavenge flow and convective heat transfer in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Eythor; Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Jensen, Michael Vincent

    2014-01-01

    A novel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is presented for the study of the scavenging processand convective heat transfer in a large two-stroke low-speed uniflow-scavenged marine diesel engine.The engine is modeled using a fully resolved 12 sector, corresponding to one scavenge port....... Theimposed experimental data includes time histories of the pressure difference across the engine and theheat release during combustion. The model is validated by a numerical sensitivity analysis and througha comparison of model predictions and experimental data, which shows a good agreement. The resultsshow...... an effective scavenging and a low convective heat loss in agreement with experimental data forlarge marine diesel engines.© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Analysis of Two Stroke Marine Diesel Engine Operation Including Turbocharger Cut-Out by Using a Zero-Dimensional Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Guan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the operation of a large two-stroke marine diesel engine including various cases with turbocharger cut-out was thoroughly investigated by using a modular zero-dimensional engine model built in MATLAB/Simulink environment. The model was developed by using as a basis an in-house modular mean value engine model, in which the existing cylinder block was replaced by a more detailed one that is capable of representing the scavenging ports-cylinder-exhaust valve processes. Simulation of the engine operation at steady state conditions was performed and the derived engine performance parameters were compared with the respective values obtained by the engine shop trials. The investigation of engine operation under turbocharger cut-out conditions in the region from 10% to 50% load was carried out and the influence of turbocharger cut-out on engine performance including the in-cylinder parameters was comprehensively studied. The recommended schedule for the combination of the turbocharger cut-out and blower activation was discussed for the engine operation under part load conditions. Finally, the influence of engine operating strategies on the annual fuel savings, CO2 emissions reduction and blower operating hours for a Panamax container ship operating at slow steaming conditions is presented and discussed.

  10. A computational fluid dynamics analysis on stratified scavenging system of medium capacity two-stroke internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitta Srinivasa Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present work is to make a computational study of stratified scavenging system in two-stroke medium capacity engines to reduce or to curb the emissions from the two-stroke engines. The 3-D flows within the cylinder are simulated using computational fluid dynamics and the code Fluent 6. Flow structures in the transfer ports and the exhaust port are predicted without the stratification and with the stratification, and are well predicted. The total pressure and velocity map from computation provided comprehensive information on the scavenging and stratification phenomenon. Analysis is carried out for the transfer ports flow and the extra port in the transfer port along with the exhaust port when the piston is moving from the top dead center to the bottom dead center, as the ports are closed, half open, three forth open, and full port opening. An unstructured cell is adopted for meshing the geometry created in CATIA software. Flow is simulated by solving governing equations namely conservation of mass momentum and energy using SIMPLE algorithm. Turbulence is modeled by high Reynolds number version k-e model. Experimental measurements are made for validating the numerical prediction. Good agreement is observed between predicted result and experimental data; that the stratification had significantly reduced the emissions and fuel economy is achieved.

  11. Numerical Investigation of the Scavenging Process in Marine Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland; Hult, Johan; Nogenmyr, Karl-Johan

    2013-01-01

    for marine propulsion are usually uniflow scavenged cross-head engines. In uniflow scavenged engines the scavenge air enters the cylinder via ports located near the bottom dead center and exits through an exhaust valve located in the cylinder head. The in cylinder flow is therefore concentrated in one...... direction which gives the method its name. In this study a CFD analysis of the scavenging process in the 4T50ME-X test engine at MAN Diesel & Turbo is presented. The CFD model uses the full engine geometry including a moving piston and valve combined with time resolved measurement data as boundary...... and initial conditions. The results are then validated with experimental data from the engine. Optical velocity measurements have been performed through a specially designed engine cover with optical access....

  12. Heat Transfer in Two-Stroke Diesel Engines for Large Ship Propulsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar Ask

    Demands on reducing the fuel consumption and harmful emissions from the compression ignition engines (diesel engines) have been continuously increasing in recent years. To comply with this, better modeling tools for the diesel combustion process are desired from the engine developers. A very...... important aspect is determining the temperature distributions in and around the combustion chamber since they are important for determining the boundary conditions of the detailed computer models of the chemical and physical processes in the engine cylinder. Furthermore, the temperature information is very...

  13. Numerical Simulation of Condensation of Sulfuric Acid and Water in a Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Karvounis, Nikolas; Pang, Kar Mun

    2016-01-01

    on the sulfuric acid gas phase. A linear correlation is found between the fuel sulfur content and the sulfuric acid condensation rate. The initial in-cylinder water content is found not to affect the sulfuric acid condensation but it has a high impact on water condensation. The scavenging pressure level shows...... an inverse correlation between pressure and condensation rate due to change in the flame propagation speed. Finally, increasing the cylinder liner temperature significantly decreases water condensation but has a negligible influence on the condensation of sulfuric acid.......We present results from computational fluid dynamics simulations of the condensation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and water (H2O) in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine. The model uses a reduced n-heptane skeletal chemical mechanism coupled with a sulfur subsetto simulate the combustion process...

  14. Effect of Cylinder Liner Oil Grooves Shape on Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine's Piston Ring Friction Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaheldin A. Mohamad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The dimensions, area densities, and geometry of macroscale surface textures may affect the performance of hydrodynamic lubrication interface. Reported in this paper are the investigations of the effect of surface textures bottom shapes on the friction forces between piston ring and cylinder liner for two-stroke marine diesel engine, using numerically generated textures and average Reynolds equation. These textures are on the cylinder liner surface in the form of circumferential oil grooves with different aspect ratios and different area densities. The hydrodynamic pressure distribution is also calculated using Reynolds boundary condition. The results revealed that the bottom shape could positively affect the friction between moving surfaces, as it could provide a microwedge or microstep bearing that tends to enhance the lubrication condition between piston ring and cylinder liner.

  15. Development and Experimental Investigation of a Two-Stroke Opposed-Piston Free-Piston Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Stephan; Chiodi, Marco; Friedrich, Horst E.; Bargende, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The proposed paper deals with the development process and initial measurement results of an opposed-piston combustion engine for application in a Free-Piston Linear Generator (FPLG). The FPLG, which is being developed at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), is an innovative internal combustion engine for a fuel based electrical power supply. With its arrangement, the pistons freely oscillate between the compression chamber of the combustion unit and a gas spring with no mechanical coupling like...

  16. The Influence of Fuel Sulfur on the Operation of Large Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov

    The present work focusses on SO3/H2SO4 formation and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) condensation in a large low speed 2-stroke marine diesel engine. SO3 formation is treated theoretically from a formulated multizone engine model described in this work that includes a detailed and validated sulfur reaction...... as also demonstrated by a number of SO3 experiments described in this work. The experiments are carried out with a heavy duty medium speed 4 stroke diesel engine operating on heavy fuel oil including ≈ 2 wt. % sulfur. SO3 was measured successfully in the exhaust gas with the PENTOL SO3 analyzer...... mechanism. Model results show that for a large marine engine generally about 3 % - 6 % of the fuel sulfur converts to SO3 while the remainder leaves the engine as SO2 from which the SO3 is formed during the expansion stroke. SO3 formation scales with the cylinder pressure and inversely with the engine speed...

  17. Integrated Analysis of the Scavenging Process in Marine Two-Stroke Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Fredrik Herland

    the exhaust valve and replaced with fresh air for the subsequent compression stroke. The scavenging air enters the cylinder via inlet ports which are uncovered by the piston at bottom dead center (BDC). The exhaust gases are then displaced bythe fresh air entering the cylinder. The scavenging ports are cut...... performance.This thesis will present a CFD model that is tested and validated with quantitative data obtained from a dedicated test engine and during engine commissioning on location at the shipbuilder. The CFD model comprises the full geometry of a single cylinder from scavenge receiver to the exhaust...... in the scavenge and exhaust receivers increase while the scavenge port exposure time, tscav, decrease. Further the scavenging pressure is varied while the engine speed is kept constant. From the perspective of the scavenging process this will resemble a load sweep following a generator curve. The scavenge port...

  18. Characteristics of Sulfuric Acid Condensation on Cylinder Liners of Large Two-Stroke Marine Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Lage; Mayer, Stefan; Schramm, Jesper

    The present work seeks to clarify the characteristics of sulfuric acid condensation on the cylinder liner of a large two–stroke marine engine. The liner is directly exposed to the cylin-der gas (i.e. no protective lube oil film) and is represented by a constant temperature over the full stroke. F...

  19. High Ethanol Fuel Endurance: A Study of the Effects of Running Gasoline with 15% Ethanol Concentration in Current Production Outboard Four-Stroke Engines and Conventional Two-Stroke Outboard Marine Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, D.

    2011-10-01

    Three Mercury Marine outboard marine engines were evaluated for durability using E15 fuel -- gasoline blended with 15% ethanol. Direct comparison was made to operation on E0 (ethanol-free gasoline) to determine the effects of increased ethanol on engine durability. Testing was conducted using a 300-hour wide-open throttle (WOT) test protocol, a typical durability cycle used by the outboard marine industry. Use of E15 resulted in reduced CO emissions, as expected for open-loop, non-feedback control engines. HC emissions effects were variable. Exhaust gas and engine operating temperatures increased as a consequence of leaner operation. Each E15 test engine exhibited some deterioration that may have been related to the test fuel. The 9.9 HP, four-stroke E15 engine exhibited variable hydrocarbon emissions at 300 hours -- an indication of lean misfire. The 300HP, four-stroke, supercharged Verado engine and the 200HP, two-stroke legacy engine tested with E15 fuel failed to complete the durability test. The Verado engine failed three exhaust valves at 285 endurance hours while the 200HP legacy engine failed a main crank bearing at 256 endurance hours. All E0-dedicated engines completed the durability cycle without incident. Additional testing is necessary to link the observed engine failures to ethanol in the test fuel.

  20. Simulation Modeling and Optimization of Uniflow Scavenging System Parameters on Opposed-Piston Two-Stroke Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukang Ma

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the introduction of opposed-piston two-stroke (OP2S gasoline direct injection (GDI engines, the OP2S-GDI engine working principle and scavenging process were analyzed. GT-Power software was employed to model the working process based on the structural style and principle of OP2S-GDI engine. The tracer gas method and OP2S-GDI engine experiment were employed for model validation at full load of 6000 rpm. The OP2S-GDI engine scavenging system parameters were optimized, including intake port height stroke ratio, intake port circumference ratio, exhaust port height stroke ratio, exhaust port circumference ratio, and opposed-piston motion phase difference. At the same time, the effect of the port height stroke ratio and opposed-piston motion phase difference on effective compression ratio and expansion ratio were considered, and the indicated work was employed as the optimization objective. A three-level orthogonal experiment was applied in the calculation process to reduce the calculation work. The influence and correlation coefficient on the scavenging efficiency and delivery ratio were investigated by the orthogonal experiment analysis of intake and exhaust port height stroke ratio and circular utilization. The effect of the scavenging system parameters on delivery ratio, scavenging efficiency and indicated work were calculated to obtain the best parameters. The results show that intake port height stroke ratio is the main factor for the delivery ratio, while exhaust port height stroke ratio is the main factor to engine delivery ratio and scavenging efficiency.

  1. Flowbench validation of a numerical model for a novel uniflow-scavenged two-stroke GDI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, P.; Ciccarelli, G. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2007-07-01

    A uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine with a unique cylinder head design that contains an array of check valves to control the airflow into the cylinder is under development at Queen's University. This paper presented a detailed investigation of the intake airflow and its impact on engine performance. In order to understand the flow and improve head design, the paper presented a numerical model that was created to simulate the steady airflow through the cylinder head. Flowbench tests were also conducted on the cylinder head to collect steady flow data to be utilized as a method of validation for the numerical model. In addition, smoke visualization techniques were utilized to further validate the flow structures predicted numerically. The paper discussed validation of the numerical model as well as the experimental and simulated results of flow coefficients and pressure profiles. The experimental apparatus was also explained. It was concluded that wall pressure profiles and smoke visualization indicated the presence of a recirculation region located downstream of the cylinder head. 4 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  2. An Investigation of the Composition of the Flow in and out of a Two-Stroke Diesel Engine and Air Consumption Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Grljušić

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the mass, substance and energy flow through two-stroke low speed Diesel engines. For this reason, a zero-dimensional model of the combustion in the engine was developed with a calculated amount and composition of exhaust gases. Due to the large amount of oxygen in the exhaust gases, a ratio of real air consumption and stoichiometric amount of air required for combustion of injected fuel was set. The calculated ratio showed that the engine consumed four times more air than needed for combustion in AFRstoich. In this work, this was called the Air Consumption Factor or Ratio, and has not previously been mentioned in scientific literature. The air consumption ratio is defined as a factor of dry or humid air. To be more comprehensive, a modified diagram of the composition of the flow in and out of a two-stroke fuel injection engine and the cylinder was made.

  3. An Investigation on the Influence of Root Defects on the Fatigue Life of the Welded Structure of a Large Two-Stroke Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders V.; Olesen, John Forbes; Agerskov, Henning

    2004-01-01

    The crankshaft housings of large two-stroke diesel engines are welded structures subjected to constant amplitude loading and designed for infinite life at full design load. A new design of the so-called frame box has been introduced in the engine using butt welded joints of thick plates, welded f...... mode loading both under the influence of residual stresses from production and in stress relieved specimens....

  4. Hybrid System Modeling and Full Cycle Operation Analysis of a Two-Stroke Free-Piston Linear Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Sun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Free-piston linear generators (FPLGs have attractive application prospects for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs owing to their high-efficiency, low-emissions and multi-fuel flexibility. In order to achieve long-term stable operation, the hybrid system design and full-cycle operation strategy are essential factors that should be considered. A 25 kW FPLG consisting of an internal combustion engine (ICE, a linear electric machine (LEM and a gas spring (GS is designed. To improve the power density and generating efficiency, the LEM is assembled with two modular flat-type double-sided PM LEM units, which sandwich a common moving-magnet plate supported by a middle keel beam and bilateral slide guide rails to enhance the stiffness of the moving plate. For the convenience of operation processes analysis, the coupling hybrid system is modeled mathematically and a full cycle simulation model is established. Top-level systemic control strategies including the starting, stable operating, fault recovering and stopping strategies are analyzed and discussed. The analysis results validate that the system can run stably and robustly with the proposed full cycle operation strategy. The effective electric output power can reach 26.36 kW with an overall system efficiency of 36.32%.

  5. Performance of thin-ceramic-coated combustion chamber with gasoline and methanol as fuels in a two-stroke SI engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K. V.

    The performance of a conventional, carbureted, two-stroke spark-ignition (SI) engine can be improved by providing moderate thermal insulation in the combustion chamber. This will help to improve the vaporization characteristics in particular at part load and medium loads with gasoline fuel and high-latent-heat fuels such as methanol. In the present investigation, the combustion chamber surface was coated with a 0.5-mm thickness of partially stabilized zirconia, and experiments were carried out in a single-cylinder, two-stroke SI engine with gasoline and methanol as fuels. Test results indicate that with gasoline as a fuel, the thin ceramic-coated combustion chamber improves the part load to medium load operation considerably, but it affects the performance at higher speeds and at higher loads to the extent of knock and loss of brake power by about 18%. However, with methanol as a fuel, the performance is better under most of the operating range and free from knock. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions are significantly reduced, by about 3 to 4% volume, for both gasoline and methanol fuels due to relatively lean operation and more complete combustion. NO(x) emissions were not measured. The results show that moderate thermal insulation of the two-stroke SI engine's combustion chamber is better suited to methanol fuel with respect to thermal efficiency, CO emissions, and knock-free operation compared to gasoline fuel.

  6. Large eddy simulations of the influence of piston position on the swirling flow in a model two-stroke diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obeidat, Anas Hassan MohD; Schnipper, Teis; Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow in a simplified model of a large two-stroke marine diesel engine. Design/methodology/approach – Large eddy simulations with four different models for the turbulent flow are used: a one...... engine model, the setup allows studies of fundamental aspects of swirling flow in a uniform scavenged engine. Comparing the four turbulence models, the local dynamic one-equation model is found to give the best agreement with the experimental results....

  7. Driving and engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Giakoumis, Evangelos G

    2017-01-01

    This book presents in detail the most important driving and engine cycles used for the certification and testing of new vehicles and engines around the world. It covers chassis and engine-dynamometer cycles for passenger cars, light-duty vans, heavy-duty engines, non-road engines and motorcycles, offering detailed historical information and critical review. The book also provides detailed examples from SI and diesel engines and vehicles operating during various cycles, with a focus on how the engine behaves during transients and how this is reflected in emitted pollutants, CO2 and after-treatment systems operation. It describes the measurement methods for the testing of new vehicles and essential information on the procedure for creating a driving cycle. Lastly, it presents detailed technical specifications on the most important chassis-dynamometer cycles around the world, together with a direct comparison of those cycles.

  8. Construction of a Direct Water-Injected Two-Stroke Engine for Phased Direct Fuel Injection-High Pressure Charging Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somsel, James P.

    1998-01-01

    The development of a water injected Orbital Combustion Process (OCP) engine was conducted to assess the viability of using the powerplant for high altitude NASA aircraft and General Aviation (GA) applications. An OCP direct fuel injected, 1.2 liter, three cylinder, two-stroke engine has been enhanced to independently inject water directly into the combustion chamber. The engine currently demonstrates low brake specific fuel consumption capability and an excellent power to weight ratio. With direct water injection, significant improvements can be made to engine power, to knock limits/ignition advance timing, and to engine NO(x) emissions. The principal aim of the testing was to validate a cyclic model developed by the Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Ames Research Center. The work is a continuation of Ames' investigations into a Phased Direct Fuel Injection Engine with High Pressure Charging (PDFI-ITPC).

  9. Personal exposure to benzene from fuel emissions among commercial fishers: comparison of two-stroke, four-stroke and diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Ellen; Loomis, Dana; Egeghy, Peter; Nylander-French, Leena

    2007-03-01

    Commercial fishers are exposed to unburned hydrocarbon vapors and combustion products present in the emissions from their boat engines. The objective of this study was to measure personal exposure to benzene as a marker of fuel exposure, and to predict exposure levels across categories of carbureted two-stroke, four-stroke and diesel engines. A self-monitoring approach, employing passive monitors, was used to obtain measurements of personal exposure to benzene over time. Mixed-effect linear regression models were used to predict exposure levels, identify significant effects and determine restricted maximum likelihood estimates for within- and between-person variance components. Significant fixed effects for engine type and refueling a car or truck were identified. After controlling for refueling, predicted benzene exposure levels to fishers on boats equipped with two-stroke, four-stroke and diesel engines were 58.4, 38.9 and 15.7 microg/m3, respectively. The logged within-person variance component was 1.43, larger than the between-person variance component of 1.13, indicating that the total variation may be attributable to monitor placement, environmental conditions and other factors that change over time as well as differences between individual work practices. The health consequences of exposure to marine engine emissions are not known. The predicted levels are well below those at which health effects have been attributed, however.

  10. Conversion of a micro, glow-ignition, two-stroke engine from nitromethane-methanol blend fuel to military jet propellant (JP-8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Andrew L.

    The goal of the thesis "Conversion of a Micro, Glow-Ignition, Two-Stroke Engine from Nitromethane-Methanol Blend Fuel to Military Jet Propellant (JP-8)" was to demonstrate the ability to operate a small engine on JP-8 and was completed in two phases. The first phase included choosing, developing a test stand for, and baseline testing a nitromethane-methanol-fueled engine. The chosen engine was an 11.5 cc, glow-ignition, two-stroke engine designed for remote-controlled helicopters. A micro engine test stand was developed to load and motor the engine. Instrumentation specific to the low flow rates and high speeds of the micro engine was developed and used to document engine behavior. The second phase included converting the engine to operate on JP-8, completing JP-8-fueled steady-state testing, and comparing the performance of the JP-8-fueled engine to the nitromethane-methanol-fueled engine. The conversion was accomplished through a novel crankcase heating method; by heating the crankcase for an extended period of time, a flammable fuel-air mixture was generated in the crankcase scavenged engine, which greatly improved starting times. To aid in starting and steady-state operation, yttrium-zirconia impregnated resin (i.e. ceramic coating) was applied to the combustion surfaces. This also improved the starting times of the JP-8-fueled engine and ultimately allowed for a 34-second starting time. Finally, the steady-state data from both the nitromethane-methanol and JP-8-fueled micro engine were compared. The JP-8-fueled engine showed signs of increased engine friction while having higher indicated fuel conversion efficiency and a higher overall system efficiency. The minimal ability of JP-8 to cool the engine via evaporative effects, however, created the necessity of increased cooling air flow. The conclusion reached was that JP-8-fueled micro engines could be viable in application, but not without additional research being conducted on combustion phenomenon and

  11. Modeling the condensation of sulfuric acid and water on the cylinder liner of a large two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov; Mayer, Stefan; Eskildsen, Svend S.

    2018-01-01

    Corrosive wear of cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines that burn heavy fuel oil containing sulfur is coupled to the formation of gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO3) and subsequent combined condensation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and water (H2O) vapor. The present work seeks to address...... vapor liquid equilibrium. By assuming homogenous cylinder gas mixtures condensation is modeled using a convective heat and mass transfer analogy combined with realistic liner temperature profiles. Condensation of water is significantly altered by the liner temperature and charge air humidity while...... how fuel sulfur content, charge air humidity and liner temperature variations affects the deposition of water and sulfuric acid at low load operation. A phenomenological engine model is applied to simulate the formation of cylinder/bulk gas combustion products and dew points comply with H2O–H2SO4...

  12. Optimizing the Performance of a 50cc Compression Ignition Two-Stroke Engine Operating on Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Rene; Dolriis, J.D.; Hansson, C.

    2011-01-01

    -out NOx of such an engine could make it ideal for future vehicles operating on second generation biofuels. Data is presented for the performance and emissions at the current state of development of the engine. Brake efficiencies above 30% were obtained despite the small size of the engine. In addition...

  13. Lubricant transport across the piston ring with flat and triangular lubrication injection profiles on the liner in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, H.; Klit, P.; Vølund, A.

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the lubricant transport across the top compression piston ring in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine is presented. A numerical model for solving Reynolds equation between the piston ring and cylinder liner based on the finite difference method in one dimension ...... from the different load conditions and different lubricant profiles on the liner are presented for film thicknesses, development in the lubricant profiles on the liner as well as the lubricant consumption at each stroke....... the lubricant transport across the piston ring, two different kinds of initial lubricant profile on the liner and two different kinds of load are investigated i.e. a flat profile and an approximated triangular profile as well as no load and a combustion load based on a combustion pressure profile. The impact...

  14. Phase-locked stereoscopic PIV measurements of the turbulent swirling flow in a dynamic model of a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    It is desirable to use computational fluid dynamics for the optimization of in-cylinder processes in large two-stroke low-speed uniflowscavenged marine diesel engines. However, the complex nature of the turbulent swirling in-cylinder flow necessitates experimental data for validation of the used...... in wake-like axial velocity profiles and the occurrence of a vortex breakdown. After scavenge port closing the axial velocity profiles indicate that large transient swirl-induced structures exists in the cylinder. Comparison with profiles obtained under steady-flow conditions shows that the steady...... profiles in general will not be representative for the dynamic conditions. The temporal development of the swirl strength is investigated by computing the angular momentum. The swirl strength shows an exponential decay from scavenge port closing to scavenge port opening corresponding to a reduction of 34%....

  15. Numerical investigation of soot formation and oxidation processes under large two-stroke marine diesel engine-like conditions using integrated CFD-chemical kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    skeletal model are close to those produced by the larger and more comprehensive chemical mechanisms, apart from those at the low pressure condition. The current study also demonstrates that the variation of averaged soot volume fraction with respect to the change of combustion chamber pressure captured...... using the revised soot model agrees reasonably well with the measurements in terms of peak values. The numerical model is subsequently applied to investigate the flame development, soot/nitrogen monoxide formation and heat transfer in a two-stroke, low-speed uniflow-scavenged marine diesel engine......% higher compared to that when only convective heat loss is considered. The averaged nitrogen monoxide concentration is 7.7% lower when both convective and soot radiative heat losses are accounted for but the net soot mass production is less sensitive to soot radiation. A sensitivity study reveals...

  16. Flowbench calibration of a numerical model for a novel uniflow-scavenged two-stroke GDI engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, P.; Ciccarelli, G. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Engine performance is significantly influenced by intake airflow. This abstract presented details of a study examining airflow through the cylinder head of a uniflow-scavenged 2-stroke engine designed at Queen's University. The engine has a unique cylinder head design that contains an array of check values to control airflow into the cylinder. A numerical model was used to simulate the airflow through the cylinder head. A flowbench test was performed to obtain steady flow data which were then used to calculate a flow coefficient. Experimental flowbench data were used to validate the numerical model. Mass flow rates and flow coefficients were presented for both the numerical simulation and the validation tests. Discrepancies between the flow rates and coefficients were discussed. The limitations of the numerical model were evaluated, and various optimization processes were reviewed.

  17. Importance of Vanadium-Catalyzed Oxidation of SO2to SO3in Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colom, Juan M.; Alzueta, María U.; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2016-01-01

    Low-speed marine diesel engines are mostly operated on heavy fuel oils, which have a high content of sulfur andash, including trace amounts of vanadium, nickel, and aluminum. In particular, vanadium oxides could catalyze in-cylinderoxidation of SO2 to SO3, promoting the formation of sulfuric acid...... of the catalyticspecies within the engine. Experiments with different particle compositions (vanadium/sodium ratio) and temperatures (300−800 °C) show that both the temperature and sodium content have a major impact on the oxidation rate. Kinetic parameters forthe catalyzed reaction are determined, and the proposed...... kinetic model fits well with the experimental data. The impact of thecatalytic reaction is studied with a phenomenological zero-dimensional (0D) engine model, where fuel oxidation and SOxformation is modeled with a comprehensive gas-phase reaction mechanism. Results indicate that the oxidation of SO2...

  18. Optimizing the Performance of a 50cc Compression Ignition Two-Stroke Engine Operating on Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Rene; Dolriis, J.D.; Hansson, C.

    2011-01-01

    . Design improvements relative to an earlier prototype are described. The major alterations are related to air intake arrangement, exhaust tuning and the fuel injector. Comparison is made to the first prototype engine and the effects of fuel injection rate, injection pressure, cylinder head geometry...... of premixing occurs before auto-ignition of the fuel. This results in approximately 65% of the fuel being burnt rapidly in the premixed phase of combustion. The engine mode of operation can be characterized as premixed compression ignition (PCI)....

  19. Combustion Heat Release Rate Comparison of Algae Hydroprocessed Renewable Diesel to F-76 in a Two-Stroke Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This thesis compared the combustion performance of algae -based...57 APPENDIX B TESTING PROCEDURES ...............................................................59 APPENDIX C SUMMARY OF HEAT RELEASE MATLAB CODE ...the above analysis was conducted by post-processing raw engine data using a code based in MATLAB . First, text files of the pressure data were read

  20. Using Ansys Fluent to Study Gas-Dynamic and Thermal Processes in Small-Sized Two-Stroke Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Lukachev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a developed and verified technique for modelling the thermal processes in the piston aero-modelling internal combustion engine (ICE of low power using modern software packages of computer-aided design and engineering analysis (CAD/CAE technologies. The solution of this problem is one of the challenges in ICE design.At the first stage a three-dimensional model of the small-sized ICE was created in the modern SolidWorks package for designing. Then an internal volume of the engine flow path was designed by means subtraction operations of volumes. The flow path of the engine was cut into nine volumes according to authors’ developed technique to prepare three-dimensional models for imposing the grid elements.Design of grid based on the Workbench platform was created in the ANSYS Meshing grid generator. When specifying the grid parameters the choice was as follows: a range of grid element sizes within 0.5 – 1.5 mm, a growth gradient of grid elements equal to 1.05, and a type of the final element is tetrahedron. For correctly working option of layer-by-layer update of grid, the grid element of 0.5 mm in size and the type of the final element being a hexahedron were specified for calculating the cylinder and sub-piston area in volume. Boundary surfaces of inlet to the flow path and working flow-out of it were defined as well. Names and boundary conditions of permeability (Interface are automatically appropriated to coinciding surfaces of various volumes.To ensure desirable accuracy of calculations the model of turbulence k-εwas chosen, which is relevant to this task. In menu of entering the boundary conditions, desirable parameters at the model borders were specified. Further, grid intersection zones were adjusted. This adjustment is necessary to have a moving grid and adjust a permeability of borders between the predicted zones. Adjusting the moving grid parameters and specifying a dynamic model of the moving grid and its key

  1. EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM TWO-STROKE MARINE DIESEL ENGINE FUELED WITH BIODIESEL PRODUCED FROM VARIOUS WASTE OILS AND DIESEL BLENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Nikolić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shipping represents a significant source of diesel emissions, which affects global climate, air quality and human health. As a solution to this problem, biodiesel could be used as marine fuel, which could help in reducing the negative impact of shipping on environment and achieve lower carbon intensity in the sector. In Southern Europe, some oily wastes, such as wastes from olive oil production and used frying oils could be utilized for production of the second-generation biodiesel. The present research investigates the influence of the second-generation biodiesel on the characteristics of gaseous emissions of NOx, SO2, and CO from marine diesel engines. The marine diesel engine that was used, installed aboard a ship, was a reversible low-speed two-stroke engine, without any after-treatment devices installed or engine control technology for reducing pollutant emission. Tests were carried out on three regimes of engine speeds, 150 rpm, 180 rpm and 210 rpm under heavy propeller condition, while the ship was berthed in the harbor. The engine was fueled by diesel fuel and blends containing 7% and 20% v/v of three types of second-generation biodiesel made of olive husk oil, waste frying sunflower oil, and waste frying palm oil. A base-catalyzed transesterification was implemented for biodiesel production. According to the results, there are trends of NOx, SO2, and CO emission reduction when using blended fuels. Biodiesel made of olive husk oil showed better gaseous emission performances than biodiesel made from waste frying oils.

  2. Stirling cycle engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundholm, Gunnar

    1983-01-01

    In a Stirling cycle engine having a plurality of working gas charges separated by pistons reciprocating in cylinders, the total gas content is minimized and the mean pressure equalization among the serial cylinders is improved by using two piston rings axially spaced at least as much as the piston stroke and by providing a duct in the cylinder wall opening in the space between the two piston rings and leading to a source of minimum or maximum working gas pressure.

  3. The effects of key parameters on the transition from SI combustion to HCCI combustion in a two-stroke free piston linear engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Nguyen Ba; Lim, Ocktaeck; Iida, Norimasa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A free piston engine is modeled and simulated by three mathematical models. • The models include dynamic model, linear alternator model and thermodynamic model. • The SI-HCCI transition is successful if the key parameters are adjusted suitably. • Spring stiffness has a strong influence on reducing peak temperature in HCCI mode. • Adjusting spark timing helps the SI-HCCI transition to be more convenient. - Abstract: An investigation was conducted to examine the effects of key parameters such as intake temperature, equivalence ratio, engine load, intake pressure, spark timing and spring stiffness on the transition from SI combustion to HCCI combustion in a two-stroke free piston linear engine. Operation of the free piston engine was simulated based on the combination of three mathematical models including a dynamic model, a linear alternator model and a thermodynamic model. These mathematical models were combined and solved by a program written in Fortran. To validate the mathematical models, the simulation results were compared with experimental data in the SI mode. For the transition from SI combustion to HCCI combustion, the simulation results show that if the equivalence ratio is decreased, the intake temperature and engine load should be increased to get a successful SI-HCCI transition. However, the simulation results also show that the in-cylinder pressure is decreased, while the peak in-cylinder temperature in HCCI mode is increased significantly if the intake temperature is increased so much. Beside the successful SI-HCCI transition, the increase of intake pressure from P in = 1.1 bar to P in = 1.6 bar is one of solutions to reduce peak in-cylinder temperature in HCCI mode. However, the simulation results also indicate that if the intake pressure is increased so much (P in = 1.6 bar), the engine knocking problem is occurred. Adjusting spring stiffness from k = 2.9 N/mm to k = 14.7 N/mm is also considered one of useful solutions for

  4. Mathematical modeling of the complete thermodynamic cycle of a new Atkinson cycle gas engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hassan; Keshavarz, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    The Atkinson cycle provides the potential to increase the efficiency of SI engines using overexpansion concept. This also will suggest decrease in CO 2 generation by internal combustion engine. In this study a mathematical modeling of complete thermodynamic cycle of a new two-stroke Atkinson cycle SI engine will be presented. The mathematical modeling is carried out using two-zone combustion analysis in order to make the model predict exhaust emission so that its values could be compared with the values of conventional SI engine. The model also is validated against experimental tests in that increase in efficiency is achieved compared to conventional SI engines. - Highlights: • The complete cycle model for the rotary Atkinson engine was developed. • Comparing the results with experimental data shows good model validity. • The model needs further improvement for the scavenging phase. • There is 5% increment in thermal efficiency with new engine compared to conventional SI engines.

  5. Variable cycle engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, A.P.; Sprunger, E.V.

    1980-09-16

    A variable cycle turboshaft engine includes a remote fan system and respective high and low pressure systems for selectively driving the fan system in such a manner as to provide VTOL takeoff capability and minimum specific fuel consumption (SFC) at cruise and loiter conditions. For takeoff the fan system is primarily driven by the relatively large low pressure system whose combustor receives the motive fluid from a core bypass duct and, for cruise and loiter conditions, the fan system is driven by both a relatively small high pressure core and the low pressure system with its combustor inoperative. A mixer is disposed downstream of the high pressure system for mixing the relatively cold air from the bypass duct and the relatively hot air from the core prior to its flow to the low pressure turbine.

  6. Validation of a zero-dimensional model for prediction of NOx and engine performance for electronically controlled marine two-stroke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scappin, Fabio; Stefansson, Sigurður H.; Haglind, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to derive a methodology suitable for energy system analysis for predicting the performance and NOx emissions of marine low speed diesel engines. The paper describes a zero-dimensional model, evaluating the engine performance by means of an energy balance and a two zone...... experimental data from two MAN B&W engines; one case being data subject to engine parameter changes corresponding to simulating an electronically controlled engine; the second case providing data covering almost all model input and output parameters. The first case of validation suggests that the model can...... predict specific fuel oil consumption and NOx emissions within the 95% confidence intervals given by the experimental measurements. The second validation confirms the capability of the model to match measured engine output parameters based on measured engine input parameters with a maximum 5% deviation....

  7. Decreasing NOx of a Low-Speed Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine by Using In-Cylinder Emission Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan Feng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors applied one-dimensional (1-D simulation and 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulation to evaluate the potential of in-cylinder control methods on a low-speed 2-stroke marine engine to reach the International Maritime Organization (IMO Tier 3 NOx emissions standards. Reducing the combustion temperature is an important in-cylinder measure to decrease NOx emissions of marine diesel engines. Miller-cycle and Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR are effective methods to reduce the maximum combustion temperature and accordingly decrease NOx emissions. The authors’ calculation results indicate that with a combination of 2-stage turbocharging, a mild Miller-cycle and 10% EGR rate, the NOx emissions can be decreased by 48% without the increased Specific Fuel Oil Consumption (SFOC penalties; with a medium Miller-cycle and 10% EGR, NOx can be decreased by 56% with a slight increase of SFOC; with a medium Miller-cycle and 20% EGR, NOx can be decreased by 77% and meet IMO Tier 3 standards, but with the high price of a considerable increase of SFOC. The first two schemes are promising to meet IMO Tier 3 standards with good fuel economy if other techniques are combined.

  8. Digital calculations of engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Starkman, E S; Taylor, C Fayette

    1964-01-01

    Digital Calculations of Engine Cycles is a collection of seven papers which were presented before technical meetings of the Society of Automotive Engineers during 1962 and 1963. The papers cover the spectrum of the subject of engine cycle events, ranging from an examination of composition and properties of the working fluid to simulation of the pressure-time events in the combustion chamber. The volume has been organized to present the material in a logical sequence. The first two chapters are concerned with the equilibrium states of the working fluid. These include the concentrations of var

  9. Small Engines as Bottoming Cycle Steam Expanders for Internal Combustion Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohitha Weerasinghe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat recovery bottoming cycles for internal combustion engines have opened new avenues for research into small steam expanders (Stobart and Weerasinghe, 2006. Dependable data for small steam expanders will allow us to predict their suitability as bottoming cycle engines and the fuel economy achieved by using them as bottoming cycles. Present paper is based on results of experiments carried out on small scale Wankel and two-stroke reciprocating engines as air expanders and as steam expanders. A test facility developed at Sussex used for measurements is comprised of a torque, power and speed measurements, electronic actuation of valves, synchronized data acquisition of pressure, and temperatures of steam and inside of the engines for steam and internal combustion cycles. Results are presented for four engine modes, namely, reciprocating engine in uniflow steam expansion mode and air expansion mode and rotary Wankel engine in steam expansion mode and air expansion mode. The air tests will provide base data for friction and motoring effects whereas steam tests will tell how effective the engines will be in this mode. Results for power, torque, and p-V diagrams are compared to determine the change in performance from air expansion mode to steam expansion mode.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 85 - Vehicle and Engine Parameters and Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Engine Parameters-Four Stroke Cycle Reciprocating Engines. 1. Compression ratio. 2. Cranking compression... Parameters—Two-Stroke Cycle Reciprocating Engine. 1.-5. Same as Section C.I. 6. Intake port(s). a. Timing in...

  11. Performance Improvement of a Portable Electric Generator Using an Optimized Bio-Fuel Ratio in a Single Cylinder Two-Stroke Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an electrical generator using bio-fuel and gasoline blends of different composition as fuel in a single cylinder engine is presented. The effect of an optimized blend ratio of bio-fuel with gasoline on engine performance improvement and thereby on the electrical generator output is studied. Bio-fuels such as ethanol, butanol and methanol are blended with gasoline in different proportions and evaluated for performance. The effects of different bio-fuel/gasoline blending ratios are compared experimentally with that of the gasoline alone using the output power developed by the electric generator as the evaluation parameter. With a composition of 10% ethanol–gasoline, the engine performance is increased up to 6% and with a blending ratio of 20% butanol–gasoline the performance is increased up to 8% compared to the use of 100% gasoline. The investigations are performed on a portable generator used in palm tree harvesting applications.

  12. PIV study of the effect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow during the scavenging process in large two-stroke marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Schnipper, Teis; Obeidat, Anas

    2013-01-01

    A simplified model of a low speed large twostroke marine diesel engine cylinder is developed. The effect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow during the scavenging process is studied using the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique. The measurements are conducted...

  13. Detonation Jet Engine. Part 1--Thermodynamic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the most relevant works on jet engine design that utilize thermodynamic cycle of detonative combustion. The efficiency advantages of thermodynamic detonative combustion cycle over Humphrey combustion cycle at constant volume and Brayton combustion cycle at constant pressure were demonstrated. An ideal Ficket-Jacobs detonation cycle, and…

  14. The influence of high-octane fuel blends on the performance of a two-stroke SI engine with knock-limited-compression ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poola, Ramesh B.; Bhasker, T.; Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K. V.

    The use of alcohol-gasoline blends enables the favorable features of alcohols to be utilized in spark ignition (SI) engines while avoiding the shortcomings of their application as straight fuels. Eucalyptus and orange oils possess high octane values and are also good potential alternative fuels for SI engines. The high octane value of these fuels can enhance the octane value of the fuel when it is blended with low-octane gasoline. In the present work, 20 percent by volume of orange oil, eucalyptus oil, methanol and ethanol were blended separately with gasoline, and the performance, combustion and exhaust emission characteristics were evaluated at two different compression ratios. The phase separation problems arising from the alcohol-gasoline blends were minimized by adding eucalyptus oil as a cosolvent. Test results indicate that the compression ratio can be raised from 7.4 to 9 without any detrimental effect, due to the higher octane rating of the fuel blends. Knock-limited maximum brake output also increases due to extension of the knock limit. The knock limit is extended by methanol-eucalyptus-ethanol-orange oil blends, in descending order.

  15. Analysis of the Scavenging Process of a Two-Stroke Free-Piston Engine Based on the Selection of Scavenging Ports or Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boru Jia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The free-piston engine generator (FPEG is a linear energy conversion device with the objective of utilisation within a hybrid-electric automotive vehicle power system. In this research, the piston dynamic characteristics of an FPEG is compared with that of a conventional engine (CE of the same size, and the difference in the valve timing is compared for both port scavenging type and valve scavenging type, with the exhaust valve closing timing is selected as the parameter. A zero-dimensional simulation model is developed in Ricardo WAVE software (2016.1, with the piston dynamics obtained from the simulation model in Matlab/SIMULINK (R2017a. For the CE and FEPG using scavenging ports, in order to improve its power output to the same level as that of a CE, the inlet gas pressure is suggested to be improved to above 1.2 bar, approximately 0.2 bar higher than that used for a CE. If a CE cylinder with exhaust valves is adopted or referred to during the development of an FPEG prototype, the exhaust valve is suggested to be closed earlier to improve its power output, and a higher intake pressure is also suggested if its output power is expected to be the same or higher than that of a CE.

  16. Increasing the volumetric efficiency of Diesel engines by intake pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Hans

    1933-01-01

    Development of a method for calculating the volumetric efficiency of piston engines with intake pipes. Application of this method to the scavenging pumps of two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging and to four-stroke-cycle engines. The utility of the method is demonstrated by volumetric-efficiency tests of the two-stroke-cycle engines with crankcase scavenging. Its practical application to the calculation of intake pipes is illustrated by example.

  17. Free Energy and Internal Combustion Engine Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, William D.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of one type (Carnot) of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) cycle is analyzed within the framework of thermodynamic free energies. ICE performance is different from that of an External Combustion Engine (ECE) which is dictated by Carnot's rule.

  18. A highly efficient six-stroke internal combustion engine cycle with water injection for in-cylinder exhaust heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, James C.; Szybist, James P.

    2010-01-01

    A concept adding two strokes to the Otto or Diesel engine cycle to increase fuel efficiency is presented here. It can be thought of as a four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle followed by a two-stroke heat recovery steam cycle. A partial exhaust event coupled with water injection adds an additional power stroke. Waste heat from two sources is effectively converted into usable work: engine coolant and exhaust gas. An ideal thermodynamics model of the exhaust gas compression, water injection and expansion was used to investigate this modification. By changing the exhaust valve closing timing during the exhaust stroke, the optimum amount of exhaust can be recompressed, maximizing the net mean effective pressure of the steam expansion stroke (MEP steam ). The valve closing timing for maximum MEP steam is limited by either 1 bar or the dew point temperature of the expansion gas/moisture mixture when the exhaust valve opens. The range of MEP steam calculated for the geometry of a conventional gasoline engine and is from 0.75 to 2.5 bars. Typical combustion mean effective pressures (MEP combustion ) of naturally aspirated gasoline engines are up to 10 bar, thus this concept has the potential to significantly increase the engine efficiency and fuel economy.

  19. Closed-cycle liquid propellant rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N. D.

    1993-06-01

    The paper presents experience gained by SSSPE TRUD in development of NK-33, NK-43, NK-39, and NK-31 liquid propellant rocket engines, which are reusable, closed-cycle type, working on liquid oxygen and kerosene. Results are presented showing the engine structure efficiency, configuration rationality, and optimal thrust values which provide the following specific parameters: specific vacuum impulses in the range 331-353 s (for NK-33 and NK-31 engines, respectively) and specific weight of about 8 kg/tf (NK-33 and NK-43 engines). The problems which occurred during engine development and the study of the main components of these engines are discussed. The important technical data, materials, methodology, and bench development data are presented for the gas generator, turbopump assembly, combustion chamber and full-scale engines.

  20. Variable Cycle Intake for Reverse Core Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Gabriel L (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M (Inventor); Staubach, Joseph B (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas generator for a reverse core engine propulsion system has a variable cycle intake for the gas generator, which variable cycle intake includes a duct system. The duct system is configured for being selectively disposed in a first position and a second position, wherein free stream air is fed to the gas generator when in the first position, and fan stream air is fed to the gas generator when in the second position.

  1. The Strutjet Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenhaar, A.; Bulman, M. J.; Bonnar, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    The multi stage chemical rocket has been established over many years as the propulsion System for space transportation vehicles, while, at the same time, there is increasing concern about its continued affordability and rather involved reusability. Two broad approaches to addressing this overall launch cost problem consist in one, the further development of the rocket motor, and two, the use of airbreathing propulsion to the maximum extent possible as a complement to the limited use of a conventional rocket. In both cases, a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle is considered a desirable goal. However, neither the "all-rocket" nor the "all-airbreathing" approach seems realizable and workable in practice without appreciable advances in materials and manufacturing. An affordable system must be reusable with minimal refurbishing on-ground, and large mean time between overhauls, and thus with high margins in design. It has been suggested that one may use different engine cycles, some rocket and others airbreathing, in a combination over a flight trajectory, but this approach does not lead to a converged solution with thrust-to-mass, specific impulse, and other performance and operational characteristics that can be obtained in the different engines. The reason is this type of engine is simply a combination of different engines with no commonality of gas flowpath or components, and therefore tends to have the deficiencies of each of the combined engines. A further development in this approach is a truly combined cycle that incorporates a series of cycles for different modes of propulsion along a flight path with multiple use of a set of components and an essentially single gas flowpath through the engine. This integrated approach is based on realizing the benefits of both a rocket engine and airbreathing engine in various combinations by a systematic functional integration of components in an engine class usually referred to as a rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine

  2. Highly efficient 6-stroke engine cycle with water injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybist, James P; Conklin, James C

    2012-10-23

    A six-stroke engine cycle having improved efficiency. Heat is recovered from the engine combustion gases by using a 6-stroke engine cycle in which combustion gases are partially vented proximate the bottom-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle, and water is injected proximate the top-dead-center position of the fourth stroke cycle.

  3. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.336-79 Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer operation...

  4. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Emissions shall be measured using one of the test cycles specified... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89...

  5. The heat engine cycle, the heat removal cycle, and ergonomics of the control room displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltracchi, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses and illustrates the ergonomics of an integrated display, which will allow operators to monitor the heat engine cycle during normal operation of the plant, and the heat removal cycle during emergency operation of the plant. A computer-based iconic display is discussed as an overview to monitor these cycles. Specific emphasis is placed upon the process variables and process functions within each cycle, and the action of control systems and engineered safeguard systems within each cycle. This paper contains examples of display formats for the heat engine cycle and the heat removal cycle in a pressurized water reactor

  6. Chemical characterization of emissions from modern two-stroke mopeds complying with legislative regulation in Europe (EURO-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, T; Farfaletti, A; Montero, L; Martini, G; Manfredi, U; Larsen, B; Santi, G De; Krasenbrink, A; Astorga, C

    2010-01-01

    In view of a new amendment to the European legislative regulation on emissions from two-stroke mopeds a study was carried out to comprehensively characterize exhaust gases of mopeds complying current EURO-2 emission standards. Three mopeds with different engine types (carburetor, direct injection, and electronic carburetion system ECS) where investigated by applying two different driving cycles, the legislative cycle ECE47 and the worldwide motorcycle test cycle WMTC. Thereby, particulate matter (PM), regulated compounds, carbonyls, volatile hydrocarbons (VOC), and particle-associated polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were analyzed and ozone formation potentials (OFP) as well as toxicity equivalents (TEQ) determined. The ECE47 emission factors for almost all species and moped types were much higher in the nonregulated, prior cold phase than in the hot phase, which is considered for legislation. Great differences for the mopeds could be observed for NO(x), VOC, and PM, whereas discrepancies between the driving cycles ECE47 and WMTC were smaller. In addition, a positive influence on exhaust composition caused by technical modifications of the ECS engine was determined. Results indicate that regulation of total hydrocarbons (THC) alone might not be sufficient to regulate PM, especially for direct injection engines. Moreover, recommendations for a revised future test protocol are demonstrated and discussed, whereby the cold phase and the hot phase are taken into account.

  7. Effective Integration of Life Cycle Engineering in Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Luttikhuis, Ellen; Toxopeus, Marten E.; Lutters, Diederick

    2015-01-01

    In practice, applying life cycle engineering in product design and development requires an integrated approach, because of the many stakeholders and variables (e.g. cost, environmental impact, energy, safety, quality) involved in a complete product life cycle. In educating young engineers, the same

  8. Small Engines as Bottoming Cycle Steam Expanders for Internal Combustion Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Rohitha Weerasinghe; Sandra Hounsham

    2017-01-01

    Heat recovery bottoming cycles for internal combustion engines have opened new avenues for research into small steam expanders [1]. Dependable data for small steam expanders will allow us to predict on their suitability as bottoming cycle engines and the fuel economy achieved by using them as bottoming cycles. Wankel Engines, with its lower resistance properties at small scale provide excellent contenders for bottoming cycle expanders. Present paper is based on results of experiments carried ...

  9. Research on Correlation between Vehicle Cycle and Engine Cycle in Heavy-duty commercial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    lin, Chen; Zhong, Wang; Shuai, Liu

    2017-12-01

    In order to study the correlation between vehicle cycle and engine cycle in heavy commercial vehicles, the conversion model of vehicle cycle to engine cycle is constructed based on the vehicle power system theory and shift strategy, which considers the verification on diesel truck. The results show that the model has high rationality and reliability in engine operation. In the acceleration process of high speed, the difference of model gear selection leads to the actual deviation. Compared with the drum test, the engine speed distribution obtained by the model deviates to right, which fits to the lower grade. The grade selection has high influence on the model.

