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Sample records for two-site protein modification

  1. Posttranslational protein modification in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Jerry; Adams, Michael W W

    2005-09-01

    One of the first hurdles to be negotiated in the postgenomic era involves the description of the entire protein content of the cell, the proteome. Such efforts are presently complicated by the various posttranslational modifications that proteins can experience, including glycosylation, lipid attachment, phosphorylation, methylation, disulfide bond formation, and proteolytic cleavage. Whereas these and other posttranslational protein modifications have been well characterized in Eucarya and Bacteria, posttranslational modification in Archaea has received far less attention. Although archaeal proteins can undergo posttranslational modifications reminiscent of what their eucaryal and bacterial counterparts experience, examination of archaeal posttranslational modification often reveals aspects not previously observed in the other two domains of life. In some cases, posttranslational modification allows a protein to survive the extreme conditions often encountered by Archaea. The various posttranslational modifications experienced by archaeal proteins, the molecular steps leading to these modifications, and the role played by posttranslational modification in Archaea form the focus of this review.

  2. Chemical Protein Modification through Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    The modification of proteins with non-protein entities is important for a wealth of applications, and methods for chemically modifying proteins attract considerable attention. Generally, modification is desired at a single site to maintain homogeneity and to minimise loss of function. Though protein modification can be achieved by targeting some natural amino acid side chains, this often leads to ill-defined and randomly modified proteins. Amongst the natural amino acids, cysteine combines advantageous properties contributing to its suitability for site-selective modification, including a unique nucleophilicity, and a low natural abundance--both allowing chemo- and regioselectivity. Native cysteine residues can be targeted, or Cys can be introduced at a desired site in a protein by means of reliable genetic engineering techniques. This review on chemical protein modification through cysteine should appeal to those interested in modifying proteins for a range of applications.

  3. Posttranslational Protein Modification in Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Eichler, Jerry; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2005-01-01

    One of the first hurdles to be negotiated in the postgenomic era involves the description of the entire protein content of the cell, the proteome. Such efforts are presently complicated by the various posttranslational modifications that proteins can experience, including glycosylation, lipid attachment, phosphorylation, methylation, disulfide bond formation, and proteolytic cleavage. Whereas these and other posttranslational protein modifications have been well characterized in Eucarya and B...

  4. Chemical Modification of Food Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Allaoua Achouri; Wang Zhang; Xu Shiying

    1999-01-01

    Acylation has been shown to be an effective tool for improving surface functional properties of plant proteins.Soy bean protein has been extensively modified through chemical and enzymatic treatments. Their effectiveness lies in their high nutritional value and low cost, which promote their use as ingredients for the formulation of food products.This paper reports a complete review of chemical modification of various proteins from plant and animal sources. The nutritive and toxicological aspects through in vitro and in vivo tests are also described.

  5. Soy protein modification: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barać Miroljub B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soy protein products such as flour, concentrates and isolates are used in food formulation because of their functionality, nutritional value and low cost. To obtain their optimal nutritive and functional properties as well as desirable flavor different treatments are used. Soybean proteins can be modified by physical, chemical and enzymatic treatments. Different thermal treatments are most commonly used, while the most appropriate way of modifying soy proteins from the standpoint of safety is their limited proteolysis. These treatments cause physical and chemical changes that affect their functional properties. This review discusses three principal methods used for modification of soy protein products, their effects on dominant soy protein properties and some biologically active compounds.

  6. Development of an efficient signal amplification strategy for label-free enzyme immunoassay using two site-specific biotinylated recombinant proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jin-Bao [School of Pharmacy, Weifang Medical University, Weifang 261053 (China); Tang, Ying [Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang 261041 (China); Yang, Hong-Ming, E-mail: yanghongming2006@sohu.com [School of Pharmacy, Weifang Medical University, Weifang 261053 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • An efficient signal amplification strategy for label-free EIA is proposed. • Divalent biotinylated AP and monovalent biotinylated ZZ were prepared via Avitag–BirA system. • The above site-specific biotinylated fusion proteins form complex via SA–biotin interaction. • The mechanism relies on the ZZ–Avi-B/SA/AP–(Avi-B){sub 2} complex. • The analytical signals are enhanced (32-fold) by the proposed strategy. - Abstract: Constructing a recombinant protein between a reporter enzyme and a detector protein to produce a homogeneous immunological reagent is advantageous over random chemical conjugation. However, the approach hardly recombines multiple enzymes in a difunctional fusion protein, which results in insufficient amplification of the enzymatic signal, thereby limiting its application in further enhancement of analytical signal. In this study, two site-specific biotinylated recombinant proteins, namely, divalent biotinylated alkaline phosphatase (AP) and monovalent biotinylated ZZ domain, were produced by employing the Avitag–BirA system. Through the high streptavidin (SA)–biotin interaction, the divalent biotinylated APs were clustered in the SA–biotin complex and then incorporated with the biotinylated ZZ. This incorporation results in the formation of a functional macromolecule that involves numerous APs, thereby enhancing the enzymatic signal, and in the production of several ZZ molecules for the interaction with immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. The advantage of this signal amplification strategy is demonstrated through ELISA, in which the analytical signal was substantially enhanced, with a 32-fold increase in the detection sensitivity compared with the ZZ–AP fusion protein approach. The proposed immunoassay without chemical modification can be an alternative strategy to enhance the analytical signals in various applications involving immunosensors and diagnostic chips, given that the label-free IgG antibody is suitable

  7. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control...

  8. Assessment of posttranslational modification of mitochondrial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ande, Sudharsana R; Padilla-Meier, G Pauline; Mishra, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play vital roles in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. They are a storehouse of cellular energy and antioxidative enzymes. Because of its immense role and function in the development of an organism, this organelle is required for the survival. Defects in mitochondrial proteins lead to complex mitochondrial disorders and heterogeneous diseases such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. It is widely known in the literature that some of the mitochondrial proteins are regulated by posttranslational modifications. Hence, designing methods to assess these modifications in mitochondria will be an important way to study the regulatory roles of mitochondrial proteins in greater detail. In this chapter, we outlined procedures to isolate mitochondria from cells and separate the mitochondrial proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identify the different posttranslational modifications in them by using antibodies specific to each posttranslational modification.

  9. Chromatin proteins and modifications as drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, Kristian; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of chromatin-associated proteins and post-translational modifications of histones, proteins and DNA (so-called epigenetic modifications) for transcriptional control and normal development. Disruption of epigenetic control...... is a frequent event in disease, and the first epigenetic-based therapies for cancer treatment have been approved. A generation of new classes of potent and specific inhibitors for several chromatin-associated proteins have shown promise in preclinical trials. Although the biology of epigenetic regulation...

  10. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research. PMID:26276765

  11. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research.

  12. Diagonal chromatography to study plant protein modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Alan; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Jacques, Silke; Stes, Elisabeth; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Goormachtig, Sofie; Gevaert, Kris

    2016-08-01

    An interesting asset of diagonal chromatography, which we have introduced for contemporary proteome research, is its high versatility concerning proteomic applications. Indeed, the peptide modification or sorting step that is required between consecutive peptide separations can easily be altered and thereby allows for the enrichment of specific, though different types of peptides. Here, we focus on the application of diagonal chromatography for the study of modifications of plant proteins. In particular, we show how diagonal chromatography allows for studying proteins processed by proteases, protein ubiquitination, and the oxidation of protein-bound methionines. We discuss the actual sorting steps needed for each of these applications and the obtained results. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  13. Posttranslational Modification Assays on Functional Protein Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiswinger, Johnathan; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Cox, Eric; Rho, HeeSool; Jeong, Jun Seop; Zhu, Heng

    2016-10-03

    Protein microarray technology provides a straightforward yet powerful strategy for identifying substrates of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and studying the specificity of the enzymes that catalyze these reactions. Protein microarray assays can be designed for individual enzymes or a mixture to establish connections between enzymes and substrates. Assays for four well-known PTMs-phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation-have been developed and are described here for use on functional protein microarrays. Phosphorylation and acetylation require a single enzyme and are easily adapted for use on an array. The ubiquitylation and SUMOylation cascades are very similar, and the combination of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes plus ubiquitin or SUMO protein and ATP is sufficient for in vitro modification of many substrates.

  14. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  15. Posttranslational Protein Modifications in Plant Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-11-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins greatly expand proteome diversity, increase functionality, and allow for rapid responses, all at relatively low costs for the cell. PTMs play key roles in plants through their impact on signaling, gene expression, protein stability and interactions, and enzyme kinetics. Following a brief discussion of the experimental and bioinformatics challenges of PTM identification, localization, and quantification (occupancy), a concise overview is provided of the major PTMs and their (potential) functional consequences in plants, with emphasis on plant metabolism. Classic examples that illustrate the regulation of plant metabolic enzymes and pathways by PTMs and their cross talk are summarized. Recent large-scale proteomics studies mapped many PTMs to a wide range of metabolic functions. Unraveling of the PTM code, i.e. a predictive understanding of the (combinatorial) consequences of PTMs, is needed to convert this growing wealth of data into an understanding of plant metabolic regulation.

  16. Pursuing DNA catalysts for protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Scott K

    2015-05-19

    Catalysis is a fundamental chemical concept, and many kinds of catalysts have considerable practical value. Developing entirely new catalysts is an exciting challenge. Rational design and screening have provided many new small-molecule catalysts, and directed evolution has been used to optimize or redefine the function of many protein enzymes. However, these approaches have inherent limitations that prompt the pursuit of different kinds of catalysts using other experimental methods. Nature evolved RNA enzymes, or ribozymes, for key catalytic roles that in modern biology are limited to phosphodiester cleavage/ligation and amide bond formation. Artificial DNA enzymes, or deoxyribozymes, have great promise for a broad range of catalytic activities. They can be identified from unbiased (random) sequence populations as long as the appropriate in vitro selection strategies can be implemented for their identification. Notably, in vitro selection is different in key conceptual and practical ways from rational design, screening, and directed evolution. This Account describes the development by in vitro selection of DNA catalysts for many different kinds of covalent modification reactions of peptide and protein substrates, inspired in part by our earlier work with DNA-catalyzed RNA ligation reactions. In one set of studies, we have sought DNA-catalyzed peptide backbone cleavage, with the long-term goal of artificial DNA-based proteases. We originally anticipated that amide hydrolysis should be readily achieved, but in vitro selection instead surprisingly led to deoxyribozymes for DNA phosphodiester hydrolysis; this was unexpected because uncatalyzed amide bond hydrolysis is 10(5)-fold faster. After developing a suitable selection approach that actively avoids DNA hydrolysis, we were able to identify deoxyribozymes for hydrolysis of esters and aromatic amides (anilides). Aliphatic amide cleavage remains an ongoing focus, including via inclusion of chemically modified DNA

  17. Analysis of posttranslational modifications of proteins by tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Trelle, Morten B; Thingholm, Tine E;

    2006-01-01

    Protein activity and turnover is tightly and dynamically regulated in living cells. Whereas the three-dimensional protein structure is predominantly determined by the amino acid sequence, posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins modulates their molecular function and the spatial...

  18. Posttranslational Modifications of Ribosomal Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterchuk, M V; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2011-04-01

    А number of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coliundergo posttranslational modifications. Six ribosomal proteins are methylated (S11, L3, L11, L7/L12, L16, and L33), three proteins are acetylated (S5, S18, and L7), and protein S12 is methylthiolated. Extra amino acid residues are added to protein S6. С-terminal amino acid residues are partially removed from protein L31. The functional significance of these modifications has remained unclear. These modifications are not vital to the cells, and it is likely that they have regulatory functions. This paper reviews all the known posttranslational modifications of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coli. Certain enzymes responsible for the modifications and mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are also discussed.

  19. Site specific protein labeling by enzymatic posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbul, Murat; Yin, Jun

    2009-09-07

    Site specific protein labeling plays a key role in elucidating the function of the proteins at the molecular level by revealing their locations in the cell, their interaction networks with other cellular components and the dynamic mechanisms of their bio-generation, trafficking and degradation in response to regulatory signals in a biological system. Site specific protein labeling is, in essence, artificial modification of proteins with new chemical entities at the posttranslational stage. Based on the analogy between protein labeling and protein posttranslational modification, enzymatic tools have been developed for site specific and efficient labeling of target proteins with chemical probes of diverse structures and functionalities. This perspective surveys a number of protein labeling methods based on the application of protein posttranslational modification enzymes.

  20. Diagonal chromatography to study plant protein modifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walton, Alan; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Jacques, Silke; Stes, Elisabeth; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Goormachtig, Sofie; Gevaert, Kris

    2016-01-01

    An interesting asset of diagonal chromatography, which we have introduced for contemporary proteome research, is its high versatility concerning proteomic applications. Indeed, the peptide modification or sorting step that is required between consecutive peptide separations can easily be altered and

  1. Principles of protein group SUMO modification substantiated in DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Psakhye, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins by covalent attachment of functional groups (like phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, glycosylation, etc.) are of key importance for the cell as they regulate various aspects of protein behavior after its synthesis, e.g., dictate protein interaction properties, change catalytic activity of enzymes, induce conformational changes, guide subcellular localization and determine protein stability. A special class of protein PTMs is the conju...

  2. High Mobility Group Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2008-01-01

    The high mobility group (HMG) proteins, including HMGA, HMGB and HMGN, are abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind to DNA, nucleosome and other multi-protein complexes in a dynamic and reversible fashion to regulate DNA processing in the context of chromatin. All HMG proteins, like histone proteins, are subjected to extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as lysine acetylation, arginine/lysine methylation and serine/threonine phosphorylation, to modulate their inter...

  3. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike eMerrick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII proteins in the Proteobacteria and the Actinobacteria are subject to post-translational modification by uridylylation or adenylylation respectively, whilst in some Cyanobacteria they can be modified by phosphorylation. In all these cases the protein’s modification state is influenced by the cellular nitrogen status and is thought to regulate its activity. However in many organisms there is no evidence for modification of PII proteins and indeed the ability of these proteins to respond to the cellular nitrogen status is fundamentally independent of post-translational modification. In this review we explore the role of post-translational modification in PII proteins in the light of recent studies.

  4. Sumoylation: a regulatory protein modification in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modification with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins is now established as one of the key regulatory protein modifications in eukaryotic cells. Hundreds of proteins involved in processes such as chromatin organization, transcription, DNA repair, macromolecular assembly, protein homeostasis, trafficking, and signal transduction are subject to reversible sumoylation. Hence, it is not surprising that disease links are beginning to emerge and that interference with sumoylation is being considered for intervention. Here, we summarize basic mechanisms and highlight recent developments in the physiology of sumoylation.

  5. Structure and Modification of Electrode Materials for Protein Electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeuken, Lars J C

    The interactions between proteins and electrode surfaces are of fundamental importance in bioelectrochemistry, including photobioelectrochemistry. In order to optimise the interaction between electrode and redox protein, either the electrode or the protein can be engineered, with the former being the most adopted approach. This tutorial review provides a basic description of the most commonly used electrode materials in bioelectrochemistry and discusses approaches to modify these surfaces. Carbon, gold and transparent electrodes (e.g. indium tin oxide) are covered, while approaches to form meso- and macroporous structured electrodes are also described. Electrode modifications include the chemical modification with (self-assembled) monolayers and the use of conducting polymers in which the protein is imbedded. The proteins themselves can either be in solution, electrostatically adsorbed on the surface or covalently bound to the electrode. Drawbacks and benefits of each material and its modifications are discussed. Where examples exist of applications in photobioelectrochemistry, these are highlighted.

  6. Research progress in protein post-translational modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Protein post-translational modification plays an important role in organism. It makes the protein obtain more complicated structures, perfect functions, more accurate regulations and more specific operations. The most common protein post- translational modifications include ubiquitylation, phosphorylation, glycosylation, lipodation, methylation, and acetylation and so on. Ubiquitylation plays an essential role in cellular functions such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, DNA repair, antigen processing, and stress response. Phosphorylation is related to physiological and pathological processes including cellular signal conduction, nervous activity, muscle contraction and proliferation, development and differentiation of cells. Protein glycosylation is of great importance for many cell processes like immunoprotection, virus replication, cell growth, and occurrence of inflammation and so on. Lipodation is vital to signal conduction. Histone methylation and acetylation are responsible for transcription regulation. In vivo, different post-translational modifications do not occur isolatedly, but influence each other's function and cooperate with each other. Understanding what influences the post-translational modifications will help to uncover cellular processes and protein network in molecular level and finally direct more precise drug design targeting molecules. Post-translational modification mimics are set to dominate the next wave of protein therapeutics and become powerful medicinal tools in the 21st century.

  7. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational modifications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    USHA P KAR; HIMANI DEY; ABDUR RAHAMAN

    2017-06-01

    Dynamin superfamily proteins comprising classical dynamins and related proteins are membrane remodelling agentsinvolved in several biological processes such as endocytosis, maintenance of organelle morphology and viralresistance. These large GTPases couple GTP hydrolysis with membrane alterations such as fission, fusion ortubulation by undergoing repeated cycles of self-assembly/disassembly. The functions of these proteins are regulatedby various post-translational modifications that affect their GTPase activity, multimerization or membrane association.Recently, several reports have demonstrated variety of such modifications providing a better understanding of themechanisms by which dynamin proteins influence cellular responses to physiological and environmental cues. In thisreview, we discuss major post-translational modifications along with their roles in the mechanism of dynaminfunctions and implications in various cellular processes.

  8. Chemical modification of muscle protein in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Nadja; Carson, James A; Alderson, Nathan L; Wang, Yuping; Nagai, Ryoji; Henle, Thomas; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2004-05-15

    Levels of glycation (fructose-lysine, FL) and advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end-products (AGE/ALEs) were measured in total skeletal (gastrocnemius) muscle and myofibril protein and compared to levels of the same compounds in insoluble skin collagen of control and diabetic rats. Levels of FL in total muscle and myofibril protein were 3-5% the level of FL in skin collagen. The AGE/ALEs, N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N(epsilon)-(carboxyethyl)lysine, were also significantly lower in total muscle and myofibril protein, approximately 25% of levels in skin collagen. The newly described sulfhydryl AGE/ALE, S-(carboxymethyl)cysteine (CMC), was also measured in muscle; levels of CMC were comparable to those of CML and increased similarly in response to diabetes. Although FL and AGE/ALEs increased in muscle protein in diabetes, the relative increase was less than that seen in skin collagen. These data indicate that muscle protein is partially protected against the increase in both glycation and AGE/ALE formation in diabetes.

  9. Generation of protein-derived redox cofactors by posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Victor L

    2011-01-01

    Redox enzymes which catalyze the oxidation and reduction of substrates are ubiquitous in nature. These enzymes typically possess exogenous cofactors to allow them to perform catalytic functions which cannot be accomplished using only amino acid residues. It is now evident that nature also employs an alternative strategy of generating catalytic and redox-active sites in proteins by posttranslational modification of amino acid residues. This review describes the structures and functions of several of these protein-derived cofactors and the diverse mechanisms of posttranslational modification through which they are generated.

  10. Modifications of blood platelet proteins of patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich-Muszalska, Anna; Olas, Beata

    2009-03-01

    Oxidative damage to lipids in plasma, blood platelets and neurons in patients with schizophrenia was described. The aim of our present study was to evaluate oxidative/nitrative modifications of blood platelets proteins by measurement the level of biomarkers of oxidative stress such as carbonyl groups, thiol groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins in patients with schizophrenia and compare with a control group. Levels of carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine residues in platelet proteins were measured by ELISA and competition ELISA, respectively. The method with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid) has been used to analyse thiol groups in platelet proteins. We demonstrated for the first time in platelet proteins from patients with schizophrenia a statistically significant increase of the level of biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress such as carbonyl groups or 3-nitrotyrosine; in schizophrenic patients the amount of thiol groups in platelet proteins was lower than in platelets from healthy subjects. Our results strongly indicate that in patients with schizophrenia reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species induce not only peroxidation of lipids, but also may stimulate oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins. The consequence of these modifications may be the alteration of platelet protein structure and function.

  11. Modification of protein synthetic components by aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, B A; Erki, L; Biedrzycka, D W; Devlin, T M; Ch'ih, J J

    1988-04-15

    Molecular sites of perturbation by the hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in the protein synthesis initiation complex were assessed using isolated hepatocytes and a cell-free activating system containing microsomes and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes (cRPC). Ribosomal proteins showed no detectable modification by the toxin in either system. With hepatocytes, initiation factors demonstrated only slight modification by AFB1. RNAs from both hepatocytes and the cell-free system with microsomes and cRPC were modified, with poly(A)-containing RNA exhibiting at least a 5-fold higher modification than poly(A)-lacking RNA. The poly(A)-lacking RNAs were modified in the order 28S rRNA greater than 18S rRNA greater than 5-6S rRNA greater than 4S tRNA. Guanine was the target base of AFB1, but only 10% of the AFB1-GMP adducts were on guanines located in a poly(G) region. These results suggest that guanine modification in RNAs may be responsible for the observed inhibition of translational initiation by AFB1 to a greater extent than modification of either ribosomal intrinsic or associated proteins.

  12. Synthesis, modification and turnover of proteins during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Suresh I S

    2010-01-01

    Iterations in the rate and extent of protein synthesis, accuracy, post-translational modifications and turnover are among the main molecular characteristics of aging. A decline in the cellular capacity through proteasomal and lysosomal pathways to recognize and preferentially degrade damaged proteins leads to the accumulation of abnormal proteins during aging. The consequent increase in molecular heterogeneity and impaired functioning of proteins is the basis of several age-related pathologies, such as cataracts, sarcopenia and neurodegerative diseases. Understanding the proteomic spectrum and its functional implications during aging can facilitate developing effective means of intervention, prevention and therapy of aging and age-related diseases.

  13. Cell signaling, post-translational protein modifications and NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany); Smet-Nocca, Caroline [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS UMR 8576 (France); Liokatis, Stamatios; Thongwichian, Rossukon; Kosten, Jonas [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany); Yoon, Mi-Kyung; Kriwacki, Richard W. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Structural Biology (United States); Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy [Universite Lille Nord de France, CNRS UMR 8576 (France); Selenko, Philipp, E-mail: selenko@fmp-berlin.de [In-cell NMR Group, Department of NMR-Supported Structural Biology, Leibniz Institute of Molecular Pharmacology (FMP Berlin) (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Post-translationally modified proteins make up the majority of the proteome and establish, to a large part, the impressive level of functional diversity in higher, multi-cellular organisms. Most eukaryotic post-translational protein modifications (PTMs) denote reversible, covalent additions of small chemical entities such as phosphate-, acyl-, alkyl- and glycosyl-groups onto selected subsets of modifiable amino acids. In turn, these modifications induce highly specific changes in the chemical environments of individual protein residues, which are readily detected by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In the following, we provide a concise compendium of NMR characteristics of the main types of eukaryotic PTMs: serine, threonine, tyrosine and histidine phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, lysine and arginine methylation, and serine, threonine O-glycosylation. We further delineate the previously uncharacterized NMR properties of lysine propionylation, butyrylation, succinylation, malonylation and crotonylation, which, altogether, define an initial reference frame for comprehensive PTM studies by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  14. PLMD: An updated data resource of protein lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haodong; Zhou, Jiaqi; Lin, Shaofeng; Deng, Wankun; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Yu

    2017-05-20

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring at protein lysine residues, or protein lysine modifications (PLMs), play critical roles in regulating biological processes. Due to the explosive expansion of the amount of PLM substrates and the discovery of novel PLM types, here we greatly updated our previous studies, and presented a much more integrative resource of protein lysine modification database (PLMD). In PLMD, we totally collected and integrated 284,780 modification events in 53,501 proteins across 176 eukaryotes and prokaryotes for up to 20 types of PLMs, including ubiquitination, acetylation, sumoylation, methylation, succinylation, malonylation, glutarylation, glycation, formylation, hydroxylation, butyrylation, propionylation, crotonylation, pupylation, neddylation, 2-hydroxyisobutyrylation, phosphoglycerylation, carboxylation, lipoylation and biotinylation. Using the data set, a motif-based analysis was performed for each PLM type, and the results demonstrated that different PLM types preferentially recognize distinct sequence motifs for the modifications. Moreover, various PLMs synergistically orchestrate specific cellular biological processes by mutual crosstalks with each other, and we totally found 65,297 PLM events involved in 90 types of PLM co-occurrences on the same lysine residues. Finally, various options were provided for accessing the data, while original references and other annotations were also present for each PLM substrate. Taken together, we anticipated the PLMD database can serve as a useful resource for further researches of PLMs. PLMD 3.0 was implemented in PHP + MySQL and freely available at http://plmd.biocuckoo.org. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical modification of proteins by lipids in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, John W

    2003-09-01

    Advanced glycation and lipoxidation end-products (AGE/ALE) increase in tissue proteins with age and at an accelerated rate in diabetes. This Review focuses on the nature and source of AGEs/ALEs and the factors affecting their formation in tissue and plasma proteins. Lipids are identified as an important source of chemical modification of proteins in diabetes, and the role of diabetes, dyslipidemia and renal disease in formation of AGEs/ALEs is reviewed. The article concludes with a discussion of ELISA assays for AGEs/ALEs and the merits of measuring AGEs/ALEs in the clinical laboratory.

  16. Recent approaches in physical modification of protein functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmoghtadaie, Leila; Shojaee Aliabadi, Saeedeh; Hosseini, Seyede Marzieh

    2016-05-15

    Today, there is a growing demand for novel technologies, such as high hydrostatic pressure, irradiation, ultrasound, filtration, supercritical carbon dioxide, plasma technology, and electrical methods, which are not based on chemicals or heat treatment for modifying ingredient functionality and extending product shelf life. Proteins are essential components in many food processes, and provide various functions in food quality and stability. They can create interfacial films that stabilize emulsions and foams as well as interact to make networks that play key roles in gel and edible film production. These properties of protein are referred to as 'protein functionality', because they can be modified by different processing. The common protein modification (chemical, enzymatic and physical) methods have strong effects on the structure and functionality of food proteins. Furthermore, novel technologies can modify protein structure and functional properties that will be reviewed in this study.

  17. Artificial Metalloenzymes through Chemical Modification of Engineered Host Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Zernickel, Anna

    2014-10-01

    With a few exceptions, all organisms are restricted to the 20 canonical amino acids for ribosomal protein biosynthesis. Addition of new amino acids to the genetic code can introduce novel functionalities to proteins, broadening the diversity of biochemical as well as chemical reactions and providing new tools to study protein structure, reactivity, dynamics and protein-protein-interactions. The site directed in vivo incorporation developed by P. G. SCHULTZ and coworkers, using an archeal orthogonal tRNA/aaRS (aminoacyl-tRNA synthase) pair, allows site-specifically insertion of a synthetic unnatural amino acid (UAA) by reprogramming the amber TAG stop codon. A variety of over 80 different UAAs can be introduced by this technique. However by now a very limited number can form kinetically stable bonds to late transition metals. This thesis aims to develop new catalytically active unnatural amino acids or strategies for a posttranslational modification of site-specific amino acids in order to achieve highly enantioselective metallorganic enzyme hybrids (MOEH). As a requirement a stable protein host has to be established, surviving the conditions for incorporation, posttranslational modification and the final catalytic reactions. mTFP* a fluorescent protein was genetically modified by excluding any exposed Cys, His and Met forming a variant mTFP*, which fulfills the required specifications. Posttranslational chemical modification of mTFP* allow the introduction of single site metal chelating moieties. For modification on exposed cysteines different maleiimid containing ligand structures were synthesized. In order to perform copper catalyzed click reactions, suitable unnatural amino acids (para-azido-(L)-phenylalanine, para-ethynyl-(L)-phenylalanine) were synthesized and a non-cytotoxic protocol was established. The triazole ring formed during this reaction may contribute as a moderate σ-donor/π-acceptor ligand to the metal binding site. Since the cell limits the

  18. [Antirestriction proteins ardA and Ocr as effective inhibitors of the type I restriction-modification enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B; Rastorguev, S M

    2009-01-01

    Genes encoding antirestriction proteins (antirestrictases, inasmuch as the antirestriction proteins inhibit the activity of restriction-modification systems, but have no proper enzyme activity, the name antirestrictase is only tentative) are included in the composition of conjugative plasmids (genes ardABC) and some bacteriophages (genes ocr and darA). Antirestriction proteins inhibit of the type I restriction-modification enzymes and thus protect unmodified DNA of plasmids and bacteriophages from degradation. Antirestriction proteins belong to the "protein mimicry of DNA" family: the spatial structure is like the B-form of DNA, and therefore the antirestriction proteins operated on the principle of concurrent inhibition replacing DNA in the complex with the restriction-modification enzyme. Based on the prepared in vitro mutant forms of ArdA and Ocr, and also on natural proteins ArdA selectively inhibiting restriction activity of the type I enzymes, but not affecting their methylase activity, we have developed a model of complex formation between the antirestriction proteins and the restriction-modification enzymes R2M2S. Antirestriction proteins are capable of competing displacement of the DNA strand from two sites which are situated as follows: 1) in S-subunit (enzyme contact with the specific DNA site) and 2) in R-subunit (through this unit translocation of the DNA strand occurs followed by its degradation). Analysis of estriction and antimodification activities of proteins ArdA and Ocr depending on the expression level of genes ardA and ocr was performed (the cloning of the genes was done under strictly regulated promoter).

  19. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  20. [Processing and Modification of Recombinant Spider Silk Proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Tao; Liu, Xiaobing; Luo, Yongen

    2015-08-01

    Due to its special sequence structure, spider silk protein has unique physical and chemical properties, mechanical properties and excellent biological properties. With the expansion of the application value of spider silk in many fields as a functional material, progress has been made in the studies on the expression of recombinant spider silk proteins through many host systems by gene recombinant techniques. Recombinant spider silk proteins can be processed into high performance fibers, and a wide range of nonfibrous morphologies. Moreover, for their excellent biocompatibility and low immune response they are ideal for biomedical applications. Here we review the process and mechanism of preparation in vitro, chemistry and genetic engineering modification on recombinant spider silk protein.

  1. Lysine Glutarylation Is a Protein Posttranslational Modification Regulated by SIRT5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Minjia; Peng, Chao; Anderson, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the identification and characterization of a five-carbon protein posttranslational modification (PTM) called lysine glutarylation (Kglu). This protein modification was detected by immunoblot and mass spectrometry (MS), and then comprehensively validated by chemical and biochemical metho...

  2. New insights into subcomplex assembly and modifications of centrosomal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habermann Karin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review provides a brief overview of the recent work on centrosome proteomics, protein complex identification and functional characterization with an emphasis on the literature of the last three years. Proteomics, genetic screens and comparative genomics studies in different model organisms have almost exhaustively identified the molecular components of the centrosome. However, much knowledge is still missing on the protein-protein interactions, protein modifications and molecular changes the centrosome undergoes throughout the cell cycle and development. The dynamic nature of this large multi-protein complex is reflected in the variety of annotated subcellular locations and biological processes of its proposed components. Some centrosomal proteins and complexes have been studied intensively in different organisms and provided detailed insight into centrosome functions. For example, the molecular, structural and functional characterization of the γ-Tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC and the the discovery of the Augmin/HAUS complex has advanced our understanding of microtubule (MT capture, nucleation and organization. Surprising findings revealed new functions and localizations of proteins that were previously regarded as bona fide centriolar or centrosome components, e.g. at the kinetochore or in the nuclear pore complex regulating MT plus end capture or mRNA processing. Many centrosome components undergo posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, SUMOylation and ubiquitylation that are critical in modulating centrosome function and biology. A wealth of information has recently become available driven by new developments in technologies such as mass spectrometry, light and electron microscopy providing more detailed molecular and structural definition of the centrosome and particular roles of proteins throughout the cell cycle and development.

  3. Potential protein post-translational modification in ERp57: A phenotype marker for male fertility

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2010-01-01

    Background : In protein expression, post-translational modification is an important process. It is also an important process in human reproductive science. ERp57 is a molecule that is mentioned for post-translational modification. ERp57 is a component of human sperm acrosome proteins. However, the data on post-translational modifications of ERp57 is limited. Aim: The aim of this work is to assess potential protein post-translational modifications in ERp57 protein. Settings and Design : A desc...

  4. Modification of proteins by norepinephrine is important for vascular contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle B Johnson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine (NE is thought to mediate its effects through G-protein coupled receptors. However, previous studies have shown that norepinephrine and another primary amine, serotonin, also have the ability to exert effects in a receptor-independent manner. We hypothesized that the enzyme transglutaminase II (TG II has the ability modify proteins with NE and that this modification is physiologically relevant. As our model we used rat aortic and vena cava tissues, two tissues that depend on NE to modulate vascular tone. Immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical staining showed that NE and TG II are present in smooth muscle cells of these tissues. Western analysis shows aorta and vena cava homogenate proteins are recognized by an anti-NE antibody. NE and α-actin colocalize in cultured aorta and vena cava smooth muscle cells. Freshly dissociated smooth muscle cells from these vessels were able to take up NE-biotin. In isolated tissue baths, inhibition of TG II with cystamine (0.5 mM completely abolished NE-induced contraction in the aorta but only attenuated the receptor-independent contractant KCl (max contraction to 100 mM KCl in cystamine treated = 88.8 ± 7.5% of vehicle treated, p<0.05. In the vena cava, contraction to NE was abolished with 0.1 mM cystamine and KCl contraction was attenuated (max contraction to 100 mM KCl in cystamine treated = 54.8 ± 21.2% of vehicle treated, p<0.05. Taken together, these results show that vascular smooth muscle cells take up and utilize NE for the modification of proteins, and that this modification may play an important role in vascular contraction.

  5. Recent Progress in Predicting Posttranslational Modification Sites in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification or PTM is a later but subtle step in protein biosynthesis via which to change the properties of a protein by adding a modified group to its one or more amino acid residues. PTMs are responsible for many significant biological processes, and meanwhile for many major diseases as well, such as cancer. Facing the avalanche of biological sequences generated in the post-genomic age, it is important for both basic research and drug development to timely identify the PTM sites in proteins. This Review is devoted to summarize the recent progresses in this area, with a focus on those predictors, which were developed based on the pseudo amino acid composition or PseAAC approach, and for which a publicly accessible web-server has been established. Meanwhile, the future challenge in this area has also been briefly addressed.

  6. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  7. Reversible lysine modification on proteins by using functionalized boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Pedro M S D; Frade, Raquel F M; Cordeiro, Carlos; Gois, Pedro M P

    2015-05-26

    Iminoboronates have been utilized to successfully install azide and alkyne bioorthogonal functions on proteins, which may then be further reacted with their bioorthogonal counterparts. These constructs were also used to add polyethylene glycol (PEG) to insulin, a modification which has been shown to be reversible in the presence of fructose. Finally, iminoboronates were used to assemble a folic acid/paclitaxel small-molecule/drug conjugate in situ with an IC50  value of 20.7 nM against NCI-H460 cancer cells and negligible cytotoxicity against the CRL-1502 noncancer cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Post-translational protein modifications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wägner, A M; Cloos, P; Bergholdt, R;

    2007-01-01

    that recognises and repairs isomerised Asn and Asp residues in proteins. The aim of this study was to assess the role of PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of 59 normal human tissues was performed with a monoclonal PIMT antibody. CGP3466B, which induces......-induced apoptosis or PIMT protein levels in INS1 cells. The onset of diabetes in the BB/OK rats was significantly delayed (85.6+/-9.0 vs 84.3+/-6.8 vs 106.6+/-13.5 days, respectively; p2+/-3.2 vs 16.9+/-2.6 vs......-translational modifications and PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes in the diabetes-prone BB rat, and perhaps also in humans...

  9. Tyrosine Sulfation as a Protein Post-Translational Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Shyong Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of inorganic sulfate into biological molecules plays an important role in biological systems and is directly involved in the instigation of diseases. Protein tyrosine sulfation (PTS is a common post-translational modification that was first reported in the literature fifty years ago. However, the significance of PTS under physiological conditions and its link to diseases have just begun to be appreciated in recent years. PTS is catalyzed by tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST through transfer of an activated sulfate from 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate to tyrosine in a variety of proteins and peptides. Currently, only a small fraction of sulfated proteins is known and the understanding of the biological sulfation mechanisms is still in progress. In this review, we give an introductory and selective brief review of PTS and then summarize the basic biochemical information including the activity and the preparation of TPST, methods for the determination of PTS, and kinetics and reaction mechanism of TPST. This information is fundamental for the further exploration of the function of PTS that induces protein-protein interactions and the subsequent biochemical and physiological reactions.

  10. Protein pI shifts due to posttranslational modifications in the separation and characterization of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kan; Zhao, Jia; Lubman, David M; Miller, Fred R; Barder, Timothy J

    2005-05-01

    Proteins from breast cancer cell lines are characterized using a 2-D liquid separation technique in which protein pI is used as the first-dimension separation parameter. To effect this protein pI separation, chromatofocusing(CF) is employed whereby a pH gradient is generated on-column using a weak anion exchange medium with the intact proteins fractionated and collected every 0.2 pH unit. It is demonstrated that the pI for expressed intact proteins as generated by CF is an important parameter for identification and characterization of the actual protein modifications occurring in the cancer cell. For most proteins, the experimentally determined pI is very close to that predicted by the databases. In other cases, however, where the pI is observed to be shifted from the expected value, it is shown that this shift is often correlated to protein modifications. The modifications that cause such shifts include truncations and deletions often observed in cancer cells or phosphorylations that can shift the pI by several pH units. It is also shown that the effects of phosphorylation on the observed shift can vary depending upon the protein and the amount of phosphorylation. Moreover, large changes in the pI are often observed for proteins with a pI above 7.0 upon phosphorylation, whereas little change is observed for proteins with a pI of approximately 5.0. The expressed protein's pI value thus becomes an important parameter together with the intact MW value, peptide map, and MS/MS results for identification of the presence and type of posttranslational modifications occurring in the cancer cell.

  11. Protein-protein-interaction Network Organization of the Hypusine Modification System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Henning; Venz, Simone; Platas-Barradas, Oscar; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Schaletzky, Martin; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Braig, Melanie; Preukschas, Michael; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Pörtner, Ralf; Walther, Reinhard; Duncan, Kent E.; Hauber, Joachim; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Hypusine modification of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) represents a unique and highly specific post-translational modification with regulatory functions in cancer, diabetes, and infectious diseases. However, the specific cellular pathways that are influenced by the hypusine modification remain largely unknown. To globally characterize eIF-5A and hypusine-dependent pathways, we used an approach that combines large-scale bioreactor cell culture with tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry: “bioreactor-TAP-MS/MS.” By applying this approach systematically to all four components of the hypusine modification system (eIF-5A1, eIF-5A2, DHS, and DOHH), we identified 248 interacting proteins as components of the cellular hypusine network, with diverse functions including regulation of translation, mRNA processing, DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. Network analysis of this data set enabled us to provide a comprehensive overview of the protein-protein interaction landscape of the hypusine modification system. In addition, we validated the interaction of eIF-5A with some of the newly identified associated proteins in more detail. Our analysis has revealed numerous novel interactions, and thus provides a valuable resource for understanding how this crucial homeostatic signaling pathway affects different cellular functions. PMID:22888148

  12. Protein-protein-interaction network organization of the hypusine modification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Henning; Venz, Simone; Platas-Barradas, Oscar; Dhople, Vishnu M; Schaletzky, Martin; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Braig, Melanie; Preukschas, Michael; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Pörtner, Ralf; Walther, Reinhard; Duncan, Kent E; Hauber, Joachim; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    Hypusine modification of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) represents a unique and highly specific post-translational modification with regulatory functions in cancer, diabetes, and infectious diseases. However, the specific cellular pathways that are influenced by the hypusine modification remain largely unknown. To globally characterize eIF-5A and hypusine-dependent pathways, we used an approach that combines large-scale bioreactor cell culture with tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry: "bioreactor-TAP-MS/MS." By applying this approach systematically to all four components of the hypusine modification system (eIF-5A1, eIF-5A2, DHS, and DOHH), we identified 248 interacting proteins as components of the cellular hypusine network, with diverse functions including regulation of translation, mRNA processing, DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. Network analysis of this data set enabled us to provide a comprehensive overview of the protein-protein interaction landscape of the hypusine modification system. In addition, we validated the interaction of eIF-5A with some of the newly identified associated proteins in more detail. Our analysis has revealed numerous novel interactions, and thus provides a valuable resource for understanding how this crucial homeostatic signaling pathway affects different cellular functions.

  13. Functional Characteristics of Milk Protein Concentrates and Their Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluko, Hankie; Liu, Lu; Lv, Jia-Ping; Zhang, Shu-Wen

    2016-05-18

    A major deterrent to the usage of milk protein concentrate (MPC), a high-protein milk product with increasing demand as a food and sports drink ingredient, has been its poor functional characteristics when compared with other milk protein products such as whey protein concentrate and sodium caseinates. This review discusses the recent research on functional properties of MPC, focusing on factors that may contribute to the poor functional characteristics before, during, and after production. Current research, methods employed, and new understanding on the causes of poor solubility of MPC at mild temperatures (about 20°C) has been presented, including loss of solubility during storage as these areas have received unprecedented attention over the past decade, and also affects other useful functional properties of MPC, such as emulsifying properties, gelation, and foaming. Processing methods, which include heat treatment, high-pressure application, microwave heating, ultrasound application, and enzyme and salts modification, have been used or have potential to modify or improve the functional properties of MPCs. Future research on the effects of these processing methods on the functional properties, including effects of enzyme hydrolysis on bitterness and bioactivity, has also been discussed.

  14. Alteration and modulation of protein activity by varying post-translational modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David N.; Reed, David W.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Apel, William A.

    2016-07-12

    Embodiments of the invention include methods of altering the enzymatic activity or solubility of an extremophilic enzyme or post-translationally modifying a protein of interest via using isolated or partially purified glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, extracts of cells comprising glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, and/or in cells comprising one or more glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins.

  15. Regulation by S-Nitrosylation of Protein Post-translational Modification*

    OpenAIRE

    Hess, Douglas T.; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    Protein post-translational modification by S-nitrosylation conveys a ubiquitous influence of nitric oxide on signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. The wide functional purview of S-nitrosylation reflects in part the regulation by S-nitrosylation of the principal protein post-translational modifications that play a role in cell signaling, including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation and related modifications, palmitoylation, and alternative Cys-based redox modifications. In this mi...

  16. Posttranslational modification of autophagy-related proteins in macroautophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangchun; Kang, Rui; Sun, Xiaofang; Zhong, Meizuo; Huang, Jin; Klionsky, Daniel J; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is an intracellular catabolic process involved in the formation of multiple membrane structures ranging from phagophores to autophagosomes and autolysosomes. Dysfunction of macroautophagy is implicated in both physiological and pathological conditions. To date, 38 autophagy-related (ATG) genes have been identified as controlling these complicated membrane dynamics during macroautophagy in yeast; approximately half of these genes are clearly conserved up to human, and there are additional genes whose products function in autophagy in higher eukaryotes that are not found in yeast. The function of the ATG proteins, in particular their ability to interact with a number of macroautophagic regulators, is modulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs) such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, lipidation, and proteolysis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the role of ATG protein PTMs and their functional relevance in macroautophagy. Unraveling how these PTMs regulate ATG protein function during macroautophagy will not only reveal fundamental mechanistic insights into the regulatory process, but also provide new therapeutic targets for the treatment of autophagy-associated diseases.

  17. Assays for Posttranslational Modifications of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Natasha T; Omary, M Bishr

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins are known to be regulated by a number of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Phosphorylation is the best-studied IF PTM, whereas ubiquitination, sumoylation, acetylation, glycosylation, ADP-ribosylation, farnesylation, and transamidation are less understood in functional terms but are known to regulate specific IFs under various contexts. The number and diversity of IF PTMs is certain to grow along with rapid advances in proteomic technologies. Therefore, the need for a greater understanding of the implications of PTMs to the structure, organization, and function of the IF cytoskeleton has become more apparent with the increased availability of data from global profiling studies of normal and diseased specimens. This chapter will provide information on established methods for the isolation and monitoring of IF PTMs along with the key reagents that are necessary to carry out these experiments.

  18. Assays for Post-translational Modifications of Intermediate Filament Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omary, M. Bishr

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins are known to be regulated by a number of post-translational modifications (PTMs). Phosphorylation is the best studied IF PTM, whereas ubiquitination, sumoylation, acetylation, glycosylation, ADP-ribosylation, farnesylation and transamidation are less understood in functional terms but are known to regulate specific IFs under various contexts. The number and diversity of IF PTMs is certain to grow along with rapid advances in proteomic technologies. Therefore, the need for a greater understanding of the implications of PTMs to the structure, organization, and function of the IF cytoskeleton has become more apparent with the increased availability of data from global profiling studies of normal and diseased specimens. This chapter will provide information on established methods for the isolation and monitoring of IF PTMs along with the key reagents that are necessary to carry out these experiments. PMID:26795469

  19. Potential protein post-translational modification in ERp57: A phenotype marker for male fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In protein expression, post-translational modification is an important process. It is also an important process in human reproductive science. ERp57 is a molecule that is mentioned for post-translational modification. ERp57 is a component of human sperm acrosome proteins. However, the data on post-translational modifications of ERp57 is limited. Aim: The aim of this work is to assess potential protein post-translational modifications in ERp57 protein. Settings and Design : A descriptive computational bioinformatics study. Materials and Methods : In this work, potential protein post-translational modifications in ERp57 protein were assessed via a standard bioinformatics technique. Statistical Analysis Used : Bioinformatics analysis. Results : There are three post-translational modifications within ERp57 from bioinformatics analysis. Conclusion : This new knowledge can be useful for better realization on molecular process of male infertility.

  20. Protein modification responds to exercise intensity and antioxidant supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Oettl, Karl; Schwaberger, Guenther; Hofmann, Peter; Greilberger, Joachim F

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effects of different exercise intensities and antioxidant supplementation on plasma protein modification. Trained men (n = 41) from a homogenous population were randomly assigned to perform cycle ergometer exercise either at 70% or 80% of individual .VO2max. Each intensity group was randomly assigned to receive either juice powder concentrate (JPC 70%, n = 11; JPC 80%, n = 10) or placebo (Plac 70%, n = 10; Plac 80%, n = 10) capsules for 28 wk. Four controlled exercise bouts and blood collections were conducted at baseline and study weeks 4, 16, and 28. Blood samples were drawn before (BE), immediately after (IE), and 30 min (30M) and 30 h (30H) postexercise. These samples were analyzed to estimate concentrations of carbonyl groups on plasma proteins (CP) and the redox state of human serum albumin (HSA). In the Plac group, CP concentrations increased at 80% of .VO2max IE and 30M, returning to preexercise concentrations by 30H (P JPC groups (P JPC group had lower baseline CP levels after 16 and 28 wk and no exercise-induced CP increase. HSA is reversibly shifted to a more oxidized state by recent intense exercise.

  1. Considering protonation as a posttranslational modification regulating protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönichen, André; Webb, Bradley A; Jacobson, Matthew P; Barber, Diane L

    2013-01-01

    Posttranslational modification is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulating protein activity, binding affinity, and stability. Compared with established posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation or ubiquitination, posttranslational modification by protons within physiological pH ranges is a less recognized mechanism for regulating protein function. By changing the charge of amino acid side chains, posttranslational modification by protons can drive dynamic changes in protein conformation and function. Addition and removal of a proton is rapid and reversible and, in contrast to most other posttranslational modifications, does not require an enzyme. Signaling specificity is achieved by only a minority of sites in proteins titrating within the physiological pH range. Here, we examine the structural mechanisms and functional consequences of proton posttranslational modification of pH-sensing proteins regulating different cellular processes.

  2. Lysine acetylation is a widespread protein modification for diverse proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Oh, Man-Ho; Schwarz, Eliezer M; Larue, Clayton T; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Imai, Brian S; Yau, Peter M; Ort, Donald R; Huber, Steven C

    2011-04-01

    Lysine acetylation (LysAc), a form of reversible protein posttranslational modification previously known only for histone regulation in plants, is shown to be widespread in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Sixty-four Lys modification sites were identified on 57 proteins, which operate in a wide variety of pathways/processes and are located in various cellular compartments. A number of photosynthesis-related proteins are among this group of LysAc proteins, including photosystem II (PSII) subunits, light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins (LHCb), Rubisco large and small subunits, and chloroplastic ATP synthase (β-subunit). Using two-dimensional native green/sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, the loosely PSII-bound LHCb was separated from the LHCb that is tightly bound to PSII and shown to have substantially higher level of LysAc, implying that LysAc may play a role in distributing the LHCb complexes. Several potential LysAc sites were identified on eukaryotic elongation factor-1A (eEF-1A) by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and using sequence- and modification-specific antibodies the acetylation of Lys-227 and Lys-306 was established. Lys-306 is contained within a predicted calmodulin-binding sequence and acetylation of Lys-306 strongly inhibited the interactions of eEF-1A synthetic peptides with calmodulin recombinant proteins in vitro. These results suggest that LysAc of eEF-1A may directly affect regulatory properties and localization of the protein within the cell. Overall, these findings reveal the possibility that reversible LysAc may be an important and previously unknown regulatory mechanism of a large number of nonhistone proteins affecting a wide range of pathways and processes in Arabidopsis and likely in all plants.

  3. Catalytic protein modification with dirhodium metallopeptides: specificity in designed and natural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Vohidov, Farrukh; Coughlin, Jane M; Stagg, Loren J; Arold, Stefan T; Ladbury, John E; Ball, Zachary T

    2012-06-20

    In this study, we present advances in the use of rhodium(II) metallopeptides for protein modification. Site-specific, proximity-driven modification is enabled by the unique combination of peptide-based molecular recognition and a rhodium catalyst capable of modifying a wide range of amino-acid side chains. We explore catalysis based on coiled-coil recognition in detail, providing an understanding of the determinants of specificity and culminating in the demonstration of orthogonal modification of separate proteins in cell lysate. In addition, the concepts of proximity-driven catalysis are extended to include modification of the natural Fyn SH3 domain with metallopeptides based on a known proline-rich peptide ligand. The development of orthogonal catalyst-substrate pairs for modification in lysate, and the extension of these methods to new natural protein domains, highlight the capabilities for new reaction design possible in chemical approaches to site-specific protein modification.

  4. Protein cysteine modifications: (2) reactivity specificity and topics of medicinal chemistry and protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Noriyuki; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Ryo; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine (cysteinyl residue) modifications in proteins result in diversity in protein functions. The reaction specificity of a protein with a modified cysteine residue is determined by the overall conditions of the protein, including the spatial position of the cysteine residue, electrostatic interactions between cysteine residue and other charged residues, spatial interactions between the cysteine residue and a chemical compound, electrophilicity of the chemical compound, and the pH of the solution. In cysteine-dependant enzymes, each specific type of cysteine modification characterizes the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. Recently, the catalytic mechanisms of peroxiredoxins and cysteine proteases, which contain a cysteine residue(s) in their catalytic sites, have been elucidated. In the catalytic process of peroxiredoxins, a sulfenyl intermediate is formed by oxidation of the catalytic cysteine residue. On the other hand, in cysteine proteases, the catalytic cysteine residue reacts with the carboxyl carbon of a peptide substrate to form an intermediate complex via S-alkylation. In this review, we introduce the most current information on the applications of cysteine thiol chemistry for in vitro glycoprotein synthesis. Recently, a glycoprotein (monocyte chemotactic protein-3), containing an intact human complex-type sialyloligosaccharide has been chemically synthesized. The procedure used for this could have applications in the development of new protein-based drugs, including antineoplastic drugs and antibiotics. It can also potentially be applied for improving the half-life and reducing the toxicity of these drugs, and for preventing the development of multidrug resistance.

  5. Polylysine modification of adenoviral fiber protein enhances muscle cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouri, K; Feero, W G; Myerburg, M M; Wickham, T J; Kovesdi, I; Hoffman, E P; Clemens, P R

    1999-07-01

    Adenoviral vectors (ADVs) are used widely for gene delivery to different tissues including muscle. One particularly promising use for ADVs is in the transfer of the dystrophin gene to the muscle of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, studies in different animal models of DMD suggest that ADVs inefficiently transduce mature skeletal muscle. In this article we test whether AdZ.F(pK7), a genetically modified ADV that expresses a polylysine moiety on the end of the fiber protein, could enhance transduction of muscle cells and circumvent the maturation-dependent loss of muscle infectivity by ADVs. The efficiency of transduction was tested at different levels of muscle maturation. In vitro, AdZ.F(pK7) showed a higher level of transduction at all stages of differentiation including myoblasts, myotubes, and single muscle fibers. In vivo, mature skeletal muscle was transduced fourfold better by AdZ.F(pK7) than by the unmodifled vector (AdZ.F). Together, these observations demonstrate improved ADV transduction of skeletal muscle by modifying ADV tropism, and provide a proof-of-principle that modification of ADVs to target muscle-specific molecules could result in tissue-specific transfer of skeletal muscle tissue as well.

  6. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-05

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Impact of protein modification on the protein corona on nanoparticles and nanoparticle-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuel, Lennart; Brandholt, Stefan; Maffre, Pauline; Wiegele, Sarah; Shang, Li; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2014-01-28

    Recent studies have firmly established that cellular uptake of nanoparticles is strongly affected by the presence and the physicochemical properties of a protein adsorption layer around these nanoparticles. Here, we have modified human serum albumin (HSA), a serum protein often used in model studies of protein adsorption onto nanoparticles, to alter its surface charge distribution and investigated the consequences for protein corona formation around small (radius ∼5 nm), dihydrolipoic acid-coated quantum dots (DHLA-QDs) by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. HSA modified by succinic anhydride (HSAsuc) to generate additional carboxyl groups on the protein surface showed a 3-fold decreased binding affinity toward the nanoparticles. A 1000-fold enhanced affinity was observed for HSA modified by ethylenediamine (HSAam) to increase the number of amino functions on the protein surface. Remarkably, HSAsuc formed a much thicker protein adsorption layer (8.1 nm) than native HSA (3.3 nm), indicating that it binds in a distinctly different orientation on the nanoparticle, whereas the HSAam corona (4.6 nm) is only slightly thicker. Notably, protein binding to DHLA-QDs was found to be entirely reversible, independent of the modification. We have also measured the extent and kinetics of internalization of these nanoparticles without and with adsorbed native and modified HSA by HeLa cells. Pronounced variations were observed, indicating that even small physicochemical changes of the protein corona may affect biological responses.

  8. Histaminylation of glutamine residues is a novel posttranslational modification implicated in G-protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowinckel, Jakob; Stahlberg, Silke; Paulmann, Nils; Bluemlein, Katharina; Grohmann, Maik; Ralser, Markus; Walther, Diego J

    2012-11-02

    Posttranslational modifications (PTM) have been shown to be essential for protein function and signaling. Here we report the identification of a novel modification, protein transfer of histamine, and provide evidence for its function in G protein signaling. Histamine, known as neurotransmitter and mediator of the inflammatory response, was found incorporated into mastocytoma proteins. Histaminylation was dependent on transglutaminase II. Mass spectrometry confirmed histamine modification of the small and heterotrimeric G proteins Cdc42, Gαo1 and Gαq. The modification was specific for glutamine residues in the catalytic core, and triggered their constitutive activation. TGM2-mediated histaminylation is thus a novel PTM that functions in G protein signaling. Protein αmonoaminylations, thus including histaminylation, serotonylation, dopaminylation and norepinephrinylation, hence emerge as a novel class of regulatory PTMs.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Effects in Protein Post-translational Modification Distributions in the Developing Mouse Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Edwards, Gregory J; Schwämmle, Veit

    2014-01-01

    Protein post-translational modification (PTM) is a powerful way to modify the behavior of cellular proteins and thereby cellular behavior. Multiple recent studies of evolutionary trends have shown that certain pairs of protein post-translational modifications tend to occur closer to each other than...... for observations of increasingly frequent and diverse protein modification in cell biology. In this study, we use mass spectrometry and proteomic strategies to present biological data showing spatiotemporal PTM co-localization across multiple PTM categories, which display changes over development of the brain...

  10. Post-translation modification of proteins; methodologies and applications in plant sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, A E; Row, P E; Dudley, E

    2011-07-01

    Proteins have the potential to undergo a variety of post-translational modifications and the different methods available to study these cellular processes has advanced rapidly with the continuing development of proteomic technologies. In this review we aim to detail five major post-translational modifications (phosphorylation, glycosylaion, lipid modification, ubiquitination and redox-related modifications), elaborate on the techniques that have been developed for their analysis and briefly discuss the study of these modifications in selected areas of plant science. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology.

  12. High-Throughput Liquid-Liquid Fractionation of Multiple Protein Post-Translational Modifications*

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFord, James H.; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Amaning, James; English, Robert D.; Tjernlund, Don; Papaconstantinou, John

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications have contributed significantly to the identification of macromolecular biomarkers of biological processes. We have modified a 2-dimensional HPLC system (Beckman Coulter PF2D ProteomeLab) to create proteome maps of post-translational protein modifications. This system resolves complex protein mixtures by anion exchange chromatofocusing in the first dimension and hydrophobicity (reverse phase chromatography) in the second dimension. The simultaneous identification of multiple protein modifications, accomplished by incorporating a photo diode array (PDA) detector into the PF2D system, facilitates the simultaneous production of three dimensional proteome maps and visualization of both unmodified and post-translationally modified (PTM) proteins at their signature wavelengths within the proteome. We describe procedures for the simultaneous resolution of proteome maps, the identification of proteins modified by nitration, carbonylation, and phosphorylation, and proteins with unique spectra such as the heme containing proteins. PMID:19099502

  13. Pseudouridine and N(6)-methyladenosine modifications weaken PUF protein/RNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Pavanapuresan P; AlSadhan, Ishraq; Merriman, Dawn K; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Herschlag, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    RNA modifications are ubiquitous in biology, with over 100 distinct modifications. While the vast majority were identified and characterized on abundant noncoding RNA such as tRNA and rRNA, the advent of sensitive sequencing-based approaches has led to the discovery of extensive and regulated modification of eukaryotic messenger RNAs as well. The two most abundant mRNA modifications-pseudouridine (Ψ) and N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A)-affect diverse cellular processes including mRNA splicing, localization, translation, and decay and modulate RNA structure. Here, we test the hypothesis that RNA modifications directly affect interactions between RNA-binding proteins and target RNA. We show that Ψ and m(6)A weaken the binding of the human single-stranded RNA binding protein Pumilio 2 (hPUM2) to its consensus motif, with individual modifications having effects up to approximately threefold and multiple modifications giving larger effects. While there are likely to be some cases where RNA modifications essentially fully ablate protein binding, here we see modest responses that may be more common. Such modest effects could nevertheless profoundly alter the complex landscape of RNA:protein interactions, and the quantitative rather than qualitative nature of these effects underscores the need for quantitative, systems-level accounting of RNA:protein interactions to understand post-transcriptional regulation. © 2017 Vaidyanathan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. The functional properties, modification and utilization of whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Venter

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein has an excellent nutritional value and exhibits a functional potential. In comparison with certain other food proteins, the whey protein content of essential amino acids is extremely favourable for human consumption. Depending on the heat-treatment history thereof, soluble whey proteins with utilizable functional properties, apart from high biological value, true digestibility, protein efficiency ratio and nett protein utilization, can be recovered. Various technological and chemical recovery processes have been designed. Chemically and enzymatically modified whey protein is manufactured to obtain technological and functional advantages. The important functional properties of whey proteins, namely hydration, gelation, emulsifying and foaming properties, are reviewed.

