WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-ribbon solar flare

  1. 3D Simulation Study of the Spreading/Elongation of Ribbons in Two-Ribbon Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Milton; Cassak, Paul; Qiu, Jiong; Longscope, Dana; Priest, Eric R.

    2017-08-01

    Two-ribbon solar flares are characterized by the appearance in pairs of bright ribbons on the surface of the Sun. The ribbons separate from each other in time, which has been cited as one of many pieces of evidence that magnetic reconnection participates in the release of magnetic energy in solar flares. In addition to moving apart from each other, observations have revealed that ribbons also elongate (or spread) in time along the polarity inversion line. This is likely related to the spreading of the magnetic reconnection process in the corona. Recent observations have shown ribbons can elongate either unidirectionally or bidirectionally. We investigate the physics of reconnection spreading and its potential relation to two-ribbon flares via a parametric study using 3D numerical simulations with the two-fluid (MHD + Hall effect + electron inertia) model. We study how anti-parallel reconnection spreads in current sheets with a non-uniform thickness in the out-of-plane direction. Previous numerical work on spreading in current sheets of uniform thickness revealed that anti-parallel reconnection spreads at a speed given by the current carriers, but it is not obvious how the spreading occurs in a current sheet with non-uniform thickness. We compare spreading in this system with spreading in current sheets of uniform thickness that are thicker than the dissipation scale. The results may be useful not just for solar flares, but also for Earth’s magnetotail, laboratory reconnection experiments, and reconnection in the solar wind.

  2. H-alpha and hard X-ray development in two-ribbon flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Hudson, H. S.; Kane, S. R.; Svestka, Z.

    1984-01-01

    Morphological features of two-ribbon flares have been studied, using simultaneous ISEE-3 hard X-ray records and high-resolution Big Bear H-alpha movies for more than 20 events. Long-lasting and complex hard X-ray bursts are almost invariably found associated with flares of the two-ribbon type. At least three events are found, namely March 31, 1979, April 10, 1980, and July 1, 1980, where the occurrence of individual spikes in hard X-ray radiation coincides with suddenly enhanced H-alpha emission covering the sunspot penumbra. There definitely exist important (greater than or equal to 1 B) two-ribbon flares without significant hard X-ray emission.

  3. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  4. Thermal and Non-Thermal Emission in Two-Ribbon Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, H.

    2004-05-01

    The observation that in many flares there is a good correlation between the soft X-ray emission and the time-integrated non-thermal emission --- the Neupert effect --- indicates a strong link between magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration. We present hydrodynamic simulations of flare loops heated by precipitating energetic electrons. Instead of representing a flare as a single loop, we model it as a succession of independently heated, small-scale filaments. We find that to reproduce the observed thermal emission the energy in the injected electrons must be proportional to the soft X-ray flux, not the derivative of the soft X-ray flux as suggested by the Neupert effect. Comparisons between the simulations and GOES and RHESSI observations indicates that there is not sufficient energy in the non-thermal electrons to account for the thermal emission observed in a large, long duration flare. This suggests that there must be in situ heating of coronal plasma as well as particle acceleration during magnetic reconnection.

  5. A UNIFIED MODEL FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenPengfei; FangCheng; DingMingde; TangYuhua

    1999-01-01

    We performed 2.5 - dimensional numerical simulation for two cases, one with the the reconnection point at a high altitude, the other with the reconnection point at a low altitude, in the high-altitude case, the bright loop appears to rise for a long time, with its two footpoints separating and the field lines below the bright loop shrinking,which are all typical features of two - ribbon flares. In the low- altitude case, the bright loops cease rising only a short time after the impulsive phase of the reconnection and then become rather stable, which shows a large similarity to the compact flares. The results imply that the two types of solar flares, i. e., the two - ribbon flares and the compact ones, might be unified into the same magnetic reconnection model, where the height of the reconnection point leads to the bifurcation.

  6. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  7. Predictability of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Peter; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2009-05-01

    Solar flares are significant drivers of space weather. With the availability of high cadence solar chromospheric and photospheric data from the USAF's Optical Solar PAtrol Network (OSPAN; photosphere and chromosphere imaging) Telescope and the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG; photosphere magnetic imaging), at the National Solar Observatory, we have gained insights into potential uses of the data for solar flare prediction. We apply the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to parameterize the flaring system and extract consistent observables at solar chromospheric and photospheric layers that indicate a viable recognition of flaring activity. Rather than limiting ourselves to a few known indicators of solar activity, PCA helps us to characterize the entire system using several tens of variables for each observed layer. The components of the Eigen vectors derived from PCA help us recognize and quantify innate characteristics of solar flares and compare them. We will present an analysis of these results to explore the viability of PCA to assist in predicting solar flares.

  8. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  9. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Shibata

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence, local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet, and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely, while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  10. Solar Features - Solar Flares - Patrol

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The H-alpha Flare Patrol identifies time periods each day when the sun is being continuously monitored by select ground-based solar observatories.

  11. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  12. The COMPTEL solar flare catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.; Varendorff, M.; McConnell, M.; Forrest, D.; Schoenfelder, V.; Lichti, G.; Diehl, R.; Rank, G.; Bennett, K.; Hanlon, L.; Winkler, W.; Swanenburg, B.; Bloemen, H. Hermsen, W.

    1993-01-01

    COMPTEL, the Imaging Compton Telescope on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, has registered many solar gamma ray flares during its two years on orbit. It detects and measures gamma rays from flares by two methods: (1) utilizing two independent large NaI gamma ray spectrometers operating from 0.2 to 2 MeV and 0.6 to 10 MeV and (2) using the telescope and imaging capabilities to acquire spectra from 0.75 to 30 MeV. Solar neutrons can also be measured in the telescope mode. The authors report here the solar gamma ray flare list compiled from COMPTEL data in the two modes of operation. They also describe the methods of searching for flares in the COMPTEL data and the qualitative nature of the flares detected.

  13. Impulsive Heating of Solar Flare Ribbons Above 10 MK

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    The chromospheric response to the input of flare energy is marked by extended extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. These are usually explained as the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from accelerated electrons colliding in the dense chromospheric plasma. We present evidence of impulsive heating of flare ribbons above 10 MK in a two-ribbon flare. We analyse the impulsive phase of SOL2013-11-09T06:38, a C2.6 class event using data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to derive the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flaring regions and investigate the evolution of the plasma in the flaring ribbons. The ribbons were visible at all SDO/AIA EUV/UV wavelengths, in particular, at 94 and 131 \\AA\\ filters, sensitive to temperatures of 8 MK and 12 MK. Time evolution of the emission measure of the plasma above 10 MK at the ribb...

  14. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Martinez-Oliveros, J. C., E-mail: wgfajardom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: oliveros@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  15. Global Properties of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh S

    2011-01-01

    This article broadly reviews our knowledge of solar flares. There is a particular focus on their global properties, as opposed to the microphysics such as that needed for magnetic reconnection or particle acceleration as such. Indeed solar flares will always remain in the domain of remote sensing, so we cannot observe the microscales directly and must understand the basic physics entirely via the global properties plus theoretical inference. The global observables include the general energetics -radiation in flares and mass loss in coronal mass ejections (CMEs) - and the formation of different kinds of ejection and global wave disturbance: the type II radio-burst exciter, the Moreton wave, the EIT "wave," and the "sunquake" acoustic waves in the solar interior. Flare radiation and CME kinetic energy can have comparable magnitudes, of order 10^32 erg each for an X-class event, with the bulk of the radiant energy in the visible-UV continuum. We argue that the impulsive phase of the flare dominates the energetic...

  16. Turbulence, Complexity, and Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    McAteer, R T James; Conlon, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    The issue of predicting solar flares is one of the most fundamental in physics, addressing issues of plasma physics, high-energy physics, and modelling of complex systems. It also poses societal consequences, with our ever-increasing need for accurate space weather forecasts. Solar flares arise naturally as a competition between an input (flux emergence and rearrangement) in the photosphere and an output (electrical current build up and resistive dissipation) in the corona. Although initially localised, this redistribution affects neighbouring regions and an avalanche occurs resulting in large scale eruptions of plasma, particles, and magnetic field. As flares are powered from the stressed field rooted in the photosphere, a study of the photospheric magnetic complexity can be used to both predict activity and understand the physics of the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum and multifractal spectrum are highlighted as two possible approaches to this.

  17. Reconnection in Solar Flares: Outstanding Questions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hiroaki Isobe; Kazunari Shibata

    2009-06-01

    Space observations of solar flares such as those from Yohkoh, SOHO,TRACE, and RHESSI have revealed a lot of observational evidence of magnetic reconnection in solar flares: cusp-shaped arcades, reconnection inflows, plasmoids, etc. Thus it has been established, at least phenomenologically, that magnetic reconnection does occur in solar flares. However, a number of fundamental questions and puzzles still remain in the physics of reconnection in solar flares. In this paper, we discuss the recent progresses and future prospects in the study of magnetic reconnection in solar flares from both theoretical and observational points of view.

  18. Impulsivity Parameter for Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W G; Alvarado-Gómez, J D; Calvo-Mozo, B

    2016-01-01

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30-40 keV and 25-50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify...

  19. Cycle 23 Variation in Solar Flare Productivity

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh; McTiernan, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The NOAA listings of solar flares in cycles 21-24, including the GOES soft X-ray magnitudes, enable a simple determination of the number of flares each flaring active region produces over its lifetime. We have studied this measure of flare productivity over the interval 1975-2012. The annual averages of flare productivity remained approximately constant during cycles 21 and 22, at about two reported M or X flares per region, but then increased significantly in the declining phase of cycle 23 (the years 2004-2005). We have confirmed this by using the independent RHESSI flare catalog to check the NOAA events listings where possible. We note that this measure of solar activity does not correlate with the solar cycle. The anomalous peak in flare productivity immediately preceded the long solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24.

  20. Solar Features - Solar Flares - SIDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance (SID) is any of several radio propagation anomalies due to ionospheric changes resulting from solar or geophysical events.

  1. Fast electrons in small solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    This review summarizes both the direct spacecraft observations of nonrelativistic solar electrons, and observations of the X-ray and radio emission generated by these particles at the sun and in the interplanetary medium. These observations bear on the basic astrophysical process of particle acceleration in tenuous plasmas. We find that in many small solar flares, the nearly 5-100 keV electrons accelerated during flash phase constitute the bulk of the total flare energy. Thus the basic flare mechanism in these flares essentially converts the available flare energy into fast electrons. These electrons may produce the other flare electromagnetic emissions through their interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large proton flares these electrons may provide the energy to eject material from the sun and to create a shock wave which could accelerate nuclei and electrons to much higher energies.

  2. Analysis of sudden variations in photospheric magnetic fields during a large flare and their influences in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Brajesh; Venkatakrishnan, P; Mathew, Shibu K

    2016-01-01

    The solar active region NOAA 11719 produced a large two-ribbon flare on 11 April 2013. We have investigated the sudden variations in the photospheric magnetic fields in this active region during the flare employing the magnetograms obtained in the spectral line Fe I 6173 Angstrom by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The analysis of the line-of-sight magnetograms from HMI show sudden and persistent magnetic field changes at different locations of the active region before the onset of the flare and during the flare. The vector magnetic field observations available from HMI also show coincident variations in the total magnetic field strength and its inclination angle at these locations. Using the simultaneous Dopplergrams obtained from HMI, we observe perturbations in the photospheric Doppler signals following the sudden changes in the magnetic fields in the aforementioned locations. The power spectrum analysis of these velocity signals show enhanced acoustic po...

  3. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  4. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  5. Diagnostics of solar flare reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karlický

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present new diagnostics of the solar flare reconnection, mainly based on the plasma radio emission. We propose that the high-frequency (600-2000 MHz slowly drifting pulsating structures map the flare magnetic field reconnection. These structures correspond to the radio emission from plasmoids which are formed in the extended current sheet due to tearing and coalescence processes. An increase of the frequency drift of the drifting structures is interpreted as an increase of the reconnection rate. Using this model, time scales of slowly drifting pulsating structure observed during the 12 April 2001 flare by the Trieste radiopolarimeter with high time resolution (1 ms are interpreted as a radio manifestation of electron beams accelerated in the multi-scale reconnection process. For short periods Fourier spectra of the observed structure have a power-law form with power-law indices in the 1.3-1.6 range. For comparison the 2-D MHD numerical modeling of the multi-scale reconnection is made and it is shown that Fourier spectrum of the reconnection dissipation power has also a power-law form, but with power-law index 2. Furthermore, we compute a time evolution of plasma parameters (density, magnetic field etc in the 2-D MHD model of the reconnection. Then assuming a plasma radio emission from locations, where the 'double-resonance' instability generates the upper-hybrid waves due to unstable distribution function of suprathermal electrons, we model radio spectra. Effects of the MHD turbulence are included. The resulting spectra are compared with those observed. It is found, that depending on model parameters the lace bursts and the decimetric spikes can be reproduced. Thus, it is shown that the model can be used for diagnostics of the flare reconnection process. We also point out possible radio signatures of reconnection outflow termination shocks. They are detected as type II-like herringbone structures in the 200-700 MHz frequency range. Finally

  6. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  7. The relationship between hard X-ray pulse timings and the locations of footpoint sources during solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, A R; 10.1088/0004-637X/748/2/139

    2013-01-01

    The cause of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in solar flares remains the subject of debate. Recently, Nakariakov & Zimovets (2011) proposed a new model suggesting that, in two-ribbon flares, such pulsations could be explained by propagating slow waves. These waves may travel obliquely to the magnetic field, reflect in the chromosphere and constructively interfere at a spatially separate site in the corona, leading to quasi-periodic reconnection events progressing along the flaring arcade. Such a slow wave regime would have certain observational characteristics. We search for evidence of this phenomenon during a selection of two-ribbon flares observed by RHESSI, SOHO and TRACE; the flares of 2002 November 9, 2005 January 19 and 2005 August 22. We were not able to observe a clear correlation between hard X-ray footpoint separations and pulse timings during these events. Also, the motion of hard X-ray footpoints is shown to be continuous within the observational error, whereas a discontinuous motion might be...

  8. Whether solar flares can trigger earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R.

    2007-05-01

    We present the study of 682 earthquakes of ¡Ý4.0 magnitude observed during January 1991 to January 2007 in the light of solar flares observed by GOES and SOXS missions in order to explore the possibility of any association between solar flares and earthquakes. Our investigation preliminarily shows that each earthquake under study was preceded by a solar flare of GOES importance B to X class by 10-100 hrs. However, each flare was not found followed by earthquake of magnitude ¡Ý4.0. We classified the earthquake events with respect to their magnitude and further attempted to look for their correlation with GOES importance class and delay time. We found that with the increasing importance of flares the delay in the onset of earthquake reduces. The critical X-ray intensity of the flare to be associated with earthquake is found to be ~10-6 Watts/m2. On the other hand no clear evidence could be established that higher importance flares precede high magnitude earthquakes. Our detailed study of 50 earthquakes associated with solar flares observed by SOXS mission and other wavebands revealed many interesting results such as the location of the flare on the Sun and the delay time in the earthquake and its magnitude. We propose a model explaining the charged particles accelerated during the solar flare and released in the space that undergone further acceleration by interplanetary shocks and produce the ring current in the earth's magnetosphere, which may enhance the process of tectonics plates motion abruptly at fault zones. It is further proposed that such sudden enhancement in the process of tectonic motion of plates in fault zones may increase abruptly the heat gradients on spatial (dT/dx) and temporal (dT/dt) scales responsible for earthquakes.

  9. New solar flare evidence may solve mystery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    An international group of scientists led by the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL), University College London, has discovered important new evidence that points to the cataclysmic events that trigger a solar flare and the mechanisms that drive its subsequent evolution.

  10. Solar Flare Magnetic Fields and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, George

    2012-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the dynamics and diagnostics of solar magnetic fields and plasmas in the Sun’s atmosphere. Five broad areas of current research in Solar Physics are presented: (1) New techniques for incorporating radiation transfer effects into three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models of the solar interior and atmosphere, (2) The connection between observed radiation processes occurring during flares and the underlying flare energy release and transport mechanisms, (3) The global balance of forces and momenta that occur during flares, (4) The data-analysis and theoretical tools needed to understand and assimilate vector magnetogram observations and (5) Connecting flare and CME phenomena to the topological properties of the magnetic field in the Solar Atmosphere. The role of the Sun’s magnetic field is a major emphasis of this book, which was inspired by a workshop honoring Richard C. (Dick) Canfield.  Dick has been making profound contributions to these areas of research over a long and pro...

  11. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Raghunandan Sharma

    2008-03-01

    Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors capable of observing the full disk Sun in X-ray energy range of 4–56 keV. The X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained by the Si detector in the 4–25 keV range show evidence of Fe and Fe/Ni line emission and multi-thermal plasma. The evolution of the break energy point that separates the thermal and non-thermal processes reveals increase with increasing flare plasma temperature. Small scale flare activities observed by both the detectors are found to be suitable to heat the active region corona; however their location appears to be in the transition region.

  12. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  13. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  14. The local Poisson hypothesis for solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2001-01-01

    The question of whether flares occur as a Poisson process has important consequences for flare physics. Recently Lepreti et al. presented evidence for local departure from Poisson statistics in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray flare catalog. Here it is argued that this effect arises from a selection effect inherent in the soft X-ray observations; namely that the slow decay of enhanced flux following a large flare makes detection of subsequent flares less likely. It is also shown that the power-law tail of the GOES waiting-time distribution varies with the solar cycle. This counts against any intrinsic significance to the appearance of a power law, or to the value of its index.

  15. Absorption events associated with solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    During the upward period of solar cycle 23, the imaging riometer at Zhongshan, Antarctica (geomag. lat. 74.5°S) was used to study the solar proton events and the X-ray solar flares which are associated with the absorption events. In our study, the relationship between the absorption intensity and X-ray flux is found in a power form which is consistent with the theoretical result. The imaging riometer absorption data at Ny-?lesund, Svalbard reconfirm the above relationship. We also argue that only M-class flares can generate a significant daytime absorption.

  16. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  17. Remote Oscillatory responses to a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Andic, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    The processes governing energy storage and release in the Sun are both related to the solar magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of a magnetic connection between energy released caused by a flare and increased oscillatory power in the lower solar atmosphere. The oscillatory power in active regions tends to increase in response to explosive events at a different location, but not in the region itself. We carry out timing studies and show that this is probably caused by a large scale magnetic connection between the regions, and not a globally propagating wave. We show that oscillations tend to exist in longer lived wave trains at short periods (P< 200s) at the time of a flare. This may be a mechanism by which flare energy can be redistributed throughout the solar atmosphere.

  18. Analysis of Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is one of the key processes of solar flares. Properties of chromospheric evaporation are thought to be closely connected to the energy release rates and energy transport mechanisms. Previous investigations revealed that in addition to electron-beam heating the chromospheric evaporation can be driven by heat fluxes and, probably, by other mechanisms. In this work, we present a study of flare events simultaneously observed by IRIS, SDO and RHESSI, focusing on spatio-temporal characteristics of the flare dynamics and its relation to the magnetic field topology. Event selection is performed using the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF) recently developed by the Center for Computational Heliophysics (CCH) at NJIT. The selection of IRIS observations was restricted to the fast-scanning regimes (coarse-raster or sparse-raster modes with ≥ 4 slit positions, ≥ 6`` spatial coverage, and ≤ 60 sec loop time). We have chosen 14 events, and estimated the spatially-resolved intensities and Doppler shifts of the chromospheric (Mg II), transition region (C II) and hot coronal (Fe XXI) lines reflecting the dynamics of the chromospheric evaporation. The correlations among the derived line profile properties, flare morphology, magnetic topology and hard X-ray characteristics will be presented, and compared with the RADYN flare models and other scenarios of chromospheric evaporations.

  19. Multithread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2006-01-01

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as a sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper, we present a method for computing multithread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the GOES and Yohkoh satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating timescale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heating timescales (20 s) lead to very high temperatures and are inconsistent with the emission observed by Yohkoh.

  20. Active Longitude and Solar Flare Occurrences

    CERN Document Server

    Gyenge, N; Baranyi, T

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to specify the spatio-temporal characteristics of flare activity observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites in connection with the behaviour of the longitudinal domain of enhanced sunspot activity known as active longitude (AL). By using our method developed for this purpose, we identified the AL in every Carrington Rotation provided by the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD). The spatial probability of flare occurrence has been estimated depending on the longitudinal distance from AL in the northern and southern hemispheres separately. We have found that more than the 60\\% of the RHESSI and GOES flares is located within $\\pm 36^{\\circ}$ from the active longitude. Hence, the most flare-productive active regions tend to be located in or close to the active longitudinal belt. This observed feature may allow predicting the geo-effective position of the domain of enhanced fla...

  1. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  2. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-08-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick-slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy-loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small-scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global statistics of flare energy release, this latter behavior may be relevant to recurrent flaring in individual coronal loops. This class of models could provide a basis for the prediction of large solar flares.

  3. Spectral Hardening and Geoeffectiveness of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R.; Kumar, S.; Dave, H.; Deshpande, M. R.

    We present the results of a few typical flares that observed by the first space borne solar astronomy experiment of India namely "Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)" mission, which has completed one year of its successful operation in geostationary orbit. The SOXS mission onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft was launched successfully by GSLV-D2 rocket on 08 May 2003 to study the energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares. The SOXS is composed of two independent payloads viz. SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload, and SOXS High Energy Detector (SHD) payload. We restrict our presentation to SLD payload that designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). We briefly present the scientific objectives and instrumentation of the SLD payload. The SLD payload employs the state-of-art solid state detectors viz. Si PIN and CZT detectors, which reveal sub-keV spectral and 100ms temporal resolution characteristics that are necessary to study the spectral response of the flare components. The dynamic range of Si and CZT detectors is 4-25 and 4-56 keV respectively. The SLD has observed more than 140 flares of C and M class since its commissioning in the orbit. We present the X-ray emission characteristics of a few typical flares in view of their spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. We extend our study of these flares to optical and radio waveband observations in order to improve the relationship of X-ray spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. The flares with harder spectra and associated with small or large CME, and radio emission at frequencies above 10 GHz are found geo-effective.

  4. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Harry P

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias ($f$). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is $...

  5. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  6. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares Determined by Solar Neutron Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Solar Neutron Observation Group

    2013-05-01

    Large amounts of particles can be accelerated to relativistic energy in association with solar flares and/or accompanying phenomena (e.g., CME-driven shocks), and they sometimes reach very near the Earth and penetrate the Earth's atmosphere. These particles are observed by ground-based detectors (e.g., neutron monitors) as Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs). Some of the GLEs originate from high energy solar neutrons which are produced in association with solar flares. These neutrons are also observed by ground-based neutron monitors and solar neutron telescopes. Recently, some of the solar neutron detectors have also been operating in space. By observing these solar neutrons, we can obtain information about ion acceleration in solar flares. Such neutrons were observed in association with some X-class flares in solar cycle 23, and sometimes they were observed by two different types of detectors. For example, on 2005 September 7, large solar neutron signals were observed by the neutron monitor at Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia and Mexico City, and by the solar neutron telescopes at Chacaltaya and Mt. Sierra Negra in Mexico in association with an X17.0 flare. The neutron signal continued for more than 20 minutes with high statistical significance. Intense gamma-ray emission was also registered by INTEGRAL, and by RHESSI during the decay phase. We analyzed these data using the solar-flare magnetic-loop transport and interaction model of Hua et al. (2002), and found that the model could successfully fit the data with intermediate values of loop magnetic convergence and pitch angle scattering parameters. These results indicate that solar neutrons were produced at the same time as the gamma-ray line emission and that ions were continuously accelerated at the emission site. In this paper, we introduce some of the solar neutron observations in solar cycle 23, and discuss the tendencies of the physical parameters of solar neutron GLEs, and the energy spectrum and population of the

  7. The Relation between Solar Eruption Topologies and Observed Flare Features I: Flare Ribbons

    CERN Document Server

    Savcheva, A; McKillop, S; McCauley, P; Hanson, E; Su, Y; Werner, E; DeLuca, E E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a topological magnetic field investigation of seven two-ribbon flares in sigmoidal active regions observed with Hinode, STEREO, and SDO. We first derive the 3D coronal magnetic field structure of all regions using marginally unstable 3D coronal magnetic field models created with the flux rope insertion method. The unstable models have been shown to be a good model of the flaring magnetic field configurations. Regions are selected based on their pre-flare configurations along with the appearance and observational coverage of flare ribbons, and the model is constrained using pre-flare features observed in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray passbands. We perform a topology analysis of the models by computing the squashing factor, Q, in order to determine the locations of prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). QSLs from these maps are compared to flare ribbons at their full extents. We show that in all cases the straight segments of the two J-shaped ribbons are matched very well by the flux...

  8. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, L; Godano, C; Lippiello, E; Nicodemi, M

    2006-02-10

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.

  9. Short-term predictions of solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, V. A.

    1990-02-01

    A review of present-day theoretical investigations of the problem of the accumulation and release of energy in solar flares permits advancing the opinion that only individual flare events are described by a concrete model and that a single model alone does not describe the entire diversity of flares. Consideration of the observational data does not permit claiming the existence of a single universal mechanism known today of flare events. It appears possible to treat the problem of prediction in terms of the algebra of logic (Boolean logic) and to compare the truth table with the often-used contingency table. The introduction of a number of very general assumptions permits forming a general approach to the development of predictive schemes and selection of the individual elements of the models and informative criteria. Experimental results are given on the testing of some prediction procedures. The author's procedure of routine short-term prediction of flares on the basis of the methods of instruction on pattern recognition implemented in the form of a set of programs is outlined. The results of the application of this procedure in 1986 - 1988 are presented.

  10. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    CERN Document Server

    Panesar, N K; Tiwari, S K; Low, B C

    2012-01-01

    Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures mainly observed as a prominence activity. We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303), and their EUV waves, with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195\\AA\\ are analyzed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171\\AA. Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within 10 hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with acceleration of tornado motion after the ...

  11. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  12. Energy release and transfer in solar flares: simulations of three-dimensional reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, Joachim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fletches, L [UNIV OF GLASGOW; Hesse, M [HGSFC; Neukirch, T [UNIV OF ST. ANDREWS

    2008-01-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations we investigate energy release and transfer in a three-dimensional extension of the standard two-ribbon flare picture. In this scenario reconnection is initiated in a thin current sheet (suggested to form below a departing coronal mass ejection) above a bipolar magnetic field. Two cases are contrasted: an initially force-free current sheet (low beta) and a finite-pressure current sheet (high beta). The energy conversion process from reconnect ion consists of incoming Poynting flux (from the release of magnetic energy) turned into up-and downgoing Poynting flux, enthalpy flux and bulk kinetic energy flux. In the low-beta case, the outgoing Poynting flux is the dominant contribution, whereas the outgoing enthalpy flux dominates in the high-beta case. The bulk kinetic energy flux is only a minor contribution, particularly in the downward direction. The dominance of the downgoing Poynting flux in the low-beta case is consistent with an alternative to the thick target electron beam model for solar flare energy transport, suggested recently by Fletcher and Hudson. For plausible characteristic parameters of the reconnecting field configuration, we obtain energy release time scales and and energy output rates that compare favorably with those inferred from observations for the impulsive phase of flares.

  13. Flare energetics: analysis of a large flare on YZ Canis Minoris observed simultaneously in the ultraviolet, optical and radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Oord, G. H. J.; Doyle, J. G.; Rodono, M.; Gary, D. E.; Henry, G. W.; Byrne, P. B.; Linsky, J. L.; Haisch, B. M.; Pagano, I.; Leto, G.

    1996-06-01

    The results of coordinated observations of the dMe star YZ CMi at optical, UV and radio wavelengths during 3-7 February 1983 are presented. YZ CMi showed repeated optical flaring with the largest flare having a magnitude of 3.8 in the U-band. This flare coincided with an IUE exposure which permits a comparison of the emission measure curves of YZ CMi in its flaring and quiescent state. During the flare a downward shift of the transition zone is observed while the radiative losses in the range 10^4^-10^7^K strongly increase. The optical flare is accompanied with a radio flare at 6cm, while at 20cm no emission is detected. The flare is interpreted in terms of optically thick synchrotron emission. We present a combined interpretation of the optical/radio flare and show that the flare can be interpreted within the context of solar two-ribbon/white-light flares. Special attention is paid to the bombardment of dMe atmospheres by particle beams. We show that the characteristic temperature of the heated atmosphere is almost independent of the beam flux and lies within the range of solar white-light flare temperatures. We also show that it is unlikely that stellar flares emit black-body spectra. The fraction of accelerated particles, as follows from our combined optical/radio interpretation is in good agreement with the fraction determined by two-ribbon flare reconnection models.

  14. Ensemble Forecasting of Major Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, J A; Uritsky, V M

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from the first ensemble prediction model for major solar flares (M and X classes). Using the probabilistic forecasts from three models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (NASA-GSFC) and the NOAA forecasts, we developed an ensemble forecast by linearly combining the flaring probabilities from all four methods. Performance-based combination weights were calculated using a Monte Carlo-type algorithm by applying a decision threshold $P_{th}$ to the combined probabilities and maximizing the Heidke Skill Score (HSS). Using the probabilities and events time series from 13 recent solar active regions (2012 - 2014), we found that a linear combination of probabilities can improve both probabilistic and categorical forecasts. Combination weights vary with the applied threshold and none of the tested individual forecasting models seem to provide more accurate predictions than the others for all values of $P_{th}$. According to the maximum values of HSS, a performance-based weights ...

  15. Heavy Ion Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2002-01-01

    The abundance enhancements of heavy ions Ne, Mg, Si and Fe in impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) eventsare explained by a plasma acceleration mechanism. In consideration of the fact that the coronal plasma is mainlycomposed of hydrogen and helium ions, we think that theion-ion hybrid wave and quasi-perpendicular wave can.be excited by the energetic electron beam in impulsive solar flares. These waves may resonantly be absorbed byheavy ions when the frequencies of these waves are close to the second-harmonic gyrofrequencies of these heavyions. This requires the coronal plasma temperature to be located in the range ofT ~ (5 - 9) × 106 K in impulsivesolar flares and makes the average ionic charge state of these heavy ions in impulsive SEP events higher than theaverage ionic charge state of these heavy ions in gradual SEP events. These pre-heated and enhanced heavy ionsin impulsive SEP events.

  16. Selective Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴

    2001-01-01

    A plasma acceleration mechanism is proposed to explain the dramatic enhancement in the ratio of 3 He/4He, (enhancement factor 102 - 103) observed in solar 3He-rich flares. Considering that coronal plasma is mainly composed of hydrogen and helium ions, the hydrogen ion-helium ion hybrid waves and quasi-perpendicular waves can be excited by energetic electron beam during the impulsive solarflares. The frequencies of these waves are close to the 3He++ ion gyrofrequency, but far from the 4He++ ion gyrofrequency. Most of these waves are selectively absorbed by 3He ions. These preheated 3He ions can be successively stochastic accelerated by Alfvén turbulence, when their velocities are larger than the local Alfvén velocity. It makes the ratio of 3He/4He dramatically enhanced and the acceleration energy spectrum of 3He ions forms a power-law distribution during the impulsive solar flares.

  17. Protection of Communication System From Solar Flares

    OpenAIRE

    Karthik, K.(Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY, United States of America); Shirvram, B.

    2008-01-01

    Solar flares are enormous explosions on the surface of the sun and they release energy of the order of billion megatons of TNThis energy is in the form of electromagnetic radiations such as alpha, gamma, and ultraviolet rays. When exposed to high doses of radiation like 2-15 kilorad (Si), silicon integrated circuits in satellite communication systems fail to operate properly, thus affecting the performance of communication systems. Therefore, the major issue that needs to be addressed is the ...

  18. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    de Arcangelis, L.; Godano, C.; Lippiello, E.; Nicodemi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analysing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, inter-occurrence times and the same temporal clustering: we find afterflare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for...

  19. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  20. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  1. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Devore, C. Richard

    1987-01-01

    A flaring solar atmosphere is modeled assuming classical thermal transport, locally limited thermal transport, and nonlocal thermal transport. The classical, local, and nonlocal expressions for the heat flux yield significantly different temperature, density, and velocity profiles throughout the rise phase of the flare. Evaporation of chromospheric material begins earlier in the nonlocal case than in the classical or local calculations, but reaches much lower upward velocities. Much higher coronal temperatures are achieved in the nonlocal calculations owing to the combined effects of delocalization and flux limiting. The peak velocity and momentum are roughly the same in all three cases. A more impulsive energy release influences the evolution of the nonlocal model more than the classical and locally limited cases.

  2. Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose here to develop the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS), the next-generation instrument for high-energy solar observations. GRIPS will...

  3. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  4. Solar flare prediction using highly stressed longitudinal magnetic field parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Huang; Hua-Ning Wang

    2013-01-01

    Three new longitudinal magnetic field parameters are extracted from SOHO/MDI magnetograms to characterize properties of the stressed magnetic field in active regions,and their flare productivities are calculated for 1055 active regions.We find that the proposed parameters can be used to distinguish flaring samples from non-flaring samples.Using the long-term accumulated MDI data,we build the solar flare prediction model by using a data mining method.Furthermore,the decision boundary,which is used to divide flaring from non-flaring samples,is determined by the decision tree algorithm.Finally,the performance of the prediction model is evaluated by 10-fold cross validation technology.We conclude that an efficient solar flare prediction model can be built by the proposed longitudinal magnetic field parameters with the data mining method.

  5. The Origin of the Solar Flare Waiting-Time Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Wheatland, M S

    2000-01-01

    It was recently pointed out that the distribution of times between solar flares (the flare waiting-time distribution) follows a power law, for long waiting times. Based on 25 years of soft X-ray flares observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) instruments it is shown that 1. the waiting-time distribution of flares is consistent with a time-dependent Poisson process, and 2. the fraction of time the Sun spends with different flaring rates approximately follows an exponential distribution. The second result is a new phenomenological law for flares. It is shown analytically how the observed power-law behavior of the waiting times originates in the exponential distribution of flaring rates. These results are argued to be consistent with a non-stationary avalanche model for flares.

  6. Investigation of the Relationship between Solar Flares and Sunspot Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, S.; Kilcik, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the relationship between X-Ray flare numbers (C, M, and, X class flares) and sunspot counts in four categories (Simple (A + B), Medium (C), Large (D + E + F), and End (H)). All data sets cover the whole Solar Cycle 23 and the ascending and maximum phases of Cycle 24 (1996-2014). Pearson correlation analysis method was used to investigate the degree of relationship between monthly solar flare numbers and sunspot counts observed in different sunspot categories. We found that the C, M, and X class flares have highest correlation with the large group sunspot counts, while the small category does not any meaningful correlation. Obtained correlation coefficients between large groups and C, M, and X class flare numbers are 0.79, 0.74, and 0.4, respectively. Thus, we conclude that the main sources of X-Ray solar flares are the complex/large sunspot groups.

  7. Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, Antoine; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

    2014-01-01

    We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick--slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global st...

  8. Magnetic Energy Release in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Terry G.

    2017-01-01

    Solar flares are the result of a rapid release of magnetic energy stored in the solar corona. An ideal-MHD process, such as a loss of magnetic equilibrium, most likely initiates the flare, but the non-ideal process of magnetic reconnection quickly becomes the dominant mechanism by which energy is released. Within the last few years EUV and X-ray instruments have directly observed the kind of plasma flows and heating indicative of magnetic reconnection. Relatively cool plasma is observed moving slowly into the reconnection region where it is transformed into two high-temperature, high-speed outflow jets moving in opposite directions. Observations of the flow in these jets suggest that they are accelerated to the ambient Alfvén speed in a manner that resembles the reconnection process first proposed by H. E. Petschek in 1964. This result is somewhat surprising because Petschek-type reconnection does not occur in most numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection. The apparent contradiction between the observations and the simulations can be understood by the fact that most simulations assume a uniform resistivity model that is unlikely to occur in reality. Recently, we have developed a theory that shows how the type of reconnection is related to the plasma resistivity. The theory is based on a form of the time-dependent, MHD-nozzle equations that incorporate the plasma resistivity. These equations are very similar to the equations used to describe magnetized plasma flow in astrophysical jets.

  9. Solar Flare Measurements with STIX and MiSolFA

    CERN Document Server

    Casadei, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares are the most powerful events in the solar system and the brightest sources of X-rays, often associated with emission of particles reaching the Earth and causing geomagnetic storms, giving problems to communication, airplanes and even black-outs. X-rays emitted by accelerated electrons are the most direct probe of solar flare phenomena. The Micro Solar-Flare Apparatus (MiSolFA) is a proposed compact X-ray detector which will address the two biggest issues in solar flare modeling. Dynamic range limitations prevent simultaneous spectroscopy with a single instrument of all X-ray emitting regions of a flare. In addition, most X-ray observations so far are inconsistent with the high anisotropy predicted by the models usually adopted for solar flares. Operated at the same time as the STIX instrument of the ESA Solar Orbiter mission, at the next solar maximum (2020), they will have the unique opportunity to look at the same flare from two different directions: Solar Orbiter gets very close to the Sun wit...

  10. Searching for Missing Pieces for Solar Flare Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leka, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the state of the solar photospheric magnetic field at a single instant in time does not appear sufficient to uniquely predict the size and timing of impending solar flares. Such knowledge may provide necessary conditions, such as estimates of the magnetic energy needed for a flare to occur. Given the necessary conditions, it is often assumed that the evolution of the field, possibly by only a small amount, may trigger the onset of a flare. We present the results of a study using time series of photospheric vector field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to quantitatively parameterize both the state and evolution of solar active regions - their complexity, magnetic topology and energy - as related to solar flare events. We examine both extensive and intensive parameters and their short-term temporal behavior, in the context of predicting flares at various thresholds. Statistical tests based on nonparametric Discriminant Analysis are used to compare pre-flare epochs to a control group of flare-quiet epochs and active regions. Results regarding the type of photospheric signature examined and the efficacy of using the present state vs. temporal evolution to predict solar flares is quantified by standard skill scores. This work is made possible by contracts NASA NNH12CG10C and NOAA/SBIR WC-133R-13-CN-0079.

  11. Prediction of Solar Flare Size and Time-to-Flare Using Support Vector Machine Regression

    CERN Document Server

    Boucheron, Laura E; McAteer, R T James

    2015-01-01

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a \\emph{geostationary operational environmental satellite} (\\emph{GOES}) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately 3/4 a \\emph{GOES} class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity fe...

  12. The CME - Flare Relationship During The Present Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.; Mahrous, A.; Youssef, M.; Mawad, R.; El-Naway, M.

    The relation between the Coronal mass Ejection CME and the solar flare is statistically studied More than ten thousand CME events observed by SOHO LASCO during the period 1996-2005 have been analyzed The soft x-ray flux measurements provided by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GEOS recorded more than twenty thousand flares in the same time period The data have been filtered under certain temporal and spatial conditions to select the CME-flare associated events The results show that the lift-off time of CME-flare associated events having a time interval within the range 0 4 sim 0 6 hour after the occurrence time of associated flares The CME events have been classified into a certain categories according to its energy E CME and the classes of the associated flares In addition we found a good linear correlation between the E CME and the x-ray flux of associated flare events

  13. Temporal variations of the Venus ionosphere during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, A.; Fujiwara, H.; Fukunishi, H.

    2006-12-01

    The effects of long-term solar activity changes such as 11-year cycle and 27-day cycle on the Venus ionosphere have been investigated by a number of researchers using data obtained from some spacecrafts. However, the effects of short-term solar activity changes, particularly the effect of solar flares, are still unknown because there are no simultaneous observations of the Venus ionosphere and solar flares. The past observations of the Earth's ionosphere suggest significant and instantaneous changes of the Venus ionosphere during solar flares. Recently, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) revealed the temporal variations of the Mars ionosphere during solar flares. The electron density of the Mars ionosphere was enhanced by ~10% at the main peak and 200% at the secondary peak at that time. The recent satellite observations of the solar X- rays enable us to model the Earth's and planetary ionospheres more exactly. In order to investigate the temporal variations of the Venus ionosphere during solar flares, we have developed a 1-D photochemical model for estimating vertical profiles of ions and electrons. We have also modeled temporal variations of solar flare using the EUV/X-rays data obtained by TIMED/SEE (0.1-194 nm) and GOES (0.1-0.8 nm) on October 28, 2003. Using the photochemical and solar flare models, we have calculated temporal variations of ion composition in the dayside Venus ionosphere. In addition, time constants for production and loss of ionospheric compositions through the photochemical reactions can be examined. We discuss differences of the response to solar flare among three planets, Venus, Earth and Mars. Then, the characteristics of the Venus ionosphere will be clarified.

  14. On the energy release in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Pustil'nik, L A; Beskrovnaya, N G; 10.1063/1.3701351

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution observations show the fine structure of the global equilibrium magnetic field configuration in solar atmosphere to be essentially different from that assumed in the traditional 'potential + force-free' field scenarios. The interacting large-scale structures of fine field elements are separated by numerous non-force-free elements (tangential discontinuities) which are neglected in the traditional field picture. An incorporation of these elements into the model implies a dynamical rather than statical character of equilibrium of the field configuration. A transition of the system into flaring can be triggered by the ballooning mode of flute instability of prominences or/and coronal condensations. Tearing-mode and MHD instabilities as well as the effects of overheating of the turbulent current sheet prevent the field from stationary reconnection as it is adopted in the traditional scenario. We speculate around the assumption that the energy release in active regions is governed by the same scenar...

  15. Particle Acceleration by a Solar Flare Termination Shock

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Bin; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Sam; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares - the most powerful explosions in the solar system - are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well-reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  16. Solar and Stellar Flares and Their Effects on Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Recent space observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of explosions, such as flares and flare-like phenomena. These flares generate not only strong electromagnetic emissions but also nonthermal particles and bulk plasma ejections, which sometimes lead to geomagnetic storms and affect terrestrial environment and our civilization, damaging satellite, power-grids, radio communication etc. Solar flares are prototype of various explosions in our universe, and hence are important not only for geophysics and environmental science but also for astrophysics. The energy source of solar flares is now established to be magnetic energy stored near sunspots. There is now increasing observational evidence that solar flares are caused by magnetic reconnection, merging of anti-parallel magnetic field lines and associated magneto-plasma dynamics (Shibata and Magara 2011, Living Review). It has also been known that many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and often such stellar flares are much more energetic than solar flares. The total energy of a solar flare is typically 10^29 - 10^32 erg. On the other hand, there are much more energetic flares (10^33 - 10^38 erg) in stars, especially in young stars. These are called superflares. We argue that these superflares on stars can also be understood in a unified way based on the reconnection mechanism. Finally we show evidence of occurrence of superflares on Sun-like stars according to recent stellar observations (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, Shibayama et al. 2013), which revealed that superflares with energy of 10^34 - 10^35 erg (100 - 1000 times of the largest solar flares) occur with frequency of once in 800 - 5000 years on Sun-like stars which are very similar to our Sun. Against the previous belief, these new observations as well as theory (Shibata et al. 2013) suggest that we cannot deny the possibility of superflares on the present Sun. Finally, we shall discuss possible impacts of these superflares

  17. Nuclear processes and neutrino production in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, S.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of flare neutrino flux is approached from the standpoint of recent observations and theoretical results on the nuclear processes in solar flares. Attention is given to the energy spectra and total numbers of accelerated particles in flares, as well as their resulting production of beta(+)-emitting radionuclei and pions; these should be the primary sources of neutrinos. The observed 0.511 MeV line flux for the June 21, 1980 flare is compared with the expected from the number and spectrum of accelerated particles.

  18. CME-flare association during the 23rd solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrous, A.; Shaltout, M.; Beheary, M. M.; Mawad, R.; Youssef, M.

    2009-04-01

    The relation between coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are statistically studied. More than 10,000 CME events observed by SOHO/LASCO during the period 1996-2005 have been analyzed. The soft X-ray flux measurements provided by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), recorded more than 20,000 flares in the same time period. The data is filtered under certain temporal and spatial conditions to select the CME-flare associated events. The results show that CME-flare associated events are triggered with a lift-off time within the range 0.4-1.0 h. We list a set of 41 CME-flare associated events satisfying the temporal and spatial conditions. The listed events show a good correlation between the CME energy and the X-ray flux of the CME-flare associated events with correlation coefficient of 0.76.

  19. Solar flare count periodicities in different X-ray flare classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng-Xin; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2016-04-01

    Using the Morlet wavelet transform and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we investigate the periodic behaviours of C, M and X-class flare counts, respectively, recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) from 1983 May to 2014 December, which cover the two complete solar cycles (SCs) 22 and 23 as well as the part of declining phase of SC 21 and rise and maximum phases of SC 24. Analyses show that the periodic behaviours of various class flare counts are different. (1) Not all periods of various class flare counts appear dominant during the cycle maxima. For C-class flares, during SC 23, periods appear dominant during the maximum phase, however, compared to those during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase of SC 22; for M-class flares, during SCs 22 and 23, periods appear dominant during the cycle maxima; for X-class flares, during SC 22, almost all periods appear during the maximum phase; however, during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase compared to those during SC 22. (2) For C-class flares, the appearance of periods do not follow the amplitude of C-class flare cycles; while, for M and X-class flares, the appearance of periods follows the amplitude of the investigated corresponding class flare cycles. (3) From the overall trends, the 10 yr and longer time-scale trends of the monthly numbers of M and X-class flares, we can infer that the maximum values of the monthly M and X-class flare numbers would increase during SC 25.

  20. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares. II - Spectroscopic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Doschek, George A.; Devore, C. Richard

    1989-01-01

    Physical parameters obtained for a flaring solar atmosphere in an earlier paper are used here to predict time-dependent emission-line profiles and integrated intensities as a function of position for two spectral lines commonly observed during solar flares: the X-ray resonance lines of Ca XIX and Mg XI. Considerations of ionization nonequilibrium during the rise phase of the flare are addressed, and the effects on the predicted spectral-line characteristics are discussed. It is concluded that some spectroscopic diagnostics favor the nonlocal model, but other long-standing discrepancies between the numerical models and the observations remain unresolved.

  1. Characteristics of the Polarity Inversion Line and Solar Flare Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Studying connection between solar flares and properties of magnetic field in active regions is very important for understanding the flare physics and developing space weather forecasts. In this work, we analyze relationship between the flare X-ray peak flux from the GOES satellite, and characteristics of the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms obtained by the SDO/HMI instrument during the period of April, 2010 - June, 2016. We try to answer two questions: 1) What characteristics of the LOS magnetic field are most important for the flare initiation and magnitude? 2) Is it possible to construct a reliable forecast of ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 class flares based only on the LOS magnetic field characteristics? To answer these questions, we apply a Polarity Inversion Line (PIL) detection algorithm, and derive various properties of the PIL and the corresponding Active Regions (AR). The importance of these properties for flare forecasting is determined by their ability to separate flaring cases from non-flaring, and their Fisher ranking score. It is found that the PIL characteristics are of special importance for the forecasts of both ≥ M1.0 and ≥ X1.0 flares, while the global AR characteristics become comparably discriminative only for ≥ X1.0 flares. We use the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and train it on the six characteristics of the most importance for each case. The obtained True Skill Statistics (TSS) values of 0.70 for ≥ M1.0 flares and 0.64 for ≥ X1.0 flares are better than the currently-known expert-based predictions. Therefore, the results confirm the importance of the LOS magnetic field data and, in particular, the PIL region characteristics for flare forecasts.

  2. Constraining Solar Flare Differential Emission Measures with EVE and RHESSI

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry P

    2014-01-01

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from $\\lesssim$2 to $\\gtrsim$50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly-observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ~2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to $\\gtrsim$10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from ...

  3. A comparison between magnetic shear and flare shear in a well-observed M-class flare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuan-Hui Zhou; Hai-Sheng Ji

    2009-01-01

    We give an extensive multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive M1.0/1N class solar flare, which occurred in the active region NOAA 10044 on 2002 July 26. Our empha-sis is on the relationship between magnetic shear and flare shear. Flare shear is defined as the angle formed between the line connecting the centroids of the two ribbons of the flare and the line perpendicular to the magnetic neutral line. The magnetic shear is computed from vector magnetograms observed at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), while the flare shear is computed from Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 1700A images. By a detailed comparison, we find that: 1) The magnetic shear and the flare shear of this event are basically consistent, as judged from the directions of the transverse mag-netic field and the line connecting the two ribbons' centroids. 2) During the period of the enhancement of magnetic shear, flare shear had a fast increase followed by a fluctuated decrease. 3) When the magnetic shear stopped its enhancement, the fluctuated decreasing behavior of the flare shear became very smooth. 4) Hard X-ray (HXR) spikes are well correlated with the unshearing peaks on the time profile of the rate of change of the flare shear. We give a discussion of the above phenomena.

  4. Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Nita, Gelu M.; Oria, Vincent; Kosovichev, Alexander G.

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares represent a complicated physical phenomenon observed in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radiowaves to gamma-rays. For a complete understanding of the flares it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For efficient data search, integration of different flare lists and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely-identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and availability of observations of a particular set of instruments. Currently, data from three primary flare lists (GOES, RHESSI and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-Wind, OVSA flare catalogs, CACTus CME catalog, Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage), are integrated. An additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) along with observing summary, data links and multi-wavelength light curves is provided for each flare event since January 2002. Results of an initial statistical analysis will be presented.

  5. An Interactive Multi-instrument Database of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Oria, Vincent; Nita, Gelu M.