  10. Engine cycle design considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaccio, D.G.; Scheil, C.M.; Collins, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    A top-level study was performed which addresses nuclear thermal propulsion system engine cycle options and their applicability to support future Space Exploration Initiative manned lunar and Mars missions. Technical and development issues associated with expander, gas generator, and bleed cycle near-term, solid core nuclear thermal propulsion engines are identified and examined. In addition to performance and weight the influence of the engine cycle type on key design selection parameters such as design complexity, reliability, development time, and cost are discussed. Representative engine designs are presented and compared. Their applicability and performance impact on typical near-term lunar and Mars missions are shown

  11. Development of a Theoretical Decoupled Stirling Cycle Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Barry; McGovern, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Stirling cycle engine is gaining increasing attention in the current energy market as a clean, quiet and versatile prime mover for use in such situations as solar thermal generation, micro cogeneration and other micro distributed generation situations. A theoretical Stirling cycle engine model is developed. Using a theoretical decoupled engine configuration in which working space swept volume, volume variation, phase angle and dead space ratio are controlled via a black-box electronic con...

  12. Flex-Fuel Two-Stroke Snowmobile: Development of a Flex-Fuel, Two-Stroke, Direct-Injection Snowmobile for Use in the Clean Snowmobile Challenge and National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The University of Idaho's entry into the 2009 SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) was a semi-direct-injection (SDI) two-stroke powered REV-XP snowmobile modified to use flex fuel. The flex fuel engine produces stock engine power on any blend of etha...

  13. A New, Highly Improved Two-Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesen, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    The figure presents a cross-sectional view of a supercharged, variable-compression, two-cycle, internal-combustion engine that offers significant advantages over prior such engines. The improvements are embodied in a combination of design changes that contribute synergistically to improvements in performance and economy. Although the combination of design changes and the principles underlying them are complex, one of the main effects of the changes on the overall engine design is reduced (relative to prior two-cycle designs) mechanical complexity, which translates directly to reduced manufacturing cost and increased reliability. Other benefits include increases in the efficiency of both scavenging and supercharging. The improvements retain the simplicity and other advantages of two-cycle engines while affording increases in volumetric efficiency and performance across a wide range of operating conditions that, heretofore have been accessible to four-cycle engines but not to conventionally scavenged two-cycle ones, thereby increasing the range of usefulness of the two-cycle engine into all areas now dominated by the four-cycle engine. The design changes and benefits are too numerous to describe here in detail, but it is possible to summarize the major improvements: Reciprocating Shuttle Inlet Valve The entire reciprocating shuttle inlet valve and its operating gear is constructed as a single member. The shuttle valve is actuated in a lost-motion arrangement in which, at the ends of its stroke, projections on the shuttle valve come to rest against abutments at the ends of grooves in a piston skirt. This shuttle-valve design obviates the customary complex valve mechanism, actuated from an engine crankshaft or camshaft, yet it is effective with every type of two-cycle engine, from small high-speed single cylinder model engines, to large low-speed multiple cylinder engines.

  14. Preliminary Modelling Results for an Otto Cycle/Stirling Cycle Hybrid-engine-based Power Generation System

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Barry; McGovern, Jim; Feidt, Michel; Petrescu, Stoian

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data and results for a system mathematical model for a proposed Otto Cycle / Stirling Cycle hybrid-engine-based power generation system. The system is a combined cycle system with the Stirling cycle machine operating as a bottoming cycle on the Otto cycle exhaust. The application considered is that of a stationary power generation scenario wherein the Stirling cycle engine operates as a waste heat recovery device on the exhaust stream of the Otto cycle engine. ...

  15. 19th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Linke, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The 19th CIRP Conference on Life Cycle Engineering continues a strong tradition of scientific meetings in the areas of sustainability and engineering within the community of the International Academy for Production Engineering (CIRP). The focus of the conference is to review and discuss the current developments, technology improvements, and future research directions that will allow engineers to help create green businesses and industries that are both socially responsible and economically successful.  The symposium covers a variety of relevant topics within life cycle engineering including Businesses and Organizations, Case Studies, End of Life Management, Life Cycle Design, Machine Tool Technologies for Sustainability, Manufacturing Processes, Manufacturing Systems, Methods and Tools for Sustainability, Social Sustainability, and Supply Chain Management.

  16. 20th CIRP International Conference on Life Cycle Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Bin; Ong, Soh-Khim

    2013-01-01

    This edited volume presents the proceedings of the 20th CIRP LCE Conference, which cover various areas in life cycle engineering such as life cycle design, end-of-life management, manufacturing processes, manufacturing systems, methods and tools for sustainability, social sustainability, supply chain management, remanufacturing, etc.

  17. Variable Cycle Engine Technology Program Planning and Definition Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, J. S.; Stern, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The variable stream control engine, VSCE-502B, was selected as the base engine, with the inverted flow engine concept selected as a backup. Critical component technologies were identified, and technology programs were formulated. Several engine configurations were defined on a preliminary basis to serve as demonstration vehicles for the various technologies. The different configurations present compromises in cost, technical risk, and technology return. Plans for possible variably cycle engine technology programs were formulated by synthesizing the technology requirements with the different demonstrator configurations.

  18. The Life Cycle of Engineered Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gálvez, David; Janer, Gemma; Vilar, Gemma; Vílchez, Alejandro; Vázquez-Campos, Socorro

    2017-01-01

    The first years in the twenty-first century have meant the inclusion of nanotechnology in most industrial sectors, from very specific sensors to construction materials. The increasing use of nanomaterials in consumer products has raised concerns about their potential risks for workers, consumers and the environment. In a comprehensive risk assessment or life cycle assessment, a life cycle schema is the starting point necessary to build up the exposure scenarios and study the processes and mechanisms driving to safety concerns. This book chapter describes the processes that usually occur at all the stages of the life cycle of the nano-enabled product, from the nanomaterial synthesis to the end-of-life of the products. Furthermore, release studies reported in literature related to these processes are briefly discussed.

  19. Using the Engineering Design Cycle to Develop Integrated Project Based Learning in Aerospace Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders-Smits, G.N.; Roling, P.; Brügemann, V.; Timmer, N.; Melkert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past four years the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands has redeveloped its BSc curriculum to mimic an engineering design cycle. Each semester represents a step in the design cycle: exploration; system design; sub-system design; test,

  20. Integrated system approach for increase of engine combined cycle efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gewald, D.; Karellas, S.; Schuster, A.; Spliethoff, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new approach for the optimization of engine combined cycle systems is presented. ► The efficiency can be increased by integrating all available waste heat sources. ► The optimization of the ICE cooling system towards higher temperatures is examined. ► Higher engine cooling water temperatures increase the combined cycle efficiency. ► The costs of electricity generation can be decreased by five integrated system. - Abstract: Internal combustion engines (ICEs) are widely used as independent power producers due to their high electrical efficiency (up to 47%), which can be further enhanced by operating them in combined cycle mode with a water/steam cycle as bottoming cycle. This study presents an integrated approach to optimize the combined cycle overall system efficiency. Therefore, not only the most favorable design of the waste heat recovery (WHR) cycle, but also the optimal configuration of the ICE cooling system have to be investigated, in order to integrate both available engine waste heat sources (exhaust gas, 300–400 °C, engine cooling water, 90 °C) into the waste heat recovery cycle. For the definition of the most favourable temperature level of the engine cooling water three variants of engine cooling systems are examined, with respect to technical limitations given by the ICE. In order to determine the types of engines for which this optimization approach is suitable, three types of engines with different characteristics (fuel, exhaust gas parameters) combined with a water/steam cycle are simulated, by using the calculation tools Excel and Ebsilon Professional. An energetic, exergetic and economic analysis is conducted. These reveal the impacts of the temperature level to the WHR system and to the design of the engine cooling system. The calculations performed, showed that up to 19% of the engine cooling water heat can be efficiently recovered compared to a portion of 6% in the standard system. The better recovery leads to a 5

  1. Optimization of Turbine Engine Cycle Analysis with Analytic Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Tristan; Hendricks, Eric; Chin, Jeffrey; Gray, Justin; Moore, Kenneth T.

    2016-01-01

    A new engine cycle analysis tool, called Pycycle, was recently built using the OpenMDAO framework. This tool uses equilibrium chemistry based thermodynamics, and provides analytic derivatives. This allows for stable and efficient use of gradient-based optimization and sensitivity analysis methods on engine cycle models, without requiring the use of finite difference derivative approximation methods. To demonstrate this, a gradient-based design optimization was performed on a multi-point turbofan engine model. Results demonstrate very favorable performance compared to an optimization of an identical model using finite-difference approximated derivatives.

  2. An Integrated Framework for Life Cycle Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Herrmann, Christoph; Kara, Sami

    2017-01-01

    has broadened, and as a result, LCE has evolved in parallel with other disciplines with similar aims. Currently, in addition to LCE, there exist a number of concepts such as Industrial Ecology, Cleaner Production, Life Cycle Management (LCM), Industrial Symbiosis, and Circular Economy. As a result...

  3. Simulation of Cycle-to-Cycle Variation in Dual-Fuel Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Jaasim, Mohammed

    2017-03-13

    Standard practices of internal combustion (IC) engine experiments are to conduct the measurements of quantities averaged over a large number of cycles. Depending on the operating conditions, the cycle-to-cycle variation (CCV) of quantities, such as the indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) are observed at different levels. Accurate prediction of CCV in IC engines is an important but challenging task. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using high performance computing (HPC) can be used effectively to visualize such 3D spatial distributions. In the present study, a dual fuel large engine is considered, with natural gas injected into the manifold accompanied with direct injection of diesel pilot fuel to trigger ignition. Multiple engine cycles in 3D are simulated in series as in the experiments to investigate the potential of HPC based high fidelity simulations to accurately capture the cycle to cycle variation in dual fuel engines. Open cycle simulations are conducted to predict the combined effect of the stratification of fuel-air mixture, temperature and turbulence on the CCV of pressure. The predicted coefficient of variation (COV) of pressure compared to the results from closed cycle simulations and the experiments.

  4. Life Cycle Management Strategies for Aging Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-02-01

    Reunions des specialistes des techniques de estion du cycle de vie pour vehicules aeriens vieillissants ] To order the complete compilation report, use...Mechanisms and Control. Specialists’ Meeting on Life Management Techniques for Ageing Air Vehicles [Les mecanismes vieillissants et le controle...protective coatings or surface modification treatments [3,7-9], while FOD can be repaired within limits, as detailed below [10]. 2.1.2. Internal

  5. Stirling cycle engines inner workings and design

    CERN Document Server

    Organ, Allan J

    2013-01-01

    Some 200 years after the original invention, internal design of a Stirling engine has come to be considered a specialist task, calling for extensive experience and for access to sophisticated computer modelling. The low parts-count of the type is negated by the complexity of the gas processes by which heat is converted to work. Design is perceived as problematic largely because those interactions are neither intuitively evident, nor capable of being made visible by laboratory experiment. There can be little doubt that the situation stands in the way of wider application of this elegant concep

  6. Cycle to Cycle Variation Study in a Dual Fuel Operated Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Pasunurthi, Shyamsundar

    2017-03-28

    The standard capability of engine experimental studies is that ensemble averaged quantities like in-cylinder pressure from multiple cycles and emissions are reported and the cycle to cycle variation (CCV) of indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) is captured from many consecutive combustion cycles for each test condition. However, obtaining 3D spatial distribution of all the relevant quantities such as fuel-air mixing, temperature, turbulence levels and emissions from such experiments is a challenging task. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of engine flow and combustion can be used effectively to visualize such 3D spatial distributions. A dual fuel engine is considered in the current study, with manifold injected natural gas (NG) and direct injected diesel pilot for ignition. Multiple engine cycles in 3D are simulated in series like in the experiments to investigate the potential of high fidelity RANS simulations coupled with detailed chemistry, to accurately predict the CCV. Cycle to cycle variation (CCV) is expected to be due to variabilities in operating and boundary conditions, in-cylinder stratification of diesel and natural gas fuels, variation in in-cylinder turbulence levels and velocity flow-fields. In a previous publication by the authors [1], variabilities in operating and boundary conditions are incorporated into several closed cycle simulations performed in parallel. Stochastic variations/stratifications of fuel-air mixture, turbulence levels, temperature and internal combustion residuals cannot be considered in such closed cycle simulations. In this study, open cycle simulations with port injection of natural gas predicted the combined effect of the stratifications on the CCV of in-cylinder pressure. The predicted Coefficient of Variation (COV) of cylinder pressure is improved compared to the one captured by closed cycle simulations in parallel.

  7. Chemical Engineering Education in a Bologna Three Cycle Degree System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    For the purpose of harmonization of European higher education, Europe’s education system has been going through major changes under what is commonly known as the ”Bologna Process”. The Bologna declaration in 1999 was the start of the introduction of a three cycle degree system in higher education...... such as applied chemistry and process engineering throughout Europe. The result has been a set of recommendations for the first (BS), second (MS) and third (PhD) cycle chemical engineering education aligned to the Bologna Process. They recommend that students studying towards bachelor and masters qualifications...... in Europe. To date, many European universities have adopted this degree structure. The Working Party on Education (WPE) of the European Federation of Chemical Engineering (EFCE) carried out research to determine the contents of higher education in chemical engineering (ChE) and related disciplines...

  8. Batu Pahat Driving Cycle for Light Duty Gasoline Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainul Abidin, Zainul Ameerul Ikhsan B.; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Ahmad, Osman Bin

    2017-08-01

    Driving cycle is a series of data points that represents the vehicle speed versus time. Transient driving cycles involve many changes such as frequent speed changes during typical on-road driving condition [2]. Model driving cycles involve protracted periods at constant speeds. The Batu Pahat Driving Cycle (BPDC) developed to represent the driving pattern of people in a district of Batu Pahat. Based on this driving cycle, it will be a reference to other researchers to study about the gases emission release and fuel consumption by the vehicle on the dynamometer or automotive simulation based on this driving cycle. Existing driving cycles used such as the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), the Federal Test Procedure (FTP-72/75, and Japan 10-15 Mode Cycle is not appropriate for Batu Pahat district because of different road conditions, driving habits and environmental of developed driving cycle countries are not same [2][14]. Batu Pahat drive cycle was developed for low-capacity gasoline engine under 150 cc and operating on urban roads, rural roads and road around Universiti Tun Hussein Onn. The importance of these driving cycle as the reference for other research to measure and do automotive simulation regarding fuel consumption and gas emission release from the motorcycle for these three type of driving cycle area. Another use for driving cycles is in vehicle simulations [3]. More specifically, they are used in propulsion system simulations to predict the performance of internal combustion engines, transmissions, electric drive systems, batteries, fuel cell systems, and similar components [18]. Data collection methods used in this study is the use of Global Positioning System (GPS). The results obtained are not similar to each other due to differences in congestion on data taken. From the driving cycle graph obtained, such as the average velocity, maximum velocity, the duration and Positive Acceleration Kinetic Energy (PKE) can be determined. In addition, the best

  9. Global life cycle releases of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Arturo A.; McFerran, Suzanne; Lazareva, Anastasiya; Suh, Sangwon

    2013-06-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are now becoming a significant fraction of the material flows in the global economy. We are already reaping the benefits of improved energy efficiency, material use reduction, and better performance in many existing and new applications that have been enabled by these technological advances. As ENMs pervade the global economy, however, it becomes important to understand their environmental implications. As a first step, we combined ENM market information and material flow modeling to produce the first global assessment of the likely ENM emissions to the environment and landfills. The top ten most produced ENMs by mass were analyzed in a dozen major applications. Emissions during the manufacturing, use, and disposal stages were estimated, including intermediate steps through wastewater treatment plants and waste incineration plants. In 2010, silica, titania, alumina, and iron and zinc oxides dominate the ENM market in terms of mass flow through the global economy, used mostly in coatings/paints/pigments, electronics and optics, cosmetics, energy and environmental applications, and as catalysts. We estimate that 63-91 % of over 260,000-309,000 metric tons of global ENM production in 2010 ended up in landfills, with the balance released into soils (8-28 %), water bodies (0.4-7 %), and atmosphere (0.1-1.5 %). While there are considerable uncertainties in the estimates, the framework for estimating emissions can be easily improved as better data become available. The material flow estimates can be used to quantify emissions at the local level, as inputs for fate and transport models to estimate concentrations in different environmental compartments.

  10. Global life cycle releases of engineered nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Arturo A., E-mail: keller@bren.ucsb.edu; McFerran, Suzanne; Lazareva, Anastasiya; Suh, Sangwon [University of California, Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are now becoming a significant fraction of the material flows in the global economy. We are already reaping the benefits of improved energy efficiency, material use reduction, and better performance in many existing and new applications that have been enabled by these technological advances. As ENMs pervade the global economy, however, it becomes important to understand their environmental implications. As a first step, we combined ENM market information and material flow modeling to produce the first global assessment of the likely ENM emissions to the environment and landfills. The top ten most produced ENMs by mass were analyzed in a dozen major applications. Emissions during the manufacturing, use, and disposal stages were estimated, including intermediate steps through wastewater treatment plants and waste incineration plants. In 2010, silica, titania, alumina, and iron and zinc oxides dominate the ENM market in terms of mass flow through the global economy, used mostly in coatings/paints/pigments, electronics and optics, cosmetics, energy and environmental applications, and as catalysts. We estimate that 63-91 % of over 260,000-309,000 metric tons of global ENM production in 2010 ended up in landfills, with the balance released into soils (8-28 %), water bodies (0.4-7 %), and atmosphere (0.1-1.5 %). While there are considerable uncertainties in the estimates, the framework for estimating emissions can be easily improved as better data become available. The material flow estimates can be used to quantify emissions at the local level, as inputs for fate and transport models to estimate concentrations in different environmental compartments.

  11. Global life cycle releases of engineered nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Arturo A.; McFerran, Suzanne; Lazareva, Anastasiya; Suh, Sangwon

    2013-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are now becoming a significant fraction of the material flows in the global economy. We are already reaping the benefits of improved energy efficiency, material use reduction, and better performance in many existing and new applications that have been enabled by these technological advances. As ENMs pervade the global economy, however, it becomes important to understand their environmental implications. As a first step, we combined ENM market information and material flow modeling to produce the first global assessment of the likely ENM emissions to the environment and landfills. The top ten most produced ENMs by mass were analyzed in a dozen major applications. Emissions during the manufacturing, use, and disposal stages were estimated, including intermediate steps through wastewater treatment plants and waste incineration plants. In 2010, silica, titania, alumina, and iron and zinc oxides dominate the ENM market in terms of mass flow through the global economy, used mostly in coatings/paints/pigments, electronics and optics, cosmetics, energy and environmental applications, and as catalysts. We estimate that 63–91 % of over 260,000–309,000 metric tons of global ENM production in 2010 ended up in landfills, with the balance released into soils (8–28 %), water bodies (0.4–7 %), and atmosphere (0.1–1.5 %). While there are considerable uncertainties in the estimates, the framework for estimating emissions can be easily improved as better data become available. The material flow estimates can be used to quantify emissions at the local level, as inputs for fate and transport models to estimate concentrations in different environmental compartments.

  12. On the question of heat engine cycles optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Костянтин Ігорович Ткаченко

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the efficiency of heat engines nowadays isn’t more than 50-60% for prototypes and maximum possible efficiency of a heat engine is considered Carnot cycle efficiency Thus, at least 40% of the disposable amount of heat is lost in the surrounding medium, unless the waste gases heat is utilized somehow. General idea of heat engines cycles is the transfer of energy from the heater (both external and internal to a working fluid, obtaining mechanical work from expanding of the working fluid, and returning the working fluid to the initial state by compression and excess heat discharge into a cooler. In this paper the combination of a heat engine operating according to the standard Edwards cycle and consisting of isochor, adiabat and isotherm, and the heat pump, using the reverse Carnot cycle is investigated. The heat pump partially picks out the heat of the working fluid at its isothermal compression, and returns it to the equivalent working fluid or regenerator cap, at the beginning of isochoric heating. The efficiency coefficient of the heat pump, and thus the work to putting it into action is calculated by proper equations at the constant temperature of the low-potential heat source (working fluid and variable temperature of the heated equivalent of the working fluid or the regenerator cap. Taking as an example selected quantitative parameters of the Edwards cycle it has been proved that the use of the heat pump increases the effective efficiency of combined cycle as compared to the basic one. In addition, it has been shown that the dependence of the efficiency on the degree of heat return is not monotonic and has a maximum

  13. Cycle Analysis of a New Air Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Wiam Fadi

    This thesis investigates a new externally heated engine design being developed by Soony Systems Inc. to serve as the prime mover in a residential-scale combined heat and power system. This is accomplished by developing a thermodynamic model for the engine and sweeping through the design parameter space in order to identify designs that maximize power output, efficiency, and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was discovered that the original engine design was flawed so a new design was proposed and analyzed. The thermodynamic model was developed in four stages. The first model was quasi-static while the other three were time-dependent and used increasingly realistic models of the heat exchangers. For the range of design parameters investigated here, the peak power output is 6.8 kW, the peak efficiency is approximately 60%, and the peak BMEP is 389 kPa. These performance levels are compared to those of other closed-cycle engines. The results suggest that the Soony engine has the potential to be more efficient than Stirlings because it more closely approximates the Carnot cycle, but this comes at the cost of significantly lower BMEP (389 kPa vs. 2,760 kPa for the SOLO Stirling engine).

  14. Matching mechanism analysis on an adaptive cycle engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Zheng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As a novel aero-engine concept, adaptive cycle aero-engines (ACEs are attracting wide attention in the international aviation industry due to their potential superior task adaptability along a wide flight regime. However, this superior task adaptability can only be demonstrated through proper combined engine control schedule design. It has resulted in an urgent need to investigate the effect of each variable geometry modulation on engine performance and stability. Thus, the aim of this paper is to predict and discuss the effect of each variable geometry modulation on the matching relationship between engine components as well as the overall engine performance at different operating modes, on the basis of a newly developed nonlinear component-based ACE performance model. Results show that at all four working modes, turning down the high pressure compressor variable stator vane, the low pressure turbine variable nozzle, the nozzle throat area, and turning up the core-driven fan stage variable stator vane, the high pressure turbine variable nozzle can increase the thrust at the expense of a higher high pressure turbine inlet total temperature. However, the influences of these adjustments on the trends of various engine components’ working points and working lines as well as the ratio of the rotation speed difference are different from each other. The above results provide valuable guidance and advice for engine combined control schedule design.

  15. Life cycle cost assessment of future low heat rejection engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The Adiabatic Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) represents a project which has the objective to accelerate the development of highway truck engines with advanced technology aimed at reduced fuel consumption. The project comprises three steps, including the synthesis of a number of engine candidate designs, the coupling of each with a number of systems for utilizing exhaust gas energy, and the evaluation of each combination in terms of desirability. Particular attention is given to the employed evaluation method and the development of this method. The objective of Life Cycle Cost (LCC) evaluation in the ADECD program was to select the best from among 42 different low heat rejection engine (LHRE)/exhaust energy recovery system configurations. The LCC model is discussed along with a maintenance cost model, the evaluation strategy, the selection of parameter ranges, and a full factorial analysis.

  16. Multicylinder Diesel Engine Tests with Unstabilized Water-in-Fuel Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Two diesel engines representative of the four-stroke cycle and two-stroke cycle main propulsion units installed in U.S. Coast Guard WPB class cutters were operated in a test environment in an attempt to demonstrate significant fuel savings associated...

  17. Utilisation of diesel engine waste heat by Organic Rankine Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kölsch, Benedikt; Radulovic, Jovana

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, three different organic liquids were investigated as potential working fluids in an Organic Rankine Cycle. Performance of Methanol, Toluene and Solkatherm SES36 was modelled in an ORC powered by a diesel engine waste heat. The ORC model consists of a preheater, evaporator, superheater, turbine, pump and two condensers. With variable maximum cycle temperatures and high cycle pressures, the thermal efficiency, net power output and overall heat transfer area have been evaluated. Methanol was found to have the best thermal performance, but also required the largest heat transfer area. While Toluene achieved lower thermal efficiency, it showed great work potential at high pressures and relatively low temperatures. Our model identified the risks associated with employing these fluids in an ORC: methanol condensing during the expansion and toluene not sufficiently superheated at the turbine inlet, which can compromise the cycle operation. The best compromise between the size of heat exchanger and thermodynamic performance was found for Methanol ORC at intermediate temperatures and high pressures. Flammability and toxicity, however, remain the obstacles for safe implementation of both fluids in ORC systems. - Highlights: • ORC powered by diesel-engine waste heat was developed. • Methanol, Toluene and Solkatherm were considered as working fluids. • Methanol was selected due to the best overall thermal performance. • Optimal cycle operating parameters and heat exchanger area were evaluated

  18. Free-piston engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A combustion system which can utilize high compression ratios, short burn durations, and homogeneous fuel/air mixtures in conjunction with low equivalence ratios. In particular, a free-piston, two-stroke autoignition internal combustion engine including an electrical generator having a linear alternator with a double-ended free piston that oscillates inside a closed cylinder is provided. Fuel and air are introduced in a two-stroke cycle fashion on each end, where the cylinder charge is compressed to the point of autoignition without spark plugs. The piston is driven in an oscillating motion as combustion occurs successively on each end. This leads to rapid combustion at almost constant volume for any fuel/air equivalence ratio mixture at very high compression ratios. The engine is characterized by high thermal efficiency and low NO.sub.x emissions. The engine is particularly suited for generating electrical current in a hybrid automobile.

  19. Nonlinear Thermodynamic Analysis and Optimization of a Carnot Engine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Feidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of the efforts to unify the various branches of Irreversible Thermodynamics, the proposed work reconsiders the approach of the Carnot engine taking into account the finite physical dimensions (heat transfer conductances and the finite speed of the piston. The models introduce the irreversibility of the engine by two methods involving different constraints. The first method introduces the irreversibility by a so-called irreversibility ratio in the entropy balance applied to the cycle, while in the second method it is emphasized by the entropy generation rate. Various forms of heat transfer laws are analyzed, but most of the results are given for the case of the linear law. Also, individual cases are studied and reported in order to provide a simple analytical form of the results. The engine model developed allowed a formal optimization using the calculus of variations.

  20. Course Content for Life Cycle Engineering and EcoDesign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jerswiet, Jack; Duflou, Joost; Dewulf, Wim

    2007-01-01

    There is a need to create an awareness of Life Cycle Engineering and EcoDesign in Engineering students. Topics covered in an LCE/EcoDesign course will create an awareness of environmental impacts, especially in other design course projects. This paper suggests that an awareness of product impact...... upon the environment must be created at an early stage in undergraduate education. Deciding what to include in an LCE/EcoDesign Course can be difficult because there are many different views on the subject. However, there are more similarities than differences. All LCE/ EcoDesign Engineering courses...... have the ultimate objective of decreasing the environmental impact of a design. It has been observed that 70% of product costs are decided at the design stage. This can be extended to environmental impact, where it can be observed that, the design is correct, at the beginning, the environmental impact...

  1. Liquid air fueled open–closed cycle Stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Weiqing; Wang, Jia; Cai, Maolin; Shi, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy of liquid air is divided into cryogenic energy and expansion energy. • Open–closed cycle Stirling mechanism is employed to improve efficiency. • The Schmidt theory is modified to describe temperature variation in cold space. - Abstract: An unconventional Stirling engine is proposed and its theoretical analysis is performed. The engine belongs to a “cryogenic heat engine” that is fueled by cryogenic medium. Conventional “cryogenic heat engine” employs liquid air as pressure source, but disregards its heat-absorbing ability. Therefore, its efficiency can only be improved by increasing vapor pressure, accordingly increasing the demand on pressure resistance and sealing. In the proposed engine, the added Stirling mechanism helps achieve its high efficiency and simplicity by utilizing the heat-absorbing ability of liquid air. On one hand, based on Stirling mechanism, gas in the hot space absorbs heat from atmosphere when expanding; gas in the cold space is cooled down by liquid air when compressed. Taking atmosphere as heat source and liquid air as heat sink, a closed Stirling cycle is formed. On the other hand, an exhaust port is set in the hot space. When expanding in the hot space, the vaporized gas is discharged through the exhaust port. Thus, an open cycle is established. To model and analyze the system, the Schmidt theory is modified to describe temperature variation in the cold space, and irreversible characteristic of regenerator is incorporated in the thermodynamic model. The results obtained from the model show that under the same working pressure, the efficiency of the proposed engine is potentially higher than that of conventional ones and to achieve the same efficiency, the working pressure could be lower with the new mechanism. Its efficiency could be improved by reducing temperature difference between the regenerator and the cold/hot space, increasing the swept volume ratio, decreasing the liquid–gas ratio. To keep

  2. Life Cycle Engineering – from methodology to enterprise culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Alting, Leo; Poll, Christian

    2003-01-01

    As part of a sustainable development, the environmental efficiency of industry must increase by a factor four to ten. This engenders attention to the environmental impact of products and technical systems over their entire life cycle. The last decade has seen the development of a number of method......As part of a sustainable development, the environmental efficiency of industry must increase by a factor four to ten. This engenders attention to the environmental impact of products and technical systems over their entire life cycle. The last decade has seen the development of a number...... of methodologies and tools for life cycle assessment and development of more eco-efficient products, from complex to simplified, catering to the needs of especially small and medium-sized enterprizes. The tools and data are in place, but dissemination lacks behind. Propagation of life cycle thinking and life cycle...... engineering to larger parts of industry is attempted by strengthening the market pull through integrated product policy measures, and at the same time pushing through information activities, training and dissemination of tools. Experience hitherto shows that these forces are insufficient and that stronger...

  3. Organic Rankine cycle - review and research directions in engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Angad

    2017-11-01

    Waste heat to power conversion using Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) is expected to play an important role in CO2 reductions from diesel engines. Firstly, a review of automotive ORCs is presented focusing on the pure working fluids, thermal architectures and expanders. The discussion includes, but is not limited to: R245fa, ethanol and water as fluids; series, parallel and cascade as architectures; dry saturated, superheated and supercritical as expansion conditions; and scroll, radial turbine and piston as expansion machines. Secondly, research direction in versatile expander and holistic architecture (NOx + CO2) are proposed. Benefits of using the proposed unconventional approaches are quantified using Ricardo Wave and Aspen HYSYS for diesel engine and ORC modelling. Results indicate that, the implementation of versatile piston expander tolerant to two-phase and using cyclopentane can potentially increase the highway drive cycle power by 8%. Furthermore, holistic architecture offering complete utilisation of charge air and exhaust recirculation heat increased the performance noticeably to 5% of engine power at the design point condition.

  4. Steam bottoming cycle for an adiabatic diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, E.; Demier, R.; Krepchin, I.; Walker, D.

    1984-01-01

    Steam bottoming cycles using adiabatic diesel engine exhaust heat which projected substantial performance and economic benefits for long haul trucks were studied. Steam cycle and system component variables, system cost, size and performance were analyzed. An 811 K/6.90 MPa state of the art reciprocating expander steam system with a monotube boiler and radiator core condenser was selected for preliminary design. The costs of the diesel with bottoming system (TC/B) and a NASA specified turbocompound adiabatic diesel with aftercooling with the same total output were compared, the annual fuel savings less the added maintenance cost was determined to cover the increase initial cost of the TC/B system in a payback period of 2.3 years. Steam bottoming system freeze protection strategies were developed, technological advances required for improved system reliability are considered and the cost and performance of advanced systes are evaluated.

  5. Analysis of engineering cycles thermodynamics and fluid mechanics series

    CERN Document Server

    Haywood, R W

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of Engineering Cycles, Third Edition, deals principally with an analysis of the overall performance, under design conditions, of work-producing power plants and work-absorbing refrigerating and gas-liquefaction plants, most of which are either cyclic or closely related thereto. The book is organized into two parts, dealing first with simple power and refrigerating plants and then moving on to more complex plants. The principal modifications in this Third Edition arise from the updating and expansion of material on nuclear plants and on combined and binary plants. In view of increased

  6. CANDU combined cycles featuring gas-turbine engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecchiarelli, J.; Choy, E.; Peryoga, Y.; Aryono, N.A.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, a power-plant analysis is conducted to evaluate the thermodynamic merit of various CANDU combined cycles in which continuously operating gas-turbine engines are employed as a source of class IV power restoration. It is proposed to utilize gas turbines in future CANDU power plants, for sites (such as Indonesia) where natural gas or other combustible fuels are abundant. The primary objective is to eliminate the standby diesel-generators (which serve as a backup supply of class III power) since they are nonproductive and expensive. In the proposed concept, the gas turbines would: (1) normally operate on a continuous basis and (2) serve as a reliable backup supply of class IV power (the Gentilly-2 nuclear power plant uses standby gas turbines for this purpose). The backup class IV power enables the plant to operate in poison-prevent mode until normal class IV power is restored. This feature is particularly beneficial to countries with relatively small and less stable grids. Thermodynamically, the advantage of the proposed concept is twofold. Firstly, the operation of the gas-turbine engines would directly increase the net (electrical) power output and the overall thermal efficiency of a CANDU power plant. Secondly, the hot exhaust gases from the gas turbines could be employed to heat water in the CANDU Balance Of Plant (BOP) and therefore improve the thermodynamic performance of the BOP. This may be accomplished via several different combined-cycle configurations, with no impact on the current CANDU Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) full-power operating conditions when each gas turbine is at maximum power. For instance, the hot exhaust gases may be employed for feedwater preheating and steam reheating and/or superheating; heat exchange could be accomplished in a heat recovery steam generator, as in conventional gas-turbine combined-cycle plants. The commercially available GateCycle power plant analysis program was applied to conduct a

  7. Development of System Engineering Technology for Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Kim, Sung Ki; Song, Kee Chan

    2010-04-01

    This report is aims to establish design requirements for constructing mock-up system of pyroprocess by 2011 to realize long-term goal of nuclear energy promotion comprehensive plan, which is construction of engineering scale pyroprocess integrated process demonstration facility. The development of efficient process for spent fuel and establishment of system engineering technology to demonstrate the process are required to develop nuclear energy continuously. The detailed contents of research for these are as follows; - Design of Mock-up facility for demonstrate pyroprocess, Construction, Approval, Trial run, Performance test - Development of nuclear material accountancy technology for unit processes of pyroprocess and design of safeguards system - Remote operation of demonstrating pyroprocess / Development of maintenance technology and equipment - Establishment of transportation system and evaluation of pre-safety for interim storage system - Deriving and implementation of a method to improve nuclear transparency for commercialization proliferation resistance nuclear fuel cycle Spent fuel which is the most important pending problem of nuclear power development would be reduced and recycled by developing the system engineering technology of pyroprocess facility by 2010. This technology would contribute to obtain JD for the use of spent fuel between the ROK-US and to amend the ROK-US Atomic Energy Agreement scheduled in 2014

  8. Biogas Engine Waste Heat Recovery Using Organic Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Benato

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Italy is a leading country in the biogas sector. Energy crops and manure are converted into biogas using anaerobic digestion and, then, into electricity using internal combustion engines (ICEs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for improving the efficiency of these engines taking the real operation into account. To this purpose, in the present work, the organic Rankine cycle (ORC technology is used to recover the waste heat contained in the exhaust gases of a 1 MWel biogas engine. The ICE behavior being affected by the biogas characteristics, the ORC unit is designed, firstly, using the ICE nameplate data and, then, with data measured during a one-year monitoring activity. The optimum fluid and the plant configuration are selected in both cases using an “in-house” optimization tool. The optimization goal is the maximization of the net electric power while the working fluid is selected among 115 pure fluids and their mixtures. Results show that a recuperative ORC designed using real data guarantees a 30% higher net electric power than the one designed with ICE nameplate conditions.

  9. A comparison of advanced heat recovery power cycles in a combined cycle for large ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Sigthorsson, Oskar; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Strong motivation exists within the marine sector to reduce fuel expenses and to comply with ever stricter emission regulations. Heat recovery can address both of these issues. The ORC (organic Rankine cycle), the Kalina cycle and the steam Rankine cycle have received the majority of the focus...... model is combined with a turbocharger model and bottoming cycle models written in Matlab. Genetic algorithm optimisation results suggest that the Kalina cycle possess no significant advantages compared to the ORC or the steam cycle. While contributing to very high efficiencies, the organic working...... in the literature. In the present work we compare these cycles in a combined cycle application with a large marine two-stroke diesel engine. We present an evaluation of the efficiency and the environmental impact, safety concerns and practical aspects of each of the cycles. A previously validated numerical engine...

  10. Concept definition study of small Brayton cycle engines for dispersed solar electric power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, L. D.; Ashe, T. L.; Dobler, F. X.; Elkins, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Three first-generation Brayton cycle engine types were studied for solar application: a near-term open cycle (configuration A), a near-term closed cycle (configuration B), and a longer-term open cycle (configuration C). A parametric performance analysis was carried out to select engine designs for the three configurations. The interface requirements for the Brayton cycle engine/generator and solar receivers were determined. A technology assessment was then carried out to define production costs, durability, and growth potential for the selected engine types.

  11. 40 CFR 86.335-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. 86... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.335-79 Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. (a) The following test sequence shall be followed in...

  12. 78 FR 50317 - Special Conditions: Cessna Aircraft Company, Model J182T; Diesel Cycle Engine Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Motorisation Aeronautiques (SMA) Engines, Inc. SR305-230E-C1 which is a four-stroke, air cooled, diesel cycle... approved under Type Certificate No. 3A13, is an aluminum, four place, single engine airplane with a... obtained by multiplying the mean torque by a factor of four for diesel cycle engines. (1) If a factor of...

  13. Fumaric acid production by Torulopsis glabrata: engineering the urea cycle and the purine nucleotide cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulai; Wu, Jing; Song, Wei; Zhang, Limei; Wang, Hongjiang; Liu, Liming

    2015-01-01

    A multi-vitamin auxotrophic Torulopsis glabrata strain, a pyruvate producer, was further engineered to produce fumaric acid. Using the genome-scale metabolic model iNX804 of T. glabrata, four fumaric acid biosynthetic pathways, involving the four cytosolic enzymes, argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), fumarylacetoacetase (FAA), and fumarase (FUM1), were found. Athough single overexpression of each of the four enzymes in the cytosol improved fumaric acid production, the highest fumaric acid titer (5.62 g L(-1) ) was obtained with strain T.G-ASL(H) -ADSL(L) by controlling the strength of ASL at a high level and ADSL at a low level. In order to further improve the production of fumaric acid, the SpMAE1 gene encoding the C4 -dicarboxylic acids transporter was overexpressed in strain T.G-ASL(H) -ADSL(L) -SpMAE1 and the final fumaric acid titer increased to 8.83 g L(-1) . This study provides a novel strategy for fumaric acid biosynthesis by utilizing the urea cycle and the purine nucleotide cycle to enhance the bridge between carbon metabolism and nitrogen metabolism. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Failure of Engineering Artifacts : A Life Cycle Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Frate, L.

    2012-01-01

    Failure is a central notion both in ethics of engineering and in engineering practice. Engineers devote considerable resources to assure their products will not fail and considerable progress has been made in the development of tools and methods for understanding and avoiding failure. Engineering

  15. To capabilities of heat engines with gas working medium in closed cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.M.; Tikhomirov, L.N.; Rajkhanov, N.A.; Kotov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    The effort gives analysis of performance of engines and heat pumps with closed cycles based on use of well practiced adiabatic and isobaric processes. Advantages of theses cycles are demonstrated as compared to Stirling engines, and capabilities of their application in piston machines. (author)

  16. HEAT RECOVERY FROM A NATURAL GAS POWERED INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE BY CO2 TRANSCRITICAL POWER CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Farzaneh-Gord

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides details of energy accounting of a natural gas powered internal combustion engine and achievable work of a utilized CO2 power cycle. Based on experimental performance analysis of a new designed IKCO (Iran Khodro Company 1.7 litre natural gas powered engine, full energy accounting of the engine were carried out on various engine speeds and loads. Further, various CO2 transcritical power cycle configurations have been appointed to take advantages of exhaust and coolant water heat lost. Based on thermodynamic analysis, the amount of recoverable work obtainable by CO2 transcritical power cycles have been calculated on various engine conditions. The results show that as much as 18 kW power could be generated by the power cycle. This would be considerable amount of power especially if compared with the engine brake power.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis and system design of a novel split cycle engine concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Guangyu; Morgan, Robert E.; Heikal, Morgan R.

    2016-01-01

    The split cycle engine is a new reciprocating internal combustion engine with a potential of a radical efficiency improvement. In this engine, the compression and combustion–expansion processes occur in different cylinders. In the compression cylinder, the charge air is compressed through a quasi-isothermal process by direct cooling of the air. The high pressure air is then heated in a recuperator using the waste heat of exhaust gas before induction to the combustion cylinder. The combustion process occurs during the expansion stroke, in a quasi-isobaric process. In this paper, a fundamental theoretical cycle analysis and one-dimensional engine simulation of the split cycle engine was undertaken. The results show that the thermal efficiency (η) is mainly decided by the CR (compression ratio) and ER (expansion ratio), the regeneration effectiveness (σ), and the temperature rising ratio (N). Based on the above analysis, a system optimization of the engine was conducted. The results showed that by increasing CR from 23 to 25, the combustion and recuperation processes could be improved. By increasing the expansion ratio to 26, the heat losses during the gas exchange stroke were further reduced. Furthermore, the coolant temperatures of the compression and expansion chambers can be controlled separately to reduce the wall heat transfer losses. Compared to a conventional engine, a 21% total efficiency improvement was achieved when the split cycle was applied. It was concluded that through the system optimization, a total thermal efficiency of 53% can be achieved on split cycle engine. - Highlights: • Fundamental mechanism of the split cycle engine is investigated. • The key affecting factors of the thermodynamic cycle efficiency are identified. • The practical efficiency of split cycle applying on diesel engine is analysed. • The design optimization on the split cycle engine concept is conducted.

  18. Internally regenerative engine cycle analysis - A parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, E. L.; Pouring, A. A.; Chute, R.

    1983-11-01

    The Air Standard analysis for the internal regenerative Otto and Diesel cycles occurring within a single piston-cylinder geometry was investigated analytically. The use of a constant temperature internal regenerative reservoir permits the absorption of heat from the hot gases and rejection to the cooler charge later in the cycle. A dimensionless analysis to obtain performance predictions for these cycles shows that with regeneration the Otto and Diesel cycles for equal compression ratios can exceed the performance of the corresponding basic cycles. It is also shown that, in certain cases, thermal efficiency and net work output can exceed the basic cycle and that external heat addition may be less than the basic cycle. Performance curves are provided for Otto and Diesel cycle regeneration with fixed Tmax and variable compression ratio.

  19. Thermodynamic efficiency analysis and cycle optimization of deeply precooled combined cycle engine in the air-breathing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Qinglian

    2017-09-01

    The efficiency calculation and cycle optimization were carried out for the Synergistic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) with deeply precooled combined cycle. A component-level model was developed for the engine, and exergy efficiency analysis based on the model was carried out. The methods to improve cycle efficiency have been proposed. The results indicate cycle efficiency of SABRE is between 29.7% and 41.7% along the flight trajectory, and most of the wasted exergy is occupied by the unburned hydrogen in exit gas. Exergy loss exists in each engine component, and the sum losses of main combustion chamber(CC), pre-burner(PB), precooler(PC) and 3# heat exchanger(HX3) are greater than 71.3% of the total loss. Equivalence ratio is the main influencing factor of cycle, and it can be regulated by adjusting parameters of helium loop. Increase the maximum helium outlet temperature of PC by 50 K, the total assumption of hydrogen will be saved by 4.8%, and the cycle efficiency is advanced by 3% averagely in the trajectory. Helium recirculation scheme introduces a helium recirculation loop to increase local helium flow rate of PC. It turns out the total assumption of hydrogen will be saved by 9%, that's about 1740 kg, and the cycle efficiency is advanced by 5.6% averagely.

  20. Thermodynamic analysis of diesel engine coupled with ORC and absorption refrigeration cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salek, Farhad; Moghaddam, Alireza Naghavi; Naserian, Mohammad Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Coupling ORC and Ammonia absorption cycles with diesel engine to recover energy. • By using designed bottoming system, recovered diesel engine energy is about 10%. • By using designed bottoming system, engine efficiency will grow about 4.65%. - Abstract: In this paper, Rankine cycle and Ammonia absorption cycle are coupled with Diesel engine to recover the energy of exhaust gases. The novelty of this paper is the use of ammonia absorption refrigeration cycle bottoming Rankine cycle which coupled with diesel engine to produce more power. Bottoming system converts engine exhaust thermal energy to cooling and mechanical energy. Energy transfer process has been done by two shell and tube heat exchangers. Simulation processes have been done by programming mathematic models of cycles in EES Program. Based on results, recovered energy varies with diesel engine load. For the particular load case of current research, the use of two heat exchangers causes 0.5% decrement of engine mechanical power. However, the recovered energy is about 10% of engine mechanical power.

  1. Effect of the Miller cycle on the performance of turbocharged hydrogen internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Qing-he; Sun, Bai-gang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The Miller cycle can increase power density for turbocharged hydrogen engines. • The boundaries is limited by the turbocharged system and valve lift. • Broke power and BSFC of using Miller cycle is the best in three technical methods. - Abstract: Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, and the port fuel injection (PFI) is a fuel-flexible, durable, and relatively cheap method of energy conversion. However, the contradiction of increasing the power density and controlling NOx emissions limits the wide application of PFI hydrogen internal combustion engines. To address this issue, two typical thermodynamic cycles—the Miller and Otto cycles—are studied based on the calculation model proposed in this study. The thermodynamic cycle analyses of the two cycles are compared and results show that the thermal efficiency of the Miller cycle (η Miller ) is higher than η Otto , when the multiplied result of the inlet pressure and Miller cycle coefficient (δ M γ M ) is larger than that of the Otto cycle (i.e., the value of the inlet pressure ratio multiplied by the Miller cycle coefficient is larger than the value of the inlet pressure ratio of the Otto cycle). The results also show that the intake valve closure (IVC) of the Miller cycle is limited by the inlet pressure and valve lift. The two factors show the boundaries of the Miller cycle in increasing the power density of the turbocharged PFI hydrogen engine. The ways of lean burn + Otto cycle (LO), stoichiometric equivalence ratio burn + EGR + Otto cycle (SEO) and Miller cycle in turbocharged hydrogen engine are compared, the results show that the Miller cycle has the highest power density and the lowest BSFC among the three methods at an engine speed of 2800 rpm and NOx emissions below 100 ppm. The brake power of the Miller cycle increases by 37.7% higher than that of the LO and 26.3% higher than that of SEO, when γ M is 0.7. The BSFC of the Miller cycle decreases by 16% lower than that of the LO

  2. All-regime combined-cycle plant: Engineering solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezinets, P. A.; Tumanovskii, G. G.; Tereshina, G. E.; Krylova, I. N.; Markina, V. N.; Migun, E. N.

    2016-12-01

    The development of distributed power generation systems as a supplement to the centralized unified power grid increases the operational stability and efficiency of the entire power generation industry and improves the power supply to consumers. An all-regime cogeneration combined-cycle plant with a power of 20-25 mW (PGU-20/25T) and an electrical efficiency above 50% has been developed at the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute (ATEI) as a distributed power generation object. The PGU-20/25T two-circuit cogeneration plant provides a wide electrical and thermal power adjustment range and the absence of the mutual effect of electrical and thermal power output regimes at controlled frequency and power in a unified or isolated grid. The PGU-20/25T combined-cycle plant incorporates a gas-turbine unit (GTU) with a power of 16 MW, a heat recovery boiler (HRB) with two burners (before the boiler and the last heating stage), and a cogeneration steam turbine with a power of 6/9 MW. The PGU-20/25T plant has a maximum electrical power of 22 MW and an efficiency of 50.8% in the heat recovery regime and a maximum thermal power output of 16.3 MW (14 Gcal/h) in the cogeneration regime. The use of burners can increase the electrical power to 25 MW in the steam condensation regime at an efficiency of 49% and the maximum thermal power output to 29.5 MW (25.4 Gcal/h). When the steam turbine is shut down, the thermal power output can grow to 32.6 MW (28 Gcal/h). The innovative equipment, which was specially developed for PGU-20/25T, improves the reliability of this plant and simplifies its operation. Among this equipment are microflame burners in the heat recovery boiler, a vacuum system based on liquid-ring pumps, and a vacuum deaerator. To enable the application of PGU-20/25T in water-stressed regions, an air condenser preventing the heat-transfer tubes from the risk of covering with ice during operation in frost air has been developed. The vacuum system eliminates the need for

  3. Metabolic Engineering of TCA Cycle for Production of Chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuoristo, K.S.; Mars, A.E.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Eggink, G.; Weusthuis, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been used for decades in the microbial production of chemicals such as citrate, L-glutamate, and succinate. Maximizing yield is key for cost-competitive production. However, for most TCA cycle products, the maximum pathway yield is lower than the theoretical

  4. An Optimization Study on an Eco-Friendly Engine Cycle Named as Dual-Miller Cycle (DMC for Marine Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Guven

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The diesel engine is an indispensable part of technology and it is commonly used in land and marine vehicles. However, diesel engines release NOx emissions due to high combustion temperatures. They have harmful effects on the environment such as sources of photo-chemical fog and climate changes. Therefore, they must be reduced and limited. The Miller cycle application is a NOx control method and it is popular in the recent years to abate NOx produced from the internal combustion engines (ICEs. A performance investigation of a Dual-Miller cycle (DMC engine in terms of power (PO, power density (PD and effective efficiency (EE has been performed using a new finite-time thermodynamics modeling (FTTM in this study. The effects of engine design and operating parameters on the engine performance (EPER have been examined. Additionally, the energy losses have been determined resulting from incomplete combustion (IC, friction (FR, heat transfer (HT and exhaust output (EO. The results presented could be an essential tool for DMC marine engine designers.