  15. Protein-protein binding before and after photo-modification of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Bioeffects of directed-optical-energy encompass a wide range of applications. One aspect of photochemical interactions involves irradiating a photosensitizer with visible light in order to induce protein unfolding and consequent changes in function. In the past, irradiation of several dye-protein combinations has revealed effects on protein structure. Beta lactoglobulin, human serum albumin (HSA) and tubulin have all been photo-modified with meso-tetrakis(4- sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) bound, but only in the case of tubulin has binding caused a verified loss of biological function (loss of ability to form microtubules) as a result of this light-induced structural change. The current work questions if the photo-induced structural changes that occur to HSA, are sufficient to disable its biological function of binding to osteonectin. The albumin-binding protein, osteonectin, is about half the molecular weight of HSA, so the two proteins and their bound product can be separated and quantified by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography. TSPP was first bound to HSA and irradiated, photo-modifying the structure of HSA. Then native HSA or photo-modified HSA (both with TSPP bound) were compared, to assess loss in HSA's innate binding ability as a result of light-induced structure modification.

  16. Protein microarray applications: Autoantibody detection and posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atak, Apurva; Mukherjee, Shuvolina; Jain, Rekha; Gupta, Shabarni; Singh, Vedita Anand; Gahoi, Nikita; K P, Manubhai; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-10-01

    The discovery of DNA microarrays was a major milestone in genomics; however, it could not adequately predict the structure or dynamics of underlying protein entities, which are the ultimate effector molecules in a cell. Protein microarrays allow simultaneous study of thousands of proteins/peptides, and various advancements in array technologies have made this platform suitable for several diagnostic and functional studies. Antibody arrays enable researchers to quantify the abundance of target proteins in biological fluids and assess PTMs by using the antibodies. Protein microarrays have been used to assess protein-protein interactions, protein-ligand interactions, and autoantibody profiling in various disease conditions. Here, we summarize different microarray platforms with focus on its biological and clinical applications in autoantibody profiling and PTM studies. We also enumerate the potential of tissue microarrays to validate findings from protein arrays as well as other approaches, highlighting their significance in proteomics.

  17. Connection between markers of cholestasis and intensity of oxidative modification of proteins in patients with choledocholithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Damnjanović

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the connection between cholestatic markers and the oxidative protein modification intensity in patients with choledocholithiasis. All the participants were subjected to clinical, laboratory and ultrasonic check-up at the Internal Department of the Military Hospital in Niš, Serbia. The parameters of oxidative stress: carbonyl groups, a measure of oxidative protein modification, and biochemical markers of cholestasis were determined by standard biochemical methods. The concentration of total (r=0.41, p<0.05, direct (r=0.49, p<+0.01 and indirect (r=0.41, p<0.05 bilirubin was in statistically significant positive linear correlation with the intensity of oxidative modification of proteins, while the other biochemical markers of cholestasis did not show such correlation. Total, direct and indirect bilirubins showed a significant positive correlation with oxidative protein modification, assessed through the levels of carbonyl groups in patients with choledocholithiasis.

  18. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mike eMerrick

    2015-01-01

    The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII prot...

  19. Glucose Autoxidation Induces Functional Damage to Proteins via Modification of Critical Arginine Residues†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Hachey, David L.; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Non-enzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to αVβ3 integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while non-oxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation. PMID:21661747

  20. Glucose autoxidation induces functional damage to proteins via modification of critical arginine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; Pedchenko, Vadim; Sanchez, Otto A; McDonald, W Hayes; Hachey, David L; Madu, Hartman; Stec, Donald; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-07-12

    Nonenzymatic modification of proteins in hyperglycemia is a major mechanism causing diabetic complications. These modifications can have pathogenic consequences when they target active site residues, thus affecting protein function. In the present study, we examined the role of glucose autoxidation in functional protein damage using lysozyme and RGD-α3NC1 domain of collagen IV as model proteins in vitro. We demonstrated that glucose autoxidation induced inhibition of lysozyme activity as well as NC1 domain binding to α(V)β(3) integrin receptor via modification of critical arginine residues by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal while nonoxidative glucose adduction to the protein did not affect protein function. The role of RCS in protein damage was confirmed using pyridoxamine which blocked glucose autoxidation and RCS production, thus protecting protein function, even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose. Glucose autoxidation may cause protein damage in vivo since increased levels of GO-derived modifications of arginine residues were detected within the assembly interface of collagen IV NC1 domains isolated from renal ECM of diabetic rats. Since arginine residues are frequently present within protein active sites, glucose autoxidation may be a common mechanism contributing to ECM protein functional damage in hyperglycemia and oxidative environment. Our data also point out the pitfalls in functional studies, particularly in cell culture experiments, that involve glucose treatment but do not take into account toxic effects of RCS derived from glucose autoxidation.

  1. A comprehensive resource for integrating and displaying protein post-translational modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ting-Yuan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein Post-Translational Modification (PTM plays an essential role in cellular control mechanisms that adjust protein physical and chemical properties, folding, conformation, stability and activity, thus also altering protein function. Findings dbPTM (version 1.0, which was developed previously, aimed on a comprehensive collection of protein post-translational modifications. In this update version (dbPTM2.0, we developed a PTM database towards an expert system of protein post-translational modifications. The database comprehensively collects experimental and predictive protein PTM sites. In addition, dbPTM2.0 was extended to a knowledge base comprising the modified sites, solvent accessibility of substrate, protein secondary and tertiary structures, protein domains, protein intrinsic disorder region, and protein variations. Moreover, this work compiles a benchmark to construct evaluation datasets for computational study to identifying PTM sites, such as phosphorylated sites, glycosylated sites, acetylated sites and methylated sites. Conclusion The current release not only provides the sequence-based information, but also annotates the structure-based information for protein post-translational modification. The interface is also designed to facilitate the access to the resource. This effective database is now freely accessible at http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/.

  2. Cucurbit[6]uril-Promoted Click Chemistry for Protein Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finbloom, Joel A; Han, Kenneth; Slack, Clancy C; Furst, Ariel L; Francis, Matthew B

    2017-07-19

    Azide-alkyne cycloaddition is a powerful reaction for the formation of bioconjugates. When catalyzed by Cu(I) or strain promotion, this cycloaddition is considered to be a "click" reaction with many applications in chemical biology and materials science. We report a new type of azide-alkyne click chemistry for the synthesis of protein conjugates using cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) supramolecular chemistry. CB6-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition has been previously used for the synthesis of rotaxanes but has not been applied to the development of complex bioconjugates. By developing new substrates for CB6 click that do not contain any cross-reactive functional groups and by optimizing reaction conditions, we converted CB6 click chemistry from a rotaxane synthesis tool into a useful bioconjugation technique. Using these new parameters, we synthesized a series of protein conjugates including protein-peptide, protein-DNA, protein-polymer, and protein-drug conjugates. We further demonstrated that CB6 click can be used in conjunction with strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition to generate distinct bioconjugates in protein mixtures. CB6 click is a promising new reaction for the development of protein conjugates and can be applied toward the synthesis of complex biomaterials for a wide range of applications.

  3. Protein Modifications after Foxtail Millet Extrusion: Solubility and Molecular Weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of illustrating the effects of extrusion cooking on the solubility of proteins in foxtail millet and their molecular basis, foxtail millet was extruded at five barrel temperature profiles and feed moisture contents. The proteins of raw and extrudate samples were extracted with six solutions sequentially. Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE of total protein and Starch Granule-Associate Protein (SGAP was performed. Extrusion caused a significant decrease in globulin, setarin and glutelin fractions with a corresponding increase in SDS- and SDS+2-ME-soluble and residual fractions. Increasing extrusion temperature or moisture content all led to SDS-soluble fraction decrease, while SDS+2-ME-soluble fraction increase. SDS-PAGE demonstrated that disulfide bond cross-linking occurred among glutelin and with setarin subunits. Extrusion had a less pronounced impact on the 60 kDa SGAP than the other middle-high molecular weight subunits. It is the protein-protein interaction shift from electrostatic force to hydrophobic and/or hydrogen forces and covalent disulfide cross-links that contributed to the decreased solubility of protein in foxtail millet extrudates.

  4. Surface modification using interfacial assembly of the Streptomyces chaplin proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Claessen, Dennis; Galli, Federica; Stamhuis, Eize

    The chaplin proteins are instrumental in the formation of reproductive aerial structures by the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. They lower the water surface tension thereby enabling aerial growth. In addition, chaplins provide surface hydrophobicity to the aerial hyphae by assembling

  5. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    OpenAIRE

    Papp Tamás; Polyák Angéla; Papp Krisztina; Mészár Zoltán (1977-) (állatorvos); Zákány Róza (1963-) (anatómus-, kötőszövetbiológus); Mészár-Katona Éva (1986-) (Ph.D hallgató); Terdik Tünde (1969-) (analitikus); Chang, Hwa Ham; Felszeghy Szabolcs Béla (1972-) (fogorvos, anatómus, kötőszövetbiológus)

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). H...

  6. Fluorescent biphenyl derivatives of phenylalanine suitable for protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengxi; Fahmi, Nour Eddine; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Wang, Lin; Jin, Yuguang; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2013-11-26

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that structurally compact fluorophores incorporated into the side chains of amino acids could be introduced into dihydrofolate reductase from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR) with minimal disruption of protein structure or function, even when the site of incorporation was within a folded region of the protein. The modified proteins could be employed for FRET measurements, providing sensitive monitors of changes in protein conformation. The very favorable results achieved in that study encouraged us to prepare additional fluorescent amino acids of potential utility for studying protein dynamics. Presently, we describe the synthesis and photophysical characterization of four positional isomers of biphenyl-phenylalanine, all of which were found to exhibit potentially useful fluorescent properties. All four phenylalanine derivatives were used to activate suppressor tRNA transcripts and incorporated into multiple positions of ecDHFR. All phenylalanine derivatives were incorporated with good efficiency into position 16 of ecDHFR and afforded modified proteins that consumed NADPH at rates up to about twice the rate measured for wild type. This phenomenon has been noted on a number of occasions previously and shown to be due to an increase in the off-rate of tetrahydrofolate from the enzyme, altering a step that is normally rate limiting. When introduced into sterically accessible position 49, the four phenylalanine derivatives afforded DHFRs having catalytic function comparable to wild type. The four phenylalanine derivatives were also introduced into position 115 of ecDHFR, which is known to be a folded region of the protein less tolerant of structural alteration. As anticipated, significant differences were noted in the catalytic efficiencies of the derived proteins. The ability of two of the sizable biphenyl-phenylalanine derivatives to be accommodated at position 115 with minimal perturbation of DHFR function is attributed to rotational

  7. Prediction of human protein function from post-translational modifications and localization features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gupta, Ramneek; Blom, Nikolaj;

    2002-01-01

    a number of functional attributes that are more directly related to the linear sequence of amino acids, and hence easier to predict, than protein structure. These attributes include features associated with post-translational modifications and protein sorting, but also much simpler aspects...

  8. Protein-RNA linkage and posttranslational modifications of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Olspert

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Caliciviridae family of positive sense RNA viruses cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals. The detailed characterization of the calicivirus life cycle had been hampered due to the lack of robust cell culture systems and experimental tools for many of the members of the family. However, a number of caliciviruses replicate efficiently in cell culture and have robust reverse genetics systems available, most notably feline calicivirus (FCV and murine norovirus (MNV. These are therefore widely used as representative members with which to examine the mechanistic details of calicivirus genome translation and replication. The replication of the calicivirus RNA genome occurs via a double-stranded RNA intermediate that is then used as a template for the production of new positive sense viral RNA, which is covalently linked to the virus-encoded protein VPg. The covalent linkage to VPg occurs during genome replication via the nucleotidylylation activity of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using FCV and MNV, we used mass spectrometry-based approach to identify the specific amino acid linked to the 5′ end of the viral nucleic acid. We observed that both VPg proteins are covalently linked to guanosine diphosphate (GDP moieties via tyrosine positions 24 and 26 for FCV and MNV respectively. These data fit with previous observations indicating that mutations introduced into these specific amino acids are deleterious for viral replication and fail to produce infectious virus. In addition, we also detected serine phosphorylation sites within the FCV VPg protein with positions 80 and 107 found consistently phosphorylated on VPg-linked viral RNA isolated from infected cells. This work provides the first direct experimental characterization of the linkage of infectious calicivirus viral RNA to the VPg protein and highlights that post-translational modifications of VPg may also occur during the viral life cycle.

  9. Protein-RNA linkage and posttranslational modifications of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olspert, Allan; Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Peil, Lauri; Truve, Erkki; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Caliciviridae family of positive sense RNA viruses cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals. The detailed characterization of the calicivirus life cycle had been hampered due to the lack of robust cell culture systems and experimental tools for many of the members of the family. However, a number of caliciviruses replicate efficiently in cell culture and have robust reverse genetics systems available, most notably feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV). These are therefore widely used as representative members with which to examine the mechanistic details of calicivirus genome translation and replication. The replication of the calicivirus RNA genome occurs via a double-stranded RNA intermediate that is then used as a template for the production of new positive sense viral RNA, which is covalently linked to the virus-encoded protein VPg. The covalent linkage to VPg occurs during genome replication via the nucleotidylylation activity of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using FCV and MNV, we used mass spectrometry-based approach to identify the specific amino acid linked to the 5' end of the viral nucleic acid. We observed that both VPg proteins are covalently linked to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) moieties via tyrosine positions 24 and 26 for FCV and MNV respectively. These data fit with previous observations indicating that mutations introduced into these specific amino acids are deleterious for viral replication and fail to produce infectious virus. In addition, we also detected serine phosphorylation sites within the FCV VPg protein with positions 80 and 107 found consistently phosphorylated on VPg-linked viral RNA isolated from infected cells. This work provides the first direct experimental characterization of the linkage of infectious calicivirus viral RNA to the VPg protein and highlights that post-translational modifications of VPg may also occur during the viral life cycle.

  10. Protein-protein-interaction network organization of the hypusine modification system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sievert, Henning; Venz, Simone; Platas-Barradas, Oscar; Dhople, Vishnu M; Schaletzky, Martin; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Braig, Melanie; Preukschas, Michael; Pällmann, Nora; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Pörtner, Ralf; Walther, Reinhard; Duncan, Kent E; Hauber, Joachim; Balabanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Hypusine modification of eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) represents a unique and highly specific post-translational modification with regulatory functions in cancer, diabetes, and infectious diseases...

  11. Exploring the diversity of protein modifications: special bacterial phosphorylation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Grangeasse, Christophe; Turgay, Kürşad

    2016-01-01

    that has been most thoroughly investigated. Unlike in eukarya, a large diversity of enzyme families has been shown to phosphorylate and dephosphorylate proteins on various amino acids with different chemical properties in bacteria. In this review, after a brief overview of the known bacterial...... phosphorylation systems, we focus on more recently discovered and less widely known kinases and phosphatases. Namely, we describe in detail tyrosine- and arginine-phosphorylation together with some examples of unusual serine-phosphorylation systems and discuss their potential role and function in bacterial...... physiology, and regulatory networks. Investigating these unusual bacterial kinase and phosphatases is not only important to understand their role in bacterial physiology but will help to generally understand the full potential and evolution of protein phosphorylation for signal transduction, protein...

  12. Multienzyme Modification of Hemp Protein for Functional Peptides Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional foods and nutraceuticals are of special importance, particularly for their impact on human health and prevention of certain chronic diseases. Consequently, the production and properties of bioactive peptides have received an increasing scientific interest over past few years. Present work intends to compare the competence of metalloendopeptidases (“Protease N” and “Protease A” with papain for getting functional peptides from hemp seed meal, which is an obligatory waste of hemp fiber production industry. As a measure of the functional potential hemp protein hydrolysates were analyzed for their antiradical properties in DPPH system. “Protease N” modified protein hydrolysate exhibited comparatively superior radical scavenging activity in DPPH system. Overall findings represent the importance of “Protease N,” as endopeptidase in getting peptides of good antiradical properties from various protein sources.

  13. Site-selective protein-modification chemistry for basic biology and drug development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Nikolaus; da Cruz, Filipa P.; Boutureira, Omar; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Nature has produced intricate machinery to covalently diversify the structure of proteins after their synthesis in the ribosome. In an attempt to mimic nature, chemists have developed a large set of reactions that enable post-expression modification of proteins at pre-determined sites. These reactions are now used to selectively install particular modifications on proteins for many biological and therapeutic applications. For example, they provide an opportunity to install post-translational modifications on proteins to determine their exact biological roles. Labelling of proteins in live cells with fluorescent dyes allows protein uptake and intracellular trafficking to be tracked and also enables physiological parameters to be measured optically. Through the conjugation of potent cytotoxicants to antibodies, novel anti-cancer drugs with improved efficacy and reduced side effects may be obtained. In this Perspective, we highlight the most exciting current and future applications of chemical site-selective protein modification and consider which hurdles still need to be overcome for more widespread use.

  14. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refsgaard, Hanne H. F.; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl R.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(III)/O2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate < methyl linolenate < methyl arachidonate. The amounts of alkyl hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde, and a number of other aldehydes that accumulated when polyunsaturated fatty acids were oxidized in the presence of BSA were significantly lower than that observed in the absence of BSA. Direct treatment of proteins with various lipid hydroperoxides led to a slight increase in the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives, whereas treatment with the hydroperoxides together with Fe(II) led to a substantial increase in the formation of protein carbonyls. These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (α,β-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues (Michael addition reactions) and also by interactions with alkoxyl radicals obtained by Fe(II) cleavage of lipid hydroperoxides that are formed. In addition, saturated aldehydes derived from the polyunsaturated fatty acids likely react with lysine residues to form Schiff base adducts.

  15. Photoinduced protein modifications by methylene blue and naproxen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracchitta, Giuseppina; Catalfo, Alfio; De Guidi, Guido

    2012-12-01

    HPLC and emission spectroscopy were used to investigate UVA photosensitization of methylene blue (MB) or naproxen (NAP) towards bovine serum albumin (BSA). In addition, time resolved singlet oxygen measurements were carried out. The most stable drug : protein adducts stoichiometry of MB-BSA (1 : 1) and NAP-BSA (9 : 1) were verified by means of binding constant determination. UVA photosensitization of MB or NAP on BSA was studied by monitoring tryptophan (Trp) residue integrity. The sensitized photodegradation of the BSA resulted in different degrees of Trp damage. Thus, protein damage was determined by quantitative measurements of the different Trp (photo)-products. Indeed, many of these Trp derivatives are diagnostic for the photosensitization mechanism and some of them, for the first time in this work, were obtained by UVA photosensitization in proteins. The analysis of quantum yields of the photoproduct distribution allowed to weigh up the type I/II contribution to the UVA photosensitization mechanism. As expected, additional experiments in deuterated solvent resulted in an increase of the photodegradation quantum yields for those species where a singlet oxygen mechanism was involved. The UVA mediated generation of these Trp derivatives is consistent with the occurrence of singlet oxygen formation (almost dominant in MB), and photoionization (significant in NAP) within the protein matrix. Additional experiments at lower NAP concentration, as well as with human serum albumin (which differs for Trp content and, partially, localization), support further the molecular mechanism of photosensitization proposed. The results obtained in the case of this more complex system are in agreement with the free Trp model, even if, in almost all cases, the Trp photoproduct formation quantum yields are lower, due to the higher number of sensitization targets in the proteins.

  16. Regulation of translesion DNA synthesis: Posttranslational modification of lysine residues in key proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Justyna; Woodgate, Roger

    2015-05-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins often controls various aspects of their cellular function. Indeed, over the past decade or so, it has been discovered that posttranslational modification of lysine residues plays a major role in regulating translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and perhaps the most appreciated lysine modification is that of ubiquitination. Much of the recent interest in ubiquitination stems from the fact that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was previously shown to be specifically ubiquitinated at K164 and that such ubiquitination plays a key role in regulating TLS. In addition, TLS polymerases themselves are now known to be ubiquitinated. In the case of human polymerase η, ubiquitination at four lysine residues in its C-terminus appears to regulate its ability to interact with PCNA and modulate TLS. Within the past few years, advances in global proteomic research have revealed that many proteins involved in TLS are, in fact, subject to a previously underappreciated number of lysine modifications. In this review, we will summarize the known lysine modifications of several key proteins involved in TLS; PCNA and Y-family polymerases η, ι, κ and Rev1 and we will discuss the potential regulatory effects of such modification in controlling TLS in vivo.

  17. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins and characterization of their post-translational modifications in proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, P; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2001-01-01

    dominant strategies for identification of proteins from gels based on peptide mass spectrometric fingerprinting and partial sequencing by mass spectrometry are described. After identification of the proteins the next challenge in proteome analysis is characterization of their post-translational...... modifications. The general problems associated with characterization of these directly from gel separated proteins are described and the current state of art for the determination of phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic processing is illustrated....

  18. Adipocyte protein modification by Krebs cycle intermediates and fumarate ester-derived succination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Allison M; Frizzell, Norma

    2013-11-01

    Protein succination, the non-enzymatic modification of cysteine residues by fumarate, is distinguishable from succinylation, an enzymatic reaction forming an amide bond between lysine residues and succinyl-CoA. Treatment of adipocytes with 30 mM glucose significantly increases protein succination with only a small change in succinylation. Protein succination may be significantly increased intracellularly after treatment with fumaric acid esters, however, the ester must be removed by saponification to permit 2SC-antibody detection of the fumarate adduct.

  19. Modifications of proteins by polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Hanne; Tsai, Lin; Stadtman, Earl

    2000-01-01

    The ability of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters to modify amino acid residues in bovine serum albumin (BSA), glutamine synthetase, and insulin in the presence of a metal-catalyzed oxidation system [ascorbate/Fe(lll)/O-2] depends on the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acid. The fatty acid......-dependent generation of carbonyl groups and loss of lysine residues increased in the order methyl linoleate fatty acids were oxidized in the presence...... in the formation of protein carbonyls, These results are consistent with the proposition that metal-catalyzed oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids can contribute to the generation of protein carbonyls by direct interaction of lipid oxidation products (alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes) with lysine residues...

  20. Chemical reporter for visualizing metabolic cross-talk between carbohydrate metabolism and protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaro, Balyn W; Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2014-09-19

    Metabolic chemical reporters have been largely used to study posttranslational modifications. Generally, it was assumed that these reporters entered one biosynthetic pathway, resulting in labeling of one type of modification. However, because they are metabolized by cells before their addition onto proteins, metabolic chemical reporters potentially provide a unique opportunity to read-out on both modifications of interest and cellular metabolism. We report here the development of a metabolic chemical reporter 1-deoxy-N-pentynyl glucosamine (1-deoxy-GlcNAlk). This small-molecule cannot be incorporated into glycans; however, treatment of mammalian cells results in labeling of a variety proteins and enables their visualization and identification. Competition of this labeling with sodium acetate and an acetyltransferase inhibitor suggests that 1-deoxy-GlcNAlk can enter the protein acetylation pathway. These results demonstrate that metabolic chemical reporters have the potential to isolate and potentially discover cross-talk between metabolic pathways in living cells.

  1. The DNA damage response pathways: at the crossroad of protein modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael SY Huen; Junjie Chen

    2008-01-01

    Post-translational modifications play a crucial role in coordinating cellular response to DNA damage. Recent evidence suggests an interplay between multiple protein modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation and sumoylation, that combine to propagate the DNA damage signal to elicit cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis and senescence. Utility of specific post-translational modifiers allows temporal and spatial control over protein relo-calization and interactions, and may represent a means for trans-regulatory activation of protein activities. The abil-ity to recognize these specific modifiers also underscores the capacity for signal amplification, a crucial step for the maintenance of genomic stability and tumor prevention. Here we have summarized recent findings that highlight the complexity of post-translational modifications in coordinating the DNA damage response, with emphasis on the DNA damage signaling cascade.

  2. Surface modification of graphene nanopores for protein translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Y. P.; Tiwari, P. B.; Krishnakumar, P.; Vlassiouk, I.; Li, W.Z.; Wang, X.W.; Darici, Y.; Lindsay, S.M.; Wang, H. D.; Smirnov, S.; He, J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of DNA translocation through graphene nanopores have revealed their potential for DNA sequencing. Here we report a study of protein translocation through chemically modified graphene nanopores. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to cut nanopores with diameters between 5-20 nm in multilayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). After oxygen plasma treatment, the dependence of the measured ionic current on salt concentration and pH was consistent with a small surface charge induced by the formation of carboxyl groups. While translocation of gold nanoparticles (10 nm) was readily detected through such treated pores of a larger diameter, translocation of protein ferritin was not observed either for oxygen plasma treated pores, or for pores modified with mercaptohexadecanoic acid. Ferritin translocation events were reliably observed after the pores were modified with the phospholipid-PEG (DPPE-PEG750) amphiphile. The ion current signature of translocation events was complex, suggesting that a series of interactions between the protein and pore occur during the process. PMID:24231385

  3. Effects of oxidative modification on gel properties of isolated porcine myofibrillar protein by peroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feibai; Zhao, Mouming; Zhao, Haifeng; Sun, Weizheng; Cui, Chun

    2014-04-01

    AAPH-derived (2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride) peroxyl radicals were selected as representative free radicals of lipid peroxidation to investigate the effects of oxidative modifications on isolated porcine myofibrillar protein structures as well as their rheological and gelling properties. Incubation of myofibrillar protein with increasing concentrations of AAPH resulted in a gradual increase (p3 mM) concentrations of AAPH induced aggregation of myosin and denaturation of myosin, troponin and tropomyosin, respectively. These structural changes resulted in changes on gelation of myofibrillar protein. Low level protein oxidation (AAPH≤0.5 mM) had no remarkable effect (p>0.05) on the viscoelastic pattern of myofibrillar protein gelation. Moderate oxidative modification (AAPH~1mM) enhanced the water-holding capacity (WHC) and texture properties of gels, while further oxidation (AAPH>3mM) significantly reduced the gel quality.

  4. Dysbiosis may trigger autoimmune diseases via inappropriate posttranslational modification of host proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eLerner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The gut ecosystem with myriads of microorganisms and the high concentration of immune system cells can be considered as a separate organ on its own. The balanced interaction between the host and microbial cells has been shaped during the long co-evolutionary process. In dysbiotic conditions, however, this balance is compromised and results in abnormal interaction between the host and microbiota. It is hypothesize here that the changed spectrum of microbial enzymes involved in posttranslational modification of proteins may contribute to the aberrant modification of host proteins thus generating autoimmune responses by the host, resulting in autoimmune diseases.

  5. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamas Papp; Angela Polyak; Krisztina Papp; Zoltan Meszar; Roza Zakany; Eva Meszar-Katona; Palne Terdik Tu nde; Chang Hwa Ham; Szabolcs Felszeghy

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2- deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes.

  6. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Tamas; Polyak, Angela; Papp, Krisztina; Meszar, Zoltan; Zakany, Roza; Meszar-Katona, Eva; Tünde, Palne Terdik; Ham, Chang Hwa; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2016-03-30

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes.

  7. Differential protein levels and post-translational modifications in spinal cord injury of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afjehi-Sadat, Leila; Brejnikow, Mika; Kang, Sung Ung; Vishwanath, Vinay; Walder, Nadja; Herkner, Kurt; Redl, Heinz; Lubec, Gert

    2010-03-05

    Although changes in protein expression in spinal cord injury (SCI) would be of pivotal interest, information so far is limited. It was therefore the aim of the study to determine protein levels and post-translational modifications in the early phase following SCI in the rat. SCI was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats and sham operated rats served as controls. A gel-based proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by quantification with specific software and subsequent identification of differentially expressed proteins by nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS was applied. Proteins of several pathways and cascades were dysregulated in SCI: 14-3-3 epsilon protein, dynein light chain 1, and tubulin beta-5 chain showed higher levels in SCI, whereas adenylyl cyclase associated protein 1, dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, F-actin capping protein subunit beta, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and transthyretin showed lower levels in the injured tissue. Post-translational modifications indicated free oxygen radical attack on proteins in SCI. The occurrence of stress is indicated by deranged stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and signaling abnormalities are reflected by adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and 14-3-3 epsilon protein. The findings propose the involvement of the corresponding cascades and challenge further work into aberrant signaling and oxidative stress in SCI, which may form the basis for experimental intervention for spinal cord trauma.

  8. Importance of post-translational modifications on the function of key haemostatic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlaftis, Vasiliki; Perera, Sachin; Monagle, Paul; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as glycosylation and phosphorylation play an important role on the function of haemostatic proteins and are critical in the setting of disease. Such secondary level changes to haemostatic proteins have wide ranging effects on their ability to interact with other proteins. This review aimed to summarize the knowledge of the common PTMs associated with haemostatic proteins and the implications of such modifications on protein function. Haemostatic proteins that represent the main focus for studies specific to PTMs are von Willebrand factor, tissue factor, factor VIII, antithrombin and fibrinogen. These proteins are susceptible to PTMs by glycosylation, phosphorylation, sulphation, citrullination and nitration, respectively, with a significant impact on their function. During synthesis, vWF must undergo extensive PTMs, with N-linked glycosylation being the most common. Increased phosphorylation of tissue factor results in increased affinity for platelets to the vessel endothelium. Citrullination of antithrombin leads to an increased anticoagulant function of this protein and therefore an anticoagulant state that inhibits clot formation. On the contrary, nitration of fibrinogen has been shown to result in a prothrombotic state, whilst sulphation is required for the normal function of Factor VIII. From this review, it is evident that PTMs of haemostatic proteins as a change in protein structure at a secondary level greatly influences the behaviour of the protein at a tertiary level.

  9. Profiling of integral membrane proteins and their post translational modifications using high-resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souda, Puneet; Ryan, Christopher M.; Cramer, William A.; Whitelegge, Julian

    2011-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins pose challenges to traditional proteomics approaches due to unique physicochemical properties including hydrophobic transmembrane domains that limit solubility in aqueous solvents. A well resolved intact protein molecular mass profile defines a protein’s native covalent state including post-translational modifications, and is thus a vital measurement toward full structure determination. Both soluble loop regions and transmembrane regions potentially contain post-translational modifications that must be characterized if the covalent primary structure of a membrane protein is to be defined. This goal has been achieved using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with low-resolution mass analyzers for intact protein profiling, and high-resolution instruments for top-down experiments, toward complete covalent primary structure information. In top-down, the intact protein profile is supplemented by gas-phase fragmentation of the intact protein, including its transmembrane regions, using collisionally activated and/or electroncapture dissociation (CAD/ECD) to yield sequence-dependent high-resolution MS information. Dedicated liquid chromatography systems with aqueous/organic solvent mixtures were developed allowing us to demonstrate that polytopic integral membrane proteins are amenable to ESI-MS analysis, including top-down measurements. Covalent post-translational modifications are localized regardless of their position in transmembrane domains. Top-down measurements provide a more detail oriented high-resolution description of post-transcriptional and post-translational diversity for enhanced understanding beyond genomic translation. PMID:21982782

  10. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  11. Do post-translational beta cell protein modifications trigger type 1 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Overgaard, Anne Julie; Brorsson, Caroline Anna;

    2013-01-01

    forms capable of specifically triggering beta cell destruction. In other immune-mediated diseases, autoantigens targeted by the immune system have undergone post-translational modification (PTM), thereby creating tissue-specific neo-epitopes. In a similar manner, PTM of beta cell proteins might create...

  12. The role of the thiol group in protein modification with methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA M. AĆIMOVIĆ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Methylglyoxal is a highly reactive α-oxoaldehyde with elevated production in hyperglycemia. It reacts with nucleophilic Lys and Arg side-chains and N-terminal amino groups causing protein modification. In the present study, the importance of the reaction of the Cys thiol group with methylglyoxal in protein modification, the competitiveness of this reaction with those of amino and guanidine groups, the time course of these reactions and their role and contribution to protein cross-linking were investigated. Human and bovine serum albumins were used as model systems. It was found that despite the very low levels of thiol groups on the surface of the examined protein molecules (approx. 80 times lower than those of amino and guanidino groups, a very high percentage of it reacts (25–85 %. The amount of reacted thiol groups and the rate of the reaction, the time for the reaction to reach equilibrium, the formation of a stable product and the contribution of thiol groups to protein cross-linking depend on the methylglyoxal concentration. The product formed in the reaction of thiol and an insufficient quantity of methylglyoxal (compared to the concentrations of the groups accessible for modification participates to a significant extent (4 % to protein cross-linking. Metformin applied in equimolar concentration with methylglyoxal prevents its reaction with amino and guanidino groups but, however, not with thiol groups.

  13. Proteomic studies on protein modification by cyclopentenone prostaglandins: expanding our view on electrophile actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Beatriz; Oeste, Clara L; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2011-10-19

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are lipid mediators that participate in the mechanisms regulating inflammation and tumorigenesis. cyPG are electrophilic compounds that act mainly through the covalent modification of cellular proteins. The stability of many cyPG-protein adducts makes them suitable for proteomic analysis. Indeed, methodological advances in recent years have allowed identifying many cyPG targets, including components of pro-inflammatory transcription factors, cytoskeletal proteins, signaling kinases and proteins involved in redox control. Insight into the diversity of cyPG targets is providing a better understanding of their mechanism of action, uncovering novel links between resolution of inflammation, proliferation and redox regulation. Moreover, identification of the target residues has unveiled the selectivity of protein modification by these electrophiles, providing valuable information for potential pharmacological applications. Among the challenges ahead, the detection of proteins modified by endogenous cyPG and the quantitative aspects of the modification require further efforts. Importantly, only a few years after the appearance of the first proteomic studies, research on cyPG targets is yielding new paradigms for redox and electrophilic signaling.

  14. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revati eWani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of reactive oxygen species (ROS has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g. cancer. New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically-distinct alterations to the protein (e.g. sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides. These post-translational modifications (PTM are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology.

  15. Redox Proteomics: A Key Tool for New Insights into Protein Modification with Relevance to Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perluigi, Marzia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Oxidatively modified proteins are characterized by elevations in protein-resident carbonyls or 3-nitrotyrosine, measures of protein oxidation, or protein bound reactive alkenals such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, a measure of lipid peroxidation. Oxidatively modified proteins nearly always have altered structure and function. Redox proteomics is that branch of proteomics used to identify oxidized proteins and determine the extent and location of oxidative modifications in the proteomes of interest. This technique nearly always employs mass spectrometry as the major platform to achieve the goals of identifying the target proteins. Once identified, oxidatively modified proteins can be placed in specific molecular pathways to provide insights into protein oxidation and human disease. Both original research and review articles are included in this Forum on Redox Proteomics. The topics related to redox proteomics range from basic chemistry of sulfur radical-induced redox modifications in proteins, to the thiol secretome and inflammatory network, to reversible thiol oxidation in proteomes, to the role of glutamine synthetase in peripheral and central environments on inflammation and insulin resistance, to bioanalytical aspects of tyrosine nitrated proteins, to protein oxidation in human smokers and models thereof, and to Alzheimer disease, including articles on the brain ubiquitinylome and the “triangle of death” composed of oxidatively modified proteins involved in energy metabolism, mammalian target of rampamycin activation, and the proteostasis network. This Forum on Redox Proteomics is both timely and a critically important resource to highlight one of the key tools needed to better understand protein structure and function in oxidative environments in health and disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 277–279. PMID:27835924

  16. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  17. Lysine glutarylation is a protein posttranslational modification regulated by SIRT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Minjia; Peng, Chao; Anderson, Kristin A; Chhoy, Peter; Xie, Zhongyu; Dai, Lunzhi; Park, Jeongsoon; Chen, Yue; Huang, He; Zhang, Yi; Ro, Jennifer; Wagner, Gregory R; Green, Michelle F; Madsen, Andreas S; Schmiesing, Jessica; Peterson, Brett S; Xu, Guofeng; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Braulke, Thomas; Mühlhausen, Chris; Backos, Donald S; Olsen, Christian A; McGuire, Peter J; Pletcher, Scott D; Lombard, David B; Hirschey, Matthew D; Zhao, Yingming

    2014-04-01

    We report the identification and characterization of a five-carbon protein posttranslational modification (PTM) called lysine glutarylation (Kglu). This protein modification was detected by immunoblot and mass spectrometry (MS), and then comprehensively validated by chemical and biochemical methods. We demonstrated that the previously annotated deacetylase, sirtuin 5 (SIRT5), is a lysine deglutarylase. Proteome-wide analysis identified 683 Kglu sites in 191 proteins and showed that Kglu is highly enriched on metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial proteins. We validated carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 (CPS1), the rate-limiting enzyme in urea cycle, as a glutarylated protein and demonstrated that CPS1 is targeted by SIRT5 for deglutarylation. We further showed that glutarylation suppresses CPS1 enzymatic activity in cell lines, mice, and a model of glutaric acidemia type I disease, the last of which has elevated glutaric acid and glutaryl-CoA. This study expands the landscape of lysine acyl modifications and increases our understanding of the deacylase SIRT5.

  18. KSHV latent protein LANA2 inhibits sumo2 modification of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Marcos-Villar; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos F; Ferreirós, Alba; Baz-Martínez, Maite; Lang, Valerie; Vidal, Anxo; Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a crucial antiviral role and targeting of p53 by viral proteins is a common mechanism involved in virus oncogenesis. The activity of p53 is tightly regulated at the post-translational levels through a myriad of modifications. Among them, modification of p53 by SUMO has been associated with the onset of cellular senescence. Kaposi´s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses several proteins targeting p53, including the latent protein LANA2 that regulates polyubiquitylation and phosphorylation of p53. Here we show that LANA2 also inhibits the modification of p53 by SUMO2. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2, as well as the p53-LANA2 interaction, both require the SUMOylation of the viral protein and its interaction with SUMO or SUMOylated proteins in a non-covalent manner. Finally, we show that the control of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2 correlates with its ability to inhibit SUMO2- and type I interferon-induced senescence. These results highlight the importance of p53 SUMOylation in the control of virus infection and suggest that viral oncoproteins could contribute to viral infection and cell transformation by abrogating p53 SUMOylation. PMID:25607652

  19. Posttranslational Protein Modification in the Salivary Glands of Sjögren's Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Esparza, Rafael; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pérez-Pérez, María Elena; Badillo-Soto, Martha Adriana; Torres-Del-Muro, Felipe; Bollain-Y-Goytia, Juan José; Pacheco-Tovar, Deyanira; Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated posttranslational reactions in the salivary glands of patients with Sjögren's syndrome. We analysed the biopsies of primary Sjögren's patients using immunohistochemistry and a tag-purified anticyclic citrullinated protein (CCP) antibody to detect citrullinated peptides, and the presence of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) was assessed simultaneously. The present work demonstrated the weak presence of the PAD2 enzyme in some normal salivary glands, although PAD2 expression was increased considerably in Sjögren's patients. The presence of citrullinated proteins was also detected in the salivary tissues of Sjögren's patients, which strongly supports the in situ posttranslational modification of proteins in this setting. Furthermore, the mutual expression of CCP and PAD2 suggests that this posttranslational modification is enzyme dependent. In conclusion, patients with Sjögren's syndrome expressed the catalytic machinery to produce posttranslational reactions that may result in autoantigen triggering.

  20. Applications of post-translational modifications of FoxO family proteins in biological functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhao; Yachen Wang; Wei-Guo Zhu

    2011-01-01

    The functions of the FoxO family proteins, in particular their transcriptional activities, are modulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs), including phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, methylation and glycosylation. These PTMs occur in response to different cellular stresses, which in turn regulate the subcellular localization of FoxO family proteins, as well as their half-life, DNA binding, transcriptional activity and ability to interact with other cellular proteins. In this review, we summarize the role of PTMs of FoxO family proteins in linking their biological and functional relevance with various diseases.%The functions of the FoxO family proteins,in particular their transcriptional activities,are modulated by post-translational modifications (PTMs),including phosphorylation,acetylation,ubiquitination,methylation and glycosylation.These PTMs occur in response to different cellular stresses,which in turn regulate the subceilular localization of FoxO family proteins,as well as their half-life,DNA binding,transcriptional activity and ability to interact with other cellular proteins.In this review,we summarize the role of PTMs of FoxO family proteins in linking their biological and functional relevance with various diseases.

  1. Monoaminylation of Fibrinogen and Glia-Derived Proteins: Indication for Similar Mechanisms in Posttranslational Protein Modification in Blood and Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummerich, René; Costina, Victor; Findeisen, Peter; Schloss, Patrick

    2015-07-15

    Distinct proteins have been demonstrated to be posttranslationally modified by covalent transamidation of serotonin (5-hydropxytryptamin) to glutamine residues of the target proteins. This process is mediated by transglutaminase (TGase) and has been termed "serotonylation." It has also been shown that other biogenic amines, including the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine, can substitute for serotonin, implying a more general mechanism of "monoaminylation" for this kind of protein modification. Here we transamidated the autofluorescent monoamine monodansylcadaverine (MDC) to purified plasma fibrinogen and to proteins from a primary glia cell culture. Electrophoretic separation of MDC-conjugated proteins followed by mass spectrometry identified three fibrinogen subunits (Aα, Bβ, γ), a homomeric Aα2 dimer, and adducts of >250 kDa molecular weight, as well as several glial proteins. TGase-mediated MDC incorporation was strongly reduced by serotonin, underlining the general mechanism of monoaminylation.

  2. The effect of polymer surface modification on polymer-protein interaction via interfacial polymerization and hydrophilic polymer grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein membrane separation is prone to fouling on the membrane surface resulting from protein adsorption onto the surface. Surface modification of synthetic membranes is one way to reduce fouling. We investigated surface modification of polyethersulfone (PES) as a way of improving hydrophilicity ...

  3. The role of protein modifications in senescence of freeze-dried Acetobacter senegalensis during storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of viability is one of the most important problems during starter culture production. Previous research has mostly focused on the production process of bacterial starters, but there are few studies about cellular protein deterioration causing cell defectiveness during storage. In the present study, we investigated the influence of storage temperature (−21, 4, 35°C) on the cellular protein modifications which may contribute to the senescence of freeze-dried Acetobacter senegalensis. Results Heterogeneous populations composed of culturable cells, viable but non-culturable cells (VBNC) and dead cells were generated when freeze-dried cells were kept at −21 and 4°C for 12 months whereas higher storage temperature (35°C) mainly caused death of the cells. The analysis of stored cell proteome by 2D-DiGE demonstrated a modified pattern of protein profile for cell kept at 4 and 35°C due to the formation of protein spot trains and shift of Isoelectric point (pI). Quantification of carbonylated protein by ELISA showed that the cells stored at 4 and 35°C had higher carbonylated protein contents than fresh cells. 2D-DiGE followed by Western blotting also confirmed the carbonylation of cellular proteins involved in translation process and energy generation. The auto-fluorescent feature of cells kept at 35°C increased significantly which may be an indication of protein glycation during storage. In addition, the percentage of cellular unsaturated fatty acid and the solubility of cellular proteins decreased upon storage of cells at higher temperature suggesting that peroxidation of fatty acids and possibly protein lipidation and oxidation occurred. Conclusions High storage temperature induces some deteriorative reactions such as protein oxidation, lipidation and glycation which may cause further protein modifications like pI-shift, and protein insolubility. These modifications can partly account for the changes in cell viability. It can also be deduced

  4. Site-Selective Disulfide Modification of Proteins: Expanding Diversity beyond the Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Seah Ling; Wang, Tao; Weil, Tanja

    2016-11-21

    The synthetic transformation of polypeptides with molecular accuracy holds great promise for providing functional and structural diversity beyond the proteome. Consequently, the last decade has seen an exponential growth of site-directed chemistry to install additional features into peptides and proteins even inside living cells. The disulfide rebridging strategy has emerged as a powerful tool for site-selective modifications since most proteins contain disulfide bonds. In this Review, we present the chemical design, advantages and limitations of the disulfide rebridging reagents, while summarizing their relevance for synthetic customization of functional protein bioconjugates, as well as the resultant impact and advancement for biomedical applications.

  5. Impact of Enzymatic and Microbial Bioprocessing on Protein Modification and Nutritional Properties of Wheat Bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arte, Elisa; Rizzello, Carlo G; Verni, Michela; Nordlund, Emilia; Katina, Kati; Coda, Rossana

    2015-10-07

    Besides providing dietary fiber, wheat bran is a recognized source of protein and is considered a very valuable substitute for other protein-rich sources in the food and feed industry. Nonetheless, several factors affect protein bioavailability, including bran's layered structure. This study showed the influence on the release and protein modification of wheat bran of different bioprocessing methods involving the activation of endogenous enzymes of bran, the addition of an enzyme mixture having carbohydrase activity, and microbial fermentation. Bioprocessing in acidic conditions significantly enhanced the solubilization of protein from wheat bran, reaching the highest value in the treatment where the sole endogenous protease activity was activated. Bioprocessing through controlled fermentation allowed a more intense proteolysis and strongly impacted the in vitro digestibility of proteins. The combined use of starter cultures and cell-wall-degrading enzymes was characterized by the highest increase of phytase activity and total phenols.

  6. Applications of diagonal chromatography for proteome-wide characterization of protein modifications and activity-based analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Kris; Impens, Francis; Van Damme, Petra; Ghesquière, Bart; Hanoulle, Xavier; Vandekerckhove, Joël

    2007-12-01

    Numerous gel-free proteomics techniques have been reported over the past few years, introducing a move from proteins to peptides as bits of information in qualitative and quantitative proteome studies. Many shotgun proteomics techniques randomly sample thousands of peptides in a qualitative and quantitative manner but overlook the vast majority of protein modifications that are often crucial for proper protein structure and function. Peptide-based proteomic approaches have thus been developed to profile a diverse set of modifications including, but not at all limited, to phosphorylation, glycosylation and ubiquitination. Typical here is that each modification needs a specific, tailor-made analytical procedure. In this minireview, we discuss how one technique - diagonal reverse-phase chromatography - is applied to study two different types of protein modification: protein processing and protein N-glycosylation. Additionally, we discuss an activity-based proteome study in which purine-binding proteins were profiled by diagonal chromatography.

  7. Mining Proteomic Data to Expose Protein Modifications in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah eLeon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteomic tools identify constituents of complex mixtures, often delivering long lists of identified proteins. The high-throughput methods excel at matching tandem mass spectrometry data to spectra predicted from sequence databases. Unassigned mass spectra are ignored, but could, in principle, provide valuable information on unanticipated modifications and improve protein annotations while consuming limited quantities of material. Strategies to mine information from these discards are presented, along with discussion of features that, when present, provide strong support for modifications. In this study we mined LC-MS/MS datasets of proteolytically-digested concanavalin A pull down fractions from Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 cell lysates. Analyses identified 154 proteins. Many of the observed proteins displayed post-translationally modified forms, including O-formylated and methyl-esterified segments that appear biologically relevant (i.e., not artifacts of sample handling. Interesting cleavages and modifications (e.g., S-cyanylation and trimethylation were observed near catalytic sites of methanogenesis enzymes. Of 31 Methanosarcina protein N-termini recovered by concanavalin A binding or from a previous study, only M. mazei S-layer protein MM1976 and its M. acetivorans C2A orthologue, MA0829, underwent signal peptide excision. Experimental results contrast with predictions from algorithms SignalP 3.0 and Exprot, which were found to over-predict the presence of signal peptides. Proteins MM0002, MM0716, MM1364, and MM1976 were found to be glycosylated, and employing chromatography tailored specifically for glycopeptides will likely reveal more.This study supplements limited, existing experimental datasets of mature archaeal N-termini, including presence or absence of signal peptides, translation initiation sites, and other processing. Methanosarcina surface and membrane proteins are richly modified.

  8. Vienna-PTM web server: a toolkit for MD simulations of protein post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margreitter, Christian; Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-07-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in numerous cellular processes by directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of target proteins. Despite their importance, our understanding of protein PTMs at the atomistic level is still largely incomplete. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide high-resolution insight into biomolecular function and underlying mechanisms, are in principle ideally suited to tackle this problem. However, because of the challenges associated with the development of novel MD parameters and a general lack of suitable computational tools for incorporating PTMs in target protein structures, MD simulations of post-translationally modified proteins have historically lagged significantly behind the studies of unmodified proteins. Here, we present Vienna-PTM web server (http://vienna-ptm.univie.ac.at), a platform for automated introduction of PTMs of choice to protein 3D structures (PDB files) in a user-friendly visual environment. With 256 different enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs available, the server performs geometrically realistic introduction of modifications at sites of interests, as well as subsequent energy minimization. Finally, the server makes available force field parameters and input files needed to run MD simulations of modified proteins within the framework of the widely used GROMOS 54A7 and 45A3 force fields and GROMACS simulation package.

  9. Vienna-PTM web server: a toolkit for MD simulations of protein post-translational modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margreitter, Christian; Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in numerous cellular processes by directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of target proteins. Despite their importance, our understanding of protein PTMs at the atomistic level is still largely incomplete. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide high-resolution insight into biomolecular function and underlying mechanisms, are in principle ideally suited to tackle this problem. However, because of the challenges associated with the development of novel MD parameters and a general lack of suitable computational tools for incorporating PTMs in target protein structures, MD simulations of post-translationally modified proteins have historically lagged significantly behind the studies of unmodified proteins. Here, we present Vienna-PTM web server (http://vienna-ptm.univie.ac.at), a platform for automated introduction of PTMs of choice to protein 3D structures (PDB files) in a user-friendly visual environment. With 256 different enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs available, the server performs geometrically realistic introduction of modifications at sites of interests, as well as subsequent energy minimization. Finally, the server makes available force field parameters and input files needed to run MD simulations of modified proteins within the framework of the widely used GROMOS 54A7 and 45A3 force fields and GROMACS simulation package. PMID:23703210

  10. Aptamers as a sensitive tool to detect subtle modifications in therapeutic proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Zichel

    Full Text Available Therapeutic proteins are derived from complex expression/production systems, which can result in minor conformational changes due to preferential codon usage in different organisms, post-translational modifications, etc. Subtle conformational differences are often undetectable by bioanalytical methods but can sometimes profoundly impact the safety, efficacy and stability of products. Numerous bioanalytical methods exist to characterize the primary structure of proteins, post translational modifications; protein-substrate/protein/protein interactions and functional bioassays are available for most proteins that are developed as products. There are however few analytical techniques to detect changes in the tertiary structure of proteins suitable for use during drug development and quality control. For example, x-ray crystallography and NMR are impractical for routine use and do not capture the heterogeneity of the product. Conformation-sensitive antibodies can be used to map proteins. However the development of antibodies to represent sufficient epitopes can be challenging. Other limitations of antibodies include limited supply, high costs, heterogeneity and batch to batch variations in titer. Here we provide proof-of-principle that DNA aptamers to thrombin can be used as surrogate antibodies to characterize conformational changes. We show that aptamers can be used in assays using either an ELISA or a label-free platform to characterize different thrombin products. In addition we replicated a heat-treatment procedure that has previously been shown to not affect protein activity but can result in conformational changes that have serious adverse consequences. We demonstrate that a panel of aptamers (but not an antibody can detect changes in the proteins even when specific activity is unaffected. Our results indicate a novel approach to monitor even small changes in the conformation of proteins which can be used in a routine drug-development and

  11. Emulsifying and Foaming Properties of Soy Protein Isolates with Covalent Modification by (--Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Soy Protein Isolates (SPI with covalent modification by (--Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG were prepared under the alkaline condition. The effects of covalent modification on the emulsifying and foaming properties of SPI were evaluated. The Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE profiles of the modified SPI revealed that EGCG treatment caused cross-linking of subunits. Emulsifying activity of modified SPI significantly increased when compared with that of control (p<0.05 at the concentration of 35 mg/mL. Modification of SPI by EGCG caused a decrease in the foam volume initially. In the range of 15 to 35 mg/mL, the foaming activities of modified SPI were found to be less than those of the control (p<0.05. The foaming stabilities of modified SPI were significantly higher when compared to those of control (p<0.05. The results obtained in this study indicated the modification by EGCG resulted in the enhancement of emulsifying activity and foaming stability of SPI. This modification may serve as a promising approach for improving functional properties of SPI.

  12. Protein glutaminylation is a yeast-specific posttranslational modification of elongation factor 1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Wirth, Christophe; Rospert, Sabine; Hu, Zehan; Dengjel, Jörn; Tzivelekidis, Tina; Andersen, Gregers Rom; Hunte, Carola; Schlosser, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus

    2017-08-11

    Ribosomal translation factors are fundamental for protein synthesis and highly conserved in all kingdoms of life. The essential eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), delivers aminoacyl tRNAs to the A-site of the translating 80S ribosome. Several studies have revealed that eEF1A is posttranslationally modified. Using MS analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and X-ray structural data analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae eEF1A, we identified a posttranslational modification in which the alpha amino group of mono-L-glutamine is covalently linked to the side chain of glutamate 45 in eEF1A. The MS analysis suggested that all eEF1A molecules are modified by this glutaminylation and that this posttranslational modification occurs at all stages of yeast growth. The mutational studies revealed that this glutaminylation is not essential for the normal functions of eEF1A in S. cerevisiae However, eEF1A glutaminylation slightly reduced growth under antibiotic-induced translational stress conditions. Moreover, we identified the same posttranslational modification in eEF1A from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, but not in various other eukaryotic organisms tested despite strict conservation of the Glu-45 residue among these organisms. We therefore conclude that eEF1A glutaminylation is a yeast-specific posttranslational modification, which appears to influence protein translation. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Aging induces cardiac diastolic dysfunction, oxidative stress, accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts and protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Yan; Du, Min; Dolence, E Kurt; Fang, Cindy X; Mayer, Gabriele E; Ceylan-Isik, Asli F; LaCour, Karissa H; Yang, Xiaoping; Wilbert, Christopher J; Sreejayan, Nair; Ren, Jun

    2005-04-01

    Evidence suggests that aging, per se, is a major risk factor for cardiac dysfunction. Oxidative modification of cardiac proteins by non-enzymatic glycation, i.e. advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), has been implicated as a causal factor in the aging process. This study was designed to examine the role of aging on cardiomyocyte contractile function, cardiac protein oxidation and oxidative modification. Mechanical properties were evaluated in ventricular myocytes from young (2-month) and aged (24-26-month) mice using a MyoCam system. The mechanical indices evaluated were peak shortening (PS), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90) and maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (+/- dL/dt). Oxidative stress and protein damage were evaluated by glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio and protein carbonyl content, respectively. Activation of NAD(P)H oxidase was determined by immunoblotting. Aged myocytes displayed a larger cell cross-sectional area, prolonged TR90, and normal PS, +/- dL/dt and TPS compared with young myocytes. Aged myocytes were less tolerant of high stimulus frequency (from 0.1 to 5 Hz) compared with young myocytes. Oxidative stress and protein oxidative damage were both elevated in the aging group associated with significantly enhanced p47phox but not gp91phox expression. In addition, level of cardiac AGEs was approximately 2.5-fold higher in aged hearts than young ones determined by AGEs-ELISA. A group of proteins with a molecular range between 50 and 75 kDa with pI of 4-7 was distinctively modified in aged heart using one- or two-dimension SDS gel electrophoresis analysis. These data demonstrate cardiac diastolic dysfunction and reduced stress tolerance in aged cardiac myocytes, which may be associated with enhanced cardiac oxidative damage, level of AGEs and protein modification by AGEs.

  14. Towards an understanding of regulating Cajal body activity by protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Michael D; Poole, Aaron R

    2016-10-07

    The biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), small Cajal body-specific RNPs (scaRNPs), small nucleolar RNPs (snoRNPs) and the telomerase RNP involves Cajal bodies (CBs). Although many components enriched in the CB contain post-translational modifications (PTMs), little is known about how these modifications impact individual protein function within the CB and, in concert with other modified factors, collectively regulate CB activity. Since all components of the CB also reside in other cellular locations, it is also important that we understand how PTMs affect the subcellular localization of CB components. In this review, we explore the current knowledge of PTMs on the activity of proteins known to enrich in CBs in an effort to highlight current progress as well as illuminate paths for future investigation.

  15. Toward an understanding of regulating Cajal body activity by protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Michael D; Poole, Aaron R

    2016-10-07

    The biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), small Cajal body-specific RNPs (scaRNPs), small nucleolar RNPs (snoRNPs) and the telomerase RNP involves Cajal bodies (CBs). Although many components enriched in the CB contain post-translational modifications (PTMs), little is known about how these modifications impact individual protein function within the CB and, in concert with other modified factors, collectively regulate CB activity. Since all components of the CB also reside in other cellular locations, it is also important that we understand how PTMs affect the subcellular localization of CB components. In this review, we explore the current knowledge of PTMs on the activity of proteins known to enrich in CBs in an effort to highlight current progress as well as illuminate paths for future investigation.

  16. Characterization of How DNA Modifications Affect DNA Binding by C2H2 Zinc Finger Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Zhang, X.; Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about vertebrate DNA methylation and oxidation; however, much less is known about how modified cytosine residues within particular sequences are recognized. Among the known methylated DNA-binding domains, the Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZnF) protein superfamily is the largest with hundreds of members, each containing tandem ZnFs ranging from 3 to >30 fingers. We have begun to biochemically and structurally characterize these ZnFs not only on their sequence specificity but also on their sensitivity to various DNA modifications. Rather than following published methods of refolding insoluble ZnF arrays, we have expressed and purified soluble forms of ZnFs, ranging in size from a tandem array of two to six ZnFs, from seven different proteins. We also describe a fluorescence polarization assay to measure ZnFs affinity with oligonucleotides containing various modifications and our approaches for cocrystallization of ZnFs with oligonucleotides. PMID:27372763

  17. Molecular Modification of a HSV-1 Protein and Its Associated Gene Transcriptional Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-chun CHE; Li JIANG; Qi-han LI

    2008-01-01

    The molecular modifications of Herpes Simplex Virus Type Ⅰ (HSV-1) proteins represented by acetylation and phosphorylation are essential to its biological functions.The cellular chromatin-remodeling/assembly is involved in HSV-1 associated gene transcriptional regulation in human cells harboring HSV-1 lytic or latent infections.Further investigation on these biological events would provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of HSV- 1 viral gene transcriptional regulation.

  18. Dissection of the DNA mimicry of the bacteriophage T7 Ocr protein using chemical modification

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Roberts, Gareth A; Cooper, Laurie P.; Clarke, David J.; Thomson, Andrew R; MacKay, C. Logan; Nutley, Margaret; Cooper, Alan; Dryden, David T.F

    2009-01-01

    The homodimeric Ocr (overcome classical restriction) protein of bacteriophage T7 is a molecular mimic of double-stranded DNA and a highly effective competitive inhibitor of the bacterial type I restriction/modification system. The surface of Ocr is replete with acidic residues that mimic the phosphate backbone of DNA. In addition, Ocr also mimics the overall dimensions of a bent 24-bp DNA molecule. In this study, we attempted to delineate these two mechanisms of DNA mimicry by chemically modi...

  19. Covalent modifications of ribosomal proteins in growing and aggregation-competent dictyostelium discoideum: phosphorylation and methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramagopal, S

    1991-04-01

    Phosphorylated and methylated ribosomal proteins were identified in vegetatively growing amoebae and in the starvation-induced, aggregation-competent cells of Dictyostelium discoideum. Of the 15 developmentally regulated cell-specific ribosomal proteins reported earlier, protein A and the acidic proteins A1, A2, and A3 were identified as phosphoproteins, and S5, S6, S10, and D were identified as methylated proteins. Three other ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated and 19 others methylated. S19, L13, A1, A2, and A3 were the predominant phosphoproteins in growing amoebae, whereas S20 and A were the predominant ones in the aggregation-competent cells. Among the methylated proteins, eight (S6, S10, S13, S30, D, L1, L2, and L31) were modified only during growth phase, six (S5, S7, S8, S24, S31, and L36) were altered only during aggregation-competent phase, and nine (S9, S27, S28, S29, S34, L7, L35, L41, and L42) were modified under both phases. Five proteins (S6, S24, L7, L41, and L42) were heavily methylated and of these, the large subunit proteins were present in both growing amoebae and aggregation-competent cells. These findings demonstrate that covalent modification of specific ribosomal proteins is regulated during cell differentiation in D. discoideum.