    2017-07-01

    Solar flares are complicated physical phenomena that are observable in a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to γ-rays. For a more comprehensive understanding of flares, it is necessary to perform a combined multi-wavelength analysis using observations from many satellites and ground-based observatories. For an efficient data search, integration of different flare lists, and representation of observational data, we have developed the Interactive Multi-Instrument Database of Solar Flares (IMIDSF, https://solarflare.njit.edu/). The web-accessible database is fully functional and allows the user to search for uniquely identified flare events based on their physical descriptors and the availability of observations by a particular set of instruments. Currently, the data from three primary flare lists (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites, RHESSI, and HEK) and a variety of other event catalogs (Hinode, Fermi GBM, Konus-W IND, the OVSA flare catalogs, the CACTus CME catalog, the Filament eruption catalog) and observing logs (IRIS and Nobeyama coverage) are integrated, and an additional set of physical descriptors (temperature and emission measure) is provided along with an observing summary, data links, and multi-wavelength light curves for each flare event since 2002 January. We envision that this new tool will allow researchers to significantly speed up the search of events of interest for statistical and case studies.

  6. Another giant solar explosion follows Tuesday's enormous solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The activity started on Tuesday with a giant solar flare - the second biggest ever seen by SOHO, the ESA-NASA solar observatory that maintains a constant watch on the Sun, monitoring these events as they happen. A few minutes later, spacecraft circling the Earth began to detect high levels of energetic radiation, capable of blinding satellites and causing increased radiation levels down to normal aircraft cruising altitudes. About 24 hours after the solar flare was observed, an accompanying coronal mass ejection - a giant cloud of magnetised plasma - reached the Earth, causing rapid changes in the Earth's magnetic field and what is known as a geomagnetic storm. This storm caused widespread disruption to communications; both satellite-based and HF radio. These events are truly sporadic and extremely difficult to predict. On Wednesday it appeared that radiation levels were decreasing. However, a second flare overnight has caused a further sharp increase in radiation levels. Here on Earth, the disruption continues today with a further coronal mass ejection expected to reach the Earth tomorrow in time for Halloween. Solar eruptions of this type together with the associated increased radiation levels and electromagnetic disturbances around the Earth have real immediate and long-term economic impacts. During the last few days, space weather related problems have been detected on spacecraft operated by a range of agencies across the globe and operations teams are on alert. On Earth, telecommunication links have been disrupted and steps have been taken to safeguard aircraft, which including some changes in scheduling. Effects have also been detected in high latitude power grids and are being carefully monitored. The increased dependency of our society on systems which are directly or indirectly influenced by solar and other events seen in space raises concerns about our ability to monitor and anticipate these events and the resulting changes collectively referred to as

  7. Filaments disappearances in relation to solar flares during the solar cycle 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawad, R.; Shaltout, Mosalam; Ewaida, M.; Yousef, M.; Yousef, S.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the association between the filament disappearances and solar flares during 1996-2010; we listed 639 associated filament disappearances with solar flares under temporal and spatial condition, those particular 639 filament disappearance were associated with 1676 solar flares during the period 1996-2010. The best angular distance between filament disappearances and associated solar flares ranged between 30° and 60°. The number of the associated events increased with increasing solar activity and decreased with quiet sun. The location of filament disappearances ranges between latitude ±50° and longitude ±70°. We found that longer filament disappearances have activity and ability of contemporary association with flares more than shorter filament disappearance, filament disappearance powers the associated flares more than non-associated flares events. The associated flares have higher solar flux, longer duration, and higher importance compared to non-associated flares with filament disappearance. In addition the associated filament disappearance with flares have two types depending on their duration, short-lived (9 h).

  8. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Yuki

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  9. The investigation of the Neupert effect in two solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Neupert effect suggests a flare model in which the nonthermal emissions are produced by energetic electrons which heat lower corona and chromosphere to produce the thermal emissions. Based on this concept, we investigate the Neupert effect to test the correlation between the hard X-ray spectral index and the time rate of the UV flare area at 1600 or 171 . Using the T RACE and RHESSI observations, we explore these quantities for two solar flares, one on March 14, 2002 and the other on November 1, 2003. The negative dependence between the spectral index and the time rate of the UV flare area is found, especially during the hard X-ray sub-peaks. This finding indicates that the electron-beam-driven heating plays a prominent role in the UV emission of these two flares.

  10. Modelling the influence of photospheric turbulence on solar flare statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, M.; Kaydul, A.; de Arcangelis, L.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-09-01

    Solar flares stem from the reconnection of twisted magnetic field lines in the solar photosphere. The energy and waiting time distributions of these events follow complex patterns that have been carefully considered in the past and that bear some resemblance with earthquakes and stockmarkets. Here we explore in detail the tangling motion of interacting flux tubes anchored in the plasma and the energy ejections resulting when they recombine. The mechanism for energy accumulation and release in the flow is reminiscent of self-organized criticality. From this model, we suggest the origin for two important and widely studied properties of solar flare statistics, including the time-energy correlations. We first propose that the scale-free energy distribution of solar flares is largely due to the twist exerted by the vorticity of the turbulent photosphere. Second, the long-range temporal and time-energy correlations appear to arise from the tube-tube interactions. The agreement with satellite measurements is encouraging.

  11. Imaging coronal magnetic-field reconnection in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yang; Holman, Gordon D; Dennis, Brian R; Wang, Tongjiang; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic-field reconnection is believed to play a fundamental role in magnetized plasma systems throughout the Universe1, including planetary magnetospheres, magnetars and accretion disks around black holes. This letter present extreme ultraviolet and X-ray observations of a solar flare showing magnetic reconnection with a level of clarity not previously achieved. The multi-wavelength extreme ultraviolet observations from SDO/AIA show inflowing cool loops and newly formed, outflowing hot loops, as predicted. RHESSI X-ray spectra and images simultaneously show the appearance of plasma heated to >10 MK at the expected locations. These two data sets provide solid visual evidence of magnetic reconnection producing a solar flare, validating the basic physical mechanism of popular flare models. However, new features are also observed that need to be included in reconnection and flare studies, such as three-dimensional non-uniform, non-steady and asymmetric evolution.

  12. Driving major solar flares and eruptions: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, C J

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the processes that energize and trigger major solar flares and flux-rope destabilizations. Numerical modeling of specific solar regions is hampered by uncertain coronal-field reconstructions and by poorly understood magnetic re- connection; these limitations result in uncertain estimates of field topology, energy, and helicity. The primary advances in understanding field destabilizations therefore come from the combination of generic numerical experiments with interpretation of sets of observations. These suggest a critical role for the emergence of twisted flux ropes into pre-existing strong field for many, if not all, of the active regions that pro- duce M- or X-class flares. The flux and internal twist of the emerging ropes appear to play as important a role in determining whether an eruption will develop predom- inantly as flare, confined eruption, or CME, as do the properties of the embedding field. Based on reviewed literature, I outline a scenario for major flares and erup- tions...

  13. Evidence That Solar Flares Drive Global Oscillations in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2008-05-01

    Solar flares are large explosions on the Sun's surface caused by a sudden release of magnetic energy. They are known to cause local short-lived oscillations traveling away from the explosion like water rings. Here we show that the energy in the solar acoustic spectrum is correlated with flares. This means that the flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake such as the 2004 December Sumatra-Andaman one. The correlation between flares and energy in the acoustic spectrum of disk-integrated sunlight is stronger for high-frequency waves than for ordinary p-modes which are excited by the turbulence in the near-surface convection zone immediately beneath the photosphere.

  14. Statistical properties of solar flares and coronal mass ejections through the solar cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telloni, Daniele; Antonucci, Ester [INAF-Astrophysical Observatory of Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Carbone, Vincenzo [University of Calabria, Department of Physics, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy); CNR-Institute for Chemical-Physical Processes, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 33B, 87036 Rende (Italy); Lepreti, Fabio [University of Calabria, Department of Physics, Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31C, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2016-03-25

    Waiting Time Distributions (WTDs) of solar flares are investigated all through the solar cycle. The same approach applied to Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in a previous work is considered here for flare occurrence. Our analysis reveals that flares and CMEs share some common statistical properties, which result dependent on the level of solar activity. Both flares and CMEs seem to independently occur during minimum solar activity phases, whilst their WTDs significantly deviate from a Poisson function at solar maximum, thus suggesting that these events are correlated. The characteristics of WTDs are constrained by the physical processes generating those eruptions associated with flares and CMEs. A scenario may be drawn in which different mechanisms are actively at work during different phases of the solar cycle. Stochastic processes, most likely related to random magnetic reconnections of the field lines, seem to play a key role during solar minimum periods. On the other hand, persistent processes, like sympathetic eruptions associated to the variability of the photospheric magnetism, are suggested to dominate during periods of high solar activity. Moreover, despite the similar statistical properties shown by flares and CMEs, as it was mentioned above, their WTDs appear different in some aspects. During solar minimum periods, the flare occurrence randomness seems to be more evident than for CMEs. Those persistent mechanisms generating interdependent events during maximum periods of solar activity can be suggested to play a more important role for CMEs than for flares, thus mitigating the competitive action of the random processes, which seem instead strong enough to weaken the correlations among flare event occurrence during solar minimum periods. However, it cannot be excluded that the physical processes at the basis of the origin of the temporal correlation between solar events are different for flares and CMEs, or that, more likely, more sophisticated effects are

  15. Automatic prediction of solar flares and super geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hui

    Space weather is the response of our space environment to the constantly changing Sun. As the new technology advances, mankind has become more and more dependent on space system, satellite-based services. A geomagnetic storm, a disturbance in Earth's magnetosphere, may produce many harmful effects on Earth. Solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are believed to be the major causes of geomagnetic storms. Thus, establishing a real time forecasting method for them is very important in space weather study. The topics covered in this dissertation are: the relationship between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of solar active regions; the relationship between solar flare index and magnetic features of solar active regions; based on these relationships a statistical ordinal logistic regression model is developed to predict the probability of solar flare occurrences in the next 24 hours; and finally the relationship between magnetic structures of CME source regions and geomagnetic storms, in particular, the super storms when the D st index decreases below -200 nT is studied and proved to be able to predict those super storms. The results are briefly summarized as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of active region. Furthermore, compared with magnetic shear, magnetic gradient might be a better proxy to locate where a large flare occurs. It appears to be more accurate in identification of sources of X-class flares than M-class flares; (2) Flare index, defined by weighting the SXR flares, is proved to have positive correlation with three magnetic features of active region; (3) A statistical ordinal logistic regression model is proposed for solar flare prediction. The results are much better than those data published in the NASA/SDAC service, and comparable to the data provided by the NOAA/SEC complicated expert system. To our knowledge, this is the first time that logistic regression model has been applied

  16. On the Study of Solar Flares with Neutrino Observatories

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Since the end of the eighties, in response to a reported increase of the total neutrino flux in the Homestake experiment in coincidence with solar flares, neutrino detectors have searched for signals of neutrinos associated with solar flare activity. Protons which are accelerated by the magnetic structures of such flares may collide with the solar atmosphere, producing mesons which subsequently decay, resulting in neutrinos at O(MeV-GeV) energies. The study of such neutrinos would provide a new window on the underlying physics of the acceleration process. The sensitivity to solar flares of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, located at the geographical South Pole, is currently under study. We introduce a new approach for a time profile analysis. This is based on a stacking method of selected solar flares which are likely to be connected with pion production. An initial approach towards a neutrino search using the current IceCube experiment as well as first efforts to improve the detection efficiency in the futu...

  17. Investigation of relationships between parameters of solar nano-flares and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen; Kaki, Bardia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares are one of the important coronal events which are originated in solar magnetic activity. They release lots of energy during the interstellar medium, right after the trigger. Flare prediction can play main role in avoiding eventual damages on the Earth. Here, to interpret solar large-scale events (e.g., flares), we investigate relationships between small-scale events (nano-flares) and large-scale events (e.g., flares). In our method, by using simulations of nano-flares based on Monte Carlo method, the intensity time series of nano-flares are simulated. Then, the solar full disk images taken at 171 angstrom recorded by SDO/AIA are employed. Some parts of the solar disk (quiet Sun (QS), coronal holes (CHs), and active regions (ARs)) are cropped and the time series of these regions are extracted. To compare the simulated intensity time series of nano-flares with the intensity time series of real data extracted from different parts of the Sun, the artificial neural networks is employed. Therefore, we are able to extract physical parameters of nano-flares like both kick and decay rate lifetime, and the power of their power-law distributions. The procedure of variations in the power value of power-law distributions within QS, CH is similar to AR. Thus, by observing the small part of the Sun, we can follow the procedure of solar activity.

  18. Modeling the Soft X-Ray During Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaman, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar Radiation can effect our communication and navigation systems here on Earth. In particular, solar X-ray (SXR) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is responsible for ionizing (charging) earth's upper atmosphere, and sudden changes in the ionosphere can disrupt high frequency communication systems (e.g. airplane-to-ground) and degrade the location accuracy for GPS navigation. New soft X-ray flare data are needed to study the sources for the SXR radiation and variability of the solar flares and thus help to answer questions if all flares follow the same trend or have different plasma characteristics? In December 2015, the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) launched from Cape Canaveral Florida to answer those questions. The MinXSS CubeSat is a miniature satellite that was designed to measure the soft X-ray spectra and study flares in the 1-15 Å wavelength range. So far, the CubeSat has observed more than ten flares. The MinXSS flare data are plotted in energy vs irradiance to display the soft X-ray spectra, and these spectra are compared with different types of CHIANTI models of the soft X-ray radiation. One comparison is for non-flaring spectra using AIA EUV images to identify solar features called active regions, coronal holes, and quiet sun, and then using the fractional area of each feature to calculate a CHIANTI-based spectrum. This comparison reveals how important the active region radiation is for the SXR spectra. A second comparison is for flare spectra to several isothermal models that were created using CHIANTI. The isothermal model comparisons were done with both the raw count spectra from MinXSS and the derived irradiance spectra. This dual comparison helps to validate the irradiance conversion algorithm for MinXSS. Comparisons of the MinXSS data to the models show that flares tend to follow a temperature pattern. Analysis of the MinXSS data can help us understand our sun better, could lead to better forecasts of solar flares, and thus

  19. Influence of solar flares on behavior of solar neutrino flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarkin, O. M.; Boyarkina, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    Limiting ourselves to two flavor approximation the motion of the neutrino flux in the solar matter and twisting magnetic field is considered. For the neutrino system described by the 4-component wave function ΨT =(νeL ,νXL ,νbareL ,νbarXL) , where X = μ , τ , an evolution equation is found. Our consideration carries general character, that is, it holds for any SM extensions with massive neutrinos. The resonance transitions of the electron neutrinos are investigated. Factors which influence on the electron neutrino flux, crossing a region of solar flares (SF) are defined. When the SF is absent a terrestrial detector records the electron neutrino flux weakened at the cost both of vacuum oscillations and of the MSW resonance conversion only. On the other hand, the electron neutrino flux passed the SF region in preflare period proves to be further weakened in so far as it undergoes one (Majorana neutrino) or two (Dirac neutrino) additional resonance conversions, apart from the MSW resonance and vacuum oscillations. The hypothesis of the νe-induced decays which states that decreasing the beta decay rates of some elements of the periodic table is caused by reduction of the solar neutrino flux is discussed as well.

  20. Giant solar flares in Antarctic ice. [nitrate ions in ice core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, R.

    1980-01-01

    A new hypothesis proposes an explanation for the presence of four prominent spikes in a long time record of the NO3(-) concentration inside the Antarctic ice. This solar flare hypothesis suggests that the ionizing radiation necessary in the spike formation could have come from extremely powerful solar flares. It is proposed that these flares would have occurred during the times of the largest maxima in the solar cycle. The solar flare hypothesis is compared with the supernova hypothesis.

  1. Protons from the decay of solar flare neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, P.; Meyer, P.; Pyle, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    Fluxes of energetic protons in interplanetary space are observed which are interpreted as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1982 June 3 at 11:42 UT. Because of the particular geometry of this event the spectrum of neutrons escaping from the sun can be constructed with great accuracy in the kinetic energy range 10-100 MeV. The resulting spectrum places stringent constraints on the free parameters used in previously published calculations of neutron production in solar flares. An estimate is made of the diffusion mean free path of charged particles in the interplanetary medium in a new way.

  2. Multi-Thread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, H P

    2006-01-01

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as an sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper we present a method for computing multi-thread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the \\textit{GOES} and \\textit{Yohkoh} satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating time-scale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heati...

  3. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. V. Energy Closure in Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Caspi, Amir; Cohen, Christina M. S.; Holman, Gordon; Jing, Ju; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Kontar, Eduard P.; McTiernan, James M.; Mewaldt, Richard A.; O’Flannagain, Aidan; Richardson, Ian G.; Ryan, Daniel; Warren, Harry P.; Xu, Yan

    2017-02-01

    In this study we synthesize the results of four previous studies on the global energetics of solar flares and associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which include magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies in 399 solar M- and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yr of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. Our findings are as follows. (1) The sum of the mean nonthermal energy of flare-accelerated particles ({E}{nt}), the energy of direct heating ({E}{dir}), and the energy in CMEs ({E}{CME}), which are the primary energy dissipation processes in a flare, is found to have a ratio of ({E}{nt}+{E}{dir}+{E}{CME})/{E}{mag}=0.87+/- 0.18, compared with the dissipated magnetic free energy {E}{mag}, which confirms energy closure within the measurement uncertainties and corroborates the magnetic origin of flares and CMEs. (2) The energy partition of the dissipated magnetic free energy is: 0.51 ± 0.17 in nonthermal energy of ≥slant 6 {keV} electrons, 0.17 ± 0.17 in nonthermal ≥slant 1 {MeV} ions, 0.07 ± 0.14 in CMEs, and 0.07 ± 0.17 in direct heating. (3) The thermal energy is almost always less than the nonthermal energy, which is consistent with the thick-target model. (4) The bolometric luminosity in white-light flares is comparable to the thermal energy in soft X-rays (SXR). (5) Solar energetic particle events carry a fraction ≈ 0.03 of the CME energy, which is consistent with CME-driven shock acceleration. (6) The warm-target model predicts a lower limit of the low-energy cutoff at {e}c≈ 6 {keV}, based on the mean peak temperature of the differential emission measure of T e = 8.6 MK during flares. This work represents the first statistical study that establishes energy closure in solar flare/CME events.

  4. Soft X-ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-01-01

    The soft X-ray emissions of solar flares come mainly from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. (2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. We analyze the suitability of the GOES data for this kind of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after Sept. 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend Dolla et al. results to a list of X-class flares from Cycle 24, and show that most of them display QPP in the impulsive phase. During the impulsive phase the footpoints of the newly-forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations. The QPP show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES dat...

  5. The Power-Law Distribution of Flare Kernels and Fractal Current Sheets in a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizuka, N; Takasaki, H; Kurokawa, H; Shibata, K; 10.1088/0004-637X/694/1/L74

    2013-01-01

    We report a detailed examination of the fine structure inside flare ribbons and the temporal evolution of this fine structure during the X2.5 solar flare that occurred on 2004 November 10. We examine elementary bursts of the C IV (1550{\\AA}) emission lines seen as local transient brightenings inside the flare ribbons in the ultraviolet (1600{\\AA}) images taken with Transition Region and Coronal Explorer, and we call them C IV kernels. This flare was also observed in Ha with the Sartorius 18 cm Refractor telescope at Kwasan observatory, Kyoto University, and in hard X-rays (HXR) with Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. Many C IV kernels, whose sizes were comparable to or less than 2", were found to brighten successively during the evolution of the flare ribbon. The majority of them were well correlated with the Ha kernels in both space and time, while some of them were associated with the HXR emission. These kernels were thought to be caused by the precipitation of nonthermal particles at the...

  6. Relationship between CME dynamics and solar flare plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajmal Jain; Malini Aggarwal; Pradeep Kulkarni

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the velocity of CMEs and the plasma temperature of the associated X-ray solar flares is investigated.The velocity of CMEs increases with plasma temperature(R=0.82)and photon index below the break energy(R=0.60)of X-ray flares.The heating of the coronal plasma appears to be significant with respect to the kinetics of a CME from the reconnection region where the flare also occurs.We propose that the initiation and velocity of CMEs perhaps depend upon the dominant process of conversion of the magnetic field energy of the active region to heating/accelerating the coronal plasma in the reconnected loops.Results show that a flare and the associated CME are two components of one energy release system,perhaps,magnetic field free energy.

  7. The challenges of the models of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Zaitsev, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    The challenges of `standard' model of solar flares motivated by new observations with the spacecrafts and ground-based telescopes are presented. The most important problems are in situ heating of photospheric and chromospheric loop footpoints up to the coronal temperatures without precipitating particle beams accelerated in the corona, and the sunquakes which are unlikely to be explained by the impact of highenergy particles producing hard X-ray emission. There is also the long-standing `number problem' in the physics of solar flares. It is shown that modern observations favored an important role of the electric currents in the energy release processes in the low solar atmosphere. Particle acceleration mechanism in the electric fields driven by the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the chromosphere is proposed. The electric current value I ≥ 1010 A, needed for the excitation of super-Dreicer electric fields in the chromosphere is determined. It is shown that both Joule dissipation of the electric currents and the particles accelerated in the chromosphere can be responsible for in situ heating of the low solar atmosphere. Alternative model of the solar flare based on the analogy between the flaring loop and an equivalent electric circuit which is good tool for the electric current diagnostics is presented. Interaction of a current-carrying loop with the partially-ionized plasma of prominence in the context of particle acceleration is considered. The role of plasma radiation mechanism in the sub-THz emission from the chromosphere is discussed.

  8. Solar neutrinos, solar flares, solar activity cycle and the proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there may be a correlation between the galactic cosmic rays and the solar neutrino data, but it appears that the neutrino flux which may be generated during the large solar cosmic ray events cannot in any way effect the solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. Only initial stage of mixing between the solar core and solar outer layers after the sunspot maximum in the solar activity cycle can explain the higher (run number 27 and 71) of solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. But solar flare induced atmospheric neutrino flux may have effect in the nucleon decay detector on the underground. The neutrino flux from solar cosmic rays may be a useful guide to understand the background of nucleon decay, magnetic monopole search, and the detection of neutrino flux in sea water experiment.

  9. Probabilistic forecasting of solar flares from vector magnetogram data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Schumer, E. A.; Della-Rose, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    Discriminant analysis is a statistical approach for assigning a measurement to one of several mutually exclusive groups. Presented here is an application of the approach to solar flare forecasting, adapted to provide the probability that a measurement belongs to either group, the groups in this case being solar active regions which produced a flare within 24 hours and those that remained flare quiet. The technique is demonstrated for a large database of vector magnetic field measurements obtained by the University of Hawai'i Imaging Vector Magnetograph. For a large combination of variables characterizing the photospheric magnetic field, the results are compared to a Bayesian approach for solar flare prediction, and to the method employed by the U.S. Space Environment Center (SEC). Although quantitative comparison is difficult as the present application provides active region (rather than whole-Sun) forecasts, and the present database covers only part of one solar cycle, the performance of the method appears comparable to the other approaches.

  10. Automatic Tracking of Active Regions and Detection of Solar Flares in Solar EUV Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, C.; Aranda, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Solar catalogs are frequently handmade by experts using a manual approach or semi-automated approach. The appearance of new tools is very useful because the work is automated. Nowadays it is impossible to produce solar catalogs using these methods, because of the emergence of new spacecraft that provide a huge amount of information. In this article an automated system for detecting and tracking active regions and solar flares throughout their evolution using the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft is presented. The system is quite complex and consists of different phases: i) acquisition and preprocessing; ii) segmentation of regions of interest; iii) clustering of these regions to form candidate active regions which can become active regions; iv) tracking of active regions; v) detection of solar flares. This article describes all phases, but focuses on the phases of tracking and detection of active regions and solar flares. The system relies on consecutive solar images using a rotation law to track the active regions. Also, graphs of the evolution of a region and solar evolution are presented to detect solar flares. The procedure developed has been tested on 3500 full-disk solar images (corresponding to 35 days) taken from the spacecraft. More than 75 % of the active regions are tracked and more than 85 % of the solar flares are detected.

  11. Soft electron beams in solar active and flare region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, V.V.; Mandelshtam, S.L.; Oparin, S.N.; Urnov, A.M.; Zhitnik, I.A.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the experimental data obtained from the high resolution X-ray spectra for solar flares and active regions the suprathermal electron model (SEM) was proposed. This model suggests the existance of the multi-temperature structure of the solar plasma emitting Fe and Ca X-rays and the presence of additional electrons with low energies (no more than 10 keV) and small densities of about 1-5 percent relative to the thermal component.

  12. Slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons during an X-class solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Wang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and there appeared three FRs. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edge, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in 3D standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that complex structures of the flare is likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least...

  13. Electron Acceleration in Contracting Magnetic Islands during Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikov, D.; Tenishev, V.; Gombosi, T. I.; Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    Electron acceleration in solar flares is well known to be efficient at generating energetic particles that produce the observed bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra. One mechanism proposed to explain the observations is electron acceleration within contracting magnetic islands formed by magnetic reconnection in the flare current sheet. In a previous study, a numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an eruptive solar flare was analyzed to estimate the associated electron acceleration due to island contraction. That analysis used a simple analytical model for the island structure and assumed conservation of the adiabatic invariants of particle motion. In this paper, we perform the first-ever rigorous integration of the guiding-center orbits of electrons in a modeled flare. An initially isotropic distribution of particles is seeded in a contracting island from the simulated eruption, and the subsequent evolution of these particles is followed using guiding-center theory. We find that the distribution function becomes increasingly anisotropic over time as the electrons’ energy increases by up to a factor of five, in general agreement with the previous study. In addition, we show that the energized particles are concentrated on the Sunward side of the island, adjacent to the reconnection X-point in the flare current sheet. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrates that the electron energy gain is dominated by betatron acceleration in the compressed, strengthened magnetic field of the contracting island. Fermi acceleration by the shortened field lines of the island also contributes to the energy gain, but it is less effective than the betatron process.

  14. Dark Post-Flare Loops Observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Qiao; Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Solar post-flare loops (PFLs) are arcade-like loop systems that appear during the gradual phases of eruptive flares. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) allow us to investigate the fine structures in PFLs. In this work, we focus on studying the dark post-flare loops (DPFLs) during X-class flares, which are more evident in SDO/AIA data than in previous EUV data. We identify and analyze the DPFLs observed by SDO and find that: (1) the DPFLs of an X5.4 flare have an average lifetime of 10.0 $\\pm$ 5.5 minutes, an average width of 1022 $\\pm$ 339 km, and an average maximum length of 33 $\\pm$ 10 Mm, (2) blob-like falling features with a size close to the resolution of SDO/AIA are identified in the DPFLs and they have an average velocity of 76 $\\pm$ 19 km s$^{-1}$, and (3) the average widths of the DPFLs slightly increase with the characteristic temperatures in AIA 304, 171, 193, and 211 {\\AA} channels. Our investigation ...

  15. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  16. Magnetic Properties of Solar Active Regions That Govern Large Solar Flares and Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Shin; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Harra, Louise K.; Hudson, Hugh; Nagashima, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), especially the larger ones, emanate from active regions (ARs). With the aim of understanding the magnetic properties that govern such flares and eruptions, we systematically survey all flare events with Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite levels of ≥M5.0 within 45° from disk center between 2010 May and 2016 April. These criteria lead to a total of 51 flares from 29 ARs, for which we analyze the observational data obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. More than 80% of the 29 ARs are found to exhibit δ-sunspots, and at least three ARs violate Hale’s polarity rule. The flare durations are approximately proportional to the distance between the two flare ribbons, to the total magnetic flux inside the ribbons, and to the ribbon area. From our study, one of the parameters that clearly determine whether a given flare event is CME-eruptive or not is the ribbon area normalized by the sunspot area, which may indicate that the structural relationship between the flaring region and the entire AR controls CME productivity. AR characterization shows that even X-class events do not require δ-sunspots or strong-field, high-gradient polarity inversion lines. An investigation of historical observational data suggests the possibility that the largest solar ARs, with magnetic flux of 2 × 1023 Mx, might be able to produce “superflares” with energies of the order of 1034 erg. The proportionality between the flare durations and magnetic energies is consistent with stellar flare observations, suggesting a common physical background for solar and stellar flares.

  17. Observations of Electrons from the Decay of Solar Flare Neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Dröge, W.; Ruffolo, D.; Klecker, B.

    1996-01-01

    We have found evidence for fluxes of energetic electrons in interplanetary space on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft which we interpret as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1980 June 21. The decay electrons arrived at the s/c shortly before the electrons from the flare and can be distinguished from the latter by their distinctive energy spectrum. The time profile of the decay electrons is in good agreement with the results from a simulation based on a scattering mean fre...

  18. High Energetic Solar Proton Flares on the Declining Phase of Solar Cycle 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M. A. Mosalam

    1995-06-01

    The year 1991 is a part of the declining phase of the solar cycle 22, during which high energetic flares have been produced by active regions NOAA/USAF 6659 in June. The associated solar proton events have affected the Earth environment and their proton fluxes have been measured by GOES space craft. The evaluation of solar activity during the first half of June 1991, have been carried out by applying a method for high energetic solar flares prediction on the flares of June 1991. The method depends on cumulative summation curves according to observed H-alpha flares, X-ray bursts, in the active region 6659 during one rotation when the energetic solar flares of June 1991 have occurred. It has been found that the steep trend of increased activity sets on several tens of hours prior to the occurrence of the energetic flare, which can be used, together with other methods, for forecasts of major flares. All the used data at the present work are received from NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, USA.

  19. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  20. North–South Distribution of Solar Flares during Cycle 23

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhuwan Joshi; P. Pant; P. K. Manoharan

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the spatial distribution of solar flares in the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun that occurred during the period 1996 to 2003. This period of investigation includes the ascending phase, the maximum and part of the descending phase of solar cycle 23. It is revealed that the flare activity during this cycle is low compared to the previous solar cycle, indicating the violation of Gnevyshev–Ohl rule. The distribution of flares with respect to heliographic latitudes shows a significant asymmetry between northern and southern hemisphere which is maximum during the minimum phase of the solar cycle. The present study indicates that the activity dominates the northern hemisphere in general during the rising phase of the cycle (1997–2000). The dominance of northern hemisphere shifted towards the southern hemisphere after the solar maximum in 2000 and remained there in the successive years. Although the annual variations in the asymmetry time series during cycle 23 are quite different from cycle 22, they are comparable to cycle 21.

  1. Predicting Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events: The FORSPEF Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadis, A.; Papaioannou, A.; Sandberg, I.; Georgoulis, M.; Tziotziou, K.; Kouloumvakos, A.; Jiggens, P.

    2017-09-01

    A novel integrated prediction system for solar flares (SFs) and solar energetic particle (SEP) events is presented here. The tool called forecasting solar particle events and flares (FORSPEF) provides forecasts of solar eruptive events, such as SFs with a projection to occurrence and velocity of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and the likelihood of occurrence of an SEP event. In addition, the tool provides nowcasting of SEP events based on actual SF and CME near real-time data, as well as the SEP characteristics ( e.g. peak flux, fluence, rise time, and duration) per parent solar event. The prediction of SFs relies on the effective connected magnetic field strength (B_{eff}) metric, which is based on an assessment of potentially flaring active-region (AR) magnetic configurations, and it uses a sophisticated statistical analysis of a large number of AR magnetograms. For the prediction of SEP events, new statistical methods have been developed for the likelihood of the SEP occurrence and the expected SEP characteristics. The prediction window in the forecasting scheme is 24 hours with a refresh rate of 3 hours, while the respective prediction time for the nowcasting scheme depends on the availability of the near real-time data and ranges between 15 - 20 minutes for solar flares and 6 hours for CMEs. We present the modules of the FORSPEF system, their interconnection, and the operational setup. Finally, we demonstrate the validation of the modules of the FORSPEF tool using categorical scores constructed on archived data, and we also discuss independent case studies.

  2. Two-Step Coronal Transport of Solar Flare Particles from Magnetic Multipolarity Sources in a Flare Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Nian; WANG Shi-Jin

    2001-01-01

    The transport of solar flare particles in the corona is studied. Considering the problems in terms of the character istics of a sunspot group producing solar cosmic rays and solar flare processes, we find that formation of the fast propagation process is associated with annihilation of sunspots in the group with magnetic multipolarity. The slower propagation process depends on magnetic irregularities in the corona, and the evolution of the transport is related to the flare processes. Equations for the coronal transport are proposed and their initial and boundary conditions are given. The predicted results agree with the main observational features.

  3. Observations of electrons from the decay of solar flare neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dröge, W; Klecker, B

    1996-01-01

    We have found evidence for fluxes of energetic electrons in interplanetary space on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft which we interpret as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1980 June 21. The decay electrons arrived at the s/c shortly before the electrons from the flare and can be distinguished from the latter by their distinctive energy spectrum. The time profile of the decay electrons is in good agreement with the results from a simulation based on a scattering mean free path derived from a fit to the flare electron data. The comparison with simultaneously observed decay protons and a published direct measurement of high-energy neutrons places important constraints on the parent neutron spectrum.

  4. Analysis of Enhanced Velocity Signals Observed during Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brajesh Kumar; B. Ravindra

    2006-12-01

    Solar flares are known to release a large amount of energy. It is believed that the flares can excite velocity oscillations in active regions. We report here the changes in velocity signals in three active regions which have produced large X-class flares. The enhanced velocity signals appeared during the rise time of the GOES soft X-ray flux. These signals are located close to the vicinity of the hard X-ray source regions as observed with RHESSI. The power maps of the active region show enhancement in the frequency regime 5–6.5 mHz, while there is feeble or no enhancement of these signals in 2–4 mHz frequency band. High energy particles with sufficient momentum seem to be the cause for these observed enhanced velocity signals.

  5. SIGN SINGULARITY AND FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11158

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorriso-Valvo, L.; De Vita, G. [IMIP-CNR, U.O.S. LICRYL di Cosenza, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Kazachenko, M. D.; Krucker, S.; Welsch, B. T.; Fisher, G. H. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley 94720, California (United States); Primavera, L.; Servidio, S.; Lepreti, F.; Carbone, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università della Calabria, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Vecchio, A., E-mail: sorriso@fis.unical.it [INGV, Sede di Cosenza, Ponte P. Bucci, Cubo 30C, I-87036 Rende (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares and the presence of correlation with Extreme-Ultra-Violet and X-ray flux suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small-scale properties of the current structures.

  6. The Signature of Flares in VIRGO Total Solar Irradiance Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Quesnel, A; Fleck, B; Froelich, C; Hudson, H S

    2010-01-01

    We use Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements from the VIRGO (Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations) instrument on board SOHO to obtain preliminary estimates of the mean total radiative energy emitted by X-class solar flares. The basic tool is that of summed-epoch analysis, which has also enabled us to detect and partially characterize systematic errors present in the basic data. We describe these errors, which significantly degrade the photometry at high frequencies. We find the ratio of GOES 1-8\\{AA} luminosity to total bolometric luminosity to be of order 0.01.

  7. Solar Neutrino flare detection in Hyperkamiokande and SK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The possible buid and near activity of a Megaton neutrino detection in HyperKamiokande and the older SK implementation by Gadolinium liqid might open to future detection of largest solar flare (pion trace at tens MeV) electron neutrino and antineutrino. The multiwave detection of X-gamma and neutrino event might offer a deep view of such solar acelleration and of neutrino flavor mix along its flight. The possoble near future discover of such events will open a third neutrino astronomy windows after rarest SN 1987A and persistent Solar nuclear signals.

  8. Ensemble prediction model of solar proton events associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Huang; Hua-Ning Wang; Le-Ping Li

    2012-01-01

    An ensemble prediction model of solar proton events (SPEs),combining the information of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs),is built.In this model,solar flares are parameterized by the peak flux,the duration and the longitude.In addition,CMEs are parameterized by the width,the speed and the measurement position angle.The importance of each parameter for the occurrence of SPEs is estimated by the information gain ratio.We find that the CME width and speed are more informative than the flare's peak flux and duration.As the physical mechanism of SPEs is not very clear,a hidden naive Bayes approach,which is a probability-based calculation method from the field of machine learning,is used to build the prediction model from the observational data.As is known,SPEs originate from solar flares and/or shock waves associated with CMEs.Hence,we first build two base prediction models using the properties of solar flares and CMEs,respectively.Then the outputs of these models are combined to generate the ensemble prediction model of SPEs.The ensemble prediction model incorporating the complementary information of solar flares and CMEs achieves better performance than each base prediction model taken separately.

  9. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  10. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Allred, Joel C; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework which can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and...

  11. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  12. Shock Versus Solar Flare Production of Heliospheric Relativistic Electron Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.

    2006-12-01

    Electrons with relativistic (E > 0.3 MeV) energies are often observed as discrete events in the inner heliosphere. Their sharp onsets and antisunward flows indicate that they are produced in solar transient events. In general their origins can be associated in time with both solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Unlike the solar energetic proton (SEP) and ion events, we do not have the advantage of particle elemental abundances and charge states as source diagnostics. We review the characteristics of the electron events observed on the Helios, Venera, ISEE-3, Phobos, and other inner heliospheric spacecraft to determine whether they are more likely to be produced by broad coronal shocks driven by CMEs or by solar flare processes associated with magnetic reconnection. Electron intensity-time profiles and energy spectra are compared with properties of flares and CMEs for this determination. Recent comparisons of peak electron and SEP event intensities provide strong evidence for the shock interpretation, but definitive results require the observations provided by the Sentinels mission.

  13. Predicting the Where and the How Big of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Graham; Leka, K. D.; Gilchrist, Stuart

    2017-08-01

    The approach to predicting solar flares generally characterizes global properties of a solar active region, for example the total magnetic flux or the total length of a sheared magnetic neutral line, and compares new data (from which to make a prediction) to similar observations of active regions and their associated propensity for flare production. We take here a different tack, examining solar active regions in the context of their energy storage capacity. Specifically, we characterize not the region as a whole, but summarize the energy-release prospects of different sub-regions within, using a sub-area analysis of the photospheric boundary, the CFIT non-linear force-free extrapolation code, and the Minimum Current Corona model. We present here early results from this approach whose objective is to understand the different pathways available for regions to release stored energy, thus eventually providing better estimates of the where (what sub-areas are storing how much energy) and the how big (how much energy is stored, and how much is available for release) of solar flares.

  14. Further observations of protons resulting from the decay of neutrons ejected by solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, P. A.; Kroeger, R.; Meyer, P.

    1985-01-01

    The solar flare of 1984 April 24 produced a large gamma ray fluence with energy 2MeV. The time profile of the interplanetary flux from this flare indicates the presence of decaying solar neutrons. This makes a total of three neutron flares so far observed by this method. The three flares are used to place constraints on the fluence and spectra of neutrons emitted by the Sun.

  15. Ensemble Forecasting of Major Solar Flares -- First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A. A.; Guerra, J. A.; Uritsky, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results from the first ensemble prediction model for major solar flares (M and X classes). Using the probabilistic forecasts from three models hosted at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (NASA-GSFC) and the NOAA forecasts, we developed an ensemble forecast by linearly combining the flaring probabilities from all four methods. Performance-based combination weights were calculated using a Monte-Carlo-type algorithm that applies a decision threshold PthP_{th} to the combined probabilities and maximizing the Heidke Skill Score (HSS). Using the data for 13 recent solar active regions between years 2012 - 2014, we found that linear combination methods can improve the overall probabilistic prediction and improve the categorical prediction for certain values of decision thresholds. Combination weights vary with the applied threshold and none of the tested individual forecasting models seem to provide more accurate predictions than the others for all values of PthP_{th}. According to the maximum values of HSS, a performance-based weights calculated by averaging over the sample, performed similarly to a equally weighted model. The values PthP_{th} for which the ensemble forecast performs the best are 25 % for M-class flares and 15 % for X-class flares. When the human-adjusted probabilities from NOAA are excluded from the ensemble, the ensemble performance in terms of the Heidke score, is reduced.

  16. Energy-Dependent Timing of Thermal Emission in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Rajmal; Rajpurohit, Arvind Singh; Aschwanden, Markus J; 10.1007/s11207-011-9754-1

    2011-01-01

    We report solar flare plasma to be multi-thermal in nature based on the theoretical model and study of the energy-dependent timing of thermal emission in ten M-class flares. We employ high-resolution X-ray spectra observed by the Si detector of the "Solar X-ray Spectrometer" (SOXS). The SOXS onboard the Indian GSAT-2 spacecraft was launched by the GSLV-D2 rocket on 8 May 2003. Firstly we model the spectral evolution of the X-ray line and continuum emission flux F(\\epsilon) from the flare by integrating a series of isothermal plasma flux. We find that multi-temperature integrated flux F(\\epsilon) is a power-law function of \\epsilon with a spectral index (\\gamma) \\approx -4.65. Next, based on spectral-temporal evolution of the flares we find that the emission in the energy range E= 4 - 15 keV is dominated by temperatures of T= 12 - 50 MK, while the multi-thermal power-law DEM index (\\gamma) varies in the range of -4.4 and -5.7. The temporal evolution of the X-ray flux F(\\epsilon,t) assuming a multi-temperature ...

  17. THE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR FLARES OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES USING GOES X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kim Tolbert, A.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Alex Young, C. [Solar Physics Laboratory (Code 671), Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated Temperature and Emission measure-Based Background Subtraction method (TEBBS), that builds on the methods of Bornmann. Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,000 solar flares occurring over nearly three solar cycles (1980-2007), and used to create an extensive catalog of the solar flare thermal properties. We confirm that the peak emission measure and total radiative losses scale with background subtracted GOES X-ray flux as power laws, while the peak temperature scales logarithmically. As expected, the peak emission measure shows an increasing trend with peak temperature, although the total radiative losses do not. While these results are comparable to previous studies, we find that flares of a given GOES class have lower peak temperatures and higher peak emission measures than previously reported. The TEBBS database of flare thermal plasma properties is publicly available at http://www.SolarMonitor.org/TEBBS/.

  18. The correlation between expansion speed and magnetic field in solar flare ribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the correlation between the expansion speed of two-ribbon flares and the magnetic field measured in the ribbon location, and compare such correlation for two events with different magnetic configurations. These two events are: an M1.0 flare in the quiet sun on September 12, 2000 and an X2.3 flare in Active Region NOAA 9415 on April 10, 2001. The magnetic configuration of the M1.0 flare is simple, while that of X2.3 event is complex. We have derived a power-law correlation between the ribbon expansion speed (V r) and the longitudinal magnetic field (Bz) with an empirical relationship V r = A×Bz-δ, where A is a constant and δ is the index of the power-law correlation. We have found that δ for the M1.0 flare in the simple magnetic configuration is larger than that for the X2.3 flare in the complex magnetic configuration.

  19. The correlation between expansion speed and magnetic field in solar flare ribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE WenBin; WANG HaiMin; JING Ju; BAO XingMing; ZHANG HongQi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the correlation between the expansion speed of two-ribbon flares and the mag-netic field measured in the ribbon location, and compare such correlation for two events with different magnetic configurations. These two events are: an M1.0 flare in the quiet sun on September 12, 2000 and an X2.3 flare in Active Region NOAA 9415 on April 10, 2001. The magnetic configuration of the M1.0 flare is simple, while that of X2.3 event is complex. We have derived a power-law correlation between the ribbon expansion speed (V_r) and the longitudinal magnetic field (B_z) with an empirical relationship V_r=A×B_(z~(-δ)), where A is a constant and δ is the index of the power-law correlation. We have found that δ for the M1.0 flare in the simple magnetic configuration is larger than that for the X2.3 flare in the complex magnetic configuration.

  20. Modern observations and models of Solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsyk, Pavel; Somov, Boris

    As well known, that fast particles propagating along flare loop generate bremsstrahlung hard x-ray emission and gyro-synchrotron microwave emission. We present the self-consistent kinetic description of propagation accelerated particles. The key point of this approach is taking into account the effect of reverse current. In our two-dimensional model the electric field of reverse current has the strong influence to the beam of accelerated particles. It decelerates part of the electrons in the beam and turns back other part of them without significant energy loss. The exact analytical solution for the appropriate kinetic equation with Landau collision integral was found. Using derived distribution function of electrons we’ve calculated evolution of their energy spectrum and plasma heating, coronal microwave emission and characteristics of hard x-ray emission in the corona and in the chromosphere. All results were compared with modern high precision space observations.

  1. Magnetic Properties of Solar Active Regions that Govern Large Solar Flares and Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Toriumi, Shin; Harra, Louise K; Hudson, Hugh; Nagashima, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), especially the larger ones, emanate from active regions (ARs). With the aim to understand the magnetic properties that govern such flares and eruptions, we systematically survey all flare events with GOES levels of >=M5.0 within 45 deg from disk center between May 2010 and April 2016. These criteria lead to a total of 51 flares from 29 ARs, for which we analyze the observational data obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. More than 80% of the 29 ARs are found to exhibit delta-sunspots and at least three ARs violate Hale's polarity rule. The flare durations are approximately proportional to the distance between the two flare ribbons, to the total magnetic flux inside the ribbons, and to the ribbon area. From our study, one of the parameters that clearly determine whether a given flare event is CME-eruptive or not is the ribbon area normalized by the sunspot area, which may indicate that the structural relationship between the flaring region and the entire AR...

  2. High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares: Observations and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    The paper begins by describing the structure of the Sun, with emphasis on the corona. The Sun is a unique plasma laboratory, which can be probed by Sun-grazing comets, and is the driver of space weather. Energization and particle acceleration mechanisms in solar flares is presented; magnetic reconnection is key is understanding stochastic acceleration mechanisms. Then coupling between kinetic and fluid aspects is taken up; the next step is feedback of atmospheric response to the acceleration process – rapid quenching of acceleration. Future challenges include applications of stochastic acceleration to solar energetic particles (SEPs), Fermi γ-rays observations, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains in a funnel-shaped wave guide associated with flare pulsations, and the new SMEX mission IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph),

  3. Soft X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The soft X-ray emissions ( hν>1.5 keV) of solar flares mainly come from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the overwhelming bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 749, L16, 2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES ( Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. In this article we analyse the suitability of the GOES data for this type of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after September, 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend the result of Dolla et al. to a complete list of X-class flares from Cycle 24 and show that most of them (80 %) display QPPs in the impulsive phase. The pulsations show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES data, making use of time-series of irradiance differences (the digital time derivative on the 2-s sampling). We deploy different techniques to characterise the periodicity of GOES pulsations, considering the red-noise properties of the flare signals, finding a range of characteristic time scales of the QPPs for each event, but usually with no strong signature of a single period dominating in the power spectrum. The QPP may also appear on somewhat longer time scales during the later gradual phase, possibly with a greater tendency towards coherence, but the sampling noise in GOES difference data for high irradiance values (X-class flares) makes these more uncertain. We show that there is minimal phase difference between the differenced GOES energy channels, or between them and the hard X-ray variations on short time scales. During the impulsive phase, the footpoints of the newly forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations.

  4. Multi-wavelength view of an M2.2 Solar Flare on 26 November 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, R; Rani, S; Maurya, R A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a study of an M2.2 class solar flare of 26 November 2000 from NOAA AR 9236. The flare was well observed by various ground based observatories (ARIES, Learmonths Solar Observatory) and space borne instruments (SOHO, HXRS, GOES) in time interval between 02:30 UT to 04:00 UT. The flare started with long arc-shape outer flare ribbon. Afterwards the main flare starts with two main ribbons. Initially the outer ribbons start to expand with an average speed ($\\sim$ 20 km s$^{-1}$) and later it shows contraction. The flare was associated with partial halo coronal mass ejection (CMEs) which has average speed of 495 km s$^{-1}$. The SOHO/MDI observations show that the active region was in quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The flux cancellation was observed before the flare onset close to flare site. Our analysis indicate the flare was initiated by the magnetic breakout mechanism.

  5. Multi-wavelength view of an M2.2 solar flare on 26 november 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, R.; Verma, V. K.; Rani, S.; Maurya, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we present a study of an M2.2 class solar flare of 26 November 2000 from NOAA AR 9236. The flare was well observed by various ground based observatories (ARIES, Learmonths Solar Observatory) and space borne instruments (SOHO, HXRS, GOES) in time interval between 02:30 UT to 04:00 UT. The flare started with long arc-shape outer flare ribbon. Afterwards the main flare starts with two main ribbons. Initially the outer ribbons start to expand with an average speed (∼20 km s-1) and later it shows contraction. The flare was associated with partial halo coronal mass ejection (CMEs) which has average speed of 495 km s-1. The SOHO/MDI observations show that the active region was in quadrupolar magnetic configuration. The flux cancellation was observed before the flare onset close to flare site. Our analysis indicate the flare was initiated by the magnetic breakout mechanism.

  6. Magnetic Properties of Solar Active Regions that Govern Large Solar Flares and Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Shin; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Harra, Louise; Hudson, Hugh S.; Nagashima, Kaori

    2017-08-01

    Strong flares and CMEs are often produced from active regions (ARs). In order to better understand the magnetic properties and evolutions of such ARs, we conducted statistical investigations on the SDO/HMI and AIA data of all flare events with GOES levels >M5.0 within 45 deg from the disk center for 6 years from May 2010 (from the beginning to the declining phase of solar cycle 24). Out of the total of 51 flares from 29 ARs, more than 80% have delta-sunspots and about 15% violate Hale’s polarity rule. We obtained several key findings including (1) the flare duration is linearly proportional to the separation of the flare ribbons (i.e., scale of reconnecting magnetic fields) and (2) CME-eruptive events have smaller sunspot areas. Depending on the magnetic properties, flaring ARs can be categorized into several groups, such as spot-spot, in which a highly-sheared polarity inversion line is formed between two large sunspots, and spot-satellite, where a newly-emerging flux next to a mature sunspot triggers a compact flare event. These results point to the possibility that magnetic structures of the ARs determine the characteristics of flares and CMEs. In the presentation, we will also show new results from the systematic flux emergence simulations of delta-sunspot formation and discuss the evolution processes of flaring ARs.