  5. Thermodynamic control-oriented modeling of cycle-to-cycle exhaust gas temperature in an HCCI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghani Firoozabadi, M.; Shahbakhti, M.; Koch, C.R.; Jazayeri, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • First thermodynamic model in the literature to predict exhaust temperature in HCCI engines. • The model can be used for integrated control of HCCI combustion and exhaust temperature. • The model is experimentally validated at over 300 steady state and transient conditions. • Results show a good agreement between predicted and measured exhaust temperatures. • Sensitivity of exhaust gas temperature to variation of engine variables is shown. - Abstract: Model-based control of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine exhaust temperature is a viable solution to optimize efficiency of both engine and the exhaust aftertreatment system. Low exhaust temperature in HCCI engines can limit the abatement of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions in an exhaust aftertreatment system. A physical–empirical model is described for control of exhaust temperature in HCCI engines. This model captures cycle-to-cycle dynamics affecting exhaust temperature and is based on thermodynamic relations and semi-empirical correlations. It incorporates intake and exhaust gas flow dynamics, residual gas mixing, and fuel burn rate and is validated with experimental data from a single cylinder engine at over 300 steady state and transient conditions. The validation results indicate a good agreement between predicted and measured exhaust gas temperature

  6. A novel split cycle internal combustion engine with integral waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Guangyu; Morgan, Robert; Heikal, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel engine thermodynamic cycle is proposed. • Theoretical analysis is applied to identify the key parameters of the thermodynamic cycle. • The key stages of the split cycle are analysed via one-dimensional modelling work. • The effecting mechanism of the split cycle efficiency is analysed. - Abstract: To achieve a step improvement in engine efficiency, a novel split cycle engine concept is proposed. The engine has separate compression and combustion cylinders and waste heat is recovered between the two. Quasi-isothermal compression of the charge air is realised in the compression cylinder while isobaric combustion of the air/fuel mixture is achieved in the combustion cylinder. Exhaust heat recovery between the compression and combustion chamber enables highly efficient recovery of waste heat within the cycle. Based on cycle analysis and a one-dimensional engine model, the fundamentals and the performance of the split thermodynamic cycle is estimated. Compared to conventional engines, the compression work can be significantly reduced through the injection of a controlled quantity of water in the compression cylinder, lowering the gas temperature during compression. Thermal energy can then be effectively recovered from the engine exhaust in a recuperator between the cooled compressor cylinder discharge air and the exhaust gas. The resulting hot high pressure air is then injected into a combustor cylinder and mixed with fuel, where near isobaric combustion leads to a low combustion temperature and reduced heat transferred from the cylinder wall. Detailed cycle simulation indicates a 32% efficiency improvement can be expected compared to the conventional diesel engines.

  7. Comparative performance analysis of combined-cycle pulse detonation turbofan engines (PDTEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Bhattrai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined-cycle pulse detonation engines are promising contenders for hypersonic propulsion systems. In the present study, design and propulsive performance analysis of combined-cycle pulse detonation turbofan engines (PDTEs is presented. Analysis is done with respect to Mach number at two consecutive modes of operation: (1 Combined-cycle PDTE using a pulse detonation afterburner mode (PDA-mode and (2 combined-cycle PDTE in pulse detonation ramjet engine mode (PDRE-mode. The performance of combined-cycle PDTEs is compared with baseline afterburning turbofan and ramjet engines. The comparison of afterburning modes is done for Mach numbers from 0 to 3 at 15.24 km altitude conditions, while that of pulse detonation ramjet engine (PDRE is done for Mach 1.5 to Mach 6 at 18.3 km altitude conditions. The analysis shows that the propulsive performance of a turbine engine can be greatly improved by replacing the conventional afterburner with a pulse detonation afterburner (PDA. The PDRE also outperforms its ramjet counterpart at all flight conditions considered herein. The gains obtained are outstanding for both the combined-cycle PDTE modes compared to baseline turbofan and ramjet engines.

  8. Cycle-skipping strategies for pumping loss reduction in spark ignition engines: An experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yüksek, Levent; Özener, Orkun; Sandalcı, Tarkan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A cycle density variation technique called cycle-skipping was applied. ► Effect on fuel consumption and gaseous emissions was investigated. ► Fuel consumption and gaseous tail-pipe emissions improved at partial loading conditions. - Abstract: Spark ignition (SI) engines are widely used for power generation, especially in the automotive industry. SI engines have a lower thermal efficiency than diesel engines due to a lower compression ratio, higher charge-induction work and lower end of compression stroke pressure. A significant amount of charge induction work is lost when an SI engine runs under partial loading conditions. Under partial loading conditions, a lower intake charge is required, which can be theoretically achieved by varying the displacement volume or the stroke number of the engine without using a throttle. Reducing the displacement volume to control the engine load can be achieved by skipping cycles in single-cylinder engines. This study investigates the effect of cycle-skipping strategies on the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and exhaust emissions of an SI engine under partial loading conditions. Three different skipping modes were applied: normal, normal-skip and normal-normal-skip. A significant improvement in BSFC and carbon monoxide emission was obtained by applying cycle-skipping strategies.

  9. Ethanol Research : Alternative Fuels & Life-Cycle Engineering Program : November 29, 2006 to November 28, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    This report presents the results of the successful ethanol fuel demonstration program conducted from September 2007 to September 2010. This project was a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Alternative Fuels and Life Cycle Engineering...

  10. Inspection of a prototype of rocket based combined cycle engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Direct Gain Solar Thermal Engine was designed with no moving parts. The concept of Solar Thermal Propulsion Research uses focused solar energy from an inflatable concentrator (a giant magnifying glass) to heat a propellant (hydrogen) and allows thermal expansion through the nozzle for low thrust without chemical combustion. Energy limitations and propellant weight associated with traditional combustion engines are non-existant with this concept. The Direct Gain Solar Thermal Engine would be used for moving from a lower orbit to an upper synchronous orbit.

  11. Metabolic Engineering of TCA Cycle for Production of Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuoristo, Kiira S; Mars, Astrid E; Sanders, Johan P M; Eggink, Gerrit; Weusthuis, Ruud A

    2016-03-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been used for decades in the microbial production of chemicals such as citrate, L-glutamate, and succinate. Maximizing yield is key for cost-competitive production. However, for most TCA cycle products, the maximum pathway yield is lower than the theoretical maximum yield (Y(E)). For succinate, this was solved by creating two pathways to the product, using both branches of the TCA cycle, connected by the glyoxylate shunt (GS). A similar solution cannot be applied directly for production of compounds from the oxidative branch of the TCA cycle because irreversible reactions are involved. Here, we describe how this can be overcome and what the impact is on the yield. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Skip cycle system for spark ignition engines: An experimental investigation of a new type working strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutlar, Osman Akin; Arslan, Hikmet; Calik, Alper T.

    2007-01-01

    A new type working strategy for spark ignition engine, named skip cycle, is examined. The main idea is to reduce the effective stroke volume of an engine by cutting off fuel injection and spark ignition in some of the classical four stroke cycles. When the cycle is skipped, additionally, a rotary valve is used in the intake to reduce pumping losses in part load conditions. The effect of this strategy is similar to that of variable displacement engines. Alternative power stroke fractions in one cycle and applicability in single cylinder engines are specific advantageous properties of the proposed system. A thermodynamic model, besides experimental results, is used to explain the skip cycle strategy in more detail. This theoretical investigation shows considerable potential to increase the efficiency at part load conditions. Experimental results obtained with this novel strategy show that the throttle valve of the engine opens wider and the minimum spark advance for maximum brake torque decreases in comparison to those of the classical operation system. The brake specific fuel consumption decreases at very low speed and load, while it increases at higher speed and load due to the increased fuel loss within the skipped cycles. In this working mode, the engine operates at lower idle speed without any stability problem; and moreover with less fuel consumption

  13. The realization and analysis of a new thermodynamic cycle for internal combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorić Jovan Ž.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents description and thermodynamic analysis of a new thermodynamic cycle. Realization of this new cycle is possible to achieve with valveless internal combustion engine with more complete expansion. The main purpose of this new IC engine is to increase engines’ thermal efficiency. The engine was designed so that the thermodynamic changes of the working fluid are different than in conventional engines. Specific differences are reflected in a more complete expansion of the working fluid (the expansion stroke is larger than compression stroke, valveless gas flowing and complete discharge of residual combustion products from the combustion chamber. In this concept, the movement of the piston is different than in conventional piston mechanisms. The results obtained herein include the efficiency characteristics of irreversible reciprocating new engine cycle which is very similar to Miller cycle. The results show that with this thermodynamic cycle engine has higher efficiency than with the standard Otto cycle. In this article, the patent application material under number 2008/607 at the Intellectual Property Office of the Republic of Serbia was used.

  14. The universal power and efficiency characteristics for irreversible reciprocating heat engine cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Qin Xiao Yong; Sun Feng Rui; Wu Chih

    2003-01-01

    The performance of irreversible reciprocating heat engine cycles with heat transfer loss and friction-like term loss is analysed using finite-time thermodynamics. The universal relations between the power output and the compression ratio, between the thermal efficiency and the compression ratio, and the optimal relation between power output and the efficiency of the cycles are derived. Moreover, analysis and optimization of the model were carried out in order to investigate the effect of cycle processes on the performance of the cycle using numerical examples. The results obtained herein include the performance characteristics of irreversible reciprocating Diesel, Otto, Atkinson and Brayton cycles.

  15. Engine performances and exhaust gas characteristics of methanol-fueled two-cycle engines. Kogata ni cycle ter dot methanol kikan no seino ni oyobosu shoinshi no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawa, N.; Kajitani, S. (Ibaraki Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Faculty of Engineerineering); Hayashi, S.; Kubota, Y. (Muroran Inst. of Technology, Muroran (Japan))

    1990-10-25

    Regarding crank case compressed two cycle engine, feasibility of methanol-fueled engine was investigated by studying effective factors on properties of power, combustion, and exhaust gas. For the experiment, air-cooling single cylinder engine was used of which specification was shown by table. As for the experiment, quantities of in-taken air, fuel consumption, torque, and composition of exhaust gas were measured under various conditions. As the consideration of experimental results, those were obtained that less exhaust gas with high performance operation of tow-cycle engie was achieved, too, by using diluted mixture gas of methanol, and that problems were found to be studied for the realization of high compression ratio. 12 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  16. THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE CYCLE OF SPARK IGNITION ENGINE WITH EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Öğüçlü, Özer

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been developed and applied to predict the emission levels and performance of a spark ignition engine with using Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) gas. The model simulates the full thermodynamic cycle of the engine and includes heat transfer, combustion, gas exchange process, thermal dissociation of water and carbon dioxide, and chemical equilibrium. 

  17. 78 FR 28719 - Special Conditions: Cessna Aircraft Company, Model J182T; Diesel Cycle Engine Installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... the Societe de Motorisation Aeronautiques (SMA) Engines, Inc. SR305-230E-C1 which is a four-stroke... derivative of the T182 currently approved under Type Certificate No. 3A13, is an aluminum, four place, single... multiplying the mean torque by a factor of four for diesel cycle engines. (1) If a factor of less than four is...

  18. Introduction of Life Cycle Assessment and Sustainability Concepts in Chemical Engineering Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Schmid, Alejandro; Schmidt Rivera, Ximena C.; Stamford, Laurence

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The implementation of life cycle assessment (LCA) and carbon footprinting represents an important professional and research opportunity for chemical engineers, but this is not broadly reflected in chemical engineering curricula worldwide. This paper aims to present the implementation of a coursework that is easy to apply, free of cost,…

  19. Life-cycle assessment of engineered nanomaterials: A literature review of assessment status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miseljic, Mirko; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2014-01-01

    The potential environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), and their engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), have, in recent years, been a cause of concern. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a highly qualified tool to assess products and systems and has an increasing extent been applied to ENM...

  20. NASA's Robotics Mining Competition Provides Undergraduates Full Life Cycle Systems Engineering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecklein, Jonette

    2017-01-01

    NASA has held an annual robotic mining competition for teams of university/college students since 2010. This competition is yearlong, suitable for a senior university engineering capstone project. It encompasses the full project life cycle from ideation of a robot design to actual tele-operation of the robot in simulated Mars conditions mining and collecting simulated regolith. A major required element for this competition is a Systems Engineering Paper in which each team describes the systems engineering approaches used on their project. The score for the Systems Engineering Paper contributes 25% towards the team's score for the competition's grand prize. The required use of systems engineering on the project by this competition introduces the students to an intense practical application of systems engineering throughout a full project life cycle.

  1. NASA's Robotic Mining Competition Provides Undergraduates Full Life Cycle Systems Engineering Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecklein, Jonette

    2017-01-01

    NASA has held an annual robotic mining competition for teams of university/college students since 2010. This competition is yearlong, suitable for a senior university engineering capstone project. It encompasses the full project life cycle from ideation of a robot design, through tele-operation of the robot collecting regolith in simulated Mars conditions, to disposal of the robot systems after the competition. A major required element for this competition is a Systems Engineering Paper in which each team describes the systems engineering approaches used on their project. The score for the Systems Engineering Paper contributes 25% towards the team’s score for the competition’s grand prize. The required use of systems engineering on the project by this competition introduces the students to an intense practical application of systems engineering throughout a full project life cycle.

  2. Thermodynamic Cycle and CFD Analyses for Hydrogen Fueled Air-breathing Pulse Detonation Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Yungster, Shaye

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a thermodynamic cycle analysis of a pulse detonation engine (PDE) using a hydrogen-air mixture at static conditions. The cycle performance results, namely the specific thrust, fuel consumption and impulse are compared to a single cycle CFD analysis for a detonation tube which considers finite rate chemistry. The differences in the impulse values were indicative of the additional performance potential attainable in a PDE.

  3. Demonstrating the Performance and Emission Characteristics of a Variable Compression Ratio, Alvar-Cycle Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Erlandsson, Olof; Lundholm, Gunnar; Söderberg, Fredrik; Johansson, Bengt; Wong, Victor W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is a direct continuation of a previous study that addressed the performance and design of a variable compression engine, the Alvar-Cycle Engine [1]. The earlier study was presented at the SAE International Conference and Exposition in Detroit during February 23- 26, 1998 as SAE paper 981027. In the present paper test results from a single cylinder prototype are reviewed and compared with a similar conventional engine. Efficiency and emissions are shown as fu...

  4. Incorporating comparative genomics into the design-test-learn cycle of microbial strain engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardi, Maria; Gasch, Audrey P

    2017-08-01

    Engineering microbes with new properties is an important goal in industrial engineering, to establish biological factories for production of biofuels, commodity chemicals and pharmaceutics. But engineering microbes to produce new compounds with high yield remains a major challenge toward economically viable production. Incorporating several modern approaches, including synthetic and systems biology, metabolic modeling and regulatory rewiring, has proven to significantly advance industrial strain engineering. This review highlights how comparative genomics can also facilitate strain engineering, by identifying novel genes and pathways, regulatory mechanisms and genetic background effects for engineering. We discuss how incorporating comparative genomics into the design-test-learn cycle of strain engineering can provide novel information that complements other engineering strategies. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A new six stroke single cylinder diesel engine referring Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hao; Guo, Qi; Yang, Lu; Liu, Shenghua; Xie, Xuliang; Chen, Zhaoyang; Liu, Zengqiang

    2015-01-01

    Six stroke engine presented by Conklin and Szybist is an effective way to recover energy of exhaust gas by adding a partial exhaust stroke and steam expansion stroke. Characteristics of the engine are analyzed and its disadvantages are pointed out. A new six stroke diesel engine is presented here. It refers rankine cycle inside cylinder. Total exhaust gas is recompressed and at a relatively low back pressure in the fourth stroke water is injected to which maintains liquid phase until the piston moves to the TDC. At c′ 720 °CA (crank angle) the water becomes saturated. An ideal thermodynamics model of exhaust gas compression, water injection and expansion is constructed to investigate this modification. Properties at characteristic points are calculated to determine the increased indicated work. Results show that the work increases with the advance of water injection timing and the quality of water. The cycle is more efficient and the new engine has potential for saving energy. Moreover, it is forecasted that HC and PM emissions may reform with steam in reality and H 2 is produced which will react with NO X . - Highlights: • A new six stroke diesel engine is introduced and a new ideal cycle is constructed. • Increased indicated work of the cycle proves that the cycle is more efficient. • In reality steam may reform with HC and PM and produced H 2 may react with NO X emission. • The engine has the potential for energy saving and emission reducing

  6. The Microbial Engines That Drive Earth’s Biogeochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Fenchel, Tom; Delong, Edward F.

    2008-05-01

    Virtually all nonequilibrium electron transfers on Earth are driven by a set of nanobiological machines composed largely of multimeric protein complexes associated with a small number of prosthetic groups. These machines evolved exclusively in microbes early in our planet’s history yet, despite their antiquity, are highly conserved. Hence, although there is enormous genetic diversity in nature, there remains a relatively stable set of core genes coding for the major redox reactions essential for life and biogeochemical cycles. These genes created and coevolved with biogeochemical cycles and were passed from microbe to microbe primarily by horizontal gene transfer. A major challenge in the coming decades is to understand how these machines evolved, how they work, and the processes that control their activity on both molecular and planetary scales.

  7. Malone-brayton cycle engine/heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Thomas A.

    1994-07-01

    A machine, such as a heat pump, and having an all liquid heat exchange fluid, operates over a more nearly ideal thermodynamic cycle by adjustment of the proportionality of the volumetric capacities of a compressor and an expander to approximate the proportionality of the densities of the liquid heat exchange fluid at the chosen working pressures. Preferred forms of a unit including both the compressor and the expander on a common shaft employs difference in axial lengths of rotary pumps of the gear or vane type to achieve the adjustment of volumetric capacity. Adjustment of the heat pump system for differing heat sink conditions preferably employs variable compression ratio pumps.

  8. 40 CFR 86.1309-90 - Exhaust gas sampling system; Otto-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines. 86.1309-90 Section 86.1309-90 Protection of Environment...-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines. (a)(1) General. The exhaust gas sampling system described in... gasoline-fueled, natural gas-fueled, liquefied petroleum gas-fueled or methanol-fueled engines. In the CVS...

  9. Cycle-to-cycle variation analysis of in-cylinder flow in a gasoline engine with variable valve lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daming; Wang, Tianyou; Jia, Ming; Wang, Gangde

    2012-09-01

    In spark ignition engines, cycle-to-cycle variation (CCV) limits the expansion of the operating range because it induces the load variations and the occurrence of misfire and/or knock. Variable valve actuation (VVA) or variable valve lift (VVL) has been widely used in SI engines to improve the volumetric efficiency or to reduce the pumping losses. It is necessary to investigate the CCV of in-cylinder gas motion and mixing processes in SI engines with VVA/VVL system. This study is aimed to analyze the CCV of the tumble flow in a gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine when VVL is employed. Cycle-resolved digital particle image velocimetry (CRD-PIV) data were acquired for the in-cylinder flow field of a motored four-stroke multi-valve GDI optical engine. The CCV of in-cylinder gas motion with a series of valve profiles and different maximum valve lift (MVL) was analyzed, including cyclic variation characteristics of bulk flow (tumble centre and tumble ratio), large- and small-scale fluctuation, total kinetic energy, and circulation. The results show that the CCV of the in-cylinder flow is increased with reduced MVL. With lower MVLs, stable tumble flow cannot be formed in the cylinder, and the ensemble-averaged tumble ratio decreases to zero before the end of the compression stroke due to violent variation. In addition, the evolution of the circulation shows larger variation with lower MVLs that indicates the `spin' of the small-scale eddy in the flow field presents violent fluctuation from one cycle to another, especially at the end of the compression stroke. Moreover, the analyze of the kinetic energy indicates the total energy of the flow field with lower MVLs increases significantly comparing with higher MVL conditions due to the intake flow jet at the intake valve seat in the intake stroke. However, the CCV of the in-cylinder flow becomes more violent under lower MVL conditions, especially for the low-frequency fluctuation kinetic energy. Thus, present strong

  10. Cycle Engine Modelling Of Spark Ignition Engine Processes during Wide-Open Throttle (WOT) Engine Operation Running By Gasoline Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahim, M F Abdul; Rahman, M M; Bakar, R A

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional engine model is developed to simulate spark ignition engine processes in a 4-stroke, 4 cylinders gasoline engine. Physically, the baseline engine is inline cylinder engine with 3-valves per cylinder. Currently, the engine's mixture is formed by external mixture formation using piston-type carburettor. The model of the engine is based on one-dimensional equation of the gas exchange process, isentropic compression and expansion, progressive engine combustion process, and accounting for the heat transfer and frictional losses as well as the effect of valves overlapping. The model is tested for 2000, 3000 and 4000 rpm of engine speed and validated using experimental engine data. Results showed that the engine is able to simulate engine's combustion process and produce reasonable prediction. However, by comparing with experimental data, major discrepancy is noticeable especially on the 2000 and 4000 rpm prediction. At low and high engine speed, simulated cylinder pressures tend to under predict the measured data. Whereas the cylinder temperatures always tend to over predict the measured data at all engine speed. The most accurate prediction is obtained at medium engine speed of 3000 rpm. Appropriate wall heat transfer setup is vital for more precise calculation of cylinder pressure and temperature. More heat loss to the wall can lower cylinder temperature. On the hand, more heat converted to the useful work mean an increase in cylinder pressure. Thus, instead of wall heat transfer setup, the Wiebe combustion parameters are needed to be carefully evaluated for better results.

  11. Third cycle university studies in Europe in the field of agricultural engineering and in the emerging discipline of biosystems engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuga, F; Briassoulis, D; Aguado, P; Farkas, I; Griepentrog, H; Lorencowicz, E

    2010-01-01

    The main objectives of European Thematic Network entitled 'Education and Research in Agricultural for Biosystems Engineering in Europe (ERABEE-TN)' is to initiate and contribute to the structural development and the assurance of the quality assessment of the emerging discipline of Biosystems Engineering in Europe. ERABEE is co-financed by the European Community in the framework of the LLP Programme. The partnership consists of 35 participants from 27 Erasmus countries, out of which 33 are Higher Education Area Institutions (EDU) and 2 are Student Associations (ASS). 13 Erasmus participants (e.g. Thematic Networks, Professional Associations, and Institutions from Brazil, Croatia, Russia and Serbia) are also involved in the Thematic Network through synergies. To date, very few Biosystems Engineering programs exist in Europe and those that are initiated are at a very primitive stage of development. The innovative and novel goal of the Thematic Network is to promote this critical transition, which requires major restructuring in Europe, exploiting along this direction the outcomes accomplished by its predecessor; the USAEE-TN (University Studies in Agricultural Engineering in Europe). It also aims at enhancing the compatibility among the new programmes of Biosystems Engineering, aiding their recognition and accreditation at European and International level and facilitating greater mobility of skilled personnel, researchers and students. One of the technical objectives of ERABEE is dealing with mapping and promoting the third cycle studies (including European PhDs) and supporting the integration of research at the 1st and 2nd cycle regarding European Biosystems Engineering university studies. During the winter 2008 - spring 2009 period, members of ERABEE conducted a survey on the contemporary status of doctoral studies in Europe, and on a possible scheme for promotion of cooperation and synergies in the framework of the third cycle of studies and the European Doctorate

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  13. A comprehensive study on waste heat recovery from internal combustion engines using organic Rankine cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahani Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a substantial amount of waste heat through exhaust gas and coolant of an Internal Combustion Engine. Organic Rankine cycle is one of the opportunities in Internal Combustion Engines waste heat recovery. In this study, two different configurations of Organic Rankine cycle with the capability of simultaneous waste heat recovery from exhaust gas and coolant of a 12L diesel engine were introduced: Preheat configuration and Two-stage. First, a parametric optimization process was performed for both configurations considering R-134a, R-123, and R-245fa as the cycle working fluids. The main objective in optimization process was maximization of the power generation and cycle thermal efficiency. Expander inlet pressure and preheating temperature were selected as design parameters. Finally, parameters like hybrid generated power and reduction of fuel consumption were studied for both configurations in different engine speeds and full engine load. It was observed that using R-123 as the working fluid, the best performance in both configurations was obtained and as a result the 11.73% and 13.56% reduction in fuel consumption for both preheat and Two-stage configurations were found respectively.

  14. Interpretation of engine cycle-to-cycle variation by chaotic time series analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C.S.; Kahl, W.K.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we summarize preliminary results from applying a new mathematical technique -- chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) -- to cylinder pressure data from a spark-ignition (SI) four-stroke engine fueled with both methanol and iso-octane. Our objective is to look for the presence of deterministic chaos'' dynamics in peak pressure variations and to investigate the potential usefulness of CTSA as a diagnostic tool. Our results suggest that sequential peak cylinder pressures exhibit some characteristic features of deterministic chaos and that CTSA can extract previously unrecognized information from such data. 18 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,…

  16. Effects of Direct Fuel Injection Strategies on Cycle-by-Cycle Variability in a Gasoline Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine: Sample Entropy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Hunicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we summarize and analyze experimental observations of cyclic variability in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI combustion in a single-cylinder gasoline engine. The engine was configured with negative valve overlap (NVO to trap residual gases from prior cycles and thus enable auto-ignition in successive cycles. Correlations were developed between different fuel injection strategies and cycle average combustion and work output profiles. Hypothesized physical mechanisms based on these correlations were then compared with trends in cycle-by-cycle predictability as revealed by sample entropy. The results of these comparisons help to clarify how fuel injection strategy can interact with prior cycle effects to affect combustion stability and so contribute to design control methods for HCCI engines.

  17. Towards a Sustainable Approach to Nanotechnology by Integrating Life Cycle Assessment into the Undergraduate Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I.; Ziegler, Kirk J.; Lindner, Angela S.; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude J.

    2012-01-01

    Because rapid growth of nanotechnology is expected to lead to intentional and non-intentional releases, future engineers will need to minimize negative environmental and health impacts of nanomaterials. We developed two upper-level undergraduate courses centered on life-cycle assessment of nanomaterials. The first part of the course sequence…

  18. Supercharged two-cycle engines employing novel single element reciprocating shuttle inlet valve mechanisms and with a variable compression ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesen, Bernard (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to novel reciprocating shuttle inlet valves, effective with every type of two-cycle engine, from small high-speed single cylinder model engines, to large low-speed multiple cylinder engines, employing spark or compression ignition. Also permitting the elimination of out-of-phase piston arrangements to control scavenging and supercharging of opposed-piston engines. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve (32) and its operating mechanism (34) is constructed as a single and simple uncomplicated member, in combination with the lost-motion abutments, (46) and (48), formed in a piston skirt, obviating the need for any complex mechanisms or auxiliary drives, unaffected by heat, friction, wear or inertial forces. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve retains the simplicity and advantages of two-cycle engines, while permitting an increase in volumetric efficiency and performance, thereby increasing the range of usefulness of two-cycle engines into many areas that are now dominated by the four-cycle engine.

  19. Numerical Model of a Variable-Combined-Cycle Engine for Dual Subsonic and Supersonic Cruise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Fernandez-Villace

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Efficient high speed propulsion requires exploiting the cooling capability of the cryogenic fuel in the propulsion cycle. This paper presents the numerical model of a combined cycle engine while in air turbo-rocket configuration. Specific models of the various heat exchanger modules and the turbomachinery elements were developed to represent the physical behavior at off-design operation. The dynamic nature of the model allows the introduction of the engine control logic that limits the operation of certain subcomponents and extends the overall engine operational envelope. The specific impulse and uninstalled thrust are detailed while flying a determined trajectory between Mach 2.5 and 5 for varying throttling levels throughout the operational envelope.

  20. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  1. Design and simulation of a two- or four-stroke free-piston engine generator for range extender applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Boru; Smallbone, Andrew; Zuo, Zhengxing; Feng, Huihua; Roskilly, Anthony Paul

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A FPE model operated in two thermodynamic cycles is presented. • The engine performance for both gas exchange cycles are described. • Power distribution with different operation parameters are provided. • Advantages and disadvantages for the two thermodynamic cycles are summarised. - Abstract: Free-piston engines (FPEs) are known to have a greater thermal efficiency (40–50%) than an equivalent and more conventional four-stroke reciprocating engines (30–40%). Modern FPEs are proposed for the generation of electric and hydraulic power, with a potential application in hybrid electric vehicles. The numerous FPE configurations considered to date have almost exclusively operated using a two-stroke thermodynamic cycle to improve the thermal efficiency, however it is well known that the application of two-stoke cycles can be limited by noise and exhaust gas emissions constraints. In this article, a numerical model is used to investigate the techno-feasibility of operating Newcastle University’s FPE prototype using a two- or four-stroke thermodynamic cycle. If operated as a four-stroke cycle, the linear generator must be used as both a motor and a generator resulting in a more irregular piston motion compared to corresponding operating in a two-stroke cycle. In four-stroke cycles, almost half the indicated power is consumed in overcoming the pumping losses of the motoring process. Whilst the heat release process is appears to be closer to a constant volume process when operated on two-stroke engine cycle, the peak cylinder pressure and compression ratio proved lower. In addition, a narrower power range is reported for a four-stroke cycle despite a corresponding higher thermal efficiency.

  2. Full-Authority Fault-Tolerant Electronic Engine Control System for Variable Cycle Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    hydraulic actuation system controlled on corrected speed by the digital controller through an Electro- Hydraulic Servo Valve ( EHSV ) and a vane position...RD-A12i 746 FULL-AUTHORITY FRULT-TOLERANT ELECTRONIC ENGINE CONTROL 1/2 SYSTEM FOR YARIAB..(U) GENERAL MOTORS CORP INDIANAPOLIS IN DETROIT DIESEL...RESOLUTION TEST CHART liafIONAL DuRtAu or SToAMONS -6 -A AFWAL-TR-82-2037 Full-Authority Fault-Tolerant - Electronic Engine Control System Sfor Variable

  3. Controlling spark timing for consecutive cycles to reduce the cyclic variations of SI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleli, Alirıza; Ceviz, Mehmet Akif; Erenturk, Köksal

    2015-01-01

    Minimization of the cyclic variations is one of the most important design goal for spark-ignited engines. Primary motivation of this study is to reduce the cyclic variations in spark ignition engines by controlling the spark timing for consecutive cycles. A stochastic model was performed between spark timing and in–cylinder maximum pressure by using the system identification techniques. The incylinder maximum pressure of the next cycle was predicted with this model. Minimum variance and generalized minimum variance controllers were designed to regulate the in–cylinder maximum pressure by changing the spark timing for consecutive cycles of the test engine. The produced control algorithms were built in LabView environment and installed to the Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) chassis. According to the test results, the in–cylinder maximum pressure of the next pressure cycle can be predicted fairly well, and the spark timing can be regulated to keep the in–cylinder maximum pressure in a desired band to reduce the cyclic variations. At fixed spark timing experiments, the COV Pmax and COV imep were 3.764 and 0.677%, whereas they decreased to 3.208 and 0.533% when GMV controller was applied, respectively. - Highlights: • Cycle per cycle spark timing control was carried out. • A stochastic process model was described between P max and the spark timing. • The cyclic variations in P max was decreased by keeping it in a desired band. • Different controllers were used to adjust spark timing signal of the next cycle. • COV Pmax was decreased by about 15% by using GMV controller

  4. 40 CFR 1042.505 - Testing engines using discrete-mode or ramped-modal duty cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE MARINE COMPRESSION... duty cycles. This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. In some cases... cycle also for commercial variable-speed propulsion marine engines that are used with (or intended to be...

  5. Turbulent swirling flow in a model of a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    are calculated in order to determine vortex core precession frequencies. The results show a very different flow dynamics for cases with weak and strong swirl. In the strongly swirling cases, a vortex breakdown is observed. Downstream of the breakdown, the vortex becomes highly concentrated and the vortex core...... precesses around the exhaust valve, resulting in an axial suction effect at the vortex center. Mean fields based on the instantaneous flow topology are shown to be more representative than mean fields based on a fixed coordinate system in cases with significant variations in the swirl center location....

  6. Ranking of Cylinder Liner Materials in Two Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Torben; Imran, Tajammal; Klit, Peder

    2009-01-01

    One of the major prerequisites for an improved combination of cylinder liner material and piston ring material is a good description of the materials tribological performance. Piston rings operate in three different lubrication regimes and the materials should be characterised for all of them bef...

  7. Design and Simulation of a Pressure Wave Supercharger for a Small Two-Stroke Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Brushless motor (L) and ESC (R) for driving the scaled rotor ....................... 44 Figure 13: CAD model of cold endwall...A direct drive system was selected with a brushless electric motor and compatible Electronic Speed Controller (ESC). The motor selected was a...Vented Ballistic 550 4.5T electric motor with a Pulse Brushless Pro Racing ESC, as shown in Figure 12. Figure 12: Brushless motor (L) and ESC (R) for

  8. Aerodynamic efficiency of flapping flight: analysis of a two-stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z Jane

    2008-01-01

    To seek the simplest efficient flapping wing motions and understand their relation to steady flight, a two-stroke model in the quasi-steady limit was analyzed. It was found that a family of two-stroke flapping motions have aerodynamic efficiency close to, but slightly lower than, the optimal steady flight. These two-stroke motions share two common features: the downstroke is a gliding motion and the upstroke has an angle of attack close to the optimal of the steady flight of the same wing. With the reduced number of parameters, the aerodynamic cost function in the parameter space can be visualized. This was examined for wings of different lift and drag characteristics at Reynolds numbers between 10(2) and 10(6). The iso-surfaces of the cost function have a tube-like structure, implying that the solution is insensitive to a specific direction in the parameter space. Related questions in insect flight that motivated this work are discussed.

  9. An engineered Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for carbon dioxide fixation in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Borzyskowski, Lennart Schada; Carrillo, Martina; Leupold, Simeon; Glatter, Timo; Kiefer, Patrick; Weishaupt, Ramon; Heinemann, Matthias; Erb, Tobias J

    2018-04-03

    Organisms are either heterotrophic or autotrophic, meaning that they cover their carbon requirements by assimilating organic compounds or by fixing inorganic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The conversion of a heterotrophic organism into an autotrophic one by metabolic engineering is a long-standing goal in synthetic biology and biotechnology, because it ultimately allows for the production of value-added compounds from CO 2 . The heterotrophic Alphaproteobacterium Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 is a platform organism for a future C1-based bioeconomy. Here we show that M. extorquens AM1 provides unique advantages for establishing synthetic autotrophy, because energy metabolism and biomass formation can be effectively separated from each other in the organism. We designed and realized an engineered strain of M. extorquens AM1 that can use the C1 compound methanol for energy acquisition and forms biomass from CO 2 by implementation of a heterologous Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle. We demonstrate that the heterologous CBB cycle is active, confers a distinct phenotype, and strongly increases viability of the engineered strain. Metabolic 13 C-tracer analysis demonstrates the functional operation of the heterologous CBB cycle in M. extorquens AM1 and comparative proteomics of the engineered strain show that the host cell reacts to the implementation of the CBB cycle in a plastic way. While the heterologous CBB cycle is not able to support full autotrophic growth of M. extorquens AM1, our study represents a further advancement in the design and realization of synthetic autotrophic organisms. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Mapping the anatomy of social engineering attacks to the systems engineering life cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van de Merwe, J

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available of security (Mitnick and Simon, 2002). Mitnick's attack model has four phases: research, developing rapport and trust, exploiting trust and utilising information. The picture below is a representation of Mitnick's attack cycle created by the authors... of Information Security & Assurance (HAISA 2017) 27 The next phase is the Development of the rapport and trust with the target. A target is more likely to divulge requested information to an attacker if he trusts the attacker. According to (Mitnick...

  11. Progress in Finite Time Thermodynamic Studies for Internal Combustion Engine Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlin Ge

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of introducing the origin and development of finite time thermodynamics (FTT, this paper reviews the progress in FTT optimization for internal combustion engine (ICE cycles from the following four aspects: the studies on the optimum performances of air standard endoreversible (with only the irreversibility of heat resistance and irreversible ICE cycles, including Otto, Diesel, Atkinson, Brayton, Dual, Miller, Porous Medium and Universal cycles with constant specific heats, variable specific heats, and variable specific ratio of the conventional and quantum working fluids (WFs; the studies on the optimum piston motion (OPM trajectories of ICE cycles, including Otto and Diesel cycles with Newtonian and other heat transfer laws; the studies on the performance limits of ICE cycles with non-uniform WF with Newtonian and other heat transfer laws; as well as the studies on the performance simulation of ICE cycles. In the studies, the optimization objectives include work, power, power density, efficiency, entropy generation rate, ecological function, and so on. The further direction for the studies is explored.

  12. Effect of replacing nitrogen with helium on a closed cycle diesel engine performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa M. Abo El Ela

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of most important problems of closed cycle diesel engine is deterioration of cylinder pressure and consequently the engine power. Therefore this research aimed to establish a multi zone model using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD code; ANSYS Fluent 14.0 to enhance the closed cycle diesel engine performance. The present work investigates the effect of replacing nitrogen gas with helium gas in different concentration under different engine load and equivalence ratios. The numerical model results were validated with comparing them with those obtained from the previous experimental results. The engine which was used for the simulation analysis and the previous experimental work was a single cylinder with a displacement volume of 825 cm3, compression ratio of 17 and run at constant speed of 1500 RPM. The numerical results showed that replacing nitrogen with helium resulted in increasing the in-cylinder pressure. The results showed also that a percentage of 0.5–10% of helium on mass basis is sufficient in the recovery needed to overcome the drop in-cylinder pressure and hence power due to the existence of CO2 in the recycled gas up to 25%. When the CO2 % reaches 25%, it is required to use at least 10% of He as replacement gas to achieve the required recovery.

  13. Parametric Optimization of Regenerative Organic Rankine Cycle System for Diesel Engine Based on Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjin Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently recover the waste heat from a diesel engine exhaust, a regenerative organic Rankine cycle (RORC system was employed, and butane, R124, R416A, and R134a were used as the working fluids. The resulting diesel engine-RORC combined system was defined and the relevant evaluation indexes were proposed. First, the variation tendency of the exhaust energy rate under various diesel engine operating conditions was analyzed using experimental data. The thermodynamic model of the RORC system was established based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and the net power output and exergy destruction rate of the RORC system were selected as the objective functions. A particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm was used to optimize the operating parameters of the RORC system, including evaporating pressure, intermediate pressure, and degree of superheat. The operating performances of the RORC system and diesel engine-RORC combined system were studied for the four selected working fluids under various operating conditions of the diesel engine. The results show that the operating performances of the RORC system and the combined system using butane are optimal on the basis of optimizing the operating parameters; when the engine speed is 2200 r/min and engine torque is 1215 N·m, the net power output of the RORC system using butane is 36.57 kW, and the power output increasing ratio (POIR of the combined system using butane is 11.56%.

  14. Electrical performances of pyroelectric bimetallic strip heat engines describing a Stirling cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, A.; Boughaleb, J.; Monfray, S.; Boeuf, F.; Cugat, O.; Skotnicki, T.

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the analytical modeling of pyroelectric bimetallic strip heat engines. These devices are designed to exploit the snap-through of a thermo-mechanically bistable membrane to transform a part of the heat flowing through the membrane into mechanical energy and to convert it into electric energy by means of a piezoelectric layer deposited on the surface of the bistable membrane. In this paper, we describe the properties of these heat engines in the case when they complete a Stirling cycle, and we evaluate the performances (available energy, Carnot efficiency...) of these harvesters at the macro- and micro-scale.

  15. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high-cycle

  16. Investigation of Boundary Condition and Field Distribution Effects on the Cycle-to-Cycle Variability of a Turbocharged GDI Engine Using LES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontanesi S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports some preliminary results of a numerical activity aiming at characterizing cycle-to-cycle variability of a highlydownsized turbocharged DISI (Direct Injection Spark Ignition engine for high-performance car applications, using a customized version of the commercial software Star-CD licensed by CD-adapco. During experimental investigations at the engine testbed, high cycle to cycle dispersion was detected even for relatively stable peak-power/full-load operations of the engine, thus limiting the overall engine performance. Despite the complex architecture of the V-8 engine, the origin of such cyclic variability could not be related to cyclic fluctuations of the gas-dynamics within the intake and exhaust pipes. Several subsequent acquisitions of the instantaneous pressure traces were measured at both the intake port entrance and exhaust port junction, showing almost negligible differences in terms of both amplitude and phasing compared to those within the cylinder. In order to explore the potentials of the LES application to the analysis and understanding of the cycle-to-cycle variability, which notoriously strongly limits the overall engine performance, a numerical activity is carried out using full-cycle LES simulations over several subsequent engine cycles. Despite the very early stage of the investigation, two main issues are addressed in the paper: the analysis of the possible causes originating the high cycle to cycle variability and the influence of the boundary conditions on the predicted cyclic dispersion. Concerning the former aspect, a detailed investigation of local and global instantaneous fields is carried out aiming at identifying both a possible hierarchy of responsibilities on one side and limitations and possible improvements of the adopted numerical procedure on the other side. Concerning the latter aspect, a set of simulations, performed applying cycle-independent averaged experimental conditions, is compared to

  17. Ideal cycle analysis of a regenerative pulse detonation engine for power production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Rafaela

    Over the last few decades, considerable research has been focused on pulse detonation engines (PDEs) as a promising replacement for existing propulsion systems with potential applications in aircraft ranging from the subsonic to the lower hypersonic regimes. On the other hand, very little attention has been given to applying detonation for electric power production. One method for assessing the performance of a PDE is through thermodynamic cycle analysis. Earlier works have adopted a thermodynamic cycle for the PDE that was based on the assumption that the detonation process could be approximated by a constant volume process, called the Humphrey cycle. The Fickett-Jacob cycle, which uses the one--dimensional Chapman--Jouguet (CJ) theory of detonation, has also been used to model the PDE cycle. However, an ideal PDE cycle must include a detonation based compression and heat release processes with a finite chemical reaction rate that is accounted for in the Zeldovich -- von Neumann -- Doring model of detonation where the shock is considered a discontinuous jump and is followed by a finite exothermic reaction zone. This work presents a thermodynamic cycle analysis for an ideal PDE cycle for power production. A code has been written that takes only one input value, namely the heat of reaction of a fuel-oxidizer mixture, based on which the program computes all the points on the ZND cycle (both p--v and T--s plots), including the von Neumann spike and the CJ point along with all the non-dimensionalized state properties at each point. In addition, the program computes the points on the Humphrey and Brayton cycles for the same input value. Thus, the thermal efficiencies of the various cycles can be calculated and compared. The heat release of combustion is presented in a generic form to make the program usable with a wide variety of fuels and oxidizers and also allows for its use in a system for the real time monitoring and control of a PDE in which the heat of reaction

  18. Parallel Multi-cycle LES of an Optical Pent-roof DISI Engine Under Motored Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dam, Noah; Sjöberg, Magnus; Zeng, Wei; Som, Sibendu

    2017-10-15

    The use of Large-eddy Simulations (LES) has increased due to their ability to resolve the turbulent fluctuations of engine flows and capture the resulting cycle-to-cycle variability. One drawback of LES, however, is the requirement to run multiple engine cycles to obtain the necessary cycle statistics for full validation. The standard method to obtain the cycles by running a single simulation through many engine cycles sequentially can take a long time to complete. Recently, a new strategy has been proposed by our research group to reduce the amount of time necessary to simulate the many engine cycles by running individual engine cycle simulations in parallel. With modern large computing systems this has the potential to reduce the amount of time necessary for a full set of simulated engine cycles to finish by up to an order of magnitude. In this paper, the Parallel Perturbation Methodology (PPM) is used to simulate up to 35 engine cycles of an optically accessible, pent-roof Directinjection Spark-ignition (DISI) engine at two different motored engine operating conditions, one throttled and one un-throttled. Comparisons are made against corresponding sequential-cycle simulations to verify the similarity of results using either methodology. Mean results from the PPM approach are very similar to sequential-cycle results with less than 0.5% difference in pressure and a magnitude structure index (MSI) of 0.95. Differences in cycle-to-cycle variability (CCV) predictions are larger, but close to the statistical uncertainty in the measurement for the number of cycles simulated. PPM LES results were also compared against experimental data. Mean quantities such as pressure or mean velocities were typically matched to within 5- 10%. Pressure CCVs were under-predicted, mostly due to the lack of any perturbations in the pressure boundary conditions between cycles. Velocity CCVs for the simulations had the same average magnitude as experiments, but the experimental data showed

  19. Modeling of Thermal Cycle CI Engine with Multi-Stage Fuel Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Jamrozik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a complete thermal cycle modeling of a four-stroke diesel engine with a three-dimensional simulation program CFD - AVL Fire. The object of the simulation was the S320 Andoria engine. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of fuel dose distribution on selected parameters of the combustion process. As a result of the modeling, time spatial pressure distributions, rate of pressure increase, heat release rate and NO and soot emission were obtained for 3 injection strategies: no division, one pilot dose and one main dose and two pilot doses and one main dose. It has been found that the use of pilot doses on the one hand reduces engine hardness and lowers NO emissions and on the other hand, increases soot emissions.

  20. A comparison of advanced heat recovery power cycles in a combined cycle for large ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Sigthorsson, Oskar; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Strong motivation exists within the marine sector to reduce fuel expenses and to comply with ever stricter emission regulations. Heat recovery can address both of these issues. The ORC (organic Rankine cycle), the Kalina cycle and the steam Rankine cycle have received the majority of the focus in the literature. In the present work we compare these cycles in a combined cycle application with a large marine two-stroke diesel engine. We present an evaluation of the efficiency and the environmental impact, safety concerns and practical aspects of each of the cycles. A previously validated numerical engine model is combined with a turbocharger model and bottoming cycle models written in Matlab. Genetic algorithm optimisation results suggest that the Kalina cycle possess no significant advantages compared to the ORC or the steam cycle. While contributing to very high efficiencies, the organic working fluids possess high global warming potentials and hazard levels. It is concluded that the ORC has the greatest potential for increasing the fuel efficiency, and the combined cycle offers very high thermal efficiency. While being less efficient, the steam cycle has the advantages of being well proven, harmless to the environment as well as being less hazardous in comparison. - Highlights: • We compare steam, ORC (organic Rankine cycle) and Kalina cycles for waste heat recovery in marine engines. • We evaluate the efficiency and important qualitative differences. • The Kalina cycle presents no apparent advantages. • The steam cycle is well known, harmless and has a high efficiency. • The ORC has the highest efficiency but also important drawbacks

  1. Perodua Myvi engine fuel consumption map and fuel economy vehicle simulation on the drive cycles based on Malaysian roads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdan Muhammad Iftishah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fuel consumption engine map for a 1.3L Perodua Myvi passenger car. The engine dynamometer and the engine throttle are controlled, to create the operating conditions for the engine map. Interpolation work is done in MATLAB, to create a 3D fuel consumption engine map. The engine map is used in a fuel-economy estimation simulation, using the city and the highway drive cycles based on Malaysian roads. The fuel economy values generated from the simulations are similar to experimental fuel consumption results.

  2. Closed Cycle Engine Program Used in Solar Dynamic Power Testing Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensworth, Clint B., III; McKissock, David B.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is testing the world's first integrated solar dynamic power system in a simulated space environment. This system converts solar thermal energy into electrical energy by using a closed-cycle gas turbine and alternator. A NASA-developed analysis code called the Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP) has been used for both pretest predictions and post-test analysis of system performance. The solar dynamic power system has a reflective concentrator that focuses solar thermal energy into a cavity receiver. The receiver is a heat exchanger that transfers the thermal power to a working fluid, an inert gas mixture of helium and xenon. The receiver also uses a phase-change material to store the thermal energy so that the system can continue producing power when there is no solar input power, such as when an Earth-orbiting satellite is in eclipse. The system uses a recuperated closed Brayton cycle to convert thermal power to mechanical power. Heated gas from the receiver expands through a turbine that turns an alternator and a compressor. The system also includes a gas cooler and a radiator, which reject waste cycle heat, and a recuperator, a gas-to-gas heat exchanger that improves cycle efficiency by recovering thermal energy.