  20. Quantitative proteomic characterization of redox-dependent post-translational modifications on protein cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Jicheng; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Protein cysteine thiols play a crucial role in redox signaling, regulation of enzymatic activity and protein function, and maintaining redox homeostasis in living systems. The unique chemical reactivity of thiol groups makes cysteine susceptible to oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to form a broad array of reversible and irreversible protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). The reversible modifications in particular are one of the major components of redox signaling and are involved in regulation of various cellular processes under physiological and pathological conditions. The biological significance of these redox PTMs in health and diseases has been increasingly recognized. Herein, we review the recent advances of quantitative proteomic approaches for investigating redox PTMs in complex biological systems, including the general considerations of sample processing, various chemical or affinity enrichment strategies, and quantitative approaches. We also highlight a number of redox proteomic approaches that enable effective profiling of redox PTMs for addressing specific biological questions. Although some technological limitations remain, redox proteomics is paving the way towards a better understanding of redox signaling and regulation in human health and diseases.

  1. Influence of surface modification and static pressure on microdialysis protein extraction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jiangtao; Undin, Torgny; Lind, Sara Bergström; Hjort, Klas; Dahlin, Andreas P

    2015-10-01

    There is growing interest in using microdialysis (MD) for monitoring larger and more complex molecules such as neuropeptides and proteins. This promotes the use of MD membranes with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of 100 kDa or above. The hydrodynamic property of the membrane goes to ultrafiltration or beyond, making the MD catheters more sensitive to pressure. In the meantime, despite the large pore size, studies have shown that membrane biofouling still lead to unstable catheter performance. The objective is to study in vitro how 500 kDa dextran and Poloxamer 407 surface modification affect the fluid recovery (FR) and extraction efficiency (EE) of 100 kDa MWCO MD catheters. A pressure chamber was designed to facilitate the tests, using as MD sample a protein standard with similar concentrations as in human cerebral spinal fluid, comparing native and Poloxamer 407 modified MD catheters. The collected dialysate fractions were examined for FR and protein EE, employing Dot-it Spot-it Protein Assay for total protein EE and targeted mass spectrometry (MS) for EE of individual proteins and peptides. The FR results suggested that the surface modified catheters were less sensitive to the pressure and provide higher precision, and provided a FR closer to 100%. The surface modification did not show a significant effect on the protein EE. The average total protein EE of surface modified catheters was slightly higher than that of the native ones. The MS EE data of individual proteins showed a clear trend of complex response in EE with pressure.

  2. Modifications in nanoparticle-protein interactions by varying the protein conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Yadav, I.; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2017-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering has been used to study the interaction of silica nanoparticle with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein without and with a protein denaturing agent urea. The measurements have been carried out at pH 7 where both the components (nanoparticle and protein) are similarly charged. We show that the interactions in nanoparticle-protein system can be modified by changing the conformation of protein through the presence of urea. In the absence of urea, the strong electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticle and protein prevents protein adsorption on nanoparticle surface. This non-adsorption, in turn gives rise to depletion attraction between nanoparticles. However, with addition of urea the depletion attraction is completely suppressed. Urea driven denaturation of protein is utilized to expose the positively charged patched of the BSA molecules which eventually leads to adsorption of BSA on nanoparticles eliminating the depletion interaction.

  3. Postranslational modifications significantly alter the binding-folding pathways of proteins associating with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoian, Garegin

    2012-02-01

    Many important regulators of gene activity are natively disordered, but fully or partially order when they bind to their targets on DNA. Interestingly, the ensembles of disordered states for such free proteins are not structurally featureless, but can qualitatively differ from protein to protein. In particular, in random coil like states the chains are swollen, making relatively few contacts, while in molten globule like states a significant collapse occurs, with ensuing high density of intra-protein interactions. Furthermore, since many DNA binding proteins are positively charged polyelectrolytes, the electrostatic self-repulsion also influences the degree of collapse of the chain and its conformational preferences in the free state and upon binding to DNA. In our work, we have found that the nature of the natively disordered ensemble significantly affects the way the protein folds upon binding to DNA. In particular, we showed that posttranslational modifications of amino acid residues, such as lysine acetylation, can alter the degree of collapse and conformational preferences for a free protein, and also profoundly impact the binding affinity and pathways for the protein DNA association. These trends will be discussed in the context of DNA interacting with various histone tails and the p53 protein.

  4. Comparison of two different plasma surface-modification techniques for the covalent immobilization of protein monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Anna; Borrós, Salvador

    2013-06-04

    The immobilization of biologically active species is crucial for the fabrication of smart bioactive surfaces. For this purpose, plasma polymerization is frequently used to modify the surface nature without affecting the bulk properties of the material. Thus, it is possible to create materials with surface functional groups that can promote the anchoring of all kinds of biomolecules. Different methodologies in protein immobilization have been developed in recent years, although some drawbacks are still not solved, such as the difficulties that some procedures involve and/or the denaturalization of the protein due to the immobilization process. In this work, two different strategies to covalently attach bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein are developed. Both techniques are compared in order to understand how the nature of the surface modification affects the conformation of the protein upon immobilization.

  5. Barley lipid transfer protein, LTP1, contains a new type of lipid-like post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Lerche, Mathilde H.; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2001-01-01

    the formation of cutin and involvement in stress and pathogen responses, but there is yet no direct demonstration of an in vivo function. We have found and characterized a novel post-translational modification of the barley nonspecific lipid transfer protein, LTP1. The protein-modification bond is of a new type...... in which an aspartic acid in LTP1 is bound to the modification through what most likely is an ester bond. The chemical structure of the modification has been characterized by means of two-dimensional homo- and heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as mass spectrometry and is found...... to be lipid-like in nature. The modification does not resemble any standard lipid post-translational modification but is similar to a compound with known antimicrobial activity....

  6. Modification of cysteine residues by cyclopentenone prostaglandins: interplay with redox regulation of protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, Clara L; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in the resolution of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation and cellular redox status. Upon exogenous administration they have shown beneficial effects in models of inflammation and tissue injury, as well as potential antitumoral actions, which have raised a considerable interest in their study for the development of therapeutic tools. Due to their electrophilic nature, the best-known mechanism of action of these mediators is the covalent modification of proteins at cysteine residues through Michael addition. Identification of cyPG targets through proteomic approaches, including MS/MS analysis to pinpoint the modified residues, is proving critical to characterize their mechanisms of action. Among the targets of cyPG are proinflammatory transcription factors, proteins involved in cell defense, such as the regulator of the antioxidant response Keap1 and detoxifying enzymes like GST, and key signaling proteins like Ras proteins. Moreover, cyPG may interact with redox-active small molecules, such as glutathione and hydrogen sulfide. Much has been learned about cyPG in the past few years and this knowledge has also contributed to clarify both pharmacological actions and signaling mechanisms of these and other electrophilic lipids. Given the fact that many cyPG targets are involved in or are targets for redox regulation, there is a complex interplay with redox-induced modifications. Here we address the modification of protein cysteine residues by cyPG elucidated by proteomic studies, paying special attention to the interplay with redox signaling.

  7. Modification of an apparatus for tumor-suppressor protein crystal growth in the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    Some human diseases as tumors are being studied continuously for the development of vaccines against them. And a way of doing that is by means of proteins research. There are some kinds of proteins, like the p53 and p73 proteins, which are tumor suppressors. There are other diseases such as A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases which are protein-related. The determination of how proteins geometrically order themselves, during its biological functions is very necessary to understand how a protein's structure affects its function, to design vaccines that intercede in tumor-protein activities and in other proteins related to those other diseases. The protein crystal growth in microgravity environment produces purer crystallization than on the ground, and it is a powerful tool to produce better vaccines. Several data have already been acquired using ground-based research and in spaceflight experiments aboard the Spacelab and Space Shuttle missions, and in the MIR and in the International Space Station (ISS). Here in this paper, I propose to be performed in the ISS Biological Research Facility (which is being developed), multiple crystal growth of proteins related to cancer (as tumors suppressors and oncoproteins), A.I.D.S., hansenosis, the Parkinson's and Chagas' diseases, for the future obtaining of possible vaccines against them. I also propose a simple and practical equipment, a modification of the crystallization plates (which use a vapor diffusion technique) inside each cylinder of the Protein Crystallization Apparatus in Microgravity (PCAM), with multiple chambers with different sizes. Instead of using some chambers with the same size it is better to use several chambers with different sizes. Why is that? The answer is: the energy associated with the surface tension of the liquid in the chamber is directly related to the circle area of it. So, to minimize the total energy of the surface tension of a proteins liquid -making it more stable

  8. Dissection of the DNA Mimicry of the Bacteriophage T7 Ocr Protein using Chemical Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanou, Augoustinos S.; Roberts, Gareth A.; Cooper, Laurie P.; Clarke, David J.; Thomson, Andrew R.; MacKay, C. Logan; Nutley, Margaret; Cooper, Alan; Dryden, David T.F.

    2009-01-01

    The homodimeric Ocr (overcome classical restriction) protein of bacteriophage T7 is a molecular mimic of double-stranded DNA and a highly effective competitive inhibitor of the bacterial type I restriction/modification system. The surface of Ocr is replete with acidic residues that mimic the phosphate backbone of DNA. In addition, Ocr also mimics the overall dimensions of a bent 24-bp DNA molecule. In this study, we attempted to delineate these two mechanisms of DNA mimicry by chemically modifying the negative charges on the Ocr surface. Our analysis reveals that removal of about 46% of the carboxylate groups per Ocr monomer results in an ∼ 50-fold reduction in binding affinity for a methyltransferase from a model type I restriction/modification system. The reduced affinity between Ocr with this degree of modification and the methyltransferase is comparable with the affinity of DNA for the methyltransferase. Additional modification to remove ∼ 86% of the carboxylate groups further reduces its binding affinity, although the modified Ocr still binds to the methyltransferase via a mechanism attributable to the shape mimicry of a bent DNA molecule. Our results show that the electrostatic mimicry of Ocr increases the binding affinity for its target enzyme by up to ∼ 800-fold. PMID:19523474

  9. Global histone modification fingerprinting in human cells using epigenetic reverse phase protein array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partolina, Marina; Thoms, Hazel C; MacLeod, Kenneth G; Rodriguez-Blanco, Giovanny; Clarke, Matthew N; Venkatasubramani, Anuroop V; Beesoo, Rima; Larionov, Vladimir; Neergheen-Bhujun, Vidushi S; Serrels, Bryan; Kimura, Hiroshi; Carragher, Neil O; Kagansky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The balance between acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of genomic functions. Aberrations in global levels of histone modifications are linked to carcinogenesis and are currently the focus of intense scrutiny and translational research investments to develop new therapies, which can modify complex disease pathophysiology through epigenetic control. However, despite significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic machinery in various genomic contexts and cell types, the links between epigenetic modifications and cellular phenotypes are far from being clear. For example, enzymes controlling histone modifications utilize key cellular metabolites associated with intra- and extracellular feedback loops, adding a further layer of complexity to this process. Meanwhile, it has become increasingly evident that new assay technologies which provide robust and precise measurement of global histone modifications are required, for at least two pressing reasons: firstly, many approved drugs are known to influence histone modifications and new cancer therapies are increasingly being developed towards targeting histone deacetylases (HDACs) and other epigenetic readers and writers. Therefore, robust assays for fingerprinting the global effects of such drugs on preclinical cell, organoid and in vivo models is required; and secondly, robust histone-fingerprinting assays applicable to patient samples may afford the development of next-generation diagnostic and prognostic tools. In our study, we have used a panel of monoclonal antibodies to determine the relative changes in the global abundance of post-translational modifications on histones purified from cancer cell lines treated with HDAC inhibitors using a novel technique, called epigenetic reverse phase protein array. We observed a robust increase in acetylation levels within 2–24 h after inhibition of HDACs in different cancer cell lines

  10. Quantification of protein posttranslational modifications using stable isotope and mass spectrometry. II. Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Quanzhou; Wypych, Jette; Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Zhang, Xin; Luo, Shun; Jerums, Matthew; Lewis, Jeffrey; Iii, Ronald Keener; Huang, Gang; Apostol, Izydor

    2012-02-15

    In this report, we examine the performance of a mass spectrometry (MS)-based method for quantification of protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs) using stable isotope labeled internal standards. Uniform labeling of proteins and highly similar behavior of the labeled vs nonlabeled analyte pairs during chromatographic separation and electrospray ionization (ESI) provide the means to directly quantify a wide range of PTMs. In the companion report (Jiang et al., Anal. Biochem., 421 (2012) 506-516.), we provided principles and example applications of the method. Here we show satisfactory accuracy and precision for quantifying protein modifications by using the SILIS method when the analyses were performed on different types of mass spectrometers, such as ion-trap, time-of-flight (TOF), and quadrupole instruments. Additionally, the stable isotope labeled internal standard (SILIS) method demonstrated an extended linear range of quantification expressed in accurate quantification up to at least a 4 log concentration range on three different types of mass spectrometers. We also demonstrate that lengthy chromatographic separation is no longer required to obtain quality results, offering an opportunity to significantly shorten the method run time. The results indicate the potential of this methodology for rapid and large-scale assessment of multiple quality attributes of a therapeutic protein in a single analysis.

  11. Profiling of Protein N-Termini and Their Modifications in Complex Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Fatih; Niedermaier, Stefan; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Huesgen, Pitter F

    2017-01-01

    Protein N termini are a unique window to the functional state of the proteome, revealing translation initiation sites, co-translation truncation and modification, posttranslational maturation, and further proteolytic processing into different proteoforms with distinct functions. As a direct readout of proteolytic activity, protein N termini further reveal proteolytic regulation of diverse biological processes and provide a route to determine specific substrates and hence the physiological functions for any protease of interest. Here, we describe our current protocol of the successful Terminal Amine Isotope Labeling of Substrates (TAILS) technique, which enriches protein N-terminal peptides from complex proteome samples by negative selection. Genome-encoded N termini, protease-generated neo-N termini, and endogenously modified N termini are all enriched simultaneously. Subsequent mass spectrometric analysis therefore profiles all protein N termini and their modifications present in a complex sample in a single experiment. We further provide a detailed protocol for the TAILS-compatible proteome preparation from plant material and discuss specific considerations for N terminome data analysis and annotation.

  12. Myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation promotes the oxidative modification of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Magon, Nicholas J; Harwood, D Tim; Kettle, Anthony J; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-04-10

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation.

  13. Cross-linking proteins by laccase-catalyzed oxidation: importance relative to other modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Charlotte L; Andersen, Mogens L; Degn, Peter E; Nielsen, Jacob H

    2008-12-24

    Laccase-catalyzed oxidation was able to induce intermolecular cross-links in beta-lactoglobulin, and ferulic acid-mediated laccase-catalyzed oxidation was able to induce intermolecular cross-links in alpha-casein, whereas transglutaminase cross-linked only alpha-casein. In addition, different patterns of laccase-induced oxidative modifications were detected, including dityrosine formation, formation of fluorescent tryptophan oxidation products, and carbonyls derived from histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Laccase-catalyzed oxidation as well as transglutaminase induced only minor changes in surface tension of the proteins, and the changes could not be correlated to protein cross-linking. The presence of ferulic acid was found to influence the effect of laccase, allowing laccase to form irreducible intermolecular cross-links in beta-lactoglobulin and resulting in proteins exercising higher surface tensions due to cross-linking as well as other oxidative modifications. The outcome of using ferulic acid-mediated laccase-catalyzed oxidation to modify the functional properties of proteinaceous food components or other biosystems is expected to be highly dependent on the protein composition, resulting in different changes of the functional properties.

  14. Posttranslational modification of bioaerosol protein by common gas pollutants: NO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi Mahmood, Marliyyah; Bloss, William; Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution can exacerbate several medical conditions, for example, hay fever and asthma. The global incidence of hay fever has been rising for decades; however, the underlying reasons behind this rise remain unclear. It is hypothesized that the exposure of pollen to common gas phase pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), increases the allergenicity of the pollen and thus increases hay fever incidence (Reinmuth-Selzle et al., 2014, Franze, et al., 2005). Since atmospheric pollutants often have greater concentrations within urban areas (in particular NO2) the hypothesis suggests that greater allergenicity should occur in urban areas. Certainly, several studies do suggest higher hay fever incidence within urban areas compared to rural areas (Schröder et al., 2015). Previous published work suggests a link between increased allergies and changes in the chemical composition of pollen protein via posttranslational modification of the protein (Reinmuth-Selzle et al., 2014). This study investigates the posttranslational modification of two highly allergenic pollen species (Birch and Ragweed) that are common in Europe. Within the laboratory, we expose pollen grains to atmospherically relevant exposures of gas phase NO2, O3 and other common gas phase oxidants under a range of environmentally relevant conditions. The effects of the exposures on the biochemistry of the pollen grains were probed using a proteomic approach (liquid chromatography coupled ultra-high resolution spectrometer). Our findings indicate the interaction between gas phase pollutants and pollen cause protein specific modifications; in particular nitration that occurs upon tyrosine residues and nitrosylation on cysteine residues. These modifications may affect human immune response to the pollen protein, which may suggest a possible reason for increased allergies in reaction to such chemically altered protein. Quantification of the relative degree of PTMs, from a variety of

  15. Covalent protein modification with ISG15 via a conserved cysteine in the hinge region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika N Bade

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 (interferon-stimulated gene of 15 kDa is strongly induced by type I interferons and displays antiviral activity. As other ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls, ISG15 is post-translationally conjugated to substrate proteins by an isopeptide bond between the C-terminal glycine of ISG15 and the side chains of lysine residues in the substrates (ISGylation. ISG15 consists of two ubiquitin-like domains that are separated by a hinge region. In many orthologs, this region contains a single highly reactive cysteine residue. Several hundred potential substrates for ISGylation have been identified but only a few of them have been rigorously verified. In order to investigate the modification of several ISG15 substrates, we have purified ISG15 conjugates from cell extracts by metal-chelate affinity purification and immunoprecipitations. We found that the levels of proteins modified by human ISG15 can be decreased by the addition of reducing agents. With the help of thiol blocking reagents, a mutational analysis and miRNA mediated knock-down of ISG15 expression, we revealed that this modification occurs in living cells via a disulphide bridge between the substrates and Cys78 in the hinge region of ISG15. While the ISG15 activating enzyme UBE1L is conjugated by ISG15 in the classical way, we show that the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme Ubc13 can either be classically conjugated by ISG15 or can form a disulphide bridge with ISG15 at the active site cysteine 87. The latter modification would interfere with its function as ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. However, we found no evidence for an ISG15 modification of the dynamin-like GTPases MxA and hGBP1. These findings indicate that the analysis of potential substrates for ISG15 conjugation must be performed with great care to distinguish between the two types of modification since many assays such as immunoprecipitation or metal-chelate affinity purification are performed with little or no

  16. Covalent protein modification with ISG15 via a conserved cysteine in the hinge region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Veronika N; Nickels, Jochen; Keusekotten, Kirstin; Praefcke, Gerrit J K

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 (interferon-stimulated gene of 15 kDa) is strongly induced by type I interferons and displays antiviral activity. As other ubiquitin-like proteins (Ubls), ISG15 is post-translationally conjugated to substrate proteins by an isopeptide bond between the C-terminal glycine of ISG15 and the side chains of lysine residues in the substrates (ISGylation). ISG15 consists of two ubiquitin-like domains that are separated by a hinge region. In many orthologs, this region contains a single highly reactive cysteine residue. Several hundred potential substrates for ISGylation have been identified but only a few of them have been rigorously verified. In order to investigate the modification of several ISG15 substrates, we have purified ISG15 conjugates from cell extracts by metal-chelate affinity purification and immunoprecipitations. We found that the levels of proteins modified by human ISG15 can be decreased by the addition of reducing agents. With the help of thiol blocking reagents, a mutational analysis and miRNA mediated knock-down of ISG15 expression, we revealed that this modification occurs in living cells via a disulphide bridge between the substrates and Cys78 in the hinge region of ISG15. While the ISG15 activating enzyme UBE1L is conjugated by ISG15 in the classical way, we show that the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme Ubc13 can either be classically conjugated by ISG15 or can form a disulphide bridge with ISG15 at the active site cysteine 87. The latter modification would interfere with its function as ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. However, we found no evidence for an ISG15 modification of the dynamin-like GTPases MxA and hGBP1. These findings indicate that the analysis of potential substrates for ISG15 conjugation must be performed with great care to distinguish between the two types of modification since many assays such as immunoprecipitation or metal-chelate affinity purification are performed with little or no reducing agent

  17. A Halotyrosine Antibody that Detects Increased Protein Modifications in Asthma Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Daly, Don S.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Nair, Parameswaran; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2014-01-31

    Background-Airway inflammation plays an important pathophysiological role in asthma. Eosinophils produce hypobromite and bromotyrosine while neutrophils produce hypochlorite and chlorotyrosine. Objective-To evaluate halotyrosine modifications of individual airway proteins as a marker of inflammation in asthma using an antibody-based assay. Methods-We developed a novel monoclonal antibody (BTK-94C) that binds halogenated tyrosine residues, and used this antibody in a custom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to examine halotyrosine levels in 23 proteins in three independent sets of sputum samples (52 samples total). Results-In 15 subjects with either no asthma, or with asthma characterized by high or low sputum eosinophil counts, we found associations between increased halotyrosine levels of at least three proteins and severity of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Treatment with mepolizumab in 17 patients with sputum eosinophilia markedly reduced the sputum eosinophilia and significantly reduced halotyrosine levels in one sputum protein. Further analysis of 10 subjects with neutrophilic asthma and 10 health controls demonstrated a broad increase in halotyrosine in the patients with airway neutrophilia. Conclusions-Significantly higher levels of halotyrosine are associated with asthma in the asthma phenotypes we examined. The halotyrosine levels correlated with indirect AHR in the form of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical Implication-An antibody-based assay for tyrosine halogenation in specific proteins may prove useful for assessing airway inflammation in asthma. Capsule Summary-An antibody to measure protein monobrominated tyrosine and other halotyrosine modifications was developed and used to evaluate halogenation in specific proteins in the airways for the first time. Associations were found between levels of halotyrosine and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil inflammation in sputum from

  18. Systems analysis of protein modification and cellular responses induced by electrophile stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Aaron T; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2010-05-18

    Biological electrophiles result from oxidative metabolism of exogenous compounds or endogenous cellular constituents, and they contribute to pathophysiologies such as toxicity and carcinogenicity. The chemical toxicology of electrophiles is dominated by covalent addition to intracellular nucleophiles. Reaction with DNA leads to the production of adducts that block replication or induce mutations. The chemistry and biology of electrophile-DNA reactions have been extensively studied, providing in many cases a detailed understanding of the relation between adduct structure and mutational consequences. By contrast, the linkage between protein modification and cellular response is poorly understood. In this Account, we describe our efforts to define the chemistry of protein modification and its biological consequences using lipid-derived alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes as model electrophiles. In our global approach, two large data sets are analyzed: one represents the identity of proteins modified over a wide range of electrophile concentrations, and the second comprises changes in gene expression observed under similar conditions. Informatics tools show theoretical connections based primarily on transcription factors hypothetically shared between the two data sets, downstream of adducted proteins and upstream of affected genes. This method highlights potential electrophile-sensitive signaling pathways and transcriptional processes for further evaluation. Peroxidation of cellular phospholipids generates a complex mixture of both membrane-bound and diffusible electrophiles. The latter include reactive species such as malondialdehyde, 4-oxononenal, and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). Enriching HNE-adducted proteins for proteomic analysis was a technical challenge, solved with click chemistry that generated biotin-tagged protein adducts. For this purpose, HNE analogues bearing terminal azide or alkyne functionalities were synthesized. Cellular lysates were first exposed to a

  19. Modifications to the translational apparatus which affect the regulation of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalise, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Protein synthesis can be regulated at a number of cellular levels. I have examined how modifications to specific components of the protein synthetic machinery are involved in regulating the efficiency of initiation of translation during early sea urchin embryogenesis. It is demonstrated that Ca{sup 2+} concentrations exceeding 500 uM cause the inhibition of protein synthesis in cell-free translation lysates prepared from sea urchin embryos. Specific changes in the state of phosphorylation of at least 8 proteins occur during this Ca{sup 2+}-mediated repression of translation. Analysis of these proteins has indicated that, unlike mammalian systems, there is no detectable level of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphorylation of the {alpha}subunit eIF-2. Two of the proteins which do become phosphorylated in response to Ca{sup 2+} are calmodulin and an isoelectric form of sea urchin eIF-4D. In addition, 2 proteins which share similarities with kinases involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in mammalian cells, also become phosphorylated. I have investigated the consequences of changes in eIF-4D during sea urchin embryogenesis because it has been proposed that a polyamine-mediated conversion of lysine to hypusine in this factor may enhance translational activity. It is demonstrated that ({sup 3}H) spermidine-derived radioactivity is incorporated into a number of proteins when sea urchin embryos are labeled in vivo, and that the pattern of individual proteins that become labeled changes over the course of the first 30 hr of development.

  20. Orthogonal dual-modification of proteins for the engineering of multivalent protein scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Mühlberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To add new tools to the repertoire of protein-based multivalent scaffold design, we have developed a novel dual-labeling strategy for proteins that combines residue-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids with chemical oxidative aldehyde formation at the N-terminus of a protein. Our approach relies on the selective introduction of two different functional moieties in a protein by mutually orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and oxime ligation. This method was applied to the conjugation of biotin and β-linked galactose residues to yield an enzymatically active thermophilic lipase, which revealed specific binding to Erythrina cristagalli lectin by SPR binding studies.

  1. Characterization of in vivo phosphorylation modification of differentially accumulated proteins in cotton fiber-initiation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenying; Zhang, Bing; He, Wenying; Wang, Zi; Li, Guanqiao; Liu, Jinyuan

    2016-08-01

    Initiation of cotton fiber from ovule epidermal cells determines the ultimate number of fibers per cotton ovule, making it one of the restriction factors of cotton fiber yield. Previous comparative proteomics studies have collectively revealed 162 important differentially accumulated proteins (DAPs) in cotton fiber-initiation process, however, whether and how post-translational modifications, especially phosphorylation modification, regulate the expression and function of the DAPs are still unclear. Here we reported the successful identification of 17 phosphopeptides from 16 phosphoproteins out of the 162 DAPs using the integrated bioinformatics analyses of peptide mass fingerprinting data and targeted MS/MS identification method. In-depth analyses indicated that 15 of the 17 phosphorylation sites were novel phosphorylation sites first identified in plants, whereas 6 of the 16 phosphoproteins were found to be the phosphorylated isoforms of 6 proteins. The phosphorylation-regulated dynamic protein network derived from this study not only expanded our understanding of the cotton fiber-initiation process, but also provided a valuable resource for future functional studies of the phosphoproteins. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Double sequential modifications of composite cryogel beds for enhanced ion-exchange capacity of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Sun, Yan

    2013-09-13

    Composite cryogel monoliths based on poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (pHEMA) were fabricated by incorporating polymeric resin particles. The monoliths were sequentially modified by polyethylenimine (PEI) and diethylaminoethyl (DEAE). The novel composite material had rough pore walls and extended anion-exchange tentacles, which provided more binding sites for protein molecules. The dynamic adsorption capacity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the novel cryogel bed reached 11.2mg/mL bed volume at a flow velocity of 8cm/min, which was about 1.5-4.6 times higher than the cryogel beds obtained by single modifications. The capacity value was also much higher than the BSA capacities of cryogel beds reported in literature (1-6mg/mL). The capacity decreased only slightly with increasing flow rate from 0.6 to 12cm/min. The height equivalent to a theoretical plate of the composite beds was in the range 2-2.5mm, changed indistinctively in a flow rate range 0.6-18cm/min. Hence, the work has proved that the double-modification strategy was promising for enhancing protein adsorption capacity of cryogel monolith for high-speed protein chromatography.

  3. Posttranslational Protein Modification in the Salivary Glands of Sjögren’s Syndrome Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herrera-Esparza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated posttranslational reactions in the salivary glands of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome. We analysed the biopsies of primary Sjögren’s patients using immunohistochemistry and a tag-purified anticyclic citrullinated protein (CCP antibody to detect citrullinated peptides, and the presence of peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2 was assessed simultaneously. The present work demonstrated the weak presence of the PAD2 enzyme in some normal salivary glands, although PAD2 expression was increased considerably in Sjögren’s patients. The presence of citrullinated proteins was also detected in the salivary tissues of Sjögren’s patients, which strongly supports the in situ posttranslational modification of proteins in this setting. Furthermore, the mutual expression of CCP and PAD2 suggests that this posttranslational modification is enzyme dependent. In conclusion, patients with Sjögren’s syndrome expressed the catalytic machinery to produce posttranslational reactions that may result in autoantigen triggering.

  4. Modification of the protein corona-nanoparticle complex by physiological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Nicholas J; DeBrosse, Madeleine C; Hussain, Saber M; Comfort, Kristen K

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona-NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications.

  5. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  6. Posttranslational modifications of Rab proteins cause effective displacement of GDP dissociation inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterlin, Lena K; Goody, Roger S; Itzen, Aymelt

    2012-04-10

    Intracellular vesicular trafficking is regulated by approximately 60 members of the Rab subfamily of small Ras-like GDP/GTP binding proteins. Rab proteins cycle between inactive and active states as well as between cytosolic and membrane bound forms. Membrane extraction/delivery and cytosolic distribution of Rabs is mediated by interaction with the protein GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) that binds to prenylated inactive (GDP-bound) Rab proteins. Because the Rab:GDP:GDI complex is of high affinity, the question arises of how GDI can be displaced efficiently from Rab protein in order to allow the necessary recruitment of the Rab to its specific target membrane. While there is strong evidence that DrrA, as a bacterially encoded GDP/GTP exchange factor, contributes to this event, we show here that posttranslational modifications of Rabs can also modulate the affinity for GDI and thus cause effective displacement of GDI from Rab:GDI complexes. These activities have been found associated with the phosphocholination and adenylylation activities of the enzymes AnkX and DrrA/SidM, respectively, from the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Both modifications occur after spontaneous dissociation of Rab:GDI complexes within their natural equilibrium. Therefore, the effective GDI displacement that is observed is caused by inhibition of reformation of Rab:GDI complexes. Interestingly, in contrast to adenylylation by DrrA, AnkX can covalently modify inactive Rabs with high catalytic efficiency even when GDP is bound to the GTPase and hence can inhibit binding of GDI to Rab:GDP complexes. We therefore speculate that human cells could employ similar mechanisms in the absence of infection to effectively displace Rabs from GDI.

  7. Modification of Turnip yellow mosaic virus coat protein and its effect on virion assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Il Shin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV is a positive strand RNAvirus. We have modified TYMV coat protein (CP by inserting ac-Myc epitope peptide at the N- or C-terminus of the CP, andhave examined its effect on assembly. We introduced therecombinant CP constructs into Nicotiana benthamiana leavesby agroinfiltration. Examination of the leaf extracts by agarosegel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis showed that theCP modified at the N-terminus produced a band co-migratingwith wild-type virions. With C-terminal modification, however,the detected bands moved faster than the wild-type virions. Tofurther examine the effect, TYMV constructs producing themodified CPs were prepared. With N-terminal modification,viral RNAs were protected from RNase A. In contrast, the viralRNAs were not protected with C-terminal modification.Overall, the results suggest that virion assembly and RNApackaging occur properly when the N-terminus of CP ismodified, but not when the C-terminus is modified. [BMBReports 2013; 46(10: 495-500

  8. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Lysine Posttranslational Modifications of Tau Protein from Alzheimer's Disease Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stefani N; Yang, Austin J

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics have greatly facilitated the robust identification and quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs), including those that are present at substoichiometric site occupancies. The abnormal posttranslational modification and accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it is thought that the primary mode of regulation of tau occurs through PTMs. Several studies have been published regarding tau phosphorylation; however, other tau PTMs such as ubiquitylation, acetylation, methylation, oxidation, sumoylation, nitration, and glycosylation have not been analyzed as extensively. The comprehensive detection and delineation of these PTMs is critical for drug target discovery and validation. Lysine-directed PTMs including ubiquitylation, acetylation, and methylation play key regulatory roles with respect to the rates of tau turnover and aggregation. MS-based analytical approaches have been used to gain insight into the tau lysine-directed PTM signature that is most closely associated with neurofibrillary lesion formation. This chapter provides details pertaining to the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based analysis of the lysine-directed posttranslational modification of tau.

  9. Induced gelation in a two-site spatial coagulation model

    OpenAIRE

    Siegmund-Schultze, Rainer; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    A two-site spatial coagulation model is considered. Particles of masses $m$ and $n$ at the same site form a new particle of mass $m+n$ at rate $mn$. Independently, particles jump to the other site at a constant rate. The limit (for increasing particle numbers) of this model is expected to be nondeterministic after the gelation time, namely, one or two giant particles randomly jump between the two sites. Moreover, a new effect of induced gelation is observed--the gelation happening at the site...

  10. Protein adsorption to graphene surfaces controlled by chemical modification of the substrate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Kenji; Ogino, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated effects of the support substrate surfaces on properties of the attached graphene flakes by observing protein adsorption to the graphene surfaces on SiO2/Si substrates that are modified with self-assembled monolayers to control their hydrophilicity. Using atomic force microscopy operated in aqueous environment, we found that high-density clusters of agglomerated avidin molecules form on the graphene flakes in the areas supported by a hydrophobic substrate surface, whereas very low density of large avidin clusters form at the edge of graphene flakes in the area supported by a hydrophilic surface. These results demonstrate that hydrophilicity of the support surface affects hydrophilicity of the graphene surface also in aqueous environment and that surface modification of the support substrate is a useful technique to control protein adsorption phenomena on graphene surfaces for realization of high sensitive graphene biosensors.

  11. Modification of the protein corona–nanoparticle complex by physiological factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Nicholas J.; DeBrosse, Madeleine C.; Hussain, Saber M. [Molecular Bioeffects Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, 711 Human Performance Wing, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, 2729 R. St, Bldg 837, Dayton, OH, 45433 (United States); Comfort, Kristen K., E-mail: kcomfort1@udayton.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Dayton, 524 Kettering Laboratories, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) effects in a biological system are driven through the formation and structure of the protein corona–NP complex, which is dynamic by nature and dependent upon factors from both the local environment and NP physicochemical parameters. To date, considerable data has been gathered regarding the structure and behavior of the protein corona in blood, plasma, and traditional cell culture medium. However, there exists a knowledge gap pertaining to the protein corona in additional biological fluids and following incubation in a dynamic environment. Using 13 nm gold NPs (AuNPs), functionalized with either polyethylene glycol or tannic acid, we demonstrated that both particle characteristics and the associated protein corona were altered when exposed to artificial physiological fluids and under dynamic flow. Furthermore, the magnitude of observed behavioral shifts were dependent upon AuNP surface chemistry. Lastly, we revealed that exposure to interstitial fluid produced protein corona modifications, reshaping of the nano-cellular interface, modified AuNP dosimetry, and induction of previously unseen cytotoxicity. This study highlights the need to elucidate both NP and protein corona behavior in biologically representative environments in an effort to increase accurate interpretation of data and transfer of this knowledge to efficacy, behavior, and safety of nano-based applications. - Highlights: • Dynamic flow increased the size of the gold nanoparticle protein corona. • Exposure to biological fluids altered protein corona size and composition. • Interstitial fluid modified the nano-cellular interface and deposition efficiency. • Tannic acid coated nanoparticles induced toxicity in an interstitial environment.

  12. Advances in identification and validation of protein targets of natural products without chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J; Kim, Y; Kwon, H J

    2016-05-04

    Covering: up to February 2016Identification of the target proteins of natural products is pivotal to understanding the mechanisms of action to develop natural products for use as molecular probes and potential therapeutic drugs. Affinity chromatography of immobilized natural products has been conventionally used to identify target proteins, and has yielded good results. However, this method has limitations, in that labeling or tagging for immobilization and affinity purification often result in reduced or altered activity of the natural product. New strategies have recently been developed and applied to identify the target proteins of natural products and synthetic small molecules without chemical modification of the natural product. These direct and indirect methods for target identification of label-free natural products include drug affinity responsive target stability (DARTS), stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX), cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA), thermal proteome profiling (TPP), and bioinformatics-based analysis of connectivity. This review focuses on and reports case studies of the latest advances in target protein identification methods for label-free natural products. The integration of newly developed technologies will provide new insights and highlight the value of natural products for use as biological probes and new drug candidates.

  13. Mussel-inspired modification of dextran for protein-resistant coatings of titanium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Yoon; Kim, Jee Seon; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2013-09-12

    Surface modification of inorganic materials to prevent non-specific protein adsorption is critically important for developing a biocompatible materials' platform for medical implantation, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Here we report mussel-inspired chemical modification of dextran for anti-fouling coatings of metal oxide. Catechols are conjugated to dextran via a carbamate ester linkage, producing catechol-grafted dextran with a grafting density of 7.3 mol.%. Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) is coated with the catechol-grafted dextran, and the anti-fouling effect of dextran coatings is examined by using the adsorption of human serum albumin. The mussel-inspired dextran coatings show excellent resistance to non-specific protein adsorption: the adsorption equilibrium constant (K) is 0.69 Lg(-1) for dextran-coated TiO₂ while that for pristine TiO₂ surface is 3.53 Lg(-1). This study suggests that catechol-grafted dextran is a promising material for effective anti-fouling coatings of implantable inorganic materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Engineering specific chemical modification sites into a collagen-like protein from Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoichevska, Violet; Peng, Yong Y; Vashi, Aditya V; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J; Ramshaw, John A M

    2017-03-01

    Recombinant bacterial collagens provide a new opportunity for safe biomedical materials. They are readily expressed in Escherichia coli in good yield and can be readily purified by simple approaches. However, recombinant proteins are limited in that direct secondary modification during expression is generally not easily achieved. Thus, inclusion of unusual amino acids, cyclic peptides, sugars, lipids, and other complex functions generally needs to be achieved chemically after synthesis and extraction. In the present study, we have illustrated that bacterial collagens that have had their sequences modified to include cysteine residue(s), which are not normally present in bacterial collagen-like sequences, enable a range of specific chemical modification reactions to be produced. Various model reactions were shown to be effective for modifying the collagens. The ability to include alkyne (or azide) functions allows the extensive range of substitutions that are available via "click" chemistry to be accessed. When bifunctional reagents were used, some crosslinking occurred to give higher molecular weight polymeric proteins, but gels were not formed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 806-813, 2017.

  15. Characterization of a novel posttranslational modification in polypyrimidine tract-binding proteins by SUMO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Wang, Lin; Yin, Bin; Peng, Xiaozhong

    2014-04-01

    Polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTBP1) and its brainspecific homologue, PTBP2, are associated with pre-mRNAs and influence pre-mRNA processing, as well as mRNA metabolism and transport. They play important roles in neural differentiation and glioma development. In our study, we detected the expression of the two proteins in glioma cells and predicted that they may be sumoylated using SUMOplot analyses. We confirmed that PTBP1 and PTBP2 can be modified by SUMO1 with co-immunoprecipitation experiments using 293ET cells transiently co-expressing SUMO1 and either PTBP1 or PTBP2. We also found that SUMO1 modification of PTBP2 was enhanced by Ubc9 (E2). The mutation of the sumoylation site (Lys137) of PTBP2 markedly inhibited its modification by SUMO1. Interestingly, in T98G glioma cells, the level of sumoylated PTBP2 was reduced compared to that of normal brain cells. Overall, this study shows that PTBP2 is posttranslationally modified by SUMO1.

  16. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  17. Glycoproteomic analysis of seven major allergenic proteins reveals novel post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM(1) characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines.

  18. Development and validation of a method for profiling post-translational modification activities using protein microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia V Del Rincón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Post-translational modifications (PTMs impact on the stability, cellular location, and function of a protein thereby achieving a greater functional diversity of the proteome. To fully appreciate how PTMs modulate signaling networks, proteome-wide studies are necessary. However, the evaluation of PTMs on a proteome-wide scale has proven to be technically difficult. To facilitate these analyses we have developed a protein microarray-based assay that is capable of profiling PTM activities in complex biological mixtures such as whole-cell extracts and pathological specimens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our assay, protein microarrays serve as a substrate platform for in vitro enzymatic reactions in which a recombinant ligase, or extracts prepared from whole cells or a pathological specimen is overlaid. The reactions include labeled modifiers (e.g., ubiquitin, SUMO1, or NEDD8, ATP regenerating system, and other required components (depending on the assay that support the conjugation of the modifier. In this report, we apply this methodology to profile three molecularly complex PTMs (ubiquitylation, SUMOylation, and NEDDylation using purified ligase enzymes and extracts prepared from cultured cell lines and pathological specimens. We further validate this approach by confirming the in vivo modification of several novel PTM substrates identified by our assay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This methodology offers several advantages over currently used PTM detection methods including ease of use, rapidity, scale, and sample source diversity. Furthermore, by allowing for the intrinsic enzymatic activities of cell populations or pathological states to be directly compared, this methodology could have widespread applications for the study of PTMs in human diseases and has the potential to be directly applied to most, if not all, basic PTM research.

  19. Pathogenic Leptospires Modulate Protein Expression and Post-translational Modifications in Response to Mammalian Host Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarlath E. Nally

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic species of Leptospira cause leptospirosis, a bacterial zoonotic disease with a global distribution affecting over one million people annually. Reservoir hosts of leptospirosis, including rodents, dogs, and cattle, exhibit little to no signs of disease but shed large numbers of organisms in their urine. Transmission occurs when mucosal surfaces or abraded skin come into contact with infected urine or urine-contaminated water or soil. Whilst little is known about how Leptospira adapt to and persist within a reservoir host, in vitro studies suggest that leptospires alter their transcriptomic and proteomic profiles in response to environmental signals encountered during mammalian infection. We applied the dialysis membrane chamber (DMC peritoneal implant model to compare the whole cell proteome of in vivo derived leptospires with that of leptospires cultivated in vitro at 30°C and 37°C by 2-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE. Of 1,735 protein spots aligned across 9 2-D DIGE gels, 202 protein spots were differentially expressed (p < 0.05, fold change >1.25 or < −1.25 across all three conditions. Differentially expressed proteins were excised for identification by mass spectrometry. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006995. The greatest differences were detected when DMC-cultivated leptospires were compared with IV30- or IV37-cultivated leptospires, including the increased expression of multiple isoforms of Loa22, a known virulence factor. Unexpectedly, 20 protein isoforms of LipL32 and 7 isoforms of LipL41 were uniformly identified by DIGE as differentially expressed, suggesting that unique post-translational modifications (PTMs are operative in response to mammalian host conditions. To test this hypothesis, a rat model of persistent renal colonization was used to isolate leptospires directly from the urine of experimentally infected rats. Comparison of urinary derived leptospires to IV30

  20. Surface Modification of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Using Ionic Complementary Peptides to Minimize Nonspecific Protein Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoling; Xiao, Junzhu; Dang, Fuquan

    2015-06-02

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) has become a widely used material for microfluidic and biological applications. However, PDMS has unacceptably high levels of nonspecific protein adsorption, which significantly lowers the performance of PDMS-based microfluidic chips. Most existing methods to reduce protein fouling of PDMS are to make the surface more hydrophilic by surface oxidization, polymer grafting, and physisorbed coatings. These methods suffer from the relatively short-term stability, the multistep complex treatment procedure, or the insufficient adsorption reduction. Herein, we developed a novel and facile modification method based on self-assembled peptides with well-tailored amino acid composition and sequence, which can also interact strongly with the PDMS surface in the same way as proteins, for suppressing the nonspecific protein fouling and improving the biocompatibility of PDMS-based microfluidic chips. We first demonstrated that an ionic complementary peptide, EAR16-II with a sequence of [(Ala-Glu-Ala-Glu-Ala-Arg-Ala-Arg)2], can readily self-assemble into an amphipathic film predominantly composed of tightly packed β-sheets on the native hydrophobic and plasma-oxidized hydrophilic PDMS surfaces upon low concentrations of carbohydrates. The self-assembled EAR16-II amphipathic film exposed its hydrophobic side to the solution and thus rendered the PDMS surface hydrophobic with water contact angles (WCAs) of around 110.0°. However, the self-assembled EAR16-II amphipathic film exhibited excellent protein-repelling and blood compatibility properties comparable to or better than those obtained with previously reported methods. A schematic model has been proposed to explain the interactions of EAR16-II with the PDMS surface and the antifouling capability of EAR16-II coatings at a molecular level. The current work will pave the way to the development of novel coating materials to address the nonspecific protein adsorption on PDMS, thereby broadening the

  1. Modifications and oxidation of lipids and proteins in human serum detected by thermochemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnizer, Sergei; Kagan, Tamara; Lanir, Amos; Maor, Irit; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2003-01-01

    Detection of electronically excited species (EES) in body fluids may constitute an important diagnostic tool in various pathologies. Examples of such products are triplet excited carbonyls (TEC), which can be a source for photon emission in the 400-550 nm range. The aim of the present study was to determine the actual contribution of lipid and protein components (protein carbonyls) to photon emission generated by thermochemiluminescence (TCL) during the heating of biological fluids. In this study, a new TCL Photometer device, designed by Lumitest Ltd, Israel, was used. Samples were heated to a constant temperature of 80 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 280 s and photon emission was measured at several time points. In order to compare the results of TCL measurements to conventional methods of detecting lipid and protein oxidation, each examined sample was also heated in a waterbath at 80 degrees C for 10-280 s. Lipid and protein oxidation were subsequently measured using conventional methods. The TCL of four polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with three to six double bonds was measured. The elevation of the PUFA TCL amplitude correlated with the increase in the number of double bonds of PUFA. A correlation between the increase in TCL intensity and protein carbonyl generation in bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also observed. In the venous blood serum, our study showed that an increase of TCL intensity during heating reflected the cleavage of TEC of lipid origin. Our study suggests that biological molecules such as proteins, lipids and other molecules, which may become unstable during heating, are capable of generating EES. We demonstrated that a TCL curve can be used as a kinetic model for measuring oxidative processes, which reflects modifications of different molecules involved in the oxidative stress phenomena.

  2. Multigene expression of protein complexes by iterative modification of genomic Bacmid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celma Cristina C

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cellular multi-protein complexes are naturally present in cells at low abundance. Baculovirus expression offers one approach to produce milligram quantities of correctly folded and processed eukaryotic protein complexes. However, current strategies suffer from the need to produce large transfer vectors, and the use of repeated promoter sequences in baculovirus, which itself produces proteins that promote homologous recombination. One possible solution to these problems is to construct baculovirus genomes that express each protein in a complex from a separate locus within the viral DNA. However current methods for selecting such recombinant genomes are too inefficient to routinely modify the virus in this way. Results This paper reports a method which combines the lambda red and bacteriophage P1 Cre-recombinase systems to efficiently generate baculoviruses in which protein complexes are expressed from multiple, single-locus insertions of foreign genes. This method is based on an 88 fold improvement in the selection of recombinant viruses generated by red recombination techniques through use of a bipartite selection cassette. Using this system, seven new genetic loci were identified in the AcMNPV genome suitable for the high level expression of recombinant proteins. These loci were used to allow the recovery two recombinant virus-like particles with potential biotechnological applications (influenza A virus HA/M1 particles and bluetongue virus VP2/VP3/VP5/VP7 particles and the mammalian chaperone and cancer drug target CCT (16 subunits formed from 8 proteins. Conclusion 1. Use of bipartite selections can significantly improve selection of modified bacterial artificial chromosomes carrying baculovirus DNA. Furthermore this approach is sufficiently robust to allow routine modification of the virus genome. 2. In addition to the commonly used p10 and polyhedrin loci, the ctx, egt, 39k, orf51, gp37, iap2 and odv-e56 loci in Ac

  3. A two-site bipolaron model for organic magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, W.; Bloom, F. L.; Bobbert, P. A.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2008-04-01

    The recently proposed bipolaron model for large "organic magnetoresistance" (OMAR) at room temperature is extended to an analytically solvable two-site scheme. It is shown that even this extremely simplified approach reproduces some of the key features of OMAR, viz., the possibility to have both positive and negative magnetoresistance, as well as its universal line shapes. Specific behavior and limiting cases are discussed. Extensions of the model, to guide future experiments and numerical Monte Carlo studies, are suggested.

  4. Post-translational Modifications of Chicken Myelin Basic Protein Charge Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Zhang, Rui; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Smith, Richard D.; Zand, Robert

    2008-07-11

    Purified myelin basic protein (MBP) from various species contains several post-translationally modified forms termed charge components or charge isomers. Chicken MBP contains four charge components denoted as C1, C2, C3 and C8. (The C8 isomer is a complex mixture and was not investigated in this study.) These findings are in contrast to those found for human, bovine and other mammalian MBP’s. Mammalian MBP’s, each of which contain seven or eight charge components depending on the analysis of the CM-52 chromatographic curves and the PAGE gels obtained under basic pH conditions. Chicken MBP components C1, C2 and C3 were treated with trypsin and endoproteinase Glu-C. The resulting digests were analyzed by capillary liquid chromatography combined with either an ion trap tandem mass spectrometer or with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. This instrumentation permitted establishing the amino acid composition and the determination of the posttranslational modifications for each of the three charge components C1-C3. With the exception of N-terminal acetylation, the post-translational modifications were partial.

  5. Quantification of protein posttranslational modifications using stable isotope and mass spectrometry I: principles and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Apostol, Izydor; Luo, Quanzhou; Lewis, Jeffrey; Keener, Ronald; Luo, Shun; Jerums, Matthew; Zhang, Xin; Wypych, Jette; Huang, Gang

    2012-02-15

    With the increased attention to quality by design (QbD) for biopharmaceutical products, there is a demand for accurate and precise quantification methods to monitor critical quality attributes (CQAs). To address this need we have developed a mass spectrometry (MS) based method to quantify a wide range of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) in recombinant proteins using stable isotope-labeled internal standard (SILIS). The SILIS was produced through metabolic labeling where ¹⁵N was uniformly introduced at every nitrogen atom in the studied proteins. To enhance the accuracy of the method, the levels of PTMs in SILIS were quantified using orthogonal analytical techniques. Digestion of an unknown sample mixed with SILIS generates a labeled and a nonlabeled version of each peptide. The nonlabeled and labeled counterparts coelute during RP-HPLC separation but exhibit a sufficient mass difference to be distinguished by MS detection. With the application of SILIS, numerous PTMs can be quantified in a single analysis based on the measured MS signal ratios of ¹⁵N-labeled versus the nonlabeled pairs. Several examples using microbial and mammalian-expressed recombinant proteins demonstrated the principle and utility of this method. The results indicate that SILIS is a valuable methodology in addressing CQAs for the QbD paradigm.

  6. Modification of foaming properties of soy protein isolate by high ultrasound intensity: Particle size effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Rocío; Martínez, Karina D; Pizones Ruiz-Henestrosa, Víctor M; Pilosof, Ana M R

    2015-09-01

    The effect of high intensity ultrasound (HIUS) may produce structural modifications on proteins through a friendly environmental process. Thus, it can be possible to obtain aggregates with a determined particle size, and altering a defined functional property at the same time. The objective of this work was to explore the impact of HIUS on the functionality of a denatured soy protein isolate (SPI) on foaming and interfacial properties. SPI solutions at pH 6.9 were treated with HIUS for 20 min, in an ultrasonic processor at room temperature, at 75, 80 and 85°C. The operating conditions were: 20 kHz, 4.27 ± 0.71 W and 20% of amplitude. It was determined the size of the protein particles, before and after the HIUS treatment, by dynamic light scattering. It was also analyzed the interfacial behavior of the different systems as well as their foaming properties, by applying the whipping method. The HIUS treatment and HIUS with temperature improved the foaming capacity by alteration of particle size whereas stability was not modified significantly. The temperature of HIUS treatment (80 and 85°C) showed a synergistic effect on foaming capacity. It was found that the reduction of particle size was related to the increase of foaming capacity of SPI. On the other hand, the invariable elasticity of the interfacial films could explain the stability of foams over time.

  7. Post-translational modifications of sibling proteins and their roles in osteogenesis and dentinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Baba, O; Butler, W T

    2004-06-04

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of bone and dentin contains several non-collagenous proteins. One category of non-collagenous protein is termed the SIBLING (Small Integrin-Binding LIgand, N-linked Glycoprotein) family, that includes osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE). These polyanionic SIBLING proteins are believed to play key biological roles in the mineralization of bone and dentin. Although the specific mechanisms involved in controlling bone and dentin formation are still unknown, it is clear that some functions of the SIBLING family members are dependent on the nature and extent of post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, and proteolytic processing, since these PTMs would have significant effects on their structure. OPN and BSP are present in the ECM of bone and dentin as full-length forms, whereas amino acid sequencing indicates that DMP1 and DSPP exist as proteolytically processed fragments that result from scission of X-Asp bonds. We hypothesized that the processing of DMP1 and DSPP is catalyzed by the PHEX enzyme, since this protein, an endopeptidase that is predominantly expressed in bone and tooth, has a strong preference for cleavage at the NH2-terminus of aspartyl residue. We envision that the proteolytic processing of DMP1 and DSPP may be an activation process that plays a significant, crucial role in osteogenesis and dentinogenesis, and that a failure in this processing would cause defective mineralization in bone and dentin, as observed in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets.

  8. Bisecting GlcNAc modification stabilizes BACE1 protein under oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Miyako; Kitazume, Shinobu; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi C; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE1) is a protease essential for amyloid-β (Aβ) production in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 protein is known to be up-regulated by oxidative stress-inducing stimuli but the mechanism for this up-regulation still needs to be clarified. We have recently found that BACE1 is modified with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-III (GnT-III, encoded by the Mgat3 gene) and that GnT-III deficiency reduces Aβ-plaque formation in the brain by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. Therefore, we hypothesized that bisecting GlcNAc would stabilize BACE1 protein on oxidative stress. In the present study, we first show that Aβ deposition in the mouse brain induces oxidative stress, together with an increase in levels of BACE1 and bisecting GlcNAc. Furthermore, prooxidant treatment induces expression of BACE1 protein in wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), whereas it reduces BACE1 protein in GnT-III (Mgat3) knock-out MEFs by accelerating lysosomal degradation of BACE1. We purified BACE1 from Neuro2A cells and performed LC/ESI/MS analysis for BACE1-derived glycopeptides and mapped bisecting GlcNAc-modified sites on BACE1. Point mutations at two N-glycosylation sites (Asn(153) and Asn(223)) abolish the bisecting GlcNAc modification on BACE1. These mutations almost cancelled the enhanced BACE1 degradation seen in Mgat3(-/-) MEFs, indicating that bisecting GlcNAc on BACE1 indeed regulates its degradation. Finally, we show that traumatic brain injury-induced BACE1 up-regulation is significantly suppressed in the Mgat3(-/-) brain. These results highlight the role of bisecting GlcNAc in oxidative stress-induced BACE1 expression and offer a novel glycan-targeted strategy for suppressing Aβ generation.

  9. Analysis of the Arabidopsis Floral Proteome:Detection of over 2 000 Proteins and Evidence for Posttranslational Modifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baomin Feng; Lianchao Li; Xiaofan Zhou; Bruce Stanley; Hong Ma

    2009-01-01

    The proteome of the Arabidopsis flower has not been extensively studied previously. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of the wild type Arabidopsis flower. Using both two-dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (2-DGE/MS) and multi-dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approaches, we identified 2 446 proteins. Although a single experiment or analysis uncovered only a subset of the proteins we identified, a combination of multiple experiments and analyses facilitated the detection of a greater number of proteins. When proteins are grouped according to RNA expression levels revealed by microarray experiments, we found that proteins encoded by genes with relatively high levels of expression were detected with greater frequencies. On the other hand, at the level of the individual genelprotein, there was not a good correlation between protein spot intensity and microarray values. We also obtained strong evidence for post-translational modification from 2-DGE and MudPIT data. We detected proteins that are annotated to function in protein synthesis, folding, modification, and degradation, as well as the presence of regulatory proteins such as transcription factors and protein kinases. Finally, sequence and evolutionary analysis of genes for active methyl group metabolisms suggests that these genes are highly conserved. Our results allow the formulation of hypotheses regarding post-translational regulation of proteins in the flower, providing new understanding about Arabidopsis flower development and physiology.

  10. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  11. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  12. Calpains mediate the proteolytic modification of human cytomegalovirus UL112-113 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang-Kwei; Jiang, Meei Jyh; Lin, Shin-Rung; Chen, Mei-Yin; Wang, Hung-Hsueh; Duh, Chang-Yih

    2015-05-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL112-113 gene is implicated in lytic viral replication. The UL112-113 proteins p34, p43, p50 and p84 are expressed via alternative splicing. However, the mechanism for the generation of three additional virus-associated proteins (p20, p26 and p28), which share the UL112 reading frame, remains unknown. Bioinformatic analyses indicated that p34, p43, p50 and p84 contain potential PEST-like degradation motifs. In this study, inhibitors of calpains, lysosomes and proteasomes reduced p20, p26 and p28 levels in virus-infected cells, suggesting the involvement of proteolytic modification. Moreover, maitotoxin, which increases intracellular calcium levels and activates calpain activity, induced the intracellular proteolysis of p34 into p20, p26 and p28 and the cleavage of p43, p50 and p84 into p38 and a novel protein, p34c. Proteolytic assays further indicated that p34, p43, p50 and p84 were substrates of calpain-1 and calpain-2 and that they generated proteolytic products that corresponded to those detected during the HCMV infectious period. Furthermore, substitution mutations in the putative calpain cleavage sites of p34 reduced accumulation of proteolytic products. The knockdown of endogenous calpain-1 and calpain-2 by RNA interference reduced accumulation of p20, p26 and p28 and concurrently increased levels of nascent p43, p50 and p84 during the infectious cycle. Intriguingly, calpain depletion enhanced viral genome synthesis. Moreover, HCMV-permissive cells that stably expressed p20, p26 or p28 exhibited reduced viral genome synthesis and mature virus production. Our findings suggest that cognate UL112-113 proteins derived from calpain-catalysed proteolysis are involved in the HCMV replication process.

  13. Prediction of protein modification sites of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid using mRMR feature selection and analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available Pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA is formed during a common post-translational modification (PTM of extracellular and multi-pass membrane proteins. In this study, we developed a new predictor to predict the modification sites of PCA based on maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR and incremental feature selection (IFS. We incorporated 727 features that belonged to 7 kinds of protein properties to predict the modification sites, including sequence conservation, residual disorder, amino acid factor, secondary structure and solvent accessibility, gain/loss of amino acid during evolution, propensity of amino acid to be conserved at protein-protein interface and protein surface, and deviation of side chain carbon atom number. Among these 727 features, 244 features were selected by mRMR and IFS as the optimized features for the prediction, with which the prediction model achieved a maximum of MCC of 0.7812. Feature analysis showed that all feature types contributed to the modification process. Further site-specific feature analysis showed that the features derived from PCA's surrounding sites contributed more to the determination of PCA sites than other sites. The detailed feature analysis in this paper might provide important clues for understanding the mechanism of the PCA formation and guide relevant experimental validations.