  7. A Database of Flare Ribbon Properties From Solar Dynamics Observatory: Reconnection Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Welsch, Brian; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Sun, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    We present a database of 3137 solar flare ribbon events corresponding to every flare of GOES class C1.0 and greater within 45 degrees from the disk center, from April 2010 until April 2016, observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. For every event in the database, we compare the GOES peak X-ray flux with corresponding active-region and flare-ribbon properties. We find that while the peak X-ray flux is not correlated with the AR unsigned magnetic flux, it is strongly correlated with the flare ribbon reconnection flux, flare ribbon area, and the fraction of active region flux that undergoes reconnection. We find the relationship between the peak X-ray flux and the flare ribbon reconnection flux to be I_{X,peak} ~ \\Phi_{ribbon}^{1.3} for flares >M1 and I_{X,peak} ~ \\Phi_{ribbon}^{1.5} over the entire flare set (>C1). This scaling law is consistent with earlier hydrodynamic simulations of impulsively heated flare loops. Using the flare reconnection flux as a proxy for the total released flare energy E, we find that the occurrence frequency of flare energies follows a power-law dependence: dN/dE ~ E^{-1.6} for E within 10^{31} to 10^{33} erg, consistent with earlier studies of solar and stellar flares. This database is available online and can be used for future quantitative studies of flares.

  8. The isotopic composition of solar flare accelerated neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The individual isotopes of neon in energetic solar-flare particles have been clearly resolved with a rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. The ratios found are Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.6 (+2.0, -1.8) and Ne-21/Ne-22 of no more than about 0.11 in the 11-26 MeV per nucleon interval. This isotopic composition is essentially the same as that of meteoritic planetary neon-A and is significantly different from that of the solar wind.

  9. The Thermal Properties of Solar Flares Over Three Solar Cycles Using GOES X-ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Daniel F; Gallagher, Peter T; Dennis, Brian R; Tolbert, A Kim; Schwartz, Richard A; Young, C Alex

    2012-01-01

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated temperature and emission measure-based background subtraction method (TEBBS), which builds on the methods of Bornmann (1990). Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. (2005). TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,...

  10. Detection of the Acceleration Site in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, E. P.; Nita, G. M.; Gary, D. E.

    2011-05-01

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare (ApJL, v. 731, p. L19, 2011), which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (1035 electrons per second above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The HXR footpoints and coronal radio sources belong, supposedly, to a single magnetic loop, which departs strongly from the corresponding potential loop (obtained from a photospheric extrapolation) in agreement with the apparent need of a non-potential magnetic field structure to produce a flare. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. We found that the electron acceleration efficiency is very high in the flare, so almost all available thermal electrons are eventually accelerated. However, given a relatively small flaring volume and rather low thermal density at the flaring loop, the total energy release turned out to be insufficient for a significant heating of the coronal plasma or for a prominent chromospheric response giving rise to chromospheric evaporation. Some sort of stochastic acceleration process is needed to account for an approximately energy-independent lifetime of about 3 s for the electrons in the acceleration region. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-0961867, AST-0908344, and NASA grants NNX10AF27G and NNX11AB49G to New Jersey Institute of Technology. This work was supported by a UK STFC rolling grant, STFC/PPARC Advanced Fellowship, and the Leverhulme Trust, UK. Financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE and HESPE Networks is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. On the ionospheric effects of 26 June, 1999 solar flare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abseim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we traced the possible influence of the solar flare of June 26, 1999 on the ionosphere throughout the F2-layer parameters. This study concentrated on two parameters, foF2, the critical frequency of the ordinary component of the F2-layer; and hc, the height of the maximum obtained by fitting a theoretical h′F curve for the parabola of best fit to the observed ordinary mode trace near foF2 and correcting for under-lying ionization. The results showed that the relation between the amplitude of averaged sudden enhancements of the perturbations for the critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 region, ΔfoF2 (for data obtained from 8 ionosonde stations, and the duration of the flare is more applicable to the empirical formula given by Youssef (2008. Since we found this relation is linear and has a very strong correlation. In addition, we found that the relation between the average amplitude, of ΔfoF2, for the 8 selected ionosonde stations, and the flare flux is not a linear. For the second parameter, hc, it was found that, the hc amplitude depends on the location of the station on the Earth, and it reaches its maximum value during the decay phase of the studied flare.

  12. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: II. Thermal Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, M J; Ryan, D; Caspi, A; McTiernan, J M; Warren, H P

    2015-01-01

    We present the second part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and CMEs that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO during the first 3.5 years of its mission. In this Paper II we compute the differential emission measure (DEM) distribution functions and associated multi-thermal energies, using a spatially-synthesized Gaussian DEM forward-fitting method. The multi-thermal DEM function yields a significantly higher (by an average factor of $\\approx 14$), but more comprehensive (multi-)thermal energy than an isothermal energy estimate from the same AIA data. We find a statistical energy ratio of $E_{th}/E_{diss} \\approx 2\\%-40\\%$ between the multi-thermal energy $E_{th}$ and the magnetically dissipated energy $E_{diss}$, which is an order of magnitude higher than the estimates of Emslie et al.~2012. For the analyzed set of M and X-class flares we find the following physical parameter ranges: $L=10^{8.2}-10^{9.7}$ cm for the length scale of the flare areas, $T_p=10^{5.7}-...

  13. Theoretical aspects related to plasma flows observed in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somov, Boris

    I review the current state of affairs in the magnetohydrodynamic theories and models for large-scale high-speed plasma flows in solar flares. Main attension is payed to the coronal signatures and their relation to the photosphere and the heliosphere.The large-scale structure and dynamics of coronal plasma flows, as seen in EUV and soft X-rays, can be explained in terms of the three-dimensional reconnection at magnetic separators in the corona. More specifically, this reconnection is determined by the large-scale photospheric flows mainly of two types. First, the shear flows, which are parallel to the photospheric neutral line, increase the length of field lines in the corona an excess of magnetic energy. Second, the converging flows, directed to the neutral line, create the preflare slowly-reconnecting current layers in the corona and provide an excess of energy sufficient to produce a large flare. During the flare, both excesses of energy are released mainly as fast flows of coronal plasma as well as powerful heat fluxes and accelerated particles. The impulsive heating of the upper chromosphere creates a fast expansion of high-temperature plasma upwards into the corona, called the chromospheric `evaporation'. Basic properties of such flows are also reviewed together with draining with cooling. Ref.: Somov B.V., Plasma Astrophysics, Part II, Reconnection and Flares. Second Edition. Springer SBM, New York, 2013.

  14. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Karlicky, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    Solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reported 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at frequency of 0.80 - 7.60 GHz during 1994 - 2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequency in range of 1.08 - 3.42 GHz and frequency gap 10 - 1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (f_{x}), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to f_{x}, while the frequency gap is independent to f_{x}. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequency, longer lifetime, wider frequency gap, and slower frequency drift than that occurring in postflare phase....

  15. Methodology of experimental search for neutrinos from solar flares in Borexino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atroshchenko, V. S.; Borodikhina, L. A.; Toropova, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Solar flares are sudden variations in brightness observed near the Sun’s surface. Some theoretical models predict production of electron and muon neutrinos with energies up to few tens of MeV during solar flares. In 1980s the Homestake experiment reported excess of detected neutrino events possibly correlated with large solar flares. Since then the interest to similar studies by other neutrino detectors has increased. In this report we summarize the status of experimental searches and describe the methodology for the study of neutrinos from solar flares in Borexino liquid scintillator detector.

  16. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Säm

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  17. Return currents and energy transport in the solar flaring atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Codispoti, Anna; Piana, Michele; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    According to a standard ohmic perspective, the injection of accelerated electrons into the flaring region violates local charge equilibrium and therefore, in response, return currents are driven by an electric field to equilibrate such charge violation. In this framework, the energy loss rate associated to these local currents has an ohmic nature and significantly shortens the acceleration electron path. In the present paper we adopt a different viewpoint and, specifically, we study the impact of the background drift velocity on the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons in solar flares. We first utilize the Rutherford cross-section to derive the formula of the energy loss rate when the collisional target has a finite temperature and the background instantaneously and coherently moves up to equilibrate the electron injection. We then use the continuity equation for electrons and imaging spectroscopy data provided by RHESSI to validate this model. Specifically, we show that this new formula for the energy l...

  18. Electron Acceleration In Impulsive Solar Flares : extract of a thesis

    CERN Document Server

    Lenters, G T

    1999-01-01

    Impulsive solar flares generate a wide range of photon and particle emissions and hence provide an excellent backyard laboratory for studying particle acceleration processes in astrophysical plasmas. The source of the acceleration remains unidentified, but the basic observations are clear: (1) Hard X-ray and gamma-ray line emission occur simultaneously, indicating that electron and ion acceleration must occur simultaneously; (2) the electron and ion precipitation rates at the foot-points of the flare must be extremely large to account for the photon emission (∼1037 electrons s −1 and ∼1035 protons s−1, respectively), which means that replenishment of the acceleration region (which contains ≈1037 fully ionized hydrogen atoms) is a crucial issue; and (3) there are enhancements of the heavy ion abundances relative to normal coronal values. The basic model proposed assumes the generation of extremely low levels of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turb...

  19. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  20. The Acceleration of Ions in Solar Flares During Magnetic Reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Knizhnik, Kalman; Drake, James F

    2011-01-01

    The acceleration of solar flare ions during magnetic reconnection is explored via particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently follow the motions of both protons and $\\alpha$ particles. We demonstrate that the dominant ion heating during reconnection with a guide field (a magnetic component perpendicular to the reconnection plane) results from pickup behavior during the entry into reconnection exhausts. In contrast with anti-parallel reconnection, the temperature increment is dominantly transverse, rather than parallel, to the local magnetic field. The comparison of protons and alphas reveals a mass-to-charge ($M/Q$) threshold in pickup behavior that favors heating of high $M/Q$ ions over protons, which is consistent with impulsive flare observations.

  1. Stochastic Particle Acceleration by Helical Turbulence in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2012-01-01

    Flaring release of magnetic energy in solar corona is only possible if the magnetic field deviates from a potential one. We show that the linear MHD modes excited on top of the non-potential magnetic field possess a nonzero kinetic helicity. Accordingly, this necessarily results in a noticeable kinetic helicity of the turbulence, composed of these linear modes with various scales and random phases, generated at the flare site by the primary energy release, which may be important for many applications. In particular, a nonzero turbulence helicity has a potentially strong effect on the particle acceleration because the helical component of the turbulence induces a mean regular large-scale (DC) electric field capable of directly accelerating the charged particles in addition to the commonly considered stochastic turbulent electric field. In this paper, we derive the kinetic helicity density of the linear MHD modes excited on top of a twisted large-scale magnetic field, estimate the corresponding turbulence helic...

  2. A mechanism for deep chromospheric heating during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M. E.; Emslie, A. G.; Mauas, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the negative hydrogen ion, H(-), in the energy balance of the deep solar chromosphere is reexamined and it is found, in contrast with earlier authors, that H(-) is a source of heating at these levels. The response of this region to an ionizing flux of flare-associated UV radiation (1500 to 1900 A) is then addressed: it is found that the excess ionization of Si to Si(+) increases the local electron number density considerably, since most species are largely neutral at deep chromospheric levels. This in turn increases the electron-hydrogen atom association rate, the H(-) abundance, and the rate of absorption of photospheric radiation by this ion. It is found that the excess absorption by this process may lead to a substantial temperature enhancement at temperature minimum levels during flares.

  3. Observations of solar flares with IRIS and SDO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Innes, D. E.; Ning, Z. J.

    2016-03-01

    Flare kernels brighten simultaneously in all Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) channels making it difficult to determine their temperature structure. The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) is able to spectrally resolve Fe xxi emission from cold chromospheric brightenings, so it can be used to infer the amount of Fe xxi emission in the 131 Å AIA channel. We use observations of two small solar flares seen by IRIS and SDO to compare the emission measures (EMs) deduced from the IRIS Fe xxi line and the AIA 131 Å channel to determine the fraction of Fe xxi emission in flare kernels in the 131 Å channel of AIA. Cotemporal and cospatial pseudo-raster AIA images are compared with the IRIS results. We use multi-Gaussian line fitting to separate the blending chromospheric emission so as to derive Fe xxi intensities and Doppler shifts in IRIS spectra. We define loop and kernel regions based on the brightness of the 131 Å and 1600 Å intensities. In the loop regions the Fe xxi EMs are typically 80% of the 131 Å values, and range from 67% to 92%. Much of the scatter is due to small misalignments, but the largest site with low Fe xxi contributions was probably affected by a recent injection of cool plasma into the loop. In flare kernels the contribution of Fe xxi increases from less than 10% at the low-intensity 131 Å sites to 40-80% in the brighter kernels. Here the Fe xxi is superimposed on bright chromospheric emission and the Fe xxi line shows blueshifts, sometimes extending up to the edge of the spectral window, 200 km s-1. The AIA 131 Å emission in flare loops is due to Fe xxi emission with a 10-20% contribution from continuum, Fe xxiii, and cooler background plasma emission. In bright flare kernels up to 52% of the 131 Å is from cooler plasma. The wide range seen in the kernels is caused by significant structure in the kernels, which is seen as sharp gradients in Fe xxi EM at sites of molecular and transition region

  4. Latitudinal Distribution of Solar Flares and Their Association with Coronal Mass Ejections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj K. Shrivastava; Neelam Singh

    2005-01-01

    Major solar flare events have been utilised to study the latitudinal frequency distribution of solar flares in northern and southern hemispheres for the period of 1986 to 2003. A statistical analysis has been performed to obtain the correlation between Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Forbush decrease (Fds)of cosmic ray intensity. Almost the same flares distribution in both hemispheres is found in association with CMEs. In a further analysis, it is noted that a larger number of CME-associated solar flares located in the northern hemisphere are found to be more effective in producing Forbush decreases.

  5. Complexity in Sequences of Solar Flares and Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir G.; Lepreti, Fabio; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the statistical properties of solar flares and earthquakes are compared by analyzing the energy distributions, the time series of energies and interevent times, and, above all, the distributions of interevent times per se. It is shown that the two phenomena have different statistics of scaling, and even the same phenomenon, when observed in different periods or at different locations, is characterized by different statistics that cannot be uniformly rescaled onto a single, universal curve. The results indicate apparent complexity of impulsive energy release processes, which neither follow a common behaviour nor could be attributed to a universal physical mechanism.

  6. Imaging Observations of Quasi-Periodic Pulsatory Non-Thermal Emission in Ribbon Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Zimovets, I V

    2008-01-01

    Using RHESSI and some auxiliary observations we examine possible connections between spatial and temporal morphology of the sources of non-thermal hard X-ray (HXR) emission which revealed minute quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the two-ribbon flares on 2003 May 29 and 2005 January 19. Microwave emission also reveals the same quasi-periodicity. The sources of non-thermal HXR emission are situated mainly inside the footpoints of the flare arcade loops observed by the TRACE and SOHO instruments. At least one of the sources moves systematically both during the QPP-phase and after it in each flare that allows to examine the sources velocities and the energy release rate via the process of magnetic reconnection. The sources move predominantly parallel to the magnetic inversion line or the appropriate flare ribbon during the QPP-phase whereas the movement slightly changes to more perpendicular regime after the QPPs. Each QPP is emitted from its own position. It is also seen that the velocity and the energy re...

  7. Sideways displacement of penumbral fibrils by the solar flare on 2006 December 13

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Leping; Solanki, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Flares are known to restructure the magnetic field in the corona and to accelerate the gas between the field lines, but their effect on the photosphere is less well studied. New data of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard Hinode provide unprecedented opportunity to uncover the photospheric effect of a solar flare, which associates with an active region NOAA AR 10930 on 2006 December 13. We find a clear lateral displacement of sunspot penumbral regions scanned by two flare ribbons. In th...

  8. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: I. Magnetic Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; Jing, Ju

    2014-01-01

    We present the first part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with AIA and HMI onboard SDO. We calculate the potential energy, free energy, and the flare-dissipated magnetic energy. We calculate these magnetic parameters using two different NLFFF codes: The COR-NLFFF code uses the line-of-sight magnetic field component $B_z$ from HMI to define the potential field, and the 2D coordinates of automatically detected coronal loops in 6 coronal wavelengths from AIA to measure the helical twist of coronal loops caused by vertical currents, while the PHOT-NLFFF code extrapolates the photospheric 3D vector fields. We find agreement between the two codes in the measurement of free energies and dissipated energies within a factor of $ \\approx 3$. The size distributions of magnetic parameters exhibit powerlaw slopes that are approximately consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model. The ma...

  9. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  10. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-13

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  11. Global energetics of solar flares. I. Magnetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschwanden, Markus J. [Lockheed Martin, Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju, E-mail: aschwanden@lmsal.com, E-mail: yan.xu@njit.edu, E-mail: ju.jing@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Laboratory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We present the first part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and coronal mass ejections that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We calculate the potential (E{sub p} ), the nonpotential (E {sub np}) or free energies (E {sub free} = E {sub np} – E{sub p} ), and the flare-dissipated magnetic energies (E {sub diss}). We calculate these magnetic parameters using two different NLFFF codes: the COR-NLFFF code uses the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub z} from HMI to define the potential field, and the two-dimensional (2D) coordinates of automatically detected coronal loops in six coronal wavelengths from AIA to measure the helical twist of coronal loops caused by vertical currents, while the PHOT-NLFFF code extrapolates the photospheric three-dimensional (3D) vector fields. We find agreement between the two codes in the measurement of free energies and dissipated energies within a factor of ≲ 3. The size distributions of magnetic parameters exhibit powerlaw slopes that are approximately consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model. The magnetic parameters exhibit scaling laws for the nonpotential energy, E{sub np}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.02}, for the free energy, E{sub free}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.7} and E{sub free}∝B{sub φ}{sup 1.0}L{sup 1.5}, for the dissipated energy, E{sub diss}∝E{sub p}{sup 1.6} and E{sub diss}∝E{sub free}{sup 0.9}, and the energy dissipation volume, V∝E{sub diss}{sup 1.2}. The potential energies vary in the range of E{sub p} = 1 × 10{sup 31}-4 × 10{sup 33} erg, while the free energy has a ratio of E {sub free}/E{sub p} ≈ 1%-25%. The Poynting flux amounts to F {sub flare} ≈ 5 × 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} during flares, which averages to F {sub AR} ≈ 6 × 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} during the entire observation

  12. Influence of solar activity on fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis. [statistical correlation between solar flare and blood coagulation indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, V. I.

    1974-01-01

    During periods of high solar activity fibrinolysis and fibrinogenolysis are increased. A direct correlative relationship is established between the indices of fibrinolysis, fibrinogenolysis and solar flares which were recorded two days before the blood was collected for analysis.

  13. Observations of the 12.3 micron Mg I emission line during a major solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Osherovich, Vladimir; Wiedemann, Gunter; Hewagama, Tilak

    1990-01-01

    The extremely Zeeman-sensitive 12.32 micron Mg I solar emission line was observed during a 3B/X5.7 solar flare on October 24, 1989. When compared to postflare values, Mg I emission-line intensity in the penumbral flare ribbon was 20 percent greater at the peak of the flare in soft X-rays, and the 12 micron continuum intensity was 7 percent greater. The flare also excited the emission line in the umbra where it is normally absent. The umbral flare emission exhibits a Zeeman splitting 200 G less than the adjacent penumbra, suggesting that it is excited at higher altitude. The absolute penumbral magnetic field strength did not change by more than 100 G between the flare peak and postflare period. However, a change in the inclination of the field lines, probably related to the formation and development of the flare loop system, was seen.

  14. Electrons re-acceleration at the footpoints of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Turkmani, Rim

    2010-01-01

    Hinode's observations revealed a very dynamic and complex chromosphere. This require revisiting the assumption that the chromospheric footpoints of solar flares are areas where accelerated particles only lose energy due to collisions. Traditionally electrons are thought to be accelerated in the coronal part of the loop, then travel to the footpoints where they lose their energy and radiate the observed Hard X-ray. Increasing observational evidence challenges this assumption. We review the evidence against this assumption and present the new Local Re-acceleration Thick Target Model (LRTTM) where at the footpoints electrons receive a boost of re-acceleration in addition to the usual collisional loses. Such model may offer an alternative to the 'standard' collisional thick target injection model (TTM) (Brown 1971) of solar HXR burst sources, requiring far fewer electrons and solving some recent problems with the TTM interpretation. We look at the different scenarios which could lead to such re-acceleration and p...

  15. Above-the-loop-top Oscillation and Quasi-periodic Coronal Wave Generation in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Takasao, Shinsuke

    2016-01-01

    Observations revealed that various kinds of oscillations are excited in solar flare regions. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the flare emissions are commonly observed in a wide range of wavelengths. Recent observations have found that fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are quasi-periodically emitted from some flaring sites (quasi-periodic propagating fast-mode magnetoacoustic waves; QPFs). Both of QPPs and QPFs imply a cyclic disturbance originating from the flaring sites. However, the physical mechanisms remain puzzling. By performing a set of two-dimensional MHD simulations of a solar flare, we discovered the local oscillation above the loops filled with evaporated plasma (above-the-loop-top region) and the generation of QPFs from such oscillating regions. Unlike all previous models for QPFs, our model includes essential physics for solar flares, such as magnetic reconnection, heat conduction, and chromospheric evaporation. We revealed that QPFs can be spontaneously excited by the above-the-loop-...

  16. Global Forces in Eruptive Solar Flares: The Lorentz Force Acting on the Solar Atmosphere and the Solar Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, George H.; Bercik, D. J.; Welsch, B. T.; Hudson, H. S.

    2012-05-01

    We compute the change in the Lorentz force integrated over the outer solar atmosphere implied by observed changes in vector magnetograms that occur during large, eruptive solar flares. This force perturbation should be balanced by an equal and opposite force perturbation acting on the solar photosphere and solar interior. The resulting expression for the estimated force change in the solar interior generalizes the earlier expression presented by Hudson, Fisher, and Welsch, providing horizontal as well as vertical force components, and provides a more accurate result for the vertical component of the perturbed force. We show that magnetic eruptions should result in the magnetic field at the photosphere becoming more horizontal, and hence should result in a downward (toward the solar interior) force change acting on the photosphere and solar interior, as recently argued from an analysis of magnetogram data by Wang and Liu. We suggest the existence of an observational relationship between the force change computed from changes in the vector magnetograms, the outward momentum carried by the ejecta from the flare, and the properties of the helioseismic disturbance driven by the downward force change. We use the impulse driven by the Lorentz-force change in the outer solar atmosphere to derive an upper limit to the mass of erupting plasma that can escape from the Sun. Finally, we compare the expected Lorentz-force change at the photosphere with simple estimates from flare-driven gasdynamic disturbances and from an estimate of the perturbed pressure from radiative backwarming of the photosphere in flaring conditions.

  17. Models for Flare Statistics and the Waiting-time Distribution of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatland, M. S.; Edney, S. D.

    1999-12-01

    In a previous study (Wheatland, Sturrock, McTiernan 1998), a waiting-time distribution was constructed for solar flare hard X-ray bursts observed by the ICE/ISEE-3 spacecraft. A comparison of the observed distribution with that of a time-dependent Poisson process indicated an overabundance of short waiting times (10~s -- 10~min), implying that the hard X-ray bursts are not independent events. Models for flare statistics assume or predict that flares are independent events -- in particular the avalanche model makes this specific prediction. The results of the previous study may be reconciled with the avalanche picture if individual flares produce several distinct bursts of hard X-ray emission. A detailed comparison of the avalanche model and the ICE/ISEE-3 waiting-time distribution is presented here.

  18. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. Part III; Nonthermal Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Holman, Gordon; O'Flannagain, Aidan; Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data of 191 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power-law slope and flux, and the thermal nonthermal cross-over energy eco. From these parameters, we calculate the total nonthermal energy E(sub nt) in electrons with two different methods: (1) using the observed cross-over energy e(sub co) as low-energy cutoff, and (2) using the low-energy cut off e(sub wt) predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. Based on a mean temperature of T(sub e) = 8.6 MK in active regions, we find low-energy cutoff energies of e(sub wt) = 6.2 +/-1.6 keV for the warm-target model, which is significantly lower than the cross-over energies e(sub co) = 21 +/- 6 keV. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies E(sub mag) and thermal energies E(sub th) from the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios with the warm-target model: E(sub nt) = 0.41E(sub mag), E(sub th) = 0.08 E(sub mag), and E(sub th) = 0.15 E(sub nt). The total dissipated magnetic energy exceeds the thermal energy in 95% and the nonthermal energy in 71% of the flare events, which confirms that magnetic reconnection processes are sufficient to explain flare energies. The nonthermal energy exceeds the thermal energy in 85% of the events, which largely confirms the warm thick-target model.

  19. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Flare Irradiation and its Influence on the Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Chamberlin, P.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar flare enhancement is one of the important factors determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system response to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of solar flare, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) has been run for 34 X-class flares. The results show that the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peak comparing to pre-flare condition have a clear wavelength dependence. In the wavelength range between 0 - 195 nm, it can vary from 1% to 10000%. The solar irradiance enhancement is largest ( 1000%) in the XUV range (0 - 25 nm), and is about 100% in EUV range (25 - 120 nm). The influence of different wavebands on the T-I system during the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17.2-class) has also been examined using the latest version of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). While the globally integrated solar energy deposition is largest in the 0 - 14 nm waveband, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for 25 - 105 nm waveband. The effect of 122 - 195 nm is small in magnitude, but it decays slowly.

  20. Solar Flare Termination Shock and the Synthetic Fe XXI 1354.08 Å line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijia; Li, Gang; Reeves, Kathy

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic phenomena occurred in the solar system. In the standard solar flare model, a fast mode shock, which is often referred to as the flare termination shock (TS), can exist above the loop-top source of hard X-ray emissions. The existence of the termination shock has been recently related to spectral hardening of flare hard X-ray spectrum at energies > 300 keV. Observations of the Fe XXI 1354.08 Å line during solar flares by the IRIS spacecraft have found significant redshift with >100 km/s, which is consistent with a reconnection downflow. The ability to identify such a redshift by IRIS is made possible by IRIS's high time resolution, high spatial resolution, high sensitivity and cadence spectral observations. The ability to identify such a redshift by IRIS suggests that one may be able to use IRIS observations to identify flare termination shocks. Using an MHD simulation to model magnetic reconnection of a solar flare and assuming the existence of a TS in the downflow of the reconnection plasma, we model the synthetic emission of the Fe XXI 1354.08 Å line in this work. We show that the existence of the TS in the solar flare may manifest itself from the Fe XXI 1354.08 Å line.

  1. Prediction of Solar Flares Using Unique Signatures of Magnetic Field Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboonik, Abbas; Safari, Hossein; Alipour, Nasibe; Wheatland, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Prediction of solar flares is an important task in solar physics. The occurrence of solar flares is highly dependent on the structure and topology of solar magnetic fields. A new method for predicting large (M- and X-class) flares is presented, which uses machine learning methods applied to the Zernike moments (ZM) of magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory for a period of six years from 2010 June 2 to 2016 August 1. Magnetic field images consisting of the radial component of the magnetic field are converted to finite sets of ZMs and fed to the support vector machine classifier. ZMs have the capability to elicit unique features from any 2D image, which may allow more accurate classification. The results indicate whether an arbitrary active region has the potential to produce at least one large flare. We show that the majority of large flares can be predicted within 48 hr before their occurrence, with only 10 false negatives out of 385 flaring active region magnetograms and 21 false positives out of 179 non-flaring active region magnetograms. Our method may provide a useful tool for the prediction of solar flares, which can be employed alongside other forecasting methods.

  2. Solar flare associated coronal mass ejections causing geo-effectiveness and Forbush decreases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Beena; Chandra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, we have selected 35 halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) associated with solar flares, Geomagnetic Storms (GSs) and Forbush decrease (Fd) chosen from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2007 (i.e., the descending phase of solar cycle 23) observed by the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the SOHO spacecraft. Statistical analyses are performed to look at the distribution of solar flares associated with halo CMEs causing GSs and Fd and investigated the relationship between solar flare and halo CME parameters with GSs and Fd. Forbush decrease is the phenomenon of rapid decrease in cosmic ray intensity following the CME. Our analysis indicates that during 2000 to 2007 the northern region produced 44 % of solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd, whereas 56 % solar flares associated with halo CMEs, GSs, and Fd were produced in the southern region. The northern and the southern hemispheres between 10° to 20° latitudinal belts are found to be more effective in producing events leading to Fd. From our selected events, we found that about 60 % of super-intense storms (Dst ≤ -200 nT) caused by halo CMEs are associated with X-class flares. Fast halo CMEs associated with X-class flares originating from 0° to 25° latitudes are better potential candidates in producing super-intense GSs than the slow halo CMEs associated with other classes of flares.

  3. Influence of solar flares on behavior of solar neutrino flux

    CERN Document Server

    Boyarkin, O M

    2016-01-01

    Limiting ourselves to two flavor approximation the motion of the neutrino flux in the solar matter and twisting magnetic field is considered. For the neutrino system described by the 4-component wave function $\\Psi^T = (\

  4. Data Mining Solar X-Ray Flares Triggered by Emerging Magnetic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Kaitlyn; Saar, Steven H.; Schanche, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between emerging magnetic flux and solar X-ray flares to identify, and if possible quantify, distinguishing physical properties of flares triggered by flux emergence versus those triggered by other sources. Our study uses as its basis GOES-classified solar flares from March 2011 through June 2016 that have been identified by the Space Weather Prediction Center’s flare detection algorithm. The basic X-ray flare data is then enriched with data about related EUV-spectrum flares, emerging fluxes, active regions, eruptions, and sigmoids, which are all characterized by event-specific keywords, identified via SDO feature finding tools, and archived in the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK). Using appropriate spatial and temporal parameters for each event type to determine association, we create a catalogue of solar events associated with each GOES-classified flare. After accounting for the primitive state of many of these event detection algorithms, we statistically analyze the compiled dataset to determine the effects of an emerging flux trigger on flare properties. A two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms with 99.9% confidence that flares triggered by emerging flux have a different peak flux distribution than non-emerging-flux-associated flares. We observe no linear or logarithmic correlations between flares’ and their associated emerging fluxes’ individual properties and find flares triggered by emerging flux are ~ 10% more likely to cause an eruption inside an active region while outside of an active region, the flare’s association with emerging flux has no effect on its likeliness to cause an eruption. We also compare the morphologies of the flares triggered by emerging flux and flares not via a superposed epoch analysis of lightcurves. Our results will be of interest for predicting flare behavior as a function of magnetic activity (where we can use enhanced rates of emerging flux as a proxy for heightened stellar

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from Solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Rollins, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the active Sun provide the largest sample of detected solar flares with emission greater than 30 MeV to date. These include detections of impulsive and sustained emission, extending up to 20 hours in the case of the 2012 March 7 X-class flares. These high-energy flares are coincident with GOES X-ray flares of X, M and C classes as well as very fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). We will present results from the First Fermi-LAT solar flare catalog covering the majority of Solar Cycle 24 including correlation studies with the associated Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and CMEs.

  6. Predictions of reconnected flux, energy and helicity in eruptive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria Dmitiyevna

    2010-12-01

    In order to better understand the solar genesis of interplanetary magnetic clouds, I model the magnetic and topological properties of several large eruptive solar flares and relate them to observations. My main hypothesis is that the flux ropes ejected during eruptive solar flares are the result of a sequence of magnetic reconnections. To test this hypothesis, I use the three-dimensional Minimum Current Corona model of flare energy storage (Longcope, 1996) together with pre-flare photospheric magnetic field and flare ribbon observations to predict the basic flare properties: reconnected magnetic flux, free energy, and flux rope helicity. Initially, the MCC model was able to quantify the properties of the flares that occur in active regions with only photospheric shearing motions. Since rotating motions may also play a key role in the flare energetics, I develop a method for including both shearing and rotating motions into the MCC model. I use this modified method to predict the model flare properties and then compare them to the observed quantities. Firstly, for two flares in active regions with fast rotating sunspots, I find that the relative importance of shearing and rotation to those flares depends critically on their location within the parent active region topology. Secondly, for four flares analyzed with the MCC model (three flares described here and one flare described in Longcope et al. (2007)), I find that the modeled flare properties agree with the observed properties within the uncertainties of the methods used. This agreement compels me to believe that the magnetic clouds associated with these four solar flares are formed by low-corona magnetic reconnection during the eruption as modeled by the MCC model, rather than eruption of pre-existing structures in the corona or formation in the upper corona with participation of the global magnetic field. I note that since all four flares occurred in active regions without significant pre-flare flux emergence

  7. Three Solar Gamma-Ray Flares Observed by Yohkoh In Autumn of 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M. A. Mosalam

    The Japanese mission Yohkoh (sun-beam) observed three solar gamma-ray flares of October, November and December 1991, on the declining phase of solar cycle 22. Each flare has different spectral characteristics, strong narrow line flare, broad line flare and continuum gamma-ray flare.The solar gamma-ray flares of October, November and December 1991 are produced from the three solar active regions NOAA/USAF 6891, 6919 and 6952 respectively. The aim of the present work is to study the general characteristics of these three active regions, and perform an evolution for the sunspots and their magnetic fields which lead to releasing highly energetic impulsive flares associated with gamma-ray emissions.The method of cumulative summation curves for X-ray bursts and Hα flares produced from the active regions and also, cumulative summation curves for sunspots area and count number for the same active regions are applied to show any steep increase in the trend in the curves for few days prior to the γ-ray flare occurrences

  8. Evidence for solar flare rare gases in the Khor Temiki aubrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, R. S.; Price, P. B.

    1973-01-01

    It has been found by studying a number of gas-rich meteorites, including Khor Temiki that there is a correlation between the abundance of 'track-rich' grains and the concentration of trapped rare gases. The amount of solar flare gas in Khor Temiki is examined. It is pointed out that the Khor Temiki enstatite is an ideal sample in which to look for evidence of solar flare gases because there has been little or no diffusion loss of solar wind gases.

  9. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: IV. Coronal Mass Ejection Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the fourth part of a global flare energetics project, in which the mass $m_{\\mathrm{cme}}$, kinetic energy $E_{\\mathrm{kin}}$, and the gravitational potential energy $E_{\\mathrm{grav}}$ of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is measured in 399 M and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 yrs of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, using a new method based on the EUV dimming effect. The EUV dimming is modeled in terms of a radial adiabatic expansion process, which is fitted to the observed evolution of the total emission measure of the CME source region. The model derives the evolution of the mean electron density, the emission measure, the bulk plasma expansion velocity, the mass, and the energy in the CME source region. The EUV dimming method is truly complementary to the Thomson scattering method in white light, which probes the CME evolution in the heliosphere at $r > 2 R_{\\odot}$, while the EUV dimming method tracks the CME launch in the corona. We compare the CME paramet...

  10. MHD discontinuities in solar flares: continuous transitions and plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, Leonid; Somov, Boris

    The conservation laws on a surface of discontinuity in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) allow changing a discontinuity type with gradual (continuous) changes in conditions of plasma. Then there are the so-called transition solutions that satisfy simultaneously two types of discontinuities. We obtain all transition solutions on the basis of a complete system of boundary conditions for the MHD equations. We also found an expression describing a jump of internal energy of the plasma flowing through the discontinuity. It allows, firstly, to construct a generalized scheme of possible transitions between MHD discontinuities, and secondly, to examine the dependence of plasma heating by plasma density and configuration of the magnetic field near the surface of the discontinuity (i.e., by the type of the MHD discontinuity). The problem of the heating of "superhot" plasma (with the electron temperature is greater than 10 keV) in solar flares are discussed. It is shown that the best conditions for heating are carried out in the vicinity of the reconnecting current layer near the areas of reverse currents. Bibl.: B.V.Somov. Plasma Astrophysics, Part II: Reconnection and Flares, Second Edition. (New York: Springer SBM, 2013).

  11. Observations and modelling of Helium lines in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, Paulo J A; Labrosse, Nicolas; Kerr, Graham S

    2015-01-01

    We explore the response of the He II 304 {\\AA} and He I 584 {\\AA} line intensities to electron beam heating in solar flares using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Comparing different electron beams parameters, we found that the intensities of both He lines are very sensitive to the energy flux deposited in the chromosphere, or more specifically to the heating rate, with He II 304 {\\AA} being more sensitive to the heating than He I 584 {\\AA}. Therefore, the He line ratio increases for larger heating rates in the chromosphere. A similar trend is found in observations, using SDO/EVE He irradiance ratios and estimates of the electron beam energy rate obtained from hard X-ray data. From the simulations, we also found that spectral index of the electrons can affect the He ratio but a similar effect was not found in the observations.

  12. Optimal Electron Energies for Driving Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Reep, Jeffrey; Alexander, David

    2015-01-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher, Canfield, & McClymont (1985a,b,c), who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Furt...

  13. Recent Advances in Understanding Particle Acceleration Processes in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkova, Valentina V; Benz, Arnold O; Browning, Phillippa; Dauphin, Cyril; Emslie, A Gordon; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Kontar, Eduard P; Mann, Gottfried; Onofri, Marco; Petrosian, Vahe; Turkmani, Rim; Vilmer, Nicole; Vlahos, Loukas

    2011-01-01

    We review basic theoretical concepts in particle acceleration, with particular emphasis on processes likely to occur in regions of magnetic reconnection. Several new developments are discussed, including detailed studies of reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic field configurations (e.g., current sheets, collapsing traps, separatrix regions) and stochastic acceleration in a turbulent environment. Fluid, test-particle, and particle-in-cell approaches are used and results compared. While these studies show considerable promise in accounting for the various observational manifestations of solar flares, they are limited by a number of factors, mostly relating to available computational power. Not the least of these issues is the need to explicitly incorporate the electrodynamic feedback of the accelerated particles themselves on the environment in which they are accelerated. A brief prognosis for future advancement is offered.

  14. Statistical properties and universality in earthquake and solar flare occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, L.; Lippiello, E.; Godano, C.; Nicodemi, M.

    2008-08-01

    Earthquakes are phenomena of great complexity, however some simple general laws govern the statistics of their occurrence. Some of these most important laws exhibit scale invariance, as the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Omori law. The origin of these scaling behaviours is not yet fully understood and a natural fondamental question concerns the existence of these features also in other complex phenomena. A direct inspection of experimental catalogues has shown that the stochastic processes underlying solar flare and earthquake occurrence have universal properties. Another intensively debated question is the existence of correlations between magnitudes of subsequent earthquakes. Our recent analysis of the Southern California Catalogue has shown that non-zero magnitude correlations exist. A branching model based on a dynamical scaling hypothesis, relating magnitude to time, reproduces the hierarchical organization in time and magnitude of events and the observed magnitude correlations.

  15. High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Benz, Arnold O; Monstein, C; Benz, Arnold O.; Messmer, Peter; Monstein, Christian

    2000-01-01

    A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1 - 2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference ...

  16. A Very Small and Super Strong Zebra Pattern Burst at the Beginning of a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Huang, Jing; Meszarosova, Hana; Karlicky, Marian; Yan, Yihua

    2014-01-01

    Microwave emission with spectral zebra pattern structures (ZPs) is observed frequently in solar flares and the Crab pulsar. The previous observations show that ZP is only a structure overlapped on the underlying broadband continuum with slight increments and decrements. This work reports an extremely unusual strong ZP burst occurring just at the beginning of a solar flare observed simultaneously by two radio telescopes located in China and Czech Republic and by the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope on board NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2013 April 11. It is a very short and super strong explosion whose intensity exceeds several times that of the underlying flaring broadband continuum emission, lasting for just 18 s. EUV images show that the flare starts from several small flare bursting points (FBPs). There is a sudden EUV flash with extra enhancement in one of these FBPs during the ZP burst. Analysis indicates that the ZP burst accompanying EUV flash is an unusual explosion revealing a str...

  17. Solar Flare Element Abundances from the Solar Assembly for X-rays (SAX) on MESSENGER

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, B R; Schwartz, R A; Tolbert, A K; Starr, R D; Nittler, L R

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectra in the range $1.5-8.5$~keV have been analyzed for 526 large flares detected with the Solar Assembly for X-rays (SAX) on the Mercury {\\em MESSENGER} spacecraft between 2007 and 2013. For each flare, the temperature and emission measure of the emitting plasma were determined from the spectrum of the continuum. In addition, with the SAX energy resolution of 0.6 keV (FWHM) at 6~keV, the intensities of the clearly resolved Fe-line complex at 6.7~keV and the Ca-line complex at 3.9~keV were determined, along with those of unresolved line complexes from S, Si, and Ar at lower energies. Comparisons of these line intensities with theoretical spectra allow the abundances of these elements relative to hydrogen to be derived, with uncertainties due to instrument calibration and the unknown temperature distribution of the emitting plasma. While significant deviations are found for the abundances of Fe and Ca from flare to flare, the abundances averaged over all flares are found to be enhanced over photospheri...

  18. MAGNETIC AND DYNAMICAL PHOTOSPHERIC DISTURBANCES OBSERVED DURING AN M3.2 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuckein, C. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Collados, M.; Sainz, R. Manso, E-mail: ckuckein@aip.de [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), Vía Láctea s/n, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-02-01

    This Letter reports on a set of full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations in the near-infrared He i 10830 Å spectral region covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare phases of an M3.2 class solar flare. The flare originated on 2013 May 17 and belonged to active region NOAA 11748. We detected strong He i 10830 Å emission in the flare. The red component of the He i triplet peaks at an intensity ratio to the continuum of about 1.86. During the flare, He i Stokes V is substantially larger and appears reversed compared to the usually larger Si i Stokes V profile. The photospheric Si i inversions of the four Stokes profiles reveal the following: (1) the magnetic field strength in the photosphere decreases or is even absent during the flare phase, as compared to the pre-flare phase. However, this decrease is not permanent. After the flare, the magnetic field recovers its pre-flare configuration in a short time (i.e., 30 minutes after the flare). (2) In the photosphere, the line of sight velocities show a regular granular up- and downflow pattern before the flare erupts. During the flare, upflows (blueshifts) dominate the area where the flare is produced. Evaporation rates of ∼10{sup −3} and ∼10{sup −4} g cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} have been derived in the deep and high photosphere, respectively, capable of increasing the chromospheric density by a factor of two in about 400 s.

  19. Thermal Structure of Supra-Arcade Plasma in Two Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina; McKenzie, David E.; Weber, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we use Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA data to determine the thermal structure of supra-arcade plasma in two solar flares. The first flare is a Ml.2 flare that occurred on November 5, 2010 on the east limb. This flare was one of a series of flares from AR 11121, published in Reeves & Golub (2011). The second flare is an XI.7 flare that occurred on January 27, 2012 on the west limb. This flare exhibits visible supra-arcade downflows (SADs), where the November 2010 flare does not. For these two flares we combine XRT and AlA data to calculate DEMs of each pixel in the supra-arcade plasma, giving insight into the temperature and density structures in the fan of plasma above the post-flare arcade. We find in each case that the supra-arcade plasma is around 10 MK, and there is a marked decrease in the emission measure in the SADs. We also compare the DEMs calculated with the combined AIA/XRT dataset to those calculated using AIA alone.

  20. Magnetic and dynamical photospheric disturbances observed during an M3.2 solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso

    2015-01-01

    This letter reports on a set of full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations in the near infrared He I 10830 A spectral region covering the pre-, flare, and post-flare phases of an M3.2 class solar flare. The flare originated on 2013 May 17 and belonged to active region NOAA 11748. We detected strong He I 10830 A emission in the flare. The red component of the He I triplet peaks at an intensity ratio to the continuum of about 1.86. During the flare, He I Stokes V is substantially larger and appears reversed compared to the usually larger Si I Stokes V profile. The photospheric Si I inversions of the four Stokes profiles reveal the following: (1) the magnetic field strength in the photosphere decreases or is even absent during the flare phase, as compared to the pre-flare phase. However, this decrease is not permanent. After the flare the magnetic field recovers its pre-flare configuration in a short time (i.e., in 30 minutes after the flare). (2) In the photosphere, the line-of-sight velocities show a regular...

  1. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2017-02-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  2. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, Ju; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most curr...

  3. High energy neutron and pion-decay gamma-ray emissions from solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward L. Chupp; James M. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Solar flare gamma-ray emissions from energetic ions and electrons have been detected and measured to GeV energies since 1980. In addition, neutrons produced in solar flares with 100 MeV to GeV energies have been observed at the Earth. These emis-sions are produced by the highest energy ions and electrons accelerated at the Sun and they provide our only direct (albeit secondary) knowledge about the properties of the acceler-ator(s) acting in a solar flare. The solar flares, which have direct evidence for pion-decaygamma-rays, are unique and are the focus of this paper. We review our current knowl-edge of the highest energy solar emissions, and how the characteristics of the acceleration process are deduced from the observations. Results from the RHESSI, INTEGRAL and CORONAS missions will also be covered. The review will also cover the solar flare ca-pabilities of the new mission, FERMI GAMMA RAY SPACE TELESCOPE, launched on 2008 June 11. Finally, we discuss the requirements for future missions to advance this vital area of solar flare physics.

  4. Statistical Properties of Solar Flares and Comparison to Other Impulsive Energy Release Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepreti, Fabio; Kossobokov, Vladimir G.; Carbone, Vincenzo

    Impulsive energy release events are observed in many natural systems. Solar flares are certainly among the most remarkable examples of such processes. In the last years the study of solar flare statistical properties has received considerable attention in the context of solar flare models based on different approaches, such as Self Organized Criticality (SOC) or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. In this talk the main statistical properties of solar flares will be presented and compared to those of other well known impulsive processes, such as earthquakes and soft γ-ray flashes occurring on neutron stars. It is shown that the these phenomena are characterized by different statistics that cannot be rescaled onto a single, universal curve and that this holds even for the same phenomenon, when observed in different periods or at different locations. Our results indicate apparent complexity of impulsive energy release processes, which neither follow a common behavior nor could be attributed to a universal physical mechanism.

  5. The Response of Debris-Flow Events to Solar Proton Flares (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Mingtao; WEI Fangqiang; ZHANG Jinghong; WANG Hongjuan

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the observation data from Dongchuan Debris Flow Observation and Research Station and historical data from year 1965 to 1990 gotten from National Astronomical Observatories/ Yunnan Observatory, the responding of debris flow in Jiangjia Ravine to Solar Proton Flare is studied. The following conclusion can be drawn. Solar Proton Flare, as one of most important astronomical factors, affects the activity of debris flow in Yunnan. Generally, from 1965 to 1990, the more active Solar Proton Flare is, the greater the probability of high frequency and large runoff of debris flow is. On the contrary, the less active Solar Proton Flare is, the greater the probability of low frequency, small runoff, and low sediment transport of debris flow is.

  6. Electrons Re-Acceleration at the Footpoints of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmani, R.; Brown, J.

    2012-08-01

    Hinode's observations revealed a very dynamic and complex chromosphere. This require revisiting the assumption that the chromospheric footpoints of solar flares are areas where accelerated particles only lose energy due to collisions. Traditionally electrons are thought to be accelerated in the coronal part of the loop, then travel to the footpoints where they lose their energy and radiate the observed hard X-ray. Increasing observational evidence challenges this assumption. We review the evidence against this assumption and present the new Local Re-acceleration Thick Target Model (LRTTM) where at the footpoints electrons receive a boost of re-acceleration in addition to the usual collisional loses. Such model may offer an alternative to the standard collisional thick target injection model (TTM) (Brown 1971) of solar HXR burst sources, requiring far fewer electrons and solving some recent problems with the TTM interpretation. We look at the different scenarios which could lead to such re-acceleration and present numerical results from one of them.

  7. Observational Investigation of Energy Release in the Lower Solar Atmosphere of a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Sharykin, I N; Kosovichev, A G; Vargas-Dominguez, S; Zimovets, I V

    2016-01-01

    We study flare processes in the lower solar atmosphere using observational data for a M1-class flare of June 12, 2014, obtained by New Solar Telescope (NST/BBSO) and Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI/SDO). The main goal is to understand triggers and manifestations of the flare energy release in the lower layers of the solar atmosphere (the photosphere and chromosphere) using high-resolution optical observations and magnetic field measurements. We analyze optical images, HMI Dopplergrams and vector magnetograms, and use Non-Linear Force-Free Field (NLFFF) extrapolations for reconstruction of the magnetic topology. The NLFFF modelling reveals interaction of oppositely directed magnetic flux-tubes in the PIL. These two interacting magnetic flux tubes are observed as a compact sheared arcade along the PIL in the high-resolution broad-band continuum images from NST. In the vicinity of the PIL, the NST H alpha observations reveal formation of a thin three-ribbon structure corresponding to the small-scale photospher...

  8. CONFINED FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 12192 FROM 2014 OCTOBER 18 TO 29

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Leping; Huang, Xin; Xiao, Junmin [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Ma, Suli, E-mail: hdchen@nao.cas.cn [College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580 (China)

    2015-07-20

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate 6 X-class and 29 M-class flares occurring in solar active region (AR) 12192 from October 18 to 29. Among them, 30 (including 6 X- and 24 M-class) flares originated from the AR core, and the other 5 M-flares appeared at the AR periphery. Four of the X-flares exhibited similar flaring structures, indicating they were homologous flares with an analogous triggering mechanism. The possible scenario is that photospheric motions of emerged magnetic fluxes lead to shearing of the associated coronal magnetic field, which then yields a tether-cutting favorable configuration. Among the five periphery M-flares, four were associated with jet activities. The HMI vertical magnetic field data show that the photospheric fluxes of opposite magnetic polarities emerged, converged, and canceled with each other at the footpoints of the jets before the flares. Only one M-flare from the AR periphery was followed by a coronal mass ejection (CME). From October 20 to 26, the mean decay index of the horizontal background field within the height range of 40–105 Mm is below the typical threshold for torus instability onset. This suggests that a strong confinement from the overlying magnetic field might be responsible for the poor CME production of AR 12192.