  3. An improved CO2-based transcritical Rankine cycle (CTRC) used for engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Gequn; Shi, Lingfeng; Tian, Hua; Li, Xiaoya; Huang, Guangdai; Chang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Propose an improved CTRC system (PR-CTRC) for engine waste heat recovery. • The PR-CTRC achieves a significant increase in thermodynamic performance. • The PR-CTRC possesses a strong coupling capability for high and low grade waste heat. • The PR-CTRC uses smaller turbine design parameters than ORC systems. • Total cooling load analysis of combined engine and recovery system was conducted. - Abstract: CO 2 -based transcritical Rankine cycle (CTRC) is a promising technology for the waste heat recovery of an engine considering its safety and environment friendly characteristics, which also matchs the high temperature of the exhaust gas and satisfies the miniaturization demand of recovery systems. But the traditional CTRC system with a basic configuration (B-CTRC) has a poor thermodynamic performance. This paper introduces an improved CTRC system containing both a preheater and regenerator (PR-CTRC), for recovering waste heat in exhaust gas and engine coolant of an engine, and compares its performance with that of the B-CTRC system and also with that of the traditional excellent Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems using R123 as a working fluid. The utilization rate of waste heat, total cooling load, net power output, thermal efficiency, exergy loss, exergy efficiency and component size have been investigated. Results show that, the net power output of the PR-CTRC could reach up to 9.0 kW for a 43.8 kW engine, which increases by 150% compared with that of the B-CTRC (3.6 kW). The PR-CTRC also improves the thermal efficiency and exergy efficiency of the B-CTRC, with increases of 184% and 227%, respectively. Compared with the ORC system, the PR-CTRC shows the significant advantage of highly recycling the exhaust gas and engine coolant simultaneously due to the special property of supercritical CO 2 ’s specific heat capacity. The supercritical property of CO 2 also generates a better heat transfer and flowing performances. Meanwhile, the PR

  4. An analytic study of applying Miller cycle to reduce NO{sub x} emission from petrol engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yaodong [School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom) and Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)]. E-mail: y.d.wang@ncl.ac.uk; Lin Lin [Nanning College for Vocational Technology, Nanning, Guangxi 530003 (China); Roskilly, Anthony P. [School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Zeng Shengchuo [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Huang, Jincheng [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); He Yunxin [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Huang Xiaodong [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Huang Huilan [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Wei Haiyan [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Li Shangping [Guangxi University of Technology, Liuzhou 545006 (China); Yang Jing [Mechanical Engineering College, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2007-08-15

    An analytic investigation of applying Miller cycle to reduce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from a petrol engine is carried out. The Miller cycle used in the investigation is a late intake valve closing version. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of the cycle is presented. A comparison of the characters of Miller cycle with Otto cycle is presented. From the results of thermodynamic analyses, it can be seen that the application of Miller cycle is able to reduce the compression pressure and temperature in the cylinder at the end of compression stroke. Therefore, it lowers down the combustion temperature and NO{sub x} formation in engine cylinder. These results in a lower exhaust temperature and less NO{sub x} emissions compared with that of Otto cycle. The analytic results also show that Miller cycle ratio is a main factor to influence the combustion temperature, and then the NO{sub x} emissions and the exhaust temperature. The results from the analytic study are used to analyse and to compare with the previous experimental results. An empirical formula from the previous experimental results that showed the relation of NO{sub x} emissions with the exhaust temperature at different engine speed is presented. The results from the study showed that the application of Miller cycle may reduce NO{sub x} emissions from petrol engine.

  5. Using Model-Based System Engineering to Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-Cycle and Technical Reviews Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Edith L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2017-01-01

    This is the presentation for the AIAA Space conference in September 2017. It highlights key information from Using Model-Based Systems Engineering to Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-cycle and Technical Reviews paper.

  6. The software-cycle model for re-engineering and reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John W.; Basili, Victor R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the progress of a study which will contribute to our ability to perform high-level, component-based programming by describing means to obtain useful components, methods for the configuration and integration of those components, and an underlying economic model of the costs and benefits associated with this approach to reuse. One goal of the study is to develop and demonstrate methods to recover reusable components from domain-specific software through a combination of tools, to perform the identification, extraction, and re-engineering of components, and domain experts, to direct the applications of those tools. A second goal of the study is to enable the reuse of those components by identifying techniques for configuring and recombining the re-engineered software. This component-recovery or software-cycle model addresses not only the selection and re-engineering of components, but also their recombination into new programs. Once a model of reuse activities has been developed, the quantification of the costs and benefits of various reuse options will enable the development of an adaptable economic model of reuse, which is the principal goal of the overall study. This paper reports on the conception of the software-cycle model and on several supporting techniques of software recovery, measurement, and reuse which will lead to the development of the desired economic model.

  7. Dynamic Testing of the NASA Hypersonic Project Combined Cycle Engine Testbed for Mode Transition Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in developing technology that leads to more routine, safe, and affordable access to space. Access to space using airbreathing propulsion systems has potential to meet these objectives based on Airbreathing Access to Space (AAS) system studies. To this end, the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) Hypersonic Project is conducting fundamental research on a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system. The TBCC being studied considers a dual flow-path inlet system. One flow-path includes variable geometry to regulate airflow to a turbine engine cycle. The turbine cycle provides propulsion from take-off to supersonic flight. The second flow-path supports a dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) cycle which would be initiated at supersonic speed to further accelerate the vehicle to hypersonic speed. For a TBCC propulsion system to accelerate a vehicle from supersonic to hypersonic speed, a critical enabling technology is the ability to safely and effectively transition from the turbine to the DMSJ-referred to as mode transition. To experimentally test methods of mode transition, a Combined Cycle Engine (CCE) Large-scale Inlet testbed was designed with two flow paths-a low speed flow-path sized for a turbine cycle and a high speed flow-path designed for a DMSJ. This testbed system is identified as the CCE Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition studies (CCE-LIMX). The test plan for the CCE-LIMX in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 10- by 10-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10 SWT) is segmented into multiple phases. The first phase is a matrix of inlet characterization (IC) tests to evaluate the inlet performance and establish the mode transition schedule. The second phase is a matrix of dynamic system identification (SysID) experiments designed to support closed-loop control development at mode transition schedule operating points for the CCE-LIMX. The third phase includes a direct demonstration of controlled mode transition using a closed loop control

  8. Evaluation of a combined cycle based on an HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine heat recovery employing two organic Rankine cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaljani, M.; Saray, R. Khoshbakhti; Bahlouli, K.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a combined power cycle which includes a HCCI (Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition) engine and two ORCs (Organic Rankine Cycles) is introduced. In the proposed cycle, the waste heats from the engine cooling water and exhaust gases are utilized to drive the ORCs. A parametric study is conducted to show the effects of decision parameters on the performance and on the total cost rate of cycle. Results of the parametric study reveal that increasing the pinch point temperature difference of evaporator and temperature of the condenser leads to reduction in both exergy efficiency and total cost rate of the bottoming cycle. There is a specific evaporator temperature where exergy efficiency is improved, but the total cost rate of the bottoming cycle is maximized. Also, a multi-objective optimization strategy is performed to achieve the best system design parameters from both thermodynamic and economic aspects. The exergy efficiency and the total cost rate of the system have been considered as objective functions. Optimization results indicate that the exergy efficiency of the cycle increases from 44.96% for the base case to 46.02%. Also, approximately1.3% reduction in the cost criteria is achieved. Results of the multi-objective optimization justify the results obtained through the parametric study and demonstrate that the design parameters of both ORCs have conflict effect on the objective functions. - Highlights: • Two Organic Rankine bottoming cycles are coupled with an HCCI Engine. • Exergetic and Exergo-economic analysis of the bottoming cycle are reported. • The system is optimized using multi-objective genetic algorithm. • Objective functions are exergy efficiency and total cost rate of the system. • The exergy efficiency of the cycle increases from 44.96% to 46.02%.

  9. Generation and propagation of shock waves in the exhaust pipe of a 4 cycle automobile engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, N.; Matsumura, S.; Aoki, K.; Takayama, K.

    1990-07-01

    An experimental investigation was made of reduction of noise generated in the exhaust pipe of a half liter 4-cycle water-cooled automobile gasoline engine. The pressure measurement along the exhaust pipe showed the nonlinear transition of compression waves discharged from the exhaust port of the engine into shock waves. In order to obtain a direct evidence of shock waves in the exhaust pipe, a flow visualization study was also conducted using a double exposure holographic interferometry. Weak shock waves of Mach number 1.09 exist in the exhaust pipe. For the purpose of collecting the data for designing optimum muffler configurations, additional shock tube experiments were carried out. The results indicates that the study of the non-linear wave interaction and propagation is important for the design of muffler.

  10. Development of LM10-MIRA LOX/LNG expander cycle demonstrator engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnykh, Mikhail; Carapellese, Stefano; Liuzzi, Daniele; Arione, Luigi; Caggiano, Giuseppe; Bellomi, Paolo; D'Aversa, Emanuela; Pellegrini, Rocco; Lobov, S. D.; Gurtovoy, A. A.; Rachuk, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    This article contains results of joint works by Konstruktorskoe Buro Khimavtomatiki (KBKhA, Russia) and AVIO Company (Italy) on creation of the LM10-MIRA liquid-propellant rocket demonstrator engine for the third stage of the upgraded "Vega" launcher.Scientific and research activities conducted by KBKhA and AVIO in 2007-2014 in the frame of the LYRA Program, funded by the Italian Space Agency, with ELV as Prime contractor, and under dedicated ASI-Roscosmos inter-agencies agreement, were aimed at development and testing of a 7.5 t thrust expander cycle demonstrator engine propelled by oxygen and liquid natural gas (further referred to as LNG).

  11. Engineered safeguards system activities at Sandia Laboratories for back-end fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, T.A.; Fienning, W.C.; Winblad, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories have been developing concepts for safeguards systems to protect facilities in the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle against potential threats of sabotage and theft of special nuclear material (SNM). Conceptual designs for Engineered Safeguards Systems (ESSs) have been developed for a Fuel Reprocessing Facility (including chemical separations, plutonium conversion, and waste solidification), a Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, and a Plutonium Transport Vehicle. Performance criteria for the various elements of these systems and a candidate systematic design approach have been defined. In addition, a conceptual layout for a large-scale Fuel-Cycle Plutonium Storage Facility has been completed. Work is continuing to develop safeguards systems for spent fuel facilities, light-water reactors, alternative fuel cycles, and improved transportation systems. Additional emphasis will be placed on the problems associated with national diversion of special nuclear material. The impact on safeguards element performance criteria for surveillance and containment to protect against national diversion in various alternative fuel cycle complexes is also being investigated

  12. Complementary use of life cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: Lessons learned from chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara D.; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Successful strategies to handle the potential health and environmental risks of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) often rely upon the well-established frameworks of life cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA). However, current research and specific guidance on how to actually apply these two......, and hence, there does not appear to be much progress made specifically for ENM. We therefore provide specific recommendations for applying LCA and RA to ENM, for which the need to establish proper dose metrics within both methods is identified as an important requirement....

  13. The role of NDE in maintaining and extending the life cycle of engineering components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.

    1997-01-01

    A successful life cycle of engineering components begins during the design to select the best materials for a given application, designing for economical maintenance, and accommodating NDE inspections. NDE in the nuclear industry is part of the defense in depth to insure structural integrity of components. High reliability NDE is needed to reliably detect and accurately characterize the failure modes that have occurred in nuclear components. The move toward risk-informed inservice inspection programs focusses the NDE on the most safety significant components. The use of performance demonstration testing is leading to improved inservice inspections through screening out ineffective procedure/equipment/personnel. (orig.)

  14. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart IIIi of... - Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump Engines 6 Table 6 to Subpart IIII of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL.... IIII, Table 6 Table 6 to Subpart IIII of Part 60—Optional 3-Mode Test Cycle for Stationary Fire Pump...

  15. System analysis and optimisation of a Kalina split-cycle for waste heat recovery on large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Knudsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    change characteristics of the ammonia-water working fluid. The present study investigates a unique type of Kalina process called the Split-cycle, applied to the exhaust heat recovery from large marine engines. In the Split-cycle, the working fluid concentration can be changed during the evaporation...

  16. Computer simulation of the heavy-duty turbo-compounded diesel cycle for studies of engine efficiency and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanis, D. N.; Ekchian, J. A.; Heywood, J. B.; Replogle, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    Reductions in heat loss at appropriate points in the diesel engine which result in substantially increased exhaust enthalpy were shown. The concepts for this increased enthalpy are the turbocharged, turbocompounded diesel engine cycle. A computer simulation of the heavy duty turbocharged turbo-compounded diesel engine system was undertaken. This allows the definition of the tradeoffs which are associated with the introduction of ceramic materials in various parts of the total engine system, and the study of system optimization. The basic assumptions and the mathematical relationships used in the simulation of the model engine are described.

  17. Life cycle assessment of engineered nanomaterials: state of the art and strategies to overcome existing gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hischier, Roland; Walser, Tobias

    2012-05-15

    The use of engineered nanomaterials offers advantages as well as disadvantages from a sustainability perspective. It is important to identify such points as early as possible in order to be able to build on existing strengths, while counteracting disadvantages. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a suitable method to assess the environmental performance of a product or process. But so far studies applying LCA to the area of nanotechnology have been scarce. One reason might be that the LCA framework has a whole list of issues that need further precision in order to be applicable to nanotechnologies: system boundaries and a functional unit have to be chosen in a way that allows one to do a comparison of equal functionalities; adequate and comprehensive life cycle inventory data for engineered nanomaterials are the key on the level of inventory analysis; and the impact assessment step requires a clear definition of the degree of detail on the level of nanoparticle emissions. The LCA studies existing thus far in the area of nanotechnology have barely begun to cover all these aspects. Thus, in order to improve the current situation, the authors propose to go ahead in each of the LCA stages as far as scientific advances allow. For the inventory modelling this means e.g. that comprehensive, transparently documented and quality ensured data of the most important engineered nanomaterials should be collected and made available in a widely-accepted format. Concerning nanoparticle emissions, as many parameters as possible have to be collected pertaining to the production, use, and the disposal phase of these engineered nanomaterials. Furthermore, on the level of impact assessment, relevant physical characteristics have to be identified for a toxicity assessment of nanoparticles and a consensus has to be found for a limited but sufficient number of independent parameters influencing toxicity to be collected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Design of the Curriculum for a Second-Cycle Course in Civil Engineering in the Context of the Bologna Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of the curriculum for a Master of Engineering programme in civil engineering at University College Dublin. The revised programme was established to meet the requirements of the Bologna process and this paper specifically considers the design of a new, second-cycle master's component of the programme. In addition to…

  19. EXTENSION OF COMPUTER-AIDED PROCESS ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS TO ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of computer-aided process engineering (CAPE) tools to enable process engineers to improve the environmental performance of both their processes and across the life cycle (from cradle-to-grave) has long been proffered. However, this use of CAPE has not been fully ach...

  20. Dynamic modelling of the expansion cylinder of an open Joule cycle Ericsson engine: A bond graph approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creyx, M.; Delacourt, E.; Morin, C.; Desmet, B.

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic model using the bond graph formalism of the expansion cylinder of an open Joule cycle Ericsson engine intended for a biomass-fuelled micro-CHP system is presented. Dynamic phenomena, such as the thermodynamic evolution of air, the instantaneous air mass flow rates linked to pressure drops crossing the valves, the heat transferred through the expansion cylinder wall and the mechanical friction losses, are included in the model. The influence on the Ericsson engine performances of the main operating conditions (intake air pressure and temperature, timing of intake and exhaust valve closing, rotational speed, mechanical friction losses and heat transfer at expansion cylinder wall) is studied. The operating conditions maximizing the performances of the Ericsson engine used in the a biomass-fuelled micro-CHP unit are an intake air pressure between 6 and 8 bar, a maximized intake air temperature, an adjustment of the intake and exhaust valve closing corresponding to an expansion cycle close to the theoretical Joule cycle, a rotational speed close to 800 rpm. The heat transfer at the expansion cylinder wall reduces the engine performances. - Highlights: • A bond graph dynamic model of the Ericsson engine expansion cylinder is presented. • Dynamic aspects are modelled: pressure drops, friction losses, wall heat transfer. • Influent factors and phenomena on the engine performances are investigated. • Expansion cycles close to the theoretical Joule cycle maximize the performances. • The heat transfer at the expansion chamber wall reduces the performances.

  1. Advanced exergy analysis for a bottoming organic rankine cycle coupled to an internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, J.; Ruiz, S.; Dolz, V.; Royo-Pascual, L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Advanced exergy analysis were carried out using experimental data of an ORC. • Exergy destruction analyzed as endogenous/exogenous and unavoidable/avoidable. • Exergy destruction was estimated by considering technological restrictions. - Abstract: This paper deals with the evaluation and analysis of a bottoming ORC cycle coupled to an IC engine by means of conventional and advanced exergy analysis. Using experimental data of an ORC coupled to a 2 l turbocharged engine, both conventional and advanced exergy analysis are carried out. Splitting the exergy in the advanced exergy analysis into unavoidable and avoidable provides a measure of the potential of improving the efficiency of this component. On the other hand, splitting the exergy into endogenous and exogenous provides information between interactions among system components. The result of this study shows that there is a high potential of improvement in this type of cycles. Although, from the conventional analysis, the exergy destruction rate of boiler is greater than the one of the expander, condenser and pump, the advanced exergy analysis suggests that the first priority of improvement should be given to the expander, followed by the pump, the condenser and the boiler. A total amount of 3.75 kW (36.5%) of exergy destruction rate could be lowered, taking account that only the avoidable part of the exergy destruction rate can be reduced.

  2. Application of a high-repetition-rate laser diagnostic system for single-cycle-resolved imaging in internal combustion engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Johan; Richter, Mattias; Nygren, Jenny; Aldén, Marcus; Hultqvist, Anders; Christensen, Magnus; Johansson, Bengt

    2002-08-20

    High-repetition-rate laser-induced fluorescence measurements of fuel and OH concentrations in internal combustion engines are demonstrated. Series of as many as eight fluorescence images, with a temporal resolution ranging from 10 micros to 1 ms, are acquired within one engine cycle. A multiple-laser system in combination with a multiple-CCD camera is used for cycle-resolved imaging in spark-ignition, direct-injection stratified-charge, and homogeneous-charge compression-ignition engines. The recorded data reveal unique information on cycle-to-cycle variations in fuel transport and combustion. Moreover, the imaging system in combination with a scanning mirror is used to perform instantaneous three-dimensional fuel-concentration measurements.

  3. Comparative Human Health Impact Assessment of Engineered Nanomaterials in the Framework of Life Cycle Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransman, Wouter; Buist, Harrie; Kuijpers, Eelco; Walser, Tobias; Meyer, David; Zondervan-van den Beuken, Esther; Westerhout, Joost; Klein Entink, Rinke H; Brouwer, Derk H

    2017-07-01

    For safe innovation, knowledge on potential human health impacts is essential. Ideally, these impacts are considered within a larger life-cycle-based context to support sustainable development of new applications and products. A methodological framework that accounts for human health impacts caused by inhalation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in an indoor air environment has been previously developed. The objectives of this study are as follows: (i) evaluate the feasibility of applying the CF framework for NP exposure in the workplace based on currently available data; and (ii) supplement any resulting knowledge gaps with methods and data from the life cycle approach and human risk assessment (LICARA) project to develop a modified case-specific version of the framework that will enable near-term inclusion of NP human health impacts in life cycle assessment (LCA) using a case study involving nanoscale titanium dioxide (nanoTiO 2 ). The intent is to enhance typical LCA with elements of regulatory risk assessment, including its more detailed measure of uncertainty. The proof-of-principle demonstration of the framework highlighted the lack of available data for both the workplace emissions and human health effects of ENMs that is needed to calculate generalizable characterization factors using common human health impact assessment practices in LCA. The alternative approach of using intake fractions derived from workplace air concentration measurements and effect factors based on best-available toxicity data supported the current case-by-case approach for assessing the human health life cycle impacts of ENMs. Ultimately, the proposed framework and calculations demonstrate the potential utility of integrating elements of risk assessment with LCA for ENMs once the data are available. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  4. Fuel conversion efficiency improvements in a highly boosted spark-ignition engine with ultra-expansion cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tie; Zheng, Bin; Yin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ultra-expansion cycle SI engine is investigated. • An improvement of 9–26% in BSFC at most frequently operated conditions is obtained. • At high and medium loads, BSFC improvement is attributed to the increased combustion efficiency and reduced exhaust energy. • At low loads, reduction in pumping loss and exhaust energy is the primary contributors to BSFC improvement. • Technical challenge in practical application of this type of engine is discussed. - Abstract: A four-cylinder, intake boosted, port fuel injection (PFI), spark-ignition (SI) engine is modified to a three-cylinder engine with the outer two cylinders working in the conventional four stroke cycle and with the inner cylinder working only with the expansion and exhausting strokes. After calibration and validation of the engine cycle simulation models using the experimental data in the original engine, the performance of the three-cylinder engine with the ultra-expansion cycle is numerically studied. Compared to the original engine, the fuel consumptions under the most-frequently operated conditions are improved by 9–26% and the low fuel consumption area on the operating map are drastically enlarged for the ultra-expansion cycle engine with the proper design. Nonetheless, a higher intake boosting is needed for the ultra-expansion cycle engine to circumvent the significant drop in the wide-open-throttle (WOT) performance, and compression ratio of the combustion cylinder must be reduced to avoid knocking combustion. Despite of the reduced compression ratio, however, the total expansion ratio is increased to 13.8 with the extra expansion of the working gas in the inner cylinder. Compared to the conventional engine, the theoretical thermal efficiency is therefore increased by up to above 4.0% with the ultra-expansion cycle over the most load range. The energy balance analysis shows that the increased combustion efficiency, reduced exhaust energy and the extra expansion work in the

  5. 40 CFR 86.099-10 - Emission standards for 1999 and later model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... manufacturer's engineering design evaluation using good engineering practice (a statement of which is required... model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty engines and vehicles. 86.099-10 Section 86.099-10 Protection of... Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.099-10 Emission standards for 1999 and later model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty...

  6. 40 CFR 86.008-10 - Emission standards for 2008 and later model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... manufacturer's engineering design evaluation using good engineering practice (a statement of which is required... model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty engines and vehicles. 86.008-10 Section 86.008-10 Protection of... Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.008-10 Emission standards for 2008 and later model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty...

  7. IECEC '91; Proceedings of the 26th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, Boston, MA, Aug. 4-9, 1991. Vol. 5 - Renewable resource systems, Stirling engines and applications, systems and cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on energy conversion engineering are presented. The general topics considered are: developments in nuclear power, energy from waste and biomass, system performance and materials in photovoltaics, solar thermal energy, wind energy systems, Stirling cycle analysis, Stirling cycle power, Stirling component technology, Stirling cooler/heat pump developments, Stirling engine concepts, Stirling engine design and optimization, Stirling engine dynamics and response, Stirling engine solar terrestrial, advanced cogeneration, AMTC, fossil fuel systems and technologies, marine energy

  8. A comparison between Miller and five-stroke cycles for enabling deeply downsized, highly boosted, spark-ignition engines with ultra expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tie; Wang, Bin; Zheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Deeply downsized, highly boosted SI engine with ultra-expansion cycle is studied. • The Miller and five stroke cycles are compared on BSFC improvements and WOT performance. • The mechanism of fuel conversion efficiency improvement at various loads is discussed. • Performance of the two-stage boosting system for the downsized SI engine is investigated. • A unique strategy using the bypass for the five-stroke engine is proposed. - Abstract: It has been well known that the engine downsizing combined with intake boosting is an effective way to improve the fuel conversion efficiency without penalizing the engine torque performance. However, the potential of engine downsizing is not yet fully explored, and the major hurdles include the knocking combustion and the pre-turbine temperature limit, owing to the aggressive intake boosting. Using the engine cycle simulation, this paper compares the effects of the Miller and five stroke cycles on the performance of the deeply downsized and highly boosted SI engine, taking the engine knock and pre-turbine temperature into consideration. In the simulation, the downsizing is implemented by reducing the combustion cylinder number from four to two, while a two stage boosting system is designed for the deeply downsized engine to ensure the wide-open-throttle (WOT) performance comparable to the original four cylinder engine. The Miller cycle is realized by varying the intake valve timing and lift, while the five stroke cycle is enabled with addition of an extra expansion cylinder between the two combustion cylinders. After calibration and validation of the engine cycle simulation models using the experimental data in the original engine, the performances of the deeply downsized engines with both the Miller and five stroke cycles are numerically studied. For the most frequently operated points on the torque-speed map, at low loads the Miller cycle exhibits superior performance over the five-stroke cycle in terms

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of a Rankine cycle applied on a diesel truck engine using steam and organic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsanos, C.O.; Hountalas, D.T.; Pariotis, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ORC improves bsfc from 10.7% to 8.4% as engine load increases from 25% to 100%. ► Increasing ORC high pressure increases thermodynamic efficiency and power output. ► Operating at high pressure the ORC is favorable for the engine cooling system. ► The low temperature values of the ORC favors heat extraction from the EGR gas. ► The impact of the exhaust gas heat exchanger on engine backpressure is limited. - Abstract: A theoretical study is conducted to investigate the potential improvement of the overall efficiency of a heavy-duty truck diesel engine equipped with a Rankine bottoming cycle for recovering heat from the exhaust gas. To this scope, a newly developed thermodynamic simulation model has been used, considering two different working media: water and the refrigerant R245ca. As revealed from the analysis, due to the variation of exhaust gas temperature with engine load it is necessary to modify the Rankine cycle parameters i.e. high pressure and superheated vapor temperature. For this reason, a new calculation procedure is applied for the estimation of the optimum Rankine cycle parameters at each operating condition. The calculation algorithm is conducted by taking certain design criteria into account, such as the exhaust gas heat exchanger size and its pinch point requirement. From the comparative evaluation between the two working media examined, using the optimum configuration of the cycle for each operating condition, it has been revealed that the brake specific fuel consumption improvement ranges from 10.2% (at 25% engine load) to 8.5% (at 100% engine load) for R245ca and 6.1% (at 25% engine load) to 7.5% (at 100% engine load) for water.

  10. Stirling-cycle rotating magnetic refrigerators and heat engines for use near room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyert, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    The application (or removal) of a magnetic field to the ferromagnetic Gd metal near its Curie point (293 K) will produce adiabatic heating (or cooling) of 14 K or isothermal expulsion (or absorption) of 32 kJ of heat per liter of Gd metal. A refrigerator and a heat engine are described for which porous Gd metal forms the rim of a wheel rotating into and out of a magnetic field region. Fluid forced to flow through the porous metal exchanges heat; the field and flow configurations are such that the metal executes a magnetic Stirling cycle allowing a very wide temperature span (many times 14 K) while maintaining the 32-kJ/l capacity. Efficiencies approaching that of Carnot are expected at 1-Hz rotation rates, resulting in 32-kW/l refrigeration or heating capacity

  11. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design.

  12. Effect of turbo charging and steam injection methods on the performance of a Miller cycle diesel engine (MCDE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonca, Guven; Sahin, Bahri

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Performance of a diesel engine is simulated by finite time thermodynamics. • Effect of steam injection on performance of a Miller cycle engine is examined. • Model results are verified with the experimental data with less than 7% error. - Abstract: In this study, application of the steam injection method (SIM), Miller cycle (MC) and turbo charging (TC) techniques into a four stroke, direct-injection diesel engine has been numerically and empirically conducted. NOx emissions have detrimental influences on the environment and living beings. They are formed at the high temperatures, thus the Diesel engines are serious NOx generation sources since they have higher compression ratios and higher combustion temperatures. The international regulations have decreased the emission limits due to environmental reasons. The Miller cycle (MC) application and steam injection method (SIM) have been popular to abate NOx produced from the internal combustion engines (ICEs), in the recent years. However, the MC application can cause a reduction in power output. The most known technique which maximizes the engine power and abates exhaust emissions is TC. Therefore, if these three techniques are combined, the power loss can be tolerated and pollutant emissions can be minimized. While the application of the MC and SIM causes to diminish in the brake power and brake thermal efficiency of the engine up to 6.5% and 10%, the TC increases the brake power and brake thermal efficiency of the engine up to 18% and 12%. The experimental and theoretical results have been compared in terms of the torque, the specific fuel consumption (SFC), the brake power and the brake thermal efficiency. The results acquired from theoretical modeling have been validated with empirical data with less than 7% maximum error. The results showed that developed combination can increase the engine performance and the method can be easily applied to the Diesel engines.

  13. Applying Systems Engineering Reduces Radiology Transport Cycle Times in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin A.; Yun, Brian J.; Lev, Michael H.; Raja, Ali S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Emergency department (ED) crowding is widespread, and can result in care delays, medical errors, increased costs, and decreased patient satisfaction. Simultaneously, while capacity constraints on EDs are worsening, contributing factors such as patient volume and inpatient bed capacity are often outside the influence of ED administrators. Therefore, systems engineering approaches that improve throughput and reduce waste may hold the most readily available gains. Decreasing radiology turnaround times improves ED patient throughput and decreases patient waiting time. We sought to investigate the impact of systems engineering science targeting ED radiology transport delays and determine the most effective techniques. Methods This prospective, before-and-after analysis of radiology process flow improvements in an academic hospital ED was exempt from institutional review board review as a quality improvement initiative. We hypothesized that reorganization of radiology transport would improve radiology cycle time and reduce waste. The intervention included systems engineering science-based reorganization of ED radiology transport processes, largely using Lean methodologies, and adding no resources. The primary outcome was average transport time between study order and complete time. All patients presenting between 8/2013–3/2016 and requiring plain film imaging were included. We analyzed electronic medical record data using Microsoft Excel and SAS version 9.4, and we used a two-sample t-test to compare data from the pre- and post-intervention periods. Results Following the intervention, average transport time decreased significantly and sustainably. Average radiology transport time was 28.7 ± 4.2 minutes during the three months pre-intervention. It was reduced by 15% in the first three months (4.4 minutes [95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5–7.3]; to 24.3 ± 3.3 min, P=0.021), 19% in the following six months (5.4 minutes, 95% CI [2.7–8.2]; to 23.3 ± 3

  14. Applying Systems Engineering Reduces Radiology Transport Cycle Times in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Benjamin A; Yun, Brian J; Lev, Michael H; Raja, Ali S

    2017-04-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is widespread, and can result in care delays, medical errors, increased costs, and decreased patient satisfaction. Simultaneously, while capacity constraints on EDs are worsening, contributing factors such as patient volume and inpatient bed capacity are often outside the influence of ED administrators. Therefore, systems engineering approaches that improve throughput and reduce waste may hold the most readily available gains. Decreasing radiology turnaround times improves ED patient throughput and decreases patient waiting time. We sought to investigate the impact of systems engineering science targeting ED radiology transport delays and determine the most effective techniques. This prospective, before-and-after analysis of radiology process flow improvements in an academic hospital ED was exempt from institutional review board review as a quality improvement initiative. We hypothesized that reorganization of radiology transport would improve radiology cycle time and reduce waste. The intervention included systems engineering science-based reorganization of ED radiology transport processes, largely using Lean methodologies, and adding no resources. The primary outcome was average transport time between study order and complete time. All patients presenting between 8/2013-3/2016 and requiring plain film imaging were included. We analyzed electronic medical record data using Microsoft Excel and SAS version 9.4, and we used a two-sample t-test to compare data from the pre- and post-intervention periods. Following the intervention, average transport time decreased significantly and sustainably. Average radiology transport time was 28.7 ± 4.2 minutes during the three months pre-intervention. It was reduced by 15% in the first three months (4.4 minutes [95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5-7.3]; to 24.3 ± 3.3 min, P=0.021), 19% in the following six months (5.4 minutes, 95% CI [2.7-8.2]; to 23.3 ± 3.5 min, P=0.003), and 26% one year

  15. Engine Cycle Analysis of Air Breathing Microwave Rocket with Reed Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Komatsu, Reiji; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Katsurayama, Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    The Microwave Rocket is a candidate for a low cost launcher system. Pulsed plasma generated by a high power millimeter wave beam drives a blast wave, and a vehicle acquires impulsive thrust by exhausting the blast wave. The thrust generation process of the Microwave Rocket is similar to a pulse detonation engine. In order to enhance the performance of its air refreshment, the air-breathing mechanism using reed valves is under development. Ambient air is taken to the thruster through reed valves. Reed valves are closed while the inside pressure is high enough. After the time when the shock wave exhausts at the open end, an expansion wave is driven and propagates to the thrust-wall. The reed valve is opened by the negative gauge pressure induced by the expansion wave and its reflection wave. In these processes, the pressure oscillation is important parameter. In this paper, the pressure oscillation in the thruster was calculated by CFD combined with the flux through from reed valves, which is estimated analytically. As a result, the air-breathing performance is evaluated using Partial Filling Rate (PFR), the ratio of thruster length to diameter L/D, and ratio of opening area of reed valves to superficial area α. An engine cycle and predicted thrust was explained.

  16. University of Idaho's low-speed flex fuel direct-injected 797cc two-stroke rear drive snowmobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The University of Idahos entry into the 2012 SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge uses a Ski-Doo XP chassis with a low-speed 797 cc direct-injection two-stroke powered snowmobile modified for flex fuel use on blended ethanol fuel. A battery-less direct ...

  17. Systematic fuel cycle systems engineering from 2D flow diagrams to 3D layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloglazov, S.; Glugla, M.; Lux, M.; Wagner, R.; Weber, V.; Chiocchio, S.; Kuehn, I.; Martin, E.

    2007-01-01

    The ITER fuel cycle systems are designed to supply deuterium-tritium gas mixtures to the ITER fueling systems and to process return gas streams from the vacuum vessel forming the closed inner fuel cycle. The radioactive nature of tritium requires implementation of a multiple barrier concept in order to assure the confinement of tritium within the process equipment. Ventilation and vent detritiation systems are the part of a dynamic confinement barrier which prevents tritium releases to the environment. The ITER fuel cycle systems, ventilation and tritium confinement systems all together form a rather complex chemical plant - the ITER Tritium Plant. Not only because of the complexity of the inner fuel cycle systems and numerous interfaces to the other systems within tritium plant but also because of the procurement sharing integrated planning is required. Interfaces management, configuration control and systems integration requires proper CAD tools and Project Data Management systems. CATIA V4 has been used in the past in ITER for 3D planning. However, only today's version of the software allows linking of the primarily 2D Pipe and Instrumentation Diagrams (P and IDs) into detailed 3D design and layout. The capabilities of the software were demonstrated through proof of principle activities in the ITER CAD office, eventually leading to the decision to deploy CATIA V5 Equipment and Systems (E and S) as general purpose single CAD tool for the design and integration of the ITER electrical, fluid and mechanical systems. In order to meet engineering requirements of ITER the CATIA V5 E and S project structure and project resources have been established starting from systems classifications, followed by the implementation of the applicable industrial standards, specifications and systems elements libraries into the Project Resources Management (PRM). Catalogues for the piping parts, piping specifications and standards specific for the design of the tritium processing

  18. Part-Load Performance Prediction and Operation Strategy Design of Organic Rankine Cycles with a Medium Cycle Used for Recovering Waste Heat from Gaseous Fuel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC is regarded as a suitable way to recover waste heat from gaseous fuel internal combustion engines. As waste heat recovery systems (WHRS have always been designed based on rated working conditions, while engines often work under part-load conditions, it is quite significant to analyze the part-load performance and corresponding operation strategy of ORC systems. This paper presents a dynamic model of ORC with a medium cycle used for a large gaseous fuel engine and analyzes the effect of adjustable parameters on the system performance, giving effective control directions under various conditions. The results indicate that the intermediary fluid mass flow rate has nearly no effect on the output power and thermal efficiency of the ORC, while the mass flow rate of working fluid has a great effect on them. In order to get a better system performance under different working conditions, the system should be operated with the working fluid mass flow rate as large as possible, but with a slight degree of superheating. Then, with the control of constant superheat degree at the end of the heating process, the performance of the combined system that consists of ORC and the engine at steady state under seven typical working conditions is also analyzed. The results indicate that the energy-saving effect of WHRS becomes worse and worse as the working condition decreases. Especially at 40% working condition the WHRS nearly has no energy-saving effect anymore.

  19. Using Model-Based Systems Engineering To Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-Cycle and Technical Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Edith L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of systems engineers to use model-based systems engineering (MBSE) to generate self-consistent, up-to-date systems engineering products for project life-cycle and technical reviews is an important aspect for the continued and accelerated acceptance of MBSE. Currently, many review products are generated using labor-intensive, error-prone approaches based on documents, spreadsheets, and chart sets; a promised benefit of MBSE is that users will experience reductions in inconsistencies and errors. This work examines features of SysML that can be used to generate systems engineering products. Model elements, relationships, tables, and diagrams are identified for a large number of the typical systems engineering artifacts. A SysML system model can contain and generate most systems engineering products to a significant extent and this paper provides a guide on how to use MBSE to generate products for project life-cycle and technical reviews. The use of MBSE can reduce the schedule impact usually experienced for review preparation, as in many cases the review products can be auto-generated directly from the system model. These approaches are useful to systems engineers, project managers, review board members, and other key project stakeholders.

  20. Critical firing and misfiring boundary in a spark ignition methanol engine during cold start based on single cycle fuel injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhaohui; Gong, Changming; Qu, Xiang; Liu, Fenghua; Sun, Jingzhen; Wang, Kang; Li, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the mass of methanol injected per cycle, ambient temperature, injection and ignition timing, preheating methods, and supplying additional liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) injection into the intake manifold on the critical firing and misfiring boundary of an electronically injection controlled spark ignition (SI) methanol engine during cold start were investigated experimentally based on a single cycle fuel injection with cycle-by-cycle control strategy. The critical firing and misfiring boundary was restricted by all parameters. For ambient temperatures below 16 °C, methanol engines must use auxiliary start-aids during cold start. Optimal control of the methanol injection and ignition timing can realize ideal next cycle firing combustion after injection. Resistance wire and glow plug preheating can provide critical firing down to ambient temperatures of 5 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Using an additional LPG injection into the intake manifold can provide critical firing down to an ambient temperature of −13 °C during cold start. As the ambient temperature decreases, the optimal angle difference between methanol injection timing and LPG injection timing for critical firing of a methanol engine increases rapidly during cold start. - Highlights: • A single cycle fuel injection and cycle-by-cycle control strategy are used to study. • In-cylinder pressure and instantaneous speed were used to determine firing boundary. • For the ambient temperatures below 16 °C, an auxiliary start-aids must be used. • A preheating and additional LPG were used to expand critical firing boundary. • Additional LPG can result in critical firing down to ambient temperature of −13 °C

  1. Cost Engineering Techniques and Their Applicability for Cost Estimation of Organic Rankine Cycle Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Lemmens

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of organic Rankine cycle (ORC systems is acknowledged by both considerable research and development efforts and an increasing number of applications. Most research aims at improving ORC systems through technical performance optimization of various cycle architectures and working fluids. The assessment and optimization of technical feasibility is at the core of ORC development. Nonetheless, economic feasibility is often decisive when it comes down to considering practical instalments, and therefore an increasing number of publications include an estimate of the costs of the designed ORC system. Various methods are used to estimate ORC costs but the resulting values are rarely discussed with respect to accuracy and validity. The aim of this paper is to provide insight into the methods used to estimate these costs and open the discussion about the interpretation of these results. A review of cost engineering practices shows there has been a long tradition of industrial cost estimation. Several techniques have been developed, but the expected accuracy range of the best techniques used in research varies between 10% and 30%. The quality of the estimates could be improved by establishing up-to-date correlations for the ORC industry in particular. Secondly, the rapidly growing ORC cost literature is briefly reviewed. A graph summarizing the estimated ORC investment costs displays a pattern of decreasing costs for increasing power output. Knowledge on the actual costs of real ORC modules and projects remains scarce. Finally, the investment costs of a known heat recovery ORC system are discussed and the methodologies and accuracies of several approaches are demonstrated using this case as benchmark. The best results are obtained with factorial estimation techniques such as the module costing technique, but the accuracies may diverge by up to +30%. Development of correlations and multiplication factors for ORC technology in particular is

  2. Getting to First Flight: Equipping Space Engineers to Break the Start-Stop-Restart Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Christopher E.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA s) history is built on a foundation of can-do strength, while pointing to the Saturn/Apollo Moon missions in the 1960s and 1970s as its apex a sentiment that often overshadows the potential that lies ahead. The chronicle of America s civil space agenda is scattered with programs that got off to good starts with adequate resources and vocal political support but that never made it past a certain milestone review, General Accountability Office report, or Congressional budget appropriation. Over the decades since the fielding of the Space Shuttle in the early 1980s, a start-stop-restart cycle has intervened due to many forces. Despite this impediment, the workforce has delivered engineering feats such as the International Space Station and numerous Shuttle and science missions, which reflect a trend in the early days of the Exploration Age that called for massive infrastructure and matching capital allocations. In the new millennium, the aerospace industry must respond to transforming economic climates, the public will, national agendas, and international possibilities relative to scientific exploration beyond Earth s orbit. Two pressing issues - workforce transition and mission success - are intertwined. As this paper will address, U.S. aerospace must confront related workforce development and industrial base issues head on to take space exploration to the next level. This paper also will formulate specific strategies to equip space engineers to move beyond the seemingly constant start-stop-restart mentality to plan and execute flight projects that actually fly.

  3. Soliton compression to few-cycle pulses with a high quality factor by engineering cascaded quadratic nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Xianglong; Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    We propose an efficient approach to improve few-cycle soliton compression with cascaded quadratic nonlinearities by using an engineered multi-section structure of the nonlinear crystal. By exploiting engineering of the cascaded quadratic nonlinearities, in each section soliton compression...... with a low effective order is realized, and high-quality few-cycle pulses with large compression factors are feasible. Each subsequent section is designed so that the compressed pulse exiting the previous section experiences an overall effective self-defocusing cubic nonlinearity corresponding to a modest...... soliton order, which is kept larger than unity to ensure further compression. This is done by increasing the cascaded quadratic nonlinearity in the new section with an engineered reduced residual phase mismatch. The low soliton orders in each section ensure excellent pulse quality and high efficiency...

  4. Mid-Term Direction of JAEA Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, H.; Sugiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Takeda, S.; Nomura, S.

    2009-01-01

    1. Introduction Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NCL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has sufficient experience and ability through its 50 year operation to establish the next generation closed cycle. It strives to become a world-class Center Of Excellence. 2. Current activity in NCL: 1) - Recycling of MOX fuel: The Tokai Reprocessing Plant has reprocessed 29 tons of MOX fuel from the ATR Fugenh as a part of 1140 tons of cumulative spent fuel reprocessed. JAEA has supported the pre-operation of the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. An innovative MOX pellet fabrication process has been developed in the Plutonium Fuel Development Center, and a part of products obtained by the development are used as a fuel for core confirmation test for re-startup of the FBR Monjuh. Characterization of MOX containing Am and Np has been studied and a new data such as melting point and thermal conductivity were reported. In the Chemical Processing Facility, a hot lab., an advanced aqueous reprocessing technology has been tested for TRU recovery, economical improvement, etc., using irradiated MOX fuel from the FR Joyoh. 2) - Supporting Activity: JAEA has improved the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safeguards activities. The Integrated Safeguards approach for all facilities in NCL has been implemented since August, 2008, as a pioneer and a good example in the world. To reduce anxiety among local residents, NCL has explained its operation plans and exchanged information and opinions with them concerning potential risks to health and environment. Recently, stake-holder participation in the management of NCL was started from the view point of Corporate Social Responsibility. In April, 2008, the agreement was signed with Idaho National Laboratory for cooperation of personnel training in fuel cycle area. 3. Mid-Term Direction: In Japan, feasibility and direction of the transition period from the LWR era to the FBR era should be discussed for the next several years. Study

  5. Evaluation of the Migrating Combustion Chamber (MCC) engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. M.; Morar, Dorin

    1993-01-01

    The Belvoir Research, Development and Engineering Center (BRDEC) tested three Migrating Combustion Chamber (MCC) engines built by Engine Research Associates (ERA) for Natick RD and E Center. The MCC concept attempts to provide a lightweight, quiet engine having a cool exhaust gas stream. The cool exhaust is attained by capturing additional energy from expansion beyond that achievable in conventional engines by the use of gas porting to multiple expansion chambers; this provides a more efficient engine operation than is otherwise attainable for the configuration. The testing included determining the engine torque-speed-power characteristics and the Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) under a variety of load conditions. Startability and operability were concerns; starting under normal ambient conditions was difficult. All testing was performed using a 10:1 fuel/oil mixture of low lead gasoline with AMZOIL synthetic lubricating oil for two-stroke engines. The maximum power achieved was 0.25 horsepower at 4,400 rpm. The peak torque observed was 69 oz.-in. at 3,200 rpm. It was not possible to make noise and vibration measurements during the testing cycle, but they appeared to be low. The MCC engines tested had relatively short lives, operating for less than 25 hours. Performance and durability improvements are necessary before this MCC design can be considered as a viable alternative to commercially available two-cycle engines.

  6. Summary of entire research achievements of creative engineering research program on nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Shingo; Ikegami, Tetsuo

    2008-03-01

    Creative Engineering Research Program on Nuclear Fuel Cycle (former In-house Innovative Research Encouraging Program) was implemented from FY 2001 to FY 2007 in order to support such in-house researches that create innovative new concepts and aim technical break-through. Totally 37 applications have been received and 14 research themes have been accepted and been performed in this program. As for the research achievements of the 14 research themes, first author papers accepted by scientific journals and by science councils were 47 and 32, respectively, and oral presentations at scientific societies were 99. Furthermore, interpretive articles for scientific journals, requested lectures, patents, and prize winnings were 13, 30, 8, and 3, respectively. Consequently, it can be evaluated that the research achievements resulted from this program are generally in high level and that the expectations, at the starting point of this program, to activate the innovative research activities have been accomplished. In this report, the final reports of the 14 research themes together with the outline of this program are included. (author)

  7. Combustion Engineering Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    On February 22, 1988, DOE issued Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Number-DE-PS01-88FE61530 for Round II of the CCT Program. The purpose of the PON was to solicit proposals to conduct cost-shared ICCT projects to demonstrate technologies that are capable of being commercialized in the 1990s, that are more cost-effective than current technologies, and that are capable of achieving significant reduction of SO[sub 2] and/or NO[sub x] emissions from existing coal burning facilities, particularly those that contribute to transboundary and interstate pollution. The Combustion Engineering (C-E) Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Repowering Project was one of 16 proposals selected by DOE for negotiation of cost-shared federal funding support from among the 55 proposals that were received in response to the PON. The ICCT Program has developed a three-level strategy for complying with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that is consistent with the President's Council on Environmental Quality regulations implementing NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508) and the DOE guidelines for compliance with NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The strategy includes the consideration of programmatic and project-specific environmental impacts during and subsequent to the reject selection process.

  8. Combustion oscillation study in a kerosene fueled rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Wei; He, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Fei; Xue, Rui; Wei, Xiang-Geng; Shi, Lei

    2016-12-01

    This study reports the combustion oscillation features in a three-dimensional (3D) rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engine combustor under flight Mach number (Mflight) 3.0 conditions both experimentally and numerically. Experiment is performed on a direct-connect ground test facility, which measures the wall pressure along the flow-path. High-speed imaging of the flame luminosity and schlieren is carried out at exit of the primary rocket. Compressible reactive large eddy simulation (LES) with reduced chemical kinetics of a surrogate model for kerosene is performed to further understand the combustion oscillation mechanisms in the combustor. LES results are validated with experimental data by the time-averaged and root mean square (RMS) pressure values, and show acceptable agreement. Effects of the primary rocket jet on pressure oscillation in the combustor are analyzed. Relation of the high speed rocket jet oscillation, which is thought to among the most probable sources of combustion oscillation, with the RBCC combustor is recognized. Results reveal that the unsteady over-expanded rocket jet has significant impacts on the combustion oscillation feature of the RBCC combustor, which is different from a thermo-acoustics type oscillation. The rocket jet/air inflow physical interactions under different rocket jet expansion degrees are experimentally studied.

  9. Comparison of the externally heated air valve engine and the helium Stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimierski, Zbyszko; Wojewoda, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Air EHVE produces comparable power as equivalent helium Stirling engine. • No heat regenerator used in the EHVE, standard lubrication system. • External combustion engine combined with forced flow added (super-charging). • EHVE uses typical piston engine body design and governing cam system. • Possible use of different fuels: oil, coal, gas also sun and nuclear energy. - Abstract: A two-stroke, externally heated valve engine (EHVE) with a heater, a cooler and two blowers is simulated. The engine is entirely different from a typical Stirling engine. The pressure ratio p max /p min of its cycle is higher, but the engine volume and the mean value of the heat exchanger wall temperatures are the same. The power and efficiency of the EHVE and Stirling engines under the same maximum pressures are compared. The results show that the EHVE engine reaches almost the same level of performance as the Stirling engine, while using only available atmospheric air, rather than helium

  10. Resonance vibrations in intake and exhaust pipes of in-line engines III : the inlet process of a four-stroke-cycle engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, O

    1940-01-01

    Using a previously developed method, the boundary process of four-stroke-cycle engines are set up. The results deviate considerably from those obtained under the assumption that the velocity fluctuation is proportional to the cylinder piston motion. The deviation is less at the position of resonance frequencies. By the method developed, the effect of the resonance vibrations on the volumetric efficiency can be demonstrated.

  11. A cycle simulation model for predicting the performance of a diesel engine fuelled by diesel and biodiesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogoi, T.K.; Baruah, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Among the alternative fuels, biodiesel and its blends are considered suitable and the most promising fuel for diesel engine. The properties of biodiesel are found similar to that of diesel. Many researchers have experimentally evaluated the performance characteristics of conventional diesel engines fuelled by biodiesel and its blends. However, experiments require enormous effort, money and time. Hence, a cycle simulation model incorporating a thermodynamic based single zone combustion model is developed to predict the performance of diesel engine. The effect of engine speed and compression ratio on brake power and brake thermal efficiency is analysed through the model. The fuel considered for the analysis are diesel, 20%, 40%, 60% blending of diesel and biodiesel derived from Karanja oil (Pongamia Glabra). The model predicts similar performance with diesel, 20% and 40% blending. However, with 60% blending, it reveals better performance in terms of brake power and brake thermal efficiency.

  12. Performance assessment and optimization of an irreversible nano-scale Stirling engine cycle operating with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad-Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah

    2015-09-01

    Developing new technologies like nano-technology improves the performance of the energy industries. Consequently, emerging new groups of thermal cycles in nano-scale can revolutionize the energy systems' future. This paper presents a thermo-dynamical study of a nano-scale irreversible Stirling engine cycle with the aim of optimizing the performance of the Stirling engine cycle. In the Stirling engine cycle the working fluid is an Ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas. Moreover, two different strategies are proposed for a multi-objective optimization issue, and the outcomes of each strategy are evaluated separately. The first strategy is proposed to maximize the ecological coefficient of performance (ECOP), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F . Furthermore, the second strategy is suggested to maximize the thermal efficiency ( η), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F). All the strategies in the present work are executed via a multi-objective evolutionary algorithms based on NSGA∥ method. Finally, to achieve the final answer in each strategy, three well-known decision makers are executed. Lastly, deviations of the outcomes gained in each strategy and each decision maker are evaluated separately.