  14. Protein post-translational modifications and regulation of pluripotency in human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chieh; Peterson, Suzanne E; Loring, Jeanne F

    2014-02-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are known to be essential mechanisms used by eukaryotic cells to diversify their protein functions and dynamically coordinate their signaling networks. Defects in PTMs have been linked to numerous developmental disorders and human diseases, highlighting the importance of PTMs in maintaining normal cellular states. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into a variety of functional somatic cells; these cells hold a great promise for the advancement of biomedical research and clinical therapy. The mechanisms underlying cellular pluripotency in human cells have been extensively explored in the past decade. In addition to the vast amount of knowledge obtained from the genetic and transcriptional research in hPSCs, there is a rapidly growing interest in the stem cell biology field to examine pluripotency at the protein and PTM level. This review addresses recent progress toward understanding the role of PTMs (glycosylation, phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation) in the regulation of cellular pluripotency.

  15. jEcho: an Evolved weight vector to CHaracterize the protein's posttranslational modification mOtifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Miaomiao; Zhang, Zhao; Mai, Guoqin; Luo, Youxi; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2015-06-01

    Protein's posttranslational modification (PTM) represents a major dynamic regulation of protein functions after the translation of polypeptide chains from mRNA molecule. Compared with the costly and labor-intensive wet laboratory characterization of PTMs, the computer-based detection of PTM residues has been a major complementary technique in recent years. Previous studies demonstrated that the PTM-flanking positions convey different contributions to the computational detection of PTM residue, but did not directly translate this observation into the in silico PTM prediction. We propose a weight vector to represent the variant contributions of the PTM-flanking positions and use an evolutionary algorithm to optimize the vector. Even a simple nearest neighbor algorithm with the incorporated optimal weight vector outperforms the currently available algorithms. The algorithm is implemented as an easy-to-use computer program, jEcho version 1.0. The implementation language, Java, makes jEcho platform-independent and visually interactive. The predicted results may be directly exported as publication-quality images or text files. jEcho may be downloaded from http://www.healthinformaticslab.org/supp/ .

  16. Structure and post-translational modifications of the web silk protein spidroin-1 from Nephila spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos-Pinto, José Roberto Aparecido; Lamprecht, Günther; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Heo, Seok; Hardy, John George; Priewalder, Helga; Scheibel, Thomas Rainer; Palma, Mario Sergio; Lubec, Gert

    2014-06-13

    Spidroin-1 is one of the major ampullate silk proteins produced by spiders for use in the construction of the frame and radii of orb webs, and as a dragline to escape from predators. Only partial sequences of spidroin-1 produced by Nephila clavipes have been reported up to now, and there is no information on post-translational modifications (PTMs). A gel-based mass spectrometry strategy with ETD and CID fragmentation methods were used to sequence and determine the presence/location of any PTMs on the spidroin-1. Sequence coverage of 98.06%, 95.05%, and 98.37% were obtained for N. clavipes, Nephila edulis and for Nephila madagascariensis, respectively. Phosphorylation was the major PTM observed with 8 phosphorylation sites considered reliable on spidroin-1 produced by N. clavipes, 4 in N. madagascariensis and 2 for N. edulis. Dityrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (formed by oxidation of the spidroin-1) were observed, although the mechanism by which they are formed (i.e. exposure to UV radiation or to peroxidases in the major ampullate silk gland) is uncertain. Herein we present structural information on the spidroin-1 produced by three different Nephila species; these findings may be valuable for understanding the physicochemical properties of the silk proteins and moreover, future designs of recombinantly produced spider silk proteins. Biotechnological significance The present investigation shows for the first time spidroin structure and post-translational modifications observed on the major ampullate silk spidroin-1. The many site specific phosphorylations (localized within the structural motifs) along with the probably photoinduction of hydroxylations may be relevant for scientists in material science, biology, biochemistry and environmental scientists. Up to now all the mechanical properties of the spidroin have been characterized without any consideration about the existence of PTMs in the sequence of spidroins. Thus, these findings for major ampullate silk

  17. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods.

  18. Mussel inspired protein-mediated surface modification to electrospun fibers and their potential biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingwei; Michael, Praveesuda Lorwattanapongsa; Zhong, Shaoping; Ma, Bing; MacEwan, Matthew R; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2012-04-01

    Mussel inspired proteins have been demonstrated to serve as a versatile biologic adhesive with numerous applications. The present study illustrates the use of such Mussel inspired proteins (polydopamine) in the fabrication of functionalized bio-inspired nanomaterials capable of both improving cell response and sustained delivery of model probes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the ability of dopamine to polymerize on the surface of plasma-treated, electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fiber mats to form polydopamine coating. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that self-polymerization of dopamine was induced by pH shift and that the thickness of polydopamine coating was readily modulated by adjusting the concentration of dopamine and reaction time. Polydopamine coatings were noted to affect the mechanical properties of underlying fiber mats, as mechanical testing demonstrated a decrease in elasticity and increase in stiffness of polydopamine-coated fiber mats. Polydopamine coatings were also utilized to effectively immobilize extracellular matrix proteins (i.e., fibronectin) on the surface of polydopamine-coated, electrospun fibers, resulting in enhancement of NIH3T3 cell attachment, spreading, and cytoskeletal development. Comparison of release rates of rhodamine 6G encapsulated in coated and uncoated PCL fibers also confirmed that polydopamine coatings modulate the release rate of loaded payloads. The authors further demonstrate the significant difference of rhodamine 6G adsorption kinetics in water between PCL fibers and polydopamine-coated PCL fibers. Taken together, polydopamine-mediated surface modification to electrospun fibers may be an effective means of fabricating a wide range of bio-inspired nanomaterials with unique properties for use in tissue engineering, drug delivery, and advanced biomedical applications.

  19. Protein Tyrosine Nitration and Thiol Oxidation by Peroxynitrite—Strategies to Prevent These Oxidative Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Daub, Steffen; Bachschmid, Markus; Schildknecht, Stefan; Oelze, Matthias; Steven, Sebastian; Schmidt, Patrick; Megner, Alexandra; Wada, Masayuki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Münzel, Thomas; Bottari, Serge; Ullrich, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide, peroxynitrite, is a potent biological oxidant. The most important oxidative protein modifications described for peroxynitrite are cysteine-thiol oxidation and tyrosine nitration. We have previously demonstrated that intrinsic heme-thiolate (P450)-dependent enzymatic catalysis increases the nitration of tyrosine 430 in prostacyclin synthase and results in loss of activity which contributes to endothelial dysfunction. We here report the sensitive peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of an over-expressed and partially purified human prostacyclin synthase (3.3 μM) with an EC50 value of 5 μM. Microsomal thiols in these preparations effectively compete for peroxynitrite and block the nitration of other proteins up to 50 μM peroxynitrite. Purified, recombinant PGIS showed a half-maximal nitration by 10 μM 3-morpholino sydnonimine (Sin-1) which increased in the presence of bicarbonate, and was only marginally induced by freely diffusing NO2-radicals generated by a peroxidase/nitrite/hydrogen peroxide system. Based on these observations, we would like to emphasize that prostacyclin synthase is among the most efficiently and sensitively nitrated proteins investigated by us so far. In the second part of the study, we identified two classes of peroxynitrite scavengers, blocking either peroxynitrite anion-mediated thiol oxidations or phenol/tyrosine nitrations by free radical mechanisms. Dithiopurines and dithiopyrimidines were highly effective in inhibiting both reaction types which could make this class of compounds interesting therapeutic tools. In the present work, we highlighted the impact of experimental conditions on the outcome of peroxynitrite-mediated nitrations. The limitations identified in this work need to be considered in the assessment of experimental data involving peroxynitrite. PMID:23567270

  20. Protein tyrosine nitration and thiol oxidation by peroxynitrite-strategies to prevent these oxidative modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiber, Andreas; Daub, Steffen; Bachschmid, Markus; Schildknecht, Stefan; Oelze, Matthias; Steven, Sebastian; Schmidt, Patrick; Megner, Alexandra; Wada, Masayuki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Münzel, Thomas; Bottari, Serge; Ullrich, Volker

    2013-04-08

    The reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide, peroxynitrite, is a potent biological oxidant. The most important oxidative protein modifications described for peroxynitrite are cysteine-thiol oxidation and tyrosine nitration. We have previously demonstrated that intrinsic heme-thiolate (P450)-dependent enzymatic catalysis increases the nitration of tyrosine 430 in prostacyclin synthase and results in loss of activity which contributes to endothelial dysfunction. We here report the sensitive peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of an over-expressed and partially purified human prostacyclin synthase (3.3 μM) with an EC50 value of 5 μM. Microsomal thiols in these preparations effectively compete for peroxynitrite and block the nitration of other proteins up to 50 μM peroxynitrite. Purified, recombinant PGIS showed a half-maximal nitration by 10 μM 3-morpholino sydnonimine (Sin-1) which increased in the presence of bicarbonate, and was only marginally induced by freely diffusing NO2-radicals generated by a peroxidase/nitrite/hydrogen peroxide system. Based on these observations, we would like to emphasize that prostacyclin synthase is among the most efficiently and sensitively nitrated proteins investigated by us so far. In the second part of the study, we identified two classes of peroxynitrite scavengers, blocking either peroxynitrite anion-mediated thiol oxidations or phenol/tyrosine nitrations by free radical mechanisms. Dithiopurines and dithiopyrimidines were highly effective in inhibiting both reaction types which could make this class of compounds interesting therapeutic tools. In the present work, we highlighted the impact of experimental conditions on the outcome of peroxynitrite-mediated nitrations. The limitations identified in this work need to be considered in the assessment of experimental data involving peroxynitrite.

  1. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-01-01

    taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we...

  2. Comparison of antioxidative and chelating effects of daidzein and daidzin on protein oxidative modification by copper in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, S; Shirataki, Y

    2001-01-01

    Daidzein and its glycoside daidzin are isoflavones. Their antioxidative effects were compared in vitro. Although both compounds inhibited protein oxidative modification by copper, the inhibitory effect of daidzein was stronger than that of daidzin. Because daidzein showed a greater affinity for Cu2+, the antioxidant effect of these isoflavones may be dependent on their respective copper-chelating abilities.

  3. Ubiquitin modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Swatek, Kirby N.; Komander, David

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic multifaceted post-translational modification involved in nearly all aspects of eukaryotic biology. Once attached to a substrate, the 76-amino acid protein ubiquitin is subjected to further modifications, creating a multitude of distinct signals with distinct cellular outcomes, referred to as the 'ubiquitin code'. Ubiquitin can be ubiquitinated on seven lysine (Lys) residues or on the N-terminus, leading to polyubiquitin chains that can encompass complex top...

  4. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species induce protein and DNA modifications driving arthrofibrosis following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Theresa A; Parvizi, Javad; Della Valle, Craig J; Steinbeck, Marla J

    2009-11-13

    Arthrofibrosis, occurring in 3%-4% of patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA), is a challenging condition for which there is no defined cause. The hypothesis for this study was that disregulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) mediates matrix protein and DNA modifications, which result in excessive fibroblastic proliferation. We found increased numbers of macrophages and lymphocytes, along with elevated amounts of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in arthrofibrotic tissues when compared to control tissues. MPO expression, an enzyme that generates ROS/RNS, is usually limited to neutrophils and some macrophages, but was found by immunohistochemistry to be expressed in both macrophages and fibroblasts in arthrofibrotic tissue. As direct measurement of ROS/RNS is not feasible, products including DNA hydroxylation (8-OHdG), and protein nitrosylation (nitrotyrosine) were measured by immunohistochemistry. Quantification of the staining showed that 8-OHdg was significantly increased in arthrofibrotic tissue. There was also a direct correlation between the intensity of inflammation and ROS/RNS to the amount of heterotopic ossification (HO). In order to investigate the aberrant expression of MPO, a real-time oxidative stress polymerase chain reaction array was performed on fibroblasts isolated from arthrofibrotic and control tissues. The results of this array confirmed the upregulation of MPO expression in arthrofibrotic fibroblasts and highlighted the downregulated expression of the antioxidants, superoxide dismutase1 and microsomal glutathione S-transferase 3, as well as the significant increase in thioredoxin reductase, a known promoter of cell proliferation, and polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase, a key enzyme in the base excision repair pathway for oxidative DNA damage. Based on our current findings, we suggest that ROS/RNS initiate and sustain the arthrofibrotic response driving aggressive fibroblast proliferation and subsequent HO.

  5. Recycling of protein subunits during DNA translocation and cleavage by Type I restriction-modification enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Michelle; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzymes comprise three protein subunits; HsdS and HsdM that form a methyltransferase (MTase) and HsdR that associates with the MTase and catalyses Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent DNA translocation and cleavage. Here, we examine whether the MTase and HsdR components can 'turnover' in vitro, i.e. whether they can catalyse translocation and cleavage events on one DNA molecule, dissociate and then re-bind a second DNA molecule. Translocation termination by both EcoKI and EcoR124I leads to HsdR dissociation from linear DNA but not from circular DNA. Following DNA cleavage, the HsdR subunits appear unable to dissociate even though the DNA is linear, suggesting a tight interaction with the cleaved product. The MTases of EcoKI and EcoAI can dissociate from DNA following either translocation or cleavage and can initiate reactions on new DNA molecules as long as free HsdR molecules are available. In contrast, the MTase of EcoR124I does not turnover and additional cleavage of circular DNA is not observed by inclusion of RecBCD, a helicase-nuclease that degrades the linear DNA product resulting from Type I cleavage. Roles for Type I restriction endonuclease subunit dynamics in restriction alleviation in the cell are discussed.

  6. A Novel 3-Methylhistidine Modification of Yeast Ribosomal Protein Rpl3 Is Dependent upon the YIL110W Methyltransferase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Kristofor J.; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I.; Al-Hadid, Qais; Laganowsky, Arthur; Young, Brian D.; Lipson, Rebecca S.; Souda, Puneet; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown that Rpl3, a protein of the large ribosomal subunit from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), is stoichiometrically monomethylated at position 243, producing a 3-methylhistidine residue. This conclusion is supported by top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry of Rpl3, as well as by biochemical analysis of Rpl3 radiolabeled in vivo with S-adenosyl-l-[methyl-3H]methionine. The results show that a +14-Da modification occurs within the GTKKLPRKTHRGLRKVAC sequence of Rpl3. Using high-resolution cation-exchange chromatography and thin layer chromatography, we demonstrate that neither lysine nor arginine residues are methylated and that a 3-methylhistidine residue is present. Analysis of 37 deletion strains of known and putative methyltransferases revealed that only the deletion of the YIL110W gene, encoding a seven β-strand methyltransferase, results in the loss of the +14-Da modification of Rpl3. We suggest that YIL110W encodes a protein histidine methyltransferase responsible for the modification of Rpl3 and potentially other yeast proteins, and now designate it Hpm1 (Histidine protein methyltransferase 1). Deletion of the YIL110W/HPM1 gene results in numerous phenotypes including some that may result from abnormal interactions between Rpl3 and the 25 S ribosomal RNA. This is the first report of a methylated histidine residue in yeast cells, and the first example of a gene required for protein histidine methylation in nature. PMID:20864530

  7. AMS 4.0: consensus prediction of post-translational modifications in protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Basu, Subhadip; Saha, Indrajit

    2012-08-01

    We present here the 2011 update of the AutoMotif Service (AMS 4.0) that predicts the wide selection of 88 different types of the single amino acid post-translational modifications (PTM) in protein sequences. The selection of experimentally confirmed modifications is acquired from the latest UniProt and Phospho.ELM databases for training. The sequence vicinity of each modified residue is represented using amino acids physico-chemical features encoded using high quality indices (HQI) obtaining by automatic clustering of known indices extracted from AAindex database. For each type of the numerical representation, the method builds the ensemble of Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) pattern classifiers, each optimising different objectives during the training (for example the recall, precision or area under the ROC curve (AUC)). The consensus is built using brainstorming technology, which combines multi-objective instances of machine learning algorithm, and the data fusion of different training objects representations, in order to boost the overall prediction accuracy of conserved short sequence motifs. The performance of AMS 4.0 is compared with the accuracy of previous versions, which were constructed using single machine learning methods (artificial neural networks, support vector machine). Our software improves the average AUC score of the earlier version by close to 7 % as calculated on the test datasets of all 88 PTM types. Moreover, for the selected most-difficult sequence motifs types it is able to improve the prediction performance by almost 32 %, when compared with previously used single machine learning methods. Summarising, the brainstorming consensus meta-learning methodology on the average boosts the AUC score up to around 89 %, averaged over all 88 PTM types. Detailed results for single machine learning methods and the consensus methodology are also provided, together with the comparison to previously published methods and state-of-the-art software tools. The

  8. Crystal structure of a PCP/Sfp complex reveals the structural basis for carrier protein posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufar, Peter; Rahighi, Simin; Kraas, Femke I; Kirchner, Donata K; Löhr, Frank; Henrich, Erik; Köpke, Jürgen; Dikic, Ivan; Güntert, Peter; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-04-24

    Phosphopantetheine transferases represent a class of enzymes found throughout all forms of life. From a structural point of view, they are subdivided into three groups, with transferases from group II being the most widespread. They are required for the posttranslational modification of carrier proteins involved in diverse metabolic pathways. We determined the crystal structure of the group II phosphopantetheine transferase Sfp from Bacillus in complex with a substrate carrier protein in the presence of coenzyme A and magnesium, and observed two protein-protein interaction sites. Mutational analysis showed that only the hydrophobic contacts between the carrier protein's second helix and the C-terminal domain of Sfp are essential for their productive interaction. Comparison with a similar structure of a complex of human proteins suggests that the mode of interaction is highly conserved in all domains of life.

  9. SDS-PAGE and IR spectroscopy to evaluate modifications in the viral protein profile induced by a cationic porphyrinic photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Correia, António; Moreirinha, Catarina; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Cunha, Ângela; Neves, Maria G P S; Faustino, Maria A F; Almeida, Adelaide

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species can be responsible for microbial photodynamic inactivation due to its toxic effects, which include severe damage to proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. In this study, the photo-oxidative modifications of the proteins of a non-enveloped T4-like bacteriophage, induced by the cationic porphyrin 5,10,15-tris(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)-20-(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin tri-iodide were evaluated. Two methods were used: sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and infrared spectroscopy. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the phage protein profile was considerably altered after photodynamic treatment. Seven protein bands putatively corresponding to capsid and tail tube proteins were attenuated and two other were enhanced. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the time-dependent alteration on the phage protein profile detected by SDS-PAGE, indicative of a response to oxidative damage. Infrared analysis showed to be a promising and rapid screening approach for the analysis of the modifications induced on viral proteins by photosensitization. In fact, one single infrared spectrum can highlight the changes induced to all viral molecular structures, overcoming the delays and complex protocols of the conventional methods, in a much simple and cost effective way.

  10. Glycan Reader is improved to recognize most sugar types and chemical modifications in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Jun; Lee, Jumin; Patel, Dhilon S; Ma, Hongjing; Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Sunhwan; Im, Wonpil

    2017-10-01

    Glycans play a central role in many essential biological processes. Glycan Reader was originally developed to simplify the reading of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files containing glycans through the automatic detection and annotation of sugars and glycosidic linkages between sugar units and to proteins, all based on atomic coordinates and connectivity information. Carbohydrates can have various chemical modifications at different positions, making their chemical space much diverse. Unfortunately, current PDB files do not provide exact annotations for most carbohydrate derivatives and more than 50% of PDB glycan chains have at least one carbohydrate derivative that could not be correctly recognized by the original Glycan Reader. Glycan Reader has been improved and now identifies most sugar types and chemical modifications (including various glycolipids) in the PDB, and both PDB and PDBx/mmCIF formats are supported. CHARMM-GUI Glycan Reader is updated to generate the simulation system and input of various glycoconjugates with most sugar types and chemical modifications. It also offers a new functionality to edit the glycan structures through addition/deletion/modification of glycosylation types, sugar types, chemical modifications, glycosidic linkages, and anomeric states. The simulation system and input files can be used for CHARMM, NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, GENESIS, LAMMPS, Desmond, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. Glycan Fragment Database in GlycanStructure.Org is also updated to provide an intuitive glycan sequence search tool for complex glycan structures with various chemical modifications in the PDB. http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/glycan and http://www.glycanstructure.org. wonpil@lehigh.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. The Molecular Mechanisms and the Role of hnRNP K Protein Post- Translational Modification in DNA Damage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage repair is a kind of cellular self-protection mechanism in which some relevant proteins are activated when DNA damage response occurs in order to maintain the intracellular function stability and structure integrity. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins can rapidly confer to them more complicated structure and sophisticated function by covalently combining different small molecules with target proteins, which in turn plays an important regulatory role in DNA damage repair. It was reported that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) could be involved in DNA damage repair process under the regulation of its many post-translational modifications, including methylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Here, we reviewed molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K protein post-translational modifications and their role in DNA damage repair, which will promote our understanding of how hnRNP K participating in the repair process to maintain the normal operation of biological activities in the cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Posttranslational modification of Birch and Ragweed allergen proteins by common gas phase pollutants, NO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, M. A.; Pope, F.; Bloss, W.

    2015-12-01

    The global incidence of hay fever has been rising for decades, however, the underlying reasons behind this rise remain unclear. It is hypothesized that exposure of pollen to common gas phase pollutants, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), increases the allergenicity of the pollen and thus increases hay fever incidence. Since atmospheric pollutants tend to have greater concentrations within urban areas (in particular NO2) the hypothesis suggests that greater allergenicity should occur in urban areas. Indeed, several studies do suggest higher hay fever incidence within urban areas compared to rural areas. Previous published work suggests a link between increased allergies with changes in the chemical composition of the pollen protein via posttranslational modification of the protein. This study investigates the posttranslational modification of two highly allergenic pollen species (Birch and Ragweed) that are common in Europe. Within the laboratory, we expose pollen grains to atmospherically relevant exposures of gas phase NO2, O3 and other common gas phase oxidants under a range of environmentally relevant conditions. The effects of the environmentally relevant exposures on the biochemistry of the pollen grains were probed using a proteomic approach (liquid chromatography coupled ultra-high resolution spectrometer). Our findings indicate the interaction between gas phase pollutants and pollen cause protein specific modifications; in particular, nitration occurs upon tyrosine residues and nitrosylation on cysteine residues. Possibly, these modifications may affect the immune response of the pollen protein, which may suggest a possible reason for increased allergies in reaction to such biologically altered protein. The laboratory-derived results will be supported with a time series analysis of asthma incidence rates for the London area, which take into account the pollen count, and pollutant concentrations. The implications of the results will be discussed

  13. Two-Site Comparison of Transpiration by Larrea Tridentata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, M. L.; Kurc, S. A.; Scott, R. L.; Bryant, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    As a result of landscape changes within the desert southwestern U.S. such as increased grazing, reduced wildfire frequency, and changes in atmospheric conditions, the native creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) has encroached upon historically grass-dominated ecosystems, expanding in range and land cover density. To understand how creosotebush influences the water budget of ecosystems, heat balance sap flow sensors were employed on creosotebush stems at both the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) and Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW). Additionally, both sites are equipped with eddy covariance towers, associated micrometeorological measurements, and profiles of water content reflectometers for soil moisture. The differences found between the two sites, including soil type and precipitation regime, are the basis of the following hypotheses. Firstly, we hypothesize that we will not see transpiration (T) responses following storms less than 5 mm at both sites. Secondly, we hypothesize that at both sites we will see a lagged response of T to large precipitation events, with evaporation being the dominate component in the partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) for the first two days. Thirdly, we hypothesize that the ratio of plant transpiration to total evapotranspiration (T/ET) will be less at SRER due to the larger amount of bare soil exposed at this site. In this study, we show data from one summer at both sites and show how these relate to different precipitation events and soil moisture reservoirs.

  14. Diverse and divergent protein post-translational modifications in two growth stages of a natural microbial community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhou [ORNL; Wang, Yingfeng [ORNL; Yao, Qiuming [University of Missouri, Columbia; Justice, Nicholas B. [University of California, Berkeley; Ahn, Tae-Hyuk [ORNL; Xu, Dong [University of Missouri, Columbia; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Pan, Chongle [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Detailed characterization of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins in microbial communities remains a significant challenge. Here we directly identify and quantify a broad range of PTMs (hydroxylation, methylation, citrullination, acetylation, phosphorylation, methylthiolation, S-nitrosylation and nitration) in a natural microbial community from an acid mine drainage site. Approximately 29% of the identified proteins of the dominant Leptospirillum group II bacteria are modified, and 43% of modified proteins carry multiple PTM types. Most PTM events, except S-nitrosylations, have low fractional occupancy. Notably, PTM events are detected on Cas proteins involved in antiviral defense, an aspect of Cas biochemistry not considered previously. Further, Cas PTM profiles from Leptospirillum group II differ in early versus mature biofilms. PTM patterns are divergent on orthologues of two closely related, but ecologically differentiated, Leptospirillum group II bacteria. Our results highlight the prevalence and dynamics of PTMs of proteins, with potential significance for ecological adaptation and microbial evolution.

  15. O-GlcNAcylation as a novel ammonia-induced posttranslational protein modification in cultured rat astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karababa, Ayşe; Görg, Boris; Schliess, Freimut; Häussinger, Dieter

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a clinical manifestation of a low grade cerebral edema with a mutual interrelationship between osmotic- and oxidative stress. This leads to RNA oxidation and posttranslational protein modifications such as protein tyrosine nitration with pathophysiological relevance. Here, we report on O-GlcNAcylation as another ammonia-induced posttranslational protein modification in cultured rat astrocytes. NH4Cl induced O-GlcNAcylation of distinct proteins (25-250 kDa) in astrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Exposure of astrocytes to NH4Cl (5 mmol/l) for 48 h and 72 h significantly increased protein O-GlcNAcylation by about 2-fold and 4-fold, respectively. NH4Cl at a concentration of 1 mmol/l was sufficient to double protein O-GlcNAcylation in astrocytes after 72 h as compared to untreated controls. Ammonia-induced protein O-GlcNAcylation was sensitive towards glutamine-synthetase inhibition by methionine sulfoximine (MSO), but was not induced by hypoosmolarity (205 mosmol/l) or CH3NH3Cl (5 mmol/l). Increased protein O-GlcNAcylation in NH4Cl (5 mmol/l, 48 h)-treated astrocytes was fully reversible within 24 h after withdrawal of NH4Cl from culture medium. Amongst the proteins which are O-GlcNAcylated in response to ammonia, GAPDH was identified. It is concluded that ammonia induces reversible protein O-GlcNAcylation in astrocytes that depends on glutamine synthesis but not on astrocyte swelling per se or ammonia-induced pH-changes. In view of the complex involvement of O-GlcNAcylation in cell regulation, such as energy metabolism, apoptosis and circadian rhythmicity and in pathologies, such as neurodegenerative diseases, O-GlcNAcylation might contribute to the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy.

  16. Regulation of the mRNA-binding protein HuR by posttranslational modification: spotlight on phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Doller, Anke; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2012-06-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR) and its neuronal relatives (HuB, HuC, HuD) participate in the post-transcriptional regulation of many AU-rich element-bearing mRNAs. In addition to its originally described role in controlling mRNA decay, the binding of HuR to target mRNAs can affect many aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, intracellular trafficking, translation and modulation of mRNA repression by miRNAs. In accordance to the growing list of signalling events which are involved in regulating these different HuR functions, recent data implicate that posttranslational modification, namely protein kinase-triggered phosphorylation of HuR plays a crucial role in connecting extracellular signal inputs to a specific post-transcriptional program by HuR. Notably, in addition to directly targeting HuR functions, posttranslational modifications of HuR have a major impact on the sequestration and binding to various HuR ligand proteins as has been demonstrated e.g. for the 14-3-3 chaperones. However, the detailed mechanisms of how a specific modification of HuR coordinates different aspects in HuR regulation are currently poorly understood. Due to the fact that most of the described HuR activities are closely related to its subcellular localization and the binding to cargo mRNA, this review will focus on these aspects of HuR functions and their control by posttranslational modification, particularly by HuR phosphorylations by different protein kinases.

  17. Diesel and silica monitoring at two sites following hurricane sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Alice; Zuckerman, Norman; Luo, Honghong; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Lucchini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Following Hurricane Sandy, which hit New York City and New Jersey in October 2012, industrial hygienists from the Mount Sinai and Belleview/New York University occupational medicine clinics conducted monitoring for diesel exhaust and silica in lower Manhattan and Rockaway Peninsula. Average daytime elemental carbon levels at three stations in lower Manhattan on December 4, 2012, ranged from 9 to18 μg/m(3). Sub-micron particle counts at various times on the same day were over 200,000 particles per cubic centimeter on many streets in lower Manhattan. In Rockaway Peninsula on December 12, 2012, all average daytime elemental carbon levels were below a detection limit of approximately 7 μg/m(3). The average daytime crystalline silica dust concentration was below detection at two sites on Rockaway Peninsula, and was 0.015 mg/m(3) quartz where sand was being replaced on the beach. The daily average levels of elemental carbon and airborne particulates that we measured are in the range of levels that have been found to cause respiratory effects in sensitive subpopulations like asthmatic patients after 2 hr of exposure. Control of exposure to diesel exhaust must be considered following natural disasters where diesel-powered equipment is used in cleanup and recovery. Although peak silica exposures were not likely captured in this study, but were reported by a government agency to have exceeded recommended guidelines for at least one cleanup worker, we recommend further study of silica exposures when debris removal operations or traffic create visible levels of suspended dust from soil or sand.

  18. Effect of methylglyoxal modification on the structure and properties of human small heat shock protein HspB6 (Hsp20).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranova, Lydia K; Perfilov, Maxim M; Serebryakova, Marina V; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2016-07-01

    Human small heat shock protein HspB6 (Hsp20) was modified by metabolic α-dicarbonyl compound methylglyoxal (MGO). At low MGO/HspB6 molar ratio, Arg13, Arg14, Arg27, and Arg102 were the primary sites of MGO modification. At high MGO/HspB6 ratio, practically, all Arg and Lys residues of HspB6 were modified. Both mild and extensive MGO modification decreased susceptibility of HspB6 to trypsinolysis and prevented its heat-induced aggregation. Modification by MGO was accompanied by formation of small quantities of chemically crosslinked dimers and did not dramatically affect quaternary structure of HspB6. Mild modification by MGO did not affect whereas extensive modification decreased interaction of HspB6 with HspB1. Phosphorylation of HspB6 by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase was inhibited after mild modification and completely prevented after extensive modification by MGO. Chaperone-like activity of HspB6 measured with subfragment 1 of skeletal myosin was enhanced after MGO modifications. It is concluded that Arg residues located in the N-terminal domain of HspB6 are easily accessible to MGO modification and that even mild modification by MGO affects susceptibility to trypsinolysis, phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and chaperone-like activity of HspB6.

  19. A comparative 'bottom up' proteomics strategy for the site-specific identification and quantification of protein modifications by electrophilic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bingnan; Hare, Michael; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yi; Maier, Claudia S

    2012-10-22

    We report a mass spectrometry-based comparative "bottom up" proteomics approach that combines d(0)/d(4)-succinic anhydride labeling with commercially available hydrazine (Hz)-functionalized beads (Affi-gel Hz beads) for detection, identification and relative quantification of site-specific oxylipid modifications in biological matrices. We evaluated and applied this robust and simple method for the quantitative analysis of oxylipid protein conjugates in cardiac mitochondrial proteome samples isolated from 3- and 24-month-old rat hearts. The use of d(0)/d(4)-succinic anhydride labeling, Hz-bead based affinity enrichment, nanoLC fractionation and MALDI-ToF/ToF tandem mass spectrometry yielded relative quantification of oxylipid conjugates with residue-specific modification information. Conjugation of acrolein (ACR), 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (HHE), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 4-oxo-2-noneal (ONE) to cysteine, histidine and lysine residues were identified. HHE conjugates were the predominant subset of Michael-type adducts detected in this study. The HHE conjugates showed higher levels in mitochondrial preparations from young heart congruent with previous findings by others that the n-3/n-6 PUFA ratio is higher in young heart mitochondrial membranes. Although this study focuses on protein adducts of reactive oxylipids, the method might be equally applicable to protein carbonyl modifications caused by metal catalyzed oxidation reactions.

  20. Comparative proteome analysis between C . briggsae embryos and larvae reveals a role of chromatin modification proteins in embryonic cell division

    KAUST Repository

    An, Xiaomeng

    2017-06-21

    Caenorhabditis briggsae has emerged as a model for comparative biology against model organism C. elegans. Most of its cell fate specifications are completed during embryogenesis whereas its cell growth is achieved mainly in larval stages. The molecular mechanism underlying the drastic developmental changes is poorly understood. To gain insights into the molecular changes between the two stages, we compared the proteomes between the two stages using iTRAQ. We identified a total of 2,791 proteins in the C. briggsae embryos and larvae, 247 of which undergo up- or down-regulation between the two stages. The proteins that are upregulated in the larval stages are enriched in the Gene Ontology categories of energy production, protein translation, and cytoskeleton; whereas those upregulated in the embryonic stage are enriched in the categories of chromatin dynamics and posttranslational modification, suggesting a more active chromatin modification in the embryos than in the larva. Perturbation of a subset of chromatin modifiers followed by cell lineage analysis suggests their roles in controlling cell division pace. Taken together, we demonstrate a general molecular switch from chromatin modification to metabolism during the transition from C. briggsae embryonic to its larval stages using iTRAQ approach. The switch might be conserved across metazoans.

  1. The La protein functions redundantly with tRNA modification enzymes to ensure tRNA structural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copela, Laura A; Chakshusmathi, Ghadiyaram; Sherrer, R Lynn; Wolin, Sandra L

    2006-04-01

    Although the La protein stabilizes nascent pre-tRNAs from nucleases, influences the pathway of pre-tRNA maturation, and assists correct folding of certain pre-tRNAs, it is dispensable for growth in both budding and fission yeast. Here we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae La shares functional redundancy with both tRNA modification enzymes and other proteins that contact tRNAs during their biogenesis. La is important for growth in the presence of mutations in either the arginyl tRNA synthetase or the tRNA modification enzyme Trm1p. In addition, two pseudouridine synthases, PUS3 and PUS4, are important for growth in strains carrying a mutation in tRNA(Arg)(CCG) and are essential when La is deleted in these strains. Depletion of Pus3p results in accumulation of the aminoacylated mutant tRNA(Arg)(CCG) in nuclei, while depletion of Pus4p results in decreased stability of the mutant tRNA. Interestingly, the degradation of mutant unstable forms of tRNA(Arg)(CCG) does not require the Trf4p poly(A) polymerase, suggesting that yeast cells possess multiple pathways for tRNA decay. These data demonstrate that La functions redundantly with both tRNA modifications and proteins that associate with tRNAs to achieve tRNA structural stability and efficient biogenesis.

  2. Multiple {gamma}-glutamylation: A novel type of post-translational modification in a diapausing Artemia cyst protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Mai [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ikeda, Yuka [Institute of High Polymer Research, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan); Kanzawa, Hideaki [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Sakamoto, Mika [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Goto, Mina [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Tsunasawa, Susumu [Analytical and Measuring Instruments Division, Shimadzu Corporation, Nishinokyo Kuwabaracho 1, Nakagyo-Ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Uchiumi, Toshio, E-mail: uchiumi@bio.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Odani, Shoji [Bioscience Course, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, 2-8050 Ikarashi, Nishi-Ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan)

    2010-03-26

    A highly hydrophilic, glutamate-rich protein was identified in the aqueous phenol extract from the cytosolic fraction of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) diapausing cysts and termed Artemia phenol soluble protein (PSP). Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many protein peaks around m/z 11,000, separated by 129 atomic mass units; this value corresponds to that of glutamate, which is strongly suggestive of heterogeneous polyglutamylation. Polyglutamylation has long been known as the functionally important post-translational modification of tubulins, which carry poly(L-glutamic acid) chains of heterogeneous length branching off from the main chain at the {gamma}-carboxy groups of a few specific glutamate residues. In Artemia PSP, however, Edman degradation of enzymatic peptides revealed that at least 13, and presumably 16, glutamate residues were modified by the attachment of a single L-glutamate, representing a hitherto undescribed type of post-translational modification: namely, multiple {gamma}-glutamylation or the addition of a large number of glutamate residues along the polypeptide chain. Although biological significance of PSP and its modification is yet to be established, suppression of in vitro thermal aggregation of lactate dehydrogenase by glutamylated PSP was observed.

  3. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the protein α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-11-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory effect on α-synuclein aggregation, while not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation.

  4. S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine: a novel chemical modification of tissue proteins by a Krebs cycle intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Nathan L; Wang, Yuping; Blatnik, Matthew; Frizzell, Norma; Walla, Michael D; Lyons, Timothy J; Alt, Nadja; Carson, James A; Nagai, Ryoji; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2006-06-01

    S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine (2SC) has been identified as a chemical modification in plasma proteins, in the non-mercaptalbumin fraction of human plasma albumin, in human skin collagen, and in rat skeletal muscle proteins and urine. 2SC increases in human skin collagen with age and is increased in muscle protein of diabetic vs. control rats. The concentration of 2SC in skin collagen and muscle protein correlated strongly with that of the advanced glycation/lipoxidation end-product (AGE/ALE), N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML). 2SC is formed by a Michael addition reaction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups with fumarate at physiological pH. Fumarate, but not succinate, inactivates the sulfhydryl enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in vitro, in concert with formation of 2SC. 2SC is the first example of spontaneous chemical modification of protein by a metabolic intermediate in the Krebs cycle. These observations identify fumarate as an endogenous electrophile and suggest a role for fumarate in regulation of metabolism.

  5. Influence of surface modification on protein retention in ion-exchange chromatography. Evaluation using different retention models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Thomas; Graalfs, Heiner; Jacob, Lothar; Frech, Christian

    2009-02-06

    A large number of different stationary phases for ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) from different manufacturers are available, which vary significantly in a number of chemical and physical properties. As a consequence, binding mechanisms may be different as well. In the work reported here, the retention data of model proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin A, bovine serum albumin and alcohol dehydrogenase) were determined for three anion-exchange adsorbents based on synthetic copolymer beads with differences in the functional group chemistry. Fractogel EMD DEAE and Fractoprep DEAE consist of functional groups bound to the surface via "tentacles", ToyopearlDEAE by a short linker. Three models which describe chromatographic retention were used to analyse the characteristic parameters of the protein/stationary-phase interactions. The number of electrostatic interaction between the stationary phase and the model proteins, the protein specific surface charge densities and the interacting surface of the proteins with the adsorptive layer of the chromatographic media depend on the surface modification as well as on the molecular mass of the model proteins. In general, protein retention of the model proteins on the weak anion exchangers was found to be greater if the stationary phase carries tentacles and protein mass is above 60 kDa.

  6. A hyperspectral and toxicological analysis of protein corona impact on silver nanoparticle properties, intracellular modifications, and macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannahan, Jonathan H; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    The inevitable adsorption of biomolecules on nanomaterials results in the formation of a protein corona (PC), which modifies the nanoparticle (NP)-cell interface resulting in modified uptake, activity, clearance, and toxicity. While the physicochemical properties of the NP govern the composition of PC, the formation of PC in turn alters the characteristics of the NP by imparting a new unique "biological" identity. To assess how the PC influences AgNP properties, intracellular modifications, and cellular responses, we utilized a combination of hyperspectral and toxicological analyses. AgNPs were coated with a complex PC (multiple proteins, eg, 10% fetal bovine serum) or a simple PC (single protein, eg, bovine serum albumin [BSA]) and evaluated by hyperspectral and dynamic light scattering for modifications in AgNP properties. Mouse macrophages were exposed to AgNPs with PCs and examined for differences in uptake, cytotoxicity, and cell activation. Hyperspectral imaging revealed intracellular modifications to AgNPs that were found to spectrally match alterations in AgNPs following incubation in lysosomal fluid. Addition of the PC influenced AgNP uptake and cytotoxicity; however, hydrodynamic size and surface charge did not contribute to these responses. Assessments of all endpoints demonstrated differences between complex and BSA PC, suggesting that these responses are not purely driven by the primary protein component of the complex PC (ie, BSA). Alterations in cellular-NP uptake/interactions may be driven through cell surface receptor recognition of protein constituents that make up the PC rather than the physicochemical differences in AgNPs.

  7. A hyperspectral and toxicological analysis of protein corona impact on silver nanoparticle properties, intracellular modifications, and macrophage activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannahan JH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan H Shannahan,1 Ramakrishna Podila,2,3 Jared M Brown1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, 2Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, 3Clemson Nanomaterials Center and COMSET, Clemson University, Anderson, SC, USA Abstract: The inevitable adsorption of biomolecules on nanomaterials results in the formation of a protein corona (PC, which modifies the nanoparticle (NP–cell interface resulting in modified uptake, activity, clearance, and toxicity. While the physicochemical properties of the NP govern the composition of PC, the formation of PC in turn alters the characteristics of the NP by imparting a new unique “biological” identity. To assess how the PC influences AgNP properties, intracellular modifications, and cellular responses, we utilized a combination of hyperspectral and toxicological analyses. AgNPs were coated with a complex PC (multiple proteins, eg, 10% fetal bovine serum or a simple PC (single protein, eg, bovine serum albumin [BSA] and evaluated by hyperspectral and dynamic light scattering for modifications in AgNP properties. Mouse macrophages were exposed to AgNPs with PCs and examined for differences in uptake, cytotoxicity, and cell activation. Hyperspectral imaging revealed intracellular modifications to AgNPs that were found to spectrally match alterations in AgNPs following incubation in lysosomal fluid. Addition of the PC influenced AgNP uptake and cytotoxicity; however, hydrodynamic size and surface charge did not contribute to these responses. Assessments of all endpoints demonstrated differences between complex and BSA PC, suggesting that these responses are not purely driven by the primary protein component of the complex PC (ie, BSA. Alterations in cellular–NP uptake/interactions may be driven through cell surface receptor recognition of protein constituents

  8. Immobilization and utilization of the recombinant fusion proteins trypsin-streptavidin and streptavidin-transglutaminase for modification of whey protein isolate functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Christopher P; Clare, Debra A; Valentine, Val W; Swaisgood, Harold E

    2002-06-19

    A method was developed for the production of a hydrolyzed/polymerized whey protein derivative with altered solution and gelation properties using a combination of recombinant DNA and immobilized enzyme technologies. The recombinant fusion proteins trypsin-streptavidin (TrypSA) and streptavidin-transglutaminase (cSAcTG) were produced in Escherichia coli, extracted, and then immobilized by selective adsorption on biotinylated controlled-pore glass. Recirculation through a TrypSA reactor induced limited proteolysis of whey proteins. Hydrolysates were then recirculated through a cSAcTG reactor for incremental periods of time to arrive at increasing degrees of polymerization. The polymers were subsequently analyzed for viscosity/flow behavior, gelation properties, and fracture properties using shear rate ramps/intrinsic viscosity, small-strain oscillatory rheology, and vane viscometry, respectively. By combining limited proteolysis with controlled cross-linking, it was possible to create derivatives of whey proteins with enhanced functional properties. Increases in the degree of whey protein modification were correlated with greater apparent viscosity and intrinsic viscosity, lowered gel point temperatures, and stronger, more brittle gels. This method allowed for recycling of the enzyme, eliminated the requirement for a downstream inactivation step, and permitted control over the extent of modification. Utilization of a similar process may allow for the production of designer proteins engineered with specific functionalities.

  9. Flu channel drug resistance: a tale of two sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielak, Rafal M; Chou, James J

    2010-03-01

    The M2 proteins of influenza A and B virus, AM2 and BM2, respectively, are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize in the viral membrane to form proton-selective channels. Proton conductance of the M2 proteins is required for viral replication; it is believed to equilibrate pH across the viral membrane during cell entry and across the trans-Golgi membrane of infected cells during viral maturation. In addition to the role of M2 in proton conductance, recent mutagenesis and structural studies suggest that the cytoplasmic domains of the M2 proteins also play a role in recruiting the matrix proteins to the cell surface during virus budding. As viral ion channels of minimalist architecture, the membrane-embedded channel domain of M2 has been a model system for investigating the mechanism of proton conduction. Moreover, as a proven drug target for the treatment of influenza A infection, M2 has been the subject of intense research for developing new anti-flu therapeutics. AM2 is the target of two anti-influenza A drugs, amantadine and rimantadine, both belonging to the adamantane class of compounds. However, resistance of influenza A to adamantane is now widespread due to mutations in the channel domain of AM2. This review summarizes the structure and function of both AM2 and BM2 channels, the mechanism of drug inhibition and drug resistance of AM2, as well as the development of new M2 inhibitors as potential anti-flu drugs.

  10. Laser- and UV-assisted modification of polystyrene surfaces for control of protein adsorption and cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleging, Wilhelm; Torge, Maika; Bruns, Michael; Trouillet, Vanessa; Welle, Alexander; Wilson, Sandra

    2009-03-01

    An appropriate choice of laser and process parameters enables new approaches for the fabrication of polymeric lab-on-chip devices with integrated functionalities. We will present our current research results in laser-assisted modification of polystyrene (PS) with respect to the fabrication of polymer devices for cell culture applications. For this purpose laser micro-patterning of PS and subsequent surface functionalization was investigated as function of laser and process parameters. A high power ArF-excimer laser radiation source with a pulse length of 19 ns as well as a high repetition ArF-excimer laser source with a pulse length of 5 ns were used in order to study the influence of laser pulse length on laser-induced surface oxidation. The change in surface chemistry was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The difference between laser-assisted modification versus UV-lamp assisted modification was investigated. A photolytic activation of specific areas of the polymer surface and subsequent oxidization in oxygen or ambient air leads to a chemically modified polymer surface bearing carboxylic acid groups well-suited for controlled competitive protein adsorption or protein immobilization. Finally, distinct areas for cell growth and adhesion are obtained.

  11. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  12. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification of zinc finger protein 131 potentiates its negative effect on estrogen signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2012-05-18

    Like ubiquitin, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) covalently attaches to specific target proteins and modulates their functional properties, including subcellular localization, protein dimerization, DNA binding, and transactivation of transcription factors. Diverse transcriptional co-regulator complexes regulate the ability of estrogen receptors to respond to positive and negative acting hormones. Zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) is poorly characterized but may act as a repressor of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-mediated trans-activation. Here, we identify ZNF131 as a target for SUMO modification and as a substrate for the SUMO E3 ligase human polycomb protein 2 (hPc2). We report that the SUMO-interacting motif 1 (SIM1) and the C-box of hPc2 are critical regions required for ZNF131 SUMOylation and define the ZNF131 SUMOylation site as lysine 567. We further show that SUMO modification potentiates the negative effect of ZNF131 on estrogen signaling and consequently attenuates estrogen-induced cell growth in a breast cancer cell line. Our findings suggest that SUMOylation is a novel regulator of ZNF131 action in estrogen signaling and breast cancer cell proliferation.

  13. Sinorhizobium meliloti Controls Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-Translational Modification of a Medicago truncatula Nodule Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquet, Pauline; Silva, Liliana; Catrice, Olivier; Bruand, Claude; Carvalho, Helena; Meilhoc, Eliane

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in various plant-microbe interactions. In the symbiosis between soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti and model legume Medicago truncatula, NO is required for an optimal establishment of the interaction but is also a signal for nodule senescence. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for NO effects in the legume-rhizobium interaction. Here, we investigate the contribution of the bacterial NO response to the modulation of a plant protein post-translational modification in nitrogen-fixing nodules. We made use of different bacterial mutants to finely modulate NO levels inside M. truncatula root nodules and to examine the consequence on tyrosine nitration of the plant glutamine synthetase, a protein responsible for assimilation of the ammonia released by nitrogen fixation. Our results reveal that S. meliloti possesses several proteins that limit inactivation of plant enzyme activity via NO-mediated post-translational modifications. This is the first demonstration that rhizobia can impact the course of nitrogen fixation by modulating the activity of a plant protein.

  14. Progress of rice protein modification technology%大米蛋白改性技术的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    银波; 李亦蔚; 汪霞丽; 沈娜; 程云辉

    2011-01-01

    Rice protein is recognized as a quality plant protein with high nutritive value and hypoallergenic. Due to the poor solubility of rice protein, the emulsification, foaming, gelling and other features are not well, which limited the wide application in food industry.The paper introduces the latest development of physical, chemical and enzymatic modification technology, analyses the technical features and key research fields, looking forward to providing theory reference for rice protein modification and applications.%大米蛋白是公认的优质植物蛋白,具有高营养价值和低过敏性等特点,但因大米蛋白溶解性差,进而导致乳化性、发泡性、胶凝性等功能特性不佳,限制了其在食品领域的广泛应用.文章综述了物理、化学和酶法3大改性技术的最新进展,分析了各类技术的特点和研究重点,以期为大米蛋白的改性及应用提供理论参考.

  15. Mass spectrometric identification of formaldehyde-induced peptide modifications under in vivo protein cross-linking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Judy; Rogalski, Jason C; Clark, Thomas J; Kast, Juergen

    2008-06-23

    Formaldehyde cross-linking of proteins is emerging as a novel approach to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. It has been shown to be compatible with standard techniques used in functional proteomics such as affinity-based protein enrichment, enzymatic digestion, and mass spectrometric protein identification. So far, the lack of knowledge on formaldehyde-induced protein modifications and suitable mass spectrometric methods for their targeted detection has impeded the identification of the different types of cross-linked peptides in these samples. In particular, it has remained unclear whether in vitro studies that identified a multitude of amino acid residues reacting with formaldehyde over the course of several days are suitable substitutes for the much shorter reaction times of 10-20 min used in cross-linking experiments in living cells. The current study on model peptides identifies amino-termini as well as lysine, tryptophan, and cysteine side chains, i.e. a small subset of those modified after several days, as the major reactive sites under such conditions, and suggests relative position in the peptide sequence as well as sequence microenvironment to be important factors that govern reactivity. Using MALDI-MS, mass increases of 12 Da on amino groups and 30 Da on cysteines were detected as the major reaction products, while peptide fragment ion analysis by tandem mass spectrometry was used to localize the actual modification sites on a peptide. Non-specific cross-linking was absent, and could only be detected with low yield at elevated peptide concentrations. The detailed knowledge on the constraints and products of the formaldehyde reaction with peptides after short incubation times presented in this study is expected to facilitate the targeted mass spectrometric analysis of proteins after in vivo formaldehyde cross-linking.

  16. Allozyme-specific modification of a maize seed chitinase by a protein secreted by the fungal pathogen Stenocarpella maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Todd A; Wicklow, Donald T

    2010-07-01

    Stenocarpella maydis causes both dry-ear rot and stalk rot of maize. Maize inbred lines have varying levels of resistance to ear rot caused by S. maydis. The genetic basis of resistance appears to rely on multiple genetic factors, none of which are known. The commonly used stiff-stalk inbred line B73 has been shown to be strongly susceptible to ear rot caused by S. maydis. Here, we report that the ChitA protein alloform from B73, ChitA-F, encoded by a known allele of the chiA gene, is susceptible to modification by a protein (Stm-cmp) secreted by S. maydis. We also identify a new allele of chiA (from inbred line LH82) which encodes ChitA-S, an alloform of ChitA that is resistant to Stm-cmp modification. Chitinase zymogram analysis of seed from a commercial field showed the presence of both ChitA alloforms in healthy ears, and showed that ChitA-F but not ChitA-S was modified in ears rotted by S. maydis. The ChitA-F protein was purified from inbred line B73 and ChitA-S from LH82. ChitA-F was modified more efficiently than ChitA-S by S. maydis protein extracts in vitro. The chiA gene from LH82 was cloned and sequenced. It is a novel allele that encodes six polymorphisms relative to the known allele from B73. This is the first demonstration that the susceptibility to modification of a fungal targeted plant chitinase differs among inbred lines. These findings suggest that the LH82 chiA allele may be a specific genetic determinant that contributes to resistance to ear rot caused by S. maydis whereas the B73 allele may contribute to susceptibility.

  17. Complex interplay among DNA modification, noncoding RNA expression and protein-coding RNA expression in Salvia miltiorrhiza chloroplast genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimei Chen

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza is one of the most widely used medicinal plants. As a first step to develop a chloroplast-based genetic engineering method for the over-production of active components from S. miltiorrhiza, we have analyzed the genome, transcriptome, and base modifications of the S. miltiorrhiza chloroplast. Total genomic DNA and RNA were extracted from fresh leaves and then subjected to strand-specific RNA-Seq and Single-Molecule Real-Time (SMRT sequencing analyses. Mapping the RNA-Seq reads to the genome assembly allowed us to determine the relative expression levels of 80 protein-coding genes. In addition, we identified 19 polycistronic transcription units and 136 putative antisense and intergenic noncoding RNA (ncRNA genes. Comparison of the abundance of protein-coding transcripts (cRNA with and without overlapping antisense ncRNAs (asRNA suggest that the presence of asRNA is associated with increased cRNA abundance (p<0.05. Using the SMRT Portal software (v1.3.2, 2687 potential DNA modification sites and two potential DNA modification motifs were predicted. The two motifs include a TATA box-like motif (CPGDMM1, "TATANNNATNA", and an unknown motif (CPGDMM2 "WNYANTGAW". Specifically, 35 of the 97 CPGDMM1 motifs (36.1% and 91 of the 369 CPGDMM2 motifs (24.7% were found to be significantly modified (p<0.01. Analysis of genes downstream of the CPGDMM1 motif revealed the significantly increased abundance of ncRNA genes that are less than 400 bp away from the significantly modified CPGDMM1motif (p<0.01. Taking together, the present study revealed a complex interplay among DNA modifications, ncRNA and cRNA expression in chloroplast genome.

  18. A Novel Proteomic Analysis of the Modifications Induced by High Hydrostatic Pressure on Hazelnut Water-Soluble Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Prieto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Food allergies to hazelnut represent an important health problem in industrialized countries because of their high prevalence and severity. Food allergenicity can be changed by several processing procedures since food proteins may undergo modifications which could alter immunoreactivity. High-hydrostatic pressure (HHP is an emerging processing technology used to develop novel and high-quality foods. The effect of HHP on allergenicity is currently being investigated through changes in protein structure. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of HHP on the protein profile of hazelnut immunoreactive extracts by comparative proteomic analysis with ProteomeLab PF-2D liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. This protein fractionation method resolves proteins by isoelectric point and hydrophobicity in the first and second dimension, respectively. Second dimension chromatogram analyses show that some protein peaks present in unpressurized hazelnut must be unsolubilized and are not present in HHP-treated hazelnut extracts. Our results show that HHP treatment at low temperature induced marked changes on hazelnut water-soluble protein profile.

  19. A Novel Proteomic Analysis of the Modifications Induced by High Hydrostatic Pressure on Hazelnut Water-Soluble Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Nuria; Burbano, Carmen; Iniesto, Elisa; Rodríguez, Julia; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Crespo, Jesus F.; Pedrosa, Mercedes M.; Muzquiz, Mercedes; del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Linacero, Rosario; Cuadrado, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Food allergies to hazelnut represent an important health problem in industrialized countries because of their high prevalence and severity. Food allergenicity can be changed by several processing procedures since food proteins may undergo modifications which could alter immunoreactivity. High-hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is an emerging processing technology used to develop novel and high-quality foods. The effect of HHP on allergenicity is currently being investigated through changes in protein structure. Our aim is to evaluate the effect of HHP on the protein profile of hazelnut immunoreactive extracts by comparative proteomic analysis with ProteomeLab PF-2D liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. This protein fractionation method resolves proteins by isoelectric point and hydrophobicity in the first and second dimension, respectively. Second dimension chromatogram analyses show that some protein peaks present in unpressurized hazelnut must be unsolubilized and are not present in HHP-treated hazelnut extracts. Our results show that HHP treatment at low temperature induced marked changes on hazelnut water-soluble protein profile. PMID:28234319

  20. Modification of proteins with cyclodextrins prevents aggregation and surface adsorption and increases thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Deepali; Cui, DaWei; Bandyopadhyay, Debjyoti; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2011-11-01

    This work describes a general approach for preventing protein aggregation and surface adsorption by modifying proteins with β-cyclodextrins (βCD) via an efficient water-driven ligation. As compared to native unmodified proteins, the cyclodextrin-modified proteins (lysozyme and RNase A) exhibit significant reduction in aggregation, surface adsorption and increase in thermal stability. These results reveal a new chemistry for preventing protein aggregation and surface adsorption that is likely of different mechanisms than that by modifying proteins with poly(ethylene glycol).

  1. [Free radical modification of proteins in brain structure of Sprague-Dawley rats and some behaviour indicators after prenatal stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    V'iushina, A V; Pritvorova, A V; Flerov, M A

    2012-08-01

    We studied the influence of late prenatal stress on free radical oxidation processes in Sprague-Dawley rats cortex, striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus proteins. It was shown that after prenatal stress most changes were observed in hypothalamus and hippocampus. It was shown that in hypothalamus spontaneous oxidation level increased, but level of induced oxidation decreased, the opposite changes were found in hippocampus. Simultaneously minor changes of protein modification were observed in cortex and striatum. It was shown that prenatal stress changed both correlation of proteins free radical oxidation in studied structures and values of these data regarding to control. In test of "open field" motor activity in rats after prenatal stress decreased and time of freezing and grooming increased; opposite, in T-labyrinth motor activity and time of grooming in rats after prenatal stress increased, but time of freezing decreased.

  2. Characterizing protein modifications by reactive metabolites using magnetic bead bioreactors and LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Fu, You-Jun; Rusling, James F

    2015-03-18

    We report here label-free metabolite-protein adduct detection and identification employing magnetic beads coated with metabolic enzymes as bioreactors to generate metabolites and possible metabolite-protein adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

  3. SSPaQ: A Subtractive Segmentation Approach for the Exhaustive Parallel Quantification of the Extent of Protein Modification at Every Possible Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabant, Guillaume; Boyer, Alain; Cadene, Martine

    2016-08-01

    Protein modifications, whether chemically induced or post-translational (PTMs), play an essential role for the biological activity of proteins. Understanding biological processes and alterations thereof will rely on the quantification of these modifications on individual residues. Here we present SSPaQ, a subtractive method for the parallel quantification of the extent of modification at each possible site of a protein. The method combines uniform isotopic labeling and proteolysis with MS, followed by a segmentation approach, a powerful tool to refine the quantification of the degree of modification of a peptide to a segment containing a single modifiable amino acid. The strength of this strategy resides in: (1) quantification of all modifiable sites in a protein without prior knowledge of the type(s) of modified residues; (2) insensitivity to changes in the solubility and ionization efficiency of peptides upon modification; and (3) detection of missed cleavages caused by the modification for mitigation. The SSPaQ method was applied to quantify modifications resulting from the interaction of human phosphatidyl ethanolamine binding protein 1 (hPEBP1), a metastasis suppressor gene product, with locostatin, a covalent ligand and antimigratory compound with demonstrated activity towards hPEBP1. Locostatin is shown to react with several residues of the protein. SSPaQ can more generally be applied to induced modification in the context of drugs that covalently bind their target protein. With an alternate front-end protocol, it could also be applied to the quantification of protein PTMs, provided a removal tool is available for that PTM.

  4. Characterization of protein crosslinks via mass spectrometry and an open-modification search strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Pragya; Shaffer, Scott A; Scherl, Alexander; Holman, Carol; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Larson Freeman, Theodore J.; Miller, Samuel I.; Hernandez, Patricia; Appel, Ron D; Goodlett, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to function and regulation of many biological pathways. To facilitate characterization of protein-protein interactions using mass spectrometry, a new data acquisition/analysis pipeline was designed. The goal for this pipeline was to provide a generic strategy for identifying crosslinked peptides from single LC/MS/MS datasets, without using specialized crosslinkers or custom-written software. To achieve this, each peptide in the pair of crosslinked peptides...