  9. Correction of SOHO CELIAS/SEM EUV Measurements saturated by extreme solar flare events

    CERN Document Server

    Didkovsky, L V; Jones, A R; Wieman, S; Tsurutani, B T; McMullin, D

    2006-01-01

    The solar irradiance in the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spectral bands has been observed with a 15 sec cadence by the SOHO Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) since 1995. During remarkably intense solar flares the SEM EUV measurements are saturated in the central (zero) order channel (0.1 -- 50.0 nm) by the flare soft X-ray and EUV flux. The first order EUV channel (26 -- 34 nm) is not saturated by the flare flux because of its limited bandwidth, but it is sensitive to the arrival of Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). While both channels detect nearly equal SEP fluxes, their contributions to the count rate is sensibly negligible in the zero order channel but must be accounted for and removed from the first channel count rate. SEP contribution to the measured SEM signals usually follows the EUV peak for the gradual solar flare events. Correcting the extreme solar flare SEM EUV measurements may reveal currently unclear relations between the flare magnitude, dynamics observed in different EUV spectral bands, and the measured Ea...

  10. Analysis of Condensation Downflows in Post-Flare Loops Using Solar Synoptic Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qiao; Wang, Jing-Song; Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, XiaoXin

    2017-08-01

    Post-flare loops (PFLs) are significant feature of eruptive flares during their gradual phases. The condensation downflows in PFLs have been found for decades; however they do not receive enough attention, especially in EUV wavelengths. The solar synoptic chart (SSC) is designed to cover the key objects of solar activities, including active regions, coronal holes, filaments/prominences, flares, and coronal mass ejections. The main aim of the SSC is presenting a timely, comprehensive, and concise chart for space weather forecast; therefore it can provide a complete image of solar activities before, during, and after a flare process. Furthermore, because the composite image of SSC made by high-quality images in multiple EUV wavelengths from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it can reveal fine structures of condensation downflows in PFLs in different temperatures. Using the SSC, we analyze the condensation downflows in PFLs of X-class flares. The results show that the overall situation of solar activities shown by SSC is helpful for studying the flare process, and SSC effectively presents fine and multi-temperature structure of the condensation downflows in PFLs. Therefore, the SSC is a useful tool not only for space weather forecast but also for the research of solar activities.

  11. Stereoscopic observations of hard x ray sources in solar flares made with GRO and other spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. R.; Hurley, K.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the launch of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) in Apr. 1991, the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on GRO has recorded a large number of solar flares. Some of these flares have also been observed by the Gamma-Ray Burst Detector on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and/or by the Solar X-Ray/Cosmic Gamma-Ray Burst Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft. A preliminary list of common flares observed during the period May-Jun. 1991 is presented and the possible joint studies are indicated.

  12. Coordinated soft X-ray and H-alpha observation of solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarro, D. M.; Canfield, R. C.; Metcalf, T. R.; Lemen, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Soft X-ray, Ca XIX, and H-alpha observations obtained for a set of four solar flares in the impulsive phase are analyzed. A blue asymmetry was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft-Xray rise phase in all of the events. A red asymmetry was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha at spatial locations associated with enhanced flare heating. It is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha plasma to within an order of magnitude. This supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares.

  13. THERMODYNAMIC SPECTRUM OF SOLAR FLARES BASED ON SDO/EVE OBSERVATIONS: TECHNIQUES AND FIRST RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Chamberlin, Phillip C., E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  14. Above-the-loop-top Oscillation and Quasi-periodic Coronal Wave Generation in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Observations revealed that various kinds of oscillations are excited in solar flare regions. Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in flare emissions are commonly observed in a wide range of wavelengths. Recent observations have found that fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are quasi-periodically emitted from some flaring sites (quasi-periodic propagating fast-mode magnetoacoustic waves; QPFs). Both QPPs and QPFs imply a cyclic disturbance originating from the flaring sites. However, the physical mechanisms remain puzzling. By performing a set of two-dimensional MHD simulations of a solar flare, we discovered the local oscillation above the loops filled with evaporated plasma (above-the-loop-top region) and the generation of QPFs from such oscillating regions. Unlike all previous models for QPFs, our model includes essential physics for solar flares such as magnetic reconnection, heat conduction, and chromospheric evaporation. We revealed that QPFs can be spontaneously excited by the above-the-loop-top oscillation. We found that this oscillation is controlled by the backflow of the reconnection outflow. The new model revealed that flare loops and the above-the-loop-top region are full of shocks and waves, which is different from the previous expectations based on a standard flare model and previous simulations. In this paper, we show the QPF generation process based on our new picture of flare loops and will briefly discuss a possible relationship between QPFs and QPPs. Our findings will change the current view of solar flares to a new view in which they are a very dynamic phenomenon full of shocks and waves.

  15. Slipping reconnection in a solar flare observed in high resolution with the GREGOR solar telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Sobotka, M; Denker, C; Balthasar, H; Jurčák, J; Liu, W; Berkefeld, T; Vera, M Collados; Feller, A; Hofmann, A; Kneer, F; Kuckein, C; Lagg, A; Louis, R E; von der Lühe, O; Nicklas, H; Schlichenmaier, R; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, W; Sigwarth, M; Solanki, S K; Soltau, D; Staude, J; Strassmeier, K G; Volkmer, R; Waldmann, T

    2016-01-01

    A small flare ribbon above a sunspot umbra in active region 12205 was observed on November 7, 2014, at 12:00 UT in the blue imaging channel of the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope, using a 1 A Ca II H interference filter. Context observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard Hinode, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) show that this ribbon is part of a larger one that extends through the neighboring positive polarities and also participates in several other flares within the active region. We reconstructed a time series of 140 seconds of Ca II H images by means of the multiframe blind deconvolution method, which resulted in spatial and temporal resolutions of 0.1 arcsec and 1 s. Light curves and horizontal velocities of small-scale bright knots in the observed flare ribbon were measured. Some knots are stationary, but three move along the ribbon with speeds of 7-11 km/s. Two of them move in the opposite d...

  16. Evaluation of expected solar flare neutrino events in the IceCube observatory

    CERN Document Server

    de Wasseige, G; Hanson, K; van Eijndhoven, N; Klein, K -L

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of the eighties and in response to a reported increase in the total neutrino flux in the Homestake experiment in coincidence with a solar flare, solar neutrino detectors have searched for solar flare signals. Neutrinos from the decay of mesons, which are themselves produced in collisions of accelerated protons with the solar atmosphere, would provide a novel window on the underlying physics of the acceleration process. For our studies we focus on the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic kilometer neutrino detector located at the geographical South Pole. Due to its Supernova data acquisition system and its DeepCore component, dedicated to low energy neutrinos, IceCube may be sensitive to solar flare neutrinos and thus permit either a measurement of the signal or the establishment of more stringent upper limits on the solar flare neutrino flux. We present an approach for a time profile analysis based on a stacking method and an evaluation of a possible solar flare signal in IceCube using the Gean...

  17. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C

    2015-01-01

    SDO/EVE provide rich information of the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly of solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. Reading from the charts, we are able to easily recognize if there is a late phase following a main phase of a flare, and able to learn the begin, peak and end times of the flare as well as the drift of the temperature, i.e., the cooling rate, of the heated plasma during the flare. Through four M-class flares of different types, we illustrate which thermodynamic information can be revealed from the TDS charts. Further, we investigate the TDS charts of all the flares greater than M5.0, and some interesting results are achieved. First, there are two distinct drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperture, whereas for Type II flares, the drift is somewhat reversed, suggesting a more violent and durable heating during Type I...

  18. High-sensitivity observations of solar flare decimeter radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, A. O.; Messmer, P.; Monstein, C.

    2001-01-01

    A new acousto-optic radio spectrometer has observed the 1-2 GHz radio emission of solar flares with unprecedented sensitivity. The number of detected decimeter type III bursts is greatly enhanced compared to observations by conventional spectrometers observing only one frequency at the time. The observations indicate a large number of electron beams propagating in dense plasmas. For the first time, we report weak, reversed drifting type III bursts at frequencies above simultaneous narrowband decimeter spikes. The type III bursts are reliable signatures of electron beams propagating downward in the corona, apparently away from the source of the spikes. The observations contradict the most popular spike model that places the spike sources at the footpoints of loops. Conspicuous also was an apparent bidirectional type U burst forming a fish-like pattern. It occurs simultaneously with an intense U-burst at 600-370 MHz observed in Tremsdorf. We suggest that it intermodulated with strong terrestrial interference(cellular phones) causing a spurious symmetric pattern in the spectrogram at 1.4 GHz. Symmetric features in the 1-2 GHz range, some already reported in the literature, therefore must be considered with utmost caution.

  19. GAIA modeling of electrodynamics in the lower ionosphere during a severe solar flare event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, M.; Shiokawa, K.; Shinagawa, H.; Jin, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Miyoshi, Y.; Otsuka, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies indicated that the ionospheric F-region disturbances due to solar flare irradiance are controlled not only by photoionization but also by electrodynamical changes of the ionosphere [Liu et al., 2007; Qian et al., 2012]. The electric field changes during solar flare events occur mainly in the E-region due to the X-ray flux enhancement, and in the equatorial counter electrojet regions the eastward electric field turns into westward below 107-km altitude [Manju and Viswanathan, 2005]. The TIME-GCM model has been used to investigate the flare-related electrodynamics of the ionosphere [Qian et al., 2012]. However, the model did not consider the flare effects at altitudes below 97 km due to the ionospheric lower boundary of the model. On the other hand, the GAIA model [Jin et al., 2011] can simulate electron density variations and electrodynamics around and below 100 km because the model does not have the limitation of the lower boundary. We have improved the GAIA model to incorporate the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) [Chamberlin et al., 2007; 2008] to understand the global response of the whole ionosphere including E and D regions to the solar flares. We have performed a simulation for the X17 flare event of October 28, 2003, and have showed that soft X-ray considerably enhances conductivity even at an altitude of 80 km. We will report its effect on the ionospheric electric field and the equatorial electrojet currents.

  20. Solar flare induced D-region ionospheric perturbations evaluated from VLF measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Rajesh; Singh, R. P.

    2014-03-01

    The results of very low frequency (VLF) wave amplitude measurements carried out at the low latitude station Varanasi (geom. lat. 14∘55'N, long. 154∘E), India during solar flares are presented for the first time. The VLF waves (19.8 kHz) transmitted from the NWC-transmitter, Australia propagated in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to long distances and were recorded at Varanasi. Data are analyzed and the reflection height H' and the sharpness factor β are evaluated. It is found that the reflection height decreases whereas sharpness factor increases with the increase of solar flare power. The H' is found to be higher and β smaller at low latitudes than the corresponding values at mid and high latitudes. The sunspot numbers were low during the considered period 2011-2012, being the rising phase of solar cycle 24 and as a result cosmic rays may impact the D-region ionosphere. The increased ionization from the flare lowers the effective reflecting height, H', of the D-region roughly in proportion to the logarithm of the X-ray flare intensity from a typical mid-day unperturbed value of about 71-72 km down to about 65 km for an X class flare. The sharpness ( β) of the lower edge of the D-region is also significantly increased by the flare but reaches a clear saturation value of about 0.48 km-1 for flares of magnitude greater than about X1 class.

  1. On the non-Kolmogorov nature of flare-productive solar active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mandage, Revati S

    2016-01-01

    A magnetic power spectral analysis is performed on 53 solar active regions, observed from August 2011 to July 2012. Magnetic field data obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, inverted as Active Region Patches, are used to study the evolution of the magnetic power index as each region rotates across the solar disk. Active regions are classified based on the number, and sizes, of solar flares they produce, in order to study the relationship between flare productivity and the magnetic power index. The choice of window size and inertial range plays a key role in determining the correct magnetic power index. The overall distribution of magnetic power indices has a range of $1.0-2.5$. Flare-quiet regions peak at a value of 1.6, however flare-productive regions peak at a value of 2.2. Overall, the histogram of the distribution of power indices of flare-productive active regions is well separated from flare-quiet active regions. Only 12\\% of flare-quiet regions exhibit an index greater than 2, whereas 90...

  2. High Energetic Solar Proton Flares on 26 and 28 October 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hady, Ahmed; Shaltout, M. A.

    During the period from 19 October to 4 November 2003, there was a sudden and high Solar activity. During this period the sunspot area increased from 1110 10E-6 Hemisphere on 19 October to 5690 10E-6 Hemisphere on 30 October, then decreased to 1110 10 E-6 Hemisphere at 4 November 2003. Also, the radio flux of 10.7 cm increased from 120 sfu on 19 October to 298 sfu on 26 October, then decrease to 168 sfu on 4 November 2003. There were two eruptive solar proton flares released on 26 and 28 October 2003, where the last one is the most eruptive flare recorded since 1976 with importance X17/4B. The proton event affecting the Earth's environment, with energy ¿10 MeV is 29500 particle flux units, on 29 October 2003 as recorded by spacecraft SOHO, due to the solar flares of 28 October. The peak of the Solar cycle 21 was at 1979, but high energetic Solar flares, or secondary peaks, occurred at the declining phase in 1981, 1982, and 1984 before the solar activity minimum in 1986. Also, the peak of the solar cycle 22 was at 1989 but high energetic solar flares occurred at the declining phase in 1991, 1992, and 1994, before the solar activity minimum in 1996. Then the secondary peaks were occurred during 2 to 3 years after the first peak, as deduced from the last five solar cycles. The period of 19 Oct. to 4 Nov. 2003 is the second peak of the solar cycle 23, where the main peak of the solar cycle 23 was at 2001. There are many terrestrial influences, due to the solar activity during Oct.-Nov. 2003. These influences are studied in details, especially the geomagnetic storms and their effects on humankind daily activity.

  3. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phases are accompanied by a series of more than three successive peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50 - 100 keV energy channel with a four-second time cadence. Twenty-nine such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with characteristic time differences between successive peaks P ≈8 - 270 s are studied. The main observational result of the analysis is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent movements or displacements in the parent active regions from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two main groups depending on the character of the dynamics of the HXR sources. Group 1 consists of 16 flares (55 %) that show systematic dynamics of the HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has a simple extended trace on the photosphere. Group 2 consists of 13 flares (45 %) that show more chaotic displacements of the HXR sources with respect to an MPIL with a more complex structure, and sometimes several MPILs are present in the parent active regions of such flares. Based on the observations, we conclude that the mechanism of the flare HXR pulsations (at least with time differences of the considered range) is related to successive triggering of the flare energy release process in different magnetic loops (or bundles of loops) of the parent active regions. Group 1 flare regions consist of loops stacked into magnetic arcades that are extended along MPILs. Group 2 flare regions have more complex magnetic structures, and the loops are arranged more chaotically and randomly there. We also found that at least 14 (88 %) group 1 flares and 11 (85 %) group 2 flares are accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), i.e. the absolute majority of the

  4. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a systematic analysis of the spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phases are accompanied by a series of more than three successive peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50 - 100 keV energy channel with a four-second time cadence. Twenty-nine such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with characteristic time differences between successive peaks P ≈8 - 270 s are studied. The main observational result of the analysis is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent movements or displacements in the parent active regions from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two main groups depending on the character of the dynamics of the HXR sources. Group 1 consists of 16 flares ( 55~%) that show systematic dynamics of the HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has a simple extended trace on the photosphere. Group 2 consists of 13 flares ( 45~%) that show more chaotic displacements of the HXR sources with respect to an MPIL with a more complex structure, and sometimes several MPILs are present in the parent active regions of such flares. Based on the observations, we conclude that the mechanism of the flare HXR pulsations (at least with time differences of the considered range) is related to successive triggering of the flare energy release process in different magnetic loops (or bundles of loops) of the parent active regions. Group 1 flare regions consist of loops stacked into magnetic arcades that are extended along MPILs. Group 2 flare regions have more complex magnetic structures, and the loops are arranged more chaotically and randomly there. We also found that at least 14 ( 88~%) group 1 flares and 11 ( 85~%) group 2 flares are accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), i.e. the absolute majority of the

  5. Estimates of the neutron emission during large solar flares in the rising and maximum period of solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, D.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Sako, T.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.

    2016-03-01

    We searched for solar neutrons using the data collected by six detectors from the International Network of Solar Neutron Telescopes and one Neutron Monitor between January 2010 and December 2014. We considered the peak time of the X-ray intensity of thirty five ≥ X1.0 class flares detected by GOES satellite as the most probable production time of solar neutrons. We prepared a light-curve of the solar neutron telescopes and the neutron monitor for each flare, spanning ± 3 h from the peak time of GOES. Based on these light curves, we performed a statistical analysis for each flare. Setting a significance level at greater than 3σ, we report that no statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found. Therefore, upper limits are determined by the background level and solar angle of these thirty five solar flares. Our calculation assumed a power-law neutron energy spectrum and an impulsive emission profile at the Sun. The estimated upper limits of the neutron emission are consistent within the order of magnitude of the successful detections of solar neutrons made in solar cycle 23.

  6. A large-scale search for evidence of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, A R; Dennis, B R; Hayes, L A; Gallagher, P T

    2016-01-01

    The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares is poorly constrained, and critically the general prevalence of such signals in solar flares is unknown. Therefore, we perform a large-scale search for evidence of signals consistent with quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares, focusing on the 1 - 300s timescale. We analyse 675 M- and X-class flares observed by GOES in 1-8\\AA\\ soft X-rays between 2011 February 1 and 2015 December 31. Additionally, over the same era we analyse Fermi/GBM 15-25 keV X-ray data for each of these flares that was associated with a Fermi/GBM solar flare trigger, a total of 261 events. Using a model comparison method, we determine whether there is evidence for a substantial enhancement in the Fourier power spectrum that may be consistent with a QPP signature, based on three tested models; a power-law plus a constant, a broken power-law plus constant, and a power-law-plus-constant with an additional QPP signature component. From this, we determine that ~30% of GOES events and ~...

  7. Solar flare neon and solar cosmic ray fluxes in the past using gas-rich meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed earlier to deduce the composition of solar flare neon and to determine the solar cosmic ray proton fluxes in the past using etched lunar samples and at present, these techniques are extended to gas rich meteorites. By considering high temperature Ne data points for Pantar, Fayetteville and other gas rich meteorites and by applying the three component Ne-decomposition methods, the solar cosmic ray and galactic cosmic ray produced spallation Ne components from the trapped SF-Ne was resolved. Using appropiate SCR and GCR production rates, in the case of Pantar, for example, a GCR exposure age of 2 m.y. was estimated for Pantar-Dark while Pantar-Light yielded a GCR age of approx. 3 m.y. However the SCR exposure age of Pantar-Dark is two orders of magnitude higher than the average surface exposure ages of lunar soils. The possibility of higher proton fluxes in the past is discussed.

  8. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares I: Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Adam F; Daw, Adrian N; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from RHESSI. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from th...

  9. Quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares: an overview of recent results

    CERN Document Server

    Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Yuan, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (or QPPs) are periodic intensity variations in the flare emission, across all wavelength bands. In this paper, we review the observational and modelling achievements since the previous review on this topic by Nakariakov & Melnikov (2009). In recent years, it has become clear that QPPs are an inherent feature of solar flares, because almost all flares exhibit QPPs. Moreover, it is now firmly established that QPPs often show multiple periods. We also review possible mechanisms for generating QPPs. Up to now, it has not been possible to conclusively identify the triggering mechanism or cause of QPPs. The lack of this identification currently hampers possible seismological inferences of flare plasma parameters. QPPs in stellar flares have been detected for a long time, and the high quality data of the Kepler mission allows to study the QPP more systematically. However, it has not been conclusively shown whether the time scales of stellar QPPs are different or the same as those in sol...

  10. High-energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi Large Area Telescope Detections and Analysis of Two M-class Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, Q.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Murphy, R.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Fermi LAT Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy γ-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying γ-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by γ-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the γ-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of γ-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and γ-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  11. The Dependence of Solar Flare Limb Darkening on Emission Peak Formation Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Edward; Epp, Luke; Eparvier, Francis; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2017-08-01

    Solar limb effects are local brightening or darkening of an emission that depend on where in the Sun's atmosphere it forms. Near the solar limb, optically thick (thin) emissions will darken (brighten) as the column of absorbers (emitters) along the line-of-sight increases. Note that in limb brightening, emission sources are re-arranged whereas in limb darkening they are obscured. Thus, only limb darkening is expected to occur in disk integrated observations. Limb darkening also results in center-to-limb variations of disk-integrated solar flare spectra, with important consequences for how planetary atmospheres are affected by flares. Flares are typically characterized by their flux in the optically thin 0.1-0.8 nm band measured by the X-ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). On the other hand, Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) line emissions can limb darken because they are sensitive to resonant scattering, resulting in a flare's location on the solar disk controlling the amount of ionizing radiation that reaches a planet. For example, an X-class flare originating from disk center may significantly heat a planet's thermosphere, whereas the same flare originating near the limb may have no effect because much of the effective emissions are scattered in the solar corona.To advance the relatively poor understanding of flare limb darkening, we use over 300 M-class or larger flares observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to characterize limb darkening as a function of emission peak formation temperature, Tf. For hot coronal emissions (Tf>2 MK), these results show a linear relationship between the degree of limb darkening and Tf where lines with Tf=2 MK darken approximately 7 times more than lines with Tf=16 MK. Because the extent of limb darkening is dependent on the height of the source plasma, we use simple Beer-Lambert radiative transfer analysis to interpret these results

  12. EUV Irradiance Observations from SDO/EVE as a Diagnostic of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Milligan, Ryan O

    2016-01-01

    For the past six years, the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has been monitoring changes in the Sun's extreme ultraviolet output over a range of timescales. Its primary function is to provide measurements of the solar spectral irradiance that is responsible for driving fluctuations in Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. However, despite its modest spectral resolution and lack of spatial information, the EVE spectral range contains many lines and continua that have become invaluable for diagnosing the response of the lower solar atmosphere itself to an injection of energy, particularly during a flare's impulsive phase. In addition, high temperature emission lines can also be used to track changes in temperature and density of flaring plasma in the corona. The high precision of EVE observations are therefore crucial in helping us understand particle acceleration and energy transport mechanisms during solar flares, as well as the origins of the Sun's most geoeffective emis...

  13. Statistical Evidence for Contributions of Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections to Major Solar Energetic Particle Events

    CERN Document Server

    Trottet, G; Klein, K -L; de Wit, T Dudok; Miteva, R

    2014-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are related to flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This work is a new investigation of statistical relationships between SEP peak intensities - deka-MeV protons and near-relativistic electrons - and characteristic quantities of the associated solar activity. We consider the speed of the CME and quantities describing the flare-related energy release: peak flux and fluence of soft X-ray (SXR) emission, fluence of microwave emission. The sample comprises 38 SEP events associated with strong SXR bursts (classes M and X) in the western solar hemisphere between 1997 and 2006, and where the flare-related particle acceleration is accompanied by radio bursts indicating electron escape to the interplanetary space. The main distinction of the present statistical analysis from earlier work is that besides the classical Pearson correlation coefficient the partial correlation coefficients are calculated in order to disentangle the effects of correlations between the solar paramet...

  14. Fluctuation analysis of solar radio bursts associated with geoeffective X-class flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, T. B.; Rosa, R. R.; Bolzan, M. J. A.; Rocha Fernandes, F. C.; Sawant, H. S.; Karlicky`, M.

    2011-07-01

    High temporal resolution solar observations in the decimetric range (1-3 GHz) can provide additional information on solar active regions dynamics and thus contribute to better understanding of solar geoeffective events as flares and coronal mass ejections. The June 6, 2000 flares are a set of remarkable geoeffective eruptive phenomena observed as solar radio bursts (SRB) by means of the 3 GHz Ondrejov Observatory radiometer. We have selected and analyzed, applying detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), three decimetric bursts associated to X1.1, X1.2 and X2.3 flare-classes, respectively. The association with geomagnetic activity is also reported. DFA method is performed in the framework of a radio burst automatic monitoring system. Our results may characterize the SRB evolution, computing the DFA scaling exponent, scanning the SRB time series by a short windowing before the extreme event. For the first time, the importance of DFA in the context of SRB monitoring analysis is presented.

  15. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Data Products and the Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Jason T. L.; Wang, Haimin

    2017-07-01

    Adverse space-weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, the prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares that occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP-related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hr, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross-validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performance metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. To our knowledge, this is the first time that RF has been used to make multiclass predictions of solar flares. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near the polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  16. X-ray observations of the impulsive phase of solar flares with the Yohkoh satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew

    This thesis starts with an overview of the physics of the solar corona, concentrating on X-ray emission and the plasma dynamics associated with the impulsive or rise phase of solar flares. The Yohkoh satellite is described, with a section on each major instrument on board. Analysis techniques used in the thesis are then introduced, with a section of soft X-ray spectroscopy and on the application of the Maximum Entropy Method image reconstruction technique to data from the Hard X-ray Telescope on Yohkoh. The instrumental effect known as fixed pattern noise is described, leading to a numerical model of the BCS digitisation process, which is used both to understand the limits of the detector, and to correct the data in a limited way. Alternative methods for the avoidance of fixed pattern noise are evaluated. The analysis of a solar flare with unusually large soft X-ray blue shifts is then performed. Physical parameters of the plasma during the initial stages of the flare are derived, which are used in an energy balance calculation. Agreement is found between the energy in nonthermal electrons and that contained in the coronal plasma, supporting the nonthermal beam driven chromospheric evaporation theory of impulsive flares. The location of superhot plasma in two impulsive flares and one hot thermal flare is then investigated. Superhot plasma is found to be located close to the chromosphere, and related to the nonthermal burst in the two impulsive flares. Superhot plasma in the hot thermal flare is distributed uniformly throughout the loop. The differences are explained as being due to the different energy transport processes active in each type of flare.

  17. Solar Flare Prediction Model with Three Machine-Learning Algorithms Using Ultraviolet Brightening and Vector Magnetogram

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizuka, N; Kubo, Y; Den, M; Watari, S; Ishii, M

    2016-01-01

    We developed a flare prediction model using machine learning, which is optimized to predict the maximum class of flares occurring in the following 24 h. Machine learning is used to devise algorithms that can learn from and make decisions on a huge amount of data. We used solar observation data during the period 2010-2015, such as vector magnetogram, ultraviolet (UV) emission, and soft X-ray emission taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. We detected active regions from the full-disk magnetogram, from which 60 features were extracted with their time differentials, including magnetic neutral lines, the current helicity, the UV brightening, and the flare history. After standardizing the feature database, we fully shuffled and randomly separated it into two for training and testing. To investigate which algorithm is best for flare prediction, we compared three machine learning algorithms: the support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbors (k-NN), and ...

  18. Statistical study of free magnetic energy and flare productivity of solar active regions

    CERN Document Server

    Su, J T; Wang, S; Wiegelmann, T; Wang, H M

    2014-01-01

    Photospheric vector magnetograms from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory are utilized as the boundary conditions to extrapolate both non-linear force-free and potential magnetic fields in solar corona. Based on the extrapolations, we are able to determine the free magnetic energy (FME) stored in active regions (ARs). Over 3000 vector magnetograms in 61 ARs were analyzed. We compare FME with ARs' flare index (FI) and find that there is a weak correlation ($<60\\%$) between FME and FI. FME shows slightly improved flare predictability relative to total unsigned magnetic flux of ARs in the following two aspects: (1) the flare productivity predicted by FME is higher than that predicted by magnetic flux and (2) the correlation between FI and FME is higher than that between FI and magnetic flux. However, this improvement is not significant enough to make a substantial difference in time-accumulated FI, rather than individual flare, predictions.

  19. Solar modulation of cosmic ray intensity and solar flare events inferred from (14)C contents in dated tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, C. Y.; Chen, T. M.; Yun, S. X.; Dai, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    The delta 14C values in 42 rings of a white spruce grown in Mackenzie Delta was measured as a continuing effort of tracing the history of solar modulation of cosmic ray intensity. The delta 14C values in six rings were measured, in search of a 14C increase due to two large solar flares that occurred in 1942. The results are presented.

  20. Verification of operational solar flare forecast: Case of Regional Warning Center Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yûki; Den, Mitsue; Ishii, Mamoru

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we discuss a verification study of an operational solar flare forecast in the Regional Warning Center (RWC) Japan. The RWC Japan has been issuing four-categorical deterministic solar flare forecasts for a long time. In this forecast verification study, we used solar flare forecast data accumulated over 16 years (from 2000 to 2015). We compiled the forecast data together with solar flare data obtained with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). Using the compiled data sets, we estimated some conventional scalar verification measures with 95% confidence intervals. We also estimated a multi-categorical scalar verification measure. These scalar verification measures were compared with those obtained by the persistence method and recurrence method. As solar activity varied during the 16 years, we also applied verification analyses to four subsets of forecast-observation pair data with different solar activity levels. We cannot conclude definitely that there are significant performance differences between the forecasts of RWC Japan and the persistence method, although a slightly significant difference is found for some event definitions. We propose to use a scalar verification measure to assess the judgment skill of the operational solar flare forecast. Finally, we propose a verification strategy for deterministic operational solar flare forecasting. For dichotomous forecast, a set of proposed verification measures is a frequency bias for bias, proportion correct and critical success index for accuracy, probability of detection for discrimination, false alarm ratio for reliability, Peirce skill score for forecast skill, and symmetric extremal dependence index for association. For multi-categorical forecast, we propose a set of verification measures as marginal distributions of forecast and observation for bias, proportion correct for accuracy, correlation coefficient and joint probability distribution for association, the

  1. Implosion of coronal loops during the impulsive phase of a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Simões, P J A; Hudson, H S; Russell, A J B

    2013-01-01

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare ...

  2. Confined Flares in Solar Active Region 12192 from 2014 October 18 to 29

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Huadong; Ma, Suli; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Leping; Huang, Xin; Xiao, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we investigate six X-class and twenty-nine M-class flares occurring in solar active region (AR) 12192 from October 18 to 29. Among them, thirty (including six X- and twenty-four M-class) flares originated from the AR core and the other five M-flares appeared at the AR periphery. Four of the X-flares exhibited similar flaring structures, indicating they were homologous flares with analogous triggering mechanism. The possible scenario is: photospheric motions of emerged magnetic fluxes lead to shearing of the associated coronal magnetic field, which then yields a tether-cutting favorable configuration. Among the five periphery M-flares, four were associated with jet activities. The HMI vertical magnetic field data show that the photospheric fluxes of opposite magnetic polarities emerged, converged and canceled with each other at the footpoints of the jets bef...

  3. High-resolution observations of flare precursors in the low solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Ahn, Kwangsu; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Deng, Na; Huang, Nengyi; Liu, Rui; Kusano, Kanya; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.; Cao, Wenda

    2017-03-01

    Solar flares are generally believed to be powered by free magnetic energy stored in the corona1, but the build up of coronal energy alone may be insufficient to trigger the flare to occur2. The flare onset mechanism is a critical but poorly understood problem, insights into which could be gained from small-scale energy releases known as precursors. These precursors are observed as small pre-flare brightenings in various wavelengths3-13 and also from certain small-scale magnetic configurations such as opposite-polarity fluxes14-16, where the magnetic orientation of small bipoles is opposite to that of the ambient main polarities. However, high-resolution observations of flare precursors together with the associated photospheric magnetic field dynamics are lacking. Here we study precursors of a flare using the unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution of the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope, complemented by new microwave data. Two episodes of precursor brightenings are initiated at a small-scale magnetic channel17-20 (a form of opposite-polarity flux) with multiple polarity inversions and enhanced magnetic fluxes and currents, lying near the footpoints of sheared magnetic loops. Microwave spectra corroborate that these precursor emissions originate in the atmosphere. These results provide evidence of low-atmospheric small-scale energy release, possibly linked to the onset of the main flare.

  4. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of white-light flare kernels in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kawate, Tomoko; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Asai, Ayumi; Morita, Satoshi; Masuda, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    On 2011 September 6, we observed an X2.1-class flare in continuum and H$\\alpha$ with a frame rate of about 30~Hz. After processing images of the event by using a speckle-masking image reconstruction, we identified white-light (WL) flare ribbons on opposite sides of the magnetic neutral line. We derive the lightcurve decay times of the WL flare kernels at each resolution element by assuming that the kernels consist of one or two components that decay exponentially, starting from the peak time. As a result, 42% of the pixels have two decay-time components with average decay times of 15.6 and 587 s, whereas the average decay time is 254 s for WL kernels with only one decay-time component. The peak intensities of the shorter decay-time component exhibit good spatial correlation with the WL intensity, whereas the peak intensities of the long decay-time components tend to be larger in the early phase of the flare at the inner part of the flare ribbons, close to the magnetic neutral line. The average intensity of th...

  5. A Quantitative Analysis of Solar Flare Characteristics as Observed in the Solar Observing Optical Network and the Global Oscillation Network Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    suppress the underlying convection. 4 During a solar flare, the plasma is heated to tens of millions of degrees and elementary particles are...seen in the Sun on September 1, 1859, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 20, 13-15. Foukal, P. V. (2004). Solar Astrophysics . Wiley...Flares, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Temmer, M, et al. (2001). Statistical Analysis of SolarFlares, Astronomy and Astrophysics , 375

  6. High spatial resolution observations of solar flares at 3.3 mm wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M. R.; White, S. M.; Welch, W. J.; Bieging, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    The first high-spatial-resolution interferometric observations of solar flares at millimeter wavelengths are presented. They are of high sensitivity, and events ranging from subflares to X-class flares were detected. One to three baselines with fringe spacings of 2 to 5 arcsec were available, which demonstrated that generally source sizes were in excess of 2 arcsec, but in some events the sources may be about 1 arcsec.

  7. Prediction of Solar Flares Using Unique Signatures of Magnetic Field Images

    CERN Document Server

    Raboonik, Abbas; Alipour, Nasibe; Wheatland, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of solar flares is an important task in solar physics. The occurrence of solar flares is highly dependent on the structure and the topology of solar magnetic fields. A new method for predicting large (M and X class) flares is presented, which uses machine learning methods applied to the Zernike moments of magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) for a period of six years from 2 June 2010 to 1 August 2016. Magnetic field images consisting of the radial component of the magnetic field are converted to finite sets of Zernike moments and fed to the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Zernike moments have the capability to elicit unique features from any 2-D image, which may allow more accurate classification. The results indicate whether an arbitrary active region has the potential to produce at least one large flare. We show that the majority of large flares can be predicted within 48 hours before their occurrence, with only ...

  8. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  9. Spectral response of the solar atmosphere to an X-class flare event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacatus, Daniela Adriana; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The only X-class flare of 2015 observed by IRIS occurred at 16:22 UT on 11 March 2015, in AR 12297. This flare generated significant seismic transients in the photosphere at the eastern location of the flare. IRIS observations of the chromosphere and transition region help us understand the physics of the sunquake. In this work we will analyse this event using data from IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. The IRIS rasters scanned the area between the main footpoints of the solar flare, and a wealth of chromospheric information has been inferred about the dynamics of the event. The main X-ray emission dominates the eastern flare footpoint, being missed by the IRIS slit. Significant enhancements in the chromospheric and TR lines intensities were identified. The forbidden line of Fe XXI 1354.1 Å is detected after the flare peak revealing the coronal responses to the flare. Plasma downflows of up to 300 km/s were identified in the majority of the observed lines, consistent with magnetic field local reconfiguration. We have also analysed an erupting filament developing at an earlier time, which moved rapidly towards the eastern part of the active region. We discuss the possibility that this filament might have pre-conditioned the chromosphere for the flare process.

  10. Stereoscopic Observation of Slipping Reconnection in A Double Candle-Flame-Shaped Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Gou, Tingyu; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai; Zhuang, Bin; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Jiajia

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 January 28 M1.4 flare exhibits two side-by-side candle-flame-shaped flare loop systems underneath a larger cusp-shaped structure during the decay phase, as observed at the northwestern solar limb by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The northern loop system brightens following the initiation of the flare within the southern loop system, but all three cusp-shaped structures are characterized by ~ 10 MK temperatures, hotter than the arch-shaped loops underneath. The "Ahead" satellite of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) provides a top view, in which the post-flare loops brighten sequentially, with one end fixed while the other apparently slipping eastward. By performing stereoscopic reconstruction of the post-flare loops in EUV and mapping out magnetic connectivities, we found that the footpoints of the post-flare loops are slipping along the footprint of a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT) separating the two loop systems, and that the reconstructed loops share similarity with the magne...

  11. A very small and super strong zebra pattern burst at the beginning of a solar flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Baolin; Tan, Chengming; Zhang, Yin; Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian, E-mail: bltan@nao.cas.cn [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Ondřejov 15165 (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-01

    Microwave emission with spectral zebra pattern structures (ZPs) is frequently observed in solar flares and the Crab pulsar. The previous observations show that ZP is a structure only overlapped on the underlying broadband continuum with slight increments and decrements. This work reports an unusually strong ZP burst occurring at the beginning of a solar flare observed simultaneously by two radio telescopes located in China and the Czech Republic and by the EUV telescope on board NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2013 April 11. It is a very short and super strong explosion whose intensity exceeds several times that of the underlying flaring broadband continuum emission, lasting for just 18 s. EUV images show that the flare starts from several small flare bursting points (FBPs). There is a sudden EUV flash with extra enhancement in one of these FBPs during the ZP burst. Analysis indicates that the ZP burst accompanying an EUV flash is an unusual explosion revealing a strong coherent process with rapid particle acceleration, violent energy release, and fast plasma heating simultaneously in a small region with a short duration just at the beginning of the flare.

  12. Solar X-ray Flare Hazards on the Surface of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, D S; Smith, David S.; Scalo, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Putative organisms on the Martian surface would be exposed to potentially high doses of ionizing radiation during strong solar X-ray flares. We extrapolate the observed flare frequency-energy release scaling relation to releases much larger than seen so far for the sun, an assumption supported by observations of flares on other solar- and subsolar-mass main sequence stars. We calculate the surficial reprocessed X-ray spectra using a Monte Carlo code we have developed. Biological doses from indirect genome damage are calculated for each parameterized flare spectrum by integration over the X-ray opacity of water. We estimate the mean waiting time for solar flares producing a given biological dose of ionizing radiation on Mars and compare with lethal dose data for a wide range of terrestrial organisms. These timescales range from decades for significant human health risk to 0.5 Myr for D. radiodurans lethality. Such doses require total flare energies of 10^33--10^38 erg, the lower range of which has been observe...

  13. The energetic relationship among geoeffective solar flares,associated CMEs and SEPs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nipa J Bhatt; Rajmal Jain; Arun Kumar Awasthi

    2013-01-01

    Major solar eruptions (flares,coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs)) strongly influence geospace and space weather.Currently,the mechanism of their influence on space weather is not well understood and requires a detailed study of the energetic relationship among these eruptive phenomena.From this perspective,we investigate 30 flares (observed by RHESSI),followed by weak to strong geomagnetic storms.Spectral analysis of these flares suggests a new power-law relationship (r ~ 0.79) between the hard X-ray (HXR) spectral index (before flarepeak) and linear speed of the associated CME observed by LASCO/SOHO.For 12 flares which were followed by SEP enhancement near Earth,HXR and SEP spectral analysis reveals a new scaling law (r ~ 0.9) between the hardest X-ray flare spectrum and the hardest SEP spectrum.Furthermore,a strong correlation is obtained between the linear speed of the CME and the hardest spectrum of the corresponding SEP event (r ~ 0.96).We propose that the potentially geoeffective flare and associated CME and SEP are well-connected through a possible feedback mechanism,and should be regarded within the framework of a solar eruption.Owing to their space weather effects,these new results will help improve our current understanding of the Sun-Earth relationship,which is a major goal of research programs in heliophysics.

  14. Prediction and warning system of SEP events and solar flares for risk estimation in space launch operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rigo, Alberto; Núñez, Marlon; Qahwaji, Rami; Ashamari, Omar; Jiggens, Piers; Pérez, Gustau; Hernández-Pajares, Manuel; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-07-01

    A web-based prototype system for predicting solar energetic particle (SEP) events and solar flares for use by space launch operators is presented. The system has been developed as a result of the European Space Agency (ESA) project SEPsFLAREs (Solar Events Prediction system For space LAunch Risk Estimation). The system consists of several modules covering the prediction of solar flares and early SEP Warnings (labeled Warning tool), the prediction of SEP event occurrence and onset, and the prediction of SEP event peak and duration. In addition, the system acquires data for solar flare nowcasting from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-based techniques (GNSS Solar Flare Detector, GSFLAD and the Sunlit Ionosphere Sudden Total Electron Content Enhancement Detector, SISTED) as additional independent products that may also prove useful for space launch operators.

  15. Hinode magnetic-field observations of solar flares for exploring the energy storage and trigger mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawabata, Yusuke

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares abruptly release the free energy stored as a non-potential magnetic field in the corona and may be accompanied by eruptions of the coronal plasma. Magnetic reconnection is considered as a physical process in which the magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, thermal energy, and particle acceleration, but the location of magnetic reconnection is difficult to identify directly because of low emission measure at the reconnection region. We are still lack of observational knowledge on the 3D magnetic configuration and physical conditions for leading to flare trigger. Accurate measurements of vector magnetic fields at the solar photosphere, provided by the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode, help us in exploring how the free energy is stored in the solar atmosphere and how the release of the energy is triggered. This presentation will review the magnetic field configuration and possible candidates for flare trigger primarily based on Hinode observations of some large flare events, which may include X5.4/X1.3 flares on 7 March 2012, X1.2 flare on 7 January 2014 and two M-class flares on 2 February 2014. The 7 March 2012 events were observed in an active region with delta-type sunspots, showing a strong shear in the entire magnetic system. For the sheared magnetic structure, the inclusion of a small-scale trigger field was identified near the polarity inversion line with excitation of a high-speed material flow in the horizontally oriented magnetic field formed nearly in parallel to the polarity inversion line. The observations suggest that gas dynamics at the solar surface play a vital role of leading to the onset of flares. The 7 January 2014 event is an exceptional event which most scientists would not be able to predict its occurrence. The flare unexpectedly happened apart from the sheared magnetic field region. The M-class flares on 2 February 2014 were observed in the magnetic field configuration, in which four magnetic domains were

  16. Predicting Solar Flares Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Data Product and Random Forest Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Wang, Jason; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    Adverse space weather effects can often be traced to solar flares, prediction of which has drawn significant research interests. Many previous forecasting studies used physical parameters derived from photospheric line-of-sight field or ground-based vector field observations. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory produces full-disk vector magnetograms with continuous high-cadence, while flare prediction efforts utilizing this unprecedented data source are still limited. Here we report results of flare prediction using physical parameters provided by the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP) and related data products. We survey X-ray flares occurred from 2010 May to 2016 December, and categorize their source regions into four classes (B, C, M, and X) according to the maximum GOES magnitude of flares they generated. We then retrieve SHARP related parameters for each selected region at the beginning of its flare date to build a database. Finally, we train a machine-learning algorithm, called random forest (RF), to predict the occurrence of a certain class of flares in a given active region within 24 hours, evaluate the classifier performance using the 10-fold cross validation scheme, and characterize the results using standard performace metrics. Compared to previous works, our experiments indicate that using the HMI parameters and RF is a valid method for flare forecasting with fairly reasonable prediction performance. We also find that the total unsigned quantities of vertical current, current helicity, and flux near polarity inversion line are among the most important parameters for classifying flaring regions into different classes.

  17. Statistical characterization of Strong and Mid Solar Flares and Sun EUV rate monitoring with GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte-Moreno, Enric; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto; Beniguel, Yannick; Orus-Perez, Raul; Prieto-Cerdeira, Roberto; Schlueter, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The global network of permanent Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers has become an useful and affordable way of monitoring the Solar EUV flux rate, especially -for the time being- in the context of Major and Mid geoeffective intensity Solar Flares (M. Hernandez-Pajares et al., Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2012SW000826, 2012). In fact the maturity of this technique (GNSS Solar FLAre Indicator, GSFLAI) has allowed to incorporate it in operational real-time (RT) conditions, thanks to the availability of global GNSS datastreams from the RT International GNSS Network (M. Caissy et al, GPS World, June 1, 2012), and performed in the context of the MONITOR and MONITOR2 ESA-funded projects (Y. Beniguel et al., NAVITEC Proc., 978-1-4673-2011-5 IEEE, 2012). The main goal of this presentation is to summarize a detailed recent study of the statistical properties of Solar Flares (E. Monte and M. Hernandez-Pajares, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2014JA020206, 2014) by considering the GNSS proxy of EUV rate (GSFLAI parameter) computed independently each 30 seconds during the whole last solar cycle. An statistical model has been characterized that explains the empirical results such as (a) the persistence and presence of bursts of solar flares and (b) their long tail peak values of the solar flux variation, which can be characterized by: (1) A fractional Brownian model for the long-term dependence, and (2), a power law distribution for the time series extreme values. Finally, an update of the Solar Flares' occurrence during the recent months of Solar Activity, gathered in RT within MONITOR2 project, will close the paper.

  18. Table-top solar flares produced with laser driven magnetic reconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong J.Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The American Nuclear Society (ANS has presented the prestigious Edward Teller award to Dr. Bruce A. Remington during the 2011 IFSA conference due to his “pioneering scientific work in the fields of inertial confinement fusion (ICF, and especially developing an international effort in high energy density laboratory astrophysics” [1,2]. This is a great acknowledgement to the subject of high energy density laboratory astrophysics. In this context, we report here one experiment conducted to model solar flares in the laboratory with intense lasers [3]. The mega-gauss –scale magnetic fields produced by laser produced plasmas can be used to make magnetic reconnection topology. We have produced one table-top solar flare in our laboratory experiment with the same geometric setup as associated with solar flares.

  19. Observation of a reversal of rotation in a sunspot during a solar flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yi; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Hong, Junchao; Li, Haidong; Yang, Bo; Xu, Zhe

    2016-12-13

    The abrupt motion of the photospheric flux during a solar flare is thought to be a back reaction caused by the coronal field reconfiguration. However, the type of motion pattern and the physical mechanism responsible for the back reaction has been uncertain. Here we show that the direction of a sunspot's rotation is reversed during an X1.6 flare using observations from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. A magnetic field extrapolation model shows that the corresponding coronal magnetic field shrinks with increasing magnetic twist density. This suggests that the abrupt reversal of rotation in the sunspot may be driven by a Lorentz torque that is produced by the gradient of twist density from the solar corona to the solar interior. These results support the view that the abrupt reversal in the rotation of the sunspot is a dynamic process responding to shrinkage of the coronal magnetic field during the flare.

  20. Magnetic Nonpotentiality in Photospheric Active Regions as a Predictor of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xiao; Zhang, HongQi; Mao, XinJie

    2013-01-01

    Based on several magnetic nonpotentiality parameters obtained from the vector photospheric active region magnetograms obtained with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station over two solar cycles, a machine learning model has been constructed to predict the occurrence of flares in the corresponding active region within a certain time window. The Support Vector Classifier, a widely used general classifier, is applied to build and test the prediction models. Several classical verification measures are adopted to assess the quality of the predictions. We investigate different flare levels within various time windows, and thus it is possible to estimate the rough classes and erupting times of flares for particular active regions. Several combinations of predictors have been tested in the experiments. The True Skill Statistics are higher than 0.36 in 97% of cases and the Heidke Skill Scores range from 0.23 to 0.48. The predictors derived from longitudinal magnetic fields do perform ...

  1. Measurements and Modeling of Total Solar Irradiance in X-Class Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Christopher Samuel; Hock, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) can detect changes in the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-Class solar ares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar ares presented in Woods et al. (2006), as well as an additional are measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five ares are then compared to the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-Class ares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar ares analyzed in the Emslie et al. (2012) study.

  2. Very Long-period Pulsations before the Onset of Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Baolin; Yu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Zhang, Yin

    2016-12-01

    Solar flares are the most powerful explosions occurring in the solar system, which may lead to disastrous space weather events and impact various aspects of our Earth. It remains a big challenge in modern astrophysics to understand the origin of solar flares and predict their onset. Based on the analysis of soft X-ray emission observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, this work reports a new discovery of very long-periodic pulsations occurring in the preflare phase before the onset of solar flares (preflare-VLPs). These pulsations typically have periods of 8-30 min and last for about 1-2 hr. They are possibly generated from LRC oscillations of plasma loops where electric current dominates the physical process during magnetic energy accumulation in the source region. Preflare-VLPs provide essential information for understanding the triggering mechanism and origin of solar flares, and may be a convenient precursory indicator to help us respond to solar explosions and the corresponding disastrous space weather events.

  3. Very Long-period Pulsations before the Onset of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Zhang, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares are the most powerful explosions occurring in the solar system, which may lead to disastrous space weather events and impact various aspects of our Earth. So far, it is still a big challenge in modern astrophysics to understand the origin of solar flares and predict their onset. Based on the analysis of soft X-ray emission observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), this work reported a new discovery of very long-periodic pulsations occurred in the preflare phase before the onset of solar flares (preflare-VLPs). These pulsations are typically with period of 8 - 30 min and last for about 1 - 2 hours. They are possibly generated from LRC oscillations of plasma loops where electric current dominates the physical process during magnetic energy accumulation in the source region. The preflare-VLP provides an essential information for understanding the triggering mechanism and origin of solar flares, and may help us to response to solar explosions and the corresponding disa...

  4. Velocity and Magnetic Transients Driven by the X2.2 White-Light Flare of 2011 February 15 in NOAA 11158

    CERN Document Server

    Maurya, R A; Ambastha, A

    2011-01-01

    The first X-class flare (X2.2) of the current solar cycle 24 occurred in Active Region (AR) NOAA 11158 during its central meridian passage on 2011 February 15. This two ribbon white-light flare was well observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board Solar Dynamics Observatory. From the HMI high resolution observations, we detected magnetic and Doppler velocity transients appearing near the umbral boundary of the main sunspot during the peak phase of the flare. These transients were spatially and temporally associated with the white-light flare ribbons. Also, magnetic polarity went through sign reversal at the location of transients. On the other hand, Doppler velocity did not show such a reversal at the transient's location, while large magnitude enhancement occurred there. We attempt to explain the cause and observational characteristics of these transients on the basis of present theoretical models.