  13. NOx, Soot, and Fuel Consumption Predictions under Transient Operating Cycle for Common Rail High Power Density Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Walke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diesel engine is presently facing the challenge of controlling NOx and soot emissions on transient cycles, to meet stricter emission norms and to control emissions during field operations. Development of a simulation tool for NOx and soot emissions prediction on transient operating cycles has become the most important objective, which can significantly reduce the experimentation time and cost required for tuning these emissions. Hence, in this work, a 0D comprehensive predictive model has been formulated with selection and coupling of appropriate combustion and emissions models to engine cycle models. Selected combustion and emissions models are further modified to improve their prediction accuracy in the full operating zone. Responses of the combustion and emissions models have been validated for load and “start of injection” changes. Model predicted transient fuel consumption, air handling system parameters, and NOx and soot emissions are in good agreement with measured data on a turbocharged high power density common rail engine for the “nonroad transient cycle” (NRTC. It can be concluded that 0D models can be used for prediction of transient emissions on modern engines. How the formulated approach can also be extended to transient emissions prediction for other applications and fuels is also discussed.

  14. Process analysis of pressurized oxy-coal power cycle for carbon capture application integrated with liquid air power generation and binary cycle engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneke, Mathew; Wang, Meihong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We model a 573 MW pressurized oxy-coal combustion with supercritical steam cycle. • A 126 MW liquid air power plant was integrated to utilize the nitrogen stream. • We used organic Rankine cycle to recover heat from compressors. • The model was analysed for with and without carbon capture consideration. • Efficiency increase of 12–15% was achieved due to integration and heat recovery. - Abstract: In this paper, the thermodynamic advantage of integrating liquid air power generation (LAPG) process and binary cycle waste heat recovery technology to a standalone pressurized oxy-coal combustion supercritical steam power generation cycle is investigated through modeling and simulation using Aspen Plus® simulation software version 8.4. The study shows that the integration of LAPG process and the use of binary cycle heat engine which convert waste heat from compressor exhaust to electricity, in a standalone pressurized oxy-coal combustion supercritical steam power generation cycle improves the thermodynamic efficiency of the pressurized oxy-coal process. The analysis indicates that such integration can give about 12–15% increase in thermodynamic efficiency when compared with a standalone pressurized oxy-coal process with or without CO 2 capture. It was also found that in a pressurized oxy-coal process, it is better to pump the liquid oxygen from the cryogenic ASU to a very high pressure prior to vapourization in the cryogenic ASU main heat exchanger and subsequently expand the gaseous oxygen to the required combustor pressure than either compressing the atmospheric gaseous oxygen produced from the cryogenic ASU directly to the combustor pressure or pumping the liquid oxygen to the combustor pressure prior to vapourization in the cryogenic ASU main heat exchanger. The power generated from the compressor heat in the flue gas purification, carbon capture and compression unit using binary cycle heat engine was also found to offset about 65% of the

  15. 40 CFR 204.55-2 - Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... use more parameters): (A) Engine type. (1) Gasoline—two stroke cycle (2) Gasoline—four stroke cycle (3) Diesel—two stroke cycle (4) Diesel—four stroke cycle (5) Rotary—Wankel (6) Turbine (7) Other (B) Engine...

  16. A new hybrid pneumatic combustion engine to improve fuel consumption of wind–Diesel power system for non-interconnected areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basbous, Tammam; Younes, Rafic; Ilinca, Adrian; Perron, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model thermodynamic ideal cycle of a new hybrid pneumaticcombustion engine. ► We optimize commands of all modes and calculate maps of fuel and air consumption. ► We evaluate fuel economy for Wind–Diesel system function of tank volume and wind penetration. ► We find up to 10% of fuel economy i.e. 80 t/year with 100% wind penetration. ► Fuel economy increases with wind penetration and with volume but has asymptotic value. -- Abstract: This paper presents an evaluation of an optimized Hybrid Pneumatic-Combustion Engine (HPCE) concept that permits reducing fuel consumption for electricity production in non-interconnected remote areas, originally equipped with hybrid Wind–Diesel System (WDS). Up to now, most of the studies on the pneumatic hybridization of Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) have dealt with two-stroke pure pneumatic mode. The few studies that have dealt with hybrid pneumatic-combustion four-stroke mode require adding a supplementary valve to charge compressed air in the combustion chamber. This modification means that a new cylinder head should be fabricated. Moreover, those studies focus on spark ignition engines and are not yet validated for Diesel engines. Present HPCE is capable of making a Diesel engine operate under two-stroke pneumatic motor mode, two-stroke pneumatic pump mode and four-stroke hybrid mode, without needing an additional valve in the combustion chamber. This fact constitutes this study’s strength and innovation. The evaluation of the concept is based on ideal thermodynamic cycle modeling. The optimized valve actuation timings for all modes lead to generic maps that are independent of the engine size. The fuel economy is calculated for a known site during a whole year, function of the air storage volume and the wind power penetration rate.

  17. Design and development of an automotive propulsion system utilizing a Rankine cycle engine (water based fluid). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demler, R.L.

    1977-09-01

    Under EPA and ERDA sponsorship, SES successfully designed, fabricated and tested the first federally sponsored steam powered automobile. The automobile - referred to as the simulator - is a 1975 Dodge Monaco standard size passenger car with the SES preprototype Rankine cycle automotive propulsion system mounted in the engine compartment. In the latter half of 1975, the simulator successfully underwent test operations at the facilities of SES in Watertown, Massachusetts and demonstrated emission levels below those of the stringent federally established automotive requirements originally set for implementation by 1976. The demonstration was accomplished during testing over the Federal Driving Cycle on a Clayton chassis dynamometer. The design and performance of the vehicle are described.

  18. Study on Mixed Working Fluids with Different Compositions in Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC Systems for Vehicle Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One way to increase the thermal efficiency of vehicle diesel engines is to recover waste heat by using an organic Rankine cycle (ORC system. Tests were conducted to study the running performances of diesel engines in the whole operating range. The law of variation of the exhaust energy rate under various engine operating conditions was also analyzed. A diesel engine-ORC combined system was designed, and relevant evaluation indexes proposed. The variation of the running performances of the combined system under various engine operating conditions was investigated. R245fa and R152a were selected as the components of the mixed working fluid. Thereafter, six kinds of mixed working fluids with different compositions were presented. The effects of mixed working fluids with different compositions on the running performances of the combined system were revealed. Results show that the running performances of the combined system can be improved effectively when mass fraction R152a in the mixed working fluid is high and the engine operates with high power. For the mixed working fluid M1 (R245fa/R152a, 0.1/0.9, by mass fraction, the net power output of the combined system reaches the maximum of 34.61 kW. Output energy density of working fluid (OEDWF, waste heat recovery efficiency (WHRE, and engine thermal efficiency increasing ratio (ETEIR all reach their maximum values at 42.7 kJ/kg, 10.90%, and 11.29%, respectively.

  19. Reuse fo a Cold War Surveillance Drone to Flight Test a NASA Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T. M.; Smith, Norm

    1999-01-01

    Plans for and early feasibility investigations into the modification of a Lockheed D21B drone to flight test the DRACO Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) engine are discussed. Modifications include the addition of oxidizer tanks, modern avionics systems, actuators, and a vehicle recovery system. Current study results indicate that the D21B is a suitable candidate for this application and will allow demonstrations of all DRACO engine operating modes at Mach numbers between 0.8 and 4.0. Higher Mach numbers may be achieved with more extensive modification. Possible project risks include low speed stability and control, and recovery techniques.

  20. Combined Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition Experiments: System Identification Rack Hardware Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Randy; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The System Identification (SysID) Rack is a real-time hardware-in-the-loop data acquisition (DAQ) and control instrument rack that was designed and built to support inlet testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. This instrument rack is used to support experiments on the Combined-Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition Experiment (CCE? LIMX). The CCE?LIMX is a testbed for an integrated dual flow-path inlet configuration with the two flow paths in an over-and-under arrangement such that the high-speed flow path is located below the lowspeed flow path. The CCE?LIMX includes multiple actuators that are designed to redirect airflow from one flow path to the other; this action is referred to as "inlet mode transition." Multiple phases of experiments have been planned to support research that investigates inlet mode transition: inlet characterization (Phase-1) and system identification (Phase-2). The SysID Rack hardware design met the following requirements to support Phase-1 and Phase-2 experiments: safely and effectively move multiple actuators individually or synchronously; sample and save effector control and position sensor feedback signals; automate control of actuator positioning based on a mode transition schedule; sample and save pressure sensor signals; and perform DAQ and control processes operating at 2.5 KHz. This document describes the hardware components used to build the SysID Rack including their function, specifications, and system interface. Furthermore, provided in this document are a SysID Rack effectors signal list (signal flow); system identification experiment setup; illustrations indicating a typical SysID Rack experiment; and a SysID Rack performance overview for Phase-1 and Phase-2 experiments. The SysID Rack described in this document was a useful tool to meet the project objectives.

  1. 76 FR 19903 - Special Conditions: Diamond Aircraft Industry Model DA-40NG; Diesel Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... these fuel system and engine related special conditions. The Austro engine has a Full Authority Digital..., except that propeller revolutions per minute (RPM) will be displayed. Sections 23.1305(b)(4), 23.1305(b...

  2. Nanodomain Engineered (K, Na)NbO3 Lead-Free Piezoceramics: Enhanced Thermal and Cycling Reliabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Fang-Zhou; Wang, Ke; Cheng, Li-Qian

    2015-01-01

    The growing environmental concerns have been pushing the development of viable green alternatives for lead-based piezoceramics to be one of the priorities in functional ceramic materials. A polymorphic phase transition has been utilized to enhance piezoelectric properties of lead-free (K, Na)NbO3......- based materials, accepting the drawbacks of high temperature and cycling instabilities. Here, we present that CaZrO3-modified (K, Na)NbO3 piezoceramics not only possess excellent performance at ambient conditions benefiting from nanodomain engineering, but also exhibit superior stability against...... temperature fluctuation and electrical fatigue cycling. It was found that the piezoelectric coefficient d33 is temperature independent under 4 kV/mm, which can be attributed to enhanced thermal stability of electric field engineered domain configuration; whereas the electric field induced strain exhibits...

  3. STATE-OF-THE-ART AND EMERGING TRUCK ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES FOR OPTIMIZED PERFORMANCE, EMISSIONS AND LIFE CYCLE COSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schittler, M

    2003-08-24

    The challenge for truck engine product engineering is not only to fulfill increasingly stringent emission requirements, but also to improve the engine's economical viability in its role as the backbone of our global economy. While societal impact and therefore emission limit values are to be reduced in big steps, continuous improvement is not enough but technological quantum leaps are necessary. The introduction and refinement of electronic control of all major engine systems has already been a quantum leap forward. Maximizing the benefits of these technologies to customers and society requires full use of parameter optimization and other enabling technologies. The next big step forward will be widespread use of exhaust aftertreatment on all transportation related diesel engines. While exhaust gas aftertreatment has been successfully established on gasoline (Otto cycle) engines, the introduction of exhaust aftertreatment especially for heavy-duty diesel engines will be much mo re demanding. Implementing exhaust gas aftertreatment into commercial vehicle applications is a challenging task but the emission requirements to be met starting in Europe, the USA and Japan in the 2005-2007 timeframe require this step. The engine industry will be able to implement the new technology if all stakeholders support the necessary decisions. One decision has already been taken: the reduction of sulfur in diesel fuel being comparable with the elimination of lead in gasoline as a prerequisite for the three-way catalyst. Now we have the chance to optimize ecology and economy of the Diesel engine simultaneously by taking the decision to provide an additional infrastructure for a NOx reduction agent needed for the introduction of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology that is already implemented in the electric power generation industry. This requires some effort, but the resulting societal benefits, fuel economy and vehicle life cycle costs are significantly better

  4. Moteurs composites à allumage par compression et cycle de Rankine Dual Fuel Compression Ignition Engines Operating on the Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daugas C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Sur les 60 % de l'énergie introduite dans un groupe électrogène et perdue sous forme de chaleur, une bonne partie peut être utilisée pour fabriquer à nouveau de l'électricité à partir d'une turbine à vapeur. Les moteurs dual fuel brûlant essentiellement du gaz naturel sont remarquablement placés pour une telle récupération, dont le rendement est meilleur aux charges partielles que celui des moteurs diesel classiques. Les différents types de fluides utilisés pour la récupération sont examinés : avantages des fluides organiques sur l'eau. Études d'une réalisation concrète. Fonctionnement aux charges partielles. Influence des différents paramètres pour obtenir le meilleur rapport prix/puissance. Of the 60% of input energy lost in the form of heat in a generating set, a sizeable part can be used to generate electricity again by means of a steam turbine. Dual fuel engines which mainly burn natural gas are outstandingly suitable for such a recovery process, the efficiency under partial loads being better than that of conventional diesel engines. The author considers the different types of fluids used for the recovery process superiority of organic fluids over water. Study of a concrete example. Operation with partial loads. Influence of the different parameters in the quest for the best cost-power ratio.

  5. A comparative study on life cycle analysis of molten carbon fuel cells and diesel engines for marine application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaner, Selim; Zhou, Peilin

    The study performed a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) plant for marine applications. The results are compared to a benchmark conventional diesel engine (DE) which operates as an auxiliary power generating unit. The LCA includes manufacturing of MCFC and DE, fuel supply, operation and decommissioning stages of the system's life cycle. As a new technology in its very early stages of commercialisation, some detailed data for the FC systems are not available. In order to overcome this problem, a series of scenario analysis has also been performed to evaluate the effect of various factors on the overall impact, such as change in power load factors and effect of recycling credit at the end of life cycle. Environmental benefits from fuel cell operation are maximised with the use of hydrogen as an input fuel. For the manufacturing stage of the life cycle, input material and process energy required for fuel cell stack assemblies and balance-of-plants (BOP) represent a bigger impact than that of conventional benchmark mainly due to special materials used in the stack and the weights of the BOP components. Additionally, recovering valuable materials through re-use or re-cycle will reduce the overall environmental burden of the system over its life cycle.

  6. Soliton compression to few-cycle pulses with a high quality factor by engineering cascaded quadratic nonlinearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianglong; Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2012-11-19

    We propose an efficient approach to improve few-cycle soliton compression with cascaded quadratic nonlinearities by using an engineered multi-section structure of the nonlinear crystal. By exploiting engineering of the cascaded quadratic nonlinearities, in each section soliton compression with a low effective order is realized, and high-quality few-cycle pulses with large compression factors are feasible. Each subsequent section is designed so that the compressed pulse exiting the previous section experiences an overall effective self-defocusing cubic nonlinearity corresponding to a modest soliton order, which is kept larger than unity to ensure further compression. This is done by increasing the cascaded quadratic nonlinearity in the new section with an engineered reduced residual phase mismatch. The low soliton orders in each section ensure excellent pulse quality and high efficiency. Numerical results show that compressed pulses with less than three-cycle duration can be achieved even when the compression factor is very large, and in contrast to standard soliton compression, these compressed pulses have minimal pedestal and high quality factor.

  7. Performance analysis of exhaust heat recovery using organic Rankine cycle in a passenger car with a compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilvacs, M.; Prisecaru, T.; Pop, H.; Apostol, V.; Prisecaru, M.; Pop, E.; Popescu, Gh; Ciobanu, C.; Mohanad, A.; Alexandru, A.

    2016-08-01

    Compression ignition engines transform approximately 40% of the fuel energy into power available at the crankshaft, while the rest part of the fuel energy is lost as coolant, exhaust gases and other waste heat. An organic Rankine cycle (ORC) can be used to recover this waste heat. In this paper, the characteristics of a system combining a compression ignition engine with an ORC which recover the waste heat from the exhaust gases are analyzed. The performance map of the diesel engine is measured on an engine test bench and the heat quantities wasted by the exhaust gases are calculated over the engine's entire operating region. Based on this data, the working parameters of ORC are defined, and the performance of a combined engine-ORC system is evaluated across this entire region. The results show that the net power of ORC is 6.304kW at rated power point and a maximum of 10% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption can be achieved.

  8. Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations, and process engineering. Final report, February 1977-December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, J.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; O' Keefe, D.R.; Allen, C.L.

    1982-05-01

    The sulfur-iodine water-splitting cycle is characterized by the following three reactions: 2H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2HI; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + 1/2 O/sub 2/; and 2HI ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/. This cycle was developed at General Atomic after several critical features in the above reactions were discovered. These involved phase separations, catalytic reactions, etc. Estimates of the energy efficiency of this economically reasonable advanced state-of-the-art processing unit produced sufficiently high values (to approx.47%) to warrant cycle development effort. The DOE contract was largely directed toward the engineering development of this cycle, including a small demonstration unit (CLCD), a bench-scale unit, engineering design, and costing. The work has resulted in a design that is projected to produce H/sub 2/ at prices not yet generally competitive with fossil-fuel-produced H/sub 2/ but are projected to be favorably competitive with respect to H/sub 2/ from fossil fuels in the future.

  9. Numerical simulation of condensation of sulfuric acid and water in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karvounis, Nikolas; Pang, Kar Mun; Mayer, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    correlation is found between the fuel sulfur content and the total condensed mass of sulfuric acid. The level of humidity of the scavenging air does not affect the condensation of sulfuric acid considerably, relative to the humidity increase, but it has a high impact on water condensation. The study...... of the scavenging pressure level reveals a counter intuitive behavior where the condensation rates decrease with higher scavenging pressures due to the flow regime and flame size. Next, increasing the cylinder liner temperature decreases significantly the water condensation contrary to the sulfuric acid...... condensation which is marginally affected. The increase in lubricant film thickness results in a decrease for both the sulfuric acid and water condensation with a more pronounced reduction for water. Finally, a comparison between the high and low load operating conditions reveals a small drop in the total...

  10. Study of mixtures based on hydrocarbons used in ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) for engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Gequn; Gao, Yuanyuan; Tian, Hua; Wei, Haiqiao; Liang, Xingyu

    2014-01-01

    For high temperature ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) used in engine waste heat recovery, it's very critical to select a high temperature working fluid. HCs (Hydrocarbons) usually have excellent cycle performance, but the flammability limits their practical application. Considering that some retardants can be used to suppress flammability, the paper presents an application of mixtures based on hydrocarbons blending with refrigerant retardants to engine waste heat ORC. Three pure hydrocarbons (cyclopentane, cyclohexane, benzene) and two retardants (R11, R123) are selected for combination. Thermal efficiency and exergy loss are selected as the main objective functions. Based on thermodynamic model, the effects of retardants mass fraction, evaporation temperature and IHE (internal heat exchanger) are investigated. Results show that zeotropic mixtures do have higher thermal efficiency and lower exergy loss than pure fluids, at a certain mixture ratio. There exists the OMR (optimal mixture ratio) for different mixtures, and it changes with the evaporation temperature. When adding IHE to system, cycle performance could be obviously improved, and for benzene/R11 (0.7/0.3), the efficiency growth is about 7.12%∼9.72%. Using it, the maximum thermal efficiency of the system can achieve 16.7%, and minimum exergy loss is only 30.76 kW. - Highlights: • A theoretical analysis of Organic Rankine Cycle for engine exhaust heat recovery is proposed. • Mixtures based on hydrocarbons as working fluids have been suggested. • Effects of the IHE (internal heat exchanger) on ORC system are investigated. • OMR (Optimal mixture ratio) changes with the evaporation temperature. • Using the system, maximum thermal efficiency can achieve 16.7%

  11. Assessment of external combustion, Brayton-cycle engine potential in total and integrated energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciniak, T.J.; Bratis, J.C.; Davis, A.; Jain, M.L.; Ashe, T.L.; Six, L.D.; Trimble, S.W.

    1980-03-01

    The history, advantages, disadvantages, and performance and cost characteristics of the external-combustion, Brayton engine are discussed. Included are studies of external combustion, Brayton engines in Integrated Energy Systems, and comparisons with current technologies, such as diesels and gas turbines, as well as with other advanced prime-mover technologies, such as large Stirling engines and adiabatic turbocompound diesel engines. Lastly, a development program, one that would lead to a commercializable external combustion, Brayton engine using an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor is described. The fluidized bed offers a method for burning coal in an environmentally acceptable manner at a fairly reasonable cost so that the external combustion Brayton concept can be used in the residential/commercial sector. Based on this study, it appears that the external combustion, Brayton engine, using a fluidized-bed combustion system, offers a technologically sound alternative for developing an economically viable, environmentally acceptable method for using non-scarce fuels. Although the efficiency of the engine is not as high as that projected for large diesel and Stirling engines, the capital cost advantages, fuel flexibility, relatively low developmental costs, and high chance of success make it an attractive alternative.

  12. Comprehensive performance analyses and optimization of the irreversible thermodynamic cycle engines (TCE) under maximum power (MP) and maximum power density (MPD) conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonca, Guven; Sahin, Bahri; Ust, Yasin; Parlak, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive performance analyses and comparisons for air-standard irreversible thermodynamic cycle engines (TCE) based on the power output, power density, thermal efficiency, maximum dimensionless power output (MP), maximum dimensionless power density (MPD) and maximum thermal efficiency (MEF) criteria. Internal irreversibility of the cycles occurred during the irreversible-adiabatic processes is considered by using isentropic efficiencies of compression and expansion processes. The performances of the cycles are obtained by using engine design parameters such as isentropic temperature ratio of the compression process, pressure ratio, stroke ratio, cut-off ratio, Miller cycle ratio, exhaust temperature ratio, cycle temperature ratio and cycle pressure ratio. The effects of engine design parameters on the maximum and optimal performances are investigated. - Highlights: • Performance analyses are conducted for irreversible thermodynamic cycle engines. • Comprehensive computations are performed. • Maximum and optimum performances of the engines are shown. • The effects of design parameters on performance and power density are examined. • The results obtained may be guidelines to the engine designers

  13. Thermodynamic analysis and performance optimization of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery system for marine diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jian; Song, Yin; Gu, Chun-wei

    2015-01-01

    Escalating fuel prices and imposition of carbon dioxide emission limits are creating renewed interest in methods to increase the thermal efficiency of marine diesel engines. One viable means to achieve such improved thermal efficiency is the conversion of engine waste heat to a more useful form of energy, either mechanical or electrical. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) has been demonstrated to be a promising technology to recover waste heat. This paper examines waste heat recovery of a marine diesel engine using ORC technology. Two separated ORC apparatuses for the waste heat from both the jacket cooling water and the engine exhaust gas are designed as the traditional recovery system. The maximum net power output is chosen as the evaluation criterion to select the suitable working fluid and define the optimal system parameters. To simplify the waste heat recovery, an optimized system using the jacket cooling water as the preheating medium and the engine exhaust gas for evaporation is presented. The influence of preheating temperature on the system performance is evaluated to define the optimal operating condition. Economic and off-design analysis of the optimized system is conducted. The simulation results reveal that the optimized system is technically feasible and economically attractive. - Highlights: • ORC is used to recover waste heat from both exhaust gas and jacket cooling water. • Comparative study is conducted for different ORC systems. • Thermal performance, system structure and economic feasibility are considered. • Optimal preheating temperature of the system is selected

  14. Reconstitution of TCA cycle with DAOCS to engineer Escherichia coli into an efficient whole cell catalyst of penicillin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Baixue; Fan, Keqiang; Zhao, Jian; Ji, Junjie; Wu, Linjun; Yang, Keqian; Tao, Yong

    2015-08-11

    Many medically useful semisynthetic cephalosporins are derived from 7-aminodeacetoxycephalosporanic acid (7-ADCA), which has been traditionally made by the polluting chemical method. Here, a whole-cell biocatalytic process based on an engineered Escherichia coli strain expressing 2-oxoglutarate-dependent deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS) for converting penicillin G to G-7-ADCA is developed. The major engineering strategy is to reconstitute the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of E. coli to force the metabolic flux to go through DAOCS catalyzed reaction for 2-oxoglutarate to succinate conversion. Then the glyoxylate bypass was disrupted to eliminate metabolic flux that may circumvent the reconstituted TCA cycle. Additional engineering steps were taken to reduce the degradation of penicillin G and G-7-ADCA in the bioconversion process. These steps include engineering strategies to reduce acetate accumulation in the biocatalytic process and to knock out a host β-lactamase involved in the degradation of penicillin G and G-7-ADCA. By combining these manipulations in an engineered strain, the yield of G-7-ADCA was increased from 2.50 ± 0.79 mM (0.89 ± 0.28 g/L, 0.07 ± 0.02 g/gDCW) to 29.01 ± 1.27 mM (10.31 ± 0.46 g/L, 0.77 ± 0.03 g/gDCW) with a conversion rate of 29.01 mol%, representing an 11-fold increase compared with the starting strain (2.50 mol%).

  15. Current state of nuclear fuel cycles in nuclear engineering and trends in their development according to the environmental safety requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vislov, I. S.; Pischulin, V. P.; Kladiev, S. N.; Slobodyan, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    The state and trends in the development of nuclear fuel cycles in nuclear engineering, taking into account the ecological aspects of using nuclear power plants, are considered. An analysis of advantages and disadvantages of nuclear engineering, compared with thermal engineering based on organic fuel types, was carried out. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing is an important task in the nuclear industry, since fuel unloaded from modern reactors of any type contains a large amount of radioactive elements that are harmful to the environment. On the other hand, the newly generated isotopes of uranium and plutonium should be reused to fabricate new nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel also includes other types of fission products. Conditions for SNF handling are determined by ecological and economic factors. When choosing a certain handling method, one should assess these factors at all stages of its implementation. There are two main methods of SNF handling: open nuclear fuel cycle, with spent nuclear fuel assemblies (NFAs) that are held in storage facilities with their consequent disposal, and closed nuclear fuel cycle, with separation of uranium and plutonium, their purification from fission products, and use for producing new fuel batches. The development of effective closed fuel cycles using mixed uranium-plutonium fuel can provide a successful development of the nuclear industry only under the conditions of implementation of novel effective technological treatment processes that meet strict requirements of environmental safety and reliability of process equipment being applied. The diversity of technological processes is determined by different types of NFA devices and construction materials being used, as well as by the composition that depends on nuclear fuel components and operational conditions for assemblies in the nuclear power reactor. This work provides an overview of technological processes of SNF treatment and methods of handling of nuclear fuel

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of a novel dual-loop organic Rankine cycle for engine waste heat and LNG cold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Taehong; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel dual ORC system is designed for engine waste heat and LNG cold. • Exhaust gas and jacket cooling water are considered as heat sources. • LNG and boil-off gas are considered as heat sinks. • ORC loops are optimized to produce the maximum net work output. - Abstract: The marine sector produces a large portion of total air pollution, so the emissions of the engines used must be improved. This can be achieved using a new eco-friendly engine and waste-heat recovery system. A dual-fuel (DF) engine has been introduced for LNG carriers that is eco-friendly and has high thermal efficiency since it uses natural gas as fuel. The thermal efficiency could be further improved with the organic Rankine cycle (ORC). A novel dual-loop ORC system was designed for DF engines. The upper ORC loop recovers waste heat from the exhaust gas, and the bottom ORC loop recovers waste heat from the jacket cooling water and LNG cold. Both ORC loops were optimized to produce the maximum net work output. The optimum simple dual-loop ORC with n-pentane and R125 as working fluids produces an additional power output of 729.1 kW, which is 4.15% of the original engine output. Further system improvement studies were conducted using a recuperator and preheater, and the feasibility of using boil-off gas as a heat sink was analyzed. Optimization of the system configuration revealed that the preheater and recuperator with n-pentane and R125 as working fluids increase the maximum net work output by 906.4 kW, which is 5.17% of the original engine output.

  17. Comparison Based on Exergetic Analyses of Two Hot Air Engines: A Gamma Type Stirling Engine and an Open Joule Cycle Ericsson Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houda Hachem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a comparison of exergetic models between two hot air engines (a Gamma type Stirling prototype having a maximum output mechanical power of 500 W and an Ericsson hot air engine with a maximum power of 300 W is made. Referring to previous energetic analyses, exergetic models are set up in order to quantify the exergy destruction and efficiencies in each type of engine. The repartition of the exergy fluxes in each part of the two engines are determined and represented in Sankey diagrams, using dimensionless exergy fluxes. The results show a similar proportion in both engines of destroyed exergy compared to the exergy flux from the hot source. The compression cylinders generate the highest exergy destruction, whereas the expansion cylinders generate the lowest one. The regenerator of the Stirling engine increases the exergy resource at the inlet of the expansion cylinder, which might be also set up in the Ericsson engine, using a preheater between the exhaust air and the compressed air transferred to the hot heat exchanger.

  18. Innovative leasing engineering as tool for synchronization of innovative, leasing and buying cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaskova, Natalia; Alekseeva, Tatyana

    2017-10-01

    This article suggests a new principle of cyclic synchronization of innovative, leasing and buying cycles in construction “innovative leasing engineering” which facilitates the accelerated transition of the national economy to the innovative way of development. Cyclical nature of economic phenomena is not only their immanent property, but also the subject of economic analysis. Modern format of decision making management requires analysis of the many cycles which fill any kind of activity. Accounting and reconciliation of construction, design, investment, buying, reproduction, leasing and other cycles is important for investment and construction sphere from the point of view of necessity for synchronization and position of determining the nature of trends in sectoral development.

  19. Thermal performance analysis of Brayton cycle with waste heat recovery boiler for diesel engines of offshore oil production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xianglong; Gong, Guangcai; Wu, Yi; Li, Hangxin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparison of Brayton cycle with WHRB adopted in diesel engines with and without fans by thermal performance. • Waste heat recovery technology for FPSO. • The thermoeconomic analysis for the heat recovery for FPSO. - Abstract: This paper presents the theoretical analysis and on-site testing on the thermal performance of the waste heat recovery system for offshore oil production facilities, including the components of diesel engines, thermal boilers and waste heat boilers. We use the ideal air standard Brayton cycle to analyse the thermal performance. In comparison with the traditional design, the fans at the engine outlet of the waste heat recovery boiler is removed due to the limited space of the offshore platform. The cases with fan and without fan are compared in terms of thermal dynamics performance, energy efficiency and thermo-economic index of the system. The results show that the application of the WHRB increases the energy efficiency of the whole system, but increases the flow resistance in the duct. It is proved that as the waste heat recovery boiler takes the place of the thermal boiler, the energy efficiency of whole system without fan is slightly reduced but heat recovery efficiency is improved. This research provides an important guidance to improve the waste heat recovery for offshore oil production facilities.

  20. A Comparative Study of Cycle Variability of Laser Plug Ignition vs Classical Spark Plug Ignition in Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Done, Bogdan

    2017-10-01

    Over the past 30 years numerous studies and laboratory experiments have researched the use of laser energy to ignite gas and fuel-air mixtures. The actual implementation of this laser application has still to be fully achieved in a commercial automotive application. Laser Plug Ignition as a replacement for Spark Plug Ignition in the internal combustion engines of automotive vehicles, offers several potential benefits such as extending lean burn capability, reducing the cyclic variability between combustion cycles and decreasing the total amount of ignition costs, and implicitly weight and energy requirements. The paper presents preliminary results of cycle variability study carried on a SI Engine equipped with laser Plug Ignition system. Versus classic ignition system, the use of the laser Plug Ignition system assures the reduction of the combustion process variability, reflected in the lower values of the coefficient of variability evaluated for indicated mean effective pressure, maximum pressure, maximum pressure angle and maximum pressure rise rate. The laser plug ignition system was mounted on an experimental spark ignition engine and tested at the regime of 90% load and 2800 rev/min, at dosage of λ=1.1. Compared to conventional spark plug, laser ignition assures the efficiency at lean dosage.

  1. Modeling and simulation in the systems engineering life cycle core concepts and accompanying lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Loper, Margaret L

    2015-01-01

    This easy to read text/reference provides a broad introduction to the fundamental concepts of modeling and simulation (M&S) and systems engineering, highlighting how M&S is used across the entire systems engineering lifecycle. Each chapter corresponds to a short lecture covering a core topic in M&S or systems engineering.  Topics and features: reviews the full breadth of technologies, methodologies and uses of M&S, rather than just focusing on a specific aspect of the field; presents contributions from renowned specialists in each topic covered; introduces the foundational elements and proce

  2. Life Cycle Assessment of Functionally Enhanced Polymers-Engineered Nanomaterials or Conventional Additives?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miseljic, Mirko; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials, where at least one dimension is within 1-100 nm, are produced and used in many consumer products, with the purpose of enhancing specific material properties (e. g., in plastic products). Conventionally, organic and inorganic non-engineered nanomaterial additives are also...... box the needed large content of micro-Mg(OH)(2) makes the engineered nanomaterial case far less favourable, but if Mg(OH)(2) substitutes halogenated flame retardants the potential toxicological impacts are shown to be significantly lower. This study shows that the consideration of enhanced material...

  3. Parametric (On-Design) Cycle Analysis for a Separate-Exhaust Turbofan Engine With Interstage Turbine Burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Siow, Y. K.; Marek, C. J.

    2005-01-01

    Today s modern aircraft is based on air-breathing jet propulsion systems, which use moving fluids as substances to transform energy carried by the fluids into power. Throughout aero-vehicle evolution, improvements have been made to the engine efficiency and pollutants reduction. The major advantages associated with the addition of ITB are an increase in thermal efficiency and reduction in NOx emission. Lower temperature peak in the main combustor results in lower thermal NOx emission and lower amount of cooling air required. This study focuses on a parametric (on-design) cycle analysis of a dual-spool, separate-flow turbofan engine with an Interstage Turbine Burner (ITB). The ITB considered in this paper is a relatively new concept in modern jet engine propulsion. The ITB serves as a secondary combustor and is located between the high- and the low-pressure turbine, i.e., the transition duct. The objective of this study is to use design parameters, such as flight Mach number, compressor pressure ratio, fan pressure ratio, fan bypass ratio, and high-pressure turbine inlet temperature to obtain engine performance parameters, such as specific thrust and thrust specific fuel consumption. Results of this study can provide guidance in identifying the performance characteristics of various engine components, which can then be used to develop, analyze, integrate, and optimize the system performance of turbofan engines with an ITB. Visual Basic program, Microsoft Excel macrocode, and Microsoft Excel neuron code are used to facilitate Microsoft Excel software to plot engine performance versus engine design parameters. This program computes and plots the data sequentially without forcing users to open other types of plotting programs. A user s manual on how to use the program is also included in this report. Furthermore, this stand-alone program is written in conjunction with an off-design program which is an extension of this study. The computed result of a selected design

  4. Integration of project management and systems engineering: Tools for a total-cycle environmental management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacker, P.B.; Winston, R.

    1997-01-01

    An expedited environmental management process has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This process is one result of the Lockheed Martin commitment to the US Department of Energy to incorporate proven systems engineering practices with project management and program controls practices at the INEEL. Lockheed Martin uses a graded approach of its management, operations, and systems activities to tailor the level of control to the needs of the individual projects. The Lockheed Martin definition of systems engineering is: ''''Systems Engineering is a proven discipline that defines and manages program requirements, controls risk, ensures program efficiency, supports informed decision making, and verifies that products and services meet customer needs.'''' This paper discusses: the need for an expedited environmental management process; how the system was developed; what the system is; what the system does; and an overview of key components of the process

  5. Model-Based Engineering Design for Trade Space Exploration throughout the Design Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamassoure, Elisabeth S.; Wall, Stephen D.; Easter, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents ongoing work to standardize model-based system engineering as a complement to point design development in the conceptual design phase of deep space missions. It summarizes two first steps towards practical application of this capability within the framework of concurrent engineering design teams and their customers. The first step is standard generation of system sensitivities models as the output of concurrent engineering design sessions, representing the local trade space around a point design. A review of the chosen model development process, and the results of three case study examples, demonstrate that a simple update to the concurrent engineering design process can easily capture sensitivities to key requirements. It can serve as a valuable tool to analyze design drivers and uncover breakpoints in the design. The second step is development of rough-order- of-magnitude, broad-range-of-validity design models for rapid exploration of the trade space, before selection of a point design. At least one case study demonstrated the feasibility to generate such models in a concurrent engineering session. The experiment indicated that such a capability could yield valid system-level conclusions for a trade space composed of understood elements. Ongoing efforts are assessing the practicality of developing end-to-end system-level design models for use before even convening the first concurrent engineering session, starting with modeling an end-to-end Mars architecture.

  6. Bottoming organic Rankine cycle configurations to increase Internal Combustion Engines power output from cooling water waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peris, Bernardo; Navarro-Esbrí, Joaquín; Molés, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    This work is focused on waste heat recovery of jacket cooling water from Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). Cooling water heat does not always find use due to its low temperature, typically around 90 °C, and usually is rejected to the ambient despite its high thermal power. An efficient way to take benefit from the ICE cooling water waste heat can be to increase the power output through suitable bottoming Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs). Thereby, this work simulates six configurations using ten non flammable working fluids and evaluates their performances in efficiency, safety, cost and environmental terms. Results show that the Double Regenerative ORC using SES36 gets the maximum net efficiency of 7.15%, incrementing the ICE electrical efficiency up to 5.3%, although requires duplicating the number of main components and high turbine size. A more rigorous analysis, based on the system feasibility, shows that small improvements in the basic cycle provide similar gains compared to the most complex schemes proposed. So, the single Regenerative ORC using R236fa and the Reheat Regenerative ORC using R134a seem suitable cycles which provide a net efficiency of 6.55%, incrementing the ICE electrical efficiency up to 4.9%. -- Highlights: • Suitable bottoming cycles for ICE cooling water waste heat recovery are studied. • Non flammable working fluids and various ORC configurations are evaluated. • Double regenerative cycle using SES36 is the most efficient configuration. • Regenerative and reheat regenerative ORCs seem feasible cycles. • Electrical efficiency of the ICE can be improved up to 5.3%

  7. Setting the stage for debating the roles of risk assessment and life-cycle assessment of engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinée, Jeroen B; Heijungs, Reinout; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2017-08-04

    Although technological and environmental benefits are important stimuli for nanotechnology development, these technologies have been contested from an environmental point of view. The steady growth of applications of engineered nanomaterials has heated up the debate on quantifying the environmental repercussions. The two main scientific methods to address these environmental repercussions are risk assessment and life-cycle assessment. The strengths and weaknesses of each of these methods, and the relation between them, have been a topic of debate in the world of traditional chemistry for over two decades. Here we review recent developments in this debate in general and for the emerging field of nanomaterials specifically. We discuss the pros and cons of four schools of thought for combining and integrating risk assessment and life-cycle assessment and conclude with a plea for action.

  8. Engineering carbon fixation in E. coli: from heterologous RuBisCO expression to the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonovsky, Niv; Gleizer, Shmuel; Milo, Ron

    2017-10-01

    Carbon fixation is the gateway of inorganic carbon into the biosphere. Our ability to engineer carbon fixation pathways in living organisms is expected to play a crucial role in the quest towards agricultural and energetic sustainability. Recent successes to introduce non-native carbon fixation pathways into heterotrophic hosts offer novel platforms for manipulating these pathways in genetically malleable organisms. Here, we focus on past efforts and future directions for engineering the dominant carbon fixation pathway in the biosphere, the Calvin-Benson cycle, into the well-known model organism Escherichia coli. We describe how central carbon metabolism of this heterotrophic bacterium can be manipulated to allow directed evolution of carbon fixing enzymes. Finally, we highlight future directions towards synthetic autotrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental study on Rankine cycle evaporator efficiency intended for exhaust waste heat recovery of a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milkov Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper pressents an experimental study of Rankine cycle evaporator efficiency. Water was chosen as the working fluid in the system. The experimental test was conducted on a test bench equipped with a burner charged by compressed fresh air. Generated exhaust gases parameters were previously determined over the diesel engine operating range (28 engine operating points were studied. For each test point the working fluid parameters (flow rate and evaporating pressure were varied. Thus, the enthalpy flow through the heat exchanger was determined. Heat exchanger was designed as 23 helical tubes are inserted. On the basis of the results, it was found out that efficiency varies from 25 % to 51,9 %. The optimal working fluid pressure is 20 bar at most of the operating points while the optimum fluid mass flow rate varies from 2 g/s to 10 g/s.

  10. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, the College of Engineering at the University of South Carolina has conducted an assessment of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle related areas. The study was initiated as a regional effort focusing on the concentration of nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. The project was envisioned as providing base line information for the eventual implementation of a program in line with the needs of the Southeast's nuclear community. Specific objectives were to establish the content of such a program and to determine those specialized features which would make the program most attractive and useful

  11. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, the College of Engineering at the University of South Carolina has conducted an assessment of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle related areas. The study was initiated as a regional effort focusing on the concentration of nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. The project was envisioned as providing base line information for the eventual implementation of a program in line with the needs of the Southeast's nuclear community. Specific objectives were to establish the content of such a program and to determine those specialized features which would make the program most attractive and useful.

  12. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  13. Life cycle inventory of manufacturing prefinished engineered wood flooring in eastern U.S. with comparison to solid strip wood flooring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Bergman; Scott A. Bowe

    2011-01-01

    Building products have come under increased scrutiny because of environmental impacts from their manufacture. Our study followed the life cycle inventory approach for prefinished engineered wood flooring in the eastern US and compared the results with those of solid strip wood flooring. Our study surveyed five engineered wood flooring manufacturers in the eastern US....

  14. Thermoeconomic multi-objective optimization of an organic Rankine cycle for exhaust waste heat recovery of a diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fubin; Zhang, Hongguang; Song, Songsong; Bei, Chen; Wang, Hongjin; Wang, Enhua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the ORC (Organic Rankine cycle) technology is adopted to recover the exhaust waste heat of diesel engine. The thermodynamic, economic and optimization models of the ORC system are established, respectively. Firstly, the effects of four key parameters, including evaporation pressure, superheat degree, condensation temperature and exhaust temperature at the outlet of the evaporator on the thermodynamic performances and economic indicators of the ORC system are investigated. Subsequently, based on the established optimization model, GA (genetic algorithm) is employed to solve the Pareto solution of the thermodynamic performances and economic indicators for maximizing net power output and minimizing total investment cost under diesel engine various operating conditions using R600, R600a, R601a, R245fa, R1234yf and R1234ze as working fluids. The most suitable working fluid used in the ORC system for diesel engine waste heat recovery is screened out, and then the corresponding optimal parameter regions are analyzed. The results show that thermodynamic performance of the ORC system is improved at the expense of economic performance. Among these working fluids, R245fa is considered as the most suitable working fluid for the ORC waste heat application of the diesel engine with comprehensive consideration of thermoeconomic performances, environmental impacts and safety levels. Under the various operating conditions of the diesel engine, the optimal evaporation pressure is in the range of 1.1 MPa–2.1 MPa. In addition, the optimal superheat degree and the exhaust temperature at the outlet of the evaporator are mainly influenced by the operating conditions of the diesel engine. The optimal condensation temperature keeps a nearly constant value of 298.15 K. - Highlights: • Thermoeconomic multi-objective optimization of an ORC (Organic Rankine cycle) system is conducted. • Sensitivity analysis of the decision variables is performed. • Genetic algorithm

  15. Bond Coat Engineering Influence on the Evolution of the Microstructure, Bond Strength, and Failure of TBCs Subjected to Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R. S.; Nagy, D.; Marple, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Different types of thermal spray systems, including HVOF (JP5000 and DJ2600-hybrid), APS (F4-MB and Axial III), and LPPS (Oerlikon Metco system) were employed to spray CoNiCrAlY bond coats (BCs) onto Inconel 625 substrates. The chemical composition of the BC powder was the same in all cases; however, the particle size distribution of the powder employed with each torch was that specifically recommended for the torch. For optimization purposes, these BCs were screened based on initial evaluations of roughness, porosity, residual stress, relative oxidation, and isothermal TGO growth. A single type of standard YSZ top coat was deposited via APS (F4MB) on all the optimized BCs. The TBCs were thermally cycled by employing a furnace cycle test (FCT) (1080 °C-1 h—followed by forced air cooling). Samples were submitted to 10, 100, 400, and 1400 cycles as well as being cycled to failure. The behavior of the microstructures, bond strength values (ASTM 633), and the TGO evolution of these TBCs, were investigated for the as-sprayed and thermally cycled samples. During FCT, the TBCs found to be both the best and poorest performing and had their BCs deposited via HVOF. The results showed that engineering low-oxidized BCs does not necessarily lead to an optimal TBC performance. Moreover, the bond strength values decrease significantly only when the TBC is about to fail (top coat spall off) and the as-sprayed bond strength values cannot be used as an indicator of TBC performance.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of engineering solutions aimed at raising the efficiency of integrated gasification combined cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S. I.; Bogatova, T. F.; Ryzhkov, A. F.

    2017-11-01

    Raising the efficiency and environmental friendliness of electric power generation from coal is the aim of numerous research groups today. The traditional approach based on the steam power cycle has reached its efficiency limit, prompted by materials development and maneuverability performance. The rival approach based on the combined cycle is also drawing nearer to its efficiency limit. However, there is a reserve for efficiency increase of the integrated gasification combined cycle, which has the energy efficiency at the level of modern steam-turbine power units. The limit of increase in efficiency is the efficiency of NGCC. One of the main problems of the IGCC is higher costs of receiving and preparing fuel gas for GTU. It would be reasonable to decrease the necessary amount of fuel gas in the power unit to minimize the costs. The effect can be reached by raising of the heat value of fuel gas, its heat content and the heat content of cycle air. On the example of the process flowsheet of the IGCC with a power of 500 MW, running on Kuznetsk bituminous coal, by means of software Thermoflex, the influence of the developed technical solutions on the efficiency of the power plant is considered. It is received that rise in steam-air blast temperature to 900°C leads to an increase in conversion efficiency up to 84.2%. An increase in temperature levels of fuel gas clean-up to 900°C leads to an increase in the IGCC efficiency gross/net by 3.42%. Cycle air heating reduces the need for fuel gas by 40% and raises the IGCC efficiency gross/net by 0.85-1.22%. The offered solutions for IGCC allow to exceed net efficiency of analogous plants by 1.8-2.3%.

  17. Performance of diesel cycle engine-generator operating on dual fuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The process was based on obtaining gas through the partial biomass burn, which in high temperatures is converted to fuel gas that may be used in internal combustion engine. Among the results, it was observed that there is a reduction of 30.7% in the diesel consumption, a better voltage adjustment and a maximum current ...

  18. Engineering Margin Factors Used in the Design of the VVER Fuel Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizorkin, M. P.; Shishkov, L. K.

    2017-12-01

    The article describes methods for determination of the engineering margin factors currently used to estimate the uncertainties of the VVER reactor design parameters calculated via the KASKAD software package developed at the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute. These margin factors ensure the meeting of the operating (design) limits and a number of other restrictions under normal operating conditions.

  19. Considering Life Cycle during Design: A Longitudinal Study of Engineering Undergraduates. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Ken; Morozov, Andrew; Kilgore, Deborah; Atman, Cynthia; Loucks-Jaret, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this age of global warming and diminishing fossil fuel stores, society is becoming increasingly aware that seemingly small decisions can have surprisingly far-reaching implications on the environment and future generations. Accordingly, today's engineers must approach design problems with a holistic, broad view of the impacts,…

  20. The US Army Corps of Engineers Roadmap for Life-Cycle Building Information Modeling (BIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Building Information Modeling ( BIM ) En gi ne er R es ea rc h an...Abstract Building Information Modeling ( BIM ) technology has rapidly gained ac- ceptance throughout the planning, architecture, engineering...the Industry Foundation Class (IFC) definitions to create vendor-neutral data exchanges for use in BIM software tools. Building Information Modeling

  1. Performance of diesel cycle engine-generator operating on dual fuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unioeste;Paulo Job Brenneisen

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... heat, and in the partial combustion a part of biomass is converted to ... air intake. Figure 1. Two stage co-current gasifier. ensuring that all the fuel is consumed. The main goal on partial combustion is the gas generation (gasification) and not ..... Engine Systems, Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), U.S..

  2. Realization of the Atkinson-Miller cycle in spark-ignition engine by means of the fully variable inlet valve control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żmudka, Zbigniew; Postrzednik, Stefan; Przybyła, Grzegorz

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical analysis of the charge exchange process in a spark ignition engine has been presented. This process has significant impact on the effectiveness of engine operation because it is related to the necessity of overcoming the flow resistance, followed by the necessity of doing a work, so-called the charge exchange work. The flow resistance caused by the throttling valve is especially high during the part load operation. The open Atkinson-Miller cycle has been assumed as a model of processes taking place in the engine. Using fully variable inlet valve timing the A-M cycle can be realized according to two systems: system with late inlet valve closing and system with early inlet valve closing. The systems have been analysed individually and comparatively with the open Seiliger-Sabathe cycle which is a theoretical cycle for the classical throttle governing of the engine load. Benefits resulting from application of the systems with independent inlet valve control have been assessed on the basis of the selected parameters: fuel dose, cycle work, charge exchange work and a cycle efficiency. The use of the analysed systems to governing of the SI engine load will enable to eliminate a throttling valve from the system inlet and reduce the charge exchange work, especially within the range of part load operation.