  5. Posttranslational modification and sequence variation of redox-active proteins correlate with biofilm life cycle in natural microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing proteins recovered from natural microbial communities affords the opportunity to correlate protein expression and modification with environmental factors, including species composition and successional stage. Proteogenomic and biochemical studies of pellicle biofilms from subsurface acid mine drainage streams have shown abundant cytochromes from the dominant organism, Leptospirillum Group II. These cytochromes are proposed to be key proteins in aerobic Fe(II) oxidation, the dominant mode of cellular energy generation by the biofilms. In this study, we determined that posttranslational modification and expression of amino-acid sequence variants change as a function of biofilm maturation. For Cytochrome579 (Cyt579), the most abundant cytochrome in the biofilms, late developmental-stage biofilms differed from early-stage biofilms in N-terminal truncations and decreased redox potentials. Expression of sequence variants of two monoheme c-type cytochromes also depended on biofilm development. For Cyt572, an abundant membrane-bound cytochrome, the expression of multiple sequence variants was observed in both early and late developmental-stage biofilms; however, redox potentials of Cyt572 from these different sources did not vary significantly. These cytochrome analyses show a complex response of the Leptospirillum Group II electron transport chain to growth within a microbial community and illustrate the power of multiple proteomics techniques to define biochemistry in natural systems.

  6. Mass Spectrometry-Based Detection and Assignment of Protein Posttranslational Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Doll, S.; Burlingame, AL

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics allow the identification and quantitation of thousands of posttranslational modification (PTM) sites in a single experiment. This follows from the development of more effective class enrichment strategies, new high performance instrumentation and bioinformatic algorithms with rigorous scoring strategies. More widespread use of these combined capabilities have led to a vast expansion in our knowledge o...

  7. Proteomic shifts in embryonic stem cells with gene dose modifications suggest the presence of balancer proteins in protein regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Mao

    Full Text Available Large numbers of protein expression changes are usually observed in mouse models for neurodegenerative diseases, even when only a single gene was mutated in each case. To study the effect of gene dose alterations on the cellular proteome, we carried out a proteomic investigation on murine embryonic stem cells that either overexpressed individual genes or displayed aneuploidy over a genomic region encompassing 14 genes. The number of variant proteins detected per cell line ranged between 70 and 110, and did not correlate with the number of modified genes. In cell lines with single gene mutations, up and down-regulated proteins were always in balance in comparison to parental cell lines regarding number as well as concentration of differentially expressed proteins. In contrast, dose alteration of 14 genes resulted in an unequal number of up and down-regulated proteins, though the balance was kept at the level of protein concentration. We propose that the observed protein changes might partially be explained by a proteomic network response. Hence, we hypothesize the existence of a class of "balancer" proteins within the proteomic network, defined as proteins that buffer or cushion a system, and thus oppose multiple system disturbances. Through database queries and resilience analysis of the protein interaction network, we found that potential balancer proteins are of high cellular abundance, possess a low number of direct interaction partners, and show great allelic variation. Moreover, balancer proteins contribute more heavily to the network entropy, and thus are of high importance in terms of system resilience. We propose that the "elasticity" of the proteomic regulatory network mediated by balancer proteins may compensate for changes that occur under diseased conditions.

  8. Early cytoskeletal protein modifications precede overt structural degeneration in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Nicole Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport deficits precede structural loss in glaucoma and other neurodegenerations. Impairments in structural support, including modified cytoskeletal proteins and microtubule-destabilizing elements, could be initiating factors in glaucoma pathogenesis. We investigated the time course of changes in protein levels and post-translational modifications in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma. Using anterograde tract tracing of the retinal projection, we assessed major cytoskeletal and transported elements as a function of transport integrity in different stages of pathological progression. Using capillary-based electrophoresis, single- and multiplex immunosorbent assays, and immunofluorescence, we quantified hyperphosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain, phosphorylated tau (ptau, calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product (145/150kDa, β –tubulin, and amyloid-β42 proteins based on age and transport outcome to the superior colliculus (SC, the main retinal target in mice. Phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain (pNF-H was elevated within the optic nerve (ON and SC of 8-10 month-old DBA/2J mice, but was not evident in the retina until 12-15 months, suggesting that cytoskeletal modifications first appear in the distal retinal projection. As expected, higher pNF-H levels in the SC and retina were correlated with axonal transport deficits. Elevations in hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau occurred in ON and SC between 3-8 month of age while retinal ptau accumulations occurred at 12-15 months in DBA/2J mice. In vitro co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested increased affinity of ptau for the retrograde motor complex protein, dynactin. We observed a transport-related decrease of β-tubulin in ON of 10-12 month-old DBA/2J mice, suggesting destabilized microtubule array. Elevations in calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product were seen in ON and SC at the earliest age examined, well before axonal transport loss is evident. Finally, transport

  9. Integration of plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein surface activation for single-cell patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Q.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2010-07-01

    Surface patterning for single-cell culture was accomplished by combining plasma-assisted surface chemical modification, soft lithography, and protein-induced surface activation. Hydrophilic patterns were produced on Parylene C films deposited on glass substrates by oxygen plasma treatment through the windows of polydimethylsiloxane shadow masks. After incubation first with Pluronic F108 solution and then serum medium overnight, surface seeding with mesenchymal stem cells in serum medium resulted in single-cell patterning. The present method provides a means of surface patterning with direct implications in single-cell culture.

  10. Mining Large Scale Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data for Protein Modifications Using Spectral Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlacher, Oliver; Lisacek, Frederique; Müller, Markus

    2016-03-04

    Experimental improvements in post-translational modification (PTM) detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has allowed the identification of vast numbers of PTMs. Open modification searches (OMSs) of MS/MS data, which do not require prior knowledge of the modifications present in the sample, further increased the diversity of detected PTMs. Despite much effort, there is still a lack of functional annotation of PTMs. One possibility to narrow the annotation gap is to mine MS/MS data deposited in public repositories and to correlate the PTM presence with biological meta-information attached to the data. Since the data volume can be quite substantial and contain tens of millions of MS/MS spectra, the data mining tools must be able to cope with big data. Here, we present two tools, Liberator and MzMod, which are built using the MzJava class library and the Apache Spark large scale computing framework. Liberator builds large MS/MS spectrum libraries, and MzMod searches them in an OMS mode. We applied these tools to a recently published set of 25 million spectra from 30 human tissues and present tissue specific PTMs. We also compared the results to the ones obtained with the OMS tool MODa and the search engine X!Tandem.

  11. Establishment of a Two-site ELISA for Detection of Chlamydia Trachomatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huj(王慧); XIONG Ljkuan(熊礼宽); LI Ying(李影)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To establish a rapid and simple assay for the diagnosis of Chlamydia trachonatis (CT) infection.Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with SDS-PAGE purified major outer membrane protein (MOMP) from CT and the monoclonal antibodies were obtained subsequently.Two-site ELISA was developed to detect CT infection.Results: The established assay was able to detect as low as 1.248ug/ml MOMP with interrun and inrun CV 6.9% and 3.1% respectively. 94% (34/36) of culture-positive samples were found to be positive in the current examination,indicating the high sensitivity of this assay.Conclusion: The assay is applicable for clinical diagnosis of CT infection.

  12. Hydrophilic modification gigaporous resins with poly(ethylenimine) for high-throughput proteins ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongyue; Li, Qiang; Gao, Yang; Li, Juan; Huang, Yongdong; Song, Cui; Zhou, Weiqing; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2014-05-23

    High hydrophilicity of gigaporous microspheres based on a copolymer of poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-co-divinyl benzene (PGMA-DVB) was successfully realized through coating the branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) in PGMA-DVB microspheres. PEI with various molecules weights and different branching agents were identified in terms of protein recovery as evaluation approach. For this evaluation, PEI600 (Mw=600) and poly (ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGDE, Mw=400) were used as modification agent and branching agent, respectively. The modified microspheres showed good permeability and revealed a certain mechanical strength. After modification, the protein recovery increased from 40% to >90%. The protein recovery increased with the branched generations and the first and second generations could give the protein recovery of 93% and 96%, respectively. Meanwhile, the ionic capacity also showed a rising trend in the range of 0.11-0.32mmol/mL with the branched generations. But the dynamic binding capacity of protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA as the model protein) increased at first and then decreased. Analysis of the dry microspheres structure by mercury intrusion method as well as observation of the branched PEI on PGMA-DVB membrane in aqueous solution indicated that excess PEI chains with the extended state in the second generation would block the small pores and decrease the accessible surface area. Therefore, the protein capacity on the second generation, on the contrary, was lower than that on the first generation. Meanwhile, it was found that the PEI chains in the modified microspheres changed their construction from the extended to the collapsed state with increase of NaCl concentration. And the corresponding pore size of the modified microspheres increased with salt concentration through low-field nuclear magnetic resonance. Dynamic binding capacity of proteins on the modified supports did not significantly change with increase of the flow rate. The media showed

  13. Two methods for glass surface modification and their application in protein immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ming; Hou, Sen; Wang, Likai; Feng, XiZeng; Wang, Rui; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Yu, Lei; Shao, Bin; Qiao, MingQiang

    2007-11-15

    Protein immobilization is a crucial step in protein chip, biosensor, etc. Here, two methods to immobilize proteins on glass surface were analyzed, one is silanization method using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and the other is hydrophobin HFBI coating. The modified glass surfaces were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurement (WCA) and immunoassay. The results of XPS and WCA illustrated that the surface property of glass can be changed by both the two methods. The following immunoassay using microcontact printing (microCP) verified that both methods could help protein immobilization effectively on glass slides. Compared with the amine treatment, it is concluded that hydrophobin self-assemblies is a simple and generic way for protein immobilization on glass slides, which has potential application in protein chips and biosensors.

  14. Structural modification of serum vitamin D3-binding protein and immunosuppression in AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R; Srinivasula, S M

    1995-11-01

    A serum glycoprotein, vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), can be converted by beta-galactosidase of stimulated B lymphocytes and sialidase of T lymphocytes to a potent macrophage-activating factor (MAF), a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar moiety. Thus, Gc protein is a precursor for MAF. Treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates an extremely high-titered MAF (GcMAF). When peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages of 46 HIV-infected patients were treated with GcMAF (100 pg/ml), the monocytes/macrophages of all patients were efficiently activated. However, the MAF precursor activity of plasma Gc protein was low in 16 (35%) of of these patients. Loss of the MAF precursor activity appeared to be due to deglycosylation of plasma Gc protein by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase found in the patient blood stream. Levels of plasma alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in individual patients had an inverse correlation with the MAF precursor activity of their plasma Gc protein. Thus, precursor activity of Gc protein and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in patient blood can serve as diagnostic and prognostic indices.

  15. Dietary protein restriction causes modification in aluminum-induced alteration in glutamate and GABA system of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Ajay K

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alteration of glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system have been reported to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders and have been postulated to be involved in aluminum-induced neurotoxicity as well. Aluminum, an well known and commonly exposed neurotoxin, was found to alter glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels as well as activities of associated enzymes with regional specificity. Protein malnutrition also reported to alter glutamate level and some of its metabolic enzymes. Thus the region-wise study of levels of brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system in protein adequacy and inadequacy may be worthwhile to understand the mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity. Results Protein restriction does not have any significant impact on regional aluminum and γ-aminobutyrate contents of rat brain. Significant interaction of dietary protein restriction and aluminum intoxication to alter regional brain glutamate level was observed in the tested brain regions except cerebellum. Alteration in glutamate α-decarboxylase and γ-aminobutyrate transaminase activities were found to be significantly influenced by interaction of aluminum intoxication and dietary protein restriction in all the tested brain regions. In case of regional brain succinic semialdehyde content, this interaction was significant only in cerebrum and thalamic area. Conclusion The alterations of regional brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels by aluminum are region specific as well as dependent on dietary protein intake. The impact of aluminum exposure on the metabolism of these amino acid neurotransmitters are also influenced by dietary protein level. Thus, modification of dietary protein level or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis by any other means may be an useful tool to find out a path to restrict amino acid neurotransmitter alterations in aluminum-associated neurodisorders.

  16. meta-Tyrosine induces modification of reactive nitrogen species level, protein nitration and nitrosoglutathione reductase in tomato roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Borucki, Wojciech; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2017-08-01

    A non-protein amino acid (NPAA) - meta-Tyrosine (m-Tyr), is a harmful compound produced by fescue roots. Young (3-4 days old) tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were supplemented for 24-72 h with m-Tyr (50 or 250 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. Fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives was determined to show reactive nitrogen species (RNS) localization and level in roots of tomato plants. m-Tyr-induced restriction of root elongation growth was related to formation of nitrated proteins described as content of 3-nitrotyrosine. Supplementation with m-Tyr enhanced superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated protein nitration. It correlated well to increase of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives corresponding respectively to NO and ONOO(-) formation. Alterations in RNS formation induced by m-Tyr were linked to metabolism of nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Activity of nitrosoglutatione reductase (GSNOR), catalyzing degradation of GSNO was enhanced by long term plant supplementation with m-Tyr, similarly as protein abundance, while transcripts level were only slightly altered by tested NPAA. We conclude, that although in animal cells m-Tyr is considered as a marker of oxidative stress, its secondary mode of action in tomato plants involves perturbation in RNS formation, alteration in GSNO metabolism and modification of protein nitration level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Modification of structure and pattern of lipid monolayer on water and solid surfaces in presence of globular protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Bijay Kumar; Kundu, Sarathi

    2017-05-01

    Langmuir monolayers of phospholipids at the air-water interface are well-established model systems for mimicking biological membranes and hence are useful for studying lipid-protein interactions. In the present work, phases and phase transformations occurring in the lipid (DMPA) monolayer in the presence of globular protein (BSA) at neutral subphase pH (≈7.0) are highlighted and the corresponding in-plane pattern and morphology are explored from the surface pressure (π) - specific molecular area (A) isotherm, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) both at air-water and air-solid interfaces. Films of pure lipid and lipid-protein complexes are deposited on solid surfaces by Langmuir-Blodgett method. Due to the presence of BSA molecules, phases and domain pattern changes in comparison with that of the pure DMPA. Moreover, accumulations of globular proteins in between lipid domains are also visible through BAM. AFM shows that the mixed film has relatively bigger globular-like morphology in comparison with that of pure DMPA domains. Combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between protein and lipid are responsible for such modifications.

  18. A comprehensive platform for the analysis of ubiquitin-like protein modifications using in vivo biotinylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirone, Lucia; Xolalpa, Wendy; Sigurdsson, Jón Otti

    2017-01-01

    UbLs allow rapid validation of UbL conjugation for exogenous or endogenous proteins, the single vector approach can facilitate biotinylation of most proteins of interest. Purification under denaturing conditions inactivates deconjugating enzymes and stringent washes remove UbL interactors and non...

  19. Modification of heterotrimeric G-proteins in Swiss 3T3 cells stimulated with Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Babb

    Full Text Available Many bacterial toxins covalently modify components of eukaryotic signalling pathways in a highly specific manner, and can be used as powerful tools to decipher the function of their molecular target(s. The Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT mediates its cellular effects through the activation of members of three of the four heterotrimeric G-protein families, G(q, G(12 and G(i. PMT has been shown by others to lead to the deamidation of recombinant Gα(i at Gln-205 to inhibit its intrinsic GTPase activity. We have investigated modification of native Gα subunits mediated by PMT in Swiss 3T3 cells using 2-D gel electrophoresis and antibody detection. An acidic change in the isoelectric point was observed for the Gα subunit of the G(q and G(i families following PMT treatment of Swiss 3T3 cells, which is consistent with the deamidation of these Gα subunits. Surprisingly, PMT also induced a similar modification of Gα(11, a member of the G(q family of G-proteins that is not activated by PMT. Furthermore, an alkaline change in the isoelectric point of Gα(13 was observed following PMT treatment of cells, suggesting differential modification of this Gα subunit by PMT. G(s was not affected by PMT treatment. Prolonged treatment with PMT led to a reduction in membrane-associated Gα(i, but not Gα(q. We also show that PMT inhibits the GTPase activity of G(q.

  20. Investigations of chemical modifications of amino-terminated organic films on silicon substrates and controlled protein immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joonyeong; Cho, Joungmo; Seidler, Paul M; Kurland, Nicholas E; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2010-02-16

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy by grazing-angle attenuated total reflection (FTIR-GATR), ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-visible spectroscopy, and fluorescence microscopy were employed to investigate chemical modifications of amino-terminated organic thin films on silicon substrates, protein immobilization, and the biological activity and hydrolytic stability of immobilized proteins. Amino-terminated organic films were prepared on silicon wafers by self-assembling 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) in anhydrous toluene. Surface amino groups were derivatized into three different linkers: N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester, hydrazide, and maleimide ester groups. UV-visible absorption measurements and fluorescence microscopy revealed that more than 40% of surface amino groups were chemically modified. Protein immobilization was carried out on modified APTES films containing these linkers via coupling with primary amines (-NH(2)) in intact monoclonal rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG), the aldehyde (-CHO) of an oxidized carbohydrate residue in IgG, or the sulfhydryl (-SH) of fragmented half-IgG, respectively. FTIR spectra contain vibrational signatures of these functional groups present in modified APTES films and immobilized IgGs. Changes in the APTES film thickness after chemical modifications and protein immobilization were also observed by ellipsometric measurements. The biological activity and long-term hydrolytic stability of immobilized IgGs on modified APTES films were estimated by fluorescence measurements of an adsorbed antigen, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG (FITC-Ab). Our results indicate that the FITC-Ab binding capacity of half-IgG immobilized via maleimide groups is greater than that of the oxidized IgG and the intact IgG immobilized via hydrazide and NHS ester groups, respectively. In addition, IgGs immobilized using all coupling chemistries were hydrolytically stable in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS).

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury by alcohol, high fat, nonalcoholic substances and pathological conditions through post-translational protein modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Joon Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are critically important in providing cellular energy ATP as well as their involvement in anti-oxidant defense, fat oxidation, intermediary metabolism and cell death processes. It is well-established that mitochondrial functions are suppressed when living cells or organisms are exposed to potentially toxic agents including alcohol, high fat diets, smoking and certain drugs or in many pathophysiological states through increased levels of oxidative/nitrative stress. Under elevated nitroxidative stress, cellular macromolecules proteins, DNA, and lipids can undergo different oxidative modifications, leading to disruption of their normal, sometimes critical, physiological functions. Recent reports also indicated that many mitochondrial proteins are modified via various post-translation modifications (PTMs and primarily inactivated. Because of the recently-emerging information, in this review, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and roles of five major PTMs (namely oxidation, nitration, phosphorylation, acetylation, and adduct formation with lipid-peroxides, reactive metabolites, or advanced glycation end products in experimental models of alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as well as acute hepatic injury caused by toxic compounds. We also highlight the role of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1 in some of these PTM changes. Finally, we discuss translational research opportunities with natural and/or synthetic anti-oxidants, which can prevent or delay the onset of mitochondrial dysfunction, fat accumulation and tissue injury.

  2. Post-Translational Modifications of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV Regulatory Proteins-SUMO and KSHV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mel eCampbell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation from a latent state is an important feature of infection and disease caused by many herpesviruses. KSHV latency can be envisioned as an outcome that is balanced between factors that promote viral gene expression and lytic replication against those that facilitate gene silencing and establish or maintain latency. A large body of work has focused on the activities of the key viral regulatory proteins involved in KSHV latent or lytic states. Moreover, recent studies have also begun to document the importance of epigenetic landscape evolution of the KSHV viral genome during latency and reactivation. However, one area of KSHV molecular virology that remains largely unanswered is the precise role of post-translational modifications on the activities of viral factors that function during latency and reactivation. In this review, we will summarize the post-translational modifications associated with three viral factors whose activities contribute to the viral state. The viral proteins discussed are the two major KSHV encoded transcription factors, K-Rta and K-bZIP (KSHV basic leucine zipper and the viral latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA. A special emphasis will be placed on the role of the sumoylation pathway in the modulation of the KSHV lifecycle. Newly uncovered SUMO-dependent properties of LANA and K-Rta will also be presented, namely LANA histone-targeting SUMO E3 ligase activity and K-Rta SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase function.

  3. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for graphene surface modification and protein translocation through the chemically modified graphene nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Purushottam; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Xuewen; Darici, Yesim; He, Jin

    2014-03-01

    The multilayer graphene surface has been modified using mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-750] (DPPE-PEG750). The surface modifications are evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS measurements show the better graphene surface passivation with DPPE-PEG750 than with MHA. After modification with ferritin, the MHA modified surface shows greater charge transfer resistance (Rct) change than DPPE-PEG750 modified surface. Based on these results the translocations of ferritin through modified graphene nanopore with diameter 5-20 nm are studied. The translocation is more successful through DPPE-PEG750 modified graphene nanopore. This concludes that that the attachment of ferritin to DPPE-PEG750 modified graphene nanopore is not significant compared to MHA modified pore for the ferritin translocation hindrance. These results nicely correlate with the EIS data for respective Rct change of ferritin modified surfaces. P. Tiwari would like to thank FIU School of Integrated Science & Humanity, College Arts & Sciences for the research assistantship.

  4. Normal histone modifications on the inactive X chromosome in ICF and Rett syndrome cells: implications for methyl-CpG binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canfield Theresa K

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, there is evidence suggesting that methyl-CpG binding proteins may play a significant role in histone modification through their association with modification complexes that can deacetylate and/or methylate nucleosomes in the proximity of methylated DNA. We examined this idea for the X chromosome by studying histone modifications on the X chromosome in normal cells and in cells from patients with ICF syndrome (Immune deficiency, Centromeric region instability, and Facial anomalies syndrome. In normal cells the inactive X has characteristic silencing type histone modification patterns and the CpG islands of genes subject to X inactivation are hypermethylated. In ICF cells, however, genes subject to X inactivation are hypomethylated on the inactive X due to mutations in the DNA methyltransferase (DNMT3B genes. Therefore, if DNA methylation is upstream of histone modification, the histones on the inactive X in ICF cells should not be modified to a silent form. In addition, we determined whether a specific methyl-CpG binding protein, MeCP2, is necessary for the inactive X histone modification pattern by studying Rett syndrome cells which are deficient in MeCP2 function. Results We show here that the inactive X in ICF cells, which appears to be hypomethylated at all CpG islands, exhibits normal histone modification patterns. In addition, in Rett cells with no functional MeCP2 methyl-CpG binding protein, the inactive X also exhibits normal histone modification patterns. Conclusions These data suggest that DNA methylation and the associated methyl-DNA binding proteins may not play a critical role in determining histone modification patterns on the mammalian inactive X chromosome at the sites analyzed.

  5. An integrated top-down and bottom-up strategy for characterization protein isoforms and modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Si; Tolic, Nikola; Tian, Zhixin; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-04-15

    Bottom-up and top-down strategies are two commonly used methods for mass spectrometry (MS) based protein identification; each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. In this chapter, we describe an integrated top-down and bottom-up approach facilitated by concurrent liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis and fraction collection for comprehensive high-throughput intact protein profiling. The approach employs a high resolution reversed phase (RP) LC separation coupled with LC eluent fraction collection and concurrent on-line MS with a high field (12 Tesla) Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. Protein elusion profiles and tentative modified protein identification are made using detected intact protein mass in conjunction with bottom-up protein identifications from the enzymatic digestion and analysis of corresponding LC fractions. Specific proteins of biological interest are incorporated into a target ion list for subsequent off-line gas-phase fragmentation that uses an aliquot of the original collected LC fraction, an aliquot of which was also used for bottom-up analysis.

  6. Effects of Industrial Heating Processes of Milk-Based Enteral Formulas on Site-Specific Protein Modifications and Their Relationship to in Vitro and in Vivo Protein Digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2015-08-01

    Heat treatments are applied to milk and dairy products to ensure their microbiological safety and shelf lives. Types of heating processes may have different effects on protein modifications, leading to different protein digestibility. In this study, milk-based liquid nutritional formulas (simulating enteral formulas) were subjected to steam injection ultra-high-temperature treatment or in-can sterilization, and the formulas were investigated by proteomic methods and in vitro and in vivo digestion assays. Proteomic analyses revealed that in-can sterilization resulted in higher signals for N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine and dephosphorylation of Ser residues in major milk proteins than in steam-injected formula, reflecting the more severe thermal process of in-can sterilization. In vitro and in vivo digestion assays indicated that steam injection improved protein digestibility, supposedly by denaturation, while the improvement seemed to be overwhelmed by formation of aggregates that showed resistance to digestion in in-can sterilized formula. Adverse effects of heat treatment on protein digestibility are more likely to be manifested in milk-based formulas than in cow's milk. Although the differences might be of limited significance in terms of amino acid bioavailability, these results emphasize the importance of protein quality of raw materials and selection of heating processes.

  7. High hydrostatic pressure modification of whey protein concentrate for improved functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S-Y; Swanson, B G; Clark, S

    2008-04-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) has many applications in the food industry. Previous research demonstrated that treatment of whey proteins with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) can enhance solubility and foaming properties of whey proteins. The objective of this study was to use HHP to improve functional properties of fresh WPC, compared with functional properties of reconstituted commercial whey protein concentrate 35 (WPC 35) powder. Fluid whey was ultrafiltered to concentrate proteins and reconstituted to equivalent total solids (8.23%) as reconstituted commercial WPC 35 powder. Solutions of WPC were treated with 300 and 400 MPa (0- and 15-min holding time) and 600 MPa (0-min holding time) pressure. After HHP, the solubility of the WPC was determined at both pH 4.6 and 7.0 using UDY and BioRad protein assay methods. Overrun and foam stability were determined after protein dispersions were whipped for 15 min. The protein solubility was greater at pH 7.0 than at pH 4.6, but there were no significant differences at different HHP treatment conditions. The maintenance of protein solubility after HHP indicates that HHP-treated WPC might be appropriate for applications to food systems. Untreated WPC exhibited the smallest overrun percentage, whereas the largest percentage for overrun and foam stability was obtained for WPC treated at 300 MPa for 15 min. Additionally, HHP-WPC treated at 300 MPa for 15 min acquired larger overrun than commercial WPC 35. The HHP treatment of 300 MPa for 0 min did not improve foam stability of WPC. However, WPC treated at 300 or 400 MPa for 15 min and 600 MPa for 0 min exhibited significantly greater foam stability than commercial WPC 35. The HHP treatment was beneficial to enhance overrun and foam stability of WPC, showing promise for ice cream and whipping cream applications.

  8. Protein modifications in the plant secretory pathway: current status and practical implications in molecular pharming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Loïc; Boulaflous, Aurelia; Benchabane, Meriem; Gomord, Véronique; Michaud, Dominique

    2005-03-01

    Plants have become, over the last ten years, a suitable alternative to microbial and animal cell factories for the production of clinically-useful, therapeutic proteins. Besides the well known advantage of low-cost and large-scale production of safe and biologically active mammalian proteins, plants also are able to perform most post-translational maturations required for biological activity and suitable pharmacokinetics of recombinant therapeutic proteins. In this short review we focus on glycosylation and proteolytic processing of plant-made pharmaceuticals during their transport through the plant cell's secretory pathway. We also address the practical implications of these important processes on the effectiveness of plant molecular pharming systems.

  9. Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films with protein via polydopamine inspired coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Caihong; Yang, Shengrong; Zhang, Junyan; Wang, Jinqing

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we report a facile two-step approach to immobilize proteins onto DLC surfaces. The first step was a simple immersion of DLC in a solution of dopamine. Polydopamine was deposited on DLC as a stable anchor to present protein molecules. Then the protein ad-layer was deposited on it. The chemical components of the modified DLC surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of it was evaluated in vitro by the tetrazolium salt method. And it was indicated that the BSA modified surface had good haemocompatibility properties, and was cytocompatible to PC-12 cells.

  10. Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films with protein via polydopamine inspired coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Caihong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); China and Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Yang Shengrong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Junyan, E-mail: zhangjunyan@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Jinqing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we report a facile two-step approach to immobilize proteins onto DLC surfaces. The first step was a simple immersion of DLC in a solution of dopamine. Polydopamine was deposited on DLC as a stable anchor to present protein molecules. Then the protein ad-layer was deposited on it. The chemical components of the modified DLC surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of it was evaluated in vitro by the tetrazolium salt method. And it was indicated that the BSA modified surface had good haemocompatibility properties, and was cytocompatible to PC-12 cells.

  11. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2015-11-24

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  12. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2013-04-09

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  13. Chemoselective modifications for the traceless ligation of thioamide-containing peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanxin J; Szantai-Kis, D Miklos; Petersson, E James

    2016-07-14

    Thioamides are single-atom substitutions of canonical amide bonds, and have been proven to be versatile and minimally perturbing probes in protein folding studies. Previously, our group showed that thioamides can be incorporated into proteins by native chemical ligation (NCL) with Cys as a ligation handle. In this study, we report the expansion of this strategy into non-Cys ligation sites, utilizing radical initiated desulfurization to "erase" the side chain thiol after ligation. The reaction exhibited high chemoselectivity against thioamides, which can be further enhanced with thioacetamide as a sacrificial scavenger. As a proof-of-concept example, we demonstrated the incorporation of a thioamide probe into a 56 amino acid protein, the B1 domain of Protein G (GB1). Finally, we showed that the method can be extended to β-thiol amino acid analogs and selenocysteine.

  14. Post-translational Modification of Extremophilic Proteins: N-glycosylation in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-02

    Conference, Lucca, Italy 2013-Proteins: From birth to death. Jerusalem, Israel 2014-Meeting of the Korean Society for Microbiology and Biotechnology ...it all, trends in microbiology , (11 2012): 512. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2012.08.007 J. Eichler, K. Jarrell, S. Albers. A proposal for the naming of N...Jerry Eichler. Extreme sweetness: protein glycosylation in archaea, Nature Reviews Microbiology , (01 2013): 151. doi: 10.1038/nrmicro2957 Lina

  15. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Yoo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate

  16. De novo design of protein-protein interactions through modification of inter-molecular helix-helix interface residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Sota; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Manami; Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2016-05-01

    For de novo design of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), information on the shape and chemical complementarity of their interfaces is generally required. Recent advances in computational PPI design have allowed for de novo design of protein complexes, and several successful examples have been reported. In addition, a simple and easy-to-use approach has also been reported that arranges leucines on a solvent-accessible region of an α-helix and places charged residues around the leucine patch to induce interactions between the two helical peptides. For this study, we adopted this approach to de novo design a new PPI between the helical bundle proteins sulerythrin and LARFH. A non-polar patch was created on an α-helix of LARFH around which arginine residues were introduced to retain its solubility. The strongest interaction found was for the LARFH variant cysLARFH-IV-3L3R and the sulerythrin mutant 6L6D (KD=0.16 μM). This artificial protein complex is maintained by hydrophobic and ionic interactions formed by the inter-molecular helical bundle structure. Therefore, by the simple and easy-to-use approach to create de novo interfaces on the α-helices, we successfully generated an artificial PPI. We also created a second LARFH variant with the non-polar patch surrounded by positively charged residues at each end. Upon mixing this LARFH variant with 6L6D, mesh-like fibrous nanostructures were observed by atomic force microscopy. Our method may, therefore, also be applicable to the de novo design of protein nanostructures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Robust circadian clocks from coupled protein-modification and transcription–translation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Lubensky, David K.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus uses both a protein phosphorylation cycle and a transcription–translation cycle to generate circadian rhythms that are highly robust against biochemical noise. We use stochastic simulations to analyze how these cycles interact to generate stable rhythms in growing, dividing cells. We find that a protein phosphorylation cycle by itself is robust when protein turnover is low. For high decay or dilution rates (and compensating synthesis rates), however, the phosphorylation-based oscillator loses its integrity. Circadian rhythms thus cannot be generated with a phosphorylation cycle alone when the growth rate, and consequently the rate of protein dilution, is high enough; in practice, a purely posttranslational clock ceases to function well when the cell doubling time drops below the 24-h clock period. At higher growth rates, a transcription–translation cycle becomes essential for generating robust circadian rhythms. Interestingly, although a transcription–translation cycle is necessary to sustain a phosphorylation cycle at high growth rates, a phosphorylation cycle can dramatically enhance the robustness of a transcription–translation cycle at lower protein decay or dilution rates. In fact, the full oscillator built from these two tightly intertwined cycles far outperforms not just each of its two components individually, but also a hypothetical system in which the two parts are coupled as in textbook models of coupled phase oscillators. Our analysis thus predicts that both cycles are required to generate robust circadian rhythms over the full range of growth conditions. PMID:21149676

  18. Robust circadian clocks from coupled protein-modification and transcription-translation cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Lubensky, David K; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-12-28

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus uses both a protein phosphorylation cycle and a transcription-translation cycle to generate circadian rhythms that are highly robust against biochemical noise. We use stochastic simulations to analyze how these cycles interact to generate stable rhythms in growing, dividing cells. We find that a protein phosphorylation cycle by itself is robust when protein turnover is low. For high decay or dilution rates (and compensating synthesis rates), however, the phosphorylation-based oscillator loses its integrity. Circadian rhythms thus cannot be generated with a phosphorylation cycle alone when the growth rate, and consequently the rate of protein dilution, is high enough; in practice, a purely posttranslational clock ceases to function well when the cell doubling time drops below the 24-h clock period. At higher growth rates, a transcription-translation cycle becomes essential for generating robust circadian rhythms. Interestingly, although a transcription-translation cycle is necessary to sustain a phosphorylation cycle at high growth rates, a phosphorylation cycle can dramatically enhance the robustness of a transcription-translation cycle at lower protein decay or dilution rates. In fact, the full oscillator built from these two tightly intertwined cycles far outperforms not just each of its two components individually, but also a hypothetical system in which the two parts are coupled as in textbook models of coupled phase oscillators. Our analysis thus predicts that both cycles are required to generate robust circadian rhythms over the full range of growth conditions.

  19. System in biology leading to cell pathology: stable protein-protein interactions after covalent modifications by small molecules or in transgenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Halina Z

    2011-01-19

    in disease development. In the knockout cells, incorrect interactions between proteins were observed without the protein modification by small molecules, indicating the abnormality of the protein network in the transgenic system. The irreversible protein-protein interactions lead to protein aggregation and cell degeneration, which are observed in all aging-associated diseases.

  20. System in biology leading to cell pathology: stable protein-protein interactions after covalent modifications by small molecules or in transgenic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malina Halina Z

    2011-01-01

    suggest a mechanism for the involvement of small molecules in disease development. In the knockout cells, incorrect interactions between proteins were observed without the protein modification by small molecules, indicating the abnormality of the protein network in the transgenic system. The irreversible protein-protein interactions lead to protein aggregation and cell degeneration, which are observed in all aging-associated diseases.

  1. Modification effects of physical activity and protein intake on heritability of body size and composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Hasselbalch, Ann Louise; Lallukka, Tea

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The development of obesity is still a poorly understood process that is dependent on both genetic and environmental factors. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine how physical activity and the proportion of energy as protein in the diet modify the genetic variation of body mass index...... (BMI), waist circumference, and percentage body fat. DESIGN: Twins from Denmark (756 complete pairs) and Finland (278 complete pairs) aged 18-67 and 21-24 y, respectively, participated. The proportion of energy as protein in the diet was estimated by using food-frequency questionnaires...... with the Mx statistical package (Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA). RESULTS: High physical activity was associated with lower mean values, and a high proportion of protein in the diet was associated with higher mean BMI, waist...

  2. Stoichiometric and irreversible cysteine-selective protein modification using carbonylacrylic reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardim, Barbara; Cal, Pedro M. S. D.; Matos, Maria J.; Oliveira, Bruno L.; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Albuquerque, Inês S.; Perkins, Elizabeth; Corzana, Francisco; Burtoloso, Antonio C. B.; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-10-01

    Maleimides remain the reagents of choice for the preparation of therapeutic and imaging protein conjugates despite the known instability of the resulting products that undergo thiol-exchange reactions in vivo. Here we present the rational design of carbonylacrylic reagents for chemoselective cysteine bioconjugation. These reagents undergo rapid thiol Michael-addition under biocompatible conditions in stoichiometric amounts. When using carbonylacrylic reagents equipped with PEG or fluorophore moieties, this method enables access to protein and antibody conjugates precisely modified at pre-determined sites. Importantly, the conjugates formed are resistant to degradation in plasma and are biologically functional, as demonstrated by the selective imaging and detection of apoptotic and HER2+ cells, respectively. The straightforward preparation, stoichiometric use and exquisite cysteine selectivity of the carbonylacrylic reagents combined with the stability of the products and the availability of biologically relevant cysteine-tagged proteins make this method suitable for the routine preparation of chemically defined conjugates for in vivo applications.

  3. Targeted modification of storage protein content resulting in improved amino acid composition of barley grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikdar, Md. Shafiqul Islam; Bowra, S; Schmidt, Daiana;

    2016-01-01

    family members. Analysis of the AA composition of the transgenic lines showed that the level of essential amino acids increased with a concomitant reduction in proline and glutamine. Both the barley C-hordein and wheat ω-gliadin genes proved successful for RNAi-gene mediated suppression of barley C......C-hordein in barley and ω-gliadins in wheat are members of the prolamins protein families. Prolamins are the major component of cereal storage proteins and composed of non-essential amino acids (AA) such as proline and glutamine therefore have low nutritional value. Using double stranded RNAi...... silencing technology directed towards C-hordein we obtained transgenic barley lines with up to 94.7 % reduction in the levels of C-hordein protein relative to the parental line. The composition of the prolamin fraction of the barley parental line cv. Golden Promise was resolved using SDS...

  4. Tandem affinity purification of histones, coupled to mass spectrometry, identifies associated proteins and new sites of post-translational modification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-16

    Histones and their post-translational modifications contribute to regulating fundamental biological processes in all eukaryotic cells. We have applied a conventional tandem affinity purification strategy to histones H3 and H4 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mass spectrometry analysis of the co-purified proteins revealed multiple associated proteins, including core histones, which indicates that tagged histones may be incorporated to the nucleosome particle. Among the many other co-isolated proteins there are histone chaperones, elements of chromatin remodeling, of nucleosome assembly/disassembly, and of histone modification complexes. The histone chaperone Rtt106p, two members of chromatin assembly FACT complex and Psh1p, an ubiquitin ligase, were the most abundant proteins obtained with both H3-TAP and H4-TAP, regardless of the cell extraction medium stringency. Our mass spectrometry analyses have also revealed numerous novel post-translational modifications, including 30 new chemical modifications in histones, mainly by ubiquitination. We have discovered not only new sites of ubiquitination but that, besides lysine, also serine and threonine residues are targets of ubiquitination on yeast histones. Our results show the standard tandem affinity purification procedure is suitable for application to yeast histones, in order to isolate and characterize histone-binding proteins and post-translational modifications, avoiding the bias caused by histone purification from a chromatin-enriched fraction.

  5. Posttranslational modifications, localization, and protein interactions of optineurin, the product of a glaucoma gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glaucoma is a major blinding disease. The most common form of this disease, primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, is genetically heterogeneous. One of the candidate genes, optineurin, is linked principally to normal tension glaucoma, a subtype of POAG. The present study was undertaken to illustrate the basic characteristics of optineurin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lysates from rat retinal ganglion RGC5 cells were subjected to N- or O-deglycosylation or membrane protein extraction. The phosphorylation status was evaluated after immunoprecipitation. It was found that while phosphorylated, optineurin was neither N- nor O-glycosylated, and was by itself not a membrane protein. RGC5 and human retinal pigment epithelial cells were double stained with anti-optineurin and anti-GM130. The endogenous optineurin exhibited a diffuse, cytoplasmic distribution, but a population of the protein was associated with the Golgi apparatus. Turnover experiments showed that the endogenous optineurin was relatively short-lived, with a half-life of approximately 8 hours. Native blue gel electrophoresis revealed that the endogenous optineurin formed homohexamers. Optineurin also interacted with molecules including Rab8, myosin VI, and transferrin receptor to assemble into supermolecular complexes. When overexpressed, optineurin-green fluorescence protein (GFP fusion protein formed punctate structures termed "foci" in the perinuclear region. Treatment of nocadazole resulted in dispersion of the optineurin foci. In addition, tetracycline-regulated optineurin-GFPs expressing RGC5 stable cell lines were established for the first time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study provides new information regarding basic characteristics of optineurin that are important for future efforts in defining precisely how optineurin functions normally and how mutations may result in pathology. The inducible optineurin-GFP-expressing cell lines are also anticipated to

  6. Modification of nanoelectrode ensembles by thiols and disulfides to prevent non specific adsorption of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvestrini, M. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Schiavuta, P.; Scopece, P. [Associazione CIVEN, via delle Industrie 5, 30175 Marghera - Venice (Italy); Pecchielan, G.; Moretto, L.M. [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Ugo, P., E-mail: ugo@unive.it [Department of Molecular Sciences and Nanosystems, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Santa Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy)

    2011-09-01

    Highlights: > Complex nanostructures are built on the gold surface of ensembles of nanoelectrodes. > Gold surface of nanoelectrodes was functionalized with SAM of organic sulphurs. > The polycarbonate surrounding nanoelectrodes was functionalized with proteins. > SAMs protect the nanoelectrodes from undesired proteins adsorption. - Abstract: The possibility to functionalize selectively with thiols or disulfides the surface of the gold nanoelectrodes of polycarbonate templated nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) is studied. It is shown that the Au nanoelectrodes can be coated by a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of thioctic acid (TA) or 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic (MES) acid. The study of the electrochemical behavior of SAM-modified NEEs by cyclic voltammetry (CV) at different solution pH, using ferrocenecarboxylate as an anionic redox probe (FcCOO{sup -}) and (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium (FA{sup +}) as a cationic redox probe, demonstrate that the SAM-modified nanoelectrodes are permselective, in that only cationic or neutral probes can access the SAM-coated nanoelectrode surface. CV, AFM and FTIR-ATR data indicate that proteins such as casein or bovine serum albumin, which are polyanionic at pH 7, adsorb on the surface of NEEs untreated with thiols, tending to block the electron transfer of the ferrocenyl redox probes. On the contrary, the pre-treatment of the NEE with an anionic SAM protects the nanoelectrodes from protein fouling, allowing the detection of well shaped voltammetric patterns for the redox probe. Experimental results indicate that, in the case of MES treated NEEs, the protein is bound only onto the polycarbonate surface which surrounds the nanoelectrodes, while the tips of the gold nanoelectrodes remain protein free.

  7. Plasma treatment induces internal surface modifications of electrospun poly(L-lactic) acid scaffold to enhance protein coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Seo, Hyok; Hee Lee, Mi; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Hye-Lee; Park, Jong-Chul [Cellbiocontrol Laboratory, Department of Medical Engineering, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Jin Lee, Seung [Department of Industrial Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bong-Jin; Wang, Kang-Kyun; Kim, Yong-Rok [Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-21

    Advanced biomaterials should also be bioactive with regard to desirable cellular responses, such as selective protein adsorption and cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. To enhance cell-material interactions, surface modifications have commonly been performed. Among the various surface modification approaches, atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma has been used to change a hydrophobic polymer surface to a hydrophilic surface. Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-derived scaffolds lack cell recognition signals and the hydrophobic nature of PLLA hinders cell seeding. To make PLLA surfaces more conducive to cell attachment and spreading, surface modifications may be used to create cell-biomaterial interfaces that elicit controlled cell adhesion and maintain differentiated phenotypes. In this study, (He) gaseous atmospheric plasma glow discharge was used to change the characteristics of a 3D-type polymeric scaffold from hydrophobic to hydrophilic on both the outer and inner surfaces of the scaffold and the penetration efficiency with fibronectin was investigated. Field-emission scanning electron microscope images showed that some grooves were formed on the PLLA fibers after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data also showed chemical changes in the PLLA structure. After plasma treatment, -CN (285.76 eV) was increased in C1s and -NH{sub 2} (399.70 eV) was increased significantly and –N=CH (400.80 eV) and –NH{sub 3}{sup +} (402.05 eV) were newly appeared in N1s. These changes allowed fibronectin to penetrate into the PLLA scaffold; this could be observed by confocal microscopy. In conclusion, helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment was effective in modifying the polymeric scaffold, making it hydrophilic, and this treatment can also be used in tissue engineering research as needed to make polymers hydrophilic.

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Grade Antibodies Directed against Histone Modifications Reveals Patterns of Co-occurring Marks on Histone Protein Molecules*

    OpenAIRE

    Peach, Sally E.; Rudomin, Emily L.; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Carr, Steven A.; Jaffe, Jacob D.

    2012-01-01

    The defining step in most chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays is the use of an antibody to enrich for a particular protein or histone modification state associated with segments of chromatin. The specificity of the antibody is critical to the interpretation of the experiment, yet this property is rarely reported. Here, we present a quantitative method using mass spectrometry to characterize the specificity of key histone H3 modification-targeting antibodies that have previously been u...

  9. Extraction and Characterization of Extracellular Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications from Arabidopsis thaliana Suspension Cell Cultures and Seedlings: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghahremani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by plant cells into the extracellular space, consisting of the cell wall, apoplastic fluid, and rhizosphere, play crucial roles during development, nutrient acquisition, and stress acclimation. However, isolating the full range of secreted proteins has proven difficult, and new strategies are constantly evolving to increase the number of proteins that can be detected and identified. In addition, the dynamic nature of the extracellular proteome presents the further challenge of identifying and characterizing the post-translational modifications (PTMs of secreted proteins, particularly glycosylation and phosphorylation. Such PTMs are common and important regulatory modifications of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes. This review explores the most recent methods in isolating and characterizing the plant extracellular proteome with a focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, highlighting the current challenges yet to be overcome. Moreover, the crucial role of protein PTMs in cell wall signalling, development, and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress is discussed.

  10. Site-specific protein modification using immobilized sortase in batch and continuous-flow systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Martin D.; Wu, Tongfei; Guimaraes, Carla P.; Theile, Christopher S.; Blom, Annet E. M.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Li, Zeyang; Kundrat, Lenka; Goldberg, Shalom D.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2015-01-01

    Transpeptidation catalyzed by sortase A allows the preparation of proteins that are site-specifically and homogeneously modified with a wide variety of functional groups, such as fluorophores, PEG moieties, lipids, glycans, bio-orthogonal reactive groups and affinity handles. This protocol describes

  11. Chemical surface modification of parylene C for enhanced protein immobilization and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changhong; Thompson, Mark E; Markland, Frank S; Swenson, Steve

    2011-10-01

    To introduce the adhesion site of proteins and/or cells on parylene C (PC)-coated medical devices that can be used as implantable biosensors or drug delivery capsules, the PC surfaces were initially modified by the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction to generate active chlorines. These chlorines were then employed to initiate the atom transfer radical polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate (TBA) and form a polymer brush layer of polyTBA on PC; the acrylate groups in the polymer brushes were hydrolyzed to carboxylic acid groups and further activated into succinimidyl ester groups via the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling reaction. The PC surface grafted with polymer brushes and activated by succinimide showed efficient attachment of proteins, including gelatin, contortrostatin (CN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), all at high density on the PC surface. The CN density on the surface was evaluated for both monolayer and polymer brush-based coatings. Based on fluorescence measurements, the polymer brush gives a 60-fold higher surface protein density than the monolayer-based system. Gelatin was used as a model protein and covalently coated onto the modified PC surface for cell culture study. Substrates with gelatin coating showed a significantly higher cell attachment and proliferation in 7 days cultures as compared to the uncoated substrates. In addition, a conventional photolithography technique was coupled with the surface chemistry to successfully pattern the BSA labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate on the modified PC surfaces.

  12. Modification of solubility and heat-induced gelation of amaranth 11S globulin by protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrazco-Peña, Laura; Osuna-Castro, Juan A; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Toro-Vazquez, Jorge F; Morales-Rueda, Juan A; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2013-04-10

    The primary structure of amaranth 11S globulin (Ah11S) was engineered with the aim to improve its functional properties. Four continuous methionines were inserted in variable region V, obtaining the Ah11Sr+4M construction. Changes on protein structure and surface characteristics were analyzed in silico. Solubility and heat-induced gelation of recombinant amaranth 11S proglobulin (Ah11Sr and Ah11Sr+4M) were compared with the native protein (Ah11Sn) purified from amaranth seed flour. The Ah11Sr+4 M showed the highest surface hydrophobicity, but as consequence the solubility was reduced. At low ionic strength (μ = 0.2) and acidic pH (proteins Ah11Sr and Ah11Sr+4 M had the highest and lowest solubility values, respectively. All globulins samples formed gels at 90 °C and low ionic strength, but Ah11Sn produced the weakest and Ah11Sr the strongest gels. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis under gel forming conditions revealed only exothermic transitions for all amaranth 11S globulins analyzed. In conclusion, the 3D structure analysis has revealed interesting molecular features that could explain the thermal resistance and gel forming ability of amaranth 11S globulins. The incorporation of four continuous methionines in amaranth increased the hydrophobicity, and self-supporting gels formed had intermediate hardness between Ah11Sn and Ah11Sr. These functional properties could be used in the food industry for the development of new products based on amaranth proteins.

  13. The effect of polymer surface modification on polymer-protein interaction via interfacial polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrane separation is an important processing technology used for separating food ingredients and fractionating value-added components from food processing by-products. Long-term performance of polymeric membranes in food protein processing is impeded by formation of fouled layers on the membrane ...

  14. Protein Modification with Amphiphilic Block Copoly(2-oxazoline)s as a New Platform for Enhanced Cellular Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Tong, Jing

    2010-08-02

    Several homopolymers, random copolymers and block copolymers based on poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx) were synthesized and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) using biodegradable and nonbiodegradable linkers. These conjugates were characterized by amino group titration, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), isoelectric focusing, enzymatic activity assay and conformation analysis. The conjugates contained on average from about one to two polymer chains per enzyme. From 70% to 90% of enzymatic activity was retained in most cases. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis revealed that HRP modification affected the secondary structure of the apoprotein but did not affect the tertiary structure and heme environment. Enhanced cellular uptake was found in the conjugates of two block copolymers using both MDCK cells and Caco-2 cells, but not in the conjugates of random copolymer and homopolymer. Conjugation with a block copolymer of 2-methyl-2-oxazoline and 2-butyl-2-oxazoline led to the highest cellular uptake as compared to other conjugates. Our data indicates that modification with amphiphilic POx has the potential to modulate and enhance cellular delivery of proteins.

  15. Discovering Mercury Protein Modifications in Whole Proteomes Using Natural Isotope Distributions Observed in Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polacco, Benjamin J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; LaVoie, Stephen P.; Lipton, Mary S.; Summers, Anne O.; Miller, Susan M.

    2011-08-01

    The identification of peptides that result from post-translational modifications is critical for understanding normal pathways of cellular regulation as well as identifying damage from, or exposures to xenobiotics, i.e. the exposome. However, because of their low abundance in proteomes, effective detection of modified peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) typically requires enrichment to eliminate false identifications. We present a new method for confidently identifying peptides with mercury (Hg)-containing adducts that is based on the influence of mercury’s seven stable isotopes on peptide isotope distributions detected by high-resolution MS. Using a pure protein and E. coli cultures exposed to phenyl mercuric acetate, we show the pattern of peak heights in isotope distributions from primary MS single scans efficiently identified Hg adducts in data from chromatographic separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry with sensitivity and specificity greater than 90%. Isotope distributions are independent of peptide identifications based on peptide fragmentation (e.g. by SEQUEST), so both methods can be combined to eliminate false positives. Summing peptide isotope distributions across multiple scans improved specificity to 99.4% and sensitivity above 95%, affording identification of an unexpected Hg modification. We also illustrate the theoretical applicability of the method for detection of several less common elements including the essential element, selenium, as selenocysteine in peptides.

  16. A hybrid two-component system of Tannerella forsythia affects autoaggregation and post-translational modification of surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative oral anaerobe closely associated with both periodontal and periapical diseases. The ORF TF0022 of strain ATCC 43037 encodes a hybrid two-component system consisting of an N-terminal histidine kinase and a C-terminal response regulator. Disruption of the TF0022 locus enhanced autoaggregation of the broth-cultured cells. Comparative proteome analyses revealed that two S-layer proteins in the TF0022 mutant exhibited decreased apparent masses by denaturing gel electrophoresis, suggesting a deficiency in post-translational modification. Furthermore, the mutant decreased the production of a glycosyltransferase encoded by TF1061 that is located in a putative glycosylation-related gene cluster. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed reduced transcription of TF1061 and the associated genes in the TF0022 mutant. These results indicate that TF0022 upregulates the expression of the glycosylation-related genes and suggest modulation of the autoaggregation of T. forsythia cells by a possible post-translational modification of cell-surface components.

  17. Cdk5rap1-mediated 2-methylthio modification of mitochondrial tRNAs governs protein translation and contributes to myopathy in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fan-Yan; Zhou, Bo; Suzuki, Takeo; Miyata, Keishi; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Horiguchi, Haruki; Takahashi, Nozomu; Xie, Peiyu; Michiue, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Atsushi; Kaitsuka, Taku; Matsui, Hideki; Koga, Yasutoshi; Mohri, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Oike, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2015-03-03

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) contain a wide variety of posttranscriptional modifications that are important for accurate decoding. Mammalian mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) are modified by nuclear-encoded tRNA-modifying enzymes; however, the physiological roles of these modifications remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that Cdk5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 1 (Cdk5rap1) is responsible for 2-methylthio (ms(2)) modifications of mammalian mt-tRNAs for Ser(UCN), Phe, Tyr, and Trp codons. Deficiency in ms(2) modification markedly impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis, which resulted in respiratory defects in Cdk5rap1 knockout (KO) mice. The KO mice were highly susceptive to stress-induced mitochondrial remodeling and exhibited accelerated myopathy and cardiac dysfunction under stressed conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the ms(2) modifications of mt-tRNAs were sensitive to oxidative stress and were reduced in patients with mitochondrial disease. These findings highlight the fundamental role of ms(2) modifications of mt-tRNAs in mitochondrial protein synthesis and their pathological consequences in mitochondrial disease.

  18. Down regulation of NO signaling in Trypanosoma cruzi upon parasite-extracellular matrix interaction: changes in protein modification by nitrosylation and nitration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Pereira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes, the causative agent of Chagas' disease in humans, to components of the extracellular matrix (ECM is an important step in host cell invasion. The signaling events triggered in the parasite upon binding to ECM are less explored and, to our knowledge, there is no data available regarding •NO signaling.Trypomastigotes were incubated with ECM for different periods of time. Nitrated and S-nitrosylated proteins were analyzed by Western blotting using anti-nitrotyrosine and S-nitrosyl cysteine antibodies. At 2 h incubation time, a decrease in NO synthase activity, •NO, citrulline, arginine and cGMP concentrations, as well as the protein modifications levels have been observed in the parasite. The modified proteins were enriched by immunoprecipitation with anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies (nitrated proteins or by the biotin switch method (S-nitrosylated proteins and identified by MS/MS. The presence of both modifications was confirmed in proteins of interest by immunoblotting or immunoprecipitation.For the first time it was shown that T. cruzi proteins are amenable to modifications by S-nitrosylation and nitration. When T. cruzi trypomastigotes are incubated with the extracellular matrix there is a general down regulation of these reactions, including a decrease in both NOS activity and cGMP concentration. Notwithstanding, some specific proteins, such as enolase or histones had, at least, their nitration levels increased. This suggests that post-translational modifications of T. cruzi proteins are not only a reflex of NOS activity, implying other mechanisms that circumvent a relatively low synthesis of •NO. In conclusion, the extracellular matrix, a cell surrounding layer of macromolecules that have to be trespassed by the parasite in order to be internalized into host cells, contributes to the modification of •NO signaling in the parasite, probably an essential move for the ensuing invasion step.

  19. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  20. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkus Kristen A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  1. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkus, Kristen A; Tsika, Elpida; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2009-06-05

    While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD) as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  2. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  3. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  4. Role of T198 modification in the regulation of p27(Kip1 protein stability and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Schiappacassi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p27(Kip1 plays a fundamental role in human cancer progression. Its expression and/or functions are altered in almost all the different tumor histotype analyzed so far. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the tumor suppression function of p27 resides not only in the ability to inhibit Cyclins/CDKs complexes through its N-terminal domain but also in the capacity to modulate cell motility through its C-terminal portion. Particular interest has been raised by the last amino-acid, (Threonine 198 in the regulation of both protein stability and cell motility.Here, we describe that the presence of Threonine in position 198 is of primary importance for the regulation of the protein stability and for the control of cell motility. However, while the control of cell motility is dependent on the phosphorylation of T198, the stability of the protein is specifically controlled by the steric hindrance of the last amino acid. The effects of T198 modification on protein stability are not linked to the capacity of p27 to bind Cyclins/CDKs complexes and/or the F-box protein Skp2. Conversely, our results support the hypothesis that conformational changes in the disordered structure of the C-terminal portion of p27 are important in its ability to be degraded via a proteasome-dependent mechanism. On the other hand T198 phosphorylation favors p27/stathmin interaction eventually contributing to the regulation of cell motility, supporting the hypothesis that the presence of T198 is fundamental for the regulation of p27 functions.