  5. On the State of a Solar Active Region Before Flares and CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsós, M. B.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-06-01

    Several attempts have been made to find reliable diagnostic tools to determine the state prior to flares and related coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in solar active regions (ARs). Characterization of the level of mixed states is carried out using the Debrecen sunspot Data for 116 flaring ARs. Conditional flare probabilities (CFPs) are calculated for different flaring classes. The association with slow/fast CMEs is examined. Two precursor parameters are introduced: (i) the sum of the (daily averaged) horizontal magnetic gradient G S (G DS ) and (ii) the separation parameter {S}l-f. We found that if {S}l-f≤slant 1 for a flaring AR then the CFP of the expected highest-intensity flare being X-class is more than 70%. If 1≤slant {S}l-f≤slant 3 the CFP is more than 45% for the highest-intensity flare(s) to be M-class, and if 3≤slant {S}l-f≤slant 13 there is larger than 60% CFP that C-class flare(s) may have the strongest intensity within 48 hr. Next, from analyzing G S for determining CFP we found: if 5.5≤slant {log}({G}S) ≤slant 6.5, then it is very likely that C-class flare(s) may be the most intense; if 6.5≤slant {log}({G}S)≤slant 7.5 then there is ˜45% CFP that M-class could have the highest intensity; finally, if 7.5≤slant {log}({G}S) then there is at least 70% chance that the strongest energy release will be X-class in the next 48 hr. ARs are unlikely to produce X-class flare(s) if 13≤slant {S}l-f and log(G S ) ≤slant 5.5. Finally, in terms of providing an estimate of an associated slow/fast CME, we found that, if {log}({S}l-f) ≥slant 0.4 or {log}({G}{DS}) ≤slant 6.5, there is no accompanying fast CME in the following 24 hr.

  6. Toward an Efficient Prediction of Solar Flares: Which Parameters, and How?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolis K. Georgoulis

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Solar flare prediction has become a forefront topic in contemporary solar physics, with numerous published methods relying on numerous predictive parameters, that can even be divided into parameter classes. Attempting further insight, we focus on two popular classes of flare-predictive parameters, namely multiscale (i.e., fractal and multifractal and proxy (i.e., morphological parameters, and we complement our analysis with a study of the predictive capability of fundamental physical parameters (i.e., magnetic free energy and relative magnetic helicity. Rather than applying the studied parameters to a comprehensive statistical sample of flaring and non-flaring active regions, that was the subject of our previous studies, the novelty of this work is their application to an exceptionally long and high-cadence time series of the intensely eruptive National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA active region (AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Aiming for a detailed study of the temporal evolution of each parameter, we seek distinctive patterns that could be associated with the four largest flares in the AR in the course of its five-day observing interval. We find that proxy parameters only tend to show preflare impulses that are practical enough to warrant subsequent investigation with sufficient statistics. Combining these findings with previous results, we conclude that: (i carefully constructed, physically intuitive proxy parameters may be our best asset toward an efficient future flare-forecasting; and (ii the time series of promising parameters may be as important as their instantaneous values. Value-based prediction is the only approach followed so far. Our results call for novel signal and/or image processing techniques to efficiently utilize combined amplitude and temporal-profile information to optimize the inferred solar-flare probabilities.

  7. Comparison of Damped Oscillations in Solar and Stellar X-Ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, I.-H.; Cho, K.-S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Kim, S.; Kumar, P.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the similarity and difference of the quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) observed in the decay phase of solar and stellar flares at X-rays. We identified 42 solar flares with pronounced QPPs, observed with RHESSI, and 36 stellar flares with QPPs, observed with XMM-Newton. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method and least-squares fit by a damped sine function were applied to obtain the periods (P) and damping times (τ) of the QPPs. We found that (1) the periods and damping times of the stellar QPPs are 16.21 ± 15.86 minutes and 27.21 ± 28.73 minutes, while those of the solar QPPs are 0.90 ± 0.56 and 1.53 ± 1.10 minutes, respectively; (2) the ratios of the damping times to the periods (τ /P) observed in the stellar QPPs (1.69 ± 0.56) are statistically identical to those of solar QPPs (1.74 ± 0.77) and (3) the scalings of the QPP damping time with the period are well described by the power law in both solar and stellar cases. The power indices of the solar and stellar QPPs are 0.96 ± 0.10 and 0.98+/- 0.05, respectively. This scaling is consistent with the scalings found for standing slow magnetoacoustic and kink modes in solar coronal loops. Thus, we propose that the underlying mechanism responsible for the stellar QPPs is the natural magnetohydrodynamic oscillation in the flaring or adjacent coronal loops, as in the case of solar flares.

  8. Universality in solar flare, magnetic storm and earthquake dynamics using Tsallis statistical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Mandea, Mioara; Eftaxias, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The universal character of the dynamics of various extreme phenomena is an outstanding scientific challenge. We show that X-ray flux and D time series during powerful solar flares and intense magnetic storms, respectively, obey a nonextensive energy distribution function for earthquake dynamics with similar values for the Tsallis entropic index q. Thus, evidence for universality in solar flares, magnetic storms and earthquakes arise naturally in the framework of Tsallis statistical mechanics. The observed similarity suggests a common approach to the interpretation of these diverse phenomena in terms of driving physical mechanisms that have the same character.

  9. Synchronized Periodicities of Cosmic Rays, Solar Flares and Ground Level Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Herrera, Victor Manuel; Perez-Peraza, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    The behaviour changes in galactic cosmic rays before the occurrence of a ground level enhancement may be used as a predictor of ground level enhancements occurrence. In order to go deep into the determination of which is the agent for such connections we study in this work the common periodicities among them and the source of ground level enhancements, namely solar flares. To find the relationships among different indexes in time-frequency space, we use wavelet coherence analysis. Also we used the probability density function in galactic cosmic rays and solar flare, which allowed the finding of a binomial asymmetric distribution and a Beta distribution respectively.

  10. Using the Maximum X-ray Flux Ratio and X-ray Background to Predict Solar Flare Class

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of a relationship between the maximum ratio of the flare flux (namely, 0.5-4 Ang to the 1-8 Ang flux) and non-flare background (namely, the 1-8 Ang background flux), which clearly separates flares into classes by peak flux level. We established this relationship based on an analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray observations of ~ 50,000 X, M, C, and B flares derived from the NOAA/SWPC flares catalog. Employing a combination of machine learning techniques (K-nearest neighbors and nearest-centroid algorithms) we show a separation of the observed parameters for the different peak flaring energies. This analysis is validated by successfully predicting the flare classes for 100% of the X-class flares, 76% of the M-class flares, 80% of the C-class flares and 81% of the B-class flares for solar cycle 24, based on the training of the parametric extracts for solar flares in cycles 22-23.

  11. EvryFlare: Flare rates and intensities for every 10 < g' < 15 solar-type and red dwarf star in the Southern sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ward; Fors, Octavi; Ratzloff, Jeff; Corbett, Hank; del Ser, Daniel; Law, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Habitable-zone rocky planets orbit nearly all stars; however, stellar flares make detecting these planets and discovering their actual habitability challenging. Although Kepler measured flare rates for various spectral-types around distant stars, the flare rates and intensities of nearby stars available to planet searches and follow-up remain poorly characterized. High-cadence, long-timescale photometry of such stars will provide the intensity and frequency of flares incident upon nearby HZ planets. At the same time, optical counterparts to CME-exoplanet-magnetosphere searches in the radio, and potentially-reduced flare interference for radial-velocity planet searches are obtained. The EvryFlare project employs the CTIO-based Evryscope, a combination of twenty-four telescopes, together giving instantaneous sky coverage of 8000 square degrees. Solar-type and red dwarf stars are selected by color and searched with an automated flare detector. We are currently sensitive to flares down to about 10 milli-magnitudes at g' 12 and about 0.2 of a magnitude at g' 15. With 2-minute cadence and a projected 5-year timeline with 1.5 years already recorded, we are precisely characterizing the flare rates and intensities of bright, nearby stars. With this information, we provide insight into the frequency and relative insolation incident upon HZ planets discovered orbiting nearby stars, as well as provide optical counterparts for radio planetary magnetosphere searches.

  12. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  13. MAGNETIC-ISLAND CONTRACTION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SIMULATED ERUPTIVE SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidoni, S. E. [The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lynch, B. J., E-mail: silvina.e.guidoni@nasa.gov [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  14. Radiative hydrodynamic modelling and observations of the X-class solar flare on 2011 March 9

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Michael B; Allred, Joel C; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the response of the solar atmosphere to non-thermal electron beam heating using the radiative transfer and hydrodynamics modelling code RADYN. The temporal evolution of the parameters that describe the non-thermal electron energy distribution were derived from hard X-ray observations of a particular flare, and we compared the modelled and observed parameters. The evolution of the non-thermal electron beam parameters during the X1.5 solar flare on 2011 March 9 were obtained from analysis of RHESSI X-ray spectra. The RADYN flare model was allowed to evolve for 110 seconds, after which the electron beam heating was ended, and was then allowed to continue evolving for a further 300s. The modelled flare parameters were compared to the observed parameters determined from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy. The model produced a hotter and denser flare loop than that observed and also cooled more rapidly, suggesting that additional energy input in the decay phase of the flare is required. In the explosi...

  15. How Did a Major Confined Flare Occur in Super Solar Active Region 12192?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Wang, Haiming; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    We study the physical mechanism of a major X-class solar flare that occurred in the super NOAA active region (AR) 12192 using data-driven numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling complemented with observations. With the evolving magnetic fields observed at the solar surface as bottom boundary input, we drive an MHD system to evolve self-consistently in correspondence with the realistic coronal evolution. During a two-day time interval, the modeled coronal field has been slowly stressed by the photospheric field evolution, which gradually created a large-scale coronal current sheet, i.e., a narrow layer with intense current, in the core of the AR. The current layer was successively enhanced until it became so thin that a tether-cutting reconnection between the sheared magnetic arcades was set in, which led to a flare. The modeled reconnecting field lines and their footpoints match well the observed hot flaring loops and the flare ribbons, respectively, suggesting that the model has successfully “reproduced” the macroscopic magnetic process of the flare. In particular, with simulation, we explained why this event is a confined eruption—the consequence of the reconnection is a shared arcade instead of a newly formed flux rope. We also found a much weaker magnetic implosion effect compared to many other X-class flares.

  16. Implications of X-ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Gordon D; Aurass, Henry; Battaglia, Marina; Grigis, Paolo C; Kontar, Eduard P; Liu, Wei; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Zharkova, Valentina V

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general fla...

  17. Spatio-temporal dynamics of sources of hard X-ray pulsations in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, S A; Morgachev, A S; Struminsky, A B

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic analysis of spatio-temporal evolution of sources of hard X-ray (HXR) pulsations in solar flares. We concentrate on disk flares whose impulsive phase are accompanied by a series of more than three peaks (pulsations) of HXR emission detected in the RHESSI 50-100 keV channel with 4-second cadence. 29 such flares observed from February 2002 to June 2015 with time differences between successive peaks of 8-270 s are studied. The main observational result is that sources of HXR pulsations in all flares are not stationary, they demonstrate apparent displacements from pulsation to pulsation. The flares can be subdivided into two groups depending on character of dynamics of HXR sources. The group-1 consists of 16 flares (55%) with systematic dynamics of HXR sources from pulsation to pulsation with respect to a magnetic polarity inversion line (MPIL), which has simple extended trace on the photosphere. The group-2 consists of 13 flares (45%) with more chaotic displacements of HXR sources with respe...

  18. Transition Region Emission and the Energy Input to Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Raymond, John C.; Panasyuk, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the energetics of solar flares depends on obtaining reliable determinations of the energy input to flare plasma. X-ray observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung from hot flare plasma provide temperatures and emission measures which, along with estimates of the plasma volume, allow the energy content of this hot plasma to be computed. However, if thermal energy losses are significant or if significant energy goes directly into cooler plasma, this is only a lower limit on the total energy injected into thermal plasma during the flare. We use SOHO UVCS observations of O VI flare emission scattered by coronal O VI ions to deduce the flare emission at transition region temperatures between 100,000 K and 1 MK for the 2002 July 23 and other flares. We find that the radiated energy at these temperatures significantly increases the deduced energy input to the thermal plasma, but by an amount that is less than the uncertainty in the computed energies. Comparisons of computed thermal and nonthermal electron energies deduced from RHESSI, GOES, and UVCS are shown.

  19. COMPTEL gamma-ray observations of the C4 solar flare on 20 January 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. A.; Arndt, M. B.; Bennett, K.; Connors, A.; Debrunner, H.; Diehl, R.; McConnell, M.; Miller, R. S.; Rank, G.; Ryan, J. M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Winkler, C.

    2001-10-01

    The ``Pre-SMM'' (Vestrand and Miller 1998) picture of gamma-ray line (GRL) flares was that they are relatively rare events. This picture was quickly put in question with the launch of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). Over 100 GRL flares were seen with sizes ranging from very large GOES class events (X12) down to moderately small events (M2). It was argued by some (Bai 1986) that this was still consistent with the idea that GRL events are rare. Others, however, argued the opposite (Vestrand 1988; Cliver, Crosby and Dennis 1994), stating that the lower end of this distribution was just a function of SMM's sensitivity. They stated that the launch of the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) would in fact continue this distribution to show even smaller GRL flares. In response to a BACODINE cosmic gamma-ray burst alert, COMPtonTELescope on the CGRO recorded gamma rays above 1 MeV from the C4 flare at 0221 UT 20 January 2000. This event, though at the limits of COMPTEL's sensitivity, clearly shows a nuclear line excess above the continuum. Using new spectroscopy techniques we were able to resolve individual lines. This has allowed us to make a basic comparison of this event with the GRL flare distribution from SMM and also compare this flare with a well-observed large GRL flare seen by OSSE. .

  20. Fast-mode Coronal EUV Wave Trains Associated with Solar Flares and CMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Ofman, Leon; Downs, Cooper; Karlicky, Marian; Chen, Bin

    2017-08-01

    As a new observational phenomenon, Quasi-periodic, Fast Propagating EUV wave trains (QFPs) are fast-mode magnetosonic waves closely related to quasi-periodic pulsations commonly detected in solar flares (traditionally with non-imaging observations). They can provide critical clues to flare energy release and serve as new tools for coronal seismology. We report recent advances in observing and modeling QFPs, including evidence of heating and cooling cycles revealed with differential emission measure (DEM) analysis that are consistent with alternating compression and rarefaction expected for magnetosonic waves. Through a statistical survey, we found a preferential association of QFPs with eruptive flares (with CMEs) rather than confined flares (without CMEs). We also identified some correlation with quasi-periodic radio bursts observed at JVLA and Ondrejov observatories. We will discuss the implications of these results and the potential roles of QFPs in coronal heating and energy transport.

  1. Thermalisation and hard X-ray bremsstrahlung efficiency of self-interacting solar flare fast electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, R K; MacKinnon, A L; Brown, J C

    2010-01-01

    Most theoretical descriptions of the production of solar flare bremsstrahlung radiation assume the collision of dilute accelerated particles with a cold, dense target plasma, neglecting interactions of the fast particles with each other. This is inadequate for situations where collisions with this background plasma are not completely dominant, as may be the case in, for example, low-density coronal sources. We aim to formulate a model of a self-interacting, entirely fast electron population in the absence of a dense background plasma, to investigate its implications for observed bremsstrahlung spectra and the flare energy budget. We derive approximate expressions for the time-dependent distribution function of the fast electrons using a Fokker-Planck approach. We use these expressions to generate synthetic bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra as would be seen from a corresponding coronal source. We find that our model qualitatively reproduces the observed behaviour of some flares. As the flare progresses, the model's...

  2. Flares on A-type Stars: Evidence for Heating of Solar Corona by Nanoflares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švanda, Michal; Karlický, Marian

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed the occurrence rates of flares on stars of spectral types K, G, F, and A, observed by Kepler. We found that the histogram of occurrence frequencies of stellar flares is systematically shifted toward a high-energy tail for A-type stars compared to stars of cooler spectral types. We extrapolated the fitted power laws toward flares with smaller energies (nanoflares) and made estimates for total energy flux to stellar atmospheres by flares. We found that, for A-type stars, the total energy flux density was at least four-times smaller than for G stars. We speculate that this deficit in energy supply may explain the lack of hot coronae on A-type stars. Our results indicate the importance of nanoflares for heating and formation of the solar corona.

  3. Flares on A-type stars: Evidence for heating of solar corona by nanoflares?

    CERN Document Server

    Svanda, M

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the occurrence rates of flares on stars of spectral types K, G, F, and A, observed by Kepler. We found that the histogram of occurrence frequencies of stellar flares is systematically shifted towards a high-energy tail for A-type stars compared to stars of cooler spectral types. We extrapolated the fitted power laws towards flares with smaller energies (nanoflares) and made estimates for total energy flux to stellar atmospheres by flares. We found that for A-type stars the total energy flux density was at least 4-times smaller than for G-stars. We speculate that this deficit in energy supply may explain the lack of hot coronae on A-type stars. Our results indicate an importance of nanoflares for heating and formation of the solar corona.

  4. An Automated Algorithm to Distinguish and Characterize Solar Flares and Associated Sequential Chromospheric Brightenings

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, M S; Jackiewicz, J; McNamara, B J; McAteer, R T J

    2011-01-01

    We present a new automated algorithm to identify, track, and characterize small-scale brightening associated with solar eruptive phenomena observed in H{\\alpha}. The temporal spatially-localized changes in chromospheric intensities can be separated into two categories: flare ribbons and sequential chromospheric brightenings (SCBs). Within each category of brightening we determine the smallest resolvable locus of pixels, a kernel, and track the temporal evolution of the position and intensity of each kernel. This tracking is accomplished by isolating the eruptive features, identifying kernels, and linking detections between frames into trajectories of kernels. We fully characterize the evolving intensity and morphology of the flare ribbons by observing the tracked flare kernels in aggregate. With the location of SCB and flare kernels identified, they can easily be overlaid on top of complementary data sets to extract Doppler velocities and magnetic field intensities underlying the kernels. This algorithm is ad...

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from behind-the-limb solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Allafort, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Fermi-LAT >30 MeV observations have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. These sample both the impulsive and long duration phases of GOES M and X class flares. Of particular interest is the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources and implications for the particle acceleration mechanisms.

  6. Evaluation the effect of energetic particles in solar flares on satellite's life time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Z.; Davoudifar, P.

    2016-09-01

    As the satellites have a multiple role in the humans' life, their damages and therefore logical failures of their segment causes problems and lots of expenses. So evaluating different types of failures in their segments has a crustal role. Solar particles are one of the most important reasons of segment damages (hard and soft) during a solar event or in usual times. During a solar event these particle may cause extensive damages which are even permanent (hard errors). To avoid these effects and design shielding mediums, we need to know SEP (solar energetic particles) flux and MTTF (mean time between two failures) of segments. In the present work, we calculated SEP flux witch collide the satellite in common times, in different altitudes. OMERE software was used to determine the coordinates and specifications of a satellite which in simulations has been launched to space. Then we considered a common electronic computer part and calculated MTTF for it. In the same way the SEP fluxes were calculated during different solar flares of different solar cycles and MTFFs were evaluated during occurring of solar flares. Thus a relation between solar flare energy and life time of the satellite electronic part (hours) was obtained.

  7. Combined Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-07-01

    I will review some observations of the characteristics of accelerated electrons seen near Earth (as SEPs) and those producing flare radiation in the low corona and chromosphere. The similarities and differences between the numbers, spectral distribution, etc. of the two population can shed light on the mechanism and sites of the acceleration. I will show that in some events the origin of both population appears to be the flare site while in others, with harder SEP spectra, in addition to acceleration at the flare site, there appears to be a need for a second stage re-acceleration in the associated fast Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) environment. This scenario can also describe a similar dichotomy that exists between the so called impulsive, highly enriched (3He and heavy ions) and softer SEP ion events, and stronger more gradual SEP events with near normal ionic abundances and harder spectra. I will also describe under what conditions such hardening can be achieved.

  8. Energy Partitions and Evolution in a Purely Thermal Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D; Gary, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a solely thermal flare, which we detected in the microwave range from the thermal gyro- and free-free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally-deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. When the magnetic energy release is over, the source parameters come back to ne...

  9. Realistic radiative MHD simulation of a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, Matthias D.; Cheung, Mark; Chintzoglou, Georgios; Chen, Feng; Testa, Paola; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Sainz Dalda, Alberto; DeRosa, Marc L.; Viktorovna Malanushenko, Anna; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Gudiksen, Boris; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2017-08-01

    We present a recently developed version of the MURaM radiative MHD code that includes coronal physics in terms of optically thin radiative loss and field aligned heat conduction. The code employs the "Boris correction" (semi-relativistic MHD with a reduced speed of light) and a hyperbolic treatment of heat conduction, which allow for efficient simulations of the photosphere/corona system by avoiding the severe time-step constraints arising from Alfven wave propagation and heat conduction. We demonstrate that this approach can be used even in dynamic phases such as a flare. We consider a setup in which a flare is triggered by flux emergence into a pre-existing bipolar active region. After the coronal energy release, efficient transport of energy along field lines leads to the formation of flare ribbons within seconds. In the flare ribbons we find downflows for temperatures lower than ~5 MK and upflows at higher temperatures. The resulting soft X-ray emission shows a fast rise and slow decay, reaching a peak corresponding to a mid C-class flare. The post reconnection energy release in the corona leads to average particle energies reaching 50 keV (500 MK under the assumption of a thermal plasma). We show that hard X-ray emission from the corona computed under the assumption of thermal bremsstrahlung can produce a power-law spectrum due to the multi-thermal nature of the plasma. The electron energy flux into the flare ribbons (classic heat conduction with free streaming limit) is highly inhomogeneous and reaches peak values of about 3x1011 erg/cm2/s in a small fraction of the ribbons, indicating regions that could potentially produce hard X-ray footpoint sources. We demonstrate that these findings are robust by comparing simulations computed with different values of the saturation heat flux as well as the "reduced speed of light".

  10. Microwave Zebra Pattern Structures in the X2.2 Solar Flare on Feb 15, 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Tan, Chengming; Sych, Robert; Gao, Guannan

    2011-01-01

    Zebra pattern structure (ZP) is the most intriguing fine structure on the dynamic spectrograph of solar microwave burst. On 15 February 2011, there erupts an X2.2 flare event on the solar disk, it is the first X-class flare since the solar Schwabe cycle 24. It is interesting that there are several microwave ZPs observed by the Chinese Solar Broadband Radiospectrometer (SBRS/Huairou) at frequency of 6.40 ~ 7.00 GHz (ZP1), 2.60 ~ 2.75 GHz (ZP2), and the Yunnan Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Yunnan) at frequency of 1.04 ~ 1.13 GHz (ZP3). The most important phenomena is the unusual high-frequency ZP structure (ZP1, up to 7.00 GHz) occurred in the early rising phase of the flare, and there are two ZP structure (ZP2, ZP3) with relative low frequencies occurred in the decay phase of the flare. By scrutinizing the current prevalent theoretical models of ZP structure generations, and comparing their estimated magnetic field strengths in the corresponding source regions, we suggest that the double plasma reso...

  11. The Temporal Behaviour of Lyman-alpha Emission During Solar Flares From SDO/EVE

    CERN Document Server

    Milligan, Ryan O

    2015-01-01

    Despite being the most prominent emission line in the solar spectrum, there has been a notable lack of studies devoted to variations in Lyman-alpha (Ly$\\alpha$) emission during solar flares in recent years. The few examples that do exist, however, have shown Ly$\\alpha$ emission to be a substantial radiator of the total energy budget of solar flares (on the order of 10%). It is also a known driver of fluctuations in earth's ionosphere. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory now provides broadband, photometric Ly$\\alpha$ data at 10 s cadence, and has observed scores of solar flares in the 5 years since it was launched. However, the time profiles appear to display a rise time of tens of minutes around the time of the flare onset. This is in stark contrast to the rapid, impulsive increase observed in other intrinsically chromospheric features (H$\\alpha$, Ly$\\beta$, LyC, C III, etc.). Furthermore, the Ly$\\alpha$ emission peaks around the time of the peak of thermal soft X-ray e...

  12. Fermi-LAT Observations of High-energy Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Ciprini, S.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Grenier, I. A.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kashapova, L.; Krucker, S.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J. D.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Pal’shin, V.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, O.; Rubio da Costa, F.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the Fermi-LAT detection of high-energy emission from the behind-the-limb (BTL) solar flares that occurred on 2013 October 11, and 2014 January 6 and September 1. The Fermi-LAT observations are associated with flares from active regions originating behind both the eastern and western limbs, as determined by STEREO. All three flares are associated with very fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and strong solar energetic particle events. We present updated localizations of the >100 MeV photon emission, hard X-ray (HXR) and EUV images, and broadband spectra from 10 keV to 10 GeV, as well as microwave spectra. We also provide a comparison of the BTL flares detected by Fermi-LAT with three on-disk flares and present a study of some of the significant quantities of these flares as an attempt to better understand the acceleration mechanisms at work during these occulted flares. We interpret the HXR emission to be due to electron bremsstrahlung from a coronal thin-target loop top with the accelerated electron spectra steepening at semirelativistic energies. The >100 MeV gamma-rays are best described by a pion-decay model resulting from the interaction of protons (and other ions) in a thick-target photospheric source. The protons are believed to have been accelerated (to energies >10 GeV) in the CME environment and precipitate down to the photosphere from the downstream side of the CME shock and landed on the front side of the Sun, away from the original flare site and the HXR emission.

  13. Solar Flare X-ray Source Motion as a Response to Electron Spectral Hardening

    CERN Document Server

    O'Flannagain, A; Brown, J; Milligan, R; Holman, G

    2013-01-01

    Context: Solar flare hard X-rays (HXRs) are thought to be produced by nonthermal coronal electrons stopping in the chromosphere, or remaining trapped in the corona. The collisional thick target model (CTTM) predicts that sources produced by harder power-law injection spectra should appear further down the legs or footpoints of a flare loop. Therefore, hardening of the injected power-law electron spectrum during flare onset should be concurrent with a descending hard X-ray source. Aims: To test this implication of the CTTM by comparing its predicted HXR source locations with those derived from observations of a solar flare which exhibits a nonthermally-dominated spectrum before the peak in HXRs, known as an early impulsive event. Methods: HXR images and spectra of an early impulsive C-class flare were obtained using the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Images were reconstructed to produce HXR source height evolutions for three energy bands. Spatially-integrated spectral analysis was perf...

  14. Energetic Electrons in Solar Flares - As Viewed in X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Hard X-ray observations provide the most direct diagnostic we have of the suprathermal electrons and the hottest thermal plasma present in solar flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) is obtaining the most comprehensive observations of individual solar flares ever available in hard X-rays. For the first time, high-resolution spectra are available for a large number of flares that accurately display the spectral shape and its evolution and, in many cases, allow us to identify the transition from the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by suprathermal electrons to the bremsstrahlung at lower energies emitted by thermal plasma. Also, for the first time, images can be produced in arbitrary energy bands above 3 keV, and spectra of distinct imaged components can be obtained. I will review what we have learned from RHESSI observations about flare suprathermal electron distributions and their evolution Next, I will present computations of the energy deposited by these suprathermal electrons in individual flares and compare this with the energy contained in the hot thermal plasma. I will point out unsolved problems in deducing both suprathermal electron distributions and the energy content of the thermal plasma, and discuss possible solutions. Finally, I will present evidence that electron acceleration is associated with magnetic reconnection in the corona.

  15. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    OpenAIRE

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework which can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into...

  16. PROPERTIES OF CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION AND PLASMA DYNAMICS OF A SOLAR FLARE FROM IRIS OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Sharykin, Ivan N.; Struminsky, Alexei B.; Zimovets, Ivan [Space Research Institute (IKI) of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of hot chromospheric plasma of solar flares is a key to understanding the mechanisms of flare energy release and particle acceleration. A moderate M1.0 class flare of 2014 June 12, (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) was simultaneously observed by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and other spacecraft, and also by the New Solar Telescope at the BBSO. This paper presents the first part of our investigation focused on analysis of the IRIS data. Our analysis of the IRIS data in different spectral lines reveals a strong redshifted jet-like flow with a speed of ∼100 km s{sup −1} of the chromospheric material before the flare. Strong nonthermal emission of the C ii k 1334.5 Å line, formed in the chromosphere–corona transition region, is observed at the beginning of the impulsive phase in several small (with a size of ∼1″) points. It is also found that the C ii k line is redshifted across the flaring region before, during, and after the impulsive phase. A peak of integrated emission of the hot (1.1 · 10{sup 7} K) plasma in the Fe xxi 1354.1 Å line is detected approximately five minutes after the integrated emission peak of the lower temperature C ii k. A strong blueshift of the Fe xxi line across the flaring region corresponds to evaporation flows of the hot chromospheric plasma with a speed of 50 km s{sup −1}. Additional analysis of the RHESSI data supports the idea that the upper chromospheric dynamics observed by IRIS has features of “gentle” evaporation driven by heating of the solar chromosphere by accelerated electrons and by a heat flux from the flare energy release site.

  17. Ionospheric response to X-class solar flares in the ascending half of the subdued solar cycle 24

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rumajyoti Hazarika; Bitap Raj Kalita; Pradip Kumar Bhuyan

    2016-08-01

    The signature of 11 X-class solar flares that occurred during the ascending half of the present subdued solar cycle 24 from 2009 to 2013 on the ionosphere over the low- and mid-latitude station, Dibrugarh (27.5◦N, 95◦E; magnetic latitude 17.6◦N), are examined. Total electron content (TEC) data derived from Global Positioning System satellite transmissions are used to study the effect of the flares on the ionosphere. A nonlinear significant correlation ($R^2$ =0.86) has been observed between EUV enhancement (ΔEUV) and corresponding enhancement in TEC (ΔTEC). This nonlinearity is triggered by a rapid increase in ΔTEC beyond the threshold value ∼1.5 (×1010 ph cm$^{−2} s^{−1})$ in ΔEUV. It is also foundthat this nonlinear relationship between TEC and EUV flux is driven by a similar nonlinear relationship between flare induced enhancement in X-ray and EUV fluxes. The local time of occurrence of the flares determines the magnitude of enhancement in TEC for flares originating from nearly similar longitudeson the solar disc, and hence proximity to the central meridian alone may not play the dominating role. Further, the X-ray peak flux, when corrected for the earth zenith angle effect, did not improve thecorrelation between ΔX-ray and ΔTEC.

  18. Implantation in interplanetary dust of rare-gas ions from solar flares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilles, D

    1966-08-26

    Measurements of excess Ar(36) + Ar(38) ( released mainly at 1200 degrees C) in magnetic concentrates of Pacific sediments and in a dense concentrate of Greenland dust agree within an order of magnitude with expected concentrations implanted by solar-flare ion streams of energy less than 10 Mev per atomic-mass unit. The agreement implies that more than 10 percent of each concentrate may be extraterrestrial, depending on size distribution and flare spectra. Rare-gas measurements on fine-grained dust can provide data on: solar-flare "paleo-ion" fluxes, energy spectra, and isotopic abundances; identification, mineralogy, and chemistry of interplanetary dust; influx rates to Earth and sedimentation rates of oceanic cores; and lunar-surface residence and mixing times.

  19. Shapes of 20Ne de-excitation line in solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Gan, Wei Qun

    2017-09-01

    Since almost all de-excitation lines from nuclear states excited by flare-accelerated protons and α -particles are emitted promptly after nuclear collisions, the emission photon's energy depends on the velocity of the recoiling nucleus. The energies and widths of γ -ray lines provide a wealth of information on the directionality and spectra of ions in solar flares. In this paper, we use TALYS code to improve the cross sections of γ -ray lines production, and calculate the shapes of the 1.634 MeV line from de-excitation of 20Ne as a function of ion's energy spectra and the heliocentric angle. Taking this line shape as an example, we try to develop a new method of line shape analysis to study the properties of accelerated ions in solar flares.

  20. Three-dimensional magnetic reconnection and its application to solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, Miho

    2017-02-01

    Solar flares are powerful radiations occurring in the Sun's atmosphere. They are powered by magnetic reconnection, a phenomenon that can convert magnetic energy into other forms of energy such as heat and kinetic energy, and which is believed to be ubiquitous in the universe. With the ever increasing spatial and temporal resolutions of solar observations, as well as numerical simulations benefiting from increasing computer power, we can now probe into the nature and the characteristics of magnetic reconnection in three dimensions to better understand the phenomenon's consequences during eruptive flares in our star's atmosphere. We review in the following the efforts made on different fronts to approach the problem of magnetic reconnection. In particular, we will see how understanding the magnetic topology in three dimensions helps in locating the most probable regions for reconnection to occur, how the current layer evolves in three dimensions and how reconnection leads to the formation of flux ropes, plasmoids and flaring loops.

  1. The spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha L S

    2014-01-01

    X-rays are a valuable diagnostic tool for the study of high energy accelerated electrons. Bremsstrahlung X-rays produced by, and directly related to, high energy electrons accelerated during a flare, provide a powerful diagnostic tool for determining both the properties of the accelerated electron distribution, and of the flaring coronal and chromospheric plasmas. This thesis is specifically concerned with the study of spatial, spectral and polarization properties of solar flare X-ray sources via both modelling and X-ray observations using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Firstly, a new model is presented, accounting for finite temperature, pitch angle scattering and initial pitch angle injection. This is developed to accurately infer the properties of the acceleration region from the observations of dense coronal X-ray sources. Moreover, examining how the spatial properties of dense coronal X-ray sources change in time, interesting trends in length, width, position, number density ...

  2. First Flare-related Rapid Change of Photospheric Magnetic Field Observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shuo; Liu, Rui; Deng, Na; Liu, Yang; Wang, Haimin

    2011-01-01

    Photospheric magnetic field not only plays important roles in building up free energy and triggering solar eruptions, but also has been observed to change rapidly and permanently responding to the coronal magnetic field restructuring due to coronal transients. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument (HMI) on board the newly launched Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) produces seeing-free full-disk vector magnetograms at consistently high resolution and high cadence, which finally makes possible an unambiguous and comprehensive study of this important back-reaction process. In this study, we present a near disk-center, GOES-class X2.2 flare occurred at NOAA AR 11158 on 2011 February 15 using the magnetic field measurements made by HMI. We obtained the first solid evidence of an enhancement in the transverse magnetic field at the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) by a magnitude of 70%. This rapid and irreversible field evolution is unequivocally associated with the flare occurrence, with the ...

  3. Analysis of coronal and chromospheric hard X-ray sources in an eruptive solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimovets, Ivan; Golovin, Dmitry; Livshits, Moisey; Vybornov, Vadim; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Mitrofanov, Igor

    We have analyzed hard X-ray emission of an eruptive solar flare on 3 November 2010. The entire flare region was observed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. This gave us an information that chromospheric footpoints of flare magnetic loops were behind the east solar limb for an earth observer. Hard X-ray emission from the entire flare region was detected by the High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft while hard X-rays from the coronal part of the flare region were detected by the RHESSI. This rare situation has allowed us to investigate both coronal and chromospheric sources of hard X-ray emission separately. Flare impulsive phase was accompanied by eruption of a magnetic flux rope and formation of a plasmoid detected by the AIA/SDO in the EUV range. Two coronal hard X-ray sources (S_{1} and S_{2}) were detected by the RHESSI. The upper source S_{1} coincided with the plasmoid and the lower source S_{2} was near the tops of the underlying flare loops that is in accordance with the standard model of eruptive flares. Imaging spectroscopy with the RHESSI has allowed to measure energetic spectra of hard X-ray emission from the S_{1} and S_{2} sources. At the impulsive phase peak they have power-law shape above ≈ 15 keV with spectral slopes gamma_{S_{1}}=3.46 ± 1.58 and gamma_{S_{2}}=4.64 ± 0.12. Subtracting spatially integrated spectrum of coronal hard X-ray emission measured by the RHESSI from the spectrum measured by the HEND we found spectrum of hard X-rays emitted from the footpoints of the flare loops (source S_{0}). This spectrum has a power-law shape with gamma_{S_{0}}=2.21 ± 0.57. It is shown that it is not possible to explain the measured spectra of the S_{2} and S_{0} sources in frames of the thin and thick target models respectively if we assume that electrons were accelerated in the energy release site situated below the plasmoid and above the flare loops as suggested by the standard flare model. To resolve the contradiction

  4. First flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Shih, Albert Y.; Duncan, Nicole; Bain, Hazel; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kelley, Nicole; Godbole, Niharika; Kaufmann, Pierre; Caspi, Amir; Sample, John; Hoberman, Jane; Mochizuki, Brent; Olson, Jerry; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Hurford, Gordon J.; Smith, David M.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) high altitude balloon payload was successfully flown in January 2016 from Antarctica (Jan 19 to Jan 30).GRIPS provides a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma ray/hard X-ray emissions from ~20 keV to >~10 MeV. GRIPS’s goal is to address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of six 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs, with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS was also equipped with active BGO shields, and three piggy-back instruments: a solar terahertz radiometer (Solar-T), a hard X-ray spectrometer (SMASH), and a sonic anemometer (TILDAE).We will present an overview of GRIPS's first flight, the performance of its instruments and subsystems, including the solar pointing and aspect systems, and the current progress of our data analysis.

  5. Electron acceleration at slow-mode shocks in the magnetic reconnection region in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Gottfried; Aurass, Henry; Önel, Hakan; Warmuth, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    A solar flare appears as an sudden enhancement of the emission of electromagnetic radiation of the Sun covering a broad range of the spectrum from the radio up to the gamma-ray range. That indicates the generation of energetic electrons during flares, which are considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetosphere, as for instance by NASA's MMS mission, have shown that electrons can efficiently accelerated at the slow-mode shocks occuring in the magnetic reconnection region. This mechanism is applied to solar flares. The electrons are accelerated by the cross-shock potential at slow-mode shocks resulting in magnetic field aligned beams of energetic electrons in the downstream region. The interaction of this electron beam with the plasma leads to the excitation of whistler waves and, subsequently, to a strong heating of the electrons in the downstream region. Considering this process under coronal circumstances, enough electrons with energies >30keV are generated in the magnetic reconnection region as required for the hard X-ray radiation during solar flares as observed by NASA's RHESSI mission.

  6. New Observations of Balmer Continuum Flux in Solar Flares, Instrument Description and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Kotrč, P; Heinzel, P

    2016-01-01

    Increase in the Balmer continuum radiation during solar flares was predicted by various authors but never firmly confirmed observationally using ground-based slit spectrographs. Here we describe a new post-focal instrument - Image Selector - enabling to measure the Balmer continuum flux from the whole flare area, in analogy of successful detections of flaring dMe stars. The system was developed and put into operation at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA-2 of the Ond\\v{r}ejov Observatory. We measure the total flux by a fast spectrometer from a limited but well defined region on the solar disk. Using a system of diaphragms, the disturbing contribution of a bright solar disk can be eliminated as much as possible. Light curves of the measured flux in the spectral range 350 - 440 nm are processed, together with the H{\\alpha} images of the flaring area delimited by the appropriate diaphragm. The spectral flux data are flat-fielded, calibrated and processed to be compared with model predictions. Our analysis of th...

  7. Quasi -Periodic Pulsations in Solar Flares: new clues from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, D; Bissaldi, E; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Greiner, J; van der Horst, A J; Kanbach, G; Rau, A; Bhat, P N; Diehl, R; von Kienlin, A; Kippen, R M; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2011-01-01

    In the last four decades it has been observed that solar flares show quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) from the lowest, i.e. radio, to the highest, i.e. gamma-ray, part of the electromagnetic spectrum. To this day, it is still unclear which mechanism creates such QPPs. In this paper, we analyze four bright solar flares which show compelling signatures of quasi-periodic behavior and were observed with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (\\gbm) onboard the Fermi satellite. Because GBM covers over 3 decades in energy (8 keV to 40 MeV) it can be a key instrument to understand the physical processes which drive solar flares. We tested for periodicity in the time series of the solar flares observed by GBM by applying a classical periodogram analysis. However, contrary to previous authors, we did not detrend the raw light curve before creating the power spectral density spectrum (PSD). To assess the significance of the frequencies we made use of a method which is commonly applied for X-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. This...

  8. Comparative Analysis of VLF Signal Variation along Trajectory Induced by X-ray Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Kolarski; D. Grubor

    2015-12-01

    Comparative qualitative analysis of amplitude and phase delay variations was carried out along the trajectory of GQD/22.1 kHz and NAA/24.0 kHz VLF signal traces, propagating from Skelton (UK) and Maine (USA) toward Belgrade, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flare events occurred during the period from September 2005 to December 2006. For monitoring, recording and for storage of VLF data at the Institute of Physics in Belgrade, Serbia, the AbsPAL system was used. For modeling purposes of propagating conditions along GQD and NAA signal propagation paths, LWPCv21 program code was used. Occurred solar flare events induced lower ionosphere electron density height profile changes, causing perturbations in VLF wave propagation within Earth-ionosphere waveguides. As analyzed VLF signals characterize by different propagation parameters along trajectories from their transmitters to the Belgrade receiver site, their propagation is affected in different ways for different solar flare events and also for the same solar flare events.

  9. Observation of quasi-periodic pulsations in the solar flare SF 900610

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.V.; Shevchenko, A.V.; Kuz'min, A.G.;

    2002-01-01

    A quasi-periodic component was found at the maximum of the X-ray light curve for the June 10, 1990 solar flare detected by the Granat observatory. The pulsation period was 143.2 +/- 0.8 s. The intensity of the pulsing component is not constant; the maximum amplitude of the pulsations is similar t...

  10. Comparative Analysis of VLF Signal Variation along Trajectory Induced by X-ray Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolarski, A.; Grubor, D.

    2015-12-01

    Comparative qualitative analysis of amplitude and phase delay variations was carried out along the trajectory of GQD/22.1 kHz and NAA/24.0 kHz VLF signal traces, propagating from Skelton (UK) and Maine (USA) toward Belgrade, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flare events occurred during the period from September 2005 to December 2006. For monitoring, recording and for storage of VLF data at the Institute of Physics in Belgrade, Serbia, the AbsPAL system was used. For modeling purposes of propagating conditions along GQD and NAA signal propagation paths, LWPCv21 program code was used. Occurred solar flare events induced lower ionosphere electron density height profile changes, causing perturbations in VLF wave propagation within Earth-ionosphere waveguides. As analyzed VLF signals characterize by different propagation parameters along trajectories from their transmitters to the Belgrade receiver site, their propagation is affected in different ways for different solar flare events and also for the same solar flare events.

  11. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kyoto University, Kurabashira, Kamitakaracho, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Imada, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  12. Understanding the formation of the Mg II h&k lines during solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Da Costa, Fatima; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-05-01

    The Mg II h&k lines are useful diagnostics for physical processes in the solar chromosphere. Understanding the line formation is crucial for the correct interpretation of spectral observations and characteristics such as line asymmetries or how their central reversals in the line cores disappear and turn into emission during flares are manifestations of various physical processes.Focusing on the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29, we carried out a joint observational and modeling study to analyze the Mg II h&k spectra observed by IRIS. We constructed a multi-threaded flare loop model and used the time-dependent electron flux inferred from the RHESSI hard X-ray data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. Using the RH code we conducted a detailed modeling on line shape and evolution to derive how different atmospheric parameters may affect the MgII line emission.We successfully simulated the single-peaked Mg II h&k line profiles by increasing electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈ 800 km below the transition region. To our knowledge, this is the first successful attempt in reproducing such line-profile shapes under flaring conditions. We will discuss the implications of this result for diagnosing atmospheric dynamics and energy transport in solar flares.

  13. Correlation of hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhar, Matej; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martínez; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Hudson, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) and HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager). We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 \\r{A} summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 seconds around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ~50 keV. At higher electron energies the co...

  14. IRIS Observations of the Mg II h & k Lines During a Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, Graham S; Qiu, Jiong; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of the radiative output of a solar flare is emitted from the chromosphere, which produces enhancements in the optical and UV continuum, and in many lines, both optically thick and thin. We have, until very recently, lacked observations of two of the strongest of these lines: the Mg II h & k resonance lines. We present a detailed study of the response of these lines to a solar flare. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the integrated intensities, k/h line ratios, line of sight velocities, line widths and line asymmetries were investigated during an M class flare (SOL2014-02-13T01:40). Very intense, spatially localised energy input at the outer edge of the ribbon is observed, resulting in redshifts equivalent to velocities of ~15-26km/s, line broadenings, and a blue asymmetry in the most intense sources. The characteristic central reversal feature that is ubiquitous in quiet Sun observations is absent in flaring profiles, indicating that the source function increases with height during the flare....

  15. He I D3 Observation of the 1984 May 22 M6.3 Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Zhang, Jifeng; Choudhary, Debi Prasad; Wang, Haimin

    2013-01-01

    He I D3 line has a unique response to the flare impact on the low solar atmosphere and can be a powerful diagnostic tool for energy transport processes. Using images obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report D3 observation of the M6.3 flare on 1984 May 22, which occurred in an active region with a circular magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL). The impulsive phase of the flare starts with a main elongated source that darkens in D3, inside of which bright emission kernels appear at the time of the initial small peak in hard X-rays (HXRs). These flare cores subsequently evolve into a sharp emission strand lying within the dark halo simultaneously with the main peak in HXRs, reversing the overall source contrast from -5% to 5%. The radiated energy in D3 during the main peak is estimated to be about 10^30 ergs, which is comparable to that carried by nonthermal electrons above 20 keV. Afterwards the flare proceeds along the circular PIL in the counterclockwise direction t...

  16. Oblique Bernstein Mode Generation Near the Upper-hybrid Frequency in Solar Pre-flare Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryshtal, A.; Fedun, V.; Gerasimenko, S.; Voitsekhovska, A.

    2015-11-01

    We study analytically the generation process of the first harmonics of the pure electron weakly oblique Bernstein modes. This mode can appear as a result of the rise and development of a corresponding instability in a solar active region. We assume that this wave mode is modified by the influence of pair Coulomb collisions and a weak large-scale sub-Dreicer electric field in the pre-flare chromosphere near the footpoints of a flare loop. To describe the pre-flare plasma we used the model of the solar atmosphere developed by Fontenla, Avrett, and Loeser ( Astrophys. J. 406, 319, 1993). We show that the generated first harmonic is close to the upper-hybrid frequency. This generation process begins at the very low threshold values of the sub-Dreicer electric field and well before the beginning of the preheating phase of a flare. We investigate the necessary conditions for the existence of non-damped first harmonics of oblique Bernstein waves with small amplitudes in the flare area.

  17. Determination of the Acceleration Region Size in a Loop-structured Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jingnan; Kontar, Eduard P; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the acceleration and propagation of bremsstrahlung-producing electrons in solar flares, we analyze the evolution of the flare loop size with respect to energy at a variety of times. A GOES M3.7 loop-structured flare starting around 23:55 on 2002 April 14 is studied in detail using \\textit{Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager} (\\textit{RHESSI}) observations. We construct photon and mean-electron-flux maps in 2-keV energy bins by processing observationally-deduced photon and electron visibilities, respectively, through several image-processing methods: a visibility-based forward-fit (FWD) algorithm, a maximum entropy (MEM) procedure and the uv-smooth (UVS) approach. We estimate the sizes of elongated flares (i.e., the length and width of flaring loops) by calculating the second normalized moments of the intensity in any given map. Employing a collisional model with an extended acceleration region, we fit the loop lengths as a function of energy in both the photon and electron domains....

  18. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Krucker, Säm [Also at Institute of 4-D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch, Switzerland. (Switzerland); Lin, Robert P., E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Also at Physics Department, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  19. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nishizuka, N. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Oi, A. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Ohyama, M. [Faculty of Education, Shiga University, 2-5-1 Hiratsu, Otsu, Shiga 1-1, Baba Hikone city, Siga 522-8522 (Japan); Nakajima, H., E-mail: kawate@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, NAOJ, Nobeyama, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  20. Enabling Solar Flare Forecasting at an Unprecedented Level: the FLARECAST Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Pariat, Etienne; Massone, Anna Maria; Vilmer, Nicole; Jackson, David; Buchlin, Eric; Csillaghy, Andre; Bommier, Veronique; Kontogiannis, Ioannis; Gallagher, Peter; Gontikakis, Costis; Guennou, Chloé; Murray, Sophie; Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Alingery, Pablo; Baudin, Frederic; Benvenuto, Federico; Bruggisser, Florian; Florios, Konstantinos; Guerra, Jordan; Park, Sung-Hong; Perasso, Annalisa; Piana, Michele; Sathiapal, Hanna; Soldati, Marco; Von Stachelski, Samuel; Argoudelis, Vangelis; Caminade, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    We attempt a brief but informative description of the Flare Likelihood And Region Eruption Forecasting (FLARECAST) project, European Commission's first large-scale investment to explore the limits of reliability and accuracy for the forecasting of major solar flares. The consortium, objectives, and first results of the project - featuring an openly accessible, interactive flare forecasting facility by the end of 2017 - will be outlined. In addition, we will refer to the so-called "explorative research" element of project, aiming to connect solar flares with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possibly pave the way for CME, or eruptive flare, prediction. We will also emphasize the FLARECAST modus operandi, namely the diversity of expertise within the consortium that independently aims to science, infrastructure development and dissemination, both to stakeholders and to the general public. Concluding, we will underline that the FLARECAST project responds squarely to the joint COSPAR - ILWS Global Roadmap to shield society from the adversities of space weather, addressing its primary goal and, in particular, its Research Recommendations 1, 2 and 4, Teaming Recommendations II and III, and Collaboration Recommendations A, B, and D. The FLARECAST project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 640216.