  3. Realization of the Atkinson-Miller cycle in spark-ignition engine by means of the fully variable inlet valve control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żmudka Zbigniew

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of the charge exchange process in a spark ignition engine has been presented. This process has significant impact on the effectiveness of engine operation because it is related to the necessity of overcoming the flow resistance, followed by the necessity of doing a work, so-called the charge exchange work. The flow resistance caused by the throttling valve is especially high during the part load operation. The open Atkinson-Miller cycle has been assumed as a model of processes taking place in the engine. Using fully variable inlet valve timing the A-M cycle can be realized according to two systems: system with late inlet valve closing and system with early inlet valve closing. The systems have been analysed individually and comparatively with the open Seiliger-Sabathe cycle which is a theoretical cycle for the classical throttle governing of the engine load. Benefits resulting from application of the systems with independent inlet valve control have been assessed on the basis of the selected parameters: fuel dose, cycle work, charge exchange work and a cycle efficiency. The use of the analysed systems to governing of the SI engine load will enable to eliminate a throttling valve from the system inlet and reduce the charge exchange work, especially within the range of part load operation.

  4. Analyzing the Performance of a Dual Loop Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery of a Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baofeng Yao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A dual loop organic Rankine cycle (DORC system is designed to recover waste heat from a heavy-duty compressed natural gas engine (CNGE, and the performance of the DORC–CNGE combined system is simulated and discussed. The DORC system includes high-temperature (HT and low-temperature (LT cycles. The HT cycle recovers energy from the exhaust gas emitted by the engine, whereas the LT cycle recovers energy from intake air, engine coolant, and the HT cycle working fluid in the preheater. The mathematical model of the system is established based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The characteristics of waste heat energy from the CNGE are calculated according to engine test data under various operating conditions. Moreover, the performance of the DORC–CNGE combined system is simulated and analyzed using R245fa as the working fluid. Results show that the maximum net power output and the maximum thermal efficiency of the DORC system are 29.37 kW and 10.81%, respectively, under the rated power output condition of the engine. Compared with the original CNG engine, the maximum power output increase ratio and the maximum brake specific fuel consumption improvement ratio are 33.73% and 25%, respectively, in the DORC–CNGE combined system.

  5. Tradeoff Study between Cost and Environmental Impact of Aircraft Using Simultaneous Optimization of Airframe and Engine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate more efficient aircraft configurations which have less environmental impact, this paper develops a multidisciplinary analysis framework integrated with the airframe and propulsion analysis modules. The characteristics for propulsion, aerodynamics, weight, performance, cost, emissions, and noise can be rapidly predicted by the framework. The impact of propulsion installation with large diameter engines on aircraft weight and drag are considered in the framework. A wide-body aircraft was taken as an example for the optimization to investigate the tradeoffs between the cost metric and the environmental performance metrics. Several cases for single objective and multiobjective optimizations were performed. In the single objective optimizations, the direct operating cost, the cumulative noise, the oxides of nitrogen emissions during landing-takeoff cycle, and the mission oxides of nitrogen emissions were considered as an objective and minimized, respectively. The different objectives resulted in designs with different airframe parameters and engine cycle parameters. In the multiobjective optimizations, the direct operating costs and environmental performances were considered as the objectives simultaneously. The optimization results were the Pareto fronts for the minimum direct operating costs and environmental performances, which illustrate the quantitative relationships between the economic metric and the environmental performances.

  6. Analysis of Combustion Process in Industrial Gas Engine with Prechamber-Based Ignition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Ślefarski

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of a pre-combustion chamber (PCC ignition system is one of the methods to improve combustion stability and reduce toxic compounds emission, especially NOx. Using PCC allows the operation of the engine at lean combustion conditions or the utilization of low calorific gaseous fuels such as syngas or biogas. The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the combustion process in two stroke, large bore, stationary gas engine GMVH 12 equipped with two spark plugs (2-SP and a PCC ignition system. The experimental research has been performed during the normal operation of the engine in an industrial compression station. It was observed that application of PCC provides less cycle-to-cycle combustion variation (more than 10% and nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions decreased to 60% and 26% respectively. The total hydrocarbon (THC emission rate is 25% higher for the engine equipped with PCC, which results in roughly two percent engine efficiency decrease. Another important criterion of engine retrofitting was the PCC location in the engine head. The experimental results show that improvement of engine operating parameters was recorded only for a configuration with one port offset by 45° from the axis of the main chamber. The study of the ignition delay angle and equivalence ratio in PCC did not demonstrate explicit influence on engine performance.

  7. Multi-objective optimization of a bottoming Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) of gasoline engine using swash-plate expander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, J.; Climent, H.; Dolz, V.; Royo-Pascual, L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermo-economic and sizing model of an ORC in a gasoline engine is carried out. • A multi-objective optimization method to design an ORC for vehicle WHR is presented. • A multiple attribute decision-making method is implemented to select the solution. - Abstract: This paper presents a mathematical model of a bottoming Organic Rankine Cycle coupled to a 2 l turbocharged gasoline engine to optimize the cycle from a thermo-economic and sizing point of view. These criteria were optimized with different cycle values. Therefore, a methodology to optimize the ORC coupled to Waste Heat Recovery systems in vehicle applications is presented using a multi-objective optimization algorithm. Multi-objective optimization results show that the optimum solution depend on the importance of each objective to the final solution. Considering thermo-economic criteria as the main objective, greater sizes will be required. Considering sizing criteria as the main objective, higher thermo-economic parameters will be obtained. Therefore, in order to select a single-solution from the Pareto frontier, a multiple attribute decision-making method (TOPSIS) was implemented in order to take into account the preferences of the Decision Maker. Considering the weight factors 0.5 for Specific Investment Cost (SIC), 0.3 for the area of the heat exchangers (A tot ) and 0.2 for Volume Coefficient (VC) and the boundaries of this particular application, the result is optimized with values of 0.48 m 2 (A tot ), 2515 €/kW (SIC) and 2.62 MJ/m 3 (VC). Moreover, the profitability of the project by means of the Net Present Value and the Payback has been estimated.

  8. Integrating life cycle assessment into managing potential EHS risks of engineered nanomaterials: reviewing progress to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, William C.; Bosso, Christopher J.; Eckelman, Matthew; Isaacs, Jacqueline A.; Pourzahedi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    The 2011 National Nanotechnology Initiative’s Environmental Health and Safety Research Strategy stressed the need for research to integrate life cycle considerations into risk management and, then, to better integrate risk assessment into decisionmaking on environmental, health, and safety (EHS) dimensions of nanomanufacturing. This paper reviews scholarly articles published 2010–2015 that in some way apply life cycle analysis to nanotechnology to assess the extent to which current research reflects the priorities lain out in the NNI report. As the NNI’s focus was primarily on the “responsible development of nanotechnology” we also focus our examination on the ways in which LCA, in concert with other methodologies, can provide utility to decision makers facing the challenge of implementing that broad goal. We explore some of the challenges and opportunities inherent in using LCA, a tool built to optimize manufacturing decisions, as a guide for policy formulation or tool for policy implementation

  9. Integrating life cycle assessment into managing potential EHS risks of engineered nanomaterials: reviewing progress to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William C.; Bosso, Christopher J.; Eckelman, Matthew; Isaacs, Jacqueline A.; Pourzahedi, Leila

    2015-08-01

    The 2011 National Nanotechnology Initiative's Environmental Health and Safety Research Strategy stressed the need for research to integrate life cycle considerations into risk management and, then, to better integrate risk assessment into decisionmaking on environmental, health, and safety (EHS) dimensions of nanomanufacturing. This paper reviews scholarly articles published 2010-2015 that in some way apply life cycle analysis to nanotechnology to assess the extent to which current research reflects the priorities lain out in the NNI report. As the NNI's focus was primarily on the "responsible development of nanotechnology" we also focus our examination on the ways in which LCA, in concert with other methodologies, can provide utility to decision makers facing the challenge of implementing that broad goal. We explore some of the challenges and opportunities inherent in using LCA, a tool built to optimize manufacturing decisions, as a guide for policy formulation or tool for policy implementation.

  10. Reverse engineering of fluid selection for thermodynamic cycles with cubic equations of state, using a compression heat pump as example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roskosch, Dennis; Atakan, Burak

    2015-01-01

    Fluid selection for thermodynamic cycles like refrigeration cycles, heat pumps or organic Rankine cycles remains an actual topic. Generally the search for a working fluid is based on experimental approaches or on a not very systematic trial and error approach, far from being elegant. An alternative method may be a theory based reverse engineering approach, proposed and investigated here: The design process should start with an optimal process and with (abstract) properties of the fluid needed to fit into this optimal process, best described by some general equation of state and the corresponding fluid-describing parameters. These should be analyzed and optimized with respect to the defined model process, which also has to be optimized simultaneously. From this information real fluids can be selected or even synthesized which have fluid defining properties in the optimum regime like critical temperature or ideal gas capacities of heat, allowing to find new working fluids, not considered so far. The number and kind of the fluid-defining parameters is mainly based on the choice of the used EOS (equation of state). The property model used in the present work is based on the cubic Peng–Robinson equation, chosen due to its moderate numerical expense, sufficient accuracy as well as a general availability of the fluid-defining parameters for many compounds. The considered model-process works between the temperature levels of 273.15 and 333.15 K and can be used as heat pump for supplying buildings with heat, typically. The objective functions are the COP (coefficient of performance) and the VHC (volumetric heating capacity) as a function of critical pressure, critical temperature, acentric factor and two coefficients for the temperature-dependent isobaric ideal gas heat capacity. Also, the steam quality at the compressor entrance has to be regarded as a problem variable. The results give clear hints regarding optimal fluid parameters of the analyzed process and deepen

  11. Towards life-cycle awareness in decision support tools for engineering design

    OpenAIRE

    Nergård, Henrik; Sandberg, Marcus; Larsson, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a decision support tool with the focus on how to generate and visualize decision base coupled to the business agreement is outlined and discussed. Decision support tools for the early design phases are few and especially tools that visualize the readiness level of activities throughout the product life-cycle. Aiming for the sustainable society there is an indication that business-to-business manufacturers move toward providing a function rather than selling off the hardware and ...

  12. Performance of a single nutating disk engine in the 2 to 500 kW power range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korakianitis, T.; Boruta, M.; Jerovsek, J.; Meitner, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    A new type of internal combustion engine with distinct advantages over conventional piston-engines and gas turbines in small power ranges is presented. The engine has analogies with piston engine operation, but like gas turbines it has dedicated spaces and devices for compression, burning and expansion. The engine operates on a modified limited-pressure thermodynamic cycle. The core of the engine is a nutating non-rotating disk, with the center of its hub mounted in the middle of a Z-shaped shaft. The two ends of the shaft rotate, while the disk nutates. The motion of the disk circumference prescribes a portion of a sphere. In the single-disk configuration a portion of the surface area of the disk is used for intake and compression, a portion is used to seal against a center casing, and the remaining portion is used for expansion and exhaust. The compressed air is admitted to an external accumulator, and then into an external combustion chamber before it is admitted to the power side of the disk. The external combustion chamber enables the engine to operate on a variable compression ratio cycle. Variations in cycle temperature ratio and compression ratio during normal operation enable the engine to effectively become a variable-cycle engine, allowing significant flexibility for optimizing efficiency or power output. The thermal efficiency is similar to that of medium sized diesel engines. For the same engine volume and weight this engine produces approximately twice the power of a two-stroke engine and four times the power of a four-stroke engine. The computed sea-level engine performance at design and off-design conditions in the 2 to 500 kW power range is presented.

  13. Therapeutic strategy for hair regeneration: Hair cycle activation, niche environment modulation, wound-induced follicle neogenesis and stem cell engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Shan-Chang; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Chih-Chiang; Lei, Mingxing; Wang, Ling Mei; Widelitz, Randall B.; Hughes, Michael W.; Jiang, Ting-Xing; Chuong, Cheng Ming

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There are major new advancements in the fields of stem cell biology, developmental biology, regenerative hair cycling, and tissue engineering. The time is ripe to integrate, translate and apply these findings to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Readers will learn about new progress in cellular and molecular aspects of hair follicle development, regeneration and potential therapeutic opportunities these advances may offer. Areas covered Here we use hair follicle formation to illustrate this progress and to identify targets for potential strategies in therapeutics. Hair regeneration is discussed in four different categories. (1) Intra-follicle regeneration (or renewal) is the basic production of hair fibers from hair stem cells and dermal papillae in existing follicles. (2) Chimeric follicles via epithelial-mesenchymal recombination to identify stem cells and signaling centers. (3) Extra-follicular factors including local dermal and systemic factors can modulate the regenerative behavior of hair follicles, and may be relatively easy therapeutic targets. (4) Follicular neogenesis means the de novo formation of new follicles. In addition, scientists are working to engineer hair follicles, which require hair forming competent epidermal cells and hair inducing dermal cells. Expert opinion Ideally self-organizing processes similar to those occurring during embryonic development should be elicited with some help from biomaterials. PMID:23289545

  14. Ascent phase trajectory optimization for vehicle with multi-combined cycle engine based on improved particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Wang, Xiaogang; Bai, Yuliang; Cui, Naigang

    2017-11-01

    An improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) algorithm is proposed to optimize the ascent phase trajectory for vehicle with multi-combined cycle engine. Aerodynamic and thrust models are formulated in couple with flying states and environment. Conventional PSO has advantages in solving complicated optimization problems but has troubles in constraints handling and premature convergence preventing. To handle constraints, a modification in the fitness function of infeasible particles is executed based on the constraints violation and a comparation is executed to choose the better particle according to the fitness. To prevent premature, a diminishing number of particles are chosen to be mutated on the velocity by random times and directions. The ascent trajectory is divided into sub-phases according to engine modes. Different constraints, control parameters and engine models are considered in each sub-phase. Though the proposed algorithm is straightforward in comprehension and implementation, the numerical examples demonstrate that the algorithm has better performance than other PSO variants. In comparation with the commercial software GPOPS, the performance index of IPSO is almost the same as GPOPS but the results are less oscillating and dependent on initial values.

  15. Performance, Life, and Operability Trade-Offs in VCE (Variable Cycle Engine) Control Logic Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    controller 33 6. through an Electro-Hydraulic Servo Valve ( EHSV ) and a position transducer. A pair of hydraulic cylinders will actuate a bell crank system to...Operability Trade-offs in VCE Control Logic Design Detroit Diesel Allison P. 0. Box 894 Indianapolis, Indiana 46206 July 1981 Final Report for Period August...L. SMALL Project Engineer Technical Area Manager S.Components Branch Controls and Diagnostics Components Branch - FOR rE COMMANDER Director Turbine

  16. Energetic optimization of the performances of a hot air engine for micro-CHP systems working with a Joule or an Ericsson cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creyx, M.; Delacourt, E.; Morin, C.; Desmet, B.; Peultier, P.

    2013-01-01

    The micro combined heat and electrical power systems (micro-CHP) with hot air engines are well adapted for solid biomass upgrading, in particular, the Ericsson engines working with an open cycle and an external combustion. This paper presents a model of an Ericsson engine with a compression and an expansion cylinder which allows a thermodynamic optimization of the engine performances in a global approach. A sensitive analysis on the influent parameters is carried out in order to determine the optimal working conditions of the engine: temperature and pressure range, expansion cycle shape with a late intake valve closing or an early exhaust valve closing, heat transfers through the wall of the cylinders. This study, focused on thermodynamic aspects, is a first step in the design of an Ericsson engine. -- Highlights: ► A model of Ericsson engine working with a Joule or Ericsson cycle is presented. ► Influent factors on the engine performances are investigated. ► The heat exchanges in the cylinder wall must be avoided to improve the performances. ► Closing the intake valve late and the exhaust valve early enhances the performances. ► Efficiency, indicated mean pressure, specific work are thermodynamically optimized.

  17. Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Engine Cycle Analysis for Hybrid-Wing-Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, James L.; Kim, Hyun Dae; Brown, Gerald V.

    2009-01-01

    Meeting NASA's N+3 goals requires a fundamental shift in approach to aircraft and engine design. Material and design improvements allow higher pressure and higher temperature core engines which improve the thermal efficiency. Propulsive efficiency, the other half of the overall efficiency equation, however, is largely determined by the fan pressure ratio (FPR). Lower FPR increases propulsive efficiency, but also dramatically reduces fan shaft speed through the combination of larger diameter fans and reduced fan tip speed limits. The result is that below an FPR of 1.5 the maximum fan shaft speed makes direct drive turbines problematic. However, it is the low pressure ratio fans that allow the improvement in propulsive efficiency which, along with improvements in thermal efficiency in the core, contributes strongly to meeting the N+3 goals for fuel burn reduction. The lower fan exhaust velocities resulting from lower FPRs are also key to meeting the aircraft noise goals. Adding a gear box to the standard turbofan engine allows acceptable turbine speeds to be maintained. However, development of a 50,000+ hp gearbox required by fans in a large twin engine transport aircraft presents an extreme technical challenge, therefore another approach is needed. This paper presents a propulsion system which transmits power from the turbine to the fan electrically rather than mechanically. Recent and anticipated advances in high temperature superconducting generators, motors, and power lines offer the possibility that such devices can be used to transmit turbine power in aircraft without an excessive weight penalty. Moving to such a power transmission system does more than provide better matching between fan and turbine shaft speeds. The relative ease with which electrical power can be distributed throughout the aircraft opens up numerous other possibilities for new aircraft and propulsion configurations and modes of operation. This paper discusses a number of these new

  18. Comparison of a Novel Organic-Fluid Thermofluidic Heat Converter and an Organic Rankine Cycle Heat Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph J.W. Kirmse

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Up-THERM heat converter is an unsteady, two-phase thermofluidic oscillator that employs an organic working fluid, which is currently being considered as a prime-mover in small- to medium-scale combined heat and power (CHP applications. In this paper, the Up-THERM heat converter is compared to a basic (sub-critical, non-regenerative organic Rankine cycle (ORC heat engine with respect to their power outputs, thermal efficiencies and exergy efficiencies, as well as their capital and specific costs. The study focuses on a pre-specified Up-THERM design in a selected application, a heat-source temperature range from 210 °C to 500 °C and five different working fluids (three n-alkanes and two refrigerants. A modeling methodology is developed that allows the above thermo-economic performance indicators to be estimated for the two power-generation systems. For the chosen applications, the power output of the ORC engine is generally higher than that of the Up-THERM heat converter. However, the capital costs of the Up-THERM heat converter are lower than those of the ORC engine. Although the specific costs (£/kW of the ORC engine are lower than those of the Up-THERM converter at low heat-source temperatures, the two systems become progressively comparable at higher temperatures, with the Up-THERM heat converter attaining a considerably lower specific cost at the highest heat-source temperatures considered.

  19. Life Cycle Systems Engineering Approach to NASA's 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dale; Smith, Charles; Safie, Fayssal; Kittredge, Sheryl

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of the 2nd Generation RLV Program is to substantially reduce technical and business risks associated with developing a new class of reusable launch vehicles. NASA's specific goals are to improve the safety of a 2nd- generation system by 2 orders of magnitude - equivalent to a crew risk of 1 -in- 10,000 missions - and decrease the cost tenfold, to approximately $1,000 per pound of payload launched. Architecture definition is being conducted in parallel with the maturating of key technologies specifically identified to improve safety and reliability, while reducing operational costs. An architecture broadly includes an Earth-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle, on-orbit transfer vehicles and upper stages, mission planning, ground and flight operations, and support infrastructure, both on the ground and in orbit. The systems engineering approach ensures that the technologies developed - such as lightweight structures, long-life rocket engines, reliable crew escape, and robust thermal protection systems - will synergistically integrate into the optimum vehicle. Given a candidate architecture that possesses credible physical processes and realistic technology assumptions, the next set of analyses address the system's functionality across the spread of operational scenarios characterized by the design reference missions. The safety/reliability and cost/economics associated with operating the system will also be modeled and analyzed to answer the questions "How safe is it?" and "How much will it cost to acquire and operate?" The systems engineering review process factors in comprehensive budget estimates, detailed project schedules, and business and performance plans, against the goals of safety, reliability, and cost, in addition to overall technical feasibility. This approach forms the basis for investment decisions in the 2nd Generation RLV Program's risk-reduction activities. Through this process, NASA will continually refine its specialized needs and

  20. Ethanol-fueled low temperature combustion: A pathway to clean and efficient diesel engine cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, Usman; Kumar, Raj; Zheng, Ming; Tjong, Jimi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Concept of ethanol–diesel fueled Premixed Pilot Assisted Combustion (PPAC). • Ultra-low NOx and soot with diesel-like thermal efficiency across the load range. • Close to TDC pilot injection timing for direct combustion phasing control. • Minimum pilot quantity (15% of total energy input) for clean, stable operation. • Defined heat release profile distribution (HRPD) to optimize pilot-ethanol ratio. - Abstract: Low temperature combustion (LTC) in diesel engines offers the benefits of ultra-low NOx and smoke emissions but suffers from lowered energy efficiency due to the high reactivity and low volatility of diesel fuel. Ethanol from renewable biomass provides a viable alternate to the petroleum based transportation fuels. The high resistance to auto-ignition (low reactivity) and its high volatility make ethanol a suitable fuel for low temperature combustion (LTC) in compression-ignition engines. In this work, a Premixed Pilot Assisted Combustion (PPAC) strategy comprising of the port fuel injection of ethanol, ignited with a single diesel pilot injection near the top dead centre has been investigated on a single-cylinder high compression ratio diesel engine. The impact of the diesel pilot injection timing, ethanol to diesel quantity ratio and exhaust gas recirculation on the emissions and efficiency are studied at 10 bar IMEP. With the lessons learnt, successful ethanol–diesel PPAC has been demonstrated up to a load of 18 bar IMEP with ultra-low NOx and soot emissions across the full load range. The main challenge of PPAC is the reduced combustion efficiency especially at low loads; therefore, the authors have presented a combustion control strategy to allow high efficiency, clean combustion across the load range. This work entails to provide a detailed framework for the ethanol-fueled PPAC to be successfully implemented.

  1. Investigating the hepatitis B virus life cycle using engineered reporter hepatitis B viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitsuji, Hironori; Harada, Keisuke; Ujino, Saneyuki; Zhang, Jing; Kohara, Michinori; Sugiyama, Masaya; Mizokami, Masashi; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2018-01-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) increases the risk of developing fibrosis, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Current therapies are limited to type-I interferons and/or nucleos(t)ide analogues; however, these are only partially effective. The development of novel anti-HBV agents for new treatment strategies has been hampered by the lack of a suitable system that allows the in vitro replication of HBV. Studies of virus infection/replication at the molecular level using wild-type HBV are labor-intensive and time-consuming. To overcome these problems, we previously constructed a recombinant reporter HBV bearing the NanoLuc gene and showed its usefulness in identifying factors that affect HBV proliferation. Because this system mimics the early stage of the HBV life cycle faithfully, we conducted a quantitative analysis of HBV infectivity to several human hepatocyte cell lines as well as the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide and HBV protein X on the early stage of HBV proliferation using this system. Furthermore, we developed a system to produce a reporter HBV expressing a pol gene. These reporter HBV may provide an opportunity to enhance our understanding of the HBV life cycle and aid strategies for the development of new anti-HBV agents. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  2. Prospective gas turbine and combined-cycle units for power engineering (a Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ol'khovskii, G. G.

    2013-02-01

    The modern state of technology for making gas turbines around the world and heat-recovery combined-cycle units constructed on their basis are considered. The progress achieved in this field by Siemens, Mitsubishi, General Electric, and Alstom is analyzed, and the objectives these companies set forth for themselves for the near and more distant future are discussed. The 375-MW gas turbine unit with an efficiency of 40% produced by Siemens, which is presently the largest one, is subjected to a detailed analysis. The main specific features of this turbine are that the gas turbine unit's hot-path components have purely air cooling, due to which the installation has enhanced maneuverability. The single-shaft combined-cycle plant constructed on the basis of this turbine has a capacity of 570 MW and efficiency higher than 60%. Programs adopted by different companies for development of new-generation gas turbine units firing synthesis gas and fitted with low-emission combustion chambers and new cooling systems are considered. Concepts of rotor blades for new gas turbine units with improved thermal barrier coatings and composite blades different parts of which are made of materials selected in accordance with the conditions of their operation are discussed.

  3. Different climate engineering methods would create different responses of the hydrological cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hauke; Niemeier, Ulrike

    2017-04-01

    The authors had the extraordinary pleasure and privilege to work with the late Jon Egill Kristjansson within the IMPLICC project on "Implications and risks of engineering solar radiation to limit climate change" and in several subsequent projects on the same topic. One of the early and still valid concerns with respect to climate engineering via the manipulation of solar radiation was that such measures would not be able to reproduce some historical climate but create a new one. In particular the increase of global mean precipitation resulting from global warming would be overcompensated. In joint work with Jon Egill we have argued that the degree of overcompensation would depend on the specific method, among them the injection of sulfur into the stratosphere, mirrors in space, and marine cloud brightening through artificial emissions of sea salt. It would be larger for aerosol based methods than for space mirrors. Work lead by Jon Egill has then shown that the situation would be very different for cirrus cloud thinning. In this presentation we will revisit the arguments given in these studies.

  4. Performance of a cycle Otto engine using biogas; Desempenho de um motor ciclo Otto utilizando biogas como combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Juliano de [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas], e-mail: jsouza@unioeste.br; Souza, Samuel N. Melegari de [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: ssouza@unioeste.br; Machado, Paulo Romeu M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2004-07-01

    The rising of the oil prices is increasing the search for alternative fuels. Brazil has a great availability of biogas from anaerobic digestion in the rural area, urban waste in the landfills and treatment of the municipal sewer. In this work were evaluated in dynamometer a cycle Otto engine using biogas, and were obtained the characteristics curves of torque and power. First was done the evidence test with gasoline, biogas and natural gas, using commercial systems for this fuels, using as comparison for other tests. After has been done tests for some combinations of ignition point, mixer of gas and compression tax. By the analysis of the results has been concluded that the better results for power and torque using biogas as fuel were with a tax compression of 12,5:1, gas mixer long and ignition point advanced in 45 deg. (author)

  5. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    An assessment was conducted of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle-related areas, focusing on the nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. As a result of the study, a list of subject areas has been compiled as best representing the current content of an educational program. In addition to identifying subject areas, a set of course descriptions and reference materials has been developed around each subject. Each course description contains information regarding objectives, anticipated audience, and prerequisites and offers a suggested course outline. An initial modest program of implementation is recommended which would continue to concentrate on the Southeast as a target area

  6. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    An assessment was conducted of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle-related areas, focusing on the nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. As a result of the study, a list of subject areas has been compiled as best representing the current content of an educational program. In addition to identifying subject areas, a set of course descriptions and reference materials has been developed around each subject. Each course description contains information regarding objectives, anticipated audience, and prerequisites and offers a suggested course outline. An initial modest program of implementation is recommended which would continue to concentrate on the Southeast as a target area.

  7. Heat transfer from an internal combustion (Otto-cycle) engine on the surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Owen

    1992-01-01

    The cooling requirements for an average car sized engine (spark-ignition, V-6, four-stroke, naturally aspirated, about 200 kg, about 100 kW) were looked at for Mars. Several modes of cooling were considered, including forced convection, exhaust, radiation and closed loop systems. The primary goal was to determine the effect of the thinner Martian atmosphere on the cooling system. The results show that there was only a 6-percent difference in the cooling requirements. This difference was due mostly to the thinner atmosphere during forced convection and the heat capacity of the exhaust. A method using a single pass counter-flow heat exchanger is suggested to offset this difference in cooling requirements.

  8. Cold-start characteristics at low temperatures based on the first firing cycle in an LPG engine. Paper no. IGEC-1-151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.; Li, L.; Deng, B.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, Z.; Gong, C.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the first firing cycle (FFC), this paper presents the combustion and emissions characteristics at cold-start and their related parameters, such as excess air coefficient in a small EFI SI engine fuelled with LPG at environmental temperature from -9 o C to +4 o C. The results show that the FFC ignition reliability, instantaneous engine speed and HC emissions are strongly dependent on the excess air coefficient at cold-start. The environmental temperature has a great influence on HC emissions of the FFC, except for engine's start-up speed. The optimum excess air coefficient to guarantee the successful FFC at cold-start of LPG engine was found. The judgment of key factors to guarantee the successful first firing cycle at cold-start is also presented in this paper. (author)

  9. Testing and analysis of the impact on engine cycle parameters and control system modifications using hydrogen or methane as fuel in an industrial gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, H. H.-W.; Keinz, J.; Börner, S.; Hendrick, P.; Elsing, R.

    2016-07-01

    The paper highlights the modification of the engine control software of the hydrogen (H2) converted gas turbine Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) GTCP 36-300 allowing safe and accurate methane (CH4) operation achieved without mechanical changes of the metering unit. The acceleration and deceleration characteristics of the engine controller from idle to maximum load are analyzed comparing H2 and CH4. Also, the paper presents the influence on the thermodynamic cycle of gas turbine resulting from the different fuels supported by a gas turbine cycle simulation of H2 and CH4 using the software GasTurb.

  10. Iron: A Biogeochemical Engine That Drives Carbon, Nitrogen, and Phosphorus Cycling in Humid Tropical Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, W. L.; Hall, S. J.; Thompson, A.; Yang, W. H.

    2014-12-01

    rapidly immobilized into biological pools (Liptzin and Silver 2009). Data suggest that Fe-redox cycling may decrease P limitation to NPP, and help maintain forest nutrient stocks. In summary, our results highlight the biogeochemical significance of Fe cycling in upland soils environments and its important role in the dynamics of humid tropical forests.

  11. Thermal and economic analyses of a compact waste heat recovering system for the marine diesel engine using transcritical Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Min-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the CWHRS for a marine diesel engine. - Highlights: • The economic optimization of a CWHRS of a marine engine is investigated. • The environmental protection refrigerant, R1234yf is used as the working fluid of the TRC system. • The optimal analysis and comparison of three models for waste heat recovering have been carried out. • The optimization of payback periods, CO 2 emission reducing and diesel oil saving are reported. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the economic performance of a novel compact waste heat recovering system for the marine diesel engine. The transcritical Rankine cycle is employed to convert the waste heat resources to useful work with R1234yf. To evaluate the utilizing efficiency and economic performance of waste heat resources, which are exhaust gas, cylinder cooling water and scavenge air cooling water, three operating models of the system are investigated and compared. The levelized energy cost, which represents the total cost per kilo-watt power, is employed to evaluate the economic performance of the system. The economic optimization and its corresponding optimal parameters of each operating model in the compact waste heat recovering system are obtained theoretically. The results show that the minimal levelized energy cost of the proposed system operated in Model I is the lowest of the three models, and then are Model II and Model III, which are 2.96% and 9.36% lower for, respectively. Similarly, the CO 2 emission reduction is the highest for Model I of the three models, and 21.6% and 30.1% lower are obtained for Model II and Model III, respectively. The compact waste heat recovering system operated in Model I has superiority on the payback periods and heavy diesel oil saving over the others. Finally, the correlations using specific work of working fluid and condensation temperature as parameters are proposed to assess the optimal conditions in economic performance

  12. Analysis of Combined Power and Refrigeration Generation Using the Carbon Dioxide Thermodynamic Cycle to Recover the Waste Heat of an Internal Combustion Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Shunsen Wang; Kunlun Bai; Yonghui Xie; Juan Di; Shangfang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    A novel thermodynamic system is proposed to recover the waste heat of an internal combustion engine (ICE) by integrating the transcritical carbon dioxide (CO2) refrigeration cycle with the supercritical CO2 power cycle, and eight kinds of integration schemes are developed. The key parameters of the system are optimized through a genetic algorithm to achieve optimum matching with different variables and schemes, as well as the maximum net power output (Wnet). The results indicate that replacin...

  13. An artificial TCA cycle selects for efficient α-ketoglutarate dependent hydroxylase catalysis in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodosiou, Eleni; Breisch, Marina; Julsing, Mattijs K; Falcioni, Francesco; Bühler, Bruno; Schmid, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Amino acid hydroxylases depend directly on the cellular TCA cycle via their cosubstrate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and are highly useful for the selective biocatalytic oxyfunctionalization of amino acids. This study evaluates TCA cycle engineering strategies to force and increase α-KG flux through proline-4-hydroxylase (P4H). The genes sucA (α-KG dehydrogenase E1 subunit) and sucC (succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit) were alternately deleted together with aceA (isocitrate lyase) in proline degradation-deficient Escherichia coli strains (ΔputA) expressing the p4h gene. Whereas, the ΔsucCΔaceAΔputA strain grew in minimal medium in the absence of P4H, relying on the activity of fumarate reductase, growth of the ΔsucAΔaceAΔputA strictly depended on P4H activity, thus coupling growth to proline hydroxylation. P4H restored growth, even when proline was not externally added. However, the reduced succinyl-CoA pool caused a 27% decrease of the average cell size compared to the wildtype strain. Medium supplementation partially restored the morphology and, in some cases, enhanced proline hydroxylation activity. The specific proline hydroxylation rate doubled when putP, encoding the Na + /l-proline transporter, was overexpressed in the ΔsucAΔaceAΔputA strain. This is in contrast to wildtype and ΔputA single-knock out strains, in which α-KG availability obviously limited proline hydroxylation. Such α-KG limitation was relieved in the ΔsucAΔaceAΔputA strain. Furthermore, the ΔsucAΔaceAΔputA strain was used to demonstrate an agar plate-based method for the identification and selection of active α-KG dependent hydroxylases. This together with the possibility to waive selection pressure and overcome α-KG limitation in respective hydroxylation processes based on living cells emphasizes the potential of TCA cycle engineering for the productive application of α-KG dependent hydroxylases. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1511-1520. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cycle work from a MEMS heat engine and characterization of the liquid-vapor phase change actuation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Scott Allan

    This dissertation presents a MEMS-based thermopneumatic actuator that produces electrical power by flexing a piezoelectric membrane. Operating the device at the resonant frequency of the piezoelectric generator results in the first documented production of cycle work from a dynamic micro fabricated heat engine. At resonance the pressure-volume diagram is an open loop curve indicating the production of cycle work and allowing for classification as an engine. The engine generates a mechanical power of 26.6muW and an electrical power of .05muW while operating at 240Hz and consuming 1.31W. This corresponds to a thermal to mechanical efficiency of .002%, mechanical to electrical efficiency of .19%, and thermal to electrical efficiency of 3.8mu%. Improvement of thermal to mechanical efficiency is accomplished by implementing a novel capillary wicking structure consisting of an array of open groove rectangular micro channels fabricated from SU-8. The wicking structure provides a method for delivering a controlled liquid layer to the heat addition region of the device. A slow filling annular wick is used to investigate performance for single pulse operation. Implementing a 7.1mum thick wick increases efficiency by a factor of 60 from .0015% to .088% for an energy input of 7.8mJ. A numerical model of the device containing the annular wick is developed to determine the energy budget and parameters controlling efficiency for operation on the millisecond time scale. Simulations indicate that liquid thickness, thermal mass, and membrane compliance have a significant impact on efficiency. Predictions are verified experimentally by testing silicon nitride and SU-8 membranes. An 8mum thick SU-8 membrane reduces efficiency due primarily to the increase in thermal mass. A 200nm thick silicon nitride membrane increases efficiency due to a decrease in thermal mass and increase in compliance. Incorporation of a fast filling 10.3mum thick radial wicking structure dramatically increases

  15. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M. J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Fuel cycle studies reported for this period include studies of advanced solvent extraction techniques focussed on the development of centrifugal contactors for use in Purex processes. Miniature single-stage and eight-stage centrifugal contactors are being employed in performance studies applicable to larger units. In other work, literature on the dispersion of reagents as a result of explosions is being reviewed to develop systematic data applicable to fuel reprocessing and useful in identifying source terms. In yet other work, scouting studies were performed to obtain criteria for identifying organic solutions suitable for the separation of actinides from fission products. A program has been initiated on pyrochemical and dry processing of nuclear fuel. Literature reviews have been initiated on material development, carbide fuel reprocessing, and thorium-uranium reprocessing in fused salts. A review and evaluation of the encapsulation of high-level waste in a metal matrix is under way. Corrosion and leach rates of simulated waste forms are being measured and a model has been proposed to describe the reaction between solidified high-level waste and metals. In other work, criteria for the handling of fuel assembly hulls are being developed on the basis of past work on the pyrophoricity of zirconium alloys and related criteria from several sources. Experimental work is underway to determine whether nuclear wastes can be safely confined in geologic formations. Information is being obtained on the migration of radionuclides in aqueous solution-rock systems. 17 figures, 27 tables.

  16. Engineering Perspectives and Environmental Life Cycle Optimization to Enhance Aggregate Mining in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Schneider

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cleaner Production (CP addresses precautionary, site-specific environmental measures to reduce emissions and assess resource efficiency potentials at the point of origin by analyzing operational material and energy flows. The approach is generally based on the criteria quality as well as environmental/occupational health and safety, and promotes their integration. The paper presents options for applying CP to aggregate mining, based on a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA and illustrated by results from a study of small-scale industrial aggregate mining in Hoa Binh Province (Vietnam. The regulatory framework to limit the impact of mining on the environment is largely comparable to international standards and is suitably enforced. Despite gaining experience through the practical handling of enforcement procedures over the long term, there is still a considerable potential to optimize CP strategies in Vietnam’s aggregate mining industry. This is shown by the results of a survey of aggregates mining companies in Hoa Binh Province as well as on-site data collection to determine the technological characteristics of production facilities alongside economic and environmental factors. The assessment of the survey is supported by LCA results for: (a the existing situation; and (b the scenario of a merging of companies, undertaken to improve the resource efficiency of the aggregate mining in Hoa Binh. Findings can help implement an integrated approach to foster the sustainable mining of building aggregates.

  17. Release of engineered nanomaterials from personal care products throughout their life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Arturo A.; Vosti, William; Wang, Hongtao; Lazareva, Anastasiya

    2014-07-01

    The impetus for this study was to provide release estimates that can serve to improve predictions of engineered nanomaterial (ENM) exposure for risk assessment. We determined the likely release of ENMs from personal care products (PCPs) through a consumer survey on use and disposal habits, and research on the types and quantities of ENMs in PCPs. Our estimates show that in the US zinc oxide (ZnO), with 1,800-2,100 mt yr-1, and titanium dioxide (TiO2), with 870-1,000 mt yr-1, represent 94 % of ENMs released into the environment or landfills from the use of PCPs. Around 36-43 % of ENMs from PCPs were estimated to end up in landfills, 24-36 % released to soils, 0.7-0.8 % to air, and 28-32 % to water bodies. ENMs in sunscreen represent around 81-82 % of total release, from ZnO and TiO2 as UV blockers, followed by facial moisturizer (7.5 %), foundation (5.7 %), and hair coloring products (3.1 %). Daily care products such as body wash, shampoo, and conditioner had by far the highest per capita and total use, but contributed little to the ENM release estimates as these products generally contain little or no ENMs. However, if ENMs are incorporated into these daily care products, this may substantially increase ENM release.

  18. Proliferation resistance design of a plutonium cycle (Proliferation Resistance Engineering Program: PREP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.; Clark, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    This document describes the proliferation resistance engineering concepts developed to counter the threat of proliferation of nuclear weapons in an International Fuel Service Center (IFSC). The basic elements of an International Fuel Service Center are described. Possible methods for resisting proliferation such as processing alternatives, close-coupling of facilities, process equipment layout, maintenance philosophy, process control, and process monitoring are discussed. Political and institutional issues in providing proliferation resistance for an International Fuel Service Center are analyzed. The conclusions drawn are (1) use-denial can provide time for international response in the event of a host nation takeover. Passive use-denial is more acceptable than active use-denial, and acceptability of active-denial concepts is highly dependent on sovereignty, energy dependence and economic considerations; (2) multinational presence can enhance proliferation resistance; and (3) use-denial must be nonprejudicial with balanced interests for governments and/or private corporations being served. Comparisons between an IFSC as a national facility, an IFSC with minimum multinational effect, and an IFSC with maximum multinational effect show incremental design costs to be less than 2% of total cost of the baseline non-PRE concept facility. The total equipment acquisition cost increment is estimated to be less than 2% of total baseline facility costs. Personnel costs are estimated to increase by less than 10% due to maximum international presence. 46 figures, 9 tables

  19. Proliferation resistance design of a plutonium cycle (Proliferation Resistance Engineering Program: PREP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorenson, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.; Clark, R.G.

    1979-01-19

    This document describes the proliferation resistance engineering concepts developed to counter the threat of proliferation of nuclear weapons in an International Fuel Service Center (IFSC). The basic elements of an International Fuel Service Center are described. Possible methods for resisting proliferation such as processing alternatives, close-coupling of facilities, process equipment layout, maintenance philosophy, process control, and process monitoring are discussed. Political and institutional issues in providing proliferation resistance for an International Fuel Service Center are analyzed. The conclusions drawn are (1) use-denial can provide time for international response in the event of a host nation takeover. Passive use-denial is more acceptable than active use-denial, and acceptability of active-denial concepts is highly dependent on sovereignty, energy dependence and economic considerations; (2) multinational presence can enhance proliferation resistance; and (3) use-denial must be nonprejudicial with balanced interests for governments and/or private corporations being served. Comparisons between an IFSC as a national facility, an IFSC with minimum multinational effect, and an IFSC with maximum multinational effect show incremental design costs to be less than 2% of total cost of the baseline non-PRE concept facility. The total equipment acquisition cost increment is estimated to be less than 2% of total baseline facility costs. Personnel costs are estimated to increase by less than 10% due to maximum international presence. 46 figures, 9 tables.

  20. Development of an Ethanol Blend Two-Stroke Direct-Injection Snowmobile for Use in the Clean Snowmobile Challenge and National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    The University of Idaho's entry into the 2010 SAE Clean Snowmobile Challenge (CSC) was a direct-injection (DI) two-stroke powered snowmobile modified to use blended ethanol fuel. The modulated and battery-less direct-injection system used to decrease...

  1. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel cycle work included hydraulic performance and extraction efficiency of eight-stage centrifugal contactors, flowsheet for the Aralex process, Ru and Zr extraction in a miniature centrifugal contactor, study of Zr aging in the organic phase and its effect on Zr extraction and hydraulic testing of the 9-cm-ID contactor. Work for predicting accident consequences in LWR fuel processing covered the relation between energy input (to subdivide a solid) and the modes of particle size frequency distribution. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program corrosion-testing materials for containment vessels and equipment for studying carbide reactions in bismuth is under way. Analytical studies have been made of salt-transport processes; efforts to spin tungsten crucibles 13 cm dia continue, and other information on tungsten fabrication is being assembled; the process steps of the chloride volatility process have been demonstrated and the thoria powder product used to produce oxide pellets; solubility of UO/sub 2/, PuO/sub 2/, and fission products in molten alkali nitrates is being investigated; work was continued on reprocessing actinide oxides by extracting the actinides into ammonium chloroaluminate from bismuth; the preparation of thorium-uranium carbide from the oxide is being studied as a means of improving the oxide reactivity; studies are in progress on producing uranium metal and decontaminated ThO/sub 2/ by the reaction of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in molten salts containing ThCl/sub 4/ and thorium metal chips. In the molten tin process, no basic thermodynamic or kinetic factors have been found that may limit process development.

  2. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Progress report, January--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1979-04-01

    Fuel cycle studies reported for this period include studies of advanced solvent extraction techniques focussed on the development of centrifugal contactors for use in Purex processes. Miniature single-stage and eight-stage centrifugal contactors are being employed in studies of contactor performance and the kinetics of extraction. A 9-cm-ID centrifugal contactor has been completed, and fabrication drawings are being prepared for a plant-scale contactor. In other work, tricaprylmethyl-ammonium nitrate and di-n-amyl n-amylphosphonate are being evaluated as extractants in the Thorex process. Literature on the dispersion of liquids by explosions is being reviewed. A process was developed for extracting TBP degradation products from TBP-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ scrub solutions while the actinides remain with the raffinate. In the program on pyrochemical and dry processing of nuclear fuel, the literature is being reviewed for acceptable materials for containment vessels, decladding methods are being evaluated, salt transport processes are being studied, a candidate flow sheet (based upon the Dow Aluminum Pyrometallurgical process) for reprocessing spent uranium metal fuel was prepared, work was begun on the use of molten salts for reprocessing actinide oxides, and the reprocessing of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in a KCl-LiCl salt containing ThCl/sub 4/ and thorium chips was studied. Work on the encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in a metal matrix includes study of (1) chemical interactions between simulated waste forms and matrix metals, (2) the leach rates of simulated encapsulated waste forms, and (3) the corrosion of candidate matrix metals and canister materials in brine solutions.Work to establish criteria for the handling of waste cladding hulls is continuing. The transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media are being studied to estimate leaching of radionuclides from deep repositories by groundwater.

  3. Chemical engineering division fuel cycle programs. Progress report, January--September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel-cycle studies reported for this period include pyrochemical separation of plutonium and americium oxides from contaminated materials of construction such as steel. When slag and actinide-contaminated metal in the same process vessel are heated until liquefied, the actinides are partitioned to a high degree into the slags. Also, studies of advanced solvent extraction techniques are focused on the development of centrifugal contactors for use in Purex processes. A miniature contactor is to be used for performance studies applicable to larger units. In other work, literature on the process chemistry of zirconium and ruthenium has been reviewed to aid in improving the process when short-residence-time contactors are used. In addition, a review of information on the dispersion of reagents and products during accidents in fuel reprocessing facilities has been initiated to develop systematic data useful in identifying source terms. A review and evaluation of the encapsulation of high-level waste in a metal matrix are continuing. The data will be used to identify the state of the art and the importance of selected features of this process. In other work, criteria for the handling of hulls are being developed on the basis of past work on the pyrophoricity of zirconium alloys and related criteria from several sources. These suggested criteria will be assembled with the necessary technical rationalization into a package for review by interested parties. Other work consists of a brief program to explore the disposal of noble gas fission products by deep-well injection and laboratory-scale experiments to study the migratory characteristics of nuclear waste confined in geologic formations. 28 figures, 26 tables

  4. Using pre-heated sunflower oil as fuel in a diesel cycle engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delalibera, H.C.; Neto, P.H.W.; Martini, J. [State Univ. of Ponta Grossa (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which 100 per cent sunflower oil was used in a tractor to compare its performance with petroleum diesel. Work trials were carried out for 50 hours on a single cylinder direct injection micro-tractor. In the first trial (E-1), the temperature of the vegetable oil was the same as the air temperature of the engine, while in the second trial (E-2), the oil was heated to a temperature of about 90 degrees C. Only petrodiesel was used in the third (E-3) trial. The head gasket burned in the first test after 50 hours of operation. An increase in compression was noted during trials E-1 and E-2. The carbonized mass in the nozzle of the E-2 trial was 81.5 per cent lower than in the E-1 trial. The carbonized mass in the intake system of the E-2 trial was 51.7 per cent lower than in the E-1 trial. The exhaust system of the E-2 trial was 33.4 per cent lower than that of the E-1 trial. For the combustion chamber, the carbonization of the E-1 trial was nearly the same as in the E-2 trial. The hourly fuel consumption of the E-1 trial was 2.3 per cent higher than petrodiesel, while E-2 trial was 0.7 per cent higher than petrodiesel. In the first 2 tests, the lubricating oil was contaminated by vegetable oil fuel. In general, results from the first trial were better than results from the second trial.

  5. Aircraft Engine Crankshaft Optimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vopařil Jan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents part of the crankshaft development of a two-stroke compression-ignition engine with contra-running pistons where, for invariably specified diameters and pin lengths, the optimal crankshaft shape is searched for. The process of creating several options which are then subjected to critical evaluation followed by the selection mechanism for the final best possible design is described.

  6. Solar-driven Joule cycle reciprocating Ericsson engines for small scale applications. From improper operation to high performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanciu, Dorin; Bădescu, Viorel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • New dynamic model for parabolic trough collector (PTC) coupled to Ericsson engine (EE). • Design procedure of the PTC-EE system which avoid malfunction. • Variation of PTC-EE system performance during a day for different engine rotation speeds. • Strategy to switch between different rotation speeds to maximize daily output work. - Abstract: The paper focuses on a Joule cycle reciprocating Ericsson engine (JCREE) coupled with a solar parabolic trough collector (PTC). A small scale application located at mid Northern Hemisphere latitude (44°25″N) is considered. A new dynamic (time-dependent) model is developed and used to design the geometry and estimate the performance of the PTC-JCREE system under the most favorable weather conditions (i.e. summer day and clear sky). The paper brings two main contributions. First, specific constraints on the design parameters have been identified in order to avoid improper JCREE operation, such as gas under-compression in the compressor cylinder and gas over-compression and/or over-expansion in the expander cylinder. Second, increasing the work generated per day requires using a proper strategy to switch between different rotation speeds. Specific results are as follows. For the (reference) constant engine rotation speed 480 rpm, the output work per day is 39,270 kJ and the overall efficiency is 0.134. The output work decreases by increasing the rotation speed, since the operation interval during a day diminishes. A better operation strategy is to switch among three rotation speed values, namely 480, 540 and 600 rpm. In this case the output work is 40,322 kJ and the overall efficiency is 0.137. The performance improvement is quite small and the reference constant rotation speed 480 rpm may be a suitable choice, easier to use in practice. For both the constant and variable rotation speed strategies, the overall efficiency is almost constant along the effective operation time interval, which is from 8:46 to

  7. 40 CFR 1039.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE...-state conditions. In some cases, we allow you to choose the appropriate steady-state duty cycle for an... described in Appendix III of this part for variable-speed engines below 19 kW. You may instead use the 8...