  5. Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity is mediated by nitroxidative modification of cochlear proteins characterized by nitration of Lmo4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamesdaniel, Samson; Coling, Donald; Hinduja, Sneha; Ding, Dalian; Li, Jun; Cassidy, Linda; Seigel, Gail M; Qu, Jun; Salvi, Richard

    2012-05-25

    Tyrosine nitration is an important sequel of cellular signaling induced by reactive oxygen species. Cisplatin is an anti-neoplastic agent that damages the inner ear through reactive oxygen species and by the formation of DNA adducts. This study reveals a correlation between cisplatin-mediated hearing loss and nitroxidative modification of cochlear proteins and is the first to report nitration of Lmo4. Cisplatin induced a dose-dependent increase in hearing loss in Wistar rats. A 10-15-dB decrease in distortion product amplitude and massive loss of outer hair cells at the basal turn of the cochlea was observed 3 days post-treatment after a 16 mg/kg dose. Cisplatin induced nitration of cellular proteins within the organ of Corti, spiral ganglion, and stria vascularis, which are known targets of cisplatin ototoxicity. Nitration of a 76-kDa cochlear protein correlated with cisplatin dose. The nitrated protein was identified as Lmo4 (LIM domain only 4) by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight) mass spectrometry and confirmed by reciprocal immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Co-localization of nitrotyrosine and Lmo4 was particularly high in outer hair cell nuclei after cisplatin treatment. Cochlear levels of Lmo4 were decreased in rats treated with cisplatin. In vitro studies supported the repression of Lmo4 in nitroxidative conditions and the induction of apoptosis upon repression of Lmo4. Inhibition of cochlear protein nitration prevented cisplatin-induced hearing loss. As Lmo4 is a transcriptional regulator that controls the choice between cell survival and cell death, these results support the hypothesis that nitration of Lmo4 influences cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  6. Cisplatin-induced Ototoxicity Is Mediated by Nitroxidative Modification of Cochlear Proteins Characterized by Nitration of Lmo4*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamesdaniel, Samson; Coling, Donald; Hinduja, Sneha; Ding, Dalian; Li, Jun; Cassidy, Linda; Seigel, Gail M.; Qu, Jun; Salvi, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine nitration is an important sequel of cellular signaling induced by reactive oxygen species. Cisplatin is an anti-neoplastic agent that damages the inner ear through reactive oxygen species and by the formation of DNA adducts. This study reveals a correlation between cisplatin-mediated hearing loss and nitroxidative modification of cochlear proteins and is the first to report nitration of Lmo4. Cisplatin induced a dose-dependent increase in hearing loss in Wistar rats. A 10-15-dB decrease in distortion product amplitude and massive loss of outer hair cells at the basal turn of the cochlea was observed 3 days post-treatment after a 16 mg/kg dose. Cisplatin induced nitration of cellular proteins within the organ of Corti, spiral ganglion, and stria vascularis, which are known targets of cisplatin ototoxicity. Nitration of a 76-kDa cochlear protein correlated with cisplatin dose. The nitrated protein was identified as Lmo4 (LIM domain only 4) by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight) mass spectrometry and confirmed by reciprocal immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Co-localization of nitrotyrosine and Lmo4 was particularly high in outer hair cell nuclei after cisplatin treatment. Cochlear levels of Lmo4 were decreased in rats treated with cisplatin. In vitro studies supported the repression of Lmo4 in nitroxidative conditions and the induction of apoptosis upon repression of Lmo4. Inhibition of cochlear protein nitration prevented cisplatin-induced hearing loss. As Lmo4 is a transcriptional regulator that controls the choice between cell survival and cell death, these results support the hypothesis that nitration of Lmo4 influences cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:22493493

  7. Nitric oxide-mediated protein modification in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen; Reinartz, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of cardiovascular functions including the control of vascular tone, anti-inflammatory properties of the endothelium, cardiac contractility, and thrombocyte activation and aggregation. Numerous experimental data support the view that NO not only acts via cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent mechanisms but also modulates protein function by nitrosation, nitrosylation, glutathiolation, and nitration, respectively. To understand how NO regulates all of these diverse biological processes on the molecular level a comprehensive assessment of NO-mediated cGMP-dependent and independent targets is required. Novel proteomic approaches allow the simultaneous identification of large quantities of proteins modified in an NO-dependent manner and thereby will considerably deepen our understanding of the role NO plays in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

  8. Epigenetic Modifications Unlock the Milk Protein Gene Loci during Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnkels, Monique; Freeman-Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Potluri, Vani; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Lemay, Danielle G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others) in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization. Conclusions/Significance A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the

  9. Age-dependent modifications of the human salivary secretory protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, Tiziana; Pisano, Elisabetta; Boi, Roberto; Olianas, Alessandra; Manconi, Barbara; Inzitari, Rosanna; Fanali, Chiara; Giardina, Bruno; Castagnola, Massimo; Messana, Irene

    2009-08-01

    Physiological variability of the naturally occurring, human salivary secretory peptidome was studied as a function of age. The qualitative and quantitative changes occurring in the secretion of proteins/peptides specific to the oral cavity (i.e., basic salivary proline-rich proteins, salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins, statherin, proline-rich peptide P-B, salivary cystatins, and histatins) were investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry in 67 subjects aged between 3 and 44 years. Subjects were divided into five age groups: group A, 8 donors, 3-5 years; group B, 11 donors, 6-9 years; group C, 20 donors, 10-12 years; group D, 15 donors, 13-17 years; group E, 13 donors, 24-44 years. Basic salivary proline-rich proteins, almost undetectable in the 3-5 and 6-9 years groups, reached salivary levels comparable to that of adults (24-44 years) around puberty. Levels of peptide P-D, basic peptide P-F, peptide P-H, peptide P-J (a new basic salivary proline-rich protein characterized in this study), and basic proline-rich peptide IB-1 were significantly higher in the 10-12-year-old group than in the 3-5-year-old group, whereas the increase of proline-rich peptide II-2 was significant only after the age of 12 years. The concentration of salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins, histatin-3 1/24, histatin-3 1/25, and monophosphorylated and diphosphorylated cystatin S showed a minimum in the 6-9-year-old group. Finally, the histatin-1 concentration was significantly higher in the youngest subjects (3-5 years) than in the other groups.

  10. Will Posttranslational Modifications of Brain Proteins Provide Novel Serological Markers for Dementias?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug development for dementias is significantly hampered by the lack of easily accessible biomarkers. Fluid biomarkers of dementias provide indications of disease stage, but have little prognostic value, cannot detect early pathological changes, and can only be measured in CSF (cerebrospinal fluid which significantly limits their applicability. In contrast, imaging based biomarkers can provide indications of probability of disease progression, yet are limited in applicability due to cost, radiation and radio-tracers. These aspects highlight the need for other approaches to the development of biomarkers of dementia, which should focus on not only providing information about pathological changes, but also on being measured easily and reproducibly. For other diseases, focus on development of assays monitoring highly specific protease-generated cleavage fragments of proteins has provided assays, which in serum or plasma have the ability to predict early pathological changes. Proteolytic processing of brain proteins, such as tau, APP, and α-synuclein, is a key pathological event in dementias. Here, we speculate that aiming biomarker development for dementias at detecting small brain protein degradation fragments of generated by brain-derived proteases specifically in blood samples could lead to the development of novel markers of disease progression, stage and importantly of treatment efficacy.

  11. Effects of high pressure modification on conformation and gelation properties of myofibrillar protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziye; Yang, Yuling; Zhou, Peng; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Jingyu

    2017-02-15

    The effects of high pressure (HP) treatment (100-500MPa) on conformation and gelation properties of myofibrillar protein (MP) were investigated. As pressure increased (0.1-500MPa), α-helix and β-sheet changed into random coil and β-turn, proteins unfolded to expose interior hydrophobic and sulfhydryl groups, therefore surface hydrophobicity and formation of disulfide bonds were strengthened. At 200MPa, protein solubility and gel hardness reached their maximum value, particle size had minimum value, and gel microstructure was dense and uniform. DSC data showed that actin and myosin completely denatured at 300MPa and 400MPa, respectively. Rheological modulus (G' and G″) of HP-treated MP decreased as pressure increased during thermal gelation. Moderate HP treatment (≦200MPa) strengthened gelation properties of MP, while stronger HP treatment (⩾300MPa) weakened the gelation properties. 200MPa was the optimum pressure level for modifying MP conformation to improve its gelation properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Protein Adsorption to Surface Chemistry and Crystal Structure Modification of Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Jimbo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To observe the early adsorption of extracellular matrix and blood plasma proteins to magnesium-incorporated titanium oxide surfaces, which has shown superior bone response in animal models.Material and Methods: Commercially pure titanium discs were blasted with titanium dioxide (TiO2 particles (control, and for the test group, TiO2 blasted discs were further processed with a micro-arc oxidation method (test. Surface morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, surface topography by optic interferometry, characterization by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The adsorption of 3 different proteins (fibronectin, albumin, and collagen type I was investigated by an immunoblotting technique.Results: The test surface showed a porous structure, whereas the control surface showed a typical TiO2 blasted structure. XPS data revealed magnesium-incorporation to the anodic oxide film of the surface. There was no difference in surface roughness between the control and test surfaces. For the protein adsorption test, the amount of albumin was significantly higher on the control surface whereas the amount of fibronectin was significantly higher on the test surface. Although there was no significant difference, the test surface had a tendency to adsorb more collagen type I.Conclusions: The magnesium-incorporated anodized surface showed significantly higher fibronectin adsorption and lower albumin adsorption than the blasted surface. These results may be one of the reasons for the excellent bone response previously observed in animal studies.

  13. Modification of tomato growth by expression of truncated ERECTA protein from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagarcia, Hector; Morin, Anne-Claire; Shpak, Elena D; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V

    2012-11-01

    ERECTA family genes encode leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases that control multiple aspects of plant development such as elongation of aboveground organs, leaf initiation, development of flowers, and epidermis differentiation. These receptors have also been implicated in responses to biotic and abiotic stress, probably as a consequence of their involvement in regulation of plant architecture. Here, ERECTA signalling in tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) was manipulated by expressing truncated ERECTA protein (AtΔKinase) from Arabidopsis using two different promoters. In Arabidopsis, this protein functions in a dominant-negative manner, disrupting signalling of the whole ERECTA gene family. Expression of AtΔKinase under a constitutive 35S promoter dramatically reduced vegetative growth and led to the formation of fruits with a reduced seed set. Similarly, expression of AtΔKinase under its own promoter resulted in transgenic tomato plants with diminished growth, a reduced number of leaves, changed flowering time, and slightly increased stomata density. The transgenic plants also exhibited increased tolerance to water deficit stress, at least partially due to their diminished surface area. These phenotypes of the transgenic plants were the result of ERECTA signalling disruption at the protein level, as the expression of two endogenous tomato ERECTA family genes was not suppressed. These results demonstrate the significance of ERECTA family genes for development and stress responses in tomato and suggest that truncated ERECTA can be used to manipulate the growth of crop species.

  14. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2 and 4 (PDK4. In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function.

  15. A comparison of forest dynamics at two sites in the Southeastern Ozark Mountains of Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Jenkins; Stephen G. Pallardy

    1993-01-01

    Changes in tree species composition and regeneration patterns were studied in 53 permanent vegetation plots located at two sites (Pioneer Forest and University State Forest) in oak-hickory forests of southeastern Missouri where mortality and decline of red oak species have been identified. The two sites also exhibited differing levels of decline and mortality. Between...

  16. Tandem Affinity Purification Approach Coupled to Mass Spectrometry to Identify Post-translational Modifications of Histones Associated with Chromatin-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Sophie; Robin, Philippe; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2017-01-01

    Protein purification by tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tag coupled to mass spectrometry analysis is usually used to reveal protein complex composition. Here we describe a TAP-tag purification of chromatin-bound proteins along with associated nucleosomes, which allow exhaustive identification of protein partners. Moreover, this method allows exhaustive identification of the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of the associated histones. Thus, in addition to partner characterization, this approach reveals the associated epigenetic landscape that can shed light on the function and properties of the studied chromatin-bound protein.

  17. Complete characterization of posttranslational modification sites in the bovine milk protein PP3 by tandem mass spectrometry with electron capture dissociation as the last stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Haselmann, Kim F; Budnik, Bogdan A

    2003-01-01

    the PTM site. Chromatographic peak analysis continues until full sequence coverage is obtained, after which the molecular mass is reconstructed and compared with the measured value. An agreement indicates that the PTM characterization was complete. This procedure applied to the bovine milk PP3 protein......A comprehensive approach to protein identification and determination of sites of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) in heavily modified proteins was tested. In this approach, termed "reconstructed molecular mass analysis" (REMMA), the molecular mass distribution of the intact protein...... is measured first, which reveals the extent and heterogeneity of modifications. Then the protein is digested with one or several enzymes, with peptides separated by reversed-phase HPLC, and analyzed by Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS). Vibrational excitation (collisional or infrared) or electron...

  18. Efficient Multiple Genome Modifications Induced by the crRNAs, tracrRNA and Cas9 Protein Complex in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Kotani

    Full Text Available The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR associated with Cas9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9 has become a powerful genetic tool for understanding the function of a gene of interest. In zebrafish, the injection of Cas9 mRNA and guide-RNA (gRNA, which are prepared using an in vitro transcription system, efficiently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs at the targeted genomic locus. Because gRNA was originally constructed by fusing two short RNAs CRISPR RNA (crRNA and trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA, we examined the effect of synthetic crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein on the genome editing activity. We previously reported that the disruption of tyrosinase (tyr by tyr-gRNA/Cas9 mRNA causes a retinal pigment defect, whereas the disruption of spns2 by spns2-gRNA1/Cas9 mRNA leads to a cardiac progenitor migration defect in zebrafish. Here, we found that the injection of spns2-crRNA1, tyr-crRNA and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein simultaneously caused a migration defect in cardiac progenitors and a pigment defect in retinal epithelial cells. A time course analysis demonstrated that the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 protein rapidly induced genome modifications compared with the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA. We further show that the crRNA-tracrRNA-Cas9 protein complex is functional for the visualization of endogenous gene expression; therefore, this is a very powerful, ready-to-use system in zebrafish.

  19. A review of chemical surface modification of bioceramics: effects on protein adsorption and cellular response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2014-10-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaPs) are ideal biomaterials for bone repair because of the similarities between their chemical structure and the mineral phase of hard biological tissues (e.g., bones and teeth). Since CaP bone grafts exhibit superior biocompatibility and strong osseointegration properties, they have been widely investigated for use as an in situ carrier for delivery of anti-resorptive and osteogenic drugs. The surface properties of CaP govern the affinity and the binding mechanisms between biological macromolecules (e.g., proteins) and the CaP surface, which indirectly determines the interactions between bone cells and implanted CaP biomaterials. These surface properties ultimately play a pivotal role in determining the success of CaP as bone implants and/or drug carriers. This review provides an in-depth discussion of the current methodologies used to regulate the surface chemistry of CaP and their subsequent effects in regards to protein adsorption and delivery, as well as cell/materials interactions.

  20. Detection of Protein Modifications and Counterfeit Protein Pharmaceuticals Using iTRAQ and MALDI TOF/TOF Mass Spectrometry: Studies with Insulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hongping; Hill, John; Kauffman, John; Gryniewicz, Connie; Han, Xianlin

    2013-01-01

    iTRAQ (isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification) reagent coupled with MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometric analysis has been evaluated as both a qualitative and quantitative method for the detection of modifications to active pharmaceutical ingredients derived from recombinant DNA technologies, and as a method to detect counterfeit drug products. Five types of insulin (human, bovine, porcine, Lispro, Lantus®) were used as model products in the study because of their minor variations in amino acid sequence. Several experiments were conducted in which each insulin variant was separately digested with Glu-C, and the digestate was labeled with one of four different iTRAQ reagents. All digestates were then combined for desalting and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometric analysis. When the digestion procedure was optimized, the insulin sequence coverage was 100%. Five different types of insulin were readily differentiated, including Human insulin (P28K29) and Lispro (K28P29), which only differ by the interchange of two contiguous residues. Moreover, quantitative analyses show that the results obtained from the iTRAQ method agree well with those determined by other conventional methods. Collectively, the iTRAQ method can be used as a qualitative and quantitative technique for the detection of protein modification and counterfeiting. PMID:18489896

  1. Inactivation of enzymes and oxidative modification of proteins by stimulated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C N

    1987-02-15

    Differentiated, stimulated HL-60 cells and freshly isolated, stimulated neutrophils inactivate glutamine synthetase (L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2) either inside or outside of Escherichia coli. Stimulated neutrophils also inactivate at least four endogenous enzymes which are inactivated by mixed-function oxidation (MFO) systems in vitro (L. Fucci, C.N. Oliver, M.J. Coon, and E.R. Stadtman (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80, 1521-1525). The inactivation of glutamine synthetase by stimulated neutrophils exhibits characteristics similar to those previously described using both enzymic and nonenzymic MFO systems (R.L. Levine, C.N. Oliver, R.M. Fulks, and E.R. Stadtman (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 2120-2124). Although the reaction occurs in the absence of Fe(III), it is stimulated by added Fe (III). Inactivation required molecular oxygen and is partially inhibited by Mn(II), catalase, superoxide dismutase, and metal chelators, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and o-phenanthroline. Both the kinetics and the extent of glutamine synthetase inactivation differ when neutrophils are stimulated with phorbol esters compared with formylated peptides. Glutamine synthetase inactivation catalyzed by MFO systems is accompanied by the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives which form stable hydrazones when treated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Multiple carbonyl derivatives are formed in the soluble protein fraction of stimulated neutrophils and these derivatives collectively exhibit an absorbance spectrum similar to that of glutamine synthetase inactivated by liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 MFO system (K. Nakamura, C.N. Oliver, and E.R. Stadtman (1985) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 240, 319-329).

  2. Combining recombinant ribonuclease U2 and protein phosphatase for RNA modification mapping by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Whitney M; Butterer, Annika; Addepalli, Balasubrahmanym; Limbach, Patrick A

    2015-06-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) mapping of modified nucleosides onto RNA sequences is limited by RNase availability. A codon-optimized gene for RNase U2, a purine selective RNase with preference for adenosine, has been designed for overexpression using Escherichia coli as the host. Optimal expression conditions were identified enabling generation of milligram-scale quantities of active RNase U2. RNase U2 digestion products were found to terminate in both 2',3'-cyclic phosphates and 3'-linear phosphates. To generate a homogeneous 3'-linear phosphate set of products, an enzymatic approach was investigated. Bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase was identified as the optimal enzyme for hydrolyzing cyclic phosphates from RNase U2 products. The compatibility of this enzymatic approach with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) RNA modification mapping was then demonstrated. RNase U2 digestion followed by subsequent phosphatase treatment generated nearly 100% 3'-phosphate-containing products that could be characterized by LC-MS/MS. In addition, bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase can be used to introduce (18)O labels within the 3'-phosphate of digestion products when incubated in the presence of H2(18)O, allowing prior isotope labeling methods for mass spectrometry to include digestion products from RNase U2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative LC-MS/MS profiling of free and protein-bound early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, Jörg; Buetler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-06-01

    Free and protein-bound forms of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine (Lys) modifications were quantified in dairy products by LC-MS/MS using a stable isotope dilution assay. The glycation profiles for N(epsilon)-fructoselysine (FL), N(epsilon)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (Pyr) were monitored in raw and processed cow milk to investigate whether free glycation products could serve as fast and simple markers to assess the extent of protein glycation in dairy products. In all milk samples, the fraction of free glycation adducts was predominantly composed of advanced modifications, e.g. 8.34+/-3.81 nmol CML per micromol of free Lys (Lys(free)) and 81.5+/-87.8 nmol Pyr micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1) vs. 3.72+/-1.29 nmol FL micromol(-1) Lys(free)(-1). In contrast, the protein-bound early glycation product FL considerably outweighed the content of CML and Pyr in milk proteins of raw and processed cow milk, whereas severely heat treated milk products, e.g. condensed milk, contained a higher amount of protein-bound advanced glycation adducts. Typical values recorded for milk samples processed under mild conditions were 0.47+/-0.08 nmol FL micromol(-1) of protein-bound Lys (Lys(p-b)), 0.04+/-0.03 nmol CML micromol(-1) Lys(p-b)(-1) and 0.06+/-0.02 nmol Pyr micromol(-1)Lys(p-b)(-1). It was particularly noticeable, however, that mild heat treatment of raw milk, i.e. pasteurization and UHT treatment, did not significantly increase the amount of both free and protein-bound Lys modifications. In conclusion, the profiles of free and protein-bound glycation-induced Lys modifications were found to be different and a screening of free glycation adducts does, therefore, not allow for a conclusion about the protein glycation status of dairy products.

  4. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin T. Shearn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4−/− mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4−/− mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4−/− PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST

  5. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF TITANIUM FILMS WITH SODIUM ION IMPLANTATION: SURFACE PROPERTIES AND PROTEIN ADSORPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Y. Cai

    2007-01-01

    Sodium implanted titanium films with different ion doses were characterized to correlate their ion implantation parameters. Native titanium films and ion implanted titanium films were characterized with combined techniques of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and light microscopy (LM). The surface presented increased sodium concentration on treated titanium films with ion dose increasing, except for the group with the highest ion dose of 4× 1017 ions/cm2. XPS depth profiling displayed that sodium entered titanium film around 25-50 nm depth depending on its implantation ion dose. AFM characterization showed that sodium ion implantation treatment changed the surface morphology from a relatively smooth titanium film to rough surfaces corresponding to different implantation doses.After sodium implantation, implanted titanium films presented big particles with island structure morphology. The surface morphology and particle growth displayed the corresponding trend.Fibrinogen adsorption on these titanium films was performed to correlate with the surface properties of treated titanium films. The results show that protein adsorption on ion-implanted samples with dose of 2 × 1017 and 4 × 1017 are statistically higher (p < 0. 01) than samples treated with dose of 5×1016 and 1 ×1017, as well as the control samples.

  6. Blend-modification of soy protein/lauric acid edible films using polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongyang; Jiang, Bo; Chen, Jie; Jin, Zhengyu

    2014-05-15

    Different types of polysaccharides (propyleneglycol alginate (PGA), pectin, carrageenan and aloe polysaccharide) were incorporated into soy protein isolate (SPI)/lauric acid (La) films using a co-drying process or by direct addition to form biodegradable composite films with modified water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties. The WVP of SPI/La/polysaccharide films decreased when polysaccharides were added using the co-drying process, regardless of the type of polysaccharide. The tensile strength of SPI/La film was increased by the addition of polysaccharides, and the percentage elongation at break was increased by incorporating PGA using the co-drying process. Regarding oxygen-barrier performance, no notable differences were observed between the SPI/La and SPI/La/polysaccharide films. The most significant improvement was observed by blending PGA, with the co-dried preparation exhibiting better properties than the direct-addition preparation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the microstructures of the films are the basis for the differences in the barrier and mechanical properties of the modified blends of SPI, polysaccharides and La.

  7. New insights into ice growth and melting modifications by antifreeze proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Dolev, Maya; Celik, Yeliz; Wettlaufer, J S; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2012-12-07

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) evolved in many organisms, allowing them to survive in cold climates by controlling ice crystal growth. The specific interactions of AFPs with ice determine their potential applications in agriculture, food preservation and medicine. AFPs control the shapes of ice crystals in a manner characteristic of the particular AFP type. Moderately active AFPs cause the formation of elongated bipyramidal crystals, often with seemingly defined facets, while hyperactive AFPs produce more varied crystal shapes. These different morphologies are generally considered to be growth shapes. In a series of bright light and fluorescent microscopy observations of ice crystals in solutions containing different AFPs, we show that crystal shaping also occurs during melting. In particular, the characteristic ice shapes observed in solutions of most hyperactive AFPs are formed during melting. We relate these findings to the affinities of the hyperactive AFPs for the basal plane of ice. Our results demonstrate the relation between basal plane affinity and hyperactivity and show a clear difference in the ice-shaping mechanisms of most moderate and hyperactive AFPs. This study provides key aspects associated with the identification of hyperactive AFPs.

  8. New insights into ice growth and melting modifications by antifreeze proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Dolev, Maya; Celik, Yeliz; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) evolved in many organisms, allowing them to survive in cold climates by controlling ice crystal growth. The specific interactions of AFPs with ice determine their potential applications in agriculture, food preservation and medicine. AFPs control the shapes of ice crystals in a manner characteristic of the particular AFP type. Moderately active AFPs cause the formation of elongated bipyramidal crystals, often with seemingly defined facets, while hyperactive AFPs produce more varied crystal shapes. These different morphologies are generally considered to be growth shapes. In a series of bright light and fluorescent microscopy observations of ice crystals in solutions containing different AFPs, we show that crystal shaping also occurs during melting. In particular, the characteristic ice shapes observed in solutions of most hyperactive AFPs are formed during melting. We relate these findings to the affinities of the hyperactive AFPs for the basal plane of ice. Our results demonstrate the relation between basal plane affinity and hyperactivity and show a clear difference in the ice-shaping mechanisms of most moderate and hyperactive AFPs. This study provides key aspects associated with the identification of hyperactive AFPs. PMID:22787007

  9. Altered plasma apolipoprotein modifications in patients with pancreatic cancer: protein characterization and multi-institutional validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Honda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the more common human malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas has the worst prognosis. The poor outcome seems to be attributable to difficulty in early detection. METHODS: We compared the plasma protein profiles of 112 pancreatic cancer patients with those of 103 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (Cohort 1 using a newly developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (oMALDI QqTOF (quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS system. RESULTS: We found that hemi-truncated apolipoprotein AII dimer (ApoAII-2; 17252 m/z, unglycosylated apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII-0; 8766 m/z, and their summed value were significantly decreased in the pancreatic cancer patients [P = 1.36×10(-21, P = 4.35×10(-14, and P = 1.83×10(-24 (Mann-Whitney U-test; area-under-curve values of 0.877, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively]. The significance was further validated in a total of 1099 plasma/serum samples, consisting of 2 retrospective cohorts [Cohort 2 (n = 103 and Cohort 3 (n = 163] and a prospective cohort [Cohort 4 (n = 833] collected from 8 medical institutions in Japan and Germany. CONCLUSIONS: We have constructed a robust quantitative MS profiling system and used it to validate alterations of modified apolipoproteins in multiple cohorts of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  10. The influence of barley malt protein modification on beer foam stability and their relationship to the barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor-I (BDAI-I) as a possible foam-promoting protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshihiro; Iimure, Takashi; Takoi, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Takafumi; Kihara, Makoto; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Ito, Kazutoshi; Sato, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Kazuyoshi

    2008-02-27

    The foam stability of beer is one of the important key factors in evaluating the quality of beer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the level of malt modification (degradation of protein, starch, and so on) and the beer foam stability. This was achieved by examining foam-promoting proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). We found that the foam stability of beer samples brewed from the barley malts of cultivars B and C decreased as the level of malt modification increased; however, the foam stability of cultivar A did not change. To identify the property providing the increased foam stability of cultivar A, we analyzed beer proteins using 2DE. We analyzed three fractions that could contain beer foam-promoting proteins, namely, beer whole proteins, salt-precipitated proteins, and the proteins concentrated from beer foam. As a result, we found that in cultivar A, some protein spots did not change in any of these three protein fractions even when the level of malt modification increased, although the corresponding protein spots in cultivars B and C decreased. We analyzed these protein spots by peptide mass finger printing using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. As a result, all of these spots were identified as barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor-I (BDAI-I). These results suggest that BDAI-I is an important contributor to beer foam stability.

  11. DbPTM 3.0: an informative resource for investigating substrate site specificity and functional association of protein post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Huang, Kai-Yao; Su, Min-Gang; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Chang, Wen-Chi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Chen, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2013-01-01

    Protein modification is an extremely important post-translational regulation that adjusts the physical and chemical properties, conformation, stability and activity of a protein; thus altering protein function. Due to the high throughput of mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods in identifying site-specific post-translational modifications (PTMs), dbPTM (http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/) is updated to integrate experimental PTMs obtained from public resources as well as manually curated MS/MS peptides associated with PTMs from research articles. Version 3.0 of dbPTM aims to be an informative resource for investigating the substrate specificity of PTM sites and functional association of PTMs between substrates and their interacting proteins. In order to investigate the substrate specificity for modification sites, a newly developed statistical method has been applied to identify the significant substrate motifs for each type of PTMs containing sufficient experimental data. According to the data statistics in dbPTM, >60% of PTM sites are located in the functional domains of proteins. It is known that most PTMs can create binding sites for specific protein-interaction domains that work together for cellular function. Thus, this update integrates protein-protein interaction and domain-domain interaction to determine the functional association of PTM sites located in protein-interacting domains. Additionally, the information of structural topologies on transmembrane (TM) proteins is integrated in dbPTM in order to delineate the structural correlation between the reported PTM sites and TM topologies. To facilitate the investigation of PTMs on TM proteins, the PTM substrate sites and the structural topology are graphically represented. Also, literature information related to PTMs, orthologous conservations and substrate motifs of PTMs are also provided in the resource. Finally, this version features an improved web interface to facilitate convenient access to the resource.

  12. Proteomic investigation of protein profile changes and amino acid residue-level modification in cooked lamb longissimus thoracis et lumborum: The effect of roasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2016-09-01

    Protein modifications of meat cooked by typical dry-heat methods (e.g., roasting) are currently not well understood. The present study utilised a shotgun proteomic approach to examine the molecular-level effect of roasting on thin lamb longissimus thoracis et lumborum patties, in terms of changes to both the protein profile and amino acid residue side-chain modifications. Cooking caused aggregation of actin, myosin heavy chains and sarcoplasmic proteins. Longer roasting time resulted in significantly reduced protein extractability as well as protein truncation involving particularly a number of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins, e.g., 6-phosphofructokinase, beta-enolase, l-lactate dehydrogenase A chain, alpha-actinin-3, actin and possibly myosin heavy chains. Modifications that have potential influence on nutritional properties, including carboxyethyllysine and a potentially glucose-derived N-terminal Amadori compound, were observed in actin and myoglobin after roasting. This study provided new insights into molecular changes resulting from the dry-heat treatment of meat, such as commonly used in food preparation.

  13. Interleukin-32α downregulates the activity of the B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 protein by inhibiting protein kinase Cε-dependent SUMO-2 modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun Sun; Kang, Jeong-Woo; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Man Sub; Bak, Yesol; Yang, Young; Lee, Hee Gu; Hong, JinTae; Yoon, Do-Young

    2014-09-30

    A proinflammatory cytokine IL-32 acts as an intracellular mediator. IL-32α interacts with many intracellular molecules, but there are no reports of interaction with a transcriptional repressor BCL6. In this study, we showed that PMA induces an interaction between IL-32α, PKCε, and BCL6, forming a trimer. To identify the mechanism of the interaction, we treated cells with various inhibitors. In HEK293 and THP-1 cell lines, treatment with a pan-PKC inhibitor, PKCε inhibitor, and PKCδ inhibitor decreased BCL6 and IL-32α protein expression. MAPK inhibitors and classical PKC inhibitor did not decrease PMA-induced BCL6 and IL-32α protein expression. Further, the pan-PKC inhibitor and PKCε inhibitor disrupted PMA-induced interaction between IL-32α and BCL6. These data demonstrate that the intracellular interaction between IL-32α and BCL6 is induced by PMA-activated PKCε. PMA induces post-translational modification of BCL6 by conjugation to SUMO-2, while IL-32α inhibits. PKCε inhibition eliminated PMA-induced SUMOylation of BCL6. Inhibition of BCL6 SUMOylation by IL-32α affected the cellular function and activity of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 in THP-1 cells. Thus, we showed that IL-32α is a negative regulator of the transcriptional repressor BCL6. IL-32α inhibits BCL6 SUMOylation by activating PKCε, resulting in the modulation of BCL6 target genes and cellular functions of BCL6.

  14. Modification of triclosan scaffold in search of improved inhibitors for enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Jozef; Fomovska, Alina; Afanador, Gustavo A; Muench, Stephen P; Zhou, Ying; Lai, Bo-Shiun; El Bissati, Kamal; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patty J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Sommervile, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W; Rice, David; Prigge, Sean T; McLeod, Rima; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2013-07-01

    Through our focused effort to discover new and effective agents against toxoplasmosis, a structure-based drug design approach was used to develop a series of potent inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) enzyme in Toxoplasma gondii (TgENR). Modifications to positions 5 and 4' of the well-known ENR inhibitor triclosan afforded a series of 29 new analogues. Among the resulting compounds, many showed high potency and improved physicochemical properties in comparison with the lead. The most potent compounds 16 a and 16 c have IC50 values of 250 nM against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites without apparent toxicity to the host cells. Their IC50 values against recombinant TgENR were found to be 43 and 26 nM, respectively. Additionally, 11 other analogues in this series had IC50 values ranging from 17 to 130 nM in the enzyme-based assay. With respect to their excellent in vitro activity as well as improved drug-like properties, the lead compounds 16 a and 16 c are deemed to be excellent starting points for the development of new medicines to effectively treat Toxoplasma gondii infections. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Rapid Histone-Catalyzed DNA Lesion Excision and Accompanying Protein Modification in Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Core Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Liwei; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-09-01

    C5'-Hydrogen atoms are frequently abstracted during DNA oxidation. The oxidized abasic lesion 5'-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) is an electrophilic product of the C5'-radical. DOB is a potent irreversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase β, and forms interstrand cross-links in free DNA. We examined the reactivity of DOB within nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles (NCPs), the monomeric component of chromatin. Depending upon the position at which DOB is generated within a NCP, it is excised from nucleosomal DNA at a rate 275-1500-fold faster than that in free DNA. The half-life of DOB (7.0-16.8 min) in NCPs is shorter than any other abasic lesion. DOB's lifetime in NCPs is also significantly shorter than the estimated lifetime of an abasic site within a cell, suggesting that the observed chemistry would occur intracellularly. Histones also catalyze DOB excision when the lesion is present in the DNA linker region of a nucleosome. Schiff-base formation between DOB and histone proteins is detected in nucleosomes and NCPs, resulting in pyrrolone formation at the lysine residues. The lysines modified by DOB are often post-translationally modified. Consequently, the histone modifications described herein could affect the regulation of gene expression and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the DNA damaging agents that produce this lesion.

  16. Coating of nanoparticles on cryogel surface and subsequent double-modification for enhanced ion-exchange capacity of protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shi-Peng; Wang, Chuan; Sun, Yan

    2014-09-12

    A novel composite cryogel monolith was developed by coating poly(glycidyl methacrylate) nanoparticles (NPs) onto the pore wall surface of poly(acrylamide) cryogel. The NPs-coated column was double-modified with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) and diethylaminoethyl in sequence. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the dense coating of the NPs on the cryogel surface, but the NPs-coating did not result in distinct changes of the column porosity and permeability. The rough pore wall surface and extended polymer chains offered more binding sites, so the dynamic binding capacity of the composite cryogel bed for bovine serum albumin reached 11.7mg/mL bed volume at a flow rate of 6cm/min, which was 4.2 times higher than that of the cryogel bed modified with PEI without coating NPs (2.8mg/mL). The binding capacity as well as column efficiency decreased only slightly with increasing flow rate from 0.6 to 12cm/min. The results indicated that the strategy of NPs-coating incorporating with double ion-exchanger modifications is promising for enhancing cryogel capacities, and the novel material would be useful for high-speed protein chromatography.

  17. Anti-tumor activity and immunological modification of ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) from Momordica charantia by covalent attachment of polyethylene glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengen Li; Yiwen Chen; Zhongyu Liu; Fubing Shen; Xiaoxiao Bian; Yanfa Meng

    2009-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a family of enzymes that depurinate rRNA and inhibit protein biosynthesis. Here we report the purification, apoptosis-inducing activity, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of RIP from the bitter melon seeds. The protein has a homogenous N-terminal sequence of N-Asp-Val-Ser-Phe-Arg. Moreover, the RIP displayed strong apoptosis-inducing activity and suppressed cancer cell growth. This might be attributed to the acti-vation of caspases-3. To make it available for in vivo application, the immunogenicity of RIP was reduced by chemical modification with 20 kDa (mPEG)2-Lys-NHS. The inhibition activity of both PEGylated and non-PEGylated RIP against cancer cells was much stronger than against normal cells, and the antigenicity of PEGylated RIP was reduced significantly. Our results suggested that the PEGylated RIP might be potentially developed as anti-cancer drug.

  18. Quantitative assessment of chromatin immunoprecipitation grade antibodies directed against histone modifications reveals patterns of co-occurring marks on histone protein molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Sally E; Rudomin, Emily L; Udeshi, Namrata D; Carr, Steven A; Jaffe, Jacob D

    2012-05-01

    The defining step in most chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays is the use of an antibody to enrich for a particular protein or histone modification state associated with segments of chromatin. The specificity of the antibody is critical to the interpretation of the experiment, yet this property is rarely reported. Here, we present a quantitative method using mass spectrometry to characterize the specificity of key histone H3 modification-targeting antibodies that have previously been used to characterize the "histone code." We further extend the use of these antibody reagents to the observation of long range correlations among disparate histone modifications. Using purified human histones representing the mixture of chromatin states present in living cells, we were able to quantify the degree of target enrichment and the specificity of several commonly used, commercially available ChIP grade antibodies. We found significant differences in enrichment efficiency among various reagents directed against four frequently studied chromatin marks: H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3. For some antibodies, we also detected significant off target enrichment of alternate modifications at the same site (i.e., enrichment of H3K4me2 by an antibody directed against H3K4me3). Through cluster analysis, we were able to recognize patterns of co-enrichment of marks at different sites on the same histone protein. Surprisingly, these co-enrichments corresponded well to "canonical" chromatin states that are exemplary of activated and repressed regions of chromatin. Altogether, our findings suggest that 1) the results of ChIP experiments need to be evaluated with caution given the potential for cross-reactivity of the commonly used histone modification recognizing antibodies, 2) multiple marks with consistent biological interpretation exist on the same histone protein molecule, and 3) some components of the histone code may be transduced on single proteins in living cells.

  19. Standardization and quality control in quantifying non-enzymatic oxidative protein modifications in relation to ageing and disease: Why is it important and why is it hard?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgica Nedić

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications (PTM of proteins determine the activity, stability, specificity, transportability and lifespan of a protein. Some PTM are highly specific and regulated involving various enzymatic pathways, but there are other non-enzymatic PTM (nePTM, which occur stochastically, depend on the ternary structure of proteins and can be damaging. It is often observed that inactive and abnormal proteins accumulate in old cells and tissues. The nature, site and extent of nePTM give rise to a population of that specific protein with alterations in structure and function ranging from being fully active to totally inactive molecules. Determination of the type and the amount (abundance of nePTM is essential for establishing connection between specific protein structure and specific biological role. This article summarizes analytical demands for reliable quantification of nePTM, including requirements for the assay performance, standardization and quality control, and points to the difficulties, uncertainties and un-resolved issues.

  20. Standardization and quality control in quantifying non-enzymatic oxidative protein modifications in relation to ageing and disease: Why is it important and why is it hard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedić, Olgica; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2015-08-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins determine the activity, stability, specificity, transportability and lifespan of a protein. Some PTM are highly specific and regulated involving various enzymatic pathways, but there are other non-enzymatic PTM (nePTM), which occur stochastically, depend on the ternary structure of proteins and can be damaging. It is often observed that inactive and abnormal proteins accumulate in old cells and tissues. The nature, site and extent of nePTM give rise to a population of that specific protein with alterations in structure and function ranging from being fully active to totally inactive molecules. Determination of the type and the amount (abundance) of nePTM is essential for establishing connection between specific protein structure and specific biological role. This article summarizes analytical demands for reliable quantification of nePTM, including requirements for the assay performance, standardization and quality control, and points to the difficulties, uncertainties and un-resolved issues.

  1. Effects of different industrial heating processes of milk on site-specific protein modifications and their relationship to in vitro and in vivo digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2014-05-07

    Heating processes are applied to milk and dairy products to ensure their microbiological safety and shelf lives. However, how differences in "industrial" thermal treatments affect protein digestibility is still equivocal. In this study, raw milk was subjected to pasteurization, three kinds of ultra-high-temperature (UHT) treatment, and in-can sterilization and was investigated by in vitro and in vivo digestion and proteomic methods. In-can sterilized milk, followed by UHT milk samples, showed a rapid decrease in protein bands during the course of digestion. However, protein digestibility determined by a Kjeldahl procedure showed insignificant differences. Proteomic analysis revealed that lactulosyllysine, which reflects a decrease in protein digestibility, in α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and caseins was higher in in-can sterilized milk, followed by UHT milk samples. Thus, industrial heating may improve the digestibility of milk proteins by denaturation, but the improvement is likely to be offset by heat-derived modifications involved in decreased protein digestibility.

  2. The Autistic Phenotype Exhibits a Remarkably Localized Modification of Brain Protein by Products of Free Radical-Induced Lipid Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa A. Evans

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage has been documented in the peripheral tissues of autism patients. In this study, we sought evidence of oxidative injury in autistic brain. Carboxyethyl pyrrole (CEP and iso[4]levuglandin (iso[4]LGE2-protein adducts, that are uniquely generated through peroxidation of docosahexaenoate and arachidonate-containing lipids respectively, and heme oxygenase-1 were detected immunocytochemically in cortical brain tissues and by ELISA in blood plasma. Significant immunoreactivity toward all three of these markers of oxidative damage in the white matter and often extending well into the grey matter of axons was found in every case of autism examined. This striking threadlike pattern appears to be a hallmark of the autistic brain as it was not seen in any control brain, young or aged, used as controls for the oxidative assays. Western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed neurofilament heavy chain to be a major target of CEP-modification. In contrast, in plasma from 27 autism spectrum disorder patients and 11 age-matched healthy controls we found similar levels of plasma CEP (124.5 ± 57.9 versus 110.4 ± 30.3 pmol/mL, iso[4]LGE2 protein adducts (16.7 ± 5.8 versus 13.4 ± 3.4 nmol/mL, anti-CEP (1.2 ± 0.7 versus 1.2 ± 0.3 and anti-iso[4]LGE2 autoantibody titre (1.3 ± 1.6 versus 1.0 ± 0.9, and no differences between the ratio of NO2Tyr/Tyr (7.81 E-06 ± 3.29 E-06 versus 7.87 E-06 ± 1.62 E-06. These findings provide the first direct evidence of increased oxidative stress in the autistic brain. It seems likely that oxidative injury of proteins in the brain would be associated with neurological abnormalities and provide a cellular basis at the root of autism spectrum disorders.

  3. Protein modification by fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkholt, Helle Vibeke; Jørgensen, P.B.; Sørensen, Anne Dorthe

    1998-01-01

    The effect of fermentation on components of potential significance for the allergenicity of pea was analyzed. Pea flour was fermented with three lactic acid bacteria, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactococcus raffinolactis, and Lactobacillus plantarum, and two fungi, Rhizopus microsporus, var....... oligosporus and Geotrichum candidum. Residual antigenicity against antipea antibodies was reduced to 10% by the three lactic acid bacteria and R. microsporus. Reactions to anti-pea profilin and anti-Bet v I were still detectable after fermentation. The contents of lectin and pea protease inhibitor were...

  4. Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Modification Using Size Exclusion Chromatography Coupled with Electron Transfer Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2016-08-01

    One difficult problem in the analysis of peptide modifications is quantifying isomeric modifications that differ by the position of the amino acid modified. HPLC separation using C18 reverse phase chromatography coupled with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) in tandem mass spectrometry has recently been shown to be able to relatively quantify how much of a given modification occurs at each amino acid position for isomeric mixtures; however, the resolution of reverse phase chromatography greatly complicates quantification of isomeric modifications by ETD because of the chromatographic separation of peptides with identical modifications at different sequence positions. Using peptide oxidation as a model system, we investigated the use of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ETD fragmentation to separate peptide sequences. This approach allows for the benefits of chromatographic separation of peptide sequences while ensuring co-elution of modification isomers for accurate relative quantification of modifications using standard data-dependent acquisitions. Using this method, the relative amount of modification at each amino acid can be accurately measured from single ETD MS/MS spectra in a standard data-dependent acquisition experiment.

  5. Modification of β-lactoglobulin by oligofructose: Impact on protein adsorption at the air-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trofimova, D.; Jongh, H.H.J.de

    2004-01-01

    Maillard products of β-lactoglobulin (βLg) and fructose oligosaccharide (FOS) were obtained in different degrees of modification depending on incubation time and pH. By use of a variety of biochemical and spectroscopic tools, it was demonstrated that the modification at limited degrees does not sign

  6. 亚基水平上大豆蛋白改性修饰的研究进展%Research Progress of Soybean Protein Modification at Subunit Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝祥威; 黄行健; 赵琪; 邱天福; 潘思轶

    2012-01-01

    主要总结大豆蛋白的改性方法及其加工性质。以国内外大豆蛋白亚基的研究成果为依据,从改性手段、功能特性、分子结构概述大豆蛋白亚基的研究情况,从亚基的层面阐述3种不同大豆蛋白凝胶的机理。最后对大豆蛋白改性存在的问题和发展方向进行思考和总结。%In this article,soybean protein modification methods and processing properties are summarized.Based on the research progress at the subunit level,the modification strategies,functional properties and molecular structures of soybean proteins as well as protein aggregation mechanisms are discussed.Moreover,current problems and future development trends for soybean protein modification are also proposed.

  7. Protein modifications regulate the role of 14-3-3γ adaptor protein in cAMP-induced steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Ye, Xiaoying; Blonder, Josip; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-09-19

    The 14-3-3 protein family comprises adaptors and scaffolds that regulate intracellular signaling pathways. The 14-3-3γ isoform is a negative regulator of steroidogenesis that is hormonally induced and transiently functions at the initiation of steroidogenesis by delaying maximal steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. Treatment of MA-10 cells with the cAMP analog 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP), which stimulates steroidogenesis, triggers the interaction of 14-3-3γ with the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR) in the cytosol, limiting STAR activity to basal levels. Over time, this interaction ceases, allowing for a 2-fold induction in STAR activity and maximal increase in the rate of steroid formation. The 14-3-3γ/STAR pattern of interaction was found to be opposite that of the 14-3-3γ homodimerization pattern. Phosphorylation and acetylation of 14-3-3γ showed similar patterns to homodimerization and STAR binding, respectively. 14-3-3γ Ser(58) phosphorylation and 14-3-3γ Lys(49) acetylation were blocked using trans-activator of HIV transcription factor 1 peptides coupled to 14-3-3γ sequences containing Ser(58) or Lys(49). Blocking either one of these modifications further induced 8-Br-cAMP-induced steroidogenesis while reducing lipid storage, suggesting that the stored cholesterol is used for steroid formation. Taken together, these results indicate that Ser(58) phosphorylation and Lys(49) acetylation of 14-3-3γ occur in a coordinated time-dependent manner to regulate 14-3-3γ homodimerization. 14-3-3γ Ser(58) phosphorylation is required for STAR interactions under control conditions, and 14-3-3γ Lys(49) acetylation is important for the cAMP-dependent induction of these interactions.

  8. A nutrient-driven tRNA modification alters translational fidelity and genome-wide protein coding across an animal genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Zaborske

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection favors efficient expression of encoded proteins, but the causes, mechanisms, and fitness consequences of evolved coding changes remain an area of aggressive inquiry. We report a large-scale reversal in the relative translational accuracy of codons across 12 fly species in the Drosophila/Sophophora genus. Because the reversal involves pairs of codons that are read by the same genomically encoded tRNAs, we hypothesize, and show by direct measurement, that a tRNA anticodon modification from guanosine to queuosine has coevolved with these genomic changes. Queuosine modification is present in most organisms but its function remains unclear. Modification levels vary across developmental stages in D. melanogaster, and, consistent with a causal effect, genes maximally expressed at each stage display selection for codons that are most accurate given stage-specific queuosine modification levels. In a kinetic model, the known increased affinity of queuosine-modified tRNA for ribosomes increases the accuracy of cognate codons while reducing the accuracy of near-cognate codons. Levels of queuosine modification in D. melanogaster reflect bioavailability of the precursor queuine, which eukaryotes scavenge from the tRNAs of bacteria and absorb in the gut. These results reveal a strikingly direct mechanism by which recoding of entire genomes results from changes in utilization of a nutrient.

  9. One-site versus two-site phacotrabeculectomy: a prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moschos MM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marilita M Moschos,1 Irini P Chatziralli,2 Michael Tsatsos3 1First Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, 2Second Department of Ophthalmology, Ophthalmiatrion Athinon, Athens, Greece; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Cambridge University Hospital NHS, Cambridge, UK Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy and safety of one-site and two-site combined phacotrabeculectomy with foldable posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation.Methods: Thirty-four patients (41 eyes with glaucoma and cataract were randomly assigned to undergo either a one-site (22 eyes or a two-site (19 eyes combined procedure. One-site approach consisted of a standard superior phacotrabeculectomy with a limbus-based conjunctival flap, while two-site approach consisted of a clear cornea phacoemulsification and a separate superior trabeculectomy with a limbus-based conjunctival flap.Results: Mean follow-up period was 54 months (standard deviation [SD] 2.3. Mean preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP in the one-site group was 21.3 mmHg (SD 2.8 and in the two-site group was 21.8 mmHg (SD 3.0 (P>0.1. Mean postoperative IOP significantly decreased in both groups compared to the preoperative level and was 15.6 mmHg (SD 3.5 in the one-site group and 14.9 mmHg (SD 2.7 in the two-site group. Three months later, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P=0.058. The one-site group required significantly more medications than the two-site group (P=0.03. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA improved similarly in both groups, but there was less postoperative (induced astigmatism in the two-site group in a marginal statistical level (P=0.058. Intra- and postoperative complications were comparable in the two groups.Conclusion: Both techniques yielded similar results concerning final BCVA and IOP reduction. However, the two-site group had less induced astigmatism and a better postoperative IOP control with less required

  10. Hydroimidazolone modification of the conserved Arg12 in small heat shock proteins: studies on the structure and chaperone function using mutant mimics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram H Nagaraj

    Full Text Available Methylglyoxal (MGO is an α-dicarbonyl compound present ubiquitously in the human body. MGO reacts with arginine residues in proteins and forms adducts such as hydroimidazolone and argpyrimidine in vivo. Previously, we showed that MGO-mediated modification of αA-crystallin increased its chaperone function. We identified MGO-modified arginine residues in αA-crystallin and found that replacing such arginine residues with alanine residues mimicked the effects of MGO on the chaperone function. Arginine 12 (R12 is a conserved amino acid residue in Hsp27 as well as αA- and αB-crystallin. When treated with MGO at or near physiological concentrations (2-10 µM, R12 was modified to hydroimidazolone in all three small heat shock proteins. In this study, we determined the effect of arginine substitution with alanine at position 12 (R12A to mimic MGO modification on the structure and chaperone function of these proteins. Among the three proteins, the R12A mutation improved the chaperone function of only αA-crystallin. This enhancement in the chaperone function was accompanied by subtle changes in the tertiary structure, which increased the thermodynamic stability of αA-crystallin. This mutation induced the exposure of additional client protein binding sites on αA-crystallin. Altogether, our data suggest that MGO-modification of the conserved R12 in αA-crystallin to hydroimidazolone may play an important role in reducing protein aggregation in the lens during aging and cataract formation.

  11. 大豆分离蛋白的提取及其改性方法%THE EXTRACTION AND MODIFICATION METHODS OF SOYBEAN PROTEIN ISOLATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董怀海

    2001-01-01

    The soybean protein isolates is the soluble protein from soybeanmeal.The traditional extration method is base extraction and acid precipitation.The other methods are membrane seaperation ,foaming seaperation and biopolar electroacidification.The modification methods are thermotreat ,acid treat and enzyme treat.%概述了大豆分离蛋白的传统提取法、膜分离法、泡沫分离法、双极膜法及其通常所用的改性方法:热处理法,酸处理法和酶处理法。

  12. Signatures of many-body localization in the dynamics of two-site entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iemini, Fernando; Russomanno, Angelo; Rossini, Davide; Scardicchio, Antonello; Fazio, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    We are able to detect clear signatures of dephasing—a distinct trait of many-body localization (MBL)—via the dynamics of two-site entanglement, quantified through the concurrence. Using the protocol implemented by M. Schreiber et al. [Science 349, 842 (2015), 10.1126/science.aaa7432], we show that in the MBL phase the average two-site entanglement decays in time as a power law, while in the Anderson localized phase it tends to a plateau. The power-law exponent is not universal and displays a clear dependence on the interaction strength. This behavior is also qualitatively different from the ergodic phase, where the two-site entanglement decays exponentially. All the results are obtained by means of time-dependent density matrix renormalization-group simulations and further corroborated by analytical calculations on an effective model. Two-site entanglement has been measured in cold atoms: our analysis paves the way for the first direct experimental test of many-body dephasing in the MBL phase.

  13. Effect of phosphorothioate modifications on the ability of GTn oligodeoxynucleotides to specifically recognize single-stranded DNA-binding proteins and to affect human cancer cellular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morassutti, C; Scaggiante, B; Dapas, B; Xodo, L; Tell, G; Quadrifoglio, F

    1999-12-01

    We have previously identified phosphodiester oligonucleotides exclusively made of G and T bases, named GTn, that significantly inhibit human cancer cell growth and recognize specific nuclear single-stranded DNA binding proteins. We wished to examine the ability of the modified GTn oligonucleotides with different degrees of phosphorothioate modifications to bind specifically to the same nuclear proteins recognized by the GTn phosphodiester analogues and their cytotoxic effect on the human T-lymphoblastic CCRF-CEM cell line. We showed that the full phosphorothioate GTn oligonucleotide was neither able to specifically recognize those nuclear proteins, nor cytotoxic. In contrast, the 3'-phosphorothioate-protected GTn oligonucleotides can maintain the specific protein-binding activity. The end-modified phosphorothioate oligonucleotides were also able to elicit the dose-dependent cell growth inhibition effect, but a loss in the cytotoxic ability was observed increasing the extent of sulphur modification of the sequences. Our results indicate that phosphorothioate oligonucleotides directed at specific single-stranded DNA-binding proteins should contain a number of phosphorothioate end-linkages which should be related to the length of the sequence, in order to maintain the same biological activities exerted by their phosphodiester analogues.

  14. An indigenous posttranscriptional modification in the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center confers resistance to an array of protein synthesis inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Seok-Ming; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    A number of nucleotide residues in ribosomal RNA undergo specific posttranscriptional modification. The roles of most modifications are unclear, but their clustering in the functionally-important regions of rRNA suggest that they might either directly affect the activity or assembly of the ribosome or modulate its interactions with ligands. Of the 25 modified nucleotides in E. coli 23S rRNA, 14 are located in the peptidyl transferase center, the main antibiotic target in the large ribosomal subunit. Since nucleotide modifications have been closely associated with both antibiotic sensitivity and antibiotic resistance, the loss of some of these posttranscriptional modifications may affect the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics. We investigated the antibiotic sensitivity of E. coli cells in which the genes of eight rRNA modifying enzymes targeting the PTC were individually inactivated. The lack of pseudouridine at position 2504 of 23S rRNA was found to significantly increase the susceptibility of bacteria to peptidyl transferase inhibitors. Therefore, this indigenous posttranscriptional modification may have evolved as an intrinsic resistance mechanism protecting bacteria against natural antibiotics. PMID:18554609

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Grade Antibodies Directed against Histone Modifications Reveals Patterns of Co-occurring Marks on Histone Protein Molecules*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Sally E.; Rudomin, Emily L.; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Carr, Steven A.; Jaffe, Jacob D.

    2012-01-01

    The defining step in most chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays is the use of an antibody to enrich for a particular protein or histone modification state associated with segments of chromatin. The specificity of the antibody is critical to the interpretation of the experiment, yet this property is rarely reported. Here, we present a quantitative method using mass spectrometry to characterize the specificity of key histone H3 modification-targeting antibodies that have previously been used to characterize the “histone code.” We further extend the use of these antibody reagents to the observation of long range correlations among disparate histone modifications. Using purified human histones representing the mixture of chromatin states present in living cells, we were able to quantify the degree of target enrichment and the specificity of several commonly used, commercially available ChIP grade antibodies. We found significant differences in enrichment efficiency among various reagents directed against four frequently studied chromatin marks: H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3. For some antibodies, we also detected significant off target enrichment of alternate modifications at the same site (i.e., enrichment of H3K4me2 by an antibody directed against H3K4me3). Through cluster analysis, we were able to recognize patterns of co-enrichment of marks at different sites on the same histone protein. Surprisingly, these co-enrichments corresponded well to “canonical” chromatin states that are exemplary of activated and repressed regions of chromatin. Altogether, our findings suggest that 1) the results of ChIP experiments need to be evaluated with caution given the potential for cross-reactivity of the commonly used histone modification recognizing antibodies, 2) multiple marks with consistent biological interpretation exist on the same histone protein molecule, and 3) some components of the histone code may be transduced on single proteins in living

  16. Exact solution of a generalized two-sites Bose-Hubbard model

    CERN Document Server

    Filho, Gilberto N Santos

    2016-01-01

    I introduce a new parametrization of a bosonic Lax operator for the algebraic Bethe ansatz method with the $gl(2)$-invariant $R$-matrix and use it to present the exact solution of a generalized two-sites Bose-Hubbard model with asymmetric tunnelling. In the no interaction limit I show that the Bethe ansatz equations can be written as a $S^{N-1}$ sphere, where $N$ is the total number of atoms in the condensate.

  17. Bethe states for the two-site Bose–Hubbard model: A binomial approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We calculate explicitly the Bethe vectors states by the algebraic Bethe ansatz method with the gl(2-invariant R-matrix for the two-site Bose–Hubbard model. Using a binomial expansion of the n-th power of a sum of two operators we get and solve a recursion equation. We calculate the scalar product and the norm of the Bethe vectors states. The form factors of the imbalance current operator are also computed.

  18. Two-site Hubbard molecule with a spinless electron-positron pair

    KAUST Repository

    Cossu, Fabrizio

    2012-12-19

    We determine the eigenvalues of the two-site Hubbard molecule with one electron and one positron to describe the characteristics of electron-positron interactions in solids. While the effect of hopping is, in general, opposite to the effect of on-site interaction, we find a complex scenario for the electron-positron pair with a non-vanishing potential drop. We give analytical solutions and discuss the combined effects of the model parameters.

  19. Modification of EGF-like module 1 of thrombospondin-1, an animal extracellular protein, by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is known to be subject to three unusual carbohydrate modifications: C-mannosylation, O-fucosylation, and O-glucosylation. We now describe a fourth: O-β-N-acetylglucosaminylation. Previously, O-β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-β-GlcNAc was found on a threonine in the loop between the fifth and sixth cysteines of the 20(th epidermal growth factor (EGF-like module of Drosophila Notch. A BLAST search based on the Drosophila Notch loop sequence identified a number of human EGF-like modules that contain a similar sequence, including EGF-like module 1 of TSP-1 and its homolog, TSP-2. TSP-1, which has a potentially modifiable serine in the loop, reacted in immuno-blots with the CTD110.6 anti-O-GlcNAc antibody. Antibody reactivity was diminished by treatment of TSP-1 with β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. TSP-2, which lacks a potentially modifiable serine/threonine in the loop, did not react with CTD110.6. Analysis of tandem modules of TSP-1 localized reactivity of CTD110.6 to EGF-like module 1. Top-down mass spectrometric analysis of EGF-like module 1 demonstrated the expected modifications with glucose (+162 Da and xylose (+132 Da separately from modification with N-acetyl hexosamine (+203 Da. Mass spectrometric sequence analysis localized the +203-Da modification to Ser580 in the sequence (575CPPGYSGNGIQC(586. These results demonstrate that O-β-N-acetylglucosaminylation can occur on secreted extracellular matrix proteins as well as on cell surface proteins.

  20. Modification of an acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate disruption method for cellular protein extraction from neuropathogenic Clostridium botulinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    An acetone-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) disruption method was used for the extraction of cellular proteins from neurotoxigenic Clostridium botulinum. The amount of protein extracted per gram of dry weight and the protein profile as revealed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was comparabl...

  1. Proteins from Erwinia asparaginase Erwinase ® and E. coli asparaginase 2 MEDAC ® for treatment of human leukemia, show a multitude of modifications for which the consequences are completely unclear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Narkhyun; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2011-07-01

    L-Asparaginase from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ASPG_ERWCH; UniProtKB accession number P06608 (Erwinase(®))) and L-asparaginase 2 from Escherichia coli (ASPG2_ECOLI; UniProtKB accession number P00805 (Medac(®))), both L-asparagine amidohydrolases, are widely used for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A series of serious side effects have been reported and this warrants studies into the protein chemistry of the medical products sold. Mass spectrometry (MS) data on ASPG_ERWCH and ASPG2_ECOLI have not been published so far and herein a gel-based proteomics study was performed to provide information about sequence and modifications of the commercially available medical products. ASPG_ERWCH and ASPG2_ECOLI were applied onto two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, spots were in-gel digested with several proteases and resulting peptides and protein modifications were analysed by nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS. Four spots were observed for ASPG_ERWCH, six spots were observed for ASPG2_ECOLI and the identified proteins showed high sequence coverage without sequence conflicts. Several protein modifications including technical and posttranslational modifications were demonstrated. Protein modifications are known to change physicochemical, immunochemical, biological and pharmacological properties and results from this work may challenge re-designing of the product including possible removal of the modifications by the manufacturer because it is not known whether they are contributing to the serious adverse effects of the protein drug.

  2. Modification of potato starch granule structure and morphology in planta by expression of starch binding domain fusion proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, X.