  1. CONTINUUM CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE SDO/AIA PASSBANDS DURING SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, Ryan O.; McElroy, Sarah A., E-mail: r.milligan@qub.ac.uk [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Data from the Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph component of the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used to quantify the contribution of continuum emission to each of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), also on SDO, during an X-class solar flare that occurred on 2011 February 15. Both the pre-flare-subtracted EVE spectra and fits to the associated free-free continuum were convolved with the AIA response functions of the seven EUV passbands at 10 s cadence throughout the course of the flare. It was found that 10%-25% of the total emission in the 94 Å, 131 Å, 193 Å, and 335 Å passbands throughout the main phase of the flare was due to free-free emission. Reliable measurements could not be made for the 171 Å channel, while the continuum contribution to the 304 Å channel was negligible due to the presence of the strong He II emission line. Up to 50% of the emission in the 211 Å channel was found to be due to free-free emission around the peak of the flare, while an additional 20% was due to the recombination continuum of He II. The analysis was extended to a number of M- and X-class flares and it was found that the level of free-free emission contributing to both the 171 Å and 211 Å passbands increased with increasing GOES class. These results suggest that the amount of continuum emission that contributes to AIA observations during flares is more significant than stated in previous studies which used synthetic, rather than observed, spectra. These findings highlight the importance of spectroscopic observations carried out in conjunction with those from imaging instruments so that the data are interpreted correctly.

  2. Estimation of Energy Equation Correlate of CMEs with X-Ray Flares during Solar Cycle 23rd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Mosalam; Shaltout, Mosalam; Ramy Mawad, Rr.

    . The aim of this paper is estimating the energy equation of CMEs with associated X-ray flares. In addition, we studied, when and where X-ray flares can eject CMEs? We are used CMEs data which observed from SOHO/LASCO, during the full solar cycle 23rd (1996- 2006), we have 12433 events. Also we are used the X-Ray flares data observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GEOS), during the same interval (1996-2006) in the 1-8 Ao GEOS Channel, it is recorded 22688 X-ray flare events. We had estimated energy equation between CMEs and associated X-ray flares during solar cycle 23rd (1996-2006). It is found the energy equation between them is polynomial series with correlation coefficient 92%. The characteristics of the CMEs and associated X-ray flares have been studied.

  3. Relationship Between Chromospheric Evaporation and Magnetic Field Topology in an M-Class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Sharykin, Ivan N.; Zimovets, Ivan V.; Vargas Dominguez, Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is observed as Doppler blueshift during solar flares. It plays a key role in the dynamics and energetics of solar flares; however, its mechanism is still unknown. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of spatially resolved multi-wavelength observations of chromospheric evaporation during an M 1.0-class solar flare (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) using data from NASA’s Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and HMI/SDO (the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory), and high-resolution observations from VIS/NST (the Visible Imaging Spectrometer at the New Solar Telescope). The results show that the averaged over the flare region Fe xxi blueshift of the hot (107 K) evaporating plasma is delayed relative to the C ii redshift of the relatively cold (104 K) chromospheric plasma by about one minute. The spatial distribution of the delays is not uniform across the region and can be as long as two minutes in several zones. Using vector magnetograms from HMI, we reconstruct the magnetic field topology and the quasi-separatrix layer, and find that the blueshift delay regions as well as the Hα flare ribbons are connected to the region of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) and an expanding flux rope via a system of low-lying loop arcades with a height of ≲4.5 Mm. As a result, the chromospheric evaporation may be driven by the energy release in the vicinity of PIL, and has the observed properties due to a local magnetic field topology.

  4. Solar flare hard and soft x ray relationship determined from SMM HXRBS and BCS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toot, G. David

    1989-01-01

    The exact nature of the solar flare process is still somewhat a mystery. A key element to understanding flares if the relationship between the hard x rays emitted by the most energetic portions of the flare and the soft x rays from other areas and times. This relationship was studied by comparing hard x ray light curved from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) with the soft x ray light curve and its derivation from the Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) which is part of the X-Ray Polychrometer (XRP), these instruments being on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft (SMM). Data sample was taken from flares observed with the above instruments during 1980, the peak of the previous maximum of solar activity. Flares were chosen based on complete coverage of the event by several instruments. The HXRBS data covers the x ray spectrum from about 25 keV to about 440 keV in 15 spectral channels, while the BCS data used covers a region of the Spectrum around 3 angstroms including emission from the Ca XIX ion. Both sets of data were summed over their spectral ranges and plotted against time at a maximum time resolution of around 3 seconds. The most popular theory of flares holds that a beam of electrons produces the hard x rays by bremsstrahlung while the soft x rays are the thermal response to this energy deposition. The question is whether the rate of change of soft x ray emission might reflect the variability of the electron beam and hence the variability of the hard x rays. To address this, we took the time derivative of the soft x ray light curve and compared it to the hard flares, 12 of them showed very closed agreement between the soft x ray derivative and the hard x ray light curve. The other five did not show this behavior but were similar to each other in general soft x ray behavior. Efforts to determine basic differences between the two kinds of flares continue. In addition the behavior of soft x ray temperature of flares was examined.

  5. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares and Associated CME Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosian, Vahe'

    2016-01-01

    Observations relating the characteristics of electrons seen near Earth (SEPs) and those producing flare radiation show that in certain (prompt) events the origin of both population appears to be the flare site, which show strong correlation between the number and spectral index of SEP and hard X-ray radiating electrons, but in others(delayed), which are associated with fast CMEs, this relation is complex and SEPs tend to be harder. Prompt event spectral relation disagrees with that expected in thick or thin target models. We show that using a a more accurate treatment of the transport of the accelerated electrons to the footpoints and to the Earth can account for this discrepancy. Our results are consistent with those found by Chen and Petrosian (2013) for two flares using non-parametric inversion methods, according to which we have weak diffusion conditions, and trapping mediated by magnetic field convergence. The weaker correlations and harder spectra of delayed events can come about by re-acceleration of e...

  6. ENERGY PARTITIONS AND EVOLUTION IN A PURELY THERMAL SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E. [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a solely thermal flare, which we detected in the microwave range from the thermal gyro- and free–free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. When the magnetic energy release is over, the source parameters come back to nearly their original values. We discuss possible scenarios to explain this behavior.

  7. Magnetic Energy Dissipation during the 2014 March 29 Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J

    2015-01-01

    We calculated the time evolution of the free magnetic energy during the 2014-Mar-29 flare (SOL2014-03-29T17:48), the first X-class flare detected by IRIS. The free energy was calculated from the difference between the nonpotential field, constrained by the geometry of observed loop structures, and the potential field. We use AIA/SDO and IRIS images to delineate the geometry of coronal loops in EUV wavelengths, as well as to trace magnetic field directions in UV wavelengths in the chromosphere and transition region. We find an identical evolution of the free energy for both the coronal and chromospheric tracers, as well as agreement between AIA and IRIS results, with a peak free energy of $E_{free}(t_{peak}) \\approx (45 \\pm 2) \\times 10^{30}$ erg, which decreases by an amount of $\\Delta E_{free} \\approx (29 \\pm 3) \\times 10^{30}$ erg during the flare decay phase. The consistency of free energies measured from different EUV and UV wavelengths for the first time here, demonstrates that vertical electric currents...

  8. Global Energetics in Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2017-08-01

    We present a statistical study of the energetics of coronal mass ejections (CME) and compare it with the magnetic, thermal, and nonthermal energy dissipated in flares. The physical parameters of CME speeds, mass, and kinetic energies are determined with two different independent methods, i.e., the traditional white-light scattering method using LASCO/SOHO data, and the EUV dimming method using AIA/SDO data. We analyze all 860 GOES M- and X-class flare events observed during the first 7 years (2010-2016) of the SDO mission. The new ingredients of our CME modeling includes: (1) CME geometry in terms of a self-similar adiabatic expansion, (2) DEM analysis of CME mass over entire coronal temperature range, (3) deceleration of CME due to gravity force which controls the kinetic and potentail CME energy as a function of time, (4) the critical speed that controls eruptive and confined CMEs, (5) the relationship between the center-of-mass motion during EUV dimming and the leading edge motion observed in white-light coronagraphs. Novel results are: (1) Physical parameters obtained from both the EUV dimming and white-light method can be reconciled; (2) the equi-partition of CME kinetic and thermal flare energy; (3) the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana scaling law. We find that the two methods in EUV and white-light wavelengths are highly complementary and yield more complete models than each method alone.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the X2.2 Solar Flare on 2011 February 15: II. A Dynamics Connecting the Solar Flare and the Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, S; Magara, T; Choe, G S; Park, Y D

    2015-01-01

    We clarify a relationship of the dynamics of a solar flare and a growing Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) by investigating the dynamics of magnetic fields during the X2.2-class flare taking place in the solar active region 11158 on 2011 February 15, based on simulation results obtained from Inoue et al. 2014. We found that the strongly twisted lines formed through the tether-cutting reconnection in the twisted lines of a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) can break the force balance within the magnetic field, resulting in their launch from the solar surface. We further discover that a large-scale flux tube is formed during the eruption as a result of the tether-cutting reconnection between the eruptive strongly twisted lines and these ambient weakly twisted lines. Then the newly formed large flux tube exceeds the critical height of the torus instability. The tether-cutting reconnection thus plays an important role in the triggering a CME. Furthermore, we found that the tangential fields at the solar surface illust...

  10. Photoelectron spectrum in the upper atmosphere of the earth during solar flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, S.V.; Kudryashev, G.S.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents calculations of the photoelectron spectrum during solar flares. A comparison with the data of satellite measurements is presented. Verification of the calculated model of the experimental data has been carried out, showing satisfactory agreement between the results of the calculations and the variations of the photoelectron intensities and emission of the upper atmosphere. The model is suitable for the evaluation of the degree of disturbance of ionospheric parameters during flares, particularly above 100 km, where the role of photoelectrons increases greatly.

  11. Solar Flares and Magnetospheric Particles: Investigations Based upon the ONR-602 Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    of neutrons produced during a solar flare. These neutrons will decay in- .0- flight and have been observed as 5 Ne-C 4 a pulse of protons in Ne-S...location of the protons from the neutron decay . Note Figure 3. Neon Isotopic Composition. ’I.: . .. ....* * •:. :..: :-- .: .,. -. - I-’ -A7.~~~ -d- ..9...have too high a background to observe the small flux from this flare. However, the discovery of a pulse of protons corresponding to the neutron decay

  12. Application of digital image processing techniques to faint solar flare phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glackin, D. L.; Martin, S. F.

    1980-01-01

    Digital image processing of eight solar flare events was performed using the Video Information Communication and Retrieval language in order to study moving emission fronts, flare halos, and Moreton waves. The techniques used include contrast enhancement, isointensity contouring, the differencing of images, spatial filtering, and geometrical registration. The spatial extent and temporal behavior of the faint phenomena is examined along with the relation of the three types of phenomena to one another. The image processing techniques make possible the detailed study of the history of the phenomena and provide clues to their physical nature.

  13. Ultra-Narrow Negative Flare Front Observed in Helium-10830 Å Using the1.6m New Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Ding, Mingde; Kleint, Lucia; Su, Jiangtao; Liu, Chang; Ji, Haisheng; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles that have adverse effects on the near-Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to as bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, we show a striking “negative” flare with a narrow but unambiguous “dark” moving front observed in He I 10830 Å, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in Hα and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 Å can be produced under special circumstances by nonthermal electron collisions or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in solar flares.

  14. Using SDO-EVE Satellite Data to Model for the First Time how Large Solar Flares Influence the Earths Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Joseph; Sojka, Jan; Schunk, Robert; David, Michael; Woods, Tom; Eparvier, Frank

    2012-10-01

    The earth's ionosphere is very important in our everyday life. During large solar flares the ionosphere expands to the point of disrupting communications from GPS, military, and commercial communications satellites, and even radio blackouts can occur. The EVE instrument on the SDO satellite has given unprecedented spectral resolution for the Extreme Ultraviolet(EUV) spectrum with a time cadence of 10 seconds. This has made it possible to analyze flare spectra as never before. Using the Time Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) we have input this new spectral data for large solar flares and analyzed the effect on the ionosphere. We take as a test case the X1.6 flare on March 9, 2011. Even this minor X-class provides insight into how the ionospheric layers respond differently to solar flares.

  15. Hard X-ray morphology of the X1.3 April 25, 2014 partially occulted limb solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Effenberger, Frederic; Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-01-01

    At hard X-ray energies, the bright footpoint emission from solar flare loops often prevents a detailed analysis of the weaker loop-top source morphology due to the limited dynamic range available for X-ray imaging. Here, we study the X1.3 April 25, 2014 flare with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). This partially occulted limb flare allows the analysis of the loop-top emission in isolation. We present results on the flare light curve at different energies, the source morphology from X-ray imaging and a detailed spectral analysis of the different source components by imaging spectroscopy. The loop-top source, a likely site of particle acceleration, shows a clear composition of different emission components. The results indicate the opportunities that detailed imaging of hard X-rays can provide to learn about particle acceleration, transport and heating processes in solar flares.

  16. Super-hot (T > 30 MK) Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    The Sun offers a convenient nearby laboratory to study the physical processes of particle acceleration and impulsive energy release in magnetized plasmas that occur throughout the universe, from planetary magnetospheres to black hole accretion disks. Solar flares are the most powerful explosions in the solar system, releasing up to 10^32-10^33 ergs over only 100-1,000 seconds, accelerating electrons up to hundreds of MeV and heating plasma to tens of MK. The accelerated electrons and the hot plasma each contain tens of percent of the total flare energy, indicating an intimate link between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and flare energy release. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observes the X-ray emission from these processes from ~3 keV to ~17 MeV with unprecedented spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution. RHESSI observations show that "super-hot" (>30 MK) plasma temperatures are achieved almost exclusively by intense, GOES X-class flares and appear to be strictly a...

  17. Solar Flare Termination Shock and Synthetic Emission Line Profiles of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijia; Li, Gang; Reeves, Kathy; Raymond, John

    2017-09-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic phenomena that occur in the solar system. In the standard solar flare model, a fast mode shock, often referred to as the flare termination shock (TS), can exist above the loop-top source of hard X-ray emissions. The existence of the TS has been recently related to spectral hardening of a flare’s hard X-ray spectra at energies >300 keV. Observations of the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line during solar flares by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spacecraft have found significant redshifts with >100 km s‑1, which is consistent with a reconnection downflow. The ability to detect such a redshift with IRIS suggests that one may be able to use IRIS observations to identify flare TSs. Using a magnetohydrodynamic simulation to model magnetic reconnection of a solar flare and assuming the existence of a TS in the downflow of the reconnection plasma, we model the synthetic emission of the Fe xxi 1354.08 line in this work. We show that the existence of the TS in the solar flare may manifest itself in the Fe xxi 1354.08 Å line.

  18. Evidence of the radio-quiet hard X-ray precursor of the 13 December 2006 solar flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimovets, I.V.; Struminsky, A.B. [Space Res Inst IKI, Moscow 117997, (Russian Federation); Gros, M. [CEA Saclay, DSM, DAPNIA, Serv Astrophys, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Struminsky, A.B. [IZMIRAN, Troitsk 142190, Moscow Region, (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    We report multi-wavelength investigation of the pre-impulsive phase of the 13 December 2006 X-class solar flare. We use hard X-ray data from the anticoincidence system of spectrometer onboard INTEGRAL (ACS) jointly with soft X-ray data from the GOES-12 and Hinode satellites. Radio data are from Nobeyama and Learmonth solar observatories and from the Culgoora Solar Radio Spectrograph. The main finding of our analysis is a spiky increase of the ACS count rate accompanied by surprisingly gradual and weak growth of microwave emission and without detectable radio emission at meter and decimeter wavelengths about 10 min prior to the impulsive phase of the solar flare. At the time of this pre-flare hard X-ray burst the onset of the GOES soft X-ray event has been reported, positive derivative of the GOES soft X-ray flux started to rise and a bright spot has appeared in the images of the Hinode X-ray telescope (XRT) between the flare ribbons near the magnetic inversion line close to the sources of thermal and non-thermal hard X-ray emission observed by Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) during the flare. These facts we consider as evidences of solar origin of the increased pre-flare ACS count rate. We briefly discuss a possible cause of the pre-flare emission peculiarities. (authors)

  19. The X-ray emission of solar flares generated by anisotropic electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogovalov, S. V.; Kelner, S. R.; Kotov, Y. D.

    1987-12-01

    For three types of the initial angle distribution of fast electrons, energy spectra, directivity, and polarization of the bremsstrahlung have been computed with an account for multiple scattering and energy losses. The influence of Compton scattering and of photoabsorption on the observed hard X-ray emission of solar flares has been investigated. It is obtained that the photon spectrum index depends not only on the spectrum of electrons but also on the registered energy range and on the angle of view of the flare. In the 10 - 40 keV range the spectrum is softer at the limb than in the solar disc centre; in the 60 - 360 keV the situation is reverse, the spectrum being softer in the solar disc centre.

  20. WebGL-enabled 3D visualization of a Solar Flare Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A.; Cheung, C. M. M.; Chintzoglou, G.

    2016-12-01

    The visualization of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of astrophysical systems such as solar flares often requires specialized software packages (e.g. Paraview and VAPOR). A shortcoming of using such software packages is the inability to share our findings with the public and scientific community in an interactive and engaging manner. By using the javascript-based WebGL application programming interface (API) and the three.js javascript package, we create an online in-browser experience for rendering solar flare simulations that will be interactive and accessible to the general public. The WebGL renderer displays objects such as vector flow fields, streamlines and textured isosurfaces. This allows the user to explore the spatial relation between the solar coronal magnetic field and the thermodynamic structure of the plasma in which the magnetic field is embedded. Plans for extending the features of the renderer will also be presented.

  1. Interplay of Boltzmann equation and continuity equation for accelerated electrons in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Codispoti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    During solar flares a large amount of electrons are accelerated within the plasma present in the solar atmosphere. Accurate measurements of the motion of these electrons start becoming available from the analysis of hard X-ray imaging-spectroscopy observations. In this paper, we discuss the linearized perturbations of the Boltzmann kinetic equation describing an ensemble of electrons accelerated by the energy release occurring during solar flares. Either in the limit of high energy or at vanishing background temperature such an equation reduces to a continuity equation equipped with an extra force of stochastic nature. This stochastic force is actually described by the well known energy loss rate due to Coulomb collision with ambient particles, but, in order to match the collision kernel in the linearized Boltzmann equation it needs to be treated in a very specific manner. In the second part of the paper the derived continuity equation is solved with some hyperbolic techniques, and the obtained solution is wr...

  2. Solar flare impact on FUV based thermospheric O/N2 estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Kil, H.

    2016-09-01

    During/after intense solar flares, FUV based thermospheric O/N2 ratio decreases and recovers instantly, indicating that the decrease is not physical. Simulations with an increased solar X-ray (0-10 nm) flux and a fixed O and N2 profiles show a significant 135.6 nm/LBHS decrease that is sufficient to explain the O/N2 decrease. The false O/N2 decrease is mostly due to increased differences in O2 absorption at 135.6 nm and LBHS caused by low-altitude emissions associated with enhanced X-rays. However, the heating from solar flares may cause a weak depletion in O/N2.

  3. Relationship between chromospheric evaporation and magnetic field topology in M-class solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Sadykov, V M; Sharykin, I N; Zimovets, I V; Dominguez, S Vargas

    2016-01-01

    Chromospheric evaporation is observed as Doppler blueshift during solar flares. It plays one of key roles in dynamics and energetics of solar flares, however, its mechanism is still unknown. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of spatially-resolved multi-wavelength observations of chromospheric evaporation during an M 1.0 class solar flare (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) using data from the NASA's IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) and HMI/SDO (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory) telescopes, and VIS/NST (Visible Imaging Spectrometer at New Solar Telescope) high-resolution observations, covering the temperature range from 10^4 K to 10^7 K. The results show that the averaged over the region Fe XXI blueshift of the hot evaporating plasma is delayed relative to the C II redshift of the relatively cold chromospheric plasma by about 1 min. The spatial distribution of the delays is not uniform across the region and can be as long as 2 min in several zones. Using vector magne...

  4. Using Extreme Value Theory for Determining the Probability of Carrington-Like Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Elvidge, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Space weather events can negatively affect satellites, the electricity grid, satellite navigation systems and human health. As a consequence, extreme space weather has been added to the UK and other national risk registers. However, by their very nature, extreme events occur rarely and statistical methods are required to determine the probability of occurrence solar storms. Space weather events can be characterised by a number of natural phenomena such as X-ray (solar) flares, solar energetic particle (SEP) fluxes, coronal mass ejections and various geophysical indices (Dst, Kp, F10.7). Here we use extreme value theory (EVT) to investigate the probability of extreme solar flares. Previous work has suggested that the distribution of solar flares follows a power law. However such an approach can lead to overly "fat-tails" in the probability distribution function and thus to an under estimation of the return time of such events. Using EVT and GOES X-ray flux data we find that the expected 150 year return level i...

  5. On the detection of neutrinos from solar flares using pion-decay photons to provide a time window template

    CERN Document Server

    de Wasseige, G; van Eijndhoven, N; Evenson, P; Klein, K -L

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of the eighties and in response to a reported increase in the total neutrino flux in the Homestake experiment in coincidence with solar flares, solar neutrino detectors have searched for solar flare signals. Even though these detectors have used different solar flare samples and analyses, none of them has been able to confirm the possible signal seen by Homestake. Neutrinos from the decay of mesons, which are themselves produced in collisions of accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere would provide a novel window on the underlying physics of the hadronic acceleration and interaction processes during solar flares. Solar flare neutrino flux measurements would indeed help to constrain current parameters such as the composition of the accelerated flux, the proton/ion spectral index and the high energy cutoff or the magnetic configuration in the interaction region. We describe here a new way to search for these neutrinos by considering a specific solar flare sample and a data driven time window te...

  6. A Large-scale Plume in an X-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.

    2017-08-01

    Ever-increasing multi-frequency imaging of solar observations suggests that solar flares often involve more than one magnetic fluxtube. Some of the fluxtubes are closed, while others can contain open fields. The relative proportion of nonthermal electrons among those distinct loops is highly important for understanding energy release, particle acceleration, and transport. The access of nonthermal electrons to the open field is also important because the open field facilitates the solar energetic particle (SEP) escape from the flaring site, and thus controls the SEP fluxes in the solar system, both directly and as seed particles for further acceleration. The large-scale fluxtubes are often filled with a tenuous plasma, which is difficult to detect in either EUV or X-ray wavelengths; however, they can dominate at low radio frequencies, where a modest component of nonthermal electrons can render the source optically thick and, thus, bright enough to be observed. Here we report the detection of a large-scale “plume” at the impulsive phase of an X-class solar flare, SOL2001-08-25T16:23, using multi-frequency radio data from Owens Valley Solar Array. To quantify the flare’s spatial structure, we employ 3D modeling utilizing force-free-field extrapolations from the line of sight SOHO/MDI magnetograms with our modeling tool GX_Simulator. We found that a significant fraction of the nonthermal electrons that accelerated at the flare site low in the corona escapes to the plume, which contains both closed and open fields. We propose that the proportion between the closed and open fields at the plume is what determines the SEP population escaping into interplanetary space.

  7. The flare origin of Forbush decreases not associated with solar flares on the visible hemisphere of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Signorini, C.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations have shown that Forbush decreases (Fds) are produced by the propagation into the interplanetary space of a strong perturbation originating from a solar flare (Sf) accompanied by Type IV radioemission. As the front of the perturbation propagates into the interplanetary space, the region in which the galactic cosmic rays are modulated (Fd-modulated region) rotates westward with the Sun and is generally included between two boundary streams; therefore the Fds not associated with observed type IV Sfs (N.Ass.Fds) are likely to be produced by type IV Sfs occurred on the Sun's backside: these vents can be observed when the Earth crosses the corotating Western boundary of the modulated region.

  8. Neutron decay electrons after the solar flare of 1980 June 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffolo, D.; Dröge, W.; Klecker, B.

    1996-06-01

    We have found evidence for fluxes of energetic electrons in interplanetary space on board the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft which we interpret as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1980 June 21. The decay electrons arrived at the spacecraft shortly before the electrons from the flare and can be distinguished from the latter by their distinctive energy spectrum. The time profile of the decay electrons is in good agreement with the results from a simulation based on a scattering mean free path derived from a fit to the flare electron data. The comparison with simultaneously observed decay protons and a published direct measurement of high-energy neutrons places important constraints on the parent neutron spectrum.

  9. Coronal loop hydrodynamics. The solar flare observedon November 12 1980 revisited the UV line emission

    CERN Document Server

    Betta, R M; Reale, F; Serio, S

    2001-01-01

    We revisit a well-studied solar flare whose X-ray emission originating from a simple loop structure was observed by most of the instruments on board SMM on November 12 1980. The X-ray emission of this flare, as observed with the XRP, was successfully modeled previously. Here we include a detailed modeling of the transition region and we compare the hydrodynamic results with the UVSP observations in two EUV lines, measured in areas smaller than the XRP rasters, covering only some portions of the flaring loop (the top and the foot-points). The single loop hydrodynamic model, which fits well the evolution of coronal lines (those observed with the XRP and the \\FeXXI 1354.1 \\AA line observed with the UVSP) fails to model the flux level and evolution of the \\OV 1371.3 \\AA line.

  10. Radio diagnostics of the solar flaring loop parameters by the forward fitting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgachev, A. S.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Melnikov, V. F.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical methods for solving the inverse problem of determining solar flaring loop physical parameters are sought and developed. This problem can be solved by fitting theoretically calculated radio emission characteristics (the flux or the degree of circular polarization) to the observed characteristics. Such a fitting is reduced to the solution of a system of equations with the observed and theoretically calculated radio emission characteristics on the right- and left-hand sides, respectively. The genetic algorithm method, which demonstrated good accuracy and calculation time when five parameters of a model flaring loop were recovered, has been used in fitting. After testing this method on the model sources, an algorithm was used to recover four parameters of the real flaring loop using the Nobeyama Radioheliograph data.

  11. Solar-flare-induced Forbush decreases - Dependence on shock wave geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B. T.; Gall, R.

    1984-01-01

    It is argued that the principal mechanism for the association of Forbush decreases with the passage of a solar flare shock wave is prolonged containment of cosmic ray particles behind the flare compression region, which acts as a semipermeable obstacle to particle motion along the field lines, leading to additional adiabatic cooling of the particles. Liouville's theorem is used to calculate the instantaneous distribution function at 1 AU for each particle arriving at the earth. By averaging over a large number of individual estimates, a representative estimate of the omnidirectional phase space density and the corresponding particle intensity is obtained. The energy change of individual particles at the shocks is found to be small in comparison to the energy lost by adiabatic cooling of the cosmic rays between the shock wave and the sun. The effects of particle rigidity, diffusion coefficient, and flare longitude on the magnitude of the Forbush decrease are quantitatively investigated.

  12. Simulation of multiple supra--arcade downflows in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Cécere, M; Costa, A; Elaskar, S; Maglione, S

    2012-01-01

    In later papers we have shown that sunward, generally dark, plasma features originated above posteruption flare arcades are consistent with a scenario where plasma voids are generated by the bouncing and interfering of shocks and expansion waves upstream of an initial localized deposition of energy which is collimated in the magnetic field direction. In this paper we analyze the multiple production and interaction of supra--arcade downflows (SAD) and the structure of individual SADs that make them relatively stable features while moving. We compare our results with observations and with the scenarios proposed by other authors.

  13. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particle event characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new catalogue of 314 solar energetic particle (SEP events extending over a large time span from 1984 to 2013 has been compiled. The properties as well as the associations of these SEP events with their parent solar sources have been thoroughly examined. The properties of the events include the proton peak integral flux and the fluence for energies above 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV. The associated solar events were parametrized by solar flare (SF and coronal mass ejection (CME characteristics, as well as related radio emissions. In particular, for SFs: the soft X-ray (SXR peak flux, the SXR fluence, the heliographic location, the rise time and the duration were exploited; for CMEs the plane-of-sky velocity as well as the angular width were utilized. For radio emissions, type III, II and IV radio bursts were identified. Furthermore, we utilized element abundances of Fe and O. We found evidence that most of the SEP events in our catalogue do not conform to a simple two-class paradigm, with the 73% of them exhibiting both type III and type II radio bursts, and that a continuum of event properties is present. Although, the so-called hybrid or mixed events are found to be present in our catalogue, it was not possible to attribute each SEP event to a mixed/hybrid sub-category. Moreover, it appears that the start of the type III burst most often precedes the maximum of the SF and thus falls within the impulsive phase of the associated SF. At the same time, type III bursts take place within ≈5.22 min, on average, in advance from the time of maximum of the derivative of the SXR flux (Neupert effect. We further performed a statistical analysis and a mapping of the logarithm of the proton peak flux at E > 10 MeV, on different pairs of the parent solar source characteristics. This revealed correlations in 3-D space and demonstrated that the gradual SEP events that stem from the central part of the visible solar disk constitute a significant radiation

  14. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particle event characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Athanasios; Sandberg, Ingmar; Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Kouloumvakos, Athanasios; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Tziotziou, Kostas; Tsiropoula, Georgia; Jiggens, Piers; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-12-01

    A new catalogue of 314 solar energetic particle (SEP) events extending over a large time span from 1984 to 2013 has been compiled. The properties as well as the associations of these SEP events with their parent solar sources have been thoroughly examined. The properties of the events include the proton peak integral flux and the fluence for energies above 10, 30, 60 and 100 MeV. The associated solar events were parametrized by solar flare (SF) and coronal mass ejection (CME) characteristics, as well as related radio emissions. In particular, for SFs: the soft X-ray (SXR) peak flux, the SXR fluence, the heliographic location, the rise time and the duration were exploited; for CMEs the plane-of-sky velocity as well as the angular width were utilized. For radio emissions, type III, II and IV radio bursts were identified. Furthermore, we utilized element abundances of Fe and O. We found evidence that most of the SEP events in our catalogue do not conform to a simple two-class paradigm, with the 73% of them exhibiting both type III and type II radio bursts, and that a continuum of event properties is present. Although, the so-called hybrid or mixed events are found to be present in our catalogue, it was not possible to attribute each SEP event to a mixed/hybrid sub-category. Moreover, it appears that the start of the type III burst most often precedes the maximum of the SF and thus falls within the impulsive phase of the associated SF. At the same time, type III bursts take place within ≈5.22 min, on average, in advance from the time of maximum of the derivative of the SXR flux (Neupert effect). We further performed a statistical analysis and a mapping of the logarithm of the proton peak flux at E > 10 MeV, on different pairs of the parent solar source characteristics. This revealed correlations in 3-D space and demonstrated that the gradual SEP events that stem from the central part of the visible solar disk constitute a significant radiation risk. The velocity of

  15. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of High-Energy Gamma-ray Emission From Behind-the-limb Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Golenetskii, Sergei; Kashapova, Larisa; Krucker, Sam; Palshin, Valentin; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fermi LAT >30 MeV observations of the active Sun have increased the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. Of particular interest are the recent detections of three solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B spacecraft. These observations sample flares from active regions originating from behind both the eastern and western limbs and include an event associated with the second ground level enhancement event (GLE) of the 24th Solar Cycle. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. These detections present an unique opportunity to diagnose the mechanisms of high-energy emission and particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources.

  16. Doppler speeds of the hydrogen Lyman lines in solar flares from EVE

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Stephen A; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen Lyman lines provide important diagnostic information about the dynamics of the chromosphere, but there have been few systematic studies of their variability during flares. We investigate Doppler shifts in these lines in several flares, and use these to calculate plasma speeds. We use spectral data from the Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph B (MEGS-B) detector of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. MEGS-B obtains full-disk spectra of the Sun at a resolution of 0.1nm in the range 37-105 nm, which we analyse using three independent methods. The first method performs Gaussian fits to the lines, and compares the quiet-Sun centroids with the flaring ones to obtain the Doppler shifts. The second method uses cross-correlation to detect wavelength shifts between the quiet-Sun and flaring line profiles. The final method calculates the "center-of-mass" of the line profile, and compares the quiet-Sun and flaring centroids to obtain the shift. In ...

  17. A Model for the Escape of Solar-Flare Accelerated Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Masson, Sophie; DeVore, C Rick

    2013-01-01

    Impulsive solar energetic particles (SEP) bursts are frequently observed in association with so-called eruptive flares consisting of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a flare. These highly prompt SEPs are believed to be accelerated by the flare rather than by a CME shock, but in the standard flare model the accelerated particles should remain trapped in the corona or in the ejected plas- moid. In this case, however, the particles would reach the Earth only after a delay of many hours to a few days. We present a new model that can account for the prompt injection of energetic particles onto open interplanetary magnetic flux tubes. The basic idea underlying the model is that magnetic reconnection between the ejection and external open field allows for the release of the ener- getic particles. We demonstrate the model using 2.5D MHD simulations of a CME/flare event. The model system consists of a multipolar field with a coro- nal null point and with photospheric shear imposed at a polarity inversion line, as in ...

  18. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF ELECTRON-DRIVEN EVAPORATION IN TWO SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Zhang, Q. M., E-mail: lidong@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2015-11-01

    We have explored the relationship between hard X-ray (HXR) emissions and Doppler velocities caused by the chromospheric evaporation in two X1.6 class solar flares on 2014 September 10 and October 22, respectively. Both events display double ribbons and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit is fixed on one of their ribbons from the flare onset. The explosive evaporations are detected in these two flares. The coronal line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å shows blueshifts, but the chromospheric line of C i 1354.29 Å shows redshifts during the impulsive phase. The chromospheric evaporation tends to appear at the front of the flare ribbon. Both Fe xxi and C i display their Doppler velocities with an “increase-peak-decrease” pattern that is well related to the “rising-maximum-decay” phase of HXR emissions. Such anti-correlation between HXR emissions and Fe xxi Doppler shifts and correlation with C i Doppler shifts indicate the electron-driven evaporation in these two flares.

  19. Abrupt Longitudinal Magnetic Field Changes and Ultraviolet Emissions Accompanying Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, Brittany; Sudol, Jeffrey; 10.1088/0004-637X/760/1/29

    2012-01-01

    We have used Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) 1600 \\AA images and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) magnetograms to compare ultraviolet (UV) emissions from the chromosphere to longitudinal magnetic field changes in the photosphere during four X-class solar flares. An abrupt, significant, and persistent change in the magnetic field occurred across more than ten pixels in the GONG magnetograms for each flare. These magnetic changes lagged the GOES flare start times in all cases, showing that they were consequences and not causes of the flares. Ultraviolet emissions were spatially coincident with the field changes. The UV emissions tended to lag the GOES start times for the flares, and led the changes in the magnetic field in all pixels except one. The UV emissions led the photospheric field changes by 4 minutes on average with the longest lead being 9 minutes, however, the UV emissions continued for tens of minutes, and more than an hour in some cases, after the field changes were complete. ...

  20. Instrumental oscillations in RHESSI count rates during solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, A R; Dennis, B R; Kontar, E P; Nakariakov, V M; Struminsky, A B; Tolbert, A K

    2011-01-01

    Aims: We seek to illustrate the analysis problems posed by RHESSI spacecraft motion by studying persistent instrumental oscillations found in the lightcurves measured by RHESSI's X-ray detectors in the 6-12 keV and 12-25 keV energy range during the decay phase of the flares of 2004 November 4 and 6. Methods: The various motions of the RHESSI spacecraft which may contribute to the manifestation of oscillations are studied. The response of each detector in turn is also investigated. Results: We find that on 2004 November 6 the observed oscillations correspond to the nutation period of the RHESSI instrument. These oscillations are also of greatest amplitude for detector 5, while in the lightcurves of many other detectors the oscillations are small or undetectable. We also find that the variation in detector pointing is much larger during this flare than the counterexample of 2004 November 4. Conclusions: Sufficiently large nutation motions of the RHESSI spacecraft lead to clearly observable oscillations in count...

  1. Global Energetics of Solar Flares: III. Non thermal Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Aschwanden, Markus J; O'Flannagain, Aidan; Campi, Amir; McTiernan, James M; Konter, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which RHESSI data of 193 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5 yrs of the SDO) mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power law slope and flux, and the thermal/nonthermal cross-over energy. From these parameters we calculate the total non thermal energy in electrons with two different methods: (i) using the observed cross-over energy as low-energy cutoff, and (ii) using the low-energy cutoff predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. We find commensurable ranges of the low-energy or 21+/-6 keV for the cross-over method, and 18+/-6 keV for the warm-target model. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies and thermal energies in the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios: E_nt=0.07 E_mag, and E_th=0.74 E_Na,...

  2. Observations and modeling of ionospheric scintillations at South Pole during six X‐class solar flares in 2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Priyadarshi, S; Zhang, Q.‐H; Ma, Y.‐Z; Wang, Y; Xing, Z.‐Y

    2016-01-01

    ...‐class solar flares have been studied during the summer and winter months, using the produced scintillation indices based on the observations from the GPS receiver at South Pole and the in situ plasma...

  3. Non-planar MHD model for solar flare-generated disturbances in the heliospheric equatorial plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.; Han, S. M.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis, with a representative (canonical) example of solar-flare-generated equatorial disturbances, is made for the temporal and spatial changes in the solar wind plasma and magnetic field environment between the sun and 1 AU. The goal is to search for first-order global consequences rather than to make a parametric study. The analysis treats all three plasma velocity and magnetic field components in any convenient heliospheric plane of symmetry. The representative disturbance is examined for the canonical case in which the temporal and spatial changes in a homogeneous solar wind caused by a solar-flare-generated shock wave are described. All plasma and field parameters at three radial locations are examined. These are the central meridian and 33 deg W and 90 deg W of the flare's central meridian. It is found that the incorporation of a small meridional magnetic field in the ambient magnetic spiral field has negligible effect on the results. The magnetic field exhibits strong kinking within the interplanetary shocked flow, even reversed polarity that, coupled with low temperature and low density, suggests a plausible explanation for magnetic clouds' with accompanying double-streaming of electrons observed at directions approximately 90 deg to the heliocentric radius.

  4. First flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A Y; Hurford, G J; Bain, H M; Amman, M; Mochizuki, B A; Hoberman, J; Olson, J; Maruca, B A; Godbole, N M; Smith, D M; Sample, J; Kelley, N A; Zoglauer, A; Caspi, A; Kaufmann, P; Boggs, S; Lin, R P

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to study solar-flare particle acceleration and transport. We describe GRIPS's first Antarctic long-duration flight in Jan 2016 and report preliminary calibration and science results. Electron and ion dynamics, particle abundances and the ambient plasma conditions in solar flares can be understood by examining hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emission (20 keV to 10 MeV) with enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry. GRIPS is specifically designed to answer questions including: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing HXRs and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? GRIPS's key technological improvements over the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) include 3D position-sensi...

  5. The Solar Flare of the 14th of July 2000 (L3+C detector results)

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bähr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chiarusi, T; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Dela Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; De Asmundis, R; Dglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Durán, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grabosch, H J; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Herv, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, A; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kantserov, V A; Kaur, M; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Kuang, H H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Rembeczki, S; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P A M; Riemann, S; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schöneich, B; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, G; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Van Wijk, R; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yeh, S C; Yu, Z Q; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhou, S J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhu, Q Q; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M; Zwart, A N M

    2006-01-01

    Several experiments have reported observations on possible correlations between the flux of high energy muons and intense solar flares. If confirmed, these observations would have significant implications for acceleration processes in the heliosphere able to accelerate protons and other ions to energies of at least tens of GeV. The solar flare of the 14 July 2000 offers a unique opportunity for the L3+C experiment to search for a correlated enhancement in the flux of muons using the L3 precision muon spectrometer. Its capabilities for observing a directional excess in the flux of muons above 15 GeV (corresponding to primary proton energies above 40 GeV) are presented along with observations made on the 14th of July 2000. We report an excess which appeared at a time coincident with the peak increase of solar protons observed at lower energies. The probability that the excess is a background fluctuation is estimated to be 1%. No similar excess of the muon flux was observed up to 1.5 hours after the solar flare ...

  6. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  7. Charge-exchange limits on low-energy alpha-particle fluxes in solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Hugh; MacKinnon, Alec; Woods, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Lyman-alpha line of He ii at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary alpha particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He ii bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV/nucleon. We study ten events in total, including the gamma-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic...

  8. How did a Major Confined Flare Occur in Super Solar Active Region 12192?

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Chaowei; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl B; Wang, Haimin; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We study the physical mechanism of a major X-class solar flare that occurred in the super NOAA active region (AR) 12192 using a data-driven numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling complemented with observations. With the evolving magnetic fields observed at the solar surface as bottom boundary input, we drive an MHD system to evolve self-consistently in correspondence with the realistic coronal evolution. During a two-day time interval, the modeled coronal field has been slowly stressed by the photospheric field evolution,which gradually created a large-scale coronal current sheet, i.e., a narrow layer with intense current, in the core of the AR. The current layer was successively enhanced until it became so thin that a tether-cutting reconnection between the sheared magnetic arcades was set in, which led to a flare. The modeled reconnecting field lines and their footpoints match well the observed hot flaring loops and the flare ribbons, respectively, suggesting that the model has successfully "reproduce...

  9. Solar Magnetic Field Studies Using the 12-Micron Emission Lines. IV. Observations of a Delta-Region Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Jennings, D E; McCabe, G; Sada, P; Moran, T; Jennings, Donald E.; Deming, Drake; Sada, Pedro; Moran, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    We have recently developed the capability to make solar vector (Stokes IQUV) magnetograms using the infrared line of MgI at 12.32 microns. On 24 April 2001, we obtained a vector magnetic map of solar active region NOAA 9433, fortuitously just prior to the occurrence of an M2 flare. Examination of a sequence of SOHO/MDI magnetograms, and comparison with ground-based H-alpha images, shows that the flare was produced by the cancellation of newly emergent magnetic flux outside of the main sunspot. The very high Zeeman-sensitivity of the 12-micron data allowed us to measure field strengths on a spatial scale which was not directly resolvable. At the flare trigger site, opposite polarity fields of 2700 and 1000 Gauss occurred within a single 2 arc-sec resolution element, as revealed by two resolved Zeeman splittings in a single spectrum. Our results imply an extremely high horizontal field strength gradient (5 G/km) prior to the flare, significantly greater than seen in previous studies. We also find that the magne...

  10. Recent Developments: The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Imaging and Detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-07-01

    In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron emission to have a significant displacement. This result is surprising; co-spatially accelerated ions and electrons are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) balloon instrument will investigate particle transport in solar flares by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emission (20keV - 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include three-dimensional position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulating collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal. This capability (1) enables the MPRM design by acting as a second modulation grid, (2) provides significant background rejection and (3) makes solar polarization measurements possible. The MPRM imager provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162 arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid collimator system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution can resolve the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35 arcsecs for gamma-rays, making these footpoints resolvable in only the largest flares. Here, we present the intial calibration of GRIPS’ 3D-GED detectors using laboratory radioactive sources. We evaluate charge sharing between adjacent strips, the detection of coincidences and preliminary depth measurements. The detectors have been shown to have a linear response and resolve line emission. The MPRM modulation grid is constructed and we present initial results from calibration. GRIPS is scheduled for a

  11. Modulation of solar flare particles and track density profiles in gas-rich meteorite grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    A solution is presented to the problem concerning the time-averaged solar flare particle flux as a function of kinetic energy and distance from the sun for a given particle injection spectrum at the sun within the framework of standard diffusion-convection-adiabatic deceleration theory with the diffusion coefficient independent of distance from the sun. Results of the calculations which give best agreement with observations at 1 AU are presented and discussed, with particular reference to their implications for gas-rich meteorites. Normalization at the orbit of earth is achieved via observed track density versus depth profiles in lunar vug crystals. It is shown that if gas-rich meteorite grains were irradiated in the asteroid belt and if source and modulation parameters have changed little since irradiation, the track density should be 'harder' than the lunar vug profile by about 0.2-0.3 in the index. Quantitative estimation of solar flare particle exposure ages is discussed.

  12. Statistics and Classification of the Microwave Zebra Patterns Associated with Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Meszarosova, H; Karlicky, M

    2013-01-01

    The microwave zebra pattern (ZP) is the most interesting, intriguing, and complex spectral structure frequently observed in solar flares. A comprehensive statistical study will certainly help us to understand the formation mechanism, which is not exactly clear now. This work presents a comprehensive statistical analysis on a big sample with 202 ZP events collected from observations at the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou and the Ondrejov Radiospectrograph in Czech Republic at frequencies of 1.00 - 7.60 GHz during 2000 - 2013. After investigating the parameter properties of ZPs, such as the occurrence in flare phase, frequency range, polarization degree, duration, etc., we find that the variation of zebra stripe frequency separation with respect to frequency is the best indicator for a physical classification of ZPs. Microwave ZPs can be classified into 3 types: equidistant ZP, variable-distant ZP, and growing-distant ZP, possibly corresponding to mechanisms of Bernstein wave model, whistl...

  13. Unusual ionospheric effects observed during the intense 28 October 2003 solar flare in the Brazilian sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sahai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The 28 October 2003 solar flare (X-ray Class X17.2 was one of the most intense solar flares observed in the recent past. In the present investigation we show the unusual ionospheric effects observed in the Brazilian sector during this solar flare, using both the ionospheric sounding observations obtained at the UNIVAP stations: Palmas (7–10.2° S, 48.2° W, dip lat. 5.5° S and Sao Jose dos Campos (23.2° S, 45.9° W, dip lat. 17.6° S, Brazil; and ground-based global positioning system (GPS data obtained at the "Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística" (IBGE stations: Imperatriz (5.5° S, 47.5° W, dip lat. 2.9° S, Brasilia (15.9° S, 47.9° W, dip lat. 11.7° S, Presidente Prudente (22.3° S, 51.4° W, dip lat. 14.9° S, and Porto Alegre (30.1° S, 51.1° W, dip lat. 20.7° S, Brazil; on two consecutive days, viz., 27 (without solar flare and 28 (with solar flare October 2003. It should be mentioned that the vertical total electron content (VTEC from the GPS observations obtained during the solar flare showed an unusual simultaneous increase in the VTEC values at about 11:00 UT at all four stations associated with the solar flare EUV enhancements and lasted for about 3 h. However, no ionograms were obtained at any of the two UNIVAP stations for a period of about 1 h between about 11:00 to 12:00 UT. Before 11:00 UT (from about 10:45 UT and after 12:00 UT (to about 16:00 UT, the ionograms were only partial, with the low frequency end missing. During this intense solar flare, hard X-rays (1 to 10 A, as observed by the GOES 12 satellite, were ejected by the Sun during a long period (several hours, with peak radiation at about 11:10 UT. These hard X-ray radiations can penetrate further into the ionosphere, causing an increase in ionization in the lower part of ionosphere (D-region. In this way, the lack of ionograms or partial ionograms, which indicates no echoes or partial echoes of the transmitted digital ionosonde signals, are

  14. Transfer of Energy, Potential, and Current by Alfv\\'en Waves in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Melrose, D B

    2013-01-01

    Alfv\\'en waves play three related roles in the impulsive phase of a solar flare: they transport energy from a generator region to an acceleration region; they map the cross-field potential (associated with the driven energy release) from the generator region onto the acceleration region; and within the acceleration region they damp by setting up a parallel electric field that accelerates electrons and transfers the wave energy to them. The Alfv\\'en waves may also be regarded as setting up new closed current loops, with field-aligned currents that close across field lines at boundaries. A model is developed for large-amplitude Alfv\\'en waves that shows how Alfv\\'en waves play these roles in solar flares. A picket-fence structure for the current flow is incorporated into the model to account for the "number problem" and the energy of the accelerated electrons.

  15. The solar flare of 18 August 1979: Incoherent scatter radar data and photochemical model comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.; Fenimore, E.E.; Ganguly, S.

    1988-04-01

    Measurements of electron density at seven D-region altidues were made with the Arecibo radar during a Class-X solar flare on 18 August 1979. Measurements of solar x-ray fluxes during the same period were available from the GOES-2 satellite (0.5 to 4 /angstrom/ and 1 to 8 /angstrom/) and from ISEE-3 (in four bands between 26 and 400 keV). From the x-ray flux data we computed ionization rates in the D-region and the associated chemical changes, using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and diffusion model (with 836 chemical reactions and 19 vertical levels). The computed electron densities matched the data fairly well after we had adjusted the rate coefficients of two reactions. We discuss the hierarchies among the many flare-induced chemical reactions in two altitude ranges within the D-region and the effects of adjusting several other rate coefficients. 51 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra structures in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Sijie; Selzer, L A; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua

    2013-01-01

    Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern structures with period range from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in a X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two-three significant periodicities and almost in phase between stripes at different frequency. The Alfven speed estimated from the zebra pattern structures is about 700 Km/s. We obtain the spatial size of the waveguiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with the detected period of about 1 s. It suggests the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast mag- netoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

  17. Method of separation of celestial gamma-ray bursts from solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K. W.; White, R. S.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    We recently discovered 217 'new' celestial gamma-ray burst candidates from the 'new' burst search of the PVO real time data base. The burst search covered the time period from September 1978 to July 1988. Sixty were confirmed by at least one other spacecraft, e.g., ISEE-3, V-II, V-12, etc. None triggered the PVO high time resolution memory. In this paper we describe a new algorithm based on the relationship between time width T(w) and hardness ratio HR, to distinguish cosmic gamma-ray bursts from solar flares without knowing the directions of the events. The algorithm was tested with 83 triggered and 60 nontriggered confirmed gamma-ray bursts and 30 confirmed solar flares from PVO.

  18. Studies of the structure and dynamics of the D region of the polar ionosphere during solar flares in April 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, V. D.; Vasil'ev, E. B.; Ogloblina, O. F.; Tereshchenko, V. A.; Chernyakov, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    [1] The results of observations of the polar lower ionosphere by the partial reflection method during moderate solar flares in April 2004 are presented. The structure of the electron concentration profile in the ionospheric D region and the effects of the impact on it of X-ray radiation of the flares both in quiet and disturbed conditions are considered. It is shown that at altitudes below 75 km the electron concentration is proportional to the intensity of X-ray radiation from a solar flare. This manifests the existence of a linear recombination law at these heights.