  8. Thermodynamic performance simulation and design optimisation of trilateral-cycle engines for waste heat recovery-to-power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajimotokan, H.A.; Sher, I.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Steady-state models of trilateral cycle (TLC) power plants are established and implemented. • Thermodynamic performance simulation and design optimisation of the TLCs are conducted. • Four configurations of the TLCs are analysed and compared their performance metrics. • Results show that thermal integration of the simple TLC enhanced energy conversion efficiency. • Comparative study shows that the recuperated TLC achieved the best performance metrics. - Abstract: The trilateral cycle (TLC) is one of the most promising alternatives among the heat recovery-to-power technologies, due to its compact system configuration and high performance at relatively low compression work and low-to-moderate expander inlet temperature. These feats make the TLC beneficial for off-grid applications particularly in remote or offshore applications where power-to-weight ratio of the power plant is of significance. This study presents the thermodynamic performance simulation and design optimisation of the TLCs using unconventional working fluid for heat recovery-to-power generation from low-grade waste heat, which is considered for process development and integration of the TLC. Four system configurations, comprising the simple TLC, recuperated TLC, reheat TLC and regenerative TLC are analysed and compared their performance metrics. Based on the theory of steady-state steady-flow thermodynamics, the simulation models of the TLC power plants, corresponding to their thermodynamic processes are established and implemented using engineering equation solver. The results show that the thermal efficiencies of the simple TLC, recuperated TLC, reheat TLC and regenerative TLC employing n-pentane are 11.85–21.97%, 12.32–23.91%, 11.86–22.07% and 12.01–22.9% respectively at subcritical operating conditions with low-grade heat in the temperature limit of 393–473 K. These suggest that the thermal integration of the optimised design of the simple TLC enhanced heat

  9. Performance analysis of waste heat recovery with a dual loop organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system for diesel engine under various operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fubin; Dong, Xiaorui; Zhang, Hongguang; Wang, Zhen; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Enhua; Liu, Hao; Zhao, Guangyao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dual loop ORC system is designed to recover waste heat from a diesel engine. • R245fa is used as working fluid for the dual loop ORC system. • Waste heat characteristic under engine various operating conditions is analyzed. • Performance of the combined system under various operating conditions is studied. • The waste heat from coolant and intake air has considerable potential for recovery. - Abstract: To take full advantage of the waste heat from a diesel engine, a set of dual loop organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system is designed to recover exhaust energy, waste heat from the coolant system, and released heat from turbocharged air in the intercooler of a six-cylinder diesel engine. The dual loop ORC system consists of a high temperature loop ORC system and a low temperature loop ORC system. R245fa is selected as the working fluid for both loops. Through the engine test, based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, the performance of the dual loop ORC system for waste heat recovery is discussed based on the analysis of its waste heat characteristics under engine various operating conditions. Subsequently, the diesel engine-dual loop ORC combined system is presented, and the effective thermal efficiency and the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) are chosen to evaluate the operating performances of the diesel engine-dual loop ORC combined system. The results show that, the maximum waste heat recovery efficiency (WHRE) of the dual loop ORC system can reach 5.4% under engine various operating conditions. At the engine rated condition, the dual loop ORC system achieves the largest net power output at 27.85 kW. Compared with the diesel engine, the thermal efficiency of the combined system can be increased by 13%. When the diesel engine is operating at the high load region, the BSFC can be reduced by a maximum 4%

  10. Performance of an Axisymmetric Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine During Rocket Only Operation Using Linear Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Yungster, Shaye; Keller, Dennis J.

    1998-01-01

    The all rocket mode of operation is shown to be a critical factor in the overall performance of a rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) vehicle. An axisymmetric RBCC engine was used to determine specific impulse efficiency values based upon both full flow and gas generator configurations. Design of experiments methodology was used to construct a test matrix and multiple linear regression analysis was used to build parametric models. The main parameters investigated in this study were: rocket chamber pressure, rocket exit area ratio, injected secondary flow, mixer-ejector inlet area, mixer-ejector area ratio, and mixer-ejector length-to-inlet diameter ratio. A perfect gas computational fluid dynamics analysis, using both the Spalart-Allmaras and k-omega turbulence models, was performed with the NPARC code to obtain values of vacuum specific impulse. Results from the multiple linear regression analysis showed that for both the full flow and gas generator configurations increasing mixer-ejector area ratio and rocket area ratio increase performance, while increasing mixer-ejector inlet area ratio and mixer-ejector length-to-diameter ratio decrease performance. Increasing injected secondary flow increased performance for the gas generator analysis, but was not statistically significant for the full flow analysis. Chamber pressure was found to be not statistically significant.

  11. Parametric optimization and heat transfer analysis of a dual loop ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system for CNG engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fubin; Zhang, Hongguang; Yu, Zhibin; Wang, Enhua; Meng, Fanxiao; Liu, Hongda; Wang, Jingfu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a dual loop ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system is adopted to recover exhaust energy, waste heat from the coolant system, and intercooler heat rejection of a six-cylinder CNG (compressed natural gas) engine. The thermodynamic, heat transfer, and optimization models for the dual loop ORC system are established. On the basis of the waste heat characteristics of the CNG engine over the whole operating range, a GA (genetic algorithm) is used to solve the Pareto solution for the thermodynamic and heat transfer performances to maximize net power output and minimize heat transfer area. Combined with optimization results, the optimal parameter regions of the dual loop ORC system are determined under various operating conditions. Then, the variation in the heat transfer area with the operating conditions of the CNG engine is analyzed. The results show that the optimal evaporation pressure and superheat degree of the HT (high temperature) cycle are mainly influenced by the operating conditions of the CNG engine. The optimal evaporation pressure and superheat degree of the HT cycle over the whole operating range are within 2.5–2.9 MPa and 0.43–12.35 K, respectively. The optimal condensation temperature of the HT cycle, evaporation and condensation temperatures of the LT (low temperature) cycle, and exhaust temperature at the outlet of evaporator 1 are kept nearly constant under various operating conditions of the CNG engine. The thermal efficiency of the dual loop ORC system is within the range of 8.79%–10.17%. The dual loop ORC system achieves the maximum net power output of 23.62 kW under the engine rated condition. In addition, the operating conditions of the CNG engine and the operating parameters of the dual loop ORC system significantly influence the heat transfer areas for each heat exchanger. - Highlights: • A dual loop ORC system is adopted to recover the waste heat of a CNG engine. • Parametric optimization and heat transfer analysis are

  12. Thermodynamic of the associated cycle and application to the assembly of thermochemical iodine sulphur cycle and a nuclear engine for the hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the design of an assembly of a hydrogen production process by the thermochemical iodine-sulphur cycle and a nuclear reactor. The suggested coupling network uses a power cycle which produces a work which is directly used for the heat pump running. The purpose of this thermodynamic cycle association is to recover the rejected energy at low temperature of a process to provide the energy needs of this same process at high temperature. This association is applied to the studied coupling. The construction of the energy distribution network is designed by the pinch analysis. In the case of a conventional coupling, the efficiency of hydrogen production is 22.0%. By integrating the associated cycles into the coupling, the efficiency of production is 42.6%. The exergetic efficiency, representative of the energy using quality, increases from 58.7% to 85.4%. (author) [fr

  13. Diesel Engine Tribology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian Kim

    Recent years have seen an increase in the wear rate of engine bearings, subsequently followed by bearing failure, for the large two-stroke diesel engines used for ship propulsion. Here, the engine bearings include main, big end and crosshead bearings, with the bearing type used being the journal...... bearing, belonging to the class of ‘hydrodynamic bearings’. This implies that the load carrying capacity is generated by a relative movement of the involved components, i.e. avelocity-driven operation. For the engine application, the velocity stems from the engine RPM. However, to comply with the latest...... emission requirements as well as attempting to minimise fuel expenses, the engine speed has been lowered together with an increase in the engine mean pressure which in terms lead to larger bearing loads. With worsened operating conditions from two sides, the encountered problems are understandable...

  14. Effects of Degree of Superheat on the Running Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC Waste Heat Recovery System for Diesel Engines under Various Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the variation law of engine exhaust energy under various operating conditions to improve the thermal efficiency and fuel economy of diesel engines. An organic Rankine cycle (ORC waste heat recovery system with internal heat exchanger (IHE was designed to recover waste heat from the diesel engine exhaust. The zeotropic mixture R416A was used as the working fluid for the ORC. Three evaluation indexes were presented as follows: waste heat recovery efficiency (WHRE, engine thermal efficiency increasing ratio (ETEIR, and output energy density of working fluid (OEDWF. In terms of various operating conditions of the diesel engine, this study investigated the variation tendencies of the running performances of the ORC waste heat recovery system and the effects of the degree of superheat on the running performance of the ORC waste heat recovery system through theoretical calculations. The research findings showed that the net power output, WHRE, and ETEIR of the ORC waste heat recovery system reach their maxima when the degree of superheat is 40 K, engine speed is 2200 r/min, and engine torque is 1200 N·m. OEDWF gradually increases with the increase in the degree of superheat, which indicates that the required mass flow rate of R416A decreases for a certain net power output, thereby significantly decreasing the risk of environmental pollution.

  15. Learning by doing – creating competences in engineering students on how and when to perform and use life cycle assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2003-01-01

    The course Life cycle assessment of products and systems has been given for eight consecutive years at the Technical University of Denmark. From the beginning, the course has been a targeted on life cycle assessment with a strong emphasis on the performance and use of life cycle assessment as dec...... as decision support to industry and authorities. While different applications of life cycle assessments are introduced in lectures during the course, the main focus is on how to do an LCA....

  16. Fuel distributor control of an internal combustion engine using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article presents the results of vibration-acoustic signal processing of an internal combustion engine using HHT. The series of experiments was carried out in a test laboratory on a motorized bench (eight-cylinder two-stroke engine). The measurements of vibrationacoustic signals were carried out for the periods when the ...

  17. Engineering a nanopore with co-chaperonin function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Ching-Wen; Meervelt, Veerle; Tsai, Keng-Chang; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Mast, Jan; Maglia, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of an enzymatic function can reveal functional insights and allows the engineering of biological systems with enhanced properties. We engineered an alpha hemolysin nanopore to function as GroES, a protein that, in complex with GroEL, forms a two-stroke protein-folding nanomachine. The

  18. Future fuel cell and internal combustion engine automobile technologies: A 25-year life cycle and fleet impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Heywood, John B.; Weiss, Malcolm A.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen fuel cell (FC) vehicles are receiving increasing attention as a potential powerful technology to reduce the transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and substantially decrease emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) at the same time. This paper projects energy use and GHG emissions from different FC vehicle configurations and compares these values to the projected characteristics of similarly sized and performing gasoline and diesel fueled automobiles on a life cycle, well to wheels and cradle to grave basis. Our analysis suggests that for the next 20 or more years, new internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid drive train vehicles can achieve similar levels of reduction in energy use and GHG emissions compared to hydrogen FC vehicles, if the hydrogen is derived from natural gas. The fleet impact of more fuel-efficient vehicles depends on the time it takes for new technology to (i) become competitive, (ii) increase its share of the new vehicles produced, and finally (iii) penetrate significantly into the vehicle fleet. Since the lead times for bringing improved ICE vehicle technology into production are the shortest, its impact on vehicle fleet energy use and emissions could be significant in 20-30 years, about half the time required for hydrogen FC vehicles to have a similar impact. Full emission reduction potential of FC vehicles can only be achieved when hydrogen is derived from zero or very low-carbon releasing production processes on a large scale-an option that further increases the impact leadtime. Thus, a comprehensive short- and long-term strategy for reducing automobile energy use and emissions should include both the continuous improvement of ICE vehicles and simultaneous research and development of hydrogen FC cars

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of a dual loop heat recovery system with trilateral cycle applied to exhaust gases of internal combustion engine for propulsion of the 6800 TEU container ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Chul; Kim, Young Min

    2013-01-01

    A dual loop waste heat recovery power generation system that comprises an upper trilateral cycle and a lower organic Rankine cycle, in which discharged exhaust gas heat is recovered and re-used for propulsion power, was theoretically applied to an internal combustion engine for propulsion in a 6800 TEU container ship. The thermodynamic properties of this exhaust gas heat recovery system, which vary depending on the boundary temperature between the upper and lower cycles, were also investigated. The results confirmed that this dual loop exhaust gas heat recovery power generation system exhibited a maximum net output of 2069.8 kW, and a maximum system efficiency of 10.93% according to the first law of thermodynamics and a maximum system exergy efficiency of 58.77% according to the second law of thermodynamics. In this case, the energy and exergy efficiencies of the dual loop system were larger than those of the single loop trilateral cycle. Further, in the upper trilateral cycle, the volumetric expansion ratio of the turbine could be considerably reduced to an adequate level to be employed in the practical system. When this dual loop exhaust gas heat recovery power generation system was applied to the main engine of the container ship, which was actually in operation, a 2.824% improvement in propulsion efficiency was confirmed in comparison to the case of a base engine. This improvement in propulsion efficiency resulted in about 6.06% reduction in the specific fuel oil consumption and specific CO 2 emissions of the main engine during actual operation. - Highlights: • WHRS was theoretically applied to exhaust gas of a main engine for ship propulsion. • A dual loop EG-WHRS using water and R1234yf as working fluids has been suggested. • Limitation of single loop trilateral cycle was improved by the dual loop system. • The propulsion efficiency of 2.824% was improved by the dual loop EG-WHRS. • This resulted in about 6.06% reduction in the SFOC and specific CO

  20. Real-Time Environmental Monitoring at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Develoment Institute Oarai Engineering Center Using the Internet to Promote Safety and Environmental Transparency

    OpenAIRE

    Sheila E.Motomat; 中島 尚子

    2000-01-01

    The report documents the results of an effort at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute O-arai Engineering Center (JNC/OEC) to provide via the Internet, in real-time, environmental monitoring data to promote safety and environmental transparency. Provided in Japanese as well as in English, the Internet site provides assurance that OEC nuclear operations are being conducted in a manner that is safe to both people in the surrounding area and the environment. This work conducted by Enviro...

  1. Analysis of combustion performance and emission of extended expansion cycle and iEGR for low heat rejection turbocharged direct injection diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabir Mohd F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing thermal efficiency in diesel engines through low heat rejection concept is a feasible technique. In LHR engines the high heat evolution is achieved by insulating the combustion chamber surfaces and coolant side of the cylinder with partially stabilized zirconia of 0.5 mm thickness and the effective utilization of this heat depend on the engine design and operating conditions. To make the LHR engines more suitable for automobile and stationary applications, the extended expansion was introduced by modifying the inlet cam for late closing of intake valve through Miller’s cycle for extended expansion. Through the extended expansion concept the actual work done increases, exhaust blow-down loss reduced and the thermal efficiency of the LHR engine is improved. In LHR engines, the formation of nitric oxide is more, to reduce the nitric oxide emission, the internal EGR is incorporated using modified exhaust cam with secondary lobe. Modifications of gas exchange with internal EGR resulted in decrease in nitric oxide emissions. In this work, the parametric studies were carried out both theoretically and experimentally. The combustion, performance and emission parameters were studied and were found to be satisfactory.

  2. Systematic engineering of TCA cycle for optimal production of a four-carbon platform chemical 4-hydroxybutyric acid in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sol; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-11-01

    To address climate change and environmental problems, it is becoming increasingly important to establish biorefineries for the production of chemicals from renewable non-food biomass. Here we report the development of Escherichia coli strains capable of overproducing a four-carbon platform chemical 4-hybroxybutyric acid (4-HB). Because 4-HB production is significantly affected by aeration level, genome-scale metabolic model-based engineering strategies were designed under aerobic and microaerobic conditions with emphasis on oxidative/reductive TCA branches and glyoxylate shunt. Several different metabolic engineering strategies were employed to develop strains suitable for fermentation both under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. It was found that microaerobic condition was more efficient than aerobic condition in achieving higher titer and productivity of 4-HB. The final engineered strain produced 103.4g/L of 4-HB by microaerobic fed-batch fermentation using glycerol. The aeration-dependent optimization strategy of TCA cycle will be useful for developing microbial strains producing other reduced derivative chemicals of TCA cycle intermediates. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. From Beginning to End: How Engineering Students Think and Talk about Sustainability across the Life Cycle. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Deborah; Jocuns, Andrew; Yasuhara, Ken; Atman, Cynthia J.

    2009-01-01

    The Academic Pathways Study (APS) is a multi-institution, mixed-methods, longitudinal study which examines engineering students' learning and development as they move into, through, and beyond their undergraduate institutions (Atman et al., 2008; Sheppard et al., 2004). It is part of the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education…

  4. Fuel Injection Pressure Effect on Performance of Direct Injection Diesel Engines Based on Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Rosli A. Bakar; Semin; Abdul R.  Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Fuel injection pressures in diesel engine plays an important role for engine performance obtaining treatment of combustion. The present diesel engines such as fuel direct injection, the pressures can be increased about 100 200 Mpa bar in fuel pump injection system. The experimental investigated effects of fuel injection pressure on engine performance. Experiments have been performed on a diesel engine with four-cylinder, two-stroke, direct injection. Engine performance values such as indicat...

  5. Experimental investigation of a low-temperature organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine under variable heat input operating at both subcritical and supercritical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosmadakis, George; Manolakos, Dimitris; Papadakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Small-scale ORC engine with converted scroll expander is installed at laboratory. • Design suitable for supercritical operation. • ORC engine tested at temperature equal to 95 °C. • Focus is given on expansion and thermal efficiency. • Supercritical operation showed some promising performance. - Abstract: The detailed experimental investigation of an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is presented, which is designed to operate at supercritical conditions. The net capacity of this engine is almost 3 kW and the laboratory testing of the engine includes the variation of the heat input and of the hot water temperature. The maximum heat input is 48 kW th , while the hot water temperature ranges from 65 up to 100°C. The tests are conducted at the laboratory and the heat source is a controllable electric heater, which can keep the hot water temperature constant, by switching on/off its electrical resistances. The expansion machine is a modified scroll compressor with major conversions, in order to be able to operate with safety at high pressure (or even supercritical at some conditions). The ORC engine is equipped with a dedicated heat exchanger of helical coil design, suitable for such applications. The speeds of the expander and ORC pump are regulated with frequency inverters, in order to control the cycle top pressure and heat input. The performance of all components is evaluated, while special attention is given on the supercritical heat exchanger and the scroll expander. The performance tests examined here concern the variation of the heat input, while the hot water temperature is equal to 95 °C. The aim is to examine the engine performance at the design conditions, as well as at off-design ones. Especially the latter ones are very important, since this engine will be coupled with solar collectors at the final configuration, where the available heat is varied to a great extent. The engine has been measured at the laboratory, where a thermal

  6. Analysis of Combined Power and Refrigeration Generation Using the Carbon Dioxide Thermodynamic Cycle to Recover the Waste Heat of an Internal Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel thermodynamic system is proposed to recover the waste heat of an internal combustion engine (ICE by integrating the transcritical carbon dioxide (CO2 refrigeration cycle with the supercritical CO2 power cycle, and eight kinds of integration schemes are developed. The key parameters of the system are optimized through a genetic algorithm to achieve optimum matching with different variables and schemes, as well as the maximum net power output (Wnet. The results indicate that replacing a single-turbine scheme with a double-turbine scheme can significantly enhance the net power output (Wnet and lower the inlet pressure of the power turbine (P4. With the same exhaust parameters of ICE, the maximum Wnet of the double-turbines scheme is 40%–50% higher than that of the single-turbine scheme. Replacing a single-stage compression scheme with a double-stage compression scheme can also lower the value of P4, while it could not always significantly enhance the value of Wnet. Except for the power consumption of air conditioning, the net power output of this thermodynamic system can reach up to 13%–35% of the engine power when it is used to recover the exhaust heat of internal combustion engines.

  7. Life-cycle energy optimisation : A proposed methodology for integrating environmental considerations early in the vehicle engineering design process

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, Ciarán J.; Göransson, Peter; Funazaki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Edlund, Stefan; Gunnarsson, Cecilia; Lundow, Jan-Olov; Cerin, Pontus; Cameron, Christopher J.; Wennhage, Per; Potting, José

    2016-01-01

    To enable the consideration of life cycle environmental impacts in the early stages of vehicle design, a methodology using the proxy of life cycle energy is proposed in this paper. The trade-offs in energy between vehicle production, operational performance and end-of-life are formulated as a mathematical problem, and simultaneously balanced with other transport-related functionalities, and may be optimised. The methodology is illustrated through an example design study, which is deliberately...

  8. Setting the stage for debating the roles of risk assessment and life-cycle assessment of engineered nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guineé, Jeroen B.; Heijungs, Reinout; Vijver, Martina G.; Peijnenburg, Willie J.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Although technological and environmental benefits are important stimuli for nanotechnology development, these technologies have been contested from an environmental point of view. The steady growth of applications of engineered nanomaterials has heated up the debate on quantifying the environmental

  9. Setting the stage for debating the roles of risk assessment and life-cycle assessment of engineered nanomaterials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guinée, Jeroen B; Heijungs, Reinout; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2017-01-01

    Although technological and environmental benefits are important stimuli for nanotechnology development, these technologies have been contested from an environmental point of view. The steady growth of applications of engineered nanomaterials has heated up the debate on quantifying the environmental

  10. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Review Guide for Operations (ERGO) Cycle I Assessment. Reports Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mann, Diane

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is pro-active in responsible environmental management of its operations, which include navigation locks, dams, hydroelectric power plants, dredges, campgrounds, marinas, oil...

  11. Analysis of lubricant oil contamination and degradation and wear of a biogas-fed otto cycle engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovian Bertinatto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing deployment of biodigesters for the treatment of waste on farms and the use of the biogas generated in the production of energy have highlighted the need for knowing the influence of this fuel on internal combustion engines. This study aimed to analyze the influence of filtrated biogas on lubricant oil contamination and degradation, as well as on engine wear and corrosion. Lubricant oil samples were collected every 75 engine operating hours (EOH and then correlated between each other and with a sample of new oil, determining the elements present in the biogas that contribute to lubricant oil contamination and degradation, as well as lubricant oil performance in the course of EOH and engine wear. The results demonstrate that hydrogen sulfide affects the performance of the lubricant oil and engine wear. Among the metals, we observed that the copper concentration exceeded the maximum limit recommended in the literature. As for the additives, the variation in concentrations of magnesium impacted on lubricant performance. By monitoring lubricant oil quality were able to extend the engine oil change interval of this study by 50%, what resulted in a savings of 33.3% in the cost of lubricant per hour worked.

  12. An algorithm on simultaneous optimization of performance and mass parameters of open-cycle liquid-propellant engine of launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, M. A.; Mazraeshahi, H. K.; Ramesh, D.; Montazer, E.; Salami, E.; Romli, F. I.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a new method for the determination of optimum parameters of open-cycle liquid-propellant engine of launch vehicles is introduced. The parameters affecting the objective function, which is the ratio of specific impulse to gross mass of the launch vehicle, are chosen to achieve maximum specific impulse as well as minimum mass for the structure of engine, tanks, etc. The proposed algorithm uses constant integration of thrust with respect to time for launch vehicle with specific diameter and length to calculate the optimum working condition. The results by this novel algorithm are compared to those obtained from using Genetic Algorithm method and they are also validated against the results of existing launch vehicle.

  13. Modeling and Experimental Validation of a Volumetric Expander Suitable for Waste Heat Recovery from an Automotive Internal Combustion Engine Using an Organic Rankine Cycle with Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Galindo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Waste heat recovery (WHR in exhaust gas flow of automotive engines has proved to be a useful path to increase the overall efficiency of internal combustion engines (ICE. Recovery potentials of up to 7% are shown in several works in the literature. However, most of them are theoretical estimations. Some present results from prototypes fed by steady flows generated in an auxiliary gas tank and not with actual engine exhaust gases. This paper deals with the modeling and experimental validation of an organic Rankine cycle (ORC with a swash-plate expander integrated in a 2 L turbocharged petrol engine using ethanol as working fluid. A global simulation model of the ORC was developed with a maximum difference of 5%, validated with experimental results. Considering the swash-plate as the main limiting factor, an additional specific submodel was implemented to model the physical phenomena in this element. This model allows simulating the fluid dynamic behavior of the swash-plate expander using a 0D model (Amesim. Differences up to 10.5% between tests and model results were found.

  14. Desempenho de motor ciclo Diesel em bancada dinamométrica utilizando misturas diesel/biodiesel Performance of cycle Diesel engine in dynamometer using diesel/biodiesel mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Castellanelli

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Diante da previsão de escassez do petróleo, o éster etílico (biodiesel tem-se apresentado como excelente opção de combustível alternativo para motores ciclo Diesel. As características do biodiesel são semelhantes às do diesel em termos de viscosidade e poder calorífico, podendo ser utilizado sem adaptações nos motores. Para a realização deste trabalho, utilizou-se de motor ciclo Diesel, de injeção direta, com quatro cilindros, sem adaptações. O motor foi acoplado a um dinamômetro e sistemas de aquisição de dados auxiliares. Avaliaram-se os desempenhos de torque, de potência e de consumo específico de combustível para as seguintes misturas diesel/éster etílico de soja: B2, B5, B10, B20, B50, B75 e B100. O melhor desempenho registrado deu-se com a mistura B20.Given the prediction of the scarcity of oil, the ethyl ester (biodiesel has presented as an excellent alternative fuel option for cycle diesel engine. The characteristics of biodiesel are similar of diesel in terms of viscosity and the calorific power, being able to be used without adaptations in the engines. For the accomplishment of this work it was used a cycle diesel engine, of direct injection with four cylinders, without adaptations. The engine was connected to a dynamometer and acquisition systems of auxiliary data. The performances of torque, power and specific fuel consumption for the following mixtures diesel/soy ethyl ester had been evaluated: B2, B5, B10, B20, B50, B75 and B100. The best registered performance was given with the B20 mixture.

  15. Analysis of ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) systems with pure hydrocarbons and mixtures of hydrocarbon and retardant for engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jian; Gu, Chun-wei

    2015-01-01

    The Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) has been demonstrated to be a promising technology for the recovery of engine waste heat. Systems with hydrocarbons as the working fluids exhibit good thermal performance. However, the flammability of hydrocarbons limits their practical applications because of safety concerns. This paper examines the potential of using mixtures of a hydrocarbon and a retardant in an ORC system for engine waste heat recovery. Refrigerants R141b and R11 are selected as the retardants and blended with the hydrocarbons to form zeotropic mixtures. The flammability is suppressed, and in addition, zeotropic mixtures provide better temperature matches with the heat source and sink, which reduces the exergy loss within the heat exchange processes, thereby increasing the cycle efficiency. Energetic and exergetic analysis of ORC systems with pure hydrocarbons and with mixtures of a hydrocarbon and a retardant are conducted and compared. The net power output and the second law efficiency are chosen as the evaluation criteria to select the suitable working fluid compositions and to define the optimal set of thermodynamic parameters. The simulation results reveal that the ORC system with cyclohexane/R141b (0.5/0.5) is optimal for this engine waste heat recovery case, thereby increasing the net power output of the system by 13.3% compared to pure cyclohexane. - Highlights: • ORC with zeotropic mixtures for engine waste heat recovery is discussed. • Energetic and exergetic analysis of ORC system are conducted. • Optimal mixture working fluid composition is identified. • Greater utilization of jacket water and lower irreversible loss are important.

  16. Life cycle greenhouse gas analysis of biojet fuels with a technical investigation into their impact on jet engine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokesh, Kadambari; Sethi, Vishal; Nikolaidis, Theoklis; Goodger, Eric; Nalianda, Devaiah

    2015-01-01

    Biojet fuels have been claimed to be one of the most promising and strategic solutions to mitigate aviation emissions. This study examines the environmental competence of Bio-Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (Bio-SPKs) against conventional Jet-A, through development of a life cycle GHG model (ALCEmB – Assessment of Life Cycle Emissions of Biofuels) from “cradle-grave” perspective. This model precisely calculates the life cycle emissions of the advanced biofuels through a multi-disciplinary study entailing hydrocarbon chemistry, thermodynamic behaviour and fuel combustion from engine/aircraft performance, into the life cycle studies, unlike earlier studies. The aim of this study is predict the “cradle-grave” carbon intensity of Camelina SPK, Microalgae SPK and Jatropha SPK through careful estimation and inclusion of combustion based emissions, which contribute ≈70% of overall life cycle emissions (LCE). Numerical modelling and non-linear/dynamic simulation of a twin-shaft turbofan, with an appropriate airframe, was conducted to analyse the impact of alternative fuels on engine/aircraft performance. ALCEmB revealed that Camelina SPK, Microalgae SPK and Jatropha SPK delivered 70%, 58% and 64% LCE savings relative to the reference fuel, Jet-A1. The net energy ratio analysis indicates that current technology for the biofuel processing is energy efficient and technically feasible. An elaborate gas property analysis infers that the Bio-SPKs exhibit improved thermodynamic behaviour in an operational gas turbine engine. This thermodynamic effect has a positive impact on aircraft-level fuel consumption and emissions characteristics demonstrating fuel savings in the range of 3–3.8% and emission savings of 5.8–6.3% (CO 2 ) and 7.1–8.3% (LTO NOx), relative to that of Jet-A. - Highlights: • Bio-SPKs were determined to deliver “Cradle-Grave” GHG savings of 58–70%. • Bio-SPKs exhibited improved thermodynamic behaviour at integrated system level assessment

  17. Potential Fuel Economy Improvements from the Implementation of cEGR and CDA on an Atkinson Cycle Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Present the implementation of cEGR and CDA on an Atkinson engine and use steady state fuel consumption maps to estimate the technologies’ potential fuel economy improvements over the FTP and Highway tests. In addition to use fuel weighted modes to determine possible fuel economy...

  18. Conversion of a Micro, Glow-Ignition, Two-Stroke Engine from Nitromethane-Methanol Blend Fuel to Military Jet Propellant (JP-8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    therefore, was to look at commonly available hobby, sensor-less, brushless direct current (BLDC) motors as they typically operate at the same... motor would require some method of converting the power generated into an easily regulated and absorbed DC power. The hobby BLDC motor had three...and output DC voltage. For this project, a Castle Creations Phoenix ICE 50 motor controller (capable of 30 VDC and 50 A) was purchased and used to

  19. Modelling of temporal and spatial evolution of sulphur oxides and sulphuric acid under large, two-stroke marine engine-like conditions using integrated CFD-chemical kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Walther, Jens Honore

    2017-01-01

    and areduced sulphur subset mechanism. In the present work, performance of the coupled CFD-chemicalkinetic model is evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The modelling results showthat the temporal and spatial evolutions of SOx predicted by the skeletal model are similar to those...... isfurther evaluated using the measured SO2 to SO3 conversion levels in a low load, low scavenge pressurecase and a low load, high scavenge pressure case. The absolute values of simulated and measured conversionlevels are close, although the former appear to be higher. The current results show...

  20. Modelling of Combustion and Pollutant Formation in a Large, Two-Stroke Marine Diesel Engine using Integrated CFD-Skeletal Chemical Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Kar Mun; Karvounis, Nikolas; Schramm, Jesper

    , liftoff lengths and averaged soot volume fraction (SVF) with respect to the change of ambient pressure captured using the model agree reasonably well with the measurement, apart from those at the low pressure condition. Numerical models are subsequently validated against experimental combustion...... ratio and SVF values. In addition, the oxygen availability is found to affect the production of acetylene and hence soot particles. For the current test condition, the averaged NO concentration calculated when soot radiative heat loss is taken into account compared to that when only convective...

  1. Influence of outlet geometry on the swirling flow in a simplfied model of a large two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Schnipper, Teis; Meyer, Knud Erik

    -like and flow reversal is observed on the cylinder axis, close to the inlet. Downstream, the flow reversal disappears and instead a localized jet develops. The corresponding tangential velocity profiles show a concentrated vortex with decreasing width along the downstream direction. By placing a concentric...... dummy-valve at the cylinder outlet, the magnitude of reverse flow at the inlet increases, the strong swirl is diminished and the axial jet disappears. We compare these findings with previous measurements in vortex chambers and discuss the relevance of these results with respect to development of marine...

  2. Stationary engine test of diesel cycle using diesel oil and biodiesel (B100); Ensaio de motores estacionarios do ciclo diesel utilizando oleo diesel e biodiesel (B100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Ednildo Andrade [Universidade Federal da Bahia (DEQ/DEM/EP/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica], Email: ednildo@ufba.br; Santos, Danilo Cardoso [Universidade Federal da Bahia (PPEQ/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Quimica; Souza, Daniel Vidigal D.; Peixoto, Leonardo Barbosa; Franca, Tiago [Universidade Federal da Bahia (DEM/UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2006-07-01

    This work objectified to test an engine stationary of the cycle diesel, having as combustible diesel fossil and bio diesel. The characteristic curves of power, torque and emissions versus rotation of the engine was elaborated. The survey of these curves was carried through in the Laboratorio de Energia e Gas da Escola Politecnica da UFBA, which makes use of two stationary dynamometers and the one of chassis and necessary instrumentation for you analyze of the exhaustion gases. The tested engine was of the mark AGRALE, M-85 model stationary type, mono cylinder, with power NF (NBRISO 1585) Cv/kw/rpm 10/7,4/2500. The assays had been carried through in a hydraulically dynamometer mark Schenck, D-210 model. The fuel consumption was measured in a scale marks Filizola model BP-6, and too much ground handling equipment such as: water reservoir, tubings, valves controllers of volumetric outflow, sensors and measurers of rotation, torque, mass, connected to a system of acquisition of data on line. The emissions of the gases (CO, CO{sub 2}, and NOx), were measured by the analytical Tempest mark, model 100. The engine operated with oil diesel and bio diesel of oils and residual fats (OGR). In the tests, the use of the fuel derived from oil and the gotten ones from OGR was not detected significant differences how much. In this phase already it can show to the immediate possibility of the substitution of the oil diesel for bio diesel as combustible in the stationary engines of low power (author)

  3. The Miller cycle effects on improvement of fuel economy in a highly boosted, high compression ratio, direct-injection gasoline engine: EIVC vs. LIVC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tie; Gao, Yi; Wang, Jiasheng; Chen, Ziqian

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • At high load, LIVC is superior over EIVC in improving fuel economy. • The improvement with LIVC is due to advanced combustion phasing and increased pumping work. • At low load, EIVC is better than LIVC in improving fuel economy. • Pumping loss with EIVC is smaller than with LIVC at low load. • But heat release rate with EIVC is slower than with LIVC. - Abstract: A combination of downsizing, highly boosting and direct injection (DI) is an effective way to improve fuel economy of gasoline engines without the penalties of reduced torque or power output. At high loads, however, knock problem becomes severer when increasing the intake boosting. As a compromise, geometric compression ratio (CR) is usually reduced to mitigate knock, and the improvement of fuel economy is discounted. Application of Miller cycle, which can be realized by either early or late intake valve closing (EIVC or LIVC), has the potential to reduce the effective CR and suppress knock. In this paper, the effects of EIVC and LIVC on the fuel economy of a boosted DI gasoline production engine reformed with a geometric CR of 12.0 are experimentally compared at low and high loads. Compared to the original production engine with CR 9.3, at the high load operation, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) is improved by 4.7% with CR12.0 and LIVC, while the effect of EIVC on improving BSFC is negligibly small. At the low load operation, combined with CR12.0, LIVC and EIVC improve the fuel economy by 6.8% and 7.4%, respectively, compared to the production engine. The mechanism behind the effects of LIVC and EIVC on improving the fuel economy is discussed. These results will be a valuable reference for engine designers and researchers

  4. Experimental Piston Ring Tribology for Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2008-01-01

    A very important condition for describing the frictional behavior of a piston ring correctly is knowledge about the amount of lubricant present. It is often assumed that piston rings operate under fully flooded conditions, but this is not the case in real life operation. In large two-stroke engines...

  5. Experimental Investigation of Piston Rings for Internal Combustion Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jens; Klit, Peder; Vølund, Anders

    2007-01-01

    conditions, but this is not the case in real life operation. These problems forms the basis for the experimental investigation. In large two-stroke engines the cylinder oil is supplied to the bearing at discrete locations on the cylinder liner at a specific rate at a certain time. The shifting in lubrication...

  6. Modelling for Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Zander, Claes-Göran; Pedersen, Nicolai

    2013-01-01

    models. While literature is rich on four-stroke automotive engines, this paper considers two-stroke engines and develops a non-linear dynamic model of the exhaust gas system. Parameters are determined by system identication. The paper uses black-box nonlinear model identication and modelling from rst...

  7. Experimental Investigation of Sulfuric Acid Condensation and Corrosion Rate in Motored Bukh DV24 Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjemtrup, Lars; Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov; Meyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The work conducted in this paper presents a novel experimental setup to study sulfuric acid cold corrosion of cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines. The process is simulated in a motored light duty BUKH DV24 diesel engine where the charge air contain known amounts of H2SO4 and...

  8. Improved gene amplification by cell-cycle engineering combined with the Cre-loxP system in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Rima; Tsutsui, Tomomi; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Omasa, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    The dihydrofolate reductase gene amplification system is widely used in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for the industrial production of therapeutic proteins. To enhance the efficiency of conventional gene amplification systems, we previously presented a novel method using cell-cycle checkpoint engineering. Here, we constructed high-producing and stable cells by the conditional expression of mutant cell division cycle 25 homolog B (CDC25B) using the Cre-loxP system. A bispecific antibody-producing CHO DG44-derived cell line was transfected with floxed mutant CDC25B. After inducing gene amplification in the presence of 250 nM methotrexate, mutant CDC25B sequence was removed by Cre recombinase protein expression. Overexpression of the floxed mutant CDC25B significantly enhanced the efficiency of transgene amplification and productivity. Moreover, the specific production rate of the isolated clone CHO Cre-1 and Cre-2 were approximately 11-fold and 15-fold higher than that of mock-transfected clone CHO Mock-S. Chromosomal aneuploidy was increased by mutant CDC25B overexpression, but Cre-1 and Cre-2 did not show any changes in chromosome number during long-term cultivation, as is the case with CHO Mock-S. Our results suggest that high-producing and stable cells can be constructed by conditionally controlling a cell-cycle checkpoint integrated in conventional gene amplification systems. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Recent advancements of chemical engineering in front end fuel cycle technologies at NFC. Contributed Paper IT-01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2014-01-01

    On front end fuel cycle side, Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) has been a pioneer in processing the uranium and zirconium ore concentrates from different sources. The uranium and zirconium ore concentrates are converted into nuclear grade uranium and zirconium di oxide powders through the conventional TBP purification and precipitation route. In case of zirconium powders, they are converted into pure nuclear grade zirconium sponge through chlorination route for the production of zirconium alloys, which are mainly used as reactor core structural material

  10. Advanced maintenance strategies for power plant operators - introducing inter-plant life cycle management. ZES research focus 'condition-based maintenance in power engineering'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeber, U.

    2003-01-01

    The optimisation of maintenance activities observed in recent years can be attributed above all to the use and continuing development of testing and diagnostic techniques, to the increased level of system and component automation and to more efficient work organisation. Despite the considerable success of these efforts, the potential for further cost reductions is still far from exhausted. The risks connected to reliability, availability and safety need to be analysed in greater detail in order to ensure the sustainability of the savings already achieved as well as those yet to be realised. The systematic application of condition-based maintenance and the introduction of structured life cycle management are essential prerequisites. Within the framework of its ''Condition-Based Maintenance in Power Engineering'' research focus, the Energy Research Centre (ZES) has set up a specialist network in which experts from various institutes belonging to the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and the Faculty of Informatic, Electrical Engineering and Information Technology can develop interdisciplinary solutions for advanced maintenance strategies. The ZES offers the industry a platform for cooperating on current issues relating to the supply of energy and supports the movement towards sustainable improvements to competitiveness through research and consulting activities. It applies professional project and quality management procedures to ensure that contracts covering interdisciplinary topics and projects are handled in a coherent manner. (orig.)

  11. Advanced maintenance strategies for power plant operators - introducing inter-plant life cycle management. ZES research focus 'condition-based maintenance in power engineering'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graeber, U.

    2003-07-01

    The optimisation of maintenance activities observed in recent years can be attributed above all to the use and continuing development of testing and diagnostic techniques, to the increased level of system and component automation and to more efficient work organisation. Despite the considerable success of these efforts, the potential for further cost reductions is still far from exhausted. The risks connected to reliability, availability and safety need to be analysed in greater detail in order to ensure the sustainability of the savings already achieved as well as those yet to be realised. The systematic application of condition-based maintenance and the introduction of structured life cycle management are essential prerequisites. Within the framework of its ''Condition-Based Maintenance in Power Engineering'' research focus, the Energy Research Centre (ZES) has set up a specialist network in which experts from various institutes belonging to the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and the Faculty of Informatic, Electrical Engineering and Information Technology can develop interdisciplinary solutions for advanced maintenance strategies. The ZES offers the industry a platform for cooperating on current issues relating to the supply of energy and supports the movement towards sustainable improvements to competitiveness through research and consulting activities. It applies professional project and quality management procedures to ensure that contracts covering interdisciplinary topics and projects are handled in a coherent manner. (orig.)

  12. Investigation of palm methyl-ester bio-diesel with additive on performance and emission characteristics of a diesel engine under 8-mode testing cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Senthilkumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its same diesel-like fuel properties and compatibility with petroleum-based diesel fueled engines. Therefore, in this paper the prospects and opportunities of using various blends of methyl esters of palm oil as fuel in an engine with and without the effect of multi-functional fuel additive (MFA, Multi DM 32 are studied to arrive at an optimum blend of bio-diesel best suited for low emissions and minimal power drop. Experimental tests were conducted on a four stroke, three cylinder and naturally aspirated D.I. Diesel engine with diesel and various blend percentages of 20%, 40%, 45%, and 50% under the 8 mode testing cycle. The effect of fuel additive was tested out on the optimum blend ratio of the bio-diesel so as to achieve further reduced emissions. Comparison of results shows that, 73% reduction in hydrocarbon emission, 46% reduction in carbon monoxide emission, and around 1% reduction in carbon dioxide emission characteristics. So it is observed that the blend ratio of 40% bio-diesel with MFA fuel additive creates reduced emission and minimal power drop due to effective combustion even when the calorific value is comparatively lower due to its higher cetane number.

  13. Performance Analysis of an Evaporator for a Diesel Engine–Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC Combined System and Influence of Pressure Drop on the Diesel Engine Operating Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research is to analyze the performance of an evaporator for the organic Rankine cycle (ORC system and discuss the influence of the evaporator on the operating characteristics of diesel engine. A simulation model of fin-and-tube evaporator of the ORC system is established by using Fluent software. Then, the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the exhaust at the evaporator shell side are obtained, and then the performance of the fin-and-tube evaporator of the ORC system is analyzed based on the field synergy principle. The field synergy angle (β is the intersection angle between the velocity vector and the temperature gradient. When the absolute values of velocity and temperature gradient are constant and β < 90°, heat transfer enhancement can be achieved with the decrease of the β. When the absolute values of velocity and temperature gradient are constant and β >90°, heat transfer enhancement can be achieved with the increase of the β. Subsequently, the influence of the evaporator of the ORC system on diesel engine performance is studied. A simulation model of the diesel engine is built by using GT–Power software under various operating conditions, and the variation tendency of engine power, torque, and brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC are obtained. The variation tendency of the power output and BSFC of diesel engine–ORC combined system are obtained when the evaporation pressure ranges from 1.0 MPa to 3.5 MPa. Results show that the field synergy effect for the areas among the tube bundles of the evaporator main body and the field synergy effect for the areas among the fins on the windward side are satisfactory. However, the field synergy effect in the areas among the fins on the leeward side is weak. As a result of the pressure drop caused by the evaporator of the ORC system, the diesel engine power and torque decreases slightly, whereas the BSFC increases slightly with the increase of exhaust back

  14. Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, A.K.

    2000-02-23

    This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

  15. Contribution of unburned lubricating oil and gasoline-derived n-alkanes to particulate emission from non-catalyst and catalyst-equipped two-stroke mopeds operated with synthetic lubricating oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzano, Pasquale; Picini, Paolo; Cataldi, Dario

    2008-10-01

    This study investigated the contribution of unburned lubricating oil and gasoline-derived n-alkanes to particulate emission from non-catalyst and catalyst-equipped two-stroke (2-S) mopeds operated with ester-based, fully synthetic lubricating oil. Exhaust particulate matter (PM) from ten 2-S, 50 cm3 mopeds belonging to three different levels of emission legislation (EURO-0, EURO-1 and EURO-2) was collected during the sampling phase of the ECE 47 driving cycle through which each mopeds was driven on a dynamometer bench. Filters containing PM were extracted with an accelerated solvent extractor and analysed by gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry. The contribution of unburned lubricating oil to the PM was ascertained and quantified by exploiting characteristic ions in its mass spectrum. The experimental results show that unburned lubricating oil accounted for a significant fraction (4.7-38.7%) of the PM emitted from 2-S mopeds. Emission rates of particulate unburned lubricating oil and n-alkanes from non-catalyst EURO-0 mopeds were 15.4-56.2 mg km(-1) and 1-2 mg km(-1), respectively. These emission rates were reduced of 75% and 88%, respectively, for catalyst-equipped EURO-1 mopeds. The results of the tests carried out on two EURO-2 mopeds of different technology were contrasting. A EURO-2 moped with carburettor and secondary air injection exhibited a clear reduction of 95% and 88% for unburned lubricating oil and n-alkanes emission rates with respect to the average values observed for EURO-1 mopeds. On the other hand, the second EURO-2 moped, equipped with catalyst and direct injection, had unburned lubricating oil emission rates roughly in the range of EURO-0 mopeds while particulate n-alkanes were emitted at rates comparable with typical values observed for catalyst EURO-1 mopeds.

  16. Computer code for single-point thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen/oxygen expander-cycle rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Arthur J.; Jones, Scott M.

    1991-01-01

    This analysis and this computer code apply to full, split, and dual expander cycles. Heat regeneration from the turbine exhaust to the pump exhaust is allowed. The combustion process is modeled as one of chemical equilibrium in an infinite-area or a finite-area combustor. Gas composition in the nozzle may be either equilibrium or frozen during expansion. This report, which serves as a users guide for the computer code, describes the system, the analysis methodology, and the program input and output. Sample calculations are included to show effects of key variables such as nozzle area ratio and oxidizer-to-fuel mass ratio.

  17. Analysis of current research addressing complementary use of life-cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: have lessons been learned from previous experience with chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    While it is generally agreed that successful strategies to address the health and environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (NM) should consider the well-established frameworks for conducting life-cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA), scientific research, and specific guidance...... on how to practically apply these methods are still very much under development. This paper evaluates how research efforts have applied LCA and RA together for NM, particularly reflecting on previous experiences with applying these methods to chemicals. Through a literature review and a separate analysis...... of research focused on applying LCA and RA together for NM, it appears that current research efforts have taken into account some key ‘‘lessons learned’’ from previous experience with chemicals while many key challenges remain for practically applying these methods to NM. We identified two main approaches...

  18. Assessment of engine cycle performances with synthes gas fuel addition based on determining coefficients in chemistry kinetics law through treatment of combustion speed

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbunov, A. V.; Viarshyna, H. A.; Pilatau, A.Y.; Baranov, V. Y.; Nozhenko, O. S.; Kaptug, A. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of engine cycle performances with synthes gas fuel addition based on determining coefficients in chemistry kinetics law through treatment of combustion speed / A. V. Gorbunov [et al.] // Наука – образованию, производству, экономике : материалы 11-й Международной научно-технической конференции. Т. 2. - Минск : БНТУ, 2013. - С. 58.

  19. Research on shock wave characteristics in the isolator of central strut rocket-based combined cycle engine under Ma5.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xianggeng; Xue, Rui; Qin, Fei; Hu, Chunbo; He, Guoqiang

    2017-11-01

    A numerical calculation of shock wave characteristics in the isolator of central strut rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine fueled by kerosene was carried out in this paper. A 3D numerical model was established by the DES method. The kerosene chemical kinetic model used the 9-component and 12-step simplified mechanism model. Effects of fuel equivalence ratio, inflow total temperature and central strut rocket on-off on shock wave characteristics were studied under Ma5.5. Results demonstrated that with the increase of equivalence ratio, the leading shock wave moves toward upstream, accompanied with higher possibility of the inlet unstart. However, the leading shock wave moves toward downstream as the inflow total temperature rises. After the central strut rocket is closed, the leading shock wave moves toward downstream, which can reduce risks of the inlet unstart. State of the shear layer formed by the strut rocket jet flow and inflow can influence the shock train structure significantly.

  20. A life cycle assessment and process system engineering integrated approach for sustainability : application to environmental evaluation of biofuel production

    OpenAIRE

    Gillani, Sayed Tamizuddin

    2013-01-01

    La méthode de l’Analyse du Cycle de Vie (ACV) est devenue ces dernières années un outil d’aide à la décision « environnementale » pour évaluer l’impact des produits et des processus associés. La pratique de l’ACV est documentée comme un outil pour l’évaluation d’impacts, la comparaison et la prise de décisions « orientée produit ». L’exploitation d’une telle méthode pour les procédés de l’industrie bio-physico-chimique a gagné récemment en popularité. Il existe de nombreux faisceaux d’amélior...