    2010-01-01

    Producing starches with altered composition, structure and novel physico-chemical properties in planta by manipulating the enzymes which are involved in starch metabolism or (over)expressing heterologous enzymes has huge advantages such as broadening the range of starch applications and reducing the costs of the post-harvest starch modification. The starch binding domain (SBD) technology has been extensively explored in our lab for modifying starch in planta and producing so-called “tailored ...

  3. Post-Translational Modification and Secretion of Azelaic Acid Induced 1 (AZI1, a Hybrid Proline-Rich Protein from Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pitzschke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis EARLI-type hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs consist of a putative N-terminal secretion signal, a proline-rich domain (PRD, and a characteristic eight-cysteine-motif (8-CM. They have been implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses. AZI1 is required for systemic acquired resistance and it has recently been identified as a target of the stress-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. AZI1 gel migration properties strongly indicate AZI1 to undergo major post-translational modifications. These occur in a stress-independent manner and are unrelated to phosphorylation by MAPKs. As revealed by transient expression of AZI1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and Tropaeolum majus, the Arabidopsis protein is similarly modified in heterologous plant species. Proline-rich regions, resembling arabinogalactan proteins point to a possible proline hydroxylation and subsequent O-glycosylation of AZI1. Consistently, inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase reduces its apparent protein size. AZI1 secretion was examined using Arabidopsis protoplasts and seedling exudates. Employing Agrobacterium-mediated leaf infiltration of N. benthamiana, we attempted to assess long-distance movement of AZI1. In summary, the data point to AZI1 being a partially secreted protein and a likely new member of the group of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Its dual location suggests AZI1 to exert both intra- and extracellular functions.

  4. A neutral polyacrylate copolymer coating for surface modification of thiol-ene microchannels for improved performance of protein separation by microchip electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesbah, Kiarach; Mai, T.D.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the behavior of thiol-ene substrates that is a class of promising materials for lab-on-a-chip electrophoresis applications. Two polymeric materials were prepared by copolymerization of N, N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA), (3-(methacryloyl-oxy)propyl)trimethoxysilane (PMA) and 3......-(DMA-PMAMAPS) copolymer were evaluated in terms of surface hydrophilicity, suppression and stability of electro-osmotic flow and prevention of protein adsorption. Surface modification of thiol-ene containing a 20 % excess of thiols with the terpolymer p-(DMA-PMA-MAPS) was found to offer the most stable coating and most...

  5. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülin Güler-Gane

    Full Text Available The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine, and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine. When proteins that naturally contain these "undesirable" residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that

  6. False-Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. Stability of proteins from rates of oxidation (SPROX) is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false-positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False-positive rates of 1.2-2.2 % and manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false-positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed.

  7. False Positive Rate Determination of Protein Target Discovery using a Covalent Modification- and Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Erin C.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hong, Jiyong; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Detection and quantitation of protein-ligand binding interactions is important in many areas of biological research. The Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX) technique is an energetics-based technique for identifying the proteins targets of ligands in complex biological mixtures. Knowing the false positive rate of protein target discovery in proteome-wide SPROX experiments is important for the correct interpretation of results. Reported here are the results of a control SPROX experiment in which chemical denaturation data is obtained on the proteins in two samples that originated from the same yeast lysate, as would be done in a typical SPROX experiment except that one sample would be spiked with the test ligand. False positive rates of 1.2–2.2% and manassantin A. The impact of ion purity in the tandem mass spectral analyses and of background oxidation on the false positive rate of protein target discovery using SPROX is also discussed. PMID:24114261

  8. Successful recruitment methods in the community for a two-site clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Eileen; Shah, Shivani; Wilde, Mary H; McDonald, Margaret V; Brasch, Judith; McMahon, James M

    2014-11-01

    Effective screening and recruitment are essential to the success of randomized clinical trials. This report is to describe key screening and recruitment strategies in a two site randomized clinical trial (RCT) conducted in community settings with a vulnerable chronically ill population and to suggest valuable approaches when planning trials. Differences between sites in a complex study with two considerably different environments (academic versus home care) and their participant pools presented challenges which required different screening and recruitment methods. A high level of communication between sites, creative problem solving and the ability to be flexible when problems were encountered were needed for successful screening and recruitment.

  9. Two-site adsolubilization model of incorporation of fluoromonomers into fluorosurfactants formed on cotton fabric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumansetty, Srinivas; O'Rear, Edgar

    2014-04-01

    The adsorption of surfactants and adsolubilization of organic compounds on knit cotton fabric are fundamentally important in admicellar polymerization to impart characteristics like water repellency, stain resistance, and flame retardancy. The main objective of this research is to study adsorption and adsolubilization of fluororsurfactants and fluoromonomers used to obtain water repellency characteristics. Adsorption of nonionic (fluoroaliphatic amine oxide) and cationic (fluoroaliphatic quaternary ammonium surfactant) fluororsurfactants at the interface of cotton is investigated with and without fluoroacrylate monomers. A two-site adsolubilization model was used to predict the aggregation number of fluorosurfactant.

  10. [Urinary protein detection by iTRAQ® associated with renal transplant complications and its modification with therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Villarreal, Miguel Mariano; Mercado-Moreira, Amanda Berenice; Muñoz-Espinosa, Linda Elsa; Gamboa-Esparza, Mariana; Pérez-Rodríguez, Edelmiro; Cordero-Pérez, Paula

    2015-01-01

    After renal transplant, surgical, infection complications, as well as graft rejection may occur; early detection through non-invasive markers is the key to change therapy and avoid biopsy. The aime of the study is to determine urine protein profiles in patients undergoing renal transplant with complications and detect its variation when therapy is modified. Urine samples were collected from patients prior the transplant and various postoperative stages. Urinary protein profiles were obtained by peptide labeling using isobaric isotopes for relative quantification (iTRAQ(®)). A total of 22 patients were included, of whom 12 developed post-transplant complication: 2 with graft rejection (one male and one female) and 10 (6 males and 4 females) in the group of post-transplant infections. Using iTRAQ(®) 15/345 and 28/113 proteins were identified and fulfilled the acceptance criteria, in graft rejection and post-transplant infections group, respectively. Albumin was the only protein found in both groups, the remaining proteins were different. The 5 proteins with higher scores in graft rejection were: alpha-1-microglobulin, 5'-nucleotidase cytosolic III, retinol-binding protein 4, membrane protein palmitoylated 4, and serine carboxypeptidase, while post-transplant infections were: mitochondrial acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase, putative adenosyl homocysteinase 2, zinc finger protein GLIS1, putative protein FAM157B, and zinc finger protein 615. It remains to elucidate the involvement of each of these in patients with renal transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. In-Depth N-Glycosylation Reveals Species-Specific Modifications and Functions of the Royal Jelly Protein from Western (Apis mellifera) and Eastern Honeybees (Apis cerana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mao; Fang, Yu; Han, Bin; Xu, Xiang; Fan, Pei; Hao, Yue; Qi, Yuping; Hu, Han; Huo, Xinmei; Meng, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianke

    2015-12-04

    Royal jelly (RJ), secreted by honeybee workers, plays diverse roles as nutrients and defense agents for honeybee biology and human health. Despite being reported to be glycoproteins, the glycosylation characterization and functionality of RJ proteins in different honeybee species are largely unknown. An in-depth N-glycoproteome analysis and functional assay of RJ produced by Apis mellifera lingustica (Aml) and Apis cerana cerana (Acc) were conducted. RJ produced by Aml yielded 80 nonredundant N-glycoproteins carrying 190 glycosites, of which 23 novel proteins harboring 35 glycosites were identified. For Acc, all 43 proteins glycosylated at 138 glycosites were reported for the first time. Proteins with distinct N-glycoproteomic characteristics in terms of glycoprotein species, number of N-glycosylated sites, glycosylation motif, abundance level of glycoproteins, and N-glycosites were observed in this two RJ samples. The fact that the low inhibitory efficiency of N-glycosylated major royal jelly protein 2 (MRJP2) against Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae) and the absence of antibacterial related glycosylated apidaecin, hymenoptaecin, and peritrophic matrix in the Aml RJ compared to Acc reveal the mechanism for why the Aml larvae are susceptible to P. larvae, the causative agent of a fatal brood disease (American foulbrood, AFB). The observed antihypertension activity of N-glycosylated MRJP1 in two RJ samples and a stronger activity found in Acc than in Aml reveal that specific RJ protein and modification are potentially useful for the treatment of hypertensive disease for humans. Our data gain novel understanding that the western and eastern bees have evolved species-specific strategies of glycosylation to fine-tune protein activity for optimizing molecular function as nutrients and immune agents for the good of honeybee and influence on the health promoting activity for human as well. This serves as a valuable resource for the targeted probing of the biological

  12. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycan by EptC protein-mediated addition of phosphoethanolamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Nichollas E; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V G

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates...

  13. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Nandita [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Kar, Rekha [Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Singha, Prajjal K. [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Venkatachalam, Manjeri A. [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); McEwen, Donald G. [Greehey Children' s Cancer Research Institute, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Saikumar, Pothana, E-mail: saikumar@uthscsa.edu [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2010-04-23

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1 {mu}M concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTP{gamma}S or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration.

  14. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T.; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K.; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H.; Pattison, David I.; Davies, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 104 in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins.

  15. Reactivity of disulfide bonds is markedly affected by structure and environment: implications for protein modification and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Maryam; Ignasiak, Marta T; Chan, Bun; Croft, Anna K; Radom, Leo; Schiesser, Carl H; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2016-12-12

    Disulfide bonds play a key role in stabilizing protein structures, with disruption strongly associated with loss of protein function and activity. Previous data have suggested that disulfides show only modest reactivity with oxidants. In the current study, we report kinetic data indicating that selected disulfides react extremely rapidly, with a variation of 10(4) in rate constants. Five-membered ring disulfides are particularly reactive compared with acyclic (linear) disulfides or six-membered rings. Particular disulfides in proteins also show enhanced reactivity. This variation occurs with multiple oxidants and is shown to arise from favorable electrostatic stabilization of the incipient positive charge on the sulfur reaction center by remote groups, or by the neighboring sulfur for conformations in which the orbitals are suitably aligned. Controlling these factors should allow the design of efficient scavengers and high-stability proteins. These data are consistent with selective oxidative damage to particular disulfides, including those in some proteins.

  16. Sequential tentacle grafting and charge modification for enhancing charge density of mono-sized beads for facilitated protein refolding and purification from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ran; Yang, Chun-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2014-06-20

    We have previously found that addition of like-charged media in a refolding solution can greatly enhance the refolding of pure proteins by suppressing protein aggregation. Herein, negatively charged mono-sized microspheres with sulfonic groups were fabricated to explore the facilitating effect of like-charged media on the refolding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs). A sequential polymer-tentacle grafting and sulfonate modification strategy was developed to increase the charge density of mono-sized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (pGMA) beads (2.4μm). Namely, GMA was first grafted onto the beads by grafting polymerization to form poly(GMA) tentacles on the pGMA beads, and then the epoxy groups on the tentacles were converted into sulfonic groups by modification with sodium sulfite. By this fabrication strategy, the charge density of the beads reached 793μmol/g, about 2.8 times higher than that modified without prior grafting of the pGMA beads (285μmol/g). The negatively charged beads of different charge densities were used for facilitating the refolding of like-charged EGFP from IBs. The refolding yield as well as refolding rate increased with increasing charge density. The anti-aggregation effects of urea and like-charged microspheres were synergetic. In addition, partial purification of EGFP was achieved because the ion-exchange adsorption led to 52% removal of positively charged contaminant proteins in the refolded solution. Finally, reusability of the tentacle beads was demonstrated by repetitive EGFP refolding and recovery cycles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Extensive Chemical Modifications in the Primary Protein Structure of IgG1 Subvisible Particles Are Necessary for Breaking Immune Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Björn; Bessa, Juliana; Folzer, Emilien; Ríos Quiroz, Anacelia; Schmidt, Roland; Bulau, Patrick; Finkler, Christof; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Huwyler, Jörg; Iglesias, Antonio; Koulov, Atanas V

    2017-04-03

    A current concern with the use of therapeutic proteins is the likely presence of aggregates and submicrometer, subvisible, and visible particles. It has been proposed that aggregates and particles may lead to unwanted increases in the immune response with a possible impact on safety or efficacy. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate the ability of subvisible particles of a therapeutic antibody to break immune tolerance in an IgG1 transgenic mouse model and to understand the particle attributes that might play a role in this process. We investigated the immunogenic properties of subvisible particles (unfractionated, mixed populations, and well-defined particle size fractions) using a transgenic mouse model expressing a mini-repertoire of human IgG1 (hIgG1 tg). Immunization with proteinaceous subvisible particles generated by artificial stress conditions demonstrated that only subvisible particles bearing very extensive chemical modifications within the primary amino acid structure could break immune tolerance in the hIgG1 transgenic mouse model. Protein particles exhibiting low levels of chemical modification were not immunogenic in this model.

  18. Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: The Functional Significance of Cysteine in Protein Function and the Soft Acids/Bases Thiol Chemistry That Facilitates Cysteine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wible, Ryan S; Sutter, Thomas R

    2017-03-20

    The unique biophysical and electronic properties of cysteine make this molecule one of the most biologically critical amino acids in the proteome. The defining sulfur atom in cysteine is much larger than the oxygen and nitrogen atoms more commonly found in the other amino acids. As a result of its size, the valence electrons of sulfur are highly polarizable. Unique protein microenvironments favor the polarization of sulfur, thus increasing the overt reactivity of cysteine. Here, we provide a brief overview of the endogenous generation of reactive oxygen and electrophilic species and specific examples of enzymes and transcription factors in which the oxidation or covalent modification of cysteine in those proteins modulates their function. The perspective concludes with a discussion of cysteine chemistry and biophysics, the hard and soft acids and bases model, and the proposal of the Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: a hypothesis proposing the existence of a complex signaling network governed by layered chemical reactivity and cross-talk in which the chemical modification of reactive cysteine in biological networks triggers the reorganization of intracellular biochemistry to mitigate spikes in endogenous or exogenous oxidative or electrophilic stress.

  19. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN OXIDATIVE MODIFICATION IN REDOX-REGULATION OF CASPASE-3 ACTIVITY IN BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES DURING OXIDATIVE STRESS IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Nosareva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of oxidative stress lies at the heart of many frequent and socially-important diseases. Blood lymphocytes are the cells which provide immunological control of our organism. As a result of their function implementation blood lymphocytes contact with different endogenic and exogenic factors, which can lead to active oxygen species production activation, macromolecules oxidative modification and to cell survival alteration. At the present time it is essential to expand and deepen the fundamental knowledge of blood lymphocytes apoptosis regulation peculiarities. The research objective was to establish the interaction among alterations of glutathione system condition, carbonylation level, protein glutathionylation and caspase-3 activity in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro.Material and Methods. The material for research was blood lymphocytes cultivated with addition of hydrogen peroxide in final concentration of 0,5 mmol and/or protein SH-group inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide – 5 mmol, protector – 5 mmol – 1,4-dithioerythritol. Reduced, oxidized and protein-bound glutathione concentration was measured by method of spectropho-tometry, additionally, the ratio size of reduced to oxidized thiol fraction was estimated. With help of enzymoimmunoassay the level of protein carbonyl derivatives was evaluated; caspase-3 activity was registered by spectrofluorometric method.Results. Protein SH-group blocking in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro was accompanied by protein-bound glutathione concentration rapid decrease in connection with increase of protein carbonyl derivatives content and caspase-3 activity. Protein SH-group protection in blood lymphocytes during oxidative stress in vitro was accompanied by concentration increase of protein-bound glutathione and protein carbonyl derivatives under comparable values of enzyme activity under study.Conclusion. The carried out research shows that caspase-3 and protein

  20. Structural characterization of the N-terminal mineral modification domains from the molluscan crystal-modulating biomineralization proteins, AP7 and AP24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, Brandon A; Morse, Daniel E; Evans, John Spencer

    2004-08-05

    The AP7 and AP24 proteins represent a class of mineral-interaction polypeptides that are found in the aragonite-containing nacre layer of mollusk shell (H. rufescens). These proteins have been shown to preferentially interfere with calcium carbonate mineral growth in vitro. It is believed that both proteins play an important role in aragonite polymorph selection in the mollusk shell. Previously, we demonstrated the 1-30 amino acid (AA) N-terminal sequences of AP7 and AP24 represent mineral interaction/modification domains in both proteins, as evidenced by their ability to frustrate calcium carbonate crystal growth at step edge regions. In this present report, using free N-terminal, C(alpha)-amide "capped" synthetic polypeptides representing the 1-30 AA regions of AP7 (AP7-1 polypeptide) and AP24 (AP24-1 polypeptide) and NMR spectroscopy, we confirm that both N-terminal sequences possess putative Ca (II) interaction polyanionic sequence regions (2 x -DD- in AP7-1, -DDDED- in AP24-1) that are random coil-like in structure. However, with regard to the remaining sequences regions, each polypeptide features unique structural differences. AP7-1 possesses an extended beta-strand or polyproline type II-like structure within the A11-M10, S12-V13, and S28-I27 sequence regions, with the remaining sequence regions adopting a random-coil-like structure, a trait common to other polyelectrolyte mineral-associated polypeptide sequences. Conversely, AP24-1 possesses random coil-like structure within A1-S9 and Q14-N16 sequence regions, and evidence for turn-like, bend, or loop conformation within the G10-N13, Q17-N24, and M29-F30 sequence regions, similar to the structures identified within the putative elastomeric proteins Lustrin A and sea urchin spicule matrix proteins. The similarities and differences in AP7 and AP24 N-terminal domain structure are discussed with regard to joint AP7-AP24 protein modification of calcium carbonate growth.

  1. Measurement of dimeric inhibin using a modified two-site immunoradiometric assay specific for oxidized (Met O) inhibin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, P G; Muttukrishna, S

    1994-06-01

    Several years ago we developed a novel two-site immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for dimeric inhibin. However, relative to the purified 32 kDa bovine inhibin standard used at that time, the immunopotencies of crude inhibin-containing samples were much less than their biopotencies estimated by pituitary cell bioassay. In attempting to improve assay performance and resolve this discrepancy we recently discovered that introduction of a preassay oxidation step to the IRMA results in a dramatic increase in the immunopotencies of inhibin-containing test samples (e.g.: bovine, human, porcine follicular fluid (FF)) and of a new (purified in 1993) 32 kDa bovine inhibin standard. However, the oxidation step did not affect the immunopotency of our original standard (purified in 1987), indicating that this material had undergone spontaneous oxidation during long-term storage, thus accounting for its higher immunopotency in our original IRMA and providing an explanation for the discrepancy between immunoactivity and bioactivity referred to above. These findings, together with other observations on the behaviour of oxidized and non-oxidized samples of inhibin, related peptide fragments and inhibin-containing samples in the IRMA and alpha subunit radioimmunoassay (RIA), indicate that the anti-beta A82-114 monoclonal antibody (E4) used as tracer in the IRMA binds selectively to the oxidized (Met O89,91,108) form of the peptide. This property of the antibody can be exploited to advantage by incorporating simple modifications to existing inhibin/activin immunoassays to ensure that all samples and standards are fully oxidized before antibody addition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Improving biocompatibility by controlling protein adsorption: Modification and design of biomaterials using poly(ethylene glycol) microgels and microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Evan Alexander

    2009-12-01

    Guided by the clinical needs of patients and developments in biology and materials science, the primary focus of the biomaterials field remains at the solid/liquid interface between biomaterial surfaces and biological fluids. For blood-contacting devices, biological responses are initially elicited and directed by proteins that adsorb from this multicomponent solution to form thin films on their surfaces. The identity, conformation, and quantity of adsorbed proteins are related to the properties of a material's surface. For example, hydrophobic surfaces tend to be thrombotic via interactions between platelets and adsorbed fibrinogen, while surface-activation of specific enzymes initiates the coagulation cascade on hydrophilic surfaces. The objective of this thesis is to improve the design of biomaterials through the analysis and control of adsorbing protein layers. This goal is approached through three separate strategies. First, a proteomics-based methodology is presented for the assessment of protein conformation at the residue level after adsorption to biomaterial surfaces. A quantitative mass spectrometric technique is additionally suggested for the identification and quantification of proteins within adsorbed protein layers. Second, a method is described for the covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel coatings onto biomaterials surfaces for the minimization of protein adsorption. The coatings are applied using partially crosslinked PEG solutions containing polymer and protein oligomers and microgels that can be designed to control cell adhesion. Finally, a modular strategy is proposed for the assembly of bioactive PEG-based hydrogel scaffolds. This was accomplished using novel PEG microspheres with diverse characteristics that individually contribute to the ability of the scaffold to direct cellular infiltration. The methodologies proposed by this thesis contribute to the recent shift in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies

  3. Rice protein improves adiposity, body weight and reduces lipids level in rats through modification of triglyceride metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate whether rice protein can possess a vital function in improving lipids level and adiposity, the effects of rice proteins extracted by alkaline (RP-A and α-amylase (RP-E on triglyceride metabolism were investigated in 7-week-old male Wistar rats fed cholesterol-enriched diets for 2 weeks, as compared with casein (CAS. Results Compared with CAS, plasma concentrations of glucose and lipids were significantly reduced by RP-feeding (P P P P P > 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between protein digestibility and deposit fat (r = 0.8567, P P Conclusions The present study demonstrates that rice protein can modify triglyceride metabolism, leading to an improvement of body weight and adiposity. Results suggest that the triglyceride-lowering action as well as the potential of anti-adiposity induced by rice protein is attributed to upregulation of lipolysis and downregulation of lipogenesis, and the lower digestibility of rice protein may be the main modulator responsible for the lipid-lowering action.

  4. Elucidation of the Fanconi Anemia Protein Network in Meoisis and Its Function in the Regulation of Histone Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris G. Alavattam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Precise epigenetic regulation of the sex chromosomes is vital for the male germline. Here, we analyze meiosis in eight mouse models deficient for various DNA damage response (DDR factors, including Fanconi anemia (FA proteins. We reveal a network of FA and DDR proteins in which FA core factors FANCA, FANCB, and FANCC are essential for FANCD2 foci formation, whereas BRCA1 (FANCS, MDC1, and RNF8 are required for BRCA2 (FANCD1 and SLX4 (FANCP accumulation on the sex chromosomes during meiosis. In addition, FA proteins modulate distinct histone marks on the sex chromosomes: FA core proteins and FANCD2 regulate H3K9 methylation, while FANCD2 and RNF8 function together to regulate H3K4 methylation independently of FA core proteins. Our data suggest that RNF8 integrates the FA-BRCA pathway. Taken together, our study reveals distinct functions for FA proteins and illuminates the male sex chromosomes as a model to dissect the function of the FA-BRCA pathway.

  5. The crystal structure of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 in the apo form: when protein post-translational modifications make the difference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita Fiorillo

    Full Text Available The 14-3-3s are a family of dimeric evolutionary conserved pSer/pThr binding proteins that play a key role in multiple biological processes by interacting with a plethora of client proteins. Giardia duodenalis is a flagellated protozoan that affects millions of people worldwide causing an acute and chronic diarrheal disease. The single giardial 14-3-3 isoform (g14-3-3, unique in the 14-3-3 family, needs the constitutive phosphorylation of Thr214 and the polyglycylation of its C-terminus to be fully functional in vivo. Alteration of the phosphorylation and polyglycylation status affects the parasite differentiation into the cyst stage. To further investigate the role of these post-translational modifications, the crystal structure of the g14-3-3 was solved in the unmodified apo form. Oligomers of g14-3-3 were observed due to domain swapping events at the protein C-terminus. The formation of filaments was supported by TEM. Mutational analysis, in combination with native PAGE and chemical cross-linking, proved that polyglycylation prevents oligomerization. In silico phosphorylation and molecular dynamics simulations supported a structural role for the phosphorylation of Thr214 in promoting target binding. Our findings highlight unique structural features of g14-3-3 opening novel perspectives on the evolutionary history of this protein family and envisaging the possibility to develop anti-giardial drugs targeting g14-3-3.

  6. The crystal structure of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 in the apo form: when protein post-translational modifications make the difference.

    KAUST Repository

    Fiorillo, Annarita

    2014-03-21

    The 14-3-3s are a family of dimeric evolutionary conserved pSer/pThr binding proteins that play a key role in multiple biological processes by interacting with a plethora of client proteins. Giardia duodenalis is a flagellated protozoan that affects millions of people worldwide causing an acute and chronic diarrheal disease. The single giardial 14-3-3 isoform (g14-3-3), unique in the 14-3-3 family, needs the constitutive phosphorylation of Thr214 and the polyglycylation of its C-terminus to be fully functional in vivo. Alteration of the phosphorylation and polyglycylation status affects the parasite differentiation into the cyst stage. To further investigate the role of these post-translational modifications, the crystal structure of the g14-3-3 was solved in the unmodified apo form. Oligomers of g14-3-3 were observed due to domain swapping events at the protein C-terminus. The formation of filaments was supported by TEM. Mutational analysis, in combination with native PAGE and chemical cross-linking, proved that polyglycylation prevents oligomerization. In silico phosphorylation and molecular dynamics simulations supported a structural role for the phosphorylation of Thr214 in promoting target binding. Our findings highlight unique structural features of g14-3-3 opening novel perspectives on the evolutionary history of this protein family and envisaging the possibility to develop anti-giardial drugs targeting g14-3-3.

  7. Lipid-protein modifications during ascorbate-Fe2+ peroxidation of photoreceptor membranes: protective effect of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Margarita H; Terrasa, Ana M; Catalá, Angel

    2006-10-01

    The rod outer segment (ROSg) membranes are essentially lipoprotein complexes. Rhodopsin, the major integral protein of ROSg, is surrounded by phospholipids highly enriched in docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n3). This fluid environment plays an important role for conformational changes after photo-activation. Thus, ROSg membranes are highly susceptible to oxidative damage. Melatonin synthesized in the pineal gland, retina and other tissues is a free radical scavenger. The principal aim of this work was to study the changes in the ROSg membranes isolated from bovine retina submitted to nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation (ascorbate-Fe2+ induced), during different time intervals (0-180 min). Oxidative stress was monitored by increase in the chemiluminescence and fatty acid alterations. In addition we studied the in vitro protective effect of 5 mm melatonin. The total cpm originated from light emission (chemiluminescence) was found to be lower in those membranes incubated in the presence of melatonin. The docosahexaenoic acid content decreased considerably when the membranes were exposed to oxidative damage. This reduction was from 35.5 +/- 2.9% in the native membranes to 12.65 +/- 1.86% in those peroxidized during 180 min. In the presence of 5 mm melatonin we observed a content preservation of 22:6 n3 (23.85 +/- 2.77%) at the same time of peroxidation. Simultaneously the alterations of membrane proteins under oxidative stress were studied using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Loss of protein sulfhydryl groups and increased incorporation of carbonyl groups were utilized as biomarkers of protein oxidation. In membranes exposed to Fe2+ -ascorbate, we observed a decrease of protein thiols from 50.9 +/- 3.38 in native membranes to 1.72 +/- 2.81 nmol/mg of protein after 180 min of lipid peroxidation associated with increased incorporation of carbonyl groups into proteins from 7.20 +/- 2.50 to 12.50 +/- 1.12 nmol/mg of protein. In the SDS-PAGE we

  8. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  9. Phytochemical differences between Calia secundiflora (Leguminosae) growing at two sites in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Chávez, Fernando; García-Mateos, Rosario; Soto-Hernández, Marcos; Kite, Geofrey

    2006-01-01

    The ecology and quinolizidine alkaloid chemistry of Calia secundiflora (Ortega) Yakovlev growing at two sites in Mexico were compared. At one site (Hidalgo) the vegetation was dominated by Flourensia resinosa and C. secundiflora, at the other site (Queretaro) C. secundiflora and Dodanaea viscosa were dominant. The Hidalgo site had shallower soils with less organic matter, N, P, and CaCO3. Seeds of C. secundiflora from each site accumulated a similar range of quinolizidine alkaloids, but the profile of alkaloids in the leaves and roots were different. The leaves and roots of plants at Hidalgo accumulated a similar range of alkaloids to the seeds with cytisine and/or N-methylcytisine being most abundant, whereas at Queretaro the leaves and roots accumulated lupinine, with other alkaloids being relatively minor constituents. The latter profile has not been reported previously for C. secundiflora.

  10. Analytical diagonalization study of a two-orbital Hubbard model on a two-site molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendola, Maria Emilia, E-mail: canio@sa.infn.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Romano, Alfonso [CNR-SPIN, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica “E. R. Caianiello”, Università di Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Noce, Canio, E-mail: canio@sa.infn.it [CNR-SPIN, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica “E. R. Caianiello”, Università di Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    We present the exact solution of a two-orbital Hubbard model on a two-site molecule for arbitrary electron filling and arbitrary interaction couplings. The knowledge of the many-particle spectrum, determined via a diagonalization procedure performed by fully taking into account the symmetry properties of the model, has been used to investigate the temperature dependence of charge, spin and orbital response functions as well as of the intra- and inter-orbital on-site occupations. We point out that this study may allow easy access to many interesting features of the model and may serve as a reference tool for various numerical or perturbation methods dealing with complex correlated electron models defined on a lattice, in particular in the case in which strong local interactions dominate over kinetic effects.

  11. Effect of oxidative stress, produced by cumene hydroperoxide, on the various steps of protein synthesis. Modifications of elongation factor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, A; Parrado, J; Bougria, M; Machado, A

    1996-09-20

    We have studied the effect of oxidative stress on protein synthesis in rat liver. Cumene hydroperoxide (CH) was used as an oxidant agent. The approach used was to determine the ribosomal state of aggregation and the time for assembly and release of polypeptide chains in the process of protein synthesis in rat liver in vivo. The results suggest that the elongation step is the most sensitive to CH treatment. The measurement of both carbonyl groups content and ADP-ribosylatable elongation factor 2 (EF-2), the main protein involved in the elongation step, indicates that under CH treatment EF-2 is oxidatively modified and a lower amount of active EF-2 is present. These results are corroborated by in vitro oxidation of EF-2 and could explain for the decline in the elongation step.

  12. Two-site kinetic modeling of bacteriophages transport through columns of saturated dune sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijven, Jack F; Hassanizadeh, S Majid; de Bruin, Ria H A M

    2002-08-01

    Breakthrough curves, on a semi-log scale, from tests in porous media with block-input of viruses, bacteria, protozoa and colloidal particles often exhibit a typical skewness: a rather slowly rising limb and a smooth transition of a declining limb to a very long tail. One-site kinetic models fail to fit the rising and declining limbs together with the tail satisfactorily. Inclusion of an equilibrium adsorption site does not seem to improve simulation results. This was encountered in the simulation of breakthrough curves from a recent field study on the removal of bacteriophages MS2 and PRD1 by passage through dune sand. In the present study, results of laboratory experiments for the study of this issue are presented. Breakthrough curves of salt and bacteriophages MS2, PRDI, and phiX174 in 1 D column experiments have been measured. One- and two-site kinetic models have been applied to fit and predict breakthrough curves from column experiments. The two-site model fitted all breakthrough curves very satisfactorily, accounting for the skewness of the rising limb as well as for the smooth transition of the declining limb to the tail of the breakthrough curve. The one-site model does not follow the curvature of the breakthrough tail, leading to an overestimation of the inactivation rate coefficient for attached viruses. Interaction with kinetic site 1 is characterized by relatively fast attachment and slow detachment, whereas attachment to and detachment from kinetic site 2 is fast. Inactivation of viruses and interaction with kinetic site 2 provide only a minor contribution to removal. Virus removal is mainly determined by the attachment to site 1. Bacteriophage phiX174 attached more than MS2 and PRD1, which can be explained by the greater electrostatic repulsion that MS2 and PRD1 experience compared to the less negatively charged phiX174.

  13. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycan by EptC protein-mediated addition of phosphoethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Nichollas E; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V G; Labbate, Maurizio; Djordjevic, Steven P; Larsen, Martin R; Szymanski, Christine M; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2012-08-24

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates the synthesis of a rigidly conserved heptasaccharide that is attached to protein substrates or released as free oligosaccharide in the periplasm. Removal of N-glycosylation results in reduced virulence and impeded host cell attachment. Since the N-glycan is conserved, the N-glycosylation system is also an attractive option for glycoengineering recombinant vaccines in Escherichia coli. To determine whether non-canonical N-glycans are present in C. jejuni, we utilized high throughput glycoproteomics to characterize C. jejuni JHH1 and identified 93 glycosylation sites, including 34 not previously reported. Interrogation of these data allowed the identification of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN)-modified variant of the N-glycan that was attached to multiple proteins. The pEtN moiety was attached to the terminal GalNAc of the canonical N-glycan. Deletion of the pEtN transferase eptC removed all evidence of the pEtN-glycan but did not globally influence protein reactivity to patient sera, whereas deletion of the pglB oligosaccharyltransferase significantly reduced reactivity. Transfer of eptC and the pgl gene cluster to E. coli confirmed the addition of the pEtN-glycan to a target C. jejuni protein. Significantly reduced, yet above background levels of pEtN-glycan were also observed in E. coli not expressing eptC, suggesting that endogenous E. coli pEtN transferases can mediate the addition of pEtN to N-glycans. The addition of pEtN must be considered in the context of glycoengineering and may alter C. jejuni glycan-mediated structure-function interactions.

  14. [Bt transgenic crops for insect-resistance and modification of Bt protein and utilization of stacking strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Liu, Bolin

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal protein genes from Bacillus thuringiensis are currently the most widely used insect-resistant genes. They have been transferred to many crops for breeding and production. Among them, cotton, maize, potato and other insect-resistant crops are commercialized, creating considerable economic benefit. In this review, we summarized advances in identifying functional genes and transgenic crops for insect resistance, compared different strategies for enhancing vigor of insecticidal protein and utilizing gene stacking as well as listing valuable groups of stacked genes. In addition, the methods for multiple gene transformation was discussed.

  15. HMG Modifications and Nuclear Function

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2010-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) proteins assume important roles in regulating chromatin dynamics, transcriptional activities of genes and other cellular processes. Post-translational modifications of HMG proteins can alter their interactions with DNA and proteins, and consequently, affect their biological activities. Although the mechanisms through which these modifications are involved in regulating biological processes in different cellular contexts are not fully understood, new insights into the...

  16. Protein nonenzymatic modifications and proteasome activity in skeletal muscle from the short-lived rat and long-lived pigeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portero-Otín, Manel; Requena, Jesús R; Bellmunt, Maria Josep; Ayala, Victoria; Pamplona, Reinald

    2004-10-01

    What are the mechanisms determining the rate of animal aging? Of the two major classes of endothermic animals, bird species are strikingly long-lived compared to similar size mammalian counterparts. Since oxidative stress is causally related to the basic aging process, markers of different kinds of oxidative damage to proteins (glutamic semialdehyde, aminoadipic semialdehyde, N(epsilon)-(carboxyethyl)lysine; N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine, N(epsilon)-(malondialdehyde)lysine and dinitrophenylhydrazyne-reactive protein carbonyls, peptidase activities of the proteasome, and amino acid and membrane fatty acyl composition were identified and measured in skeletal muscle from the short-lived rat (maximum life span, 4 years) and compared with the long-lived pigeon (maximum life span, 35 years). Skeletal muscle from pigeon showed significantly higher levels of glutamic semialdehyde, protein carbonyls (by western blot), N(epsilon)-(carboxyethyl)lysine and N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine. No differences were observed for aminoadipic semialdehyde, whereas the lipoxidation marker N(epsilon)-(malondialdehyde)lysine displayed a significant low steady-state level, probably related with their significantly lower membrane unsaturation. The amino acid compositional analysis revealed that arginine, serine, threonine and methionine showed significantly lower levels in pigeon. Finally, pigeon samples showed also significantly lower levels of the peptidase activities of the proteasome. These results reinforces the role of structural components such as membrane unsaturation and protein composition in determining the longer maximum life span showed by birds compared with mammals of similar body size.

  17. Structure based modification of Bluetongue virus helicase protein VP6 to produce a viable VP6-truncated BTV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Eiko [Microbiology and Immunology, Division of Animal Science, Department of Bioresource Science, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokkodai, Nada-ku, Kobe-City 657-8501 (Japan); Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom); Leon, Esther; Matthews, Steve J. [Division of Molecular Biosciences, Centre for Structural Biology, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Roy, Polly, E-mail: polly.roy@lshtm.ac.uk [Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • NMR analysis on BTV VP6 reveals two large loop regions. • The loss of a loop (aa 34–130) does not affect the overall fold of the protein. • A region of VP6 (aa 34–92) is not required for BTV replication. • A region of VP6 (aa 93–130) plays an essential role in the virus replication. - Abstract: Bluetongue virus core protein VP6 is an ATP hydrolysis dependent RNA helicase. However, despite much study, the precise role of VP6 within the viral capsid and its structure remain unclear. To investigate the requirement of VP6 in BTV replication, we initiated a structural and biological study. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were assigned on his-tagged full-length VP6 (329 amino acid residues) as well as several truncated VP6 variants. The analysis revealed a large structured domain with two large loop regions that exhibit significant conformational exchange. One of the loops (amino acid position 34–130) could be removed without affecting the overall fold of the protein. Moreover, using a BTV reverse genetics system, it was possible to demonstrate that the VP6-truncated BTV was viable in BHK cells in the absence of any helper VP6 protein, suggesting that a large portion of this loop region is not absolutely required for BTV replication.

  18. In situ coating--an approach for particle modification and encapsulation of proteins during spray-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elversson, Jessica; Millqvist-Fureby, Anna

    2006-10-12

    In this paper, we present a method for in situ coating of individual protein particles in a respirable size. The aim of the coating was to influence the particle/powder properties, and to reduce or prevent surface-induced conformational changes of the protein, during spray-drying, which was the method used for simultaneously preparing and coating particles. The investigated formulations included bovine serum albumin (BSA), trehalose and either of the two non-ionic polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) triblock co-polymer (Poloxamer 188). Complete protein coating as measured by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) was achieved at a polymer concentration of approximately 1% of the total solids weight, and could be predicted from the dynamic surface tension at the air/water interface, as measured by the pendant drop method. Further, particle properties such as: size, dissolution time, powder flowability, and apparent particle density, as measured by gas pycnometry, were affected by the type and concentration of the polymer. In addition, the particle surface morphology could possibly be correlated to the surface elasticity of the droplet surface during drying. Moreover, an extensive investigation (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism and size exclusion chromatography) of the structural effects of protein encapsulated in a polymeric coating suggested that in situ coating provide particulate formulations with preserved native conformation and with a high stability during rehydration.

  19. Changes in malondialdehyde and C-reactive protein concentrations after lifestyle modification are related to different metabolic syndrome-associated pathophysiological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreto, Fernando; Kano, Hugo T; Torezan, Gabriel A; de Oliveira, Erick P; Manda, Rodrigo M; Teixeira, Okesley; Michelin, Edilaine; Correa, Camila R; Burini, Roberto C

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is often accompanied by pro-oxidative and pro-inflammatory processes. Lifestyle modification (LiSM) may act as primary treatment for these processes. This study aimed to elucidate influencing factors on changes of malondialdehyde (MDA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations after a LiSM intervention. Sixty subjects (53 yrs, 84% women) clinically approved to attend a 20 weeks LiSM-program were submitted to weekly nutritional counseling and physical activities combining aerobic (3 times/week) and resistance (2 times/week) exercises. Before and after intervention they were assessed for anthropometric, clinical, cardiorespiratory fitness test (CRF) and laboratory markers. Statistical analyses performed were multiple regression analysis and backward stepwise with phealthy eating index (HEI), total plasma antioxidant capacity (TAP) and HDL-C along with reductions in waist circumference measures and MetS (47-40%) prevalence. MDA and CRP did not change after LiSM, however, we observed that MDA concentrations were positively influenced (R(2)=0.35) by fasting blood glucose (β=0.64) and HOMA-IR (β=0.58) whereas CRP concentrations were by plasma gamma-glutamyltransferase activity (β=0.54; R(2)=0.29). Pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory states of MetS can be attenuated after lifestyle modification if glucose metabolism homeostasis were recovered and if liver inflammation were reduced, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. High hydrostatic pressure modification of whey protein concentrate for improved body and texture of lowfat ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S-Y; Swanson, B G; Ross, C F; Clark, S

    2008-04-01

    Previous research demonstrated that application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), particularly at 300 MPa for 15 min, can enhance foaming properties of whey protein concentrate (WPC). The purpose of this research was to determine the practical impact of HHP-treated WPC on the body and texture of lowfat ice cream. Washington State University (WSU)-WPC was produced by ultrafiltration of fresh separated whey received from the WSU creamery. Commercial whey protein concentrate 35 (WPC 35) powder was reconstituted to equivalent total solids as WSU-WPC (8.23%). Three batches of lowfat ice cream mix were produced to contain WSU-WPC without HHP, WSU-WPC with HHP (300 MPa for 15 min), and WPC 35 without HHP. All lowfat ice cream mixes contained 10% WSU-WPC or WPC 35. Overrun and foam stability of ice cream mixes were determined after whipping for 15 min. Ice creams were produced using standard ice cream ingredients and processing. The hardness of ice creams was determined with a TA-XT2 texture analyzer. Sensory evaluation by balanced reference duo-trio test was carried out using 52 volunteers. The ice cream mix containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC exhibited the greatest overrun and foam stability, confirming the effect of HHP on foaming properties of whey proteins in a complex system. Ice cream containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC exhibited significantly greater hardness than ice cream produced with untreated WSU-WPC or WPC 35. Panelists were able to distinguish between ice cream containing HHP-treated WSU-WPC and ice cream containing untreated WPC 35. Improvements of overrun and foam stability were observed when HHP-treated whey protein was used at a concentration as low as 10% (wt/wt) in ice cream mix. The impact of HHP on the functional properties of whey proteins was more pronounced than the impact on sensory properties.

  1. Advanced on Modification and Application of Soy Protein Isolate%大豆分离蛋白接枝改性与应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小洁; 王荣民; 何玉凤; 何乃普; 裴菲

    2011-01-01

    随着人们对环保问题和新材料发展的日益重视,大豆分离蛋白由于其生物可降解性、营养价值高、对人体与环境无害、来源广泛等特点而倍受关注.本文介绍了大豆分离蛋白的接枝改性方法及在食品添加剂、包装膜和医用外敷膜材料的基料以及化妆品中的应用,并综述了国内外在改善膜的应用特性方面取得的研究进展.%With increasing in public awareness of environmental protection and development of new materials,soy protein isolates have attracted attention because of its biodegradable, environmentally friendly, high nutritional value,nonpoisonous, readily available from an abundant renewable resource, and so on. The modifications and applications of isolated soy protein in food additives, cosmetic additives, packaging films and medical external films were introduced briefly. The achievements in improving application performances of the films of soy protein isolates were also reviewed.

  2. Protein corona changes mediated by surface modification of amorphous silica nanoparticles suppress acute toxicity and activation of intrinsic coagulation cascade in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Morishita, Yuki; Aoyama, Michihiko; Tochigi, Saeko; Hirai, Toshiro; Tanaka, Kota; Nagano, Kazuya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nanomaterial-mediated biological effects have been shown to be governed by the interaction of nanomaterials with some kinds of proteins in biological fluids, and the physical characteristics of the nanomaterials determine the extent and type of their interactions with proteins. Here, we examined the relationships between the surface properties of amorphous silica nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm (nSP70), their interactions with some proteins in biological fluids, and their toxicity in mice after intravenous administration. The surface modification of nSP70 with amino groups (nSP70-N) prevented acute lethality and abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade found in the nSP70-treated group of mice. Since our previous study showed that coagulation factor XII played a role in the nSP70-mediated abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade, we examined the interaction of nSP70 and nSP70-N with coagulation factor XII. Coagulation factor XII bonded to the surface of nSP70 to a greater extent than that observed for nSP70-N, and consequently more activation of coagulation factor XII was observed for nSP70 than for nSP70-N. Collectively, our results suggest that controlling the interaction of nSP70 with blood coagulation factor XII by modifying the surface properties would help to inhibit the nSP70-mediated abnormal activation of the blood coagulation cascade.

  3. May modifications of human plasma proteins stimulated by homocysteine and its thiolactone induce changes of hemostatic function of plasma in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata; Kołodziejczyk, Joanna; Malinowska, Joanna

    2010-06-01

    Homocysteine (Hcys) may be implicated in different diseases, especially in cardiovascular illnesses. The most reactive form of Hcys is its cyclic thioester-homocysteine thiolactone (HTL), which is formed in plasma and represents up to 0.29% of plasma total Hcys. Recently, it has been observed that Hcys and HTL may modify plasma proteins, including albumin, hemoglobin or fibrinogen, but the role of this process is not yet well known. The aim of our study in vitro was to investigate the modifications of human plasma total proteins after incubation with the reduced form of Hcys in concentrations 10-100 micromol/l, and HTL in concentrations 1-0.1 micromol/l, which correspond to levels found in human plasma during hyperhomocysteinemia in vivo. The aim of our study was also to explain the effects of Hcys and HTL on coagulation activity of human plasma. We showed that in model system in vitro Hcys and HTL change the level of thiol, amino and carbonyl groups in plasma total proteins. Moreover, our studies reported that not only Hcys (10-100 micromol/l), but also HTL (at lower concentrations than Hcys) modulates the coagulation properties of human plasma.

  4. Data for the identification of proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins associated to histones H3 and H4 in S. cerevisiae, using tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Luz Valero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tandem affinity purification method (TAP allows the efficient purification of native protein complexes which incorporate a target protein fused with the TAP tag. Purified multiprotein complexes can then be subjected to diverse types of proteomic analyses. Here we describe the data acquired after applying the TAP strategy on histones H3 and H4 coupled with mass spectrometry to identify associated proteins and protein post-translational modifications in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mass spectrometry dataset described here consists of 14 files generated from four different analyses in a 5600 Triple TOF (Sciex by information‐dependent acquisition (IDA LC–MS/MS. The above files contain information about protein identification, protein relative abundance, and PTMs identification. The instrumental raw data from these files has been also uploaded to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository, with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002671 and http://dx.doi.org/10.6019/PXD002671. These data are discussed and interpreted in http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2016.01.004. Valero et al. (2016 [1].

  5. Data for the identification of proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins associated to histones H3 and H4 in S. cerevisiae, using tandem affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, M Luz; Sendra, Ramon; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2016-03-01

    Tandem affinity purification method (TAP) allows the efficient purification of native protein complexes which incorporate a target protein fused with the TAP tag. Purified multiprotein complexes can then be subjected to diverse types of proteomic analyses. Here we describe the data acquired after applying the TAP strategy on histones H3 and H4 coupled with mass spectrometry to identify associated proteins and protein post-translational modifications in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mass spectrometry dataset described here consists of 14 files generated from four different analyses in a 5600 Triple TOF (Sciex) by information-dependent acquisition (IDA) LC-MS/MS. The above files contain information about protein identification, protein relative abundance, and PTMs identification. The instrumental raw data from these files has been also uploaded to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository, with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002671 and http://dx.doi.org/10.6019/PXD002671. These data are discussed and interpreted in http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2016.01.004. Valero et al. (2016) [1].

  6. Sequence-Independent Cloning and Post-Translational Modification of Repetitive Protein Polymers through Sortase and Sfp-Mediated Enzymatic Ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Thomas; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2016-04-11

    Repetitive protein-based polymers are important for many applications in biotechnology and biomaterials development. Here we describe the sequential additive ligation of highly repetitive DNA sequences, their assembly into genes encoding protein-polymers with precisely tunable lengths and compositions, and their end-specific post-translational modification with organic dyes and fluorescent protein domains. Our new Golden Gate-based cloning approach relies on incorporation of only type IIS BsaI restriction enzyme recognition sites using PCR, which allowed us to install ybbR-peptide tags, Sortase c-tags, and cysteine residues onto either end of the repetitive gene polymers without leaving residual cloning scars. The assembled genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using inverse transition cycling (ITC). Characterization by cloud point spectrophotometry, and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with fluorescence detection confirmed successful phosphopantetheinyl transferase (Sfp)-mediated post-translational N-terminal labeling of the protein-polymers with a coenzyme A-647 dye (CoA-647) and simultaneous sortase-mediated C-terminal labeling with a GFP domain containing an N-terminal GG-motif in a one-pot reaction. In a further demonstration, we installed an N-terminal cysteine residue into an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) that was subsequently conjugated to a single chain poly(ethylene glycol)-maleimide (PEG-maleimide) synthetic polymer, noticeably shifting the ELP cloud point. The ability to straightforwardly assemble repetitive DNA sequences encoding ELPs of precisely tunable length and to post-translationally modify them specifically at the N- and C- termini provides a versatile platform for the design and production of multifunctional smart protein-polymeric materials.

  7. Evaluating the extent of protein damage in dairy products: simultaneous determination of early and advanced glycation-induced lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegele, Jörg; Parisod, Véronique; Richoz, Janique; Förster, Anke; Maurer, Sarah; Krause, René; Henle, Thomas; Bütler, Timo; Delatour, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    An isotope dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed to determine lysine (Lys), N(epsilon)-fructosyllysine (FL), N epsilon-carboxymethyllysine (CML), and pyrraline (Pyr) in dairy products. The presented approach entails protein cleavage via enzymatic digestion to liberate the aforementioned compounds, which were then quantified using a stable isotope dilution assay. LC-MS/MS analysis was performed by positive electrospray ionization recording two transition reactions per analyte in selected reaction monitoring mode. The CML and Lys values obtained with enzymatic digestion were compared to those acquired with acid hydrolysis HCl (6 mol/L), and the two proteolysis methods yielded comparable quantifications. Allowing for the fact that the investigated compounds are formed during different stages of the glycation process, the method is able to reveal the progress of protein glycation in dairy products.

  8. c-Myc Alters Substrate Utilization and O-GlcNAc Protein Posttranslational Modifications without Altering Cardiac Function during Early Aortic Constriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolena Ledee

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic stimuli cause transcription of the proto-oncogene c-Myc (Myc. Prior work showed that myocardial knockout of c-Myc (Myc attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we assessed the interplay between Myc, substrate oxidation and cardiac function during early pressure overload hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc knockout (MycKO-TAC and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n = 7/group. Additional groups underwent sham surgery (Cont-Sham and MycKO-Sham, n = 5 per group. After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. In sham hearts, Myc knockout did not affect cardiac function or substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle. However, Myc knockout altered fractional contributions during TAC. The unlabeled fractional contribution increased in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC, whereas ketone and free fatty acid fractional contributions decreased. Additionally, protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc were significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Cont-Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy, which may regulate Myc-induced metabolic changes.

  9. Modifications of nano-titania surface for in vitro evaluations of hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and nonspecific protein binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Aparna; Dasgupta, Sayantan; Mukherjee, Siddhartha

    2017-04-01

    In the past decade, a variety of drug carriers based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles has been extensively reported. However, their biocompatibility still remains debatable, which motivated us to explore the porous nanostructures of other metal oxides, for example titanium dioxide (TiO2), as potential drug delivery vehicles. Herein, we report the in vitro hemolysis, cytotoxicity, and protein binding of TiO2 nanoparticles, synthesized by a sol-gel method. The surface of the TiO2 nanoparticles was modified with hydroxyl, amine, or thiol containing moieties to examine the influence of surface functional groups on the toxicity and protein binding aspects of the nanoparticles. Our study revealed the superior hemocompatibility of pristine, as well as functionalized TiO2 nanoparticles, compared to that of mesoporous silica, the present gold standard. Among the functional groups studied, aminosilane moieties on the TiO2 surface substantially reduced the degree of hemolysis (down to 5%). Further, cytotoxicity studies by MTT assay suggested that surface functional moieties play a crucial role in determining the biocompatibility of the nanoparticles. The presence of NH2- functional groups on the TiO2 nanoparticle surface enhanced the cell viability by almost 28% as compared to its native counterpart (at 100 μg/ml), which was in agreement with the hemolysis assay. Finally, nonspecific protein adsorption on functionalized TiO2 surfaces was examined using human serum albumin and it was found that negatively charged surface moieties, like -OH and -SH, could mitigate protein adsorption to a significant extent.

  10. Cellulose binding protein from the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii interacts with Arabidopsis pectin methylesterase: cooperative cell wall modification during parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewezi, Tarek; Howe, Peter; Maier, Tom R; Hussey, Richard S; Mitchum, Melissa Goellner; Davis, Eric L; Baum, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete a complex of cell wall-digesting enzymes, which aid in root penetration and migration. The soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines also produces a cellulose binding protein (Hg CBP) secretory protein. To determine the function of CBP, an orthologous cDNA clone (Hs CBP) was isolated from the sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii, which is able to infect Arabidopsis thaliana. CBP is expressed only in the early phases of feeding cell formation and not during the migratory phase. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Hs CBP developed longer roots and exhibited enhanced susceptibility to H. schachtii. A yeast two-hybrid screen identified Arabidopsis pectin methylesterase protein 3 (PME3) as strongly and specifically interacting with Hs CBP. Transgenic plants overexpressing PME3 also produced longer roots and exhibited increased susceptibility to H. schachtii, while a pme3 knockout mutant showed opposite phenotypes. Moreover, CBP overexpression increases PME3 activity in planta. Localization studies support the mode of action of PME3 as a cell wall-modifying enzyme. Expression of CBP in the pme3 knockout mutant revealed that PME3 is required but not the sole mechanism for CBP overexpression phenotype. These data indicate that CBP directly interacts with PME3 thereby activating and potentially targeting this enzyme to aid cyst nematode parasitism.

  11. Structure of a Putative Lipoate Protein Ligase from Thermoplasma acidophilum and the Mechanism of Target Selection for Post-Translational Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McManus,E.; Luisi, B.; Perham, R.

    2006-01-01

    Lipoyl-lysine swinging arms are crucial to the reactions catalysed by the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes. A gene encoding a putative lipoate protein ligase (LplA) of Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, a monomer of molecular mass 29 kDa, was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures in the absence and presence of bound lipoic acid were solved at 2.1 Angstroms resolution. The protein was found to fall into the a/{beta} class and to be structurally homologous to the catalytic domains of class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and biotin protein ligase, BirA. Lipoic acid in LplA was bound in the same position as biotin in BirA. The structure of the T. acidophilum LplA and limited proteolysis of E. coli LplA together highlighted some key features of the post-translational modification. A loop comprising residues 71-79 in the T. acidophilumligase is proposed as interacting with the dithiolane ring of lipoic acid and discriminating against the entry of biotin. A second loop comprising residues 179-193 was disordered in the T. acidophilum structure; tryptic cleavage of the corresponding loop in the E. coli LplA under non-denaturing conditions rendered the enzyme catalytically inactive, emphasizing its importance. The putative LplA of T. acidophilum lacks a C-terminal domain found in its counterparts in E. coli (Gram-negative) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (Gram-positive). A gene encoding a protein that appears to have structural homology to the additional domain in the E. coli and S. pneumoniae enzymes was detected alongside the structural gene encoding the putative LplA in the T. acidophilum genome. It is likely that this protein is required to confer activity on the LplA as currently purified, one protein perhaps catalysing the formation of the obligatory lipoyl-AMP intermediate, and the other transferring the lipoyl group from it to the specific lysine residue in the target protein.

  12. IODP Expedition 322 Drills Two Sites to Document Inputs to The Nankai Trough Subduction Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu’suke Kubo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean Drilling Program were to sample and log the incoming sedimentary strata and uppermost igneous basement of the Shikoku Basin, seaward of the Nankai Trough (southwestern Japan. Characterization of these subduction inputs is one piece of the overall science plan for the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment. Before we can assess how various material properties evolve down the dip of the plate interface, and potentially change the fault’s behavior from stable sliding to seismogenic slip, we must determine the initial pre-subduction conditions. Two sites were drilled seaward of the trench to demonstrate how facies characterand sedimentation rates responded to bathymetric architecture. Site C0011 is located on the northwest flank of a prominent basement high (Kashinosaki Knoll, and Site C0012 is located near the crest of the seamount. Even though significant gaps remain in the coring record, and attempts to recover wireline logs at Site C0012 failed, correlations can be made between stratigraphic units at the two sites.Sedimentation rates slowed down throughout the condensed section above the basement high, but the seafloor relief was never high enough during the basin’s evolution to prevent the accumulation of sandy turbidites near the crest of the seamount. We discovered a new stratigraphic unit, the middle Shikoku Basin facies, which is typified by late Miocene volcaniclastic turbidites. The sediment-basalt contact was recovered intact at Site C0012, giving a minimumbasement age of 18.9 Ma. Samples of interstitial water show a familiar freshening trend with depth at Site C0011, but chlorinity values at Site C0012 increase above the values for seawater toward the basement contact. The geochemical trends at Site C0012 are probably a response to hydration reactions in the volcaniclastic sediment and diffusional exchange with seawater-like fluid in the upper igneous basement. These data are important because they finallyestablish an

  13. PM2.5 Indoor Air Quality at Two Sites in London Ontario - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mates, A. V.; Xu, X.; Gilliland, J.; Maltby, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Studies have shown an association between ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and health impacts, particularly for the elderly and children. As part of a larger study, PM2.5 concentrations were measured using the DustTrak (Model 8520, TSI, St. Paul, MN, USA) at two schools within the city of London, Ontario (Canada). Site A was in a suburban environment while site B was in an urban setting. Monitoring took place for 3 weeks during winter (Feb. 16 - Mar. 8) and 3 weeks during spring (May 05 - 25) of 2010. The winter campaign monitored indoor PM2.5 only, while the spring campaign added outdoor monitors (PM2.5 and CO2) after the first week. Ten min. concentrations were used for analysis. Indoor measurements were split into weekday and weekend. For the same time interval, the outdoor concentrations showed mean values of 18 and 21 μg/m3 for sites A & B, respectively, both under the Canada Wide Standard of 30 μg/m3. Measurements at the two sites showed good associations (R^2 = 0.44), during the spring campaign. This indicates that the outdoor PM2.5 had similar sources. For indoor concentrations, Site B showed a significantly different mean concentration 5 times higher compared to site A during the winter ( 8.1 vs. 1.5 μg/m3 ) and 3 times higher (11.9 vs. 3.7 μg/m3) during the spring campaign. Since the outdoor concentrations were similar the large difference in indoor concentrations could be attributed to the following factors: site B being an older building, and the different physical characteristics between the two sites. The spring measurements showed an increase of 50% from weekday to weekend for site A and 22% for site B. The higher level of PM2.5 during weekends is possibly due to the infiltration of outdoor air while the ventilation/filtration system is shut off. During the winter campaign, Site A showed a 14% higher concentration during weekdays compared to weekends while site B weekend concentrations were 17% higher compared to weekday, which will be

  14. Oxidative protein modification as predigestive mechanism of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula: an hypothesis based on in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galek, H; Osswald, W F; Elstner, E F

    1990-01-01

    Aqueous leaf extracts from Dionaea muscipula contain quinones such as the naphthoquinone plumbagin that couple to different NADH-dependent diaphorases, producing superoxide and hydrogen peroxide upon autoxidation. Upon preincubation of Dionaea extracts with certain diaphorases and NADH in the presence of serumalbumin (SA), subsequent tryptic digestion of SA is facilitated. Since the secretroy glands of Droseracea contain proteases and possibly other degradative enzymes it is suggested that the presence of oxygen-activating redox cofactors in the extracts function as extracellular predigestive oxidants which render membrane-bound proteins of the prey (insects) more susceptible to proteolytic attacks.