  19. Validation of a scaling law for the coronal magnetic field strength and loop length of solar and stellar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namekata, Kosuke; Sakaue, Takahito; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Shibata and Yokoyama (1999, ApJ, 526, L49; 2002, ApJ, 577, 422) proposed a method of estimating the coronal magnetic field strength (B) and magnetic loop length (L) of solar and stellar flares, on the basis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetic reconnection model. Using the scaling law provided by Shibata and Yokoyama (1999, ApJ, 526, L49; 2002, ApJ, 577, 422), we obtain B and L as functions of the emission measure (EM = n2L3) and temperature (T) at the flare peak. Here, n is the coronal electron density of the flares. This scaling law enables the estimation of B and L for unresolved stellar flares from the observable physical quantities EM and T, which is helpful for studying stellar surface activities. To apply this scaling law to stellar flares, we discuss its validity for spatially resolved solar flares. Quantities EM and T are calculated from GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) soft X-ray flux data, and B and L are theoretically estimated using the scaling law. For the same flare events, B and L were also observationally estimated with images taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Magnetogram and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 94 Å pass band. As expected, a positive correlation was found between the theoretically and observationally estimated values. We interpret this result as indirect evidence that flares are caused by magnetic reconnection. Moreover, this analysis makes us confident about the validity of applying this scaling law to stellar flares as well as solar flares.

  20. The solar active region No. 10486 and its production of high energetic flares at October-November 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hady, Ahmed; Shaltout, M. A.

    The solar active region No. 10486 can be considered as one of the very large and powerful active regions since 1976. This region has produced the most important two solar flares during the period (1976-2003). The first flare released at 12:15UT on 28 October 2003 with importance X17/4B, and the second flare released at 22:25UT on 4 November 2003 with importance X28/3B. Both flares are the highest level in x-ray production since 1976, when different detectors, onboard various spacecrafts, have taken the data, and since 1996, when SOHO was launched to space. The first flare on 28 October 2003 produced protons events at 6:15UT on 29 Oct. 2003 with energies > 10 MeV. The maximum solar wind speed is 1905 and 1986 km/sec at 29 and 30 October 2003 respectively. The same region after its rotation across the sun was appeared again on the sun's edge at 18 November 2003, and produced high energetic flare at 19 November 2003, which led to increase the solar wind speed to 947 km/sec at 20 November 2003. The evaluation of the active region No. 10486 is very important for understanding the high energetic proton flares. The aim of this study is to follow the morphological and magnetic changes of the active region before, during, and after the high energetic flares were produced. Also, applying the cumulative summation curves method for the different index of the active region to predict the flare of high energy has been carried out. The results are promising and can be used for proton flares and Geomagnetic storms prediction, few days before their occurrence.

  1. Search of Continuum Solar Flare Radiation from GHz to THz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Giménez de Castro, C.; Hurford, G.; Lin, R. P.; Makhmutov, V. S.; Marcon, R.; Marun, A.; Raulin, J.-P.; Shih, A. Y.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Válio, A.; Villela, T.

    2011-05-01

    The new solar burst emission spectral component showing sub-THz fluxes increasing with frequency, spectrally separated from the well known microwave component, brings serious constraints for interpretation. The knowledge of THz continuum spectral shape is essential to investigate the nature of the emission mechanisms involved. New 45 and 90 GHz solar polarimeters are being installed at El Leoncito high altitude observatory, where sub-THz (0.2 and 0.4 THz) solar flare flux data are being obtained regularly since several years. The development of THz photometers for continuum requires solutions for several technical challenges. To avoid atmospheric attenuation the THz solar observations should be carried in space or at selected frequency windows on exceptionally high sites near the South Pole. A double THz solar photometer system has been developed to operate at center frequencies of 3 and 7 THz. Golay cell sensors are used, preceded by a low pass membrane filter (f Berkeley, together with GRIPS (Gamma-Ray Imaging Polarimeter for solar flares) experiment. One test flight is planned for 2012. USA. Another balloon flight over Russia (one week) is considered between 2014-2016, in a cooperation with Moscow Lebedev Physics Institute.

  2. NST and IRIS multi-wavelength observations of an M1.0 class solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Kosovichev, Alexander; Sharykin, Ivan; Struminsky, Alexei; Zimovets, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Although solar flares are the most energetic events in the Solar System and have direct impact in the interplanetary space and ultimately in our planet, there are still many unresolved issues concerning their generation, the underlying processes of particle acceleration involved, the effect at different layer in the solar atmosphere, among others. This work presents new coordinated observations from the New Solar Telescope (NST) and the space telescope IRIS that acquired simultaneous observations of an M1.0 class flare occurred on 12 June, 2014 in active region NOAA 12087. NST filtergrams using the TiO filter, together with chromospheric data from the Halpha line allow us to study the evolution of the event from the first signs of the intensification of the intensity in the region. We focused on a small portion where the intensity enhancement in Halpha (blue and red wings) seems to be triggered, and discovered a rapid expansion of a flux-rope structure near the magnetic neutral line, in the sequence of high-resolution photospheric images. IRIS observations evidenced strong emission of the chromospheric and transition region lines during the flare. Jet-like structures are detected before the initiation of the flare in chromospheric lines and strong non-thermal emission in the transition region at the beginning of the impulsive phase. Evaporation flows with velocities up to 50 km/s occurred in the hot chromospheric plasma. We interpreted the result in terms of the “gentle” evaporation that occurs after accelerated particles heat the chromosphere.

  3. Solar Flare Chromospheric Line Emission: Comparison Between IBIS High-resolution Observations and Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahé; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Liu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares involve impulsive energy release, which results in enhanced radiation in a broad spectral and at a wide height range. In particular, line emission from the chromosphere (lower atmosphere) can provide critical diagnostics of plasma heating processes. Thus, a direct comparison between high-resolution spectroscopic observations and advanced numerical modeling results can be extremely valuable, but has not been attempted so far. We present in this paper such a self-consistent investigation of an M3.0 flare observed by the Dunn Solar Telescope's (DST) Interferometric Bi-dimensional Spectrometer (IBIS) on 2011 September 24 that we have modeled with the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN (Carlsson & Stein 1992, 1997; Abbett & Hawley 1999; Allred et al. 2005). We obtained images and spectra of the flaring region with IBIS in H$\\alpha$ 6563 \\AA\\ and Ca II 8542 \\AA, and with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in X-rays. The latter was used to infer the non-thermal elect...

  4. Reconstruction of RHESSI Solar Flare Images with a Forward Fitting Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Schmahl, Ed; RHESSI Team

    2002-11-01

    We describe a forward-fitting method that has been developed to reconstruct hard X-ray images of solar flares from the Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), a Fourier imager with rotation-modulated collimators that was launched on 5 February 2002. The forward-fitting method is based on geometric models that represent a spatial map by a superposition of multiple source structures, which are quantified by circular gaussians (4 parameters per source), elliptical gaussians (6 parameters), or curved ellipticals (7 parameters), designed to characterize real solar flare hard X-ray maps with a minimum number of geometric elements. We describe and demonstrate the use of the forward-fitting algorithm. We perform some 500 simulations of rotation-modulated time profiles of the 9 RHESSI detectors, based on single and multiple source structures, and perform their image reconstruction. We quantify the fidelity of the image reconstruction, as function of photon statistics, and the accuracy of retrieved source positions, widths, and fluxes. We outline applications for which the forward-fitting code is most suitable, such as measurements of the energy-dependent altitude of energy loss near the limb, or footpoint separation during flares.

  5. On the Relationship Between Sunspot Structure and Magnetic Field Changes Associated with Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y. L.; Zhang, M.

    2016-08-01

    Many previous studies have shown that magnetic fields and sunspot structures present rapid and irreversible changes associated with solar flares. In this paper, we first use five X-class flares observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to show that not only do magnetic fields and sunspot structures show rapid, irreversible changes, but also that these changes are closely related both spatially and temporally. The magnitudes of the correlation coefficients between the temporal variations of the horizontal magnetic field and sunspot intensity are all larger than 0.90, with a maximum value of 0.99 and an average value of 0.96. Then, using four active regions during quiescent periods, three observed and one simulated, we show that in sunspot penumbra regions there also exists a close correlation between sunspot intensity and horizontal magnetic field strength in addition to the well-known correlation between sunspot intensity and the normal magnetic field strength. By connecting these two observational phenomena, we show that the sunspot structure change and magnetic field change are two facets of the same phenomena of solar flares; one change might be induced by the change of the other due to a linear correlation between sunspot intensity and magnetic field strength out of a local force balance.

  6. Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Energy Balance of a Solar Flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E P; Perez, J E; Harra, L K; Kuznetsov, A A; Emslie, A G; Jeffrey, N L S; Bian, N H; Dennis, B R

    2017-04-14

    The energy released in solar flares derives from a reconfiguration of magnetic fields to a lower energy state, and is manifested in several forms, including bulk kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection, acceleration of electrons and ions, and enhanced thermal energy that is ultimately radiated away across the electromagnetic spectrum from optical to x rays. Using an unprecedented set of coordinated observations, from a suite of instruments, we here report on a hitherto largely overlooked energy component-the kinetic energy associated with small-scale turbulent mass motions. We show that the spatial location of, and timing of the peak in, turbulent kinetic energy together provide persuasive evidence that turbulent energy may play a key role in the transfer of energy in solar flares. Although the kinetic energy of turbulent motions accounts, at any given time, for only ∼(0.5-1)% of the energy released, its relatively rapid (∼1-10  s) energization and dissipation causes the associated throughput of energy (i.e., power) to rival that of major components of the released energy in solar flares, and thus presumably in other astrophysical acceleration sites.

  7. Solar Flare Prediction Model with Three Machine-learning Algorithms using Ultraviolet Brightening and Vector Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizuka, N.; Sugiura, K.; Kubo, Y.; Den, M.; Watari, S.; Ishii, M.

    2017-02-01

    We developed a flare prediction model using machine learning, which is optimized to predict the maximum class of flares occurring in the following 24 hr. Machine learning is used to devise algorithms that can learn from and make decisions on a huge amount of data. We used solar observation data during the period 2010–2015, such as vector magnetograms, ultraviolet (UV) emission, and soft X-ray emission taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. We detected active regions (ARs) from the full-disk magnetogram, from which ∼60 features were extracted with their time differentials, including magnetic neutral lines, the current helicity, the UV brightening, and the flare history. After standardizing the feature database, we fully shuffled and randomly separated it into two for training and testing. To investigate which algorithm is best for flare prediction, we compared three machine-learning algorithms: the support vector machine, k-nearest neighbors (k-NN), and extremely randomized trees. The prediction score, the true skill statistic, was higher than 0.9 with a fully shuffled data set, which is higher than that for human forecasts. It was found that k-NN has the highest performance among the three algorithms. The ranking of the feature importance showed that previous flare activity is most effective, followed by the length of magnetic neutral lines, the unsigned magnetic flux, the area of UV brightening, and the time differentials of features over 24 hr, all of which are strongly correlated with the flux emergence dynamics in an AR.

  8. Hard X-ray and microwave sources located around the apex of a solar flare loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, S.; Shimojo, M.; Watanabe, K.; Minoshima, T.; Yaji, K.

    2010-12-01

    The apex of a flare loop is one of important regions to understand particle acceleration in solar flares, under the framework of the flare model based on magnetic reconnection. At that portion, nonthermal emissions are observed in hard X-rays and microwave. These two emissions are originated from electrons accelerated/energized in different energy ranges. Hard X-rays (~ 50 - 100 keV ) are emitted by relatively lower-energy (~ 100 keV) accelerated electrons. On the other hand, microwaves (17 GHz) are emitted by relatively higher-energy (~ 1 MeV) electrons. The locations (heights) of these two emitting regions impose considerable constraints on the acceleration/transport/loss processes of electrons in solar flares. To compare hard X-ray and microwave sources, we chose twenty-three events among all events detected by Nobeyama Radio Heliograph (NoRH) during the almost whole period of its operation (1992 - 2008). The criteria are (1) limb event, (2) simultaneous observation with Yohkoh/HXT or RHESSI, (3) enough number of photons in the energy range of 33 - 53 keV, and (4) microwave source large enough to resolve the flare loop into footpoint and looptop sources. However, only seven events among them can be used for this study. The remaining sixteen events are displaced from the list due to no hard X-ray looptop source, too complex structure of multiple loops, and so force. Among the seven events, six events show that the looptop hard X-ray source is located at a higher altitude than the looptop microwave source. This result suggests that lower-energy accelerated electrons (~ 100 keV) are located at a higher altitude than higher-energy (~ 1 MeV) electrons. What makes this height difference? We discuss the cause of it from various kinds of viewpoints, e.g. emission mechanism, trapping effect, transport process, loss process.

  9. An Interpretation of the Solar Flare Ocurred on 17 may 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul Firoz, Kazi; Gan, Wei-Qun; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Javier; Li, You-Ping

    2016-04-01

    We study temporal, spectral, and spatial evolution of a solar flare (M5.1) that erupted on 17 May 2012 from active region 11476. Investigation reveals that the flare satisfies standard-dynamical scenario such as the X-ray thermal emission components (6 - 12 keV) lay at the loop-top near the possible reconnection area whereas X-ray nonthermal emission components (25 - 50 keV) were from two laterally expanding foot-points. The topology structure demonstrates that microwave solar radio flux density (RFD) components originated from the positions around/above foot-points. Consequently propagation-delays between HXR and RFD components occurred and their onset/peak times differed. Spatial evolution of the thermal components demonstrates that the brighter region evolved through expansion and compression within a range of volume from 1.1x1028 to 2.3x1028 cm3. The peak time (~01:47 UT) of the flare in terms of soft X-ray (SXR) component (1 - 8 Å) occurred one minute before the first appearance (~ 01:48 UT) of the coronal mass ejection (CME) when a Type-II radio burst was clearly visible. The decay phase of the SXR component preserved a strong correlation with that of the Type-II burst and with the corresponding decay phase of the RFD components. The thermal energy of the flare was inversely proportional to the propagation time such that the flare energy decreases in the interplanetary medium so that the CME-driven shock becomes the dominant particle accelerator.

  10. Proton spectrum of the 2005 January 20 solar flare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-Guang

    2008-01-01

    An extreme solar cosmic ray event broke out on 2005 January 20.Not only is it the most intensive solar energetic particle (SEP) event,with>100 MeV particles measured by GOES satellite since 1986,but it has been the largest ground level enhancement (GLE) event recorded by the ground-based neutron monitors since 1956.This work presents the solar proton spectra for this event with data obtained by GOES in multiple energy cbannels.These spectra are well fitted by a modified power-law function.The spectral index of around -1 indicates that the January 20 event has a hard energy spectrum.Possible mechanisms for the acceleration of relativistic protons are discussed.

  11. Solar Flares and Variation of Local Geomagnetic Field: Measurements by the Huancayo Observatory over 2001-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Reyes, Rafael E.; Gárate Ayesta, Gabriel A.; Reyes Navarro, Felipe A.

    2017-02-01

    We study the local variation of the geomagnetic field measured by the Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory, Peru, during 2001-2010. Initially, we sought to relate the SFI values, stored daily in the NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center, with the corresponding geomagnetic index; however, no relation was observed. Nonetheless, subsequently, a comparison between the monthly geomagnetic-activity index and the monthly SFI average allowed observing a temporal correlation between these average indices. This correlation shows that the effect of the solar flares does not simultaneously appear on the corresponding magnetic indices. To investigate this, we selected the most intense X-class flares; then, we checked the magnetic field disturbances observed in the Huancayo Geomagnetic Observatory magnetograms. We found some disturbances of the local geomagnetic field in the second and third day after the corresponding solar flare; however, the disturbance strength of the local geomagnetic field is not correlated with the X-class of the solar flare. Finally, there are some disturbances of the local geomagnetic field that are simultaneous with the X-class solar flares and they show a correlation with the total flux of the solar flare.

  12. Neutron-decay Protons from Solar Flares as Seed Particles for CME-shock Acceleration in the Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ronald J.; Ko, Yuan-Kuen

    2017-09-01

    The protons in large solar energetic particle events are accelerated in the inner heliosphere by fast shocks produced by coronal mass ejections. Unless there are other sources, the protons these shocks act upon would be those of the solar wind (SW). The efficiency of the acceleration depends on the kinetic energy of the protons. For a 2000 km s‑1 shock, the most effective proton energies would be 30–100 keV; i.e., within the suprathermal tail component of the SW. We investigate one possible additional source of such protons: those resulting from the decay of solar-flare-produced neutrons that escape from the Sun into the low corona. The neutrons are produced by interactions of flare-accelerated ions with the solar atmosphere. We discuss the production of low-energy neutrons in flares and their decay on a interplanetary magnetic field line near the Sun. We find that even when the flaring conditions are optimal, the 30–100 keV neutron-decay proton density produced by even a very large solar flare would be only about 10% of that of the 30–100 keV SW suprathermal tail. We discuss the implication of a seed-particle source of more frequent, small flares.

  13. High resolution He I 10830 \\AA\\ narrow-band imaging of an M-class flare. I - analysis of sunspot dynamics during flaring

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ya; Hong, Zhenxiang; Zeng, Zhicheng; Ji, Kaifan; Goode, Philip R; Cao, Wenda; Ji, Haisheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report our first-step results of high resolution He\\,\\textsc{i} 10830 \\AA\\ narrow-band imaging (bandpass: 0.5 {\\AA}) of an M1.8 class two-ribbon flare on July 5, 2012. The flare was observed with the 1.6 meter aperture New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. For this unique data set, sunspot dynamics during flaring were analyzed for the first time. By directly imaging the upper chromosphere, running penumbral waves are clearly seen as an outward extension of umbral flashes, both take the form of absorption in the 10830 \\AA\\ narrow-band images. From a space-time image made of a slit cutting across a flare ribbon and the sunspot, we find that the dark lanes for umbral flashes and penumbral waves are obviously broadened after the flare. The most prominent feature is the sudden appearance of an oscillating absorption strip inside the ribbon when it sweeps into the sunspot's penumbral and umbral regions. During each oscillation, outwardly propagating umbral flashes and subsequent penum...

  14. STEREO Observations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms during the 5 December 2006 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms emitted during the X9 solar event of December 5, 2006. Beginning 1 hour following the onset of this E79 flare, the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on both the STEREO A and B spacecraft observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons beginning hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within 10 of the Sun, consistent with the measurement resolution. The derived emission profile at the Sun had onset and peak times remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile and continued for more than an hour. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events less than 5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs). To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. Possible origins for the production of ENAs in a large solar event are considered. We conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona and that charge-transfer reactions between accelerated protons and partially-stripped coronal ions are an important source of ENAs in solar events.

  15. Multi-wavelength observations and modelling of a canonical solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Raftery, Claire L; Milligan, Ryan O; Klimchuk, James A

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the temporal evolution of temperature, emission measure, energy loss and velocity in a C-class solar flare from both an observational and theoretical perspective. The properties of the flare were derived by following the systematic cooling of the plasma through the response functions of a number of instruments -- RHESSI (>5 MK), GOES-12 (5-30 MK), TRACE 171 A (1 MK) and SOHO/CDS (~0.03-8 MK). These measurements were studied in combination with simulations from the 0-D EBTEL model. At the flare on-set, upflows of ~90 km s-1 and low level emission were observed in Fe XIX, consistent with pre-flare heating and gentle chromospheric evaporation. During the impulsive phase, upflows of ~80 km s-1 in Fe XIX and simultaneous downflows of 20 km s-1 in He I and O V were observed, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. The plasma was subsequently found to reach a peak temperature of ~13 MK in approximately 10 minutes. Using EBTEL, conduction was found to be the dominant loss mechanism dur...

  16. Periodicity in the most violent solar eruptions: recent observations of coronal mass ejections and flares revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng-Xin Gao; Jing-Lan Xie; Hong-Fei Liang

    2012-01-01

    Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform method,we investigate the periodicity in the monthly occurrence numbers and monthly mean energy of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment on board the Solar and Heliographic Observatory from 1999 March to 2009 December.We also investigate the periodicity in the monthly occurrence numbers of Hα flares and monthly mean flare indices from 1996 January to 2008 December.The results show the following.(1) The period of 5.66 yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly occurrence numbers of CMEs; the period of 10.5 yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly mean energy of CMEs.(2) The periods of 3.05 and 8.70 yr are found to be statistically significant in the monthly occurrence numbers of Hα flares; the period of 9.14yr is found to be statistically significant in the monthly mean flare indices.

  17. CHROMOSPHERIC AND CORONAL OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez Oliveros, Juan-Carlos; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lindsey, Charles [North West Research Associates, CORA Division, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Bogart, Rick; Couvidat, Sebastien; Scherrer, Phil [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Schou, Jesper [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-01-10

    We report observations of white-light ejecta in the low corona, for two X-class flares on 2013 May 13, using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory. At least two distinct kinds of sources appeared (chromospheric and coronal), in the early and later phases of flare development, in addition to the white-light footpoint sources commonly observed in the lower atmosphere. The gradual emissions have a clear identification with the classical loop-prominence system, but are brighter than expected and possibly seen here in the continuum rather than line emission. We find the HMI flux exceeds the radio/X-ray interpolation of the bremsstrahlung produced in the flare soft X-ray sources by at least one order of magnitude. This implies the participation of cooler sources that can produce free-bound continua and possibly line emission detectable by HMI. One of the early sources dynamically resembles {sup c}oronal rain{sup ,} appearing at a maximum apparent height and moving toward the photosphere at an apparent constant projected speed of 134 ± 8 km s{sup –1}. Not much literature exists on the detection of optical continuum sources above the limb of the Sun by non-coronagraphic instruments and these observations have potential implications for our basic understanding of flare development, since visible observations can in principle provide high spatial and temporal resolution.

  18. SOLAR FLARE PREDICTION USING SDO/HMI VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELD DATA WITH A MACHINE-LEARNING ALGORITHM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobra, M. G.; Couvidat, S., E-mail: couvidat@stanford.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We attempt to forecast M- and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm, called support vector machine (SVM), and four years of data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space. Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use either line-of-sight magnetograms or a relatively small number of ground-based vector magnetograms. This is the first time a large data set of vector magnetograms has been used to forecast solar flares. We build a catalog of flaring and non-flaring active regions sampled from a database of 2071 active regions, comprised of 1.5 million active region patches of vector magnetic field data, and characterize each active region by 25 parameters. We then train and test the machine-learning algorithm and we estimate its performances using forecast verification metrics with an emphasis on the true skill statistic (TSS). We obtain relatively high TSS scores and overall predictive abilities. We surmise that this is partly due to fine-tuning the SVM for this purpose and also to an advantageous set of features that can only be calculated from vector magnetic field data. We also apply a feature selection algorithm to determine which of our 25 features are useful for discriminating between flaring and non-flaring active regions and conclude that only a handful are needed for good predictive abilities.

  19. Solar Chromospheric Flares: Observations in Ly-lpha and Hlpha and Radiative Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima

    2011-03-01

    This thesis is divided into two main parts: a multiwavelength observational study of solar flares, focusing mainly in the chromosphere in Ly-α and Hα, and an application of a radiative transfer code and a radiative hydrodynamic code, to compare the results obtained by observations with the simulated ones. The Ly-α emission is a very interesting line because it is a natural tracer of the solar activity in the chromosphere. The Transition Region And Coronal Explorer satellite observed a small number of flares in the Ly-α passband, but apart from this, these events have not often been observed in this strong chromospheric line. Because TRACE has a broad Ly-α channel, in order to estimate the "pure" Lyα emission, we had to apply an empirical correction. We found that there is a reasonable coverage in TRACE 1216 A and the TRACE 1600 A for two different flares: on 8 September 1999 and on 28 February 1999. Studying them we estimated, for the first time, the pure Ly-α flare signature, being on the order of 10^25 erg/s at the flare peak. The study of the first flare gave us the possibility to calculate the electron energy budget using the X-ray data from Yohkoh/HXT in the context of the collisional thick target model, finding that the Ly-α power is less than 10% of the power inferred by the electrons. The morphology and evolution of the second flare were described in different wavelengths by using imaging data acquired by TRACE and by BBSO in white light and in Hα. We studied the magnetic topology using the magnetic field provided by SOHO/MDI, extrapolating the photospheric magnetic field lines, assuming a potential field. We found different morphologies in the magnetic configuration before and after the flare, confirming the occurrence of a reconnection process. The Hα line is the most important line in the chromosphere. We studied the Hα emission of a flare which occurred on 3 July 2002 using some spectroscopical observations from the Ondrejov Observatory

  20. Evolution of the Solar Flare Energetic Electrons in the Inhomogeneous Inner Heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Hamish A S; 10.1007/s11207-012-0013-x

    2012-01-01

    Solar flare accelerated electrons escaping into the interplanetary space and seen as type III solar radio bursts are often detected near the Earth. Using numerical simulations we consider the evolution of energetic electron spectrum in the inner heliosphere and near the Earth. The role of Langmuir wave generation, heliospheric plasma density fluctuations, and expansion of magnetic field lines on the electron peak flux and fluence spectra is studied to predict the electron properties as could be observed by Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus. Considering various energy loss mechanisms we show that the substantial part of the initial energetic electron energy is lost via wave-plasma processes due to plasma inhomogeneity. For the parameters adopted, the results show that the electron spectra changes mostly at the distances before $\\sim20 R_\\odot$. Further into the heliosphere, the electron flux spectra of electrons forms a broken power-law relatively similar to what is observed at 1 AU.

  1. Modeling atmospheric effects of the September 1859 Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, B; Melott, A; Thomas, Brian; Jackman, Charles; Melott, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    We have modeled atmospheric effects, especially ozone depletion, due to a solar proton event which probably accompanied the extreme magnetic storm of 1-2 September 1859. We use an inferred proton fluence for this event as estimated from nitrate levels in Greenland ice cores. We present results showing production of odd nitrogen compounds and their impact on ozone. We also compute rainout of nitrate in our model and compare to values from ice core data.

  2. Determining the solar-flare photospheric scale height from SMM gamma-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A connected series of Monte Carlo programs was developed to make systematic calculations of the energy, temporal and angular dependences of the gamma-ray line and neutron emission resulting from such accelerated ion interactions. Comparing the results of these calculations with the Solar Maximum Mission/Gamma Ray Spectrometer (SMM/GRS) measurements of gamma-ray line and neutron fluxes, the total number and energy spectrum of the flare-accelerated ions trapped on magnetic loops at the Sun were determined and the angular distribution, pitch angle scattering, and mirroring of the ions on loop fields were constrained. Comparing the calculations with measurements of the time dependence of the neutron capture line emission, a determination of the He-3/H ratio in the photosphere was also made. The diagnostic capabilities of the SMM/GRS measurements were extended by developing a new technique to directly determine the effective photospheric scale height in solar flares from the neutron capture gamma-ray line measurements, and critically test current atmospheric models in the flare region.

  3. Support Vector Machine combined with K-Nearest Neighbors for Solar Flare Forecasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Li; Hua-Ning Wang; Han He; Yan Mei; Zhan-Le Du

    2007-01-01

    A method combining the support vector machine(SVM)the K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN),labelled the SVM-KNN method,is used to construct a solar flare forecasting model.Based on a proven relationship between SVM and KNN.the SVM-KNN method improves the SVM algorithm of classification by taking advantage of the KNN algorithm according to the distribution of test samples in a feature space.In our flare forecast study.sunspots and 10cm radio flux data observe during Solar Cycle 23 are taken as predictors,and whether an M class flare will occur for each active region within two days will be predicted.The SVMKNN method is compared with the SVM and Neural networks-based method.The test results indicate that the rate of correct predictions from the SVM-KNN method is higher than that from the other two methods.This method shows promise as a practicable future forecasting model.

  4. Microwave burst with fine spectral structures in a solar flare on 2011 August 9

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin; Liu, Yuying; 10.1051/eas/1255035

    2012-01-01

    On August 9, 2011, there was an X6.9 flare event occurred near the west limb of solar disk. From the observation obtained by the spectrometer of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer in Huairou (SBRS/Huairou) around the flare, we find that this powerful flare has only a short-duration microwave burst of about only 5 minutes, and during the short-duration microwave burst, there are several kinds of fine structures on the spectrogram. These fine structures include very short-period pulsations, millisecond spike bursts, and type III bursts. The most interesting is that almost all of the pulses of very short-period pulsation (VSP) are structured by clusters of millisecond timescales of spike bursts or type III bursts. And there exists three different kinds of frequency drift rates in the VSP: the frequency drift rates with absolute value of about 55 - 130 MHz s^{-1} in the pulse groups, the frequency drift rates with absolute value of about 2.91 - 16.9 GHz s^{-1} on each individual pulse, and the frequen...

  5. IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC RECONNECTION AND CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K.; Raymond, John C.; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Li, Gang [Department of Physics and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Liu, Wei, E-mail: hui.tian@cfa.harvard.edu [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfvén speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of a greatly redshifted (∼125 km s{sup –1} along the line of sight) Fe XXI 1354.08 Å emission line with a ∼100 km s{sup –1} nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe XXI feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-ray source observed by RHESSI. We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory also reveal the eruption and reconnection processes. Fast downward-propagating blobs along these loops are also found from cool emission lines (e.g., Si IV, O IV, C II, Mg II) and images of AIA and IRIS. Furthermore, the entire Fe XXI line is blueshifted by ∼260 km s{sup –1} at the loop footpoints, where the cool lines mentioned above all exhibit obvious redshift, a result that is consistent with the scenario of chromospheric evaporation induced by downward-propagating nonthermal electrons from the reconnection site.

  6. The Effects Od Solar Protons Flares On The Navigation Systems of Aircrafts and Resulting Accents During 20th Cencury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.; Hady, A.

    In early study for the authors, from the analysis of 802 important accents of the air- craft's which occurred during the period (1920-2000) all over the world. It is found that the number of occurrence of the accents increases at the solar maximum activity, and decrease with decreasing the solar activity on the annual scale. There is a doubt the geomagnetic storms due to the charged particles, which come from the sun as a cloud after two or three days from the high energetic flares occurrence. Which affected on the navigation system of the aircraft's, especially for aircraft's which pass through the polar regions of the earth, at the high latitudes. The aim of the present study is to analysis more than one handed solar protons flares (1970-2000) of energies more than 10 MeV observed by the artificial satellites GOES and published in solar Geophysical Data, NOAA, Boulder, Colorado, USA. A com- parison studies between the proton flares occurrence and the important accents of the aircraft's, which occur after two days to one week, from the high energetic proton flares occurrence, or case by case, in an attempt to confirm the relation between the solar activities and aircraft accents due to disturbance in the Navigation systems. Also, we not Ignore in our study the effects of the geomagnetic field on the flying staff, due to the occurrence of the solar proton flares , as indicated by other authors in early studies.

  7. DIRECT SPATIAL ASSOCIATION OF AN X-RAY FLARE WITH THE ERUPTION OF A SOLAR QUIESCENT FILAMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Foord, Adi, E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-05-10

    Solar flares primarily occur in active regions. Hard X-ray flares have been found to occur only in active regions. They are often associated with the eruption of active region filaments and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). CMEs can also be associated with the eruption of quiescent filaments, not located in active regions. Here we report the first identification of a solar X-ray flare outside an active region observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The X-ray emission was directly associated with the eruption of a long, quiescent filament and fast CME. Images from RHESSI show this flare emission to be located along a section of the western ribbon of the expanding, post-eruption arcade. EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly show no connection between this location and nearby active regions. Therefore the flare emission is found not to be located in or associated with an active region. However, a nearby, small, magnetically strong dipolar region provides a likely explanation for the existence and location of the flare X-ray emission. This emerging dipolar region may have also triggered the filament eruption.

  8. Reconciliation of Waiting Time Statistics of Solar Flares Observed in Hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; McTiernan, James M.

    2010-07-01

    We study the waiting time distributions of solar flares observed in hard X-rays with ISEE-3/ICE, HXRBS/SMM, WATCH/GRANAT, BATSE/CGRO, and RHESSI. Although discordant results and interpretations have been published earlier, based on relatively small ranges (<2 decades) of waiting times, we find that all observed distributions, spanning over 6 decades of waiting times (Δt ≈ 10-3-103 hr), can be reconciled with a single distribution function, N(Δt) vprop λ0(1 + λ0Δt)-2, which has a power-law slope of p ≈ 2.0 at large waiting times (Δt ≈ 1-1000 hr) and flattens out at short waiting times Δt <~ Δt 0 = 1/λ0. We find a consistent breakpoint at Δt 0 = 1/λ0 = 0.80 ± 0.14 hr from the WATCH, HXRBS, BATSE, and RHESSI data. The distribution of waiting times is invariant for sampling with different flux thresholds, while the mean waiting time scales reciprocically with the number of detected events, Δt 0 vprop 1/n det. This waiting time distribution can be modeled with a nonstationary Poisson process with a flare rate λ = 1/Δt that varies as f(λ) vprop λ-1exp - (λ/λ0). This flare rate distribution requires a highly intermittent flare productivity in short clusters with high rates, separated by relatively long quiescent intervals with very low flare rates.

  9. Solar Flare Prediction Science-to-Operations: the ESA/SSA SWE A-EFFort Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Tziotziou, Konstantinos; Themelis, Konstantinos; Magiati, Margarita; Angelopoulou, Georgia

    2016-07-01

    We attempt a synoptical overview of the scientific origins of the Athens Effective Solar Flare Forecasting (A-EFFort) utility and the actions taken toward transitioning it into a pre-operational service of ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Programme. The preferred method for solar flare prediction, as well as key efforts to make it function in a fully automated environment by coupling calculations with near-realtime data-downloading protocols (from the Solar Dynamics Observatory [SDO] mission), pattern recognition (solar active-region identification) and optimization (magnetic connectivity by simulated annealing) will be highlighted. In addition, the entire validation process of the service will be described, with its results presented. We will conclude by stressing the need for across-the-board efforts and synergistic work in order to bring science of potentially limited/restricted interest into realizing a much broader impact and serving the best public interests. The above presentation was partially supported by the ESA/SSA SWE A-EFFort project, ESA Contract No. 4000111994/14/D/MRP. Special thanks go to the ESA Project Officers R. Keil, A. Glover, and J.-P. Luntama (ESOC), M. Bobra and C. Balmer of the SDO/HMI team at Stanford University, and M. Zoulias at the RCAAM of the Academy of Athens for valuable technical help.

  10. Properties of the 15 February 2011 Flare Seismic Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Zharkov, S; Matthews, S A; Zharkova, V V

    2012-01-01

    The first near-side X-class flare of the Solar Cycle 24 occurred in February 2011 and produced a very strong seismic response in the photosphere. One sunquake was reported by Kosovichev (2011) followed by the discovery of a second sunquake by Zharkov et al (2011). The flare had a two-ribbon structure and was associated with a flux rope eruption and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) as reported in the CACTus catalogue. Following the discovery of the second sunquake and the spatial association of both sources with the locations of the feet of the erupting flux rope (Zharkov et al 2011) we present here a more detailed analysis of the observed photospheric changes in and around the seismic sources. These sunquakes are quite unusual, taking place early in the impulsive stage of the flare, with the seismic sources showing little hard X-ray (HXR) emission, and strongest X-ray emission sources located in the flare ribbons. We present a directional time--distance diagram computed for the second source, which clearly ...

  11. Relationship of type III radio bursts with quasi-periodic pulsations in a solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Kupriyanova, E G; Reid, H A S; Myagkova, I N

    2016-01-01

    We studied a solar flare with pronounced quasi-periodic pulsations detected in the microwave, X-ray, and radio bands. We used the methods of correlation, Fourier, and wavelet analyses to examine the temporal fine structures and relationships between the time profiles in each wave band. We found that the time profiles of the microwaves, hard X-rays and type III radio bursts vary quasi-periodically with the common period of 40-50 s. The average amplitude of the variations is high, above 30% of the background flux level and reaching 80% after the flare maximum. We did not find the periodicity in either the thermal X-ray flux component or source size dynamics. Our findings indicate that the detected periodicity is likely to be associated with periodic dynamics in the injection of non-thermal electrons, that can be produced by periodic modulation of magnetic reconnection.

  12. On the Lower Energy Cutoff of Nonthermal Electrons in Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative method to determine the lower energy cutoff (Ec) ofpower-law electron beams is established. We apply this method to the 54 hardX-ray events observed with BATSE/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO).The results show that about 75% of the observed broken double power-law spectra of hard X-rays can be explained by a lower energy cutoff in the power-law electronbeams. The values of Ec, varying among the flares, are all greater than the usuallyaccepted 20 keV! On average, Ec is about 69 keV. So high a lower energy cutoff of nonthermal electrons implies that nonthermal electrons might not be as important inpowering solar flares as was previously thought. Further significance of this finding is discussed.

  13. Direct electric field heating and acceleration of electrons in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Benka, Stephen G.

    1992-01-01

    We show that the observed properties of solar flare X-ray and microwave emission can be explained through the Joule heating and electric field acceleration of runaway electrons in current channels. The global properties of the flaring region required for this are presented. We have fit a hybrid thermal/nonthermal electron distribution, consisting of hot, isothermal electrons with a nonthermal tail of runaway electrons, to high-resolution hard X-ray and microwave spectra and have obtained excellent fits to both. The hybrid model relaxes the electron number and energy flux requirements for the hard X-ray emission over those of a purely nonthermal model. The model also provides explanations for several previously unexplained aspects of the high-resolution microwave spectra. The fit parameters can be related to physical properties (such as the electric field strength in the current channels) of the acceleration region.

  14. Empirical studies of solar flares: Comparison of X-ray and H alpha filtergrams and analysis of the energy balance of the X-ray plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of solar flares was investigated through a combined analysis of X-ray filtergrams of the high temperature coronal component of flares and H alpha filtergrams of the low temperature chromospheric component. The data were used to study the magnetic field configuration and its changes in solar flares, and to examine the chromospheric location and structure of X-ray bright points (XPB) and XPB flares. Each topic and the germane data are discussed. The energy balance of the thermal X-ray plasma in flares, while not studied, is addressed.

  15. Ultra-narrow Negative Flare Front Observed in Helium-10830~\\AA\\ using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yan; Ding, Mingde; Kleint, Lucia; Su, Jiangtao; Liu, Chang; Ji, Haisheng; Chae, Jongchul; Jing, Ju; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Cho, Kyungsuk; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares are sudden flashes of brightness on the Sun and are often associated with coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles which have adverse effects in the near Earth environment. By definition, flares are usually referred to bright features resulting from excess emission. Using the newly commissioned 1.6~m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory, here we show a striking "negative" flare with a narrow, but unambiguous "dark" moving front observed in He I 10830 \\AA, which is as narrow as 340 km and is associated with distinct spectral characteristics in H-alpha and Mg II lines. Theoretically, such negative contrast in He I 10830 \\AA\\ can be produced under special circumstances, by nonthermal-electron collisions, or photoionization followed by recombination. Our discovery, made possible due to unprecedented spatial resolution, confirms the presence of the required plasma conditions and provides unique information in understanding the energy release and radiative transfer in astronomi...

  16. Martian upper atmosphere response to solar EUV flux and soft X-ray flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Stiepen, Arnaud; Evans, J. Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; McClintock, William; Montmessin, Franck; Thiemann, E. M.; Eparvier, Frank; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Planetary upper atmosphere energetics is mainly governed by absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Understanding the response of planetary upper atmosphere to the daily, long and short term variation in solar flux is very important to quantify energy budget of upper atmosphere. We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations made by the IUVS instrument aboard the MAVEN spacecraft, focusing on upper atmospheric response to solar EUV flux. Our analysis shows both short and long term effect of solar EUV flux on Martian thermospheric temperature. We find a significant drop (> 100 K) in thermospheric temperature between Ls = 218° and Ls = 140°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. IUVS has observed response of Martian thermosphere to the 27-day solar flux variation due to solar rotation.We also report effect of two solar flare events (19 Oct. 2014 and 24 March 2015) on Martian dayglow observations. IUVS observed about ~25% increase in observed brightness of major ultraviolet dayglow emissions below 120 km, where most of the high energy photons (< 10 nm) deposit their energy. The results presented in this talk will help us better understand the role of EUV flux in total heat budget of Martian thermosphere.

  17. Solar Flare Prediction Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data with a Machine-Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobra, M.; Couvidat, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    We attempt to forecast M-and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm, called Support Vector Machine (SVM), and four years of data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space (Schou et al., 2012). Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use either line-of-sight magnetograms or a relatively small number of ground-based vector magnetograms. This is the first time such a large dataset of vector magnetograms has been used to forecast solar flares. We build a catalog of flaring and non-flaring active regions sampled from a database of 2,071 active regions, comprised of 1.5 million active region patches of vector magnetic field data, and characterize each active region by 25 parameters --- which include the flux, energy, shear, current, helicity, gradient, geometry, and Lorentz force. We then train and test the machine-learning algorithm. Finally, we estimate the performance of this algorithm using forecast verification metrics with an emphasis on the true skill statistic (TSS). Bloomfield et al. (2012) suggest the use of the TSS as it is not sensitive to the class imbalance problem. Indeed, there are many more non-flaring active regions in a given time interval than flaring ones: this class imbalance distorts many performance metrics and renders comparison between various studies somewhat unreliable. We obtain relatively high TSS scores and overall predictive abilities. We surmise that this is partly due to fine-tuning the SVM for this purpose and also to an advantageous set of features that can only be calculated from vector magnetic field data. We also apply a feature selection algorithm to determine which of our 25 features are useful for discriminating between flaring and non-flaring active regions and conclude that only a handful are needed for good predictive abilities.

  18. Flare processes evolution and polarization changes of fine structures of solar radio emission in the April 11, 2013 event

    CERN Document Server

    Chernov, Gennady; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Chengming; Fu, Qijun; Karlicky, Marian; Fomichev, Valery

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of positions and sizes of radio sources in the observations of solar radio spectral fine structures in an M6.5 flare on April 11, 2013 were observed simultaneously by several radio instruments at four different observatories: Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers at Huairou (SBRS/Huairou), Ondrejov Radio spectrograph in the Czech Republic (ORSC/Ondrejov), Badary Broadband Microwave spectropolarimeter (BMS/Irkutsk), and spectrograph/IZMIRAN (Moscow, Troitsk). The fine structures include microwave zebra patterns (ZP), fast pulsations, and fibers. They were observed during the flare brightening located at the tops of a loop arcade. The dynamics of the polarization was associated with the motion of the flare exciter, which was observed in EUV images at 171A and 131A (SDO/AIA). Combining magnetograms observed by the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) with the homologous assumption of EUV flare brightening and ZP bursts, we deduced that the observed ZPs correspond to the ordinary radio...

  19. Constraints on Stochastic Electron Acceleration Process from RHESSI Solar Flare Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.; Petrosian, V.

    2011-12-01

    Bremsstrahlung hard X-ray (HXR) emission provides the most direct information for diagnosing the electron acceleration and transport processes in solar flares. HXR observations have indicated that the majority of nonthermal electrons are accelerated near the top of the flaring loop, as evidenced by the distinct coronal loop top (LT) source, and move downward along the loop to the footpoints (FPs). This can be naturally accounted for by the model of stochastic acceleration, in which electrons are scattered and accelerated near the LT region by plasma waves or turbulence. In this work, we aim to better understand the role of turbulence in scattering and accelerating electrons in solar flares based on imaging spectroscopic observations from the RHESSI satellite and theoretical modeling of the process of stochastic acceleration by turbulence. We show how the RHESSI observations can constrain some important characteristics of turbulence. In particular, we obtain the accelerated electron spectra from the LT source in the regularized electron maps, which is determined by the turbulence acceleration rate, and also obtain the escape time from the LT and FP spectral difference, which is related to the pitch angle scattering rate of electrons by turbulence. Furthermore, comparison of the electron spectra obtained from solution of the Fokker-Planck equation describing the acceleration process with the directly observed LT electron spectra in principle allows us to determine whether the required acceleration rate by turbulence is consistent with the scattering rate. We will present results from several RHESSI flares with different LT spectral hardness relative to the FPs and discuss the physical implication for the electron acceleration and transport processes.

  20. Spectral and Imaging Observations of a White-light Solar Flare in the Mid-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Matt; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh; Jhabvala, Murzy; Jennings, Don; Lunsford, Allen; Kaufmann, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    We report high-resolution observations at mid-infrared wavelengths of a minor solar flare, SOL2014-09-24T17:50 (C7.0), using Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector cameras at an auxiliary of the McMath-Pierce telescope. The flare emissions, the first simultaneous observations in two mid-infrared bands at 5.2 and 8.2 μ {{m}} with white-light and hard X-ray coverage, revealed impulsive time variability with increases on timescales of ˜4 s followed by exponential decay at ˜10 s in two bright regions separated by about 13\\prime\\prime . The brightest source is compact, unresolved spatially at the diffraction limit (1\\_\\_AMP\\_\\_farcs;72 at 5.2 μ {{m}}). We identify the IR sources as flare ribbons also seen in white-light emission at 6173 Å observed by SDO/HMI, with twin hard X-ray sources observed by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and with EUV sources (e.g., 94 Å) observed by SDO/AIA. The two infrared points have nearly the same flux density (fν, W m-2 Hz) and extrapolate to a level of about an order of magnitude below that observed in the visible band by HMI, but with a flux of more than two orders of magnitude above the free-free continuum from the hot (˜15 MK) coronal flare loop observed in the X-ray range. The observations suggest that the IR emission is optically thin; this constraint and others suggest major contributions from a density less than about 4× {10}13 cm-3. We tentatively interpret this emission mechanism as predominantly free-free emission in a highly ionized but cool and rather dense chromospheric region.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Global energetics of solar flares. III. (Aschwanden+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, M. J.; Holman, G.; O'Flannagain, A.; Caspi, A.; McTiernan, J. M.; Kontar, E. P.

    2017-02-01

    This study entails the third part of a global flare energetics project, in which Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data of 191 M and X-class flare events from the first 3.5yrs of the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission are analyzed. We fit a thermal and a nonthermal component to RHESSI spectra, yielding the temperature of the differential emission measure (DEM) tail, the nonthermal power-law slope and flux, and the thermal/nonthermal cross-over energy eco. From these parameters, we calculate the total nonthermal energy Ent in electrons with two different methods: (1) using the observed cross-over energy eco as low-energy cutoff, and (2) using the low-energy cutoff ewt predicted by the warm thick-target bremsstrahlung model of Kontar et al. Based on a mean temperature of Te=8.6MK in active regions, we find low-energy cutoff energies of ewt=6.2+/-1.6keV for the warm-target model, which is significantly lower than the cross-over energies eco=21+/-6keV. Comparing with the statistics of magnetically dissipated energies Emag and thermal energies Eth from the two previous studies, we find the following mean (logarithmic) energy ratios with the warm-target model: Ent=0.41Emag, Eth=0.08Emag, and Eth=0.15Ent. The total dissipated magnetic energy exceeds the thermal energy in 95% and the nonthermal energy in 71% of the flare events, which confirms that magnetic reconnection processes are sufficient to explain flare energies. The nonthermal energy exceeds the thermal energy in 85% of the events, which largely confirms the warm thick-target model. (1 data file).

  2. Solar flare mechanism based on magnetic arcade reconnection and island merging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.Z. Chen; G.S. Choe

    2000-06-15

    The authors propose a model describing physical processes of solar flares based on resistive reconnection of magnetic field subject to continuous increase of magnetic shear in the arcade. The individual flaring process consists of magnetic reconnection of arcade field lines, generation of magnetic islands in the magnetic arcade, and coalescence of magnetic islands. When a magnetic arcade is sheared (either by foot point motion or by flux emergence), a current sheet is formed and magnetic reconnection can take place to form a magnetic island. A continuing increase of magnetic shear can trigger a new reconnection process and create a new island in the under lying arcade below the magnetic island. The new born island rises faster than the preceding island and merges with it to form one island. Before completing the island merging process, the new born island exhibits two phases of rising motion: a first phase with a slower rising speed and a second phase with a faster rising speed. The flare plasma heating occurs mainly due to magnetic reconnection in the current sheet under the new born island. The new born island represents the X-ray plasma ejecta which shows two phases of rising motion observed by Yohkoh [Ohyama and Shibata (1997)]. The first phase with slower new born island rising speed corresponds to the early phase of reconnection of line-tied field in the underlying current sheet and is considered as the preflare phase. In the second phase, the island coalescence takes place, and the underlying current sheet is elongated so that the line-tied arcade field reconnection rate is enhanced. This phase is interpreted as the impulsive phase or the flash phase of flares. The obtained reconnection electric field is large enough to accelerate electrons to an energy level higher than 10 keV, which is necessary for observed hard X-ray emissions. After merging of the islands is completed, magnetic reconnection continues in the current sheet under the integrated island for

  3. The influence of the energy emitted by solar flare soft X-ray bursts on the propagation of their associated interplanetary shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, S.; Dryer, M.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the thermal energy released from 29 solar flares and the propagation features of their associated interplanetary shock waves that were detected at 1 AU is investigated. The 29 interplanetary shock waves were identified unambiguously and their tracking from each solar flare was deduced by tracking their associated interplanetary type-II radio emission. The thermal energy released in the solar flares was estimated from the time-intensity profiles of 1-8 A soft X-ray bursts from each flare. A good relationship is found between the flares' thermal energy with the IP shock-waves' transient velocity and arrival time at the earth - that is, the largest flare energy released is associated with the faster shock waves. Finally, a possible scenario of formation of a shock wave during the early phase of the flare and its propagation features is discussed.

  4. Validation of a Scaling Law for the Coronal Magnetic Field Strengths and Loop Lengths of Solar and Stellar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Namekata, Kosuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Shibata & Yokoyama (1999, 2002) proposed a method of estimating the coronal magnetic field strengths ($B$) and magnetic loop lengths ($L$) of solar and stellar flares, on the basis of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetic reconnection model. Using the scaling law provided by Shibata & Yokoyama (1999, 2002), $B$ and $L$ are obtained as functions of the emission measure ($EM=n^2L^3$) and temperature ($T$) at the flare peak. Here, $n$ is the coronal electron density of the flares. This scaling law enables the estimation of $B$ and $L$ for unresolved stellar flares from the observable physical quantities $EM$ and $T$, which is helpful for studying stellar surface activities. To apply this scaling law to stellar flares, we discuss its validity for spatially resolved solar flares. $EM$ and $T$ were calculated from GOES soft X-ray flux data, and $B$ and $L$ are theoretically estimated using the scaling law. For the same flare events, $B$ and $L$ were also observationally estimated with images taken...