  1. Improving the success and impact of the metabolic engineering design, build, test, learn cycle by addressing proteins of unknown function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, Laura R

    2018-01-04

    Rational, predictive metabolic engineering of organisms requires an ability to associate biological activity to the corresponding gene(s). Despite extensive advances in the 20 years since the Escherichia coli genome was published, there are still gaps in our knowledge of protein function. The substantial amount of data that has been published, such as: omics-level characterization in a myriad of conditions; genome-scale libraries; and evolution and genome sequencing, provide means of identifying and prioritizing proteins for characterization. This review describes the scale of this knowledge gap, demonstrates the benefit of addressing the knowledge gap, and demonstrates the availability of interesting candidates for characterization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Updating the U.S. Life Cycle GHG Petroleum Baseline to 2014 with Projections to 2040 Using Open-Source Engineering-Based Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Gregory; Jamieson, Matthew; Marriott, Joe; Bergerson, Joule; Brandt, Adam; Skone, Timothy J

    2017-01-17

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory produced a well-to-wheels (WTW) life cycle greenhouse gas analysis of petroleum-based fuels consumed in the U.S. in 2005, known as the NETL 2005 Petroleum Baseline. This study uses a set of engineering-based, open-source models combined with publicly available data to calculate baseline results for 2014. An increase between the 2005 baseline and the 2014 results presented here (e.g., 92.4 vs 96.2 g CO 2 e/MJ gasoline, + 4.1%) are due to changes both in modeling platform and in the U.S. petroleum sector. An updated result for 2005 was calculated to minimize the effect of the change in modeling platform, and emissions for gasoline in 2014 were about 2% lower than in 2005 (98.1 vs 96.2 g CO 2 e/MJ gasoline). The same methods were utilized to forecast emissions from fuels out to 2040, indicating maximum changes from the 2014 gasoline result between +2.1% and -1.4%. The changing baseline values lead to potential compliance challenges with frameworks such as the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Section 526, which states that Federal agencies should not purchase alternative fuels unless their life cycle GHG emissions are less than those of conventionally produced, petroleum-derived fuels.

  3. Analysis of current research addressing complementary use of life-cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: have lessons been learned from previous experience with chemicals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieger, Khara D.; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko; Christensen, Frans; Baun, Anders; Olsen, Stig I.

    2012-01-01

    While it is generally agreed that successful strategies to address the health and environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (NM) should consider the well-established frameworks for conducting life-cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA), scientific research, and specific guidance on how to practically apply these methods are still very much under development. This paper evaluates how research efforts have applied LCA and RA together for NM, particularly reflecting on previous experiences with applying these methods to chemicals. Through a literature review and a separate analysis of research focused on applying LCA and RA together for NM, it appears that current research efforts have taken into account some key “lessons learned” from previous experience with chemicals while many key challenges remain for practically applying these methods to NM. We identified two main approaches for using these methods together for NM: “LC-based RA” (traditional RA applied in a life-cycle perspective) and “RA-complemented LCA” (conventional LCA supplemented by RA in specific life-cycle steps). Hence, the latter is the only identified approach which genuinely combines LC- and RA-based methods for NM-risk research efforts to date as the former is rather a continuation of normal RA according to standard assessment procedures (e.g., REACH). Both these approaches along with recommendations for using LCA and RA together for NM are similar to those made previously for chemicals, and thus, there does not appear to be much progress made specific for NM. We have identified one issue in particular that may be specific for NM when applying LCA and RA at this time: the need to establish proper dose metrics within both methods.

  4. 40 CFR 94.105 - Duty cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Test Procedures § 94.105 Duty cycles. (a) Overview. For...) General cycle. Propulsion engines that are used with (or intended to be used with) fixed-pitch propellers, propeller-law auxiliary engines, and any other engines for which the other duty cycles of this section do...

  5. Comparison of the performance of two different Dual-loop organic Rankine cycles (DORC) with nanofluid for engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haozhong; Zhu, Juan; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparison of two DORC systems with the addition of nanoparticles in coolant. • One-stage DORC system is better than two-stage DORC system. • Water-based one-stage DORC system performs the best. • The addition of nanoparticles in coolant can improve DORC system’s performance. - Abstract: To recover the heat from engine exhaust, coolant liquid and high-temperature loop, two different Dual-loop organic Rankine cycles (DORC) are studied in this paper. The two systems differ for the number of stages of heat recovery from engine exhaust, and both include high temperature loop and low temperature loop in each system. R123, R245fa, ethanol, R141b, and water are the candidate working fluids of HT loop, and R143a is the working fluid of LT loop. Because the coolant water in engines has lower temperature, it is more difficult to recover its heat. Therefore, in this study, graphene nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes are added to coolant water to enhance its heat transfer. Net output power, thermal efficiency, and exergy efficiency are selected as the objective functions. Results show that the single stage system (S1) is a little better than the other. Water-based S1 performs the best and the net output power, the thermal efficiency, and the exergy efficiency are 96.92 kW, 14.13% and 64.04%, respectively. High evaporation pressure and turbine inlet temperature are better for performance optimization. And when the coolant water contains 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, system reaches the max net output power increment of 3.84 kW.

  6. Survey of modern power plants driven by diesel and gas engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemi, S. [Turku Polytechnic, Turku (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This report surveys the latest technology of power plants driven by reciprocating internal combustion (IC) engines, from information collected from publications made mainly during the 1990`s. Diesel and gas engines are considered competitive prime movers in power production due mainly to their high full- and part-load brake thermal efficiency, ability to burn different fuels, short construction time and fast start-ups. The market for engine power plants has grown rapidly, with estimated total orders for reciprocating engines of 1 MW output and more reaching the 5000 unit level, (10 GW), between June 1995 and May 1996. Industrialized countries much prefer combined heat and power (CHP) production. Intense interest has been shown in recent years in alternative gas fuels; natural gas appears to be the most promising, but liquid petroleum gas, gas from sewage disposal plants, landfill gas and other biogases, as well as wood gas have also been recognized as other alternatives. Liquid alternatives such as fuels and pyrolysis oil have also been mentioned, in addition to information on coal burning engines. The percentage of gas engines used has increased and different ones are being developed, based on either the traditional spark ignition (SI), dual-fuel technology or the more recent high pressure gas injection system. In cold climates, energy production is largely based on CHP plants. Waste heat is utilized for local, regional or district heating or for industrial uses like drying, heating, cooling etc. Even radiative and convective heat from gen-set surfaces are employed, and boilers are used with exhaust outlet temperatures of below dew point. Combined cycle schemes, including turbo compound systems and steam turbines, are also incorporated into engine power plants in order to increase output and efficiency. Two-stroke, low-speed diesel engine plants show the highest electric efficiencies, with combined cycle plants reaching up to 54 %, while gas engine plants achieved

  7. Wastewater engineering applications of BioIronTech process based on the biogeochemical cycle of iron bioreduction and (biooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Ivanov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioreduction of Fe(III and biooxidation of Fe(II can be used in wastewater engineering as an innovative biotechnology BioIronTech, which is protected for commercial applications by US patent 7393452 and Singapore patent 106658 “Compositions and methods for the treatment of wastewater and other waste”. The BioIronTech process comprises the following steps: 1 anoxic bacterial reduction of Fe(III, for example in iron ore powder; 2 surface renovation of iron ore particles due to the formation of dissolved Fe2+ ions; 3 precipitation of insoluble ferrous salts of inorganic anions (phosphate or organic anions (phenols and organic acids; 4 (biooxidation of ferrous compunds with the formation of negatively, positively, or neutrally charged ferric hydroxides, which are good adsorbents of many pollutants; 5 disposal or thermal regeration of ferric (hydroxide. Different organic substances can be used as electron donors in bioreduction of Fe(III. Ferrous ions and fresh ferrous or ferric hydroxides that are produced after iron bioreduction and (biooxidation adsorb and precipitate diferent negatively charged molecules, for example chlorinated compounds of sucralose production wastewater or other halogenated organics, as well as phenols, organic acids, phosphate, and sulphide. Reject water (return liquor from the stage of sewage sludge dewatering on municipal wastewater treatment plants represents from 10 to 50% of phosphorus load when being recycled to the aeration tank. BioIronTech process can remove/recover more than 90% of phosphorous from this reject water thus replacing the conventional process of phosphate precipitation by ferric/ferrous salts, which are 20–100 times more expensive than iron ore, which is used in BioIronTech process. BioIronTech process can remarkably improve the aerobic and anaerobic treatments of municipal and industrial wastewaters, especially anaerobic digestion of lipid- and sulphate-containing food-processing wastewater. It

  8. The US Army Corps of Engineers Roadmap for Life-Cycle Building Information Modeling (BIM). Supplement 2 - BIM Implementation Guide for Military Construction (MILCON) Projects Using the Bentley Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Building Information Modeling ( BIM ...12-2, Supplement 2 November 2012 The US Army Corps of Engineers Roadmap for Life-Cycle Building Information Modeling ( BIM ) Supplement 2 – BIM ...39180 ERDC SR-12-2, Supplement 2 (November 2012) ii Abstract Building Information Modeling ( BIM ) technology has rapidly gained ac-

  9. 40 CFR 86.005-10 - Emission standards for 2005 and later model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emissions from new 2005 and later model year Otto-cycle HDEs, except for Otto-cycle HDEs subject to the... its Otto-cycle HDE families in any or all of the emissions ABT programs for HDEs, within the... measured under transient operating conditions. (C) Idle carbon monoxide. For all Otto-cycle HDEs utilizing...

  10. Nonlinear Adaptive Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kræn Vodder; Blanke, Mogens; Vejlgaard-Laursen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    A nonlinear adaptive controller is proposed for the exhaust gas recirculation systemon large two-stroke diesel engines. The control design is based on a control oriented model ofthe nonlinear dynamics at hand that incorporates load and engine speed changes as knowndisturbances to the exhaust gas...... will make the system converge exponentiallyto the best achievable state. Simulation examples confirm convergence and good disturbancerejection over relevant operational ranges of the engine....

  11. Real-time environmental monitoring at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute O-arai Engineering Center. Using the internet to promote safety and environmental transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motomatsu, Sheila; Nakashima Inoue, Naoko

    2000-12-01

    The report documents the results of an effort at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute O-arai Engineering Center (JNC/OEC) to provide via the Internet, in real-time, environmental monitoring data to promote safety and environmental transparency. Provided in Japanese as well as in English, the Internet site provides assurance that OEC nuclear operations are being conducted in a manner that is safe to both people in the surrounding area and the environment. This work conducted by Environmental Monitoring Team of the OEC Safety Administration Section fulfilled the assignment to release data real-time via the Internet tasked by the Information Disclosure Section of the JNC Headquarters Public Relations Division. The work conducted by the visiting exchange scientist fulfilled the experimental portion of Action Sheet 34 of the Agreement between JNC and DOE for Cooperation in Research and Development Concerning Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Measures for Safeguards and Nonproliferation. In Japan, the project for Action Sheet 34 Personnel Exchange on Remote Monitoring and Transparency' entailed both a study and an experiment on how remote monitoring technologies can be used to promote nonproliferation, environmental and safety transparency. Environmental airborne radionuclide monitoring falls under the definition of remote monitoring technology more broadly defined as 'remotely accessed unattended monitoring system technology'. (author)

  12. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine, NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program - Commercial Supersonic Technology Project - AeroServoElasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  13. Similarity Theory Based Radial Turbine Performance and Loss Mechanism Comparison between R245fa and Air for Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Organic Rankine Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic Rankine Cycles using radial turbines as expanders are considered as one of the most efficient technologies to convert heavy-duty diesel engine waste heat into useful work. Turbine similarity design based on the existing air turbine profiles is time saving. Due to totally different thermodynamic properties between organic fluids and air, its influence on turbine performance and loss mechanisms need to be analyzed. This paper numerically simulated a radial turbine under similar conditions between R245fa and air, and compared the differences of the turbine performance and loss mechanisms. Larger specific heat ratio of air leads to air turbine operating at higher pressure ratios. As R245fa gas constant is only about one-fifth of air gas constant, reduced rotating speeds of R245fa turbine are only 0.4-fold of those of air turbine, and reduced mass flow rates are about twice of those of air turbine. When using R245fa as working fluid, the nozzle shock wave losses decrease but rotor suction surface separation vortex losses increase, and eventually leads that isentropic efficiencies of R245fa turbine in the commonly used velocity ratio range from 0.5 to 0.9 are 3%–4% lower than those of air turbine.

  14. Life-cycle environmental performance of renewable building materials in the context of residential construction : phase II research report : an extension to the 2005 phase I research report. Module N, Life-cycle inventory of manufacturing prefinished engineered wood flooring in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard D. Bergman; Scott A. Bowe

    2011-01-01

    This study summarizes the environmental performance of prefinished engineered wood flooring using life-cycle inventory (LCI) analysis. Using primary mill data gathered from manufacturers in the eastern United States and applying the methods found in Consortium for Research on Renewable Industrial Materials (CORRIM) Research Guidelines and International Organization of...

  15. Tribological Performance of Different Geometries of Piston Rings in Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imran, Tajammal; Klit, Peder; Felter, Christian

    Friction in the piston ring package (piston, piston rings and liner) is a major source of power consumption in two stroke marine diesel engines. It is well-known that a typical piston ring operates under full separation in the mid-part of the stroke, and in the mixed lubrication regime at the dead...

  16. Influence of piston position on the scavenging and swirling flow in two-stoke diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obeidat, Anas; Haider, Sajjad; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2011-01-01

    We study the eect of piston position on the in-cylinder swirling flow in a low speed large two-stroke marine diesel engine model. We are using Large Eddy Simulations in OpenFOAM, with three different models for the turbulent flow: a one equation model (OEM), a dynamic one equation model (DOEM...

  17. EMISSIONS FROM TWO OUTBOARD ENGINES OPERATING ON REFORMULATED GASOLINE CONTAINING MTBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air and water pollutant emissions were measured from two 9.9 HP outboard engines: a two-stroke Evinrude and its four-stroke Honda counterpart. In addition to the measurement of regulated air pollutants, speciated organic pollutants and particulate matter emissions were determi...

  18. A review on the use of gas and steam turbine combined cycles as prime movers for large ships. Part I: Background and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haglind, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to review the prospects of using combined cycles as prime movers for large ships, like, container ships, tankers and bulk carriers. The paper is divided into three parts of which this paper constitutes Part I. Here, the environmental and human health concerns of international shipping are outlined. The regulatory framework relevant for shipping and the design of combined cycles are discussed. In Part II, previous work and experience are reviewed, and an overview of the implications of introducing combined cycles as prime movers is included. In Part III, marine fuels are discussed and the pollutant emissions of gas turbines are compared with those of two-stroke, slow-speed diesel engines. Environmental effects of shipping include contributions to the formation of ground-level ozone, acidification, eutrophication and climate impact. Tightening environmental regulations limit the fuel sulphur content and pollutant emissions. For moderate live steam pressures, a vertical HRSG of drum-type mounted directly over the gas turbine, is suggested to be a viable configuration that minimizes ground floor and space requirements

  19. Consumer exposures to laser printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles: A case study of life-cycle implications from nano-enabled products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Bello, Dhimiter; Shafer, Martin; Bunker, Kristin Lee; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that printers emit nanoparticles during their operation. To-date, however, the physicochemical and toxicological characterization of “real world” printer-emitted nanoparticles (PEPs) remains incomplete, hampering proper risk assessment efforts. Here, we investigate our earlier hypothesis that engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are used in toners and ENMs are released during printing (consumer use). Furthermore, we conduct a detailed physicochemical and morphological characterization of PEPs in support of ongoing toxicological assessment. A comprehensive suite of state of the art analytical methods and tools was employed for the physicochemical and morphological characterization of 11 toners widely utilized in printers from major printer manufacturers and their PEPs. We confirmed that a number of ENMs incorporated into toner formulations (e.g., silica, alumina, titania, iron oxide, zinc oxide, copper oxide, cerium oxide, carbon black among others) and released into the air during printing. All evaluated toners contained large amounts of organic carbon (OC, 42–89%), metals/metal oxides (1–33%), and some elemental carbon (EC, 0.33–12%). The PEPs possess a composition similar to that of toner and contained 50–90% OC, 0.001–0.5% EC and 1–3% metals. While the chemistry of the PEPs generally reflected that of their toners, considerable differences are documented indicative of potential transformations taking place during consumer use (printing). We conclude that: (i) Routine incorporation of ENMs in toners classifies them as nano-enabled products (NEPs); (ii) These ENMs become airborne during printing; (iii) The chemistry of PEPs is complex and it reflects that of the toner and paper. This work highlights the importance of understanding life-cycle (LC) nano-EHS implications of NEPs and assessing real world exposures and associated toxicological properties rather than focusing on “raw” materials used in the synthesis of an NEP. PMID

  20. Consumer exposures to laser printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles: A case study of life-cycle implications from nano-enabled products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela, Sandra V; Sotiriou, Georgios A; Bello, Dhimiter; Shafer, Martin; Bunker, Kristin Lee; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that printers emit nanoparticles during their operation. To-date, however, the physicochemical and toxicological characterization of "real world" printer-emitted nanoparticles (PEPs) remains incomplete, hampering proper risk assessment efforts. Here, we investigate our earlier hypothesis that engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are used in toners and ENMs are released during printing (consumer use). Furthermore, we conduct a detailed physicochemical and morphological characterization of PEPs in support of ongoing toxicological assessment. A comprehensive suite of state of the art analytical methods and tools was employed for the physicochemical and morphological characterization of 11 toners widely utilized in printers from major printer manufacturers and their PEPs. We confirmed that a number of ENMs incorporated into toner formulations (e.g. silica, alumina, titania, iron oxide, zinc oxide, copper oxide, cerium oxide, carbon black among others) and released into the air during printing. All evaluated toners contained large amounts of organic carbon (OC, 42-89%), metals/metal oxides (1-33%), and some elemental carbon (EC, 0.33-12%). The PEPs possess a composition similar to that of toner and contained 50-90% OC, 0.001-0.5% EC and 1-3% metals. While the chemistry of the PEPs generally reflected that of their toners, considerable differences are documented indicative of potential transformations taking place during consumer use (printing). We conclude that: (i) Routine incorporation of ENMs in toners classifies them as nano-enabled products (NEPs); (ii) These ENMs become airborne during printing; (iii) The chemistry of PEPs is complex and it reflects that of the toner and paper. This work highlights the importance of understanding life-cycle (LC) nano-EHS implications of NEPs and assessing real world exposures and associated toxicological properties rather than focusing on "raw" materials used in the synthesis of an NEP.

  1. Desempenho comparativo de um motor de ciclo diesel utilizando diesel e misturas de biodiesel Comparative performance of a cycle diesel engine using diesel and biodiesel mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Leite Barbosa

    2008-10-01

    fixation of man country life, the excellent and varied climatic conditions and several types of terrain become the country, with extensive workable areas, stand out in the world scenery if considering its great potentiality on generation of alternative fuels. The environmental preservation, important subject nowadays, makes that the human being work in searches for the development of alternative energies, mainly those originating from renewable and biodegradable sources of sustantable character. Taking in consideration those searches, the purpose of this work was to evaluate the performance of a diesel engine working in different moments with mineral diesel and mixtures of mineral diesel and biodiesel in the equivalent proportions B2 (98% mineral diesel and 2%biodiesel, B5 (95% mineral diesel and 5%biodiesel, B20 (80% mineral diesel and 20%biodiesel, and, finally, B100 (100% biodiesel. The rehearsal was accomplished in the dependences of the Engineering Department at UFLA - Federal University of Lavras, in Lavras, Minas Gerais, in July, 2005. For the accomplishment of the rehearsals it, was used an engine cycle diesel of a tractor VALMET 85 id, of 58,2kW (78 cv, following it methodology established by the norm NBR 5484 of ABNT (1985, that refers to the rehearsal dynamometric of engines cycle Otto and Diesel being proceeded. One noticed ended that the potency of the motor when using biodiesel was lower than one when using mineral diesel. One observed that, in some rotations, the mixtures B5 and B20 presented the same potency or even higher, in some situations, than the one when if using mineral diesel. The best thermal efficiency of the motor was verified in the rotation of 540 rpm of equivalent TDP to 1720 rpm of the motor.

  2. Conversion of Low Quality Waste Heat to Electric Power with Small-Scale Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) Engine/Generator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    baseline testing, MUSE conducted a full service of the engine changing all fluids and filters . Southern verified with Cummins that there is no...manufacturers recommended service was performed at the required intervals throughout the demonstration. Southern also analyzed engine oil and coolant...degradation of the engine oil or coolant. Indications of mechanical wear are also provided by the oil and coolant analyses. A related factor that could have

  3. Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To receive General email updates Enter email Submit Menstrual Cycle The menstrual cycle is the hormonal process ... Preventing problems with your menstrual cycle View more Menstrual Cycle resources Related information Endometriosis Infertility Polycystic ovary ...

  4. Emotional engineering

    CERN Document Server

    In an age of increasing complexity, diversification and change, customers expect services that cater to their needs and to their tastes. Emotional Engineering vol 2. describes how their expectations can be satisfied and managed throughout the product life cycle, if producers focus their attention more on emotion. Emotional engineering provides the means to integrate products to create a new social framework and develops services beyond product realization to create of value across a full lifetime.  14 chapters cover a wide range of topics that can be applied to product, process and industry development, with special attention paid to the increasing importance of sensing in the age of extensive and frequent changes, including: • Multisensory stimulation and user experience  • Physiological measurement • Tactile sensation • Emotional quality management • Mental model • Kansei engineering.   Emotional Engineering vol 2 builds on Dr Fukuda’s previous book, Emotional Engineering, and provides read...

  5. Experimental study of hydraulic electronic unit injector in a hydraulic free piston engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shuanlu; Zhao, Zhenfeng; Zhao, Changlu; Zhang, Fujun; Wang, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A hydraulic electronic unit injector in HFPE is developed and the test bench is established. • Effect of drive pressure on injection delay of hydraulic electronic unit injector are investigated. • Cycle fuel injection quantity is tested online and off-line engine operation. • The BDC control results in HFPE based on feed-forward compensation are acceptable. • The energy flow in HFPE is analyzed and the hydraulic output energy is optimized. - Abstract: The fuel injection system in two stroke engine is very important, therefore the hydraulic electronic unit injector system is developed and the injection characteristics of hydraulic electronic unit injector are investigated. Firstly the HFPE and the hydraulic electronic unit injector working principle are analyzed, and then PID control strategy is built by engine demand. In order to validate the feasibility of hydraulic electronic unit injector, the prototype test bench is established. The specific measurement principle is presented. Further the injection characteristics, such as the effect of injection pressure on injection delay and the effect of engine frequency on injection delay, are analyzed. In order to optimize the engine stability performance, the BDC control based on fuel injection control is investigated. The load control based on fuel injection is also discussed and the BDC feedforward control with the load variation is investigated. Experiment results of stead engine operation shows that the hydraulic electronic unit injector system based on PID control can be satisfied with the engine operation demand. In addition, cycle fuel injection quantity is tested online and off-line engine operation. It is obvious that the fuel injection quantity is affected by the hydraulic pressure. The fuel injection quantity variation can be improved with decreasing the fluctuation of drive pressure or adopting more suitable oil common rail instead of connected with exhaust valve hydraulic drive oil

  6. Software Engineering Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John; Wenneson, Greg

    1993-01-01

    The Software Engineering Guidebook describes SEPG (Software Engineering Process Group) supported processes and techniques for engineering quality software in NASA environments. Three process models are supported: structured, object-oriented, and evolutionary rapid-prototyping. The guidebook covers software life-cycles, engineering, assurance, and configuration management. The guidebook is written for managers and engineers who manage, develop, enhance, and/or maintain software under the Computer Software Services Contract.

  7. Genome scale engineering techniques for metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongming; Bassalo, Marcelo C; Zeitoun, Ramsey I; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic engineering has expanded from a focus on designs requiring a small number of genetic modifications to increasingly complex designs driven by advances in genome-scale engineering technologies. Metabolic engineering has been generally defined by the use of iterative cycles of rational genome modifications, strain analysis and characterization, and a synthesis step that fuels additional hypothesis generation. This cycle mirrors the Design-Build-Test-Learn cycle followed throughout various engineering fields that has recently become a defining aspect of synthetic biology. This review will attempt to summarize recent genome-scale design, build, test, and learn technologies and relate their use to a range of metabolic engineering applications. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 40 CFR 1048.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... NO X aftertreatment. For lean-burn engines that depend on aftertreatment to meet the NOX emission... and calculations. (g) For those cases where steady-state testing does not directly follow a transient...

  9. Numerical simulation of the flow field and fuel sprays in an IC engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Schock, H. J.; Ramos, J. I.; Carpenter, M. H.; Stegeman, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional model for axisymmetric piston-cylinder configurations is developed to study the flow field in two-stroke direct-injection Diesel engines under motored conditions. The model accounts for turbulence by a two-equation model for the turbulence kinetic energy and its rate of dissipation. A discrete droplet model is used to simulate the fuel spray, and the effects of the gas phase turbulence on the droplets is considered. It is shown that a fluctuating velocity can be added to the mean droplet velocity every time step if the step is small enough. Good agreement with experimental data is found for a range of ambient pressures in Diesel engine-type microenvironments. The effects of the intake swirl angle in the spray penetration, vaporization, and mixing in a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke Diesel engine are analyzed. It is found that the swirl increases the gas phase turbulence levels and the rates of vaporization.

  10. IFR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E.; Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase, which includes completion of facility modifications and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the development of the electrorefining pyroprocess, the design and construction of the facility for the hot demonstration, the design and fabrication of the equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation

  11. PIV Study of the Effect of Piston Motion on the Confined Swirling Flow in the Scavenging Process in 2-Stroke Marine Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Meyer, Knud Erik; Schramm, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    The effect of piston motion on the incylinder swirling flow for a low speed, large two-stroke marine diesel engine is studies using the stereoscopic PIV technique. The measuremenrs are conducted at 5 cross sectional planes along the cylinder length and at piston positions covering the air intake...

  12. Blends of ethanol, n-butanol and isobutanol with 5% oxygen in ordinary engines: Effects on exhaust emissions over the Artemis cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Beránek, V.; Vojtíšek-Lom, M.; Štolcpartová, J. (Jitka); Mikuška, P. (Pavel); Křůmal, K. (Kamil)

    2015-01-01

    This work examines the effects of extending the ethanol share to 15%. Additionally, considering the high hygroscopicity and corrosivity of ethanol, two isomers of butanol, n-butanol and isobutanol, were blended with gasoline at 25% by volume, all blends corresponding to approximately 5% oxygen by weight. These four fuels were examined in two typical spark ingition automobile engines, a Ford Focus car with a Euro 6 EcoBoost direct injection (DISI) engine, and a Skoda Fabia car with a Euro 5 mu...

  13. The software life cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, Darrel

    1990-01-01

    The Software Life Cycle deals with the software lifecycle, that is, what exactly happens when software is developed. Topics covered include aspects of software engineering, structured techniques of software development, and software project management. The use of mathematics to design and develop computer systems is also discussed. This book is comprised of 20 chapters divided into four sections and begins with an overview of software engineering and software development, paying particular attention to the birth of software engineering and the introduction of formal methods of software develop

  14. Express Control of the Mechanical Properties of High-Strength and Hard-to-Machine Materials at All Stages of the Technological Cycle of Producing Mechanical Engineering Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Marchenkov, A. Yu.; Demidov, A. N.; Karimbekov, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    It is shown that depth-sensing indentation can be used to perform express control of the mechanical properties of high-strength and hard-to-machine materials. This control can be performed at various stages of a technological cycle of processing materials and parts without preparing and testing tensile specimens, which will significantly reduce the consumption of materials, time, and labor.

  15. 40 CFR 86.098-10 - Emission standards for 1998 and later model year Otto-cycle heavy-duty engines and vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... programs for HDEs, within the restrictions described in § 86.098-15 as applicable. If the manufacturer... NOX plus NMHC ABT programs for HDEs, within the restrictions described in § 86.098-15 as applicable... gasoline-fueled Otto-cycle HDE families in any or all of the NOX or NOX plus NMHC ABT programs for HDEs...

  16. Two Quantum Polytropic Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Hernández, L. A.; Morales-Serrano, A. F.

    2002-11-01

    In this work we follow the Bender et al paper [1] to study the quantum analogues of the Stirling and Ericsson polytropic cycles. In the context of the classical thermodynamics, the Stirling and Ericsson cycles correspond to reversible heat engines with two isothermal processes joined by two polytropic branches which occur in a device called regenerator. If this device is an ideal one, the efficiency of these cycles is the Carnot efficiency. Here, we introduce the quantum analogues of the Stirling and Ericsson cycles, the first one based on a double square potential well with a finite potential barrier, since in this system the tunnel effect could be the analogue to the regeneration classical process, therefore the isochoric quantum branches would really correspond to an internal energy storage, and the last one with an unknown system where the isobaric quantum processes don't induce changes in its quantum state. With these systems the quantum engines have cycles consisting of polytropic and isothermal quantum processes analogues to the corresponding classical processes. We show that in both cases the quantum cycles have an efficiency given by ηCQM = 1 - EC/EH, which is the same expression for the quantum analogue of the Carnot cycle studied by Bender.

  17. Systematic Curriculum Integration of Sustainable Development Using Life Cycle Approaches: The Case of the Civil Engineering Department at the Université de Sherbrooke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roure, Bastien; Anand, Chirjiv; Bisaillon, Véronique; Amor, Ben

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a consistent and systematic integration framework of sustainable development (SD) in a civil engineering (CE) curriculum, given the connection between the two. Curriculum integration is a challenging project and requires the development of certain protocols to ensure success.…

  18. Performance Analysis of a Reciprocating Piston Expander and a Plate Type Exhaust Gas Recirculation Boiler in a Water-Based Rankine Cycle for Heat Recovery from a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Latz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine provides favorable conditions for a waste-heat recovery (WHR system. The highest potential is achieved by the Rankine cycle as a heat recovery technology. There are only few experimental studies that investigate full-scale systems using water-based working fluids and their effects on the performance and operation of a Rankine cycle heat recovery system. This paper discusses experimental results and practical challenges with a WHR system when utilizing heat from the exhaust gas recirculation system of a truck engine. The results showed that the boiler’s pinch point necessitated trade-offs between maintaining adequate boiling pressure while achieving acceptable cooling of the EGR and superheating of the water. The expander used in the system had a geometric compression ratio of 21 together with a steam outlet timing that caused high re-compression. Inlet pressures of up to 30 bar were therefore required for a stable expander power output. Such high pressures increased the pump power, and reduced the EGR cooling in the boiler because of pinch-point effects. Simulations indicated that reducing the expander’s compression ratio from 21 to 13 would allow 30% lower steam supply pressures without adversely affecting the expander’s power output.

  19. Application of Dimethyl Ether in Compression Ignition Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Rene

    . The elastomer seals that provided the sealing instead of the metal-to-metal contact could do that because of the low injection pressure. The engine developed in this way was based on a 50cc Peugeot two-stroke engine. The fuel injector used was a Bosch HDEV originally developed for direct injection of gasoline......This study has its roots in two separate events at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at DTU. In 1995 the first attempt to operate a diesel engine on dimethyl ether (DME) was successfully concluded. In 2004 the department decided to compete in the vehicle fuel efficiency competition Shell Eco......-Marathon. The diesel engine test results from 1995 showed that DME is a superb diesel fuel. DME is easy to ignite by compression ignition and it has a molecular structure that results in near-zero emission of particulates when burned. These are features of a fuel that are highly desirable in a diesel engine...

  20. Systems engineering simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Cloutier, Robert; Bone, Mary Alice

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionOverviewDiscussion of Common TerminologyThe Case for Systems EngineeringA Brief History of Systems EngineeringSystem ExamplesSummaryThe System Life CycleManaging System Development-The Vee ModelSystem ProductionSystem Utilization and SupportSystem Retirement and DisposalOther Systems Engineering Development ModelsSpiral ModelAgile Model for Systems EngineeringSystem of InterestAbstraction and DecompositionIntegrationDeveloping and Managing RequirementsCyclone Requiremen

  1. Performance of PZT stacks under high-field electric cycling at various temperatures in heavy-duty diesel engine fuel injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Lee, Sung-Min; Lin, Hua-Tay; Stafford, Randy

    2016-04-01

    Testing and characterization of large prototype lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stacks present substantial technical challenges to electronic systems. The work in this study shows that an alternative approach can be pursued by using subunits extracted from prototype stacks. Piezoelectric and dielectric integrity was maintained even though the PZT plate specimens experienced an additional loading process involved with the extraction after factory poling. Extracted 10-layer plate specimens were studied by an electric cycle test under an electric field of 3.0/0.0 kV/mm, 100 Hz to 108 cycles, both at room temperature (22°C) and at 50°C. The elevated temperature had a defined impact on the fatigue of PZT stacks. About 48 and 28% reductions were observed in the piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients, respectively, after 108 cycles at 50°C, compared with reductions of 25 and 15% in the respective coefficients at 22°C. At the same time, the loss tangent varied to a limited extent. The evolution of PZT-electrode interfacial layers or nearby dielectric layers should account for the difference in the fatigue rates of piezoelectric and dielectric coefficients. But the basic contribution to observed fatigue may result from the buildup of a bias field that finally suppressed the motion of the domain walls. Finally, monitoring of dielectric coefficients can be an effective tool for on-line lifetime prediction of PZT stacks in service if a failure criterion is defined properly.

  2. Analytical Solutions and Optimization of the Exo-Irreversible Schmidt Cycle with Imperfect Regeneration for the 3 Classical Types of Stirling Engine Solutions analytiques et optimisation du cycle de Schmidt irréversible à régénération imparfaite appliquées aux 3 types classiques de moteur Stirling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochelle P.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The “old” Stirling engine is one of the most promising multi-heat source engines for the future. Simple and realistic basic models are useful to aid in optimizing a preliminary engine configuration. In addition to new proper analytical solutions for regeneration that dramatically reduce computing time, this study of the Schmidt-Stirling engine cycle is carried out from an engineer-friendly viewpoint introducing exo-irreversible heat transfers. The reference parameters are the technological or physical constraints: the maximum pressure, the maximum volume, the extreme wall temperatures and the overall thermal conductance, while the adjustable optimization variables are the volumetric compression ratio, the dead volume ratios, the volume phase-lag, the gas characteristics, the hot-to-cold conductance ratio and the regenerator efficiency. The new normalized analytical expressions for the operating characteristics of the engine: power, work, efficiency, mean pressure, maximum speed of revolution are derived, and some dimensionless and dimensional reference numbers are presented as well as power optimization examples with respect to non-dimensional speed, volume ratio and volume phase-lag angle.analytical solutions. Le “vieux” moteur Stirling est l’un des moteurs a sources multiples d’energie les plus prometteurs pour le futur. Des modeles elementaires simples et realistes sont utiles pour faciliter l’optimisation de configurations preliminaires du moteur. En plus de nouvelles solutions analytiques qui reduisent fortement le temps de calcul, cette etude du cycle moteur de Schmidt-Stirling modifie est entreprise avec le point de vue de l’ingenieur en introduisant les exo-irreversibilites dues aux transferts thermiques. Les parametres de reference sont des contraintes technologiques ou physiques : la pression maximum, le volume maximum, les temperatures de paroi extremes et la conductance totale, alors que les parametres d

  3. Engineering Sciences Strategic Leadership Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Heidi A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-14

    The purpose of this report is to promote the three key elements of engineering capabilities, staff and engagement in coordination with an R&D investment cycle; and establish an Engineering Steering Council to own and guide this leadership plan.

  4. Concept of Six Stroke Engine

    OpenAIRE

    P.Naresh

    2015-01-01

    One of the most difficult challenges in engine technology today is the urgent need to increase engine thermal efficiency. Higher efficiencies mean less fuel consumption and lower atmospheric emissions per unit of work produced by the engine. In 1862 a Frenchman Alphouse Beau de Rochas gives his theory regarding the ideal cycle of the internal combustion engine. This theory is applied by a German engineer named Nikolaus A. Otto, who firstly built a successful four-stroke SI engine in 1876. The...

  5. Life cycle assessment and sustainable engineering in the context of near net shape grown components: striving towards a sustainable way of future production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpfer, Christoph; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Beger, Anna-Lena; Jacobs, Georg; Löwer, Manuel; Moser, Franziska; Reimer, Julia; Trautz, Martin; Usadel, Björn; Wormit, Alexandra; Hollert, Henner

    2017-01-01

    Technical product harvesting (TEPHA) is a newly developing interdisciplinary approach in which bio-based production is investigated from a technical and ecological perspective. Society's demand for ecologically produced and sustainably operable goods is a key driver for the substitution of conventional materials like metals or plastics through bio-based alternatives. Technical product harvesting of near net shape grown components describes the use of suitable biomass for the production of technical products through influencing the natural shape of plants during their growth period. The use of natural materials may show positive effects on the amount of non-renewable resource consumption. This also increases the product recyclability at the end of its life cycle. Furthermore, through the near net shape growth of biomass, production steps can be reduced. As a consequence such approaches may save energy and the needed resources like crude oil, coal or gas. The derived near net shape grown components are not only considered beneficial from an environmental point of view. They can also have mechanical advantages through an intrinsic topology optimization in contrast to common natural materials, which are influenced in their shape after harvesting. In order to prove these benefits a comprehensive, interdisciplinary scientific strategy is needed. Here, both mechanical investigations and life cycle assessment as a method of environmental evaluation are used.

  6. Using Life-Cycle Human Factors Engineering to Avoid $2.4 Million in Costs: Lessons Learned from NASA's Requirements Verification Process for Space Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Daniel; Ellenberger, Rich

    2008-01-01

    The Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) process has been used to verify human factors requirements for NASA International Space Station (ISS) payloads since 2003, resulting in $2.4 million in avoided costs. This cost benefit has been realized by greatly reducing the need to process time-consuming formal waivers (exceptions) for individual requirements violations. The HFIT team, which includes astronauts and their technical staff, acts as the single source for human factors requirements integration of payloads. HFIT has the authority to provide inputs during early design phases, thus eliminating many potential requirements violations in a cost-effective manner. In those instances where it is not economically or technically feasible to meet the precise metric of a given requirement, HFIT can work with the payload engineers to develop common sense solutions and formally document that the resulting payload design does not materially affect the astronaut s ability to operate and interact with the payload. The HFIT process is fully ISO 9000 compliant and works concurrently with NASA s formal systems engineering work flow. Due to its success with payloads, the HFIT process is being adapted and extended to ISS systems hardware. Key aspects of this process are also being considered for NASA's Space Shuttle replacement, the Crew Exploration Vehicle.

  7. Performance assessment of simple and modified cycle turboshaft gas turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barinyima Nkoi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on investigations encompassing comparative assessment of gas turbine cycle options. More specifically, investigation was carried out of technical performance of turboshaft engine cycles based on existing simple cycle (SC and its projected modified cycles for civil helicopter application. Technically, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and power output are of paramount importance to the overall performance of gas turbine engines. In course of carrying out this research, turbomatch software established at Cranfield University based on gas turbine theory was applied to conduct simulation of a simple cycle (baseline two-spool helicopter turboshaft engine model with free power turbine. Similarly, some modified gas turbine cycle configurations incorporating unconventional components, such as engine cycle with low pressure compressor (LPC zero-staged, recuperated engine cycle, and intercooled/recuperated (ICR engine cycle, were also simulated. In doing so, design point (DP and off-design point (OD performances of the engine models were established. The percentage changes in performance parameters of the modified cycle engines over the simple cycle were evaluated and it was found that to a large extent, the modified engine cycles with unconventional components exhibit better performances in terms of thermal efficiency and specific fuel consumption than the traditional simple cycle engine. This research made use of public domain open source references.

  8. Analysis and simulation of Wiseman hypocycloid engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyesh Ray

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research studies an alternative to the slider-crank mechanism for internal combustion engines, which was proposed by the Wiseman Technologies Inc. Their design involved replacing the crankshaft with a hypocycloid gear assembly. The unique hypocycloid gear arrangement allowed the piston and connecting rod to move in a straight line creating a perfect sinusoidal motion, without any side loads. In this work, the Wiseman hypocycloid engine was modeled in a commercial engine simulation software and compared to slider-crank engine of the same size. The engine’s performance was studied, while operating on diesel, ethanol, and gasoline fuel. Furthermore, a scaling analysis on the Wiseman engine prototypes was carried out to understand how the performance of the engine is affected by increasing the output power and cylinder displacement. It was found that the existing 30cc Wiseman engine produced about 7% less power at peak speeds than the slider-crank engine of the same size. These results were concurrent with the dynamometer tests performed in the past. It also produced lower torque and was about 6% less fuel efficient than the slider-crank engine. The four-stroke diesel variant of the same Wiseman engine performed better than the two-stroke gasoline version. The Wiseman engine with a contra piston (that allowed to vary the compression ratio showed poor fuel efficiency but produced higher torque when operating on E85 fuel. It also produced about 1.4% more power than while running on gasoline. While analyzing effects of the engine size on the Wiseman hypocycloid engine prototypes, it was found that the engines performed better in terms of power, torque, fuel efficiency, and cylinder brake mean effective pressure as the displacement increased. The 30 horsepower (HP conceptual Wiseman prototype, while operating on E85, produced the most optimum results in all aspects, and the diesel test for the same engine proved to be the most fuel efficient.

  9. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  10. One crop breeding cycle from starvation? How engineering crop photosynthesis for rising CO2 and temperature could be one important route to alleviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromdijk, Johannes; Long, Stephen P

    2016-03-16

    Global climate change is likely to severely impact human food production. This comes at a time when predicted demand for primary foodstuffs by a growing human population and changing global diets is already outpacing a stagnating annual rate of increase in crop productivity. Additionally, the time required by crop breeding and bioengineering to release improved varieties to farmers is substantial, meaning that any crop improvements needed to mitigate food shortages in the 2040s would need to start now. In this perspective, the rationale for improvements in photosynthetic efficiency as a breeding objective for higher yields is outlined. Subsequently, using simple simulation models it is shown how predicted changes in temperature and atmospheric [CO2] affect leaf photosynthetic rates. The chloroplast accounts for the majority of leaf nitrogen in crops. Within the chloroplast about 25% of nitrogen is invested in the carboxylase, Rubisco, which catalyses the first step of CO2 assimilation. Most of the remaining nitrogen is invested in the apparatus to drive carbohydrate synthesis and regenerate ribulose-1:5-bisphosphate (RuBP), the CO2-acceptor molecule at Rubisco. At preindustrial [CO2], investment in these two aspects may have been balanced resulting in co-limitation. At today's [CO2], there appears to be over-investment in Rubisco, and despite the counter-active effects of rising temperature and [CO2], this imbalance is predicted to worsen with global climate change. By breeding or engineering restored optimality under future conditions increased productivity could be achieved in both tropical and temperate environments without additional nitrogen fertilizer. Given the magnitude of the potential shortfall, better storage conditions, improved crop management and better crop varieties will all be needed. With the short time-scale at which food demand is expected to outpace supplies, all available technologies to improve crop varieties, from classical crop breeding to

  11. Reliability and safety engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Ajit Kumar; Karanki, Durga Rao

    2016-01-01

    Reliability and safety are core issues that must be addressed throughout the life cycle of engineering systems. Reliability and Safety Engineering presents an overview of the basic concepts, together with simple and practical illustrations. The authors present reliability terminology in various engineering fields, viz.,electronics engineering, software engineering, mechanical engineering, structural engineering and power systems engineering. The book describes the latest applications in the area of probabilistic safety assessment, such as technical specification optimization, risk monitoring and risk informed in-service inspection. Reliability and safety studies must, inevitably, deal with uncertainty, so the book includes uncertainty propagation methods: Monte Carlo simulation, fuzzy arithmetic, Dempster-Shafer theory and probability bounds. Reliability and Safety Engineering also highlights advances in system reliability and safety assessment including dynamic system modeling and uncertainty management. Cas...

  12. Integrating the SE and HCI models in the human factors engineering cycle for re-engineering Computerized Physician Order Entry systems for medications: basic principles illustrated by a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernonville, Stéphanie; Kolski, Christophe; Leroy, Nicolas; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine

    2010-04-01

    The integration of Human Factors is still insufficient in the design and implementation phases of complex interactive systems such as Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) systems. One of the problems is that human factors specialists have difficulties to communicate their data and to have them properly understood by the computer scientists in the design and implementation phases. This paper presents a solution to this problem based on the creation of common documentation supports using Software Engineering (SE) and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) methods. The integration of SE and HCI methods and models is an interesting means for modelling an organization's activities, with software applications being part of these activities. Integrating these SE and HCI methods and models allows case studies to be seen from the technical, organizational and ergonomic perspectives, and also makes it easier to compare current and future work situations. The exploitation of these techniques allows the creation of common work supports that can be easily understandable by computer scientists and relevant for re-engineering or design. In this paper, the basic principles behind such communication supports are described and illustrated by a real case study. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Systems engineering and integration as a foundation for mission engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Beam, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This paper investigates the emerging term mission engineering through the framework of systems engineering and systems integration. Systems engineering concepts, processes, and methodologies are extrapolated for use in conjunction with a systems integration, life-cycle based framework to effect mission engineering. The specific systems engineering concepts of measures of effectiveness, performance and suitability are recommended as fou...

  14. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT XI, PART I--MAINTAINING THE FUEL SYSTEM (PART I), CUMMINS DIESEL ENGINES, PART II--UNIT REPLACEMENT (ENGINE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TWO AND FOUR CYCLE ENGINES, THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE FUEL SYSTEM, AND THE PROCEDURES FOR DIESEL ENGINE REMOVAL. TOPICS ARE (1) REVIEW OF TWO CYCLE AND FOUR CYCLE CONCEPT, (2) SOME BASIC CHARACTERISTICS OF FOUR CYCLE ENGINES,…

  15. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  16. Chemical Engineering Division Fuel Cycle Programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1978. [Advanced solvent extraction; accidents; pyrochemical; radwaste in metal matrix; waste migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M. J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R. E.

    1979-12-01

    Fuel cycle studies reported include development of centrifugal contactors for Purex processes. Tricaprylmethyl-ammonium nitrate and di-n-amyl-n-amylphosphonate are being evaluated as Thorex extractants. Dispersion of uranium and plutonium by fires, and mechanisms for subdividing and dispersing liquids and solids were reviewed. In the pyrochemical and dry processing program, a facility for testing containment materials is under construction; a flowsheet for carbide fuel processing has been designed and studies of carbide reactions in bismuth are underway; salt transport processes are being studied; process-size refractory metal vessels are being fabricated; the feasibility of AIROX reprocessing is being determined; the solubility of UO/sub 2/, UO/sub 2/ + fission products, and PuO/sub 2/ in molten alkali metal nitrates, has been investigated; a flowsheet was developed for reprocessing actinide oxides in molten salts; preparation of Th-U carbide from the oxide is being studied; new flowsheets based on the Dow Aluminum Pyrometallurgical process for reprocessing of spent uranium metal fuel have been prepared; the chloride volitility processing of thorium-based fuels is being studied; the reprocessing of (Th,U)O/sub 2/ solid solution in KCl-LiCl-ThCl/sub 4/-Th is being studied; and a flowsheet for processing spent nuclear fuel in molten tin has been constructed. Leach rates of simulated encapsulated waste forms in a metal matrix were studied. Nine criteria for handling waste cladding hulls were established. Strontium and tin migration in glauconite columns was measured. Radioactive Sr in a stream of water moved through oolitic limestone as rapidly as water, but in a stream of water equilibrated with the limestone, Sr moved through the limestone one-tenth as fast. Migration of trace quantities of Cs and I through kaolinite was studied. 88 figures, 53 tables.

  17. Program For Optimization Of Nuclear Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebuch, R. K.; Mcdougall, J. K.; Ridolphi, F.; Walton, James T.

    1994-01-01

    NOP is versatile digital-computer program devoloped for parametric analysis of beryllium-reflected, graphite-moderated nuclear rocket engines. Facilitates analysis of performance of engine with respect to such considerations as specific impulse, engine power, type of engine cycle, and engine-design constraints arising from complications of fuel loading and internal gradients of temperature. Predicts minimum weight for specified performance.

  18. 40 CFR 86.1332-90 - Engine mapping procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures...) Perform an engine power map. (1) During engine preparation or warm-up, the engine may be operated such... generation. (1) Otto-cycle engines. (i) Fit all data points recorded under paragraphs (d)(2) (vi) and (vii...

  19. Marine Diesel Engine Control to meet Emission Requirements and Maintain Maneuverability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kræn Vodder; Blanke, Mogens; Eriksson, Lars

    2018-01-01

    International shipping has been reported to account for 13% of global NOx emissions and 2.1% of global green house gas emissions. Recent restrictions of NOx emissions from marine vessels have led to the development of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for large two-stroke diesel engines. Meanwhile......, the same engines have been downsized and derated to optimize fuel efficiency. The smaller engines reduce the possible vessel acceleration, and to counteract this, the engine controller must be improved to fully utilize the physical potential of the engine. A fuel index limiter based on air/fuel ratio...... was recently developed [1], but as it does not account for EGR, accelerations lead to excessive exhaust smoke formation which could damage the engine when recirculated. This paper presents two methods for extending a fuel index limiter function to EGR engines. The methods are validated through simulations...

  20. Simulation Of The Internal-Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, Frank J.; Mcbride, Bonnie J.

    1987-01-01

    Program adapts to available information about particular engine. Mathematical model of internal-combustion engine constructed and implemented as computer program suitable for use on large digital computer systems. ZMOTTO program calculates Otto-cycle performance parameters as well as working-fluid compositions and properties throughout cycle for number of consecutive cycles and for variety of input parameters. Written in standard FORTRAN IV.