  15. Modification of water absorption capacity of a plastic based on bean protein using gamma irradiated starches as additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeber, E. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, M.E. [Comision Nacional Energia Atomica, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gavioli, N. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Salmoral, E.M. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Grupo de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: esalmor@fi.uba.ar

    2007-01-15

    Some properties of a bean protein-starch plastic were modified by irradiation of the starch. Two kinds of starch from bean and cassava were irradiated with doses until 50 kGy before their inclusion in the composite. Water absorption of the resultant product was reduced by 36% and 60% in materials containing bean and cassava starch, respectively. A large decline in the elongation is observed till 10 kGy in both materials, while tensile strength diminished by 11% in the cassava composite.

  16. Mass spectrometric evidence for the existence of distinct modifications of different proteins by 2(E),4(E)-decadienal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaochun; Tang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jianye; Tochtrop, Gregory P; Anderson, Vernon E; Sayre, Lawrence M

    2010-03-15

    2(E),4(E)-Decadienal (DDE), a lipid peroxidation product, was found to covalently modify Lys residues of different proteins by different reactions using mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS). DDE mainly formed Lys Schiff base adducts with cytochrome c and ribonuclease A at 10 min, but these reversibly formed adducts almost disappeared after 24 h. In contrast, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) was highly modified by DDE after 24 h. In addition to the Lys Schiff base adducts, DDE formed novel Lys pyridinium adducts as well as Cys Michael adducts with beta-LG.

  17. Mass Spectrometric Evidence for the Existence of Distinct Modifications of Different Proteins by 2(E), 4(E)-Decadienal

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaochun; Tang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jianye; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Sayre, Lawrence M.

    2010-01-01

    2(E), 4(E)-Decadienal (DDE), a lipid peroxidation product, was found to covalently modify Lys residues of different proteins by different reactions using mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS). DDE mainly formed Lys Schiff base adducts with cytochrome c and ribonuclease A at 10 min, but these reversibly-formed adducts almost disappeared after 24 h. In contrast, β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) was highly modified by DDE after 24 h. In addition to the Lys Schiff base adducts, DDE formed novel Ly...

  18. Protein-sequence polymorphisms and post-translational modifications in proteins from human saliva using top-down Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelegge, Julian P.; Zabrouskov, Vlad; Halgand, Frederic; Souda, Puneet; Bassilian, Sara; Yan, Weihong; Wolinsky, Larry; Loo, Joseph A.; Wong, David T. W.; Faull, Kym F.

    2007-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can result in protein-sequence polymorphisms (PSPs) when codon translations are altered. Both top-down and bottom-up proteomics strategies can identify PSPs, but only if databases and software are used with this in mind. A 14,319 Da protein from human saliva was characterized using the top-down approach on a hybrid linear ion-trap Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer equipped for both collisionally activated (CAD) and electron-capture (ECD) dissociation. Sequence tags identified the protein as Cystatin SN, and defined the N-terminal signal peptide cleavage site, as well as two disulfide bonds, in agreement with previous studies. The mass of the intact protein (published gene sequence by 16.031 Da, and, based on CAD and ECD fragment ion assignments, it was concluded that the isoform of the protein analyzed carried a PSP at residue 11 such that the Pro translated from the genome was in fact Leu/Ile. An independently determined SNP (rs2070856) subsequently confirmed the genetic basis of the mass spectral interpretation and defined the residue as Leu. In another example, the PRP3 protein with mass ~10,999 Da was found to be an isomeric/isobaric mixture of the reported sequence with PSPs D4N or D50N (rs1049112). Both CAD and ECD datasets support two phosphorylation sites at residues Ser8 and Ser22, rather than Ser17. In the context of discovery proteomics, previously undefined PSPs and PTMs will only be detected if the logic of data processing strategies considers their presence in an unbiased fashion.

  19. Protein restriction during gestation alters histone modifications at the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) promoter region and induces GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle of female rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shasha; Rollet, Michelle; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy is an intrauterine factor that results in alteration of the offspring genome and associates with disease risk in the offspring. We investigated the impact of a maternal low-protein (LP) diet on the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in offspring skeletal muscle. GLUT4 is an insulin-regulated glucose transporter involved in insulin sensitivity and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle cells. We observed sex-dependent GLUT4 mRNA expression and increased GLUT4 protein content in female pup skeletal muscle with maternal LP. Analysis of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of increased skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression in offspring rats revealed the regulatory mechanisms involved. The protein level of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which has been known as an activator of GLUT4 transcription via the ability to carry out specific binding to the GLUT4 MEF2 binding sequence, increased in female pups whose mothers were fed a LP diet. Modifications of chromatin structure, including acetylated histone H3, acetylated histone H4 and di-methylated histone H3 at lysine 4, were detected at a significantly increased level at the GLUT4 promoter region in female pup muscle following a maternal LP diet. Glycogen content was also detected as up-regulated, accompanied by increased glycogen synthase in LP female offspring muscle. These results document that maternal protein restriction during pregnancy induces GLUT4 expression in female offspring skeletal muscle but not in males, which may indicate sex-dependent adaptation of glucose metabolism to a maternal LP diet.

  20. Modification of the plasma complement protein profile by exogenous estrogens is indicative of a compromised immune competence in marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Miao; Seemann, Frauke; Humble, Joseph L; Liang, Yimin; Peterson, Drew R; Ye, Rui; Ren, Honglin; Kim, Hui-Su; Lee, Jae-Seong; Au, Doris W T; Lam, Yun Wah

    2017-09-04

    Growing evidence suggests that the immune system of teleost is vulnerable to xenoestrogens, which are ubiquitous in the marine environment. This study detected and identified the major circulatory immune proteins deregulated by 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), which may be linked to fish susceptibility to pathogens in the marine medaka, Oryzias melastigma. Fish immune competence was determined using a host resistance assay to pathogenic bacteria Edwardsiella tarda. Females were consistently more susceptible to infection-induced mortality than males. Exposure to EE2 could narrow the sex gap of mortality by increasing infection-induced death in male fish. Proteomic analysis revealed that the major plasma immune proteins of adult fish were highly sexually dimorphic. EE2 induced pronounced sex-specific changes in the plasma proteome, with the male plasma composition clearly becoming "feminised". Male plasma was found to contain a higher level of fibrinogens, WAP63 and ependymin-2-like protein, which are involved in coagulation, inflammation and regeneration. For the first time, we demonstrated that expression of C1q subunit B (C1Q), an initiating factor of the classical complement pathway, was higher in males and was suppressed in both sexes in response to EE2 and bacterial challenge. Moreover, cleavage and post-translational modification of C3, the central component of the complement system, could be altered by EE2 treatment in males (C3dg down; C3g up). Multiple regression analysis indicated that C1Q is possibly an indicator of fish survival, which warrants further confirmation. The findings support the potential application of plasma immune proteins for prognosis/diagnosis of fish immune competence. Moreover, this study provides the first biochemical basis of the sex-differences in fish immunity and how these differences might be modified by xenoestrogens. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Structure of an epiphytic hydroid community on Cystoseira at two sites of different wave exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuschka Faucci

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytism is a strategy by which opportunistic species such as hydroids, escape the intense levels of competition in marine hard bottom communities. Species of the macroalgae Cystoseira have a seasonal turnover of the frond, and we hypothesise that epiphytic hydroids colonising such an unstable substrate might show some degree of specialisation. Here the first systematic study on hydroid-Cystoseira communities is presented. In particular, the seasonal and spatial distribution of epiphytic hydroids on three species of Cystoseira at two sites of different wave exposure at Porto Cesareo (Ionian Sea/Italy were investigated. Thirty-two hydroid species were recorded which are well known from other substrates and thus are not specific to Cystoseira; dominant species were all thecates. The influence of biological factors such as competition and the structure and abundance of the host, seem to have little influence on the hydroid community. The factors of greatest influence were mostly abiotic: sedimentation rate, nutrient levels, temperature and most especially water movement. The importance of water movement was evident in the higher colonisation of algal stems, higher hydroid frequency, larger colonies, reduced colony height, species composition, and distribution on the stems at the wave-exposed site.

  2. Pseudospin representation of the two-site Anderson-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortis, Rachel; Kennett, Malcolm

    The state of an Anderson localized system can be described in terms of the occupation of a set of single-particle wave functions which are localized in space. When interactions are added, single-particle wave functions are no longer well defined, so what is a useful description of the state of a many-body localized system and what about it is localized? Given that any system with Hilbert-space dimension 2N may be described by an Ising-type Hamiltonian, it has been proposed that in a fully many-body localized system the Ising pseudospins in this representation may be chosen to be local. Actually constructing these spins is non-trivial. While a number of approaches have been proposed, few explicit examples exist and almost all work has been on spin systems. Here we present the Hamiltonian of a two-site Hubbard model with disorder and nearest-neighbor interactions written in terms of pseudospins, and we explore the form of these pseudospins and their evolution as a function of hopping amplitude. Supported by NSERC of Canada.

  3. Differential arsenic binding in the sediments of two sites in Chile's lower Loa River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugueño, Manuel P; Acevedo, Sara E; Bonilla, Carlos A; Pizarro, Gonzalo E; Pasten, Pablo A

    2014-01-01

    Fluvial sediments from two lower Loa River basin sites in northern Chile were compared in order to probe the effects of vegetation and organic matter (OM) on As accumulation in fluvial environments. The two sites were the Sloman dam, which lacks macrophytes and has a low OM content (2.4%) in sediments, and the Quillagua Oasis, which is 23 km downstream from the Sloman site and has a higher OM (6.2%) in sediments and abundant aquatic plant life. The Quillagua site had preferential As enrichment with a co-occurrence pattern that differed from that of the Sloman site, which had a lower As concentration (1528 vs. 262 mg/kg d.w., respectively). At the Quillagua site, As concentration was strongly correlated with Mn and OM (r = 0.91 and 0.85, respectively); while at the Sloman site, As concentration in sediments was significantly correlated with Ca and Sr (r = 0.63 and 0.54, respectively). Sequential extraction analyses showed that the Sloman site had higher percentage of easily exchangeable As within the surface sediment (12%, 45 mg/kg d.w.) compared with the Quillagua site (3%, 40 mg/kg d.w.). These contrasting results suggest that both vegetation and OM control the immobilization and accumulation of As in the arid Loa River basin.

  4. Flowering phenology of tree rhododendron along an elevation gradient in two sites in the Eastern Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitkar, Sailesh; Luedeling, Eike; Shrestha, Krishna Kumar; Guan, Kaiyun; Xu, Jianchu

    2013-03-01

    Flowering phenology of tree rhododendron ( Rhododendron arboreum Sm.) was monitored in situ along elevation gradients in two distinct ecological settings. Observations were carried out in Gaoligong Nature Reserve (GNR) in China and in the Kanchenjunga Conservation Area (KCA) in Nepal. Using the crown density method, flowering events of the selected species were recorded. Flowering duration and synchrony were determined within each site and along the elevation gradient in each study area. Our observations showed high synchrony throughout the elevation gradient, especially for peak flowering. Mean 15-day soil temperature, soil parameters (soil moisture, nitrogen, organic matter and pH), age of the observed trees, and site characteristics (litter cover, canopy cover, inclination) were related to mean initial and peak flowering dates using partial least squares regression (PLS). Results differed between the two sites, but winter temperature was the most important variable affecting the regression model for both initial flowering and peak flowering at both sites. After temperature, soil moisture was the most important variable for explaining initial flowering dates. The distribution of tree rhododendron indicates that it is able to grow in a wide range of habitats with different environmental conditions. The recent trend of rising winter-spring temperature and the detected bloom-advancing effect of high temperatures during this period suggest that tree rhododendron might expand its distributional range in response to global warming.

  5. Modification of gold surface by grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) for reduction in protein adsorption and platelet adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Kang, E T; Neoh, K G; Huang, W

    2001-01-01

    Gold surfaces were first treated in an alkanethiol solution to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The thiolated Au surface was then subjected to Ar plasma pretreatment, followed by air exposure and UV-induced graft polymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) macromonomer. In comparison with the 3-mercaptopropionic acid-2-ethylhexyl ester (MPAEE) SAM, the (3-mercaptoproply)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) SAM on Au exhibited higher stability under the conditions of Ar plasma pretreatment. The graft concentration of the PEGMA polymer on SAM-modified Au surface increased with increasing PEGMA macromonomer concentration and UV-graft polymerization time. The modified-Au surfaces were characterized by X-ray spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and water contact angle measurement. The Au surface with a high concentration of grafted PEGMA polymer could completely repel protein adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  6. ELISA-PLA: A novel hybrid platform for the rapid, highly sensitive and specific quantification of proteins and post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing-He; Tao, Tao; Xie, Li-Qi; Lu, Hao-Jie

    2016-06-15

    Detection of low-abundance proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) remains a great challenge. A conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is not sensitive enough to detect low-abundance PTMs and suffers from nonspecific detection. Herein, a rapid, highly sensitive and specific platform integrating ELISA with a proximity ligation assay (PLA), termed ELISA-PLA, was developed. Using ELISA-PLA, the specificity was improved by the simultaneous and proximate recognition of targets through multiple probes, and the sensitivity was significantly improved by rolling circle amplification (RCA). For GFP, the limit of detection (LOD) was decreased by two orders of magnitude compared to that of ELISA. Using site-specific phospho-antibody and pan-specific phospho-antibody, ELISA-PLA was successfully applied to quantify the phosphorylation dynamics of ERK1/2 and the overall tyrosine phosphorylation level of ERK1/2, respectively. ELISA-PLA was also used to quantify the O-GlcNAcylation of AKT, c-Fos, CREB and STAT3, which is faster and more sensitive than the conventional immunoprecipitation and western blotting (IP-WB) method. As a result, the sample consumption of ELISA-PLA was reduced 40-fold compared to IP-WB. Therefore, ELISA-PLA could be a promising platform for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of proteins and PTMs.

  7. A single intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin in rats induces long-lasting modifications in behavior and brain protein levels of TNF-α and IL-18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossù Paola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic inflammation might cause neuronal damage and sustain neurodegenerative diseases and behavior impairment, with the participation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-18. However, the potential contribution of these cytokines to behavioral impairment in the long-term period has not been fully investigated. Methods Wistar rats were treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of LPS (5 mg/kg or vehicle. After 7 days and 10 months, the animal behavior was evaluated by testing specific cognitive functions, as mnesic, discriminative, and attentional functions, as well as anxiety levels. Contextually, TNF-α and IL-18 protein levels were measured by ELISA in defined brain regions (that is, frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, and hypothalamus. Results Behavioral testing demonstrated a specific and persistent cognitive impairment characterized by marked deficits in reacting to environment modifications, possibly linked to reduced motivational or attentional deficits. Concomitantly, LPS induced a TNF-α increase in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (from 7 days onward and cerebellum (only at 10 months. Interestingly, LPS treatment enhanced IL-18 expression in these same areas only at 10 months after injection. Conclusions Overall, these results indicate that the chronic neuroinflammatory network elicited by systemic inflammation involves a persistent participation of TNF-α accompanied by a differently regulated contribution of IL-18. This leads to speculation that, though with still unclear mechanisms, both cytokines might take part in long-lasting modifications of brain functions, including behavioral alteration.

  8. Modification of -Adenosyl--Homocysteine as Inhibitor of Nonstructural Protein 5 Methyltransferase Dengue Virus Through Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Sumo Friend Tambunan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is still a major threat worldwide, approximately threatening two-fifths of the world’s population in tropical and subtropical countries. Nonstructural protein 5 (NS5 methyltransferase enzyme plays a vital role in the process of messenger RNA capping of dengue by transferring methyl groups from S -adenosyl- l -methionine to N7 atom of the guanine bases of RNA and the RNA ribose group of 2′OH, resulting in S -adenosyl- l -homocysteine (SAH. The modification of SAH compound was screened using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, along with computational ADME-Tox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity test. The 2 simulations were performed using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE 2008.10 software, whereas the ADME-Tox test was performed using various software. The modification of SAH compound was done using several functional groups that possess different polarities and properties, resulting in 3460 ligands to be docked. After conducting docking simulation, we earned 3 best ligands (SAH-M331, SAH-M2696, and SAH-M1356 based on ΔG binding and molecular interactions, which show better results than the standard ligands. Moreover, the results of molecular dynamics simulation show that the best ligands are still able to maintain the active site residue interaction with the binding site until the end of the simulation. After a series of molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation were performed, we concluded that SAH-M1356 ligand is the most potential SAH-based compound to inhibit NS5 methyltransferase enzyme for treating dengue fever.

  9. Shifting p53-induced senescence to cell death by TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3) gene through posttranslational modification of p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ok Ran; Ryu, Min Sook; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Cellular senescence and apoptosis can be regulated by p53 activity, although the underlying mechanism of the switch between the two events remains largely unknown. Cells exposed to cancer chemotherapy can escape to senescence phenotype rather than undergoing apoptosis. By employing adenoviral transduction of p53 or TIS21 genes, we observed shifting of p53 induced-senescence to apoptosis in EJ bladder cancer cells, which express H-RasV12 and mutant p53; transduction of p53 increased H-RasV12 expression along with senescence phenotypes, whereas coexpression with TIS21 (p53+TIS21) induced cell death rather than senescence. The TIS21-mediated switch of senescence to apoptosis was accompanied by nuclear translocation of p53 protein and its modifications on Ser-15 and Ser-46 phosphorylation and acetylations on Lys-120, -320, -373 and -382 residues. Mechanistically, TIS21(/BTG2) regulated posttranslational modification of p53 via enhancing miR34a and Bax expressions as opposed to inhibiting SIRT1 and Bcl2 expression. At the same time, TIS21 increased APAF-1 and p53AIP1 expressions, but inhibited the interaction of p53 with iASPP. In vitro tumorigenicity was significantly reduced in the p53+TIS21 expresser through inhibiting micro-colony proliferation by TIS21. Effect of TIS21 on the regulation of p53 activity was confirmed by knockdown of TIS21 expression by RNA interference. Therefore, we suggest TIS21 expression as an endogenous cell death inducer at the downstream of p53 gene, which might be useful for intractable cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Determination of the Mixing Layer Height Over two Sites, Using Pilot Balloons During the MILAGRO Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrnschimmel, H.; Alonso, A. L.; Ángeles, F.; Sosa, G.; Varela, J.; Cárdenas, B.

    2007-12-01

    Among the mechanisms that affect air quality there is a variety of meteorological processes. An important process in this context are the changes in the mixing layer height during a day and over the year. The mixing layer height is the portion of the atmosphere close to the surface layer where air pollutants get diluted, without leaving this layer. Therefore, it is important to describe the variations in the height of the mixing layer, i.e. the vertical dilution of air pollution, since this is a process mitigating naturally the impact of emissions. There exist different methods to obtain information on the mixing layer height, among them radio soundings, the application of vertical wind profilers, and launching pilot balloons. In this study, pilot balloons have been used simultaneously over two sites of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign in March 2006. The objective was to determine the vertical wind profiles and derive information on the mixing layer height. Daily, four pilot balloons were launched, at 9:00, 12:00, 15:00, and 18:00 hours, over Tenango del Aire (a rural area in the Southeast of Mexico City), and over Ciudad Universitaria, in the Southern metropolitan area. At some occasions, night time measurements have been carried out at 21:00 and 24:00. A variability of the diurnal evolution of the mixing layer was observed along March, which could be related to surface temperature. The diurnal evolution showed a sudden growth of the mixing layer between 9:00 and 12:00 hours. Data intercomparisons were carried out for pilot balloons versus radio soundings during a few days at a third site, Tula, in the North of Mexico City. Both intercomparisons showed that pilot balloons are an effective method to obtain information about the development of the mixing layer.

  11. Direct measurement of human plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone by two-site immunoradiometric assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, E.A.; McLean, C.; Nieuwenhuyzen Kruseman, A.C.; Tilders, F.J.; Van der Veen, E.A.; Lowry, P.J.

    1987-05-01

    A ''two-site'' immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) which allows the direct estimation of human CRH (hCRH) in plasma is described. Using this IRMA, basal levels of CRH in normal subjects ranged from 2-28 pg/mL (mean, 15 +/- 7 (+/- SD) pg/mL; n = 58). Values in men and women were similar. Plasma CRH values within this range were also found in patients with Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, and Nelson's syndrome, with no correlation between plasma CRH and ACTH levels in these patients. Elevated plasma CRH levels were found in pregnant women near term (1462 +/- 752 (+/- SD) pg/mL; n = 55), and the dilution curve of this CRH-like immunoreactivity paralleled the IRMA standard curve. After its immunoadsorption from maternal plasma, this CRH-like material eluted on reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with a retention time identical to that of synthetic CRH and had equipotent bioactivity with the synthetic peptide in the perfused anterior pituitary cell bioassay. Circulating CRH was not detected in Wistar rats, even after adrenalectomy and subsequent ether stress. Synthetic hCRH was degraded by fresh human plasma relatively slowly; 65% of added CRH remained after 1 h of incubation at 37 C. Degradation was inhibited by heat treatment (54 C; 1 h), cold treatment (4 C; 4 h), or freezing and thawing. Loss of synthetic rat CRH occurred more rapidly when fresh rat plasma was used; only 20% of added CRH remained under the same conditions. The inability to measure CRH in peripheral rat plasma may be due to the presence of active CRH-degrading enzymes which fragment the CRH molecule into forms not recognized by the CRH IRMA.

  12. Soil micromorphology, geochemistry and microbiology at two sites on James Ross Island, Maritime Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Lars A.; Krauze, Patryk; Prater, Isabel; Scholten, Thomas; Wagner, Dirk; Kühn, Peter; Mueller, Carsten W.

    2017-04-01

    Referring to the fundamental question in ecosystem research, how biotic and abiotic processes interact, only a few studies exist for polar regions that integrate microbiological and soil scientific studies . Soils comprise the complex structure and environment that fosters water storage and nutrient cycling determined by its unique chemical, physical and biological properties with respect to the specific climate and parent material. In the extreme environment of Antarctica, soil biological processes are primarily controlled by microbial communities (Bacteria, Archaea and Fungi), and thus microbiota may also determine soils chemical and physical properties in a landscape lacking higher plants at an average air temperature below 0°C. James Ross Island, Maritime Antarctica, offers a pristine laboratory and an exceptional opportunity to study pedogenesis without the influence of vascular plants and burrowing animals. We analysed micromorphological features, chemical and microbiological measures at two sites on James Ross Island (Brandy Bay and St. Martha Cove) with similar substrates (mostly fine-grained calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Alpha Member of the Santa Martha Formation with varying amounts of conglomerates and mudstones) at similar topographic positions (small plateaus at similar elevation (80m a.s.l.)). The sites represent luv- and leeward conditions with respect to the main southwesterly winds. The climate on James Ross Island is to be described as semi-arid polar-continental, which is in clear contrast to the Southern Shetlands (e.g. King George Island) north of the Antarctic Peninsula. We will present first results of soil physical (bulk density, soil moisture and grains size distribution), pedochemical (SOC, total N and S, pH, CECeff, and pedogenic oxides) micromorphological and microbial analyses (Microbial DNA content, microbial abundances).

  13. Temporal variation of fine particle mass at two sites in Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, P.; Allen, G. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Castillejos, M. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana, Xochimilco (Mexico); Gold, D.; Speizer, F. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hernandez, M. [Inst. Nacional de Salud Publica, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Hayes, C.; McDonnell, W. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Simultaneous sampling of fine mass (PM{sub 2.5}, using an integrated 24 hour gravimetric method) and the particle scattering extinction coefficient (b{sub sp}, using a heated integrating nephelometer) were used to estimate continuous fine particle concentration at two sites in Mexico City. Linear regression analysis of the 24 h averages of b{sub sp} and the PM{sub 2.5} integrated samples was done on a seasonal basis. The coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}) between these methods ranged from 0.84 to 0.90 for the different sampling periods. These data are the first attempt to describe the diurnal variation of fine mass in Mexico City. Distinct and different diurnal patterns were observed for both sites. For the site located near an industrialized area, a sharp peak occurred between 0700 and 0900 hours and a second smaller but broader peak occurred late at night. This site is characterized by the presence of primary pollutants, with PM{sub 10} annual mean concentrations exceeding 150 {micro}g {center_dot} m{sup {minus}3}. The second bite is located in a residential area down wind of the industrialized area, and is characterized by the presence of secondary pollutants with much lower PM{sub 10} concentrations (annual mean of under 50 {micro}g {center_dot} m{sup {minus}3}). The diurnal fine mass pattern at this site had a broad peak between 0900 and 1200 hours. On individual days, fine mass was sometimes highly correlated with ozone.

  14. The pattern of coral reef development at two sites in the Seychelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, J. S.; Humber, S. R.

    2004-12-01

    Extensive drilling and dating of modern reef complexes worldwide have shown them to be just thin veneers of Holocene material deposited on older Pleistocene limestone. Where the Pleistocene substrate has been imaged seismically it is often characterised by rough karst topography that is thought to be the result of exposure to subaerial weathering during sea-level low stands. The importance of this antecedent karst topography relative to organic growth processes in controlling present day reef morphology has been much debated. We present high-resolution side-scan backscatter and 2D bathymetric survey results from two sites in the Seychelles (western Indian Ocean). These sites are relatively protected and reef morphology is not modified by tropical storms. The sonogram mosaics reveal areas of uniform backscatter intensity, together with regions of coarse image texture and isolated objects. Based on image texture and gross morphology, the mosaics have been classified into two categories of sediment (fine and coarse sand), seagrass beds, and four categories of reef (low relief reefs, patches, pinnacles, high relief continuous reef). The interpretation was ground truthed by independent diver observations and sediment grain size analysis. The pattern of reef development in these two leeward reefs is complex, with no shore-parallel zoning. The total spatial coverage of the reef classes is only 15% of the total surveyed area. Within these mapped reef areas, actual hard coral cover is estimated to be < 50%, so the actual hard-ground coverage is relatively small. Within the various reef types, no simple relationship between morphological parameters such as spatial area, perimeter water depth and height was found. We speculate that the dominant control on reef development is antecedent granite or karst limestone topography.

  15. PERFORMANCE OF 28-YEAR-OLD PROVENANCES OF LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AT TWO SITES IN WESTERN KENYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joram M. E. Mbinga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic variation in growth of ten 28-year-old Liquidambar styraciflua provenances was studied at two sites, Lugari and Kakamega in Western Kenya. The trial at each site was established in a Randomized Block Design with the ten provenances replicated in four blocks. Each block had ten square plots corresponding to the ten provenances and each plot had thirty six trees. Analysis of growth data gave results which showed a significant difference (P<0.01 in survival, and growth parameters of tree height, and diameter at breast height (Dbh among provenances at both sites. Ranking based on height growth of the provenances showed the best provenance at Lugari site was Finca Las Victoria-Guatemala, with mean height and Dbh of 35.8 m and 37.1 cm respectively, while the leading provenance at Kakamega site was Tactic Coban, Guatemala, with a mean height and Dbh of 28.7 m and 26.8 cm respectively. The provenance with highest mean survival at Lugari was Finca Las Victoria-Guatemala with a value of 29.2%, while at Kakamega the best provenance was Franklin, Virginia–USA, with a value of 72.2%. Provenance by site interaction was significant as shown by the difference in performance of provenances between the sites. A comparison of the result from the best performing provenances with the growth of the most commonly grown Cupressus lusitanica species in similar sites in Kenya indicates the high potential of L. styraciflua as a commercial plantation species in medium altitude sites in Kenya.

  16. 乳清蛋白的酶法改性研究%Study on the enzymatic modification of whey protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧; 石金波; 刘小翠

    2011-01-01

    采用碱性蛋白酶、风味蛋白酶、木瓜蛋白酶、中性蛋白酶、复合蛋白酶、胰蛋白酶、胃蛋白酶在各自的最适条件下对乳清蛋白粉进行水解,通过HPLC方法测定酶解产物中α-乳白蛋白(α—La)和β-乳球蛋白(β—Lg)的含量。结果表明,碱性蛋白酶对其水解最快,其次为木瓜蛋白酶,而在胃蛋白酶和胰蛋白酶作用下则不易酶解,而且发现α-La比β—Lg更容易水解。%Whey protein concentrate (WPC) were hydrolyzed by seven proteases respectively, they were alcalase, papain, flavourzyme, protamex, neturase, pepain and trypsin. The degradation of α-Lactalbumin(α-La) and β-Lac- toglobulin( β -Lg) were determined by HPLC. Results indicated alcalase was observed to be the fastest degradation of α -La and β -Lg. The second was papain. Pepain and trypsin hydrolysis rate was slow. α -La hydrolyzed easier than β-Ls.

  17. Modifications to the organophosphorus nerve agent-protein adduct refluoridation method for retrospective analysis of nerve agent exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Kerry E; Solano, Maria I; Johnson, Rudolph C; Maggio, Vincent L; Barr, John R

    2008-01-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents (OPNAs) continue to pose a threat to military personnel and the general public because of their toxicity and their potential use as weapons of mass destruction. An effective method for the detection of human exposure to OPNAs involves the refluoridation of nerve agents adducted to the serum protein butyrylcholinesterase. The regenerated agents are then enriched by solid-phase extraction and quantified by isotope-dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We have previously reported improvements that resulted in a 10-fold increase in sensitivity. We have now made further changes to the method that include the addition of confirmation ions, the addition of soman (GD) to the assay, the expansion of the linear range, and the elimination of high-volume injection to decrease background noise and run time while improving sensitivity. This report includes the standard operating procedures for this method for tabun, sarin, soman, cyclohexylsarin, and VX and validation studies. The method's limits of detection ranged from 5.5 to 16.5 pg/mL for the G analogue of VX and GD, respectively. Characterization of quality control (QC) materials resulted in an average coefficient of variation of 15.1% for the five analytes in low QC pools and 11.7% in high QC pools.

  18. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium DT104 ArtA-dependent modification of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in the presence of [32P]NAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Ikuo; Ishihara, Ryoko; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Hata, Eiji; Makino, Sou-ichi; Kanno, Toru; Hatama, Shinichi; Kishima, Masato; Akiba, Masato; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kubota, Takayuki

    2009-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) definitive phage type (DT) 104 has become a widespread cause of human and other animal infections worldwide. The severity of clinical illness in S. Typhimurium DT104 outbreaks suggests that this strain possesses enhanced virulence. ArtA and ArtB - encoded by a prophage in S. Typhimurium DT104 - are homologues of components of pertussis toxin (PTX), including its ADP-ribosyltransferase subunit. Here, we show that exposing DT104 to mitomycin C, a DNA-damaging agent, induced production of prophage-encoded ArtA/ArtB. Pertussis-sensitive G proteins were labelled in the presence of [(32)P]NAD and ArtA, and the label was released by HgCl(2), which is known to cleave cysteine-ADP-ribose bonds. ADP-dependent modification of G proteins was markedly reduced in in vitro-synthesized ArtA(6Arg-Ala) and ArtA(115Glu-Ala), in which alanine was substituted for the conserved arginine at position 6 (necessary for NAD binding) and the predicted catalytic glutamate at position 115, respectively. A cellular ADP-ribosylation assay and two-dimensional electrophoresis showed that ArtA- and PTX-induced ADP-ribosylation in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells occur with the same type of G proteins. Furthermore, exposing CHO cells to the ArtA/ArtB-containing culture supernatant of DT104 resulted in a clustered growth pattern, as is observed in PTX-exposed CHO cells. Hydrogen peroxide, an oxidative stressor, also induced ArtA/ArtB production, suggesting that these agents induce in vivo synthesis of ArtA/ArtB. These results, taken together, suggest that ArtA/ArtB is an active toxin similar to PTX.

  19. Posttranslational modification and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejun; Pattison, J Scott; Su, Huabo

    2013-01-18

    Protein quality control functions to minimize the level and toxicity of misfolded proteins in the cell. Protein quality control is performed by intricate collaboration among chaperones and target protein degradation. The latter is performed primarily by the ubiquitin-proteasome system and perhaps autophagy. Terminally misfolded proteins that are not timely removed tend to form aggregates. Their clearance requires macroautophagy. Macroautophagy serves in intracellular quality control also by selectively segregating defective organelles (eg, mitochondria) and targeting them for degradation by the lysosome. Inadequate protein quality control is observed in a large subset of failing human hearts with a variety of causes, and its pathogenic role has been experimentally demonstrated. Multiple posttranslational modifications can occur to substrate proteins and protein quality control machineries, promoting or hindering the removal of the misfolded proteins. This article highlights recent advances in posttranslational modification-mediated regulation of intracellular quality control mechanisms and its known involvement in cardiac pathology.

  20. Purification and determination of the modifying protein responsible for the post-synthetic modification of creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2) and enolase(EC 4.2.1.11)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landeghem, A.A.J. van; Soons, J.B.J.; Wever, R.A.; Mul-Steinbusch, M.W.F.J.; Antonissen-Zijdaa, T.

    1985-01-01

    The purification of a serum protein, responsible for the postsynthetic modification of CK and enolase, is described. A purification of about 1 300-fold could be reached after subsequent chromatography of human serum on DEAE cellulose and Sephacryl S-200 Superfine followed by affinity chromatography

  1. Chemical characterization and factor analysis of PM2.5 in two sites of Monterrey, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Marco A; Caballero, Porfirio; Carrillo, Olivia; Mendoza, Alberto; Mejia, Gerardo Manuel

    2012-07-01

    The Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA) has shown a high concentration of PM2.5 in its atmosphere since 2003. The contribution of possible sources of primary PM2.5 and its precursors is not known. In this paper we present the results of analyzing the chemical composition of sixty 24-hr samples of PM2.5 to determine possible sources of PM2.5 in the MMA. The samples were collected at the northeast and southeast of the MMA between November 22 and December 12, 2007, using low-volume devices. Teflon and quartz filters were used to collect the samples. The concentrations of 16 airborne trace elements were determined using x-ray fluorescence (XRF). Anions and cations were determined using ion chromatography. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were determined by thermal optical analysis. The results show that Ca had the maximum mean concentration of all elements studied, followed by S. Enrichment factors above 50 were calculated for S, Cl, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb. This indicates that these elements may come from anthropogenic sources. Overall, the major average components of PM2.5 were OC (41.7%), SO4(2-) (22.9%), EC (7.4%), crustal material (11.4%), and NO3- (12.6%), which altogether accounted for 96% of the mass. Statistically, we did not find any difference in SO4(2-) concentrations between the two sites. The fraction of secondary organic carbon was between 24% and 34%. The results of the factor analysis performed over 10 metals and OC and EC show that there are three main sources of PM2.5: crustal material and vehicle exhaust; industrial activity; and fuel oil burning. The results show that SO4(2-), OC, and crustal material are important components of PM2.5 in MMA. Further work is necessary to evaluate the proportion of secondary inorganic and organic aerosol in order to have a better understanding of the sources and precursors of aerosols in the MMA.

  2. Modification of the analysis of parathyroid hormone-related protein in milk and concentrations of this protein in commercial milk and milk products in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, K; Yamaguchi, M; Ohashi, M; Sato, R; Ochiai, H; Iriki, T; Wada, Y

    2010-05-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), which causes hypercalcemia associated with malignant tumors, is known to be present in milk. Gene expression of PTHrP in the mammary gland increases markedly during parturition and with the onset of lactation. Even when circulating PTHrP levels are extremely low or below the detection limit, milk PTHrP levels are remarkably high. Parathyroid hormone-related protein derived from the mammary gland is assumed to play a role in maintaining the maternal calcium homeostasis and calcium transport from blood to milk. In previous studies that determined the PTHrP concentrations in milk, the pretreatments and diluent composition were not standardized. Here, we investigated the effect of various pretreatment procedures and diluent constitutions and the consequent PTHrP concentrations in commercial milk and milk products in Japan. Significant differences were found in PTHrP concentrations in raw milk samples subjected to different combinations of pretreatments (mixing, centrifugation, acidification, and heating) and diluents (0pM standard solution of PTHrP, plasma treated with protease inhibitors, and original diluent). We measured the PTHrP concentrations in normal liquid milk, processed milk, milk drinks, formulated milk powders, and skim milk powder by using the appropriate combination of pretreatment (acidification) and diluent (plasma treated with protease inhibitors). The PTHrP concentration in normal liquid milk, processed milk, and skim milk powder was as high as that in raw milk (>5nM), whereas that in milk drinks differed considerably. The PTHrP concentration in infant formulas (PTHrP is ingested when milk and milk products are consumed. Copyright 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial protein acetylation as a cell-intrinsic, evolutionary driver of fat storage: chemical and metabolic logic of acetyl-lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanta, Sirisha; Grossmann, Ruth E; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Hormone systems evolved over 500 million years of animal natural history to motivate feeding behavior and convert excess calories to fat. These systems produced vertebrates, including humans, who are famine-resistant but sensitive to obesity in environments of persistent overnutrition. We looked for cell-intrinsic metabolic features, which might have been subject to an evolutionary drive favoring lipogenesis. Mitochondrial protein acetylation appears to be such a system. Because mitochondrial acetyl-coA is the central mediator of fuel oxidation and is saturable, this metabolite is postulated to be the fundamental indicator of energy excess, which imprints a memory of nutritional imbalances by covalent modification. Fungal and invertebrate mitochondria have highly acetylated mitochondrial proteomes without an apparent mitochondrially targeted protein lysine acetyltransferase. Thus, mitochondrial acetylation is hypothesized to have evolved as a nonenzymatic phenomenon. Because the pKa of a nonperturbed Lys is 10.4 and linkage of a carbonyl carbon to an ε amino group cannot be formed with a protonated Lys, we hypothesize that acetylation occurs on residues with depressed pKa values, accounting for the propensity of acetylation to hit active sites and suggesting that regulatory Lys residues may have been under selective pressure to avoid or attract acetylation throughout animal evolution. In addition, a shortage of mitochondrial oxaloacetate under ketotic conditions can explain why macronutrient insufficiency also produces mitochondrial hyperacetylation. Reduced mitochondrial activity during times of overnutrition and undernutrition would improve fitness by virtue of resource conservation. Micronutrient insufficiency is predicted to exacerbate mitochondrial hyperacetylation. Nicotinamide riboside and Sirt3 activity are predicted to relieve mitochondrial inhibition.

  4. Modification of Si(100) surface by the grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) for reduction in protein adsorption and platelet adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F; Kang, E T; Neoh, K G; Wang, P; Tan, K L

    2001-09-05

    The modification of argon plasma-pretreated single-crystal Si(100) wafer surfaces via the UV-induced graft polymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) macromonomer (molecular weight approximately 340) for biomaterials applications was explored. The modified Si(100) surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Surface peroxide concentrations resulting from the argon plasma treatment and subsequent atmospheric exposure were determined by a coupling reaction with diphenylpicrylhydrazyl. The results suggested that a short plasma treatment time of 10 s and brief air exposure were sufficient for generating an optimum amount of peroxides and hydroperoxides for the subsequent UV-induced graft polymerization. The graft concentration of the PEGMA polymer increased with increasing PEGMA macromonomer concentration for the graft polymerization and with increasing UV graft polymerization time. The PEGMA graft-polymerized silicon surface with a high poly(ethylene glycol) graft concentration was very effective in preventing protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The grafted PEGMA polymer layer on the Si(100) surface exhibited fairly good stability during storage in a buffer solution.

  5. Comparison of three modifications of fused-silica capillaries and untreated capillaries for protein profiling of maize extracts by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobozy, Ewa; Sentkowska, Aleksandra; Piskor, Anna

    2014-09-01

    In this work, capillary electrophoresis was applied to protein profiling of fractionated extracts of maize. A comparative study on the application of uncoated fused-silica capillaries and capillaries modified with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, ω-iodoalkylammonium salt and a commercially available neutral capillary covalently coated with polyacrylamide is presented. The coating stability, background electrolyte composition, and separation efficiency were investigated. It was found that for zeins separation, the most stable and efficient was the capillary coated with polyacrylamide. Finally, the usefulness of these methods was studied for the differentiation of zein fraction in transgenic and nontransgenic maize. Zeins extracted from maize standards containing 0 and 5% m/m genetic modification were successfully separated, but slight differences were observed in terms of the zein content. Albumin and globulin fractions were analyzed with the use of unmodified fused-silica capillary with borate buffer pH 9 and the capillary coated with polyacrylamide with phosphate buffer pH 3. In the albumin fraction, additional peaks were found in genetically modified samples.

  6. Promoter- and cell-specific epigenetic regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN by Methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzenbach Heidi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to analyze the involvement of methyl-CpG binding proteins (MBDs and histone modifications on the regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN in different cellular contexts such as the prostate cancer cells DU145 and LNCaP, and the breast cancer cells MCF-7. Since global chromatin changes have been shown to occur in tumours and regions of tumour-associated genes are affected by epigenetic modifications, these may constitute important regulatory mechanisms for the pathogenesis of malignant transformation. Methods In DU145, LNCaP and MCF-7 cells mRNA expression levels of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN were determined by quantitative RT-PCR at the basal status as well as after treatment with demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A. Furthermore, genomic DNA was bisulfite-converted and sequenced. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed with the stimulated and unstimulated cells using antibodies for MBD1, MBD2 and MeCP2 as well as 17 different histone antibodies. Results Comparison of the different promoters showed that MeCP2 and MBD2a repressed promoter-specifically Cyclin D2 in all cell lines, whereas in MCF-7 cells MeCP2 repressed cell-specifically all methylated promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that all methylated promoters associated with at least one MBD. Treatment of the cells by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR caused dissociation of the MBDs from the promoters. Only MBD1v1 bound and repressed methylation-independently all promoters. Real-time amplification of DNA immunoprecipitated by 17 different antibodies showed a preferential enrichment for methylated lysine of histone H3 (H3K4me1, H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 at the particular promoters. Notably, the silent promoters were associated with unmodified histones which were acetylated following treatment by 5-aza-CdR. Conclusions This study is one

  7. Green fluorescent protein (GFP color reporter gene visualizes parvovirus B19 non-structural segment 1 (NS1 transfected endothelial modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19 has been associated with myocarditis putative due to endothelial infection. Whether PVB19 infects endothelial cells and causes a modification of endothelial function and inflammation and, thus, disturbance of microcirculation has not been elucidated and could not be visualized so far. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To examine the PVB19-induced endothelial modification, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP color reporter gene in the non-structural segment 1 (NS1 of PVB19. NS1-GFP-PVB19 or GFP plasmid as control were transfected in an endothelial-like cell line (ECV304. The endothelial surface expression of intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 (CD54/ICAM-1 and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN/CD147 were evaluated by flow cytometry after NS-1-GFP or control-GFP transfection. To evaluate platelet adhesion on NS-1 transfected ECs, we performed a dynamic adhesion assay (flow chamber. NS-1 transfection causes endothelial activation and enhanced expression of ICAM-1 (CD54: mean ± standard deviation: NS1-GFP vs. control-GFP: 85.3 ± 11.2 vs. 61.6 ± 8.1; P<0.05 and induces endothelial expression of EMMPRIN/CD147 (CD147: mean ± SEM: NS1-GFP vs. control-GFP: 114 ± 15.3 vs. 80 ± 0.91; P<0.05 compared to control-GFP transfected cells. Dynamic adhesion assays showed that adhesion of platelets is significantly enhanced on NS1 transfected ECs when compared to control-GFP (P<0.05. The transfection of ECs was verified simultaneously through flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis. CONCLUSIONS: GFP color reporter gene shows transfection of ECs and may help to visualize NS1-PVB19 induced endothelial activation and platelet adhesion as well as an enhanced monocyte adhesion directly, providing in vitro evidence of possible microcirculatory dysfunction in PVB19-induced myocarditis and, thus, myocardial tissue damage.

  8. Reconstruction of past and prediction of future erythemal UV-radiation at two sites in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, Philipp; Rieder, Harald; Wagner, Jochen; Simic, Stana; Dameris, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Since the discovery of anthropogenic ozone depletion more than 30 year ago, the scientific community has shown an increasing interest in UV-B radiation and started to monitor UV-radiation. However, difficulties involved in the routine operation and maintenance of the instruments have limited the length of reliable data records to about two decades. Further the number of places where they were measured, result in a set of observations too short and too sparse for a good understanding of past UV changes. Moreover state of the art climate models do not calculate future scenarios of UV-doses. Therefore detailed information about past and future UV-trends are lacking. Reconstruction techniques are indispensable to derive long-term time series of UV-radiation and fill this gap. Apart from the astronomical parameters, like solar zenith angle and sun-earth-distance, UV radiation is strongly influenced by clouds, ozone and surface albedo. We developed and evaluated a reconstruction technique for UV-doses (from regional climate model output) that first calculates the UV-doses under clear-sky condition and afterwards applies corrections in order to take cloud effects into account. Since the input parameters cloud cover, total ozone column and surface albedo are available from the Regional Climate Models REMO and E39/C (DLR-model), we applied our reconstruction technique for the past and for future scenarios using REMO and E39/C data as input. Hence we simulated a seamless UV long-term time series from the past to the future. Our method was applied for the high alpine station Hoher Sonnblick (3106m) situated in the Austrian Alps and for Vienna (170m) in the Eastern part of the Austrian territory. We first analyse the accuracy of the obtained backward reconstruction and intercompare the modelled and measured input parameters ozone, cloud modification factor, and ground albedo. Several approaches to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction are presented. Then we present the

  9. Chemical biology approaches for studying posttranslational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Aerin; Cho, Kyukwang; Park, Hee-Sung

    2017-09-13

    Posttranslational modification (PTM) is a key mechanism for regulating diverse protein functions, and thus critically affects many essential biological processes. Critical for systematic study of the effects of PTMs is the ability to obtain recombinant proteins with defined and homogenous modifications. To this end, various synthetic and chemical biology approaches, including genetic code expansion and protein chemical modification methods, have been developed. These methods have proven effective for generating site-specific authentic modifications or structural mimics, and have demonstrated their value for in vitro and in vivo functional studies of diverse PTMs. This review will discuss recent advances in chemical biology strategies and their application to various PTM studies.

  10. Adsorption of surfactant protein D from human respiratory secretions by carbon nanotubes and polystyrene nanoparticles depends on nanomaterial surface modification and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Magda; Shaffer, Milo S P; Zambianchi, Martina; Chen, Shu; Superti, Fabiana; Schwander, Stephan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2015-02-05

    The alveolar respiratory unit constitutes one of the main targets of inhaled nanoparticles; the effect of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) on human health is largely unknown. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is synthesized by alveolar type II epithelial cells and released into respiratory secretions; its main function is in immune defence, notably against inhaled microbes. SP-D also plays an important role in modulating an appropriate inflammatory response in the lung, and reduced SP-D is associated with a number of inflammatory lung diseases. Adsorption of SP-D to inhaled NMs may facilitate their removal via macrophage phagocytosis. This study addresses the hypothesis that the chemistry, size and surface modification of engineered NMs will impact on their interaction with, and adsorption of, SP-D. To this purpose, we have examined the interactions between SP-D in human lung lavage and two NMs, carbon nanotubes and polystyrene nanoparticles, with different surface functionalization. We have demonstrated that particle size, functionalization and concentration affect the adsorption of SP-D from human lung lavage. Functionalization with negatively charged groups enhanced the amount of SP-D binding. While SP-D binding would be expected to enhance macrophage phagocytosis, these results suggest that the degree of binding is markedly affected by the physicochemistry of the NM and that deposition of high levels of some nanoparticles within the alveolar unit might deplete SP-D levels and affect alveolar immune defence mechanisms. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteomic analysis of post-translational modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Matthias; Jensen, Ole N

    2003-01-01

    Post-translational modifications modulate the activity of most eukaryote proteins. Analysis of these modifications presents formidable challenges but their determination generates indispensable insight into biological function. Strategies developed to characterize individual proteins are now...... mass spectrometric peptide sequencing and analysis technologies hold tremendous potential. Finally, stable isotope labeling strategies in combination with mass spectrometry have been applied successfully to study the dynamics of modifications....

  12. Involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in the barrier function of the human erythrocyte membrane. III. Permeability of spectrin-depleted inside-out membrane vesicles to hydrophilic nonelectrolytes. Formation of leaks by chemical or enzymatic modification of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonk, S; Deuticke, B

    1992-04-29

    Spectrin-depleted inside-out vesicles (IOV's) prepared from human erythrocyte membranes were characterized in terms of size, ground permeability to hydrophilic nonelectrolytes and their sensitivity to modification by SH reagents, DIDS and trypsin. IOV's proved to have the same permeability of their lipid domain to erythritol as native erythrocytes, in contrast to resealed ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 126-136 (Part I in this series)), which have a residual leak. On the other hand, IOV's have a slightly elevated permeability for mannitol and sucrose, nonelectrolytes which are almost (mannitol) or fully (sucrose) impermeant in the native membrane. These increased fluxes, which have a high activation energy and can be stimulated by phloretin, are, however, also much smaller than the corresponding leak fluxes observed in resealed ghosts. In view of these differences, formation of IOV's can be concluded to go along with partial annealing of barrier defects persisting in the erythrocyte membrane after preparation of resealed ghosts. Oxidation of SH groups of the IOV membrane by diamide produces an enhancement of permeability for hydrophilic nonelectrolytes which is much less pronounced than that induced by a similar treatment of erythrocytes or ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 126-136 (Part I in this series)). Moreover, proteolytic treatment of the vesicle membrane, although leading to a marked digestion of integral membrane proteins, only induces a minor, saturating increase of permeability, much lower than that in trypsinized resealed ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 137-142 (Part II of this series)). Since absence of the cytoskeletal proteins, spectrin and actin, is the major difference between IOV's and resealed ghosts, these results may be taken as further evidence for a dependence of the barrier properties of the erythrocyte membrane bilayer domain

  13. Optimising expression of the recombinant fusion protein biopesticide ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a/GNA in Pichia pastoris: sequence modifications and a simple method for the generation of multi-copy strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2014-08-01

    Production of recombinant protein bio-insecticides on a commercial scale can only be cost effective if host strains with very high expression levels are available. A recombinant fusion protein containing an arthropod toxin, ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a, (from funnel web spider Hadronyche versuta) linked to snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) is an effective oral insecticide and candidate biopesticide. However, the fusion protein was vulnerable to proteolysis during production in the yeast Pichia pastoris. To prevent proteolysis, the Hv1a/GNA fusion expression construct was modified by site-directed mutagenesis to remove a potential Kex2 cleavage site at the C-terminus of the Hv1a peptide. To obtain a high expressing clone of P. pastoris to produce recombinant Hv1a/GNA, a straightforward method was used to produce multi-copy expression plasmids, which does not require multiple integrations to give clones of P. pastoris containing high copy numbers of the introduced gene. Removal of the Kex2 site resulted in increased levels of intact fusion protein expressed in wild-type P. pastoris strains, improving levels of intact recombinant protein recoverable. Incorporation of a C-terminal (His)6 tag enabled single step purification of the fusion protein. These modifications did not affect the insecticidal activity of the recombinant toxin towards lepidopteran larvae. Introduction of multiple expression cassettes increased the amount of secreted recombinant fusion protein in a laboratory scale fermentation by almost tenfold on a per litre of culture basis. Simple modifications in the expression construct can be advantageous for the generation of high expressing P. pastoris strains for production of a recombinant protein, without altering its functional properties.

  14. Surface modification of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene by the poly(ethylene glycol)-grafted method and its effect on the adsorption of proteins and the adhesion of blood platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing; Xie, Meiju; Yang, Bangcheng

    2013-01-01

    With the help of a silane coupling agent, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), a well-biocompatable agent, was grafted onto the surface of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by ultraviolet initiation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis proved the success of PEG grafting. Water contact angle measurement showed that the modified UHMWPE was obviously improved in surface hydrophilicity and thermogravimetric analysis result showed that its thermostability did not decline even it was pretreated by strong acids. Then, the protein adsorption of the modified UHMWPE was investigated using three model proteins including bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, and fibrinogen. Rabbit blood was used to study the platelet adhesion on the surface of modified UHMWPE. The results indicated that the quantity of protein adsorption on the modified UHMWPE grafted PEG reduced apparently for all the model proteins while there was some specific differences or exceptions among them. It was ascribed to the changed surface chemical composition, surface hydrophilicity and surface topography after modification. The adhesive ability of blood platelets on the modified surface of UHMWPE decreased after PEG grafting. Owing to the improved resistance to fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion, the surface modification might endow the UHWMPE surface better anticoagulation ability according to clotting mechanism.

  15. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by fumarate in diabetes: formation of S-(2-succinyl)cysteine, a novel chemical modification of protein and possible biomarker of mitochondrial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatnik, Matthew; Frizzell, Norma; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2008-01-01

    (2-succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is formed by a Michael addition reaction of the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, with cysteine residues in protein. We investigated the role of fumarate in chemical modification and inhibition of the sulfhydryl enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), in vitro and in tissues of diabetic rats. GAPDH was incubated with fumarate in PBS to assess effects of fumarate on enzyme activity in vitro. Sites of 2SC formation were determined by analysis of tryptic peptides by high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. 2SC and fumarate in gastrocnemius muscle of control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, respectively. GAPDH was isolated from muscle by immunoprecipitation, and sites of modification of GAPDH were determined by mass spectrometry analysis. 2SC was found, both in vitro and in vivo, about equally at active-site Cys-149 and nucleophilic Cys-244. Inactivation of GAPDH by fumarate in vitro correlated with formation of 2SC. In diabetic compared with control rats, fumarate and 2SC concentration increased approximately fivefold, accompanied by an approximately 25% decrease in GAPDH specific activity. The fractional modification of GAPDH by 2SC was significantly increased in diabetic versus control animals, consistent with the decreased specific activity of GAPDH in muscle of diabetic animals. Fumarate contributes to inactivation of GAPDH in diabetes. 2SC may be a useful biomarker of mitochondrial stress in diabetes. Modification of GAPDH and other enzymes and proteins by fumarate may contribute to the metabolic changes underlying the development of diabetes complications.

  16. Mangrove sediment core analysis of foraminiferal assemblages - a study at two sites along the western coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vidya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves are an unique habitat and are largely influenced by sea level changes and wave energy. Foraminifera (Protista preserved in mangrove sediments provide an excellent proxy for deducing past conditions. One meter deep mangrove core samples at two sites on the western coast of India were collected. The foraminiferal assemblages at various depths showed significant changes in the abundance and diversity down the cores. A total of 59 species belonging to 32 genera, 24 families and five suborders were identified from the cores of these two sites. The cores showed an abundance of genus Rotalidium particularly the species Rotalidium annectans. Other species identified include Ammonia, Elphidium, Nonion, Spiroloculina, Quinqueloculina, Globigerinoides, etc. The pH, organic matter and CaCO3 also showed variations down the cores. There was a lack of correlation between sediment characteristics and the abundance of foraminifera in the cores. The low diversity and differences in distribution of foraminifera compared to surface intertidal samples may be due to intense post depositional changes or anthropogenic disturbances. The mangrove ecology thus appears disturbed by various factors.

  17. Protein interaction analysis of senataxin and the ALS4 L389S mutant yields insights into senataxin post-translational modification and uncovers mutant-specific binding with a brain cytoplasmic RNA-encoded peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig L Bennett

    Full Text Available Senataxin is a large 303 kDa protein linked to neuron survival, as recessive mutations cause Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia type 2 (AOA2, and dominant mutations cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 4 (ALS4. Senataxin contains an amino-terminal protein-interaction domain and a carboxy-terminal DNA/RNA helicase domain. In this study, we focused upon the common ALS4 mutation, L389S, by performing yeast two-hybrid screens of a human brain expression library with control senataxin or L389S senataxin as bait. Interacting clones identified from the two screens were collated, and redundant hits and false positives subtracted to yield a set of 13 protein interactors. Among these hits, we discovered a highly specific and reproducible interaction of L389S senataxin with a peptide encoded by the antisense sequence of a brain-specific non-coding RNA, known as BCYRN1. We further found that L389S senataxin interacts with other proteins containing regions of conserved homology with the BCYRN1 reverse complement-encoded peptide, suggesting that such aberrant protein interactions may contribute to L389S ALS4 disease pathogenesis. As the yeast two-hybrid screen also demonstrated senataxin self-association, we confirmed senataxin dimerization via its amino-terminal binding domain and determined that the L389S mutation does not abrogate senataxin self-association. Finally, based upon detection of interactions between senataxin and ubiquitin-SUMO pathway modification enzymes, we examined senataxin for the presence of ubiquitin and SUMO monomers, and observed this post-translational modification. Our senataxin protein interaction study reveals a number of features of senataxin biology that shed light on senataxin normal function and likely on senataxin molecular pathology in ALS4.

  18. 响应面法优化玉米胚芽蛋白粉的酶改性工艺%Optimization of Enzymatic Modification for Corn Germ Protein Powder by Response Surface Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵梅; 韩忠杰; 孙庆杰

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to optimize the process condition of enzymatic modification for corn germ albumen powder.The functional property of modified protein and examinational protein was compared.The gel hardness of corn germ powder was investigated with respect to processing time,substrate concentration and enzyme content.The results showed that the optimized enzymatic modification process was processing time of 3.18 h,substrate mass fraction of 10.88% and enzyme content of 24.16 U/g.Under above conditions,the gel hardness was 98.13 g.Modified corn germ protein showed an obviously improvement in its functional property.Therefore,the effect of enzymatic modification is obvious.%酶法改性处理玉米胚芽蛋白粉,并比较改性前后玉米胚芽蛋白粉的功能性质.以改性时间、底物浓度和加酶量为响应因素,玉米胚芽蛋白粉凝胶硬度为响应值,采用响应面分析方法,优化玉米胚芽蛋白粉酶改性工艺.结果表明:酶法改性玉米胚芽蛋白粉的最优工艺条件为改性时间3.18 h;底物质量分数10.88%;加酶量24.16 U/g,在此工艺条件下得到的凝胶硬度为98.13 g.改性后的玉米胚芽蛋白粉其功能性质有了较明显的改善,说明酶法改性玉米胚芽蛋白粉效果明显.

  19. Protein Microarrays Technology and Its Application in Genome-Wide Posttranslational Modification%蛋白质芯片技术及其在全基因组翻译后修饰分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    眭维国; 王惠; 曹翠辉; 薛雯; 陈洁晶

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarrays technology is an important part in the current biological research. It can be used to study the interactions of protein-DNA,protein-ligand,protein-protein. In recent years,its application in the biochemical analysis of genome-wide has obtained remarkable achievement. Here is to make a review focusing on protein microarrays technology and its application in the analysis of genome-wide post-translational modification.%蛋白质芯片技术可用于研究蛋白质-DNA、蛋白质-配基和蛋白质与蛋白质之间的相互作用,是当前生物科学研究中的重要内容.近年来,运用蛋白质芯片技术对全基因组进行生物化学分析的应用取得令人瞩目的 成就.现着重总结蛋白质芯片技术及其在全基因组翻译后修饰分析中的应用.

  20. Characterization of Surface Modification of Polyethersulfone Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface modification of polyethersulfone (PES) membrane surface using UV/ozone-treated grafting and interfacial polymerization on membrane surface was investigated in order to improve the resistance of membrane surface to protein adsorption. These methods of surface modification were compared in te...

  1. Behavior of trace metals in the hydrothermal plume at two sites on the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitashima, K.

    2004-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal systems play an important role in the oceanic geochemical cycles of trace metals. High concentration of trace metals of the basalt origin is discharged into the deep sea via the hydrothermal plume. The hydrothermal plume is widely diffused to the ocean by mixing with ambient seawater. The processes of input and removal in the diffusing hydrothermal plume differ by individual hydrothermal systems. In this presentation, the behavior of trace metals in the hydrothermal plume of two sites on the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc is compared. This study was funded by