  5. First evidence of non-Gaussian solar flare EUV spectral line profiles and accelerated non-thermal ion motion

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Natasha; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The properties of solar flare plasma can be determined from observations of optically thin EUV lines. The spectral line profiles emitted in a flaring MK plasma are expected to be dominated by Doppler broadening, producing Gaussian line profiles, if the underlying ion velocity distribution is Maxwellian. We look for non-Gaussian line profiles during a flare, that may indicate the presence of accelerated ion and/or plasma non-thermal velocity distributions. We study EUV spectral lines during a flare SOL2013-05-15T01:45 using the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The flare is located close to the eastern solar limb. It has an extended loop structure, allowing different flare features: ribbons, hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints and the loop-top source to be clearly observed in EUV and X-rays. EUV line spectroscopy is performed in seven regions covering the flare features. We study the line profiles of isolated and unblended Fe XVI lines (262.9760 A) formed at temperatures of 2-4 MK. Suitable Fe XVI line profiles c...

  6. Enhancement in electron and ion temperatures due to solar flares as measured by SROSS-C2 satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Sharma

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The observations on the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures (Te and Ti measured by the RPA payload aboard the SROSS-C2 satellite have been used to study the effect of solar flares on ionospheric heating. The data on solar flare has been obtained from the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC Boulder, Colorado (USA. It has been found that the electron and ion temperatures have a consistent enhancement during the solar flares on the dayside Earth's ionosphere. The estimated enhancement for the average electron temperature is from 1.3 to 1.9 times whereas for ion temperature it is from 1.2 to 1.4 times to the normal days average temperature. The enhancement of ionospheric temperatures due to solar flares is correlated with the diurnal variation of normal days' ionospheric temperatures. The solar flare does not have any significant effect on the nightside ionosphere. A comparison with the temperature obtained from the IRI-95 model also shows a similar enhancement.

  7. Estimating the Properties of Hard X-Ray Solar Flares by Constraining Model Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, J.; Tolbert, A. K.; Schwartz, R. A.; Holman, G. D.; Dennis, B. R.

    2013-01-01

    We wish to better constrain the properties of solar flares by exploring how parameterized models of solar flares interact with uncertainty estimation methods. We compare four different methods of calculating uncertainty estimates in fitting parameterized models to Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager X-ray spectra, considering only statistical sources of error. Three of the four methods are based on estimating the scale-size of the minimum in a hypersurface formed by the weighted sum of the squares of the differences between the model fit and the data as a function of the fit parameters, and are implemented as commonly practiced. The fourth method is also based on the difference between the data and the model, but instead uses Bayesian data analysis and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to calculate an uncertainty estimate. Two flare spectra are modeled: one from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X1.3 class flare of 2005 January 19, and the other from the X4.8 flare of 2002 July 23.We find that the four methods give approximately the same uncertainty estimates for the 2005 January 19 spectral fit parameters, but lead to very different uncertainty estimates for the 2002 July 23 spectral fit. This is because each method implements different analyses of the hypersurface, yielding method-dependent results that can differ greatly depending on the shape of the hypersurface. The hypersurface arising from the 2005 January 19 analysis is consistent with a normal distribution; therefore, the assumptions behind the three non- Bayesian uncertainty estimation methods are satisfied and similar estimates are found. The 2002 July 23 analysis shows that the hypersurface is not consistent with a normal distribution, indicating that the assumptions behind the three non-Bayesian uncertainty estimation methods are not satisfied, leading to differing estimates of the uncertainty. We find that the shape of the hypersurface is crucial in understanding

  8. Data-driven Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of the 2014 March 29 X1.0 Solar Flare

    CERN Document Server

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahe'; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in MgII h&k, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST/IBIS) in H$\\alpha$ 6563 {\\AA} and CaII 8542 {\\AA}, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multi-threaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, t...

  9. Effect of solar flare on the equatorial electrojet in eastern Brazil region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R G Rastogi; P Janardhan; H Chandra; N B Trivedi; Vidal Erick

    2017-06-01

    The effect of solar flare, sudden commencement of magnetic storm and of the disturbances ring current on the equatorial electrojet in the Eastern Brazil region, where the ground magnetic declination is as large as 20∘W is studied based on geomagnetic data with one minute resolution from Bacabal during November–December 1990. It is shown that the mean diurnal vector of the horizontal field was aligned along 2∘E of north at Huancayo and 30∘W of north at Bacabal during the month of December 1990. Number of solar flares that occurred on 30 December 1990 indicated the direction of solar flare related $\\Delta H$ vector to be aligned along 5∘E of north at Huancayo and 28∘W of north at Bacabal. This is expected as the solar flare effects are due to the enhanced conductivity in the ionosphere. The SC at 2230 UT on 26 November 1990 produced a positive impulse in $\\Delta X$ and negative impulse in $\\Delta Y$ at Bacabal with $\\Delta H$ vector aligned along 27∘W of north. At Huancayo the $\\Delta H$ vector associated with SC is aligned along 8∘E of north, few degrees east to the alignment of the diurnal vector of H. The magnetic storm that followed the SC had a minimum Dst index of –150 nT. The corresponding storm time disturbance in $\\Delta X$ at Huancayo as well as at Bacabal were about –250 nT but $\\Delta Y$ at Bacabal was about +70 nT and very small at Huancayo, that give the alignment of the H vector due to ring current about 16∘W of north at Bacabal and almost along N–S at Huancayo. Thus alignment of the $\\Delta H$ vector due to ring current at Bacabal is 14∘E of the mean direction of $\\Delta H$ vector during December 1990. This is consistent with the direction of ring current dependent on the dipole declination at the ring current altitude which is about 5∘W of north over Bacabal and the deviation of declination due to the ring current during disturbed period given by the angle $(\\psi-D)$.

  10. 太阳耀斑的MHD模型%The Magnetohydrodynamic Models of Solar Flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴怡芬

    2011-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) equations are important models for the fluid's dynamics theory in the plasma.MHD models for the initial stages of solar flares are considered in this paper.%MHD方程组是来解释耀斑的复杂特性的等离子体流体动力学理论的重要模型.为此,主要通过太阳耀斑初期阶段的MHD模型来讨论耀斑的一些特征.

  11. Shock waves generated by the intense solar flare of 1972, August 7, 15:00 UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, A.; Rinehart, R.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic radio spectrum of the class 3B solar flare of 1972, August 7, 15:00 UT, over the band 10 to 2000 MHz is examined. Type II and type IV bursts in the spectrum are interpreted in terms of a piston-driven shock, which appeared to be traveling at a velocity of about 1500 km per sec and which generated pulsations in the band 100 to 200 MHz as it passed through the corona. The progress of the shock through the interplanetary plasma was subsequently monitored by Malitson et al. with radio equipment covering the band 0.03 to 2.6 MHz on the IMP-6 satellite.

  12. Departure of high temperature iron lines from the equilibrium state in flaring solar plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kawate, Tomoko; Jess, David B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify if the assumption of ionization equilibrium and a Maxwellian electron energy distribution is valid in flaring solar plasmas. We analyze the 2014 December 20 X1.8 flare, in which the \\ion{Fe}{xxi} 187~\\AA, \\ion{Fe}{xxii} 253~\\AA, \\ion{Fe}{xxiii} 263~\\AA\\ and \\ion{Fe}{xxiv} 255~\\AA\\ emission lines were simultaneously observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Hinode satellite. Intensity ratios among these high temperature Fe lines are compared and departures from isothermal conditions and ionization equilibrium examined. Temperatures derived from intensity ratios involving these four lines show significant discrepancies at the flare footpoints in the impulsive phase, and at the looptop in the gradual phase. Among these, the temperature derived from the \\ion{Fe}{xxii}/\\ion{Fe}{xxiv} intensity ratio is the lowest, which cannot be explained if we assume a Maxwellian electron distribution and ionization equilibrium, even in the case of a multi-thermal structure. This re...

  13. Electron Distribution Functions in Solar Flares from combined X-ray and EUV Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous solar flare observations with SDO and RHESSI provide spatially resolved information about hot plasma and energetic particles in flares. RHESSI allows the properties of both hot (> 8 MK) thermal plasma and nonthermal electron distributions to be inferred, while SDO/AIA is more sensitive to lower temperatures. We present and implement a new method to reconstruct electron distribution functions from SDO/AIA data. The combined analysis of RHESSI and AIA data allows the electron distribution function to be inferred over the broad energy range from ~0.1 keV up to a few tens of keV. The analysis of two well observed flares suggests that the distributions in general agree to within a factor of three when the RHESSI values are extrapolated into the intermediate range 1-3 keV, with AIA systematically predicting lower electron distributions. Possible instrumental and numerical effects, as well as potential physical origins for this discrepancy are discussed. The inferred electron distribution functions in g...

  14. One-Minute Quasi-Periodic Pulsations Seen in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Z.

    2017-01-01

    We study quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in the SOL2014-09-10 event that was detected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES), the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi satellite. Previous studies have found that this flare displays four-minute QPPs in a broad range of wavelengths. In this article, we find that this event also shows QPPs with a period of around one minute. Using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method, the light curves are decomposed into fast- and slowly varying components with a separation at {≈} 100 seconds. The four-minute QPPs are in the slowly varying component, and the one-minute QPPs are identified with the fast-varying components in the impulsive and maximum phases. Similarly as the four-minute QPPs, the one-minute QPPs are simultaneously found in soft X-rays (SXR), extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and hard X-ray (HXR) emission. High correlations are found between the fast-varying components at the different wavelengths, especially between SXR and HXR. The spatial location of the sources of one-minute QPPs differ from those of the four-minute QPPs. The four-minute QPPs appear in the whole flare region, while the one-minute QPPs tend to originate from the flare loop footpoints. This finding provides an observational constraint for the physical origin of the QPPs.

  15. Investigating Energetic X-Shaped Flares on the Outskirts of A Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai

    2016-09-01

    Typical solar flares display two quasi-parallel, bright ribbons on the chromosphere. In between is the polarity inversion line (PIL) separating concentrated magnetic fluxes of opposite polarity in active regions (ARs). Intriguingly a series of flares exhibiting X-shaped ribbons occurred at the similar location on the outskirts of NOAA AR 11967, where magnetic fluxes were scattered, yet three of them were alarmingly energetic. The X shape, whose center coincided with hard X-ray emission, was similar in UV/EUV, which cannot be accommodated in the standard flare model. Mapping out magnetic connectivities in potential fields, we found that the X morphology was dictated by the intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers, i.e., a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), within which a separator connecting a double null was embedded. This topology was not purely local but regulated by fluxes and flows over the whole AR. The nonlinear force-free field model suggested the formation of a current layer at the HFT, where the current dissipation can be mapped to the X-shaped ribbons via field-aligned heat conduction. These results highlight the critical role of HFTs in 3D magnetic reconnection and have important implications for astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  16. MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D. [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

  17. Investigating Energetic X-Shaped Flares on the Outskirts of A Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Typical solar flares display two quasi-parallel, bright ribbons on the chromosphere. In between is the polarity inversion line (PIL) separating concentrated magnetic fluxes of opposite polarity in active regions (ARs). Intriguingly a series of flares exhibiting X-shaped ribbons occurred at the similar location on the outskirts of NOAA AR 11967, where magnetic fluxes were scattered, yet three of them were alarmingly energetic. The X shape, whose center coincided with hard X-ray emission, was similar in UV/EUV, which cannot be accommodated in the standard flare model. Mapping out magnetic connectivities in potential fields, we found that the X morphology was dictated by the intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers, i.e., a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), within which a separator connecting a double null was embedded. This topology was not purely local but regulated by fluxes and flows over the whole AR. The nonlinear force-free field model suggested the formation of a current layer at the HFT, where the current dissipation can be mapped to the X-shaped ribbons via field-aligned heat conduction. These results highlight the critical role of HFTs in 3D magnetic reconnection and have important implications for astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. PMID:27677354

  18. EUV Spectra of Solar Flares from the EUV Spectroheliograph SPIRIT aboard CORONAS-F satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Shestov, Sergey; Kuzin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    We present detailed EUV spectra of 4 large solar flares: M5.6, X1.3, X3.4, and X17 classes in the spectral ranges 176-207 \\AA\\ and 280-330 \\AA. These spectra were obtained {by the slitless} spectroheliograph SPIRIT aboard the CORONAS-F satellite. To our knowledge these are the first detailed EUV spectra of large flares obtained with spectral resolution of $\\sim 0.1$ \\AA. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the obtained spectra and provide identification of the observed spectral lines. The identification was performed based {on the calculation} of synthetic spectra (CHIANTI database was used), with simultaneous {calculations of DEM} and density of the emitting plasma. More than 50 intense lines are present in the spectra that correspond to a temperature range of $T=0.5-16$ MK; most of the lines belong to Fe, Ni, Ca, Mg, Si ions. In all the considered flares intense hot lines from Ca XVII, Ca XVIII, Fe XX, Fe XXII, and Fe XXIV are observed. The calculated DEMs have a peak at $T \\sim 10$ MK. The densities w...

  19. Investigating Energetic X-Shaped Flares on the Outskirts of A Solar Active Region

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Typical solar flares display two quasi-parallel, bright ribbons on the chromosphere. In between is the polarity inversion line (PIL) separating concentrated magnetic fluxes of opposite polarity in active regions (ARs). Intriguingly a series of flares exhibiting X-shaped ribbons occurred at the similar location on the outskirts of NOAA AR 11967, where magnetic fluxes were scattered, yet three of them were alarmingly energetic. The X shape, whose center coincided with hard X-ray emission, was similar in UV/EUV, which cannot be accommodated in the standard flare model. Mapping out magnetic connectivities in potential fields, we found that the X morphology was dictated by the intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers, i.e., a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), within which a separator connecting a double null was embedded. This topology was not purely local but regulated by fluxes and flows over the whole AR. The nonlinear force-free field model suggested the formation of a current layer at the HFT, where the current ...

  20. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Irradiance Enhancement During X-Class Flares and Its Influence on the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Qian, Liying; Solomon, Stanley C.; Roble, Raymond G.; Xiao, Zuo

    2013-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar irradiance enhancement during flare events is one of the important factors in determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system responds to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of flare enhancement, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) was run for 61 X-class flares. The absolute and the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peaks, compared to pre-flare conditions, have clear wavelength dependences. The 0-14 nm irradiance increases much more (approx. 680% on average) than that in the 14-25 nm waveband (approx. 65% on average), except at 24 nm (approx. 220%). The average percentage increases for the 25-105 nm and 122-190 nm wavebands are approx. 120% and approx. 35%, respectively. The influence of 6 different wavebands (0-14 nm, 14-25 nm, 25-105 nm, 105- 120 nm, 121.56 nm, and 122-175 nm) on the thermosphere was examined for the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17-class) event by coupling FISM with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) under geomagnetically quiet conditions (Kp=1). While the enhancement in the 0-14 nm waveband caused the largest enhancement of the globally integrated solar heating, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for the 25-105 nm waveband (EUV), which accounts for about 33 K of the total 45 K temperature enhancement, and approx. 7.4% of the total approx. 11.5% neutral density enhancement. The effect of 122-175 nm flare radiation on the thermosphere is rather small. The study also illustrates that the high-altitude thermospheric response to the flare radiation at 0-175 nm is almost a linear combination of the responses to the individual wavebands. The upper thermospheric temperature and density enhancements peaked 3-5 h after the maximum flare radiation.

  1. A long-term study of the impact of solar flares on ionospheric characteristics measured by digisondes and GNSS receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sharad Chandra; Haralambous, Haris; Das, Tanmay

    2016-07-01

    Solar Flares are highly transient phenomena radiating over a wide spectrum of wavelengths with EUV and X-rays imposing the most significant effect on ionospheric characteristics. This study presents an attempt to examine qualitatively and quantitatively these effects as measured by digisondes and GNSS receivers on a global scale. For this purpose we have divided the whole globe in three sectors (American, African-European and Asian) based on longitude. We have extracted data for ionospheric characteristics by scaling, manually, the ionograms being provided by DIDBase (Digital Ionogram Database) as provided by the Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory (GIRO) during X-class flares for an approximate period of a solar cycle . We have also used TEC data extracted from GPS observations from collocated IGS Stations. Spectral analysis of Solar Flares are added to the methodology to compare the effects in terms of spectral characteristics.

  2. Data-driven Radiative Hydrodynamic Modeling of the 2014 March 29 X1.0 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Kleint, Lucia; Petrosian, Vahé; Liu, Wei; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-08-01

    Spectroscopic observations of solar flares provide critical diagnostics of the physical conditions in the flaring atmosphere. Some key features in observed spectra have not yet been accounted for in existing flare models. Here we report a data-driven simulation of the well-observed X1.0 flare on 2014 March 29 that can reconcile some well-known spectral discrepancies. We analyzed spectra of the flaring region from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in Mg ii h&k, the Interferometric BIdimensional Spectropolarimeter at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST/IBIS) in Hα 6563 Å and Ca ii 8542 Å, and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscope Imager (RHESSI) in hard X-rays. We constructed a multithreaded flare loop model and used the electron flux inferred from RHESSI data as the input to the radiative hydrodynamic code RADYN to simulate the atmospheric response. We then synthesized various chromospheric emission lines and compared them with the IRIS and IBIS observations. In general, the synthetic intensities agree with the observed ones, especially near the northern footpoint of the flare. The simulated Mg ii line profile has narrower wings than the observed one. This discrepancy can be reduced by using a higher microturbulent velocity (27 km s-1) in a narrow chromospheric layer. In addition, we found that an increase of electron density in the upper chromosphere within a narrow height range of ≈800 km below the transition region can turn the simulated Mg ii line core into emission and thus reproduce the single peaked profile, which is a common feature in all IRIS flares.

  3. Characteristics of Solar Flare Hard X-ray Emissions: Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    2007-05-01

    The main theme of this dissertation is the investigation of the physics of acceleration and transport of particles in solar flares and their radiative signatures. The observational studies, using hard X-rays (HXRs) observed by RHESSI, concentrate on four flares, which support the classical magnetic reconnection model of flares in various ways. In the 11/03/2003 X3.9 flare, there is an upward motion of the loop-top source, accompanied by a systematic increase in the separation of the foot-point sources at a comparable speed. This is consistent with the reconnection model with an inverted-Y geometry. The 04/30/2002 M1.3 event exhibits rarely observed two coronal sources, with very similar spectra and their higher-energy emission being close together. This suggests that reconnection occurs between the two sources. In the 10/29/2003 X10 flare, the logarithmic total HXR flux of the two foot-points correlates with their mean magnetic field. The foot-points show asymmetric HXR fluxes, qualitatively consistent with the magnetic mirroring effect. The 11/13/2003 M1.7 flare reveals evidence of chromospheric evaporation directly imaged by RHESSI for the first time. The emission centroids move toward the loop-top, indicating a density increase in the loop. The theoretical modeling of this work combines the Stanford stochastic acceleration model with the NRL hydrodynamic model to study the interplay of the particle acceleration, transport, and radiation effects and the atmospheric response to the energy deposition by electrons. I find that low-energy electrons in the quasi-thermal portion of the spectrum affects the hydrodynamics by producing more heating in the corona than the previous models that used a power-law spectrum with a low-energy cutoff. The Neupert effect is found to be present and effects of suppression of thermal conduction are tested in the presence of hydrodynamic flows. I gratefully thank my adviser, Prof. Vahe' Petrosian, my collaborators, and funding support

  4. Anomalous-plasmoid-ejection-induced secondary magnetic reconnection: modeling solar flares and coronal mass ejections by laser–plasma experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanli; Dong; Dawei; Yuan; Shoujun; Wang; Xun; Liu; Yutong; Li; Xiaoxuan; Lin; Huigang; Wei; Jiayong; Zhong; Shaoen; Jiang; Yongkun; Ding; Bobin; Jiang; Kai; Du; Yongjian; Tang; Mingyang; Yu; Xiantu; He; Neng; Hua; Zhanfeng; Qiao; Kuixi; Huang; Ming; Chen; Jianqiang; Zhu; Gang; Zhao; Zhengming; Sheng; Jie; Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The driving mechanism of solar flares and coronal mass ejections is a topic of ongoing debate, apart from the consensus that magnetic reconnection plays a key role during the impulsive process. While present solar research mostly depends on observations and theoretical models, laboratory experiments based on high-energy density facilities provide the third method for quantitatively comparing astrophysical observations and models with data achieved in experimental settings.In this article, we show laboratory modeling of solar flares and coronal mass ejections by constructing the magnetic reconnection system with two mutually approaching laser-produced plasmas circumfused of self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. Due to the Euler similarity between the laboratory and solar plasma systems, the present experiments demonstrate the morphological reproduction of flares and coronal mass ejections in solar observations in a scaled sense,and confirm the theory and model predictions about the current-sheet-born anomalous plasmoid as the initial stage of coronal mass ejections, and the behavior of moving-away plasmoid stretching the primary reconnected field lines into a secondary current sheet conjoined with two bright ridges identified as solar flares.

  5. Observations and Simulations of the Na i D1 Line Profiles in an M-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuridze, D.; Mathioudakis, M.; Christian, D. J.; Kowalski, A. F.; Jess, D. B.; Grant, S. D. T.; Kawate, T.; Simões, P. J. A.; Allred, J. C.; Keenan, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We study the temporal evolution of the Na i D1 line profiles in the M3.9 flare SOL2014-06-11T21:03 UT, using observations at high spectral resolution obtained with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer instrument on the Dunn Solar Telescope combined with radiative hydrodynamic simulations. Our results show a significant increase in the intensities of the line core and wings during the flare. The analysis of the line profiles from the flare ribbons reveals that the Na i D1 line has a central reversal with excess emission in the blue wing (blue asymmetry). We combine RADYN and RH simulations to synthesize Na i D1 line profiles of the flaring atmosphere and find good agreement with the observations. Heating with a beam of electrons modifies the radiation field in the flaring atmosphere and excites electrons from the ground state 3s 2S to the first excited state 3p 2P, which in turn modifies the relative population of the two states. The change in temperature and the population density of the energy states make the sodium line profile revert from absorption into emission. Furthermore, the rapid changes in temperature break the pressure balance between the different layers of the lower atmosphere, generating upflow/downflow patterns. Analysis of the simulated spectra reveals that the asymmetries of the Na i D1 flare profile are produced by the velocity gradients in the lower solar atmosphere.

  6. Comparison between Hinode/SOT and SDO/HMI, AIA Data for the Study of the Solar Flare Trigger Process

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Yumi; Imada, Shinsuke; Iida, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the flare trigger mechanism, we have analyzed several flare events which were observed by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), in our previous study. Because of the limitation of SOT field of view, however, only four events in the Hinode data sets have been utilizable. Therefore, increasing the number of events is required for evaluating the flare trigger models. We investigated the applicability of data obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to increase the data sample for a statistical analysis of the flare trigger process. SDO regularly observes the full disk of the sun and all flares although its spatial resolution is lower than that of Hinode. We investigated the M6.6 flare which occurred on 13 February 2011 and compared the analyzed data of SDO with the results of our previous study using Hinode/SOT data. Filter and vector magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and filtergrams from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 1600A were employed. From the c...

  7. Spontaneous Current-layer Fragmentation and Cascading Reconnection in Solar Flares. I. Model and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárta, Miroslav; Büchner, Jörg; Karlický, Marian; Skála, Jan

    2011-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection is commonly considered to be a mechanism of solar (eruptive) flares. A deeper study of this scenario reveals, however, a number of open issues. Among them is the fundamental question of how the magnetic energy is transferred from large, accumulation scales to plasma scales where its actual dissipation takes place. In order to investigate this transfer over a broad range of scales, we address this question by means of a high-resolution MHD simulation. The simulation results indicate that the magnetic-energy transfer to small scales is realized via a cascade of consecutively smaller and smaller flux ropes (plasmoids), analogous to the vortex-tube cascade in (incompressible) fluid dynamics. Both tearing and (driven) "fragmenting coalescence" processes are equally important for the consecutive fragmentation of the magnetic field (and associated current density) into smaller elements. At the later stages, a dynamic balance between tearing and coalescence processes reveals a steady (power-law) scaling typical of cascading processes. It is shown that cascading reconnection also addresses other open issues in solar-flare research, such as the duality between the regular large-scale picture of (eruptive) flares and the observed signatures of fragmented (chaotic) energy release, as well as the huge number of accelerated particles. Indeed, spontaneous current-layer fragmentation and the formation of multiple channelized dissipative/acceleration regions embedded in the current layer appear to be intrinsic to the cascading process. The multiple small-scale current sheets may also facilitate the acceleration of a large number of particles. The structure, distribution, and dynamics of the embedded potential acceleration regions in a current layer fragmented by cascading reconnection are studied and discussed.

  8. Energetic Phenomena on the Sun: The Solar Maximum Mission Flare Workshop. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, M.; Woodgate, B.

    1986-12-01

    The general objectives of the conference were as follows: (1) Synthesize flare studies after three years of Solar Maximum Mission (SSM) data analysis. Encourage a broader participation in the SMM data analysis and combine this more fully with theory and other data sources-data obtained with other spacecraft such as the HINOTORI, p78-1, and ISEE-3 spacecrafts, and with the Very Large Array (VLA) and many other ground-based instruments. Many coordinated data sets, unprecedented in their breadth of coverage and multiplicity of sources, had been obtained within the structure of the Solar Maximum Year (SMY). (2) Stimulate joint studies, and publication in the general scientific literature. The intended primary benefit was for informal collaborations to be started or broadened at the Workshops with subsequent publications. (3) Provide a special publication resulting from the Workshop.

  9. Hard X-Ray Imaging of Individual Spectral Components in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M; Krucker, Säm

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially-invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically-determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities wi...

  10. First high spatial resolution interferometric observations of solar flares at millimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M. R.; White, S. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Bieging, J. H.; Hurford, G. J.

    1990-01-01

    The first high spatial resolution interferometric observations of solar flares at millimeter wavelengths, carried out with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Array are presented. The observations were made at 3.3 mm wavelength during the very active periods of March 1989, using one or three baselines with fringe spacings of 2-5 arcsec. The observations represent an improvement of an order of magnitude in both sensitivity and spatial resolution compared with previous solar observations at these wavelengths. It appears that millimeter burst sources are not much smaller than microwave sources. The most intense bursts imply brightness temperatures of over 10 to the 6th K and are due to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission or possibly thermal free-free emission. If the emission in the flash phase is predominantly due to gyrosynchrotron emission, thermal gyrosynchrotron models can be ruled out for the radio emission because the flux at millimeter wavelengths is too high.

  11. Observation of Reconstructable Radio Waveforms from Solar Flares with the Askaryan Radio Array (ARA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian; Askaryan Radio Array Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is an ultra-high energy (>1017 eV) neutrino detector in phased construction at the South Pole. The full detector will consist of 37 autonomous stations of antennas which search for the radio pulses produced by neutrino interactions in the Antarctic ice. Three of the proposed detectors have been installed at up to 200m depth, with an additional two slated for deployment in Austral summer 2017. A prototype of the detector was deployed in January 2011, in time to serendipitously observe the relatively active solar month of February. In this talk, we will present preliminary results from an analysis of radio waveforms associated with an X-class solar flare observed in this prototype station. These are the first reconstructable events of natural origin seen by ARA, and could potentially be a powerful calibration source for the array.

  12. Derivation of Stochastic Acceleration Model Characteristics for Solar Flares from RHESSI Hard X-ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosian, Vahé; Chen, Qingrong

    2010-04-01

    The model of stochastic acceleration of particles by turbulence has been successful in explaining many observed features of solar flares. Here, we demonstrate a new method to obtain the accelerated electron spectrum and important acceleration model parameters from the high-resolution hard X-ray (HXR) observations provided by RHESSI. In our model, electrons accelerated at or very near the loop top (LT) produce thin target bremsstrahlung emission there and then escape downward producing thick target emission at the loop footpoints (FPs). Based on the electron flux spectral images obtained by the regularized spectral inversion of the RHESSI count visibilities, we derive several important parameters for the acceleration model. We apply this procedure to the 2003 November 3 solar flare, which shows an LT source up to 100-150 keV in HXR with a relatively flat spectrum in addition to two FP sources. The results imply the presence of strong scattering and a high density of turbulence energy with a steep spectrum in the acceleration region.

  13. Is Cyclotron Maser Emission in Solar Flares Driven by a Horseshoe Distribution?

    CERN Document Server

    Melrose, D B

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, decimetric spike bursts have been attributed to electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME) by the electrons that produce hard X-ray bursts as they precipitate into the chromosphere in the impulsive phase of a solar flare. Spike bursts are regarded as analogous to the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), which is associated with the precipitation of auroral electrons in a geomagnetic substorm. Originally, a loss-cone-driven version of ECME, developed for AKR, was applied to spike bursts, but it is now widely accepted that a different, horseshoe-driven, version of EMCE applies to AKR. We explore the implications of the assumption that horseshoe-driven ECME also applies to spike bursts. We develop a 1D model for the acceleration of the electrons by a parallel electric field, and show that under plausible assumptions it leads to a horseshoe distribution of electrons in a solar flare. A second requirement for horseshoe-driven ECME is an extremely low plasma density, referred to as a density cav...

  14. QUASI-PERIODIC WIGGLES OF MICROWAVE ZEBRA STRUCTURES IN A SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sijie; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Nakariakov, V. M.; Selzer, L. A., E-mail: sjyu@nao.cas.cn [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-10

    Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures with periods ranging from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in an X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two to three significant periodicities and are almost in phase between stripes at different frequencies. The Alfvén speed estimated from the ZP structures is about 700 km s{sup –1}. We find the spatial size of the wave-guiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with a detected period of about 1 s. This suggests that the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

  15. Statistics and classification of the microwave zebra patterns associated with solar flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Baolin; Tan, Chengming; Zhang, Yin [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M., E-mail: bltan@nao.cas.cn [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Ondrejov 15165 (Czech Republic)

    2014-01-10

    The microwave zebra pattern (ZP) is the most interesting, intriguing, and complex spectral structure frequently observed in solar flares. A comprehensive statistical study will certainly help us to understand the formation mechanism, which is not exactly clear now. This work presents a comprehensive statistical analysis of a big sample with 202 ZP events collected from observations at the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou and the Ondŕejov Radiospectrograph in the Czech Republic at frequencies of 1.00-7.60 GHz from 2000 to 2013. After investigating the parameter properties of ZPs, such as the occurrence in flare phase, frequency range, polarization degree, duration, etc., we find that the variation of zebra stripe frequency separation with respect to frequency is the best indicator for a physical classification of ZPs. Microwave ZPs can be classified into three types: equidistant ZPs, variable-distant ZPs, and growing-distant ZPs, possibly corresponding to mechanisms of the Bernstein wave model, whistler wave model, and double plasma resonance model, respectively. This statistical classification may help us to clarify the controversies between the existing various theoretical models and understand the physical processes in the source regions.

  16. Behaviour of Electron Content in the Ionospheric D-Region During Solar X-Ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović Drakul, M.; Čadež, V. M.; Bajčetić, J.; Popović, L. Č.; Blagojević, D.; Nina, A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC) representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km - 90 km above Earth's surface) is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TEC_{D) during activity of a solar X-ray flare (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case) when TEC_{D} contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites.

  17. On the Nature of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Late Phase of Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Guo, Y; Dai, Y

    2014-01-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) late phase of solar flares is a second peak of warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI) for many minutes to a few hours after the GOES soft X-ray peak. It was first observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The late phase emission originates from a second set of longer loops (late phase loops) that are higher than the main flaring loops. It is suggested as being caused by either additional heating or long-lasting cooling. In this paper, we study the role of long-lasting cooling and additional heating in producing the EUV late phase using the "enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops" (EBTEL) model. We find that a long cooling process in late phase loops can well explain the presence of the EUV late phase emission, but we cannot exclude the possibility of additional heating in the decay phase. Moreover, we provide two preliminary methods based on the UV and EUV emissions from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board SDO to...

  18. Behaviour of Electron Content in the Ionospheric D-Region During Solar X-Ray Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorović Drakul, M.; Čadež, V. M.; Bajčetić, J.; Popović, L. Č.; Blagojević, D.; Nina, A.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important parameters in ionospheric plasma research, also having a wide practical application in wireless satellite telecommunications, is the total electron content (TEC) representing the columnal electron number density. The F-region with high electron density provides the biggest contribution to TEC while the relatively weakly ionized plasma of the D-region (60 km - 90 km above Earth's surface) is often considered as a negligible cause of satellite signal disturbances. However, sudden intensive ionization processes, like those induced by solar X-ray flares, can cause relative increases of electron density that are significantly larger in the D-region than in regions at higher altitudes. Therefore, one cannot exclude a priori the D-region from investigations of ionospheric influences on propagation of electromagnetic signals emitted by satellites. We discuss here this problem which has not been sufficiently treated in literature so far. The obtained results are based on data collected from the D-region monitoring by very low frequency radio waves and on vertical TEC calculations from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal analyses, and they show noticeable variations in the D-region's electron content (TEC_{D}) during activity of a solar X-ray flare (it rises by a factor of 136 in the considered case) when TEC_{D} contribution to TEC can reach several percent and which cannot be neglected in practical applications like global positioning procedures by satellites.

  19. Acceleration, magnetic fluctuations and cross-field transport of energetic electrons in a solar flare loop

    CERN Document Server

    Kontar, E P; Bian, N H

    2011-01-01

    Plasma turbulence is thought to be associated with various physical processes involved in solar flares, including magnetic reconnection, particle acceleration and transport. Using Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager ({\\it RHESSI}) observations and the X-ray visibility analysis, we determine the spatial and spectral distributions of energetic electrons for a flare (GOES M3.7 class, April 14, 2002 23$:$55 UT), which was previously found to be consistent with a reconnection scenario. It is demonstrated that because of the high density plasma in the loop, electrons have to be continuously accelerated about the loop apex of length $\\sim 2\\times 10^9$cm and width $\\sim 7\\times 10^8$cm. Energy dependent transport of tens of keV electrons is observed to occur both along and across the guiding magnetic field of the loop. We show that the cross-field transport is consistent with the presence of magnetic turbulence in the loop, where electrons are accelerated, and estimate the magnitude of the field line diffu...

  20. High Resolution He I 10830 AA Narrow-band Imaging of an M-class Flare. I - Analysis of Sunspot Dynamics during Flaring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Su, Yingna; Hong, Zhenxiang; Zeng, Zhicheng; Ji, Kaifan; Goode, Philip R.; Cao, Wenda; Ji, Haisheng

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we report our first-step results of high resolution He i 10830 Å narrow-band imaging (bandpass: 0.5 Å) of an M1.8 class two-ribbon flare on 2012 July 5. The flare was observed with the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. For this unique data set, sunspot dynamics during flaring were analyzed for the first time. By directly imaging the upper chromosphere, running penumbral waves are clearly seen as an outward extension of umbral flashes; both take the form of absorption in the 10830 Å narrow-band images. From a space-time image made of a slit cutting across a flare ribbon and the sunspot, we find that the dark lanes for umbral flashes and penumbral waves are obviously broadened after the flare. The most prominent feature is the sudden appearance of an oscillating absorption strip inside the ribbon when it sweeps into the sunspot’s penumbral and umbral regions. During each oscillation, outwardly propagating umbral flashes and subsequent penumbral waves rush out into the inwardly sweeping ribbon, followed by a return of the absorption strip with similar speed. We tentatively explain the phenomena as the result of a sudden increase in the density of ortho-helium atoms in the area of the sunspot being excited by the flare’s extreme ultraviolet illumination. This explanation is based on the observation that 10830 Å absorption around the sunspot area gets enhanced during the flare. Nevertheless, questions are still open and we need further well-devised observations to investigate the behavior of sunspot dynamics during flares.

  1. Does There Exist a Relationship Between Acoustic and White-Light Emission in Hard-X ray Solar Flares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago-Casas, J. C.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Calvo-Mozo, B.

    2014-12-01

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed seismicity during some solar flares. One theory associates high-energy electrons and white-light emission with sunquakes. This relationship is based on the back-warming model, where high-energy electrons and their subsequent heating of the photosphere induce acoustic waves in the solar interior. We carried out a correlative study of solar flares with emission in hard-X rays (HXRs) above 50 keV, enhanced white light emission at 6573Å, and acoustic sources. We selected those flares observed by RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) with a considerable flux in the 50-100 and 100-300 keV bands between January 1, 2010 and June 26, 2014. Additionally, we restricted the sample to flares close to disk center where it is observationally easiest to detect a sunquake. We then used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO/HMI) to search for white-light emission and helioseismic signatures. Finally, we calculated a coefficient of correlation for this set of dichotomic observables. We discuss the phenomenological connectivity between these physical quantities and the observational difficulties of detecting seismic signals and white-light radiation with terrestrial and space-borne observations.

  2. Solar Flare Prediction Using SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Data with a Machine-Learning Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Bobra, Monica G

    2014-01-01

    We attempt to forecast M-and X-class solar flares using a machine-learning algorithm, called Support Vector Machine (SVM), and four years of data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the first instrument to continuously map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field from space. Most flare forecasting efforts described in the literature use either line-of-sight magnetograms or a relatively small number of ground-based vector magnetograms. This is the first time a large dataset of vector magnetograms has been used to forecast solar flares. We build a catalog of flaring and non-flaring active regions sampled from a database of 2,071 active regions, comprised of 1.5 million active region patches of vector magnetic field data, and characterize each active region by 25 parameters. We then train and test the machine-learning algorithm and we estimate its performances using forecast verification metrics with an emphasis on the True Skill Statistic (TSS). We obtain relatively h...

  3. Analysis of flares in the chromosphere and corona of main- and pre-main-sequence M-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Chacón, I.

    2015-11-01

    having an accretion disk) we carry out a detailed analysis of an extremely long rise phase and of a shorter, weaker flare (allowing us to compare the results with those reported for young stars but surrounded by disks). Assuming multitemperature models to describe the coronal flaring plasma, we have calculated the metal abundance, the electron temperatures and the respective emission measures by fitting the spectra with the Astrophysical Plasma Emission Code included in the XSPEC software, which calculates spectral models for hot, optically thin plasmas. Moreover, we are able to estimate the size of the flaring loops by using theoretical models. These sizes give us an idea about the extent of the corona. For those flares in which heating does not entirely drive the flare evolution we use the models reported by Reale (2007) and Reale et al. (1997) for the rise and decay phases, respectively, including the effect of sustained heating during the decay. Instead, the stellar version of the Kopp & Poletto (1984)'s solar two-ribbon flare model (Poletto et al. 1988) is used when the residual heating completely drives the flare over the plasma cooling. Later, we apply the so-called RTV scaling laws (Rosner et al. 1978) and other fundamental laws of physics to determine additional characteristics of the plasma contained in the flaring loops (electron density and pressure), as well as the volume of the flaring region, the heating rate per unit volume, and the strength of the magnetic field required to confine this plasma. Making some assumptions we are also able to estimate the number of loops involved in the observed flares and the kind of magnetic structures present in the atmosphere of these types of stars. Finally, we discuss and interpret the results in the context of solar and stellar flares reported so far.

  4. RADIOEMISSÕES SOLARES TIPO II ASSOCIADAS A FLARES E CMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Douglas Cunha-Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Atribuídas a ondas de choque e a ejeções de plasmoide, as emissões solares tipo II são ondaseletromagnéticas geradas a partir de oscilações do plasma coronal. A origem dos choques associados a essasemissões é ainda uma questão em aberto da física solar. Enquanto alguns trabalhos sugerem os flares solarescomo seus acionadores, outros fornecem indícios de serem as ejeções de massa coronal (CMEs sua origemmais provável. Este trabalho apresenta os resultados da análise de duas emissões tipo II, registradas por doisespectrômetros da rede e-CALLISTO (extended-Compound Astronomical Low-cost Low-frequency Instrument forSpectroscopy and Transportable Observatory, os quais operam na faixa de frequências de 45-870 MHz. Oprimeiro evento, observado em 13 de junho de 2010, às 05:38 UT, apresentou uma taxa de deriva em frequênciade -0,2 MHz s-1, correspondente a uma velocidade de choque de 528 km s-1, estando, temporalmente, associadoa uma CME lenta (~320 km s-1 e a um flare solar em raios-X, classe M1.0. O segundo evento, observado em 09de Agosto de 2011, às 08:02 UT, apresentou uma taxa de deriva em frequência de -1,4 MHz s-1, correspondentea uma velocidade de choque de 1375 km s-1, estando, temporalmente, associado a uma CME tipo halo (~1610km s-1 e a um flare solar em raios-X, classe X6.9. Os resultados obtidos, para os parâmetros observacionais dasemissões tipo II e para os parâmetros físicos de suas fontes, são discutidos no contexto de sua relação com seuflares e CMEs associados.

  5. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  6. Transient behavior of a flare-associated solar wind. I - Gas dynamics in a radial open field region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical investigation is conducted into the way in which a solar wind model initially satisfying both steady state and energy balance conditions is disturbed and deformed, under the assumption of heating that correspoonds to the energy release of solar flares of an importance value of approximately 1 which occur in radial open field regions. Flare-associated solar wind transient behavior is modeled for 1-8 solar radii. The coronal temperature around the heat source region rises, and a large thermal conductive flux flows inward to the chromosphere and outward to interplanetary space along field lines. The speed of the front of expanding chromospheric material generated by the impingement of the conduction front on the upper chromosphere exceeds the local sound velocity in a few minutes and eventually exceeds 100 million cm/sec.

  7. High-Energy Solar Flare Studies with HAWC and Neutron Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares can produce ions in excess of 1 GeV/nuc, both impulsively and for extended periods of time. We know this by way of the γ radiation those ions produce. We have witnessed this in several Fermi flares above 100 MeV as well as in the data from SMM and Compton. Our ability to deduce the nature of parent ion population responsible for the γ rays is limited by the confounding multiple processes that separate the ion population from the consequent photons. However, when neutrons (>500 MeV) are produced, which should be almost every time pions are produced, we have complementary information about the ion spectrum if those neutrons are measured. The γ rays are most closely tied to the ion spectrum near the pion production threshold, while the ground level neutrons sample the ion spectrum >1 GeV. Together these two measurements provide information on the ion spectral shape and its turnover at high energy. The turnover embodies critical information about the parameters of the acceleration process and environment. Above 500 MeV, neutrons can be detected at the ground near the subsolar point. HAWC, the High Altitude Water Čerenkov γ-ray telescope is designed to measure cosmic TeV γ-ray sources. HAWC resides on Sierra Negra in Mexico at a latitude of 19 degrees and an altitude of ~14,000 ft., 623 mbar. Neutron signals detected by HAWC will be from higher energy ions at the Sun, compared to the bulk of photons detected by Fermi. If a γ signal is also present in HAWC, this will be additional information with which to examine the solar ion spectrum. The neutron and γ data from HAWC and neutron monitors when combined with data from Fermi LAT/GBM will constitute the the most comprehensive measure of the high-energy solar ion spectrum.

  8. The 26 December 2001 Solar Event Responsible for GLE63. I. Observations of a Major Long-Duration Flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V V

    2016-01-01

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic-ray intensity occur, on average, once a year. Due to their rareness, studying the solar sources of GLEs is especially important to approach understanding their origin. The SOL2001-12-26 eruptive-flare event responsible for GLE63 seems to be challenging in some aspects. Deficient observations limited its understanding. Analysis of extra observations found for this event provided new results shading light on the flare. This article addresses the observations of this flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT). Taking advantage of its instrumental characteristics, we analyze the detailed SSRT observations of a major long-duration flare at 5.7 GHz without cleaning the images. The analysis confirms that the source of GLE63 was associated with an event in active region 9742 that comprised two flares. The first flare (04:30-05:03 UT) reached a GOES importance of about M1.6. Two microwave sources were observed, whose brightness temperatures at 5.7 GHz exceeded 10 MK...

  9. “Dandelion” Filament Eruption and Coronal Waves Associated with a Solar Flare on 2011 February 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Denis P.; Martínez, Lurdes M.; Buleje, Yovanny J.; Ishitsuka, Mutsumi; Ishitsuka, José K.; Morita, Satoshi; Asai, Ayumi; UeNo, Satoru; Ishii, Takako T.; Kitai, Reizaburo; Takasao, Shinsuke; Yoshinaga, Yusuke; Otsuji, Kenichi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2017-02-01

    Coronal disturbances associated with solar flares, such as Hα Moreton waves, X-ray waves, and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) coronal waves, are discussed herein in relation to magnetohydrodynamic fast-mode waves or shocks in the corona. To understand the mechanism of coronal disturbances, full-disk solar observations with high spatial and temporal resolution over multiple wavelengths are of crucial importance. We observed a filament eruption, whose shape is like a “dandelion,” associated with the M1.6 flare that occurred on 2011 February 16 in Hα images taken by the Flare Monitoring Telescope at Ica University, Peru. We derive the three-dimensional velocity field of the erupting filament. We also identify winking filaments that are located far from the flare site in the Hα images, whereas no Moreton wave is observed. By comparing the temporal evolution of the winking filaments with those of the coronal wave seen in the EUV images data taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-Ahead, we confirm that the winking filaments were activated by the EUV coronal wave.

  10. The Role of Diffusion in the Transport of Energetic Electrons during Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2017-02-01

    The transport of the energy contained in suprathermal electrons in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of flare physics, from the spatial distributions of hard X-ray emission and energy deposition in the ambient atmosphere to global energetics. Historically the transport of these particles has been largely treated through a deterministic approach, in which first-order secular energy loss to electrons in the ambient target is treated as the dominant effect, with second-order diffusive terms (in both energy and angle) generally being either treated as a small correction or even neglected. Here, we critically analyze this approach, and we show that spatial diffusion through pitch-angle scattering necessarily plays a very significant role in the transport of electrons. We further show that a satisfactory treatment of the diffusion process requires consideration of non-local effects, so that the electron flux depends not just on the local gradient of the electron distribution function but on the value of this gradient within an extended region encompassing a significant fraction of a mean free path. Our analysis applies generally to pitch-angle scattering by a variety of mechanisms, from Coulomb collisions to turbulent scattering. We further show that the spatial transport of electrons along the magnetic field of a flaring loop can be modeled rather effectively as a Continuous Time Random Walk with velocity-dependent probability distribution functions of jump sizes and occurrences, both of which can be expressed in terms of the scattering mean free path.

  11. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of High-energy Protons in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 105) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ˜2 × 103, similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20-W90) SEP events.

  12. Hard X-Ray Flare Source Sizes Measured with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Pernak, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of 18 double hard X-ray sources seen at energies above 25 keV are analyzed to determine the spatial extent of the most compact structures evident in each case. The following four image reconstruction algorithms were used: Clean, Pixon, and two routines using visibilities maximum entropy and forward fit (VFF). All have been adapted for this study to optimize their ability to provide reliable estimates of the sizes of the more compact sources. The source fluxes, sizes, and morphologies obtained with each method are cross-correlated and the similarities and disagreements are discussed. The full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the major axes of the sources with assumed elliptical Gaussian shapes are generally well correlated between the four image reconstruction routines and vary between the RHESSI resolution limit of approximately 2" up to approximately 20" with most below 10". The FWHM of the minor axes are generally at or just above the RHESSI limit and hence should be considered as unresolved in most cases. The orientation angles of the elliptical sources are also well correlated. These results suggest that the elongated sources are generally aligned along a flare ribbon with the minor axis perpendicular to the ribbon. This is verified for the one flare in our list with coincident Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) images. There is evidence for significant extra flux in many of the flares in addition to the two identified compact sources, thus rendering the VFF assumption of just two Gaussians inadequate. A more realistic approximation in many cases would be of two line sources with unresolved widths. Recommendations are given for optimizing the RHESSI imaging reconstruction process to ensure that the finest possible details of the source morphology become evident and that reliable estimates can be made of the source dimensions.

  13. IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR FLARE LOOPS WITH SDO/AIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, J. T.; Mao, X. J. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Shen, Y. D.; Liu, Y. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physical Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) of flaring emission with periods from a few seconds to tens of minutes have been widely detected from radio bands to {gamma}-ray emissions. However, in the past the spatial information of pulsations could not be utilized well due to the instrument limits. We report here imaging observations of the QPPs in three loop sections during a C1.7 flare with periods of P = 24 s-3 minutes by means of the extreme-ultraviolet 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We confirm that the QPPs with the shortest period of 24 s were not of an artifact produced by the Nyquist frequency of the AIA 12 s cadence. The QPPs in the three loop sections were interconnected and closely associated with the flare. The detected perturbations propagated along the loops at speeds of 65-200 km s{sup -1}, close to those of acoustic waves in them. The loops were made up of many bright blobs arranged in alternating bright and dark changes in intensity (spatial periodical distribution) with the wavelengths 2.4-5 Mm (as if they were magnetohydrodynamic waves). Furthermore, in the time-distance diagrams, the detected perturbation wavelengths of the QPPs are estimated to be {approx}10 Mm, which evidently do not fit the above ones of the spatial periodic distributions and produce a difference of a factor of 2-4 with them. It is suggested that the short QPPs with periods P < 60 s were possibly sausage-mode oscillations and the long QPPs with periods P > 60 s were the higher (e.g., >2nd) harmonics of slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  14. High-temperature differential emission measure and altitude variations in the temperature and density of solar flare coronal X-ray sources

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of plasma heating and acceleration region properties presents a major observational challenge in solar flare physics. Using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), the high temperature differential emission measure, DEM(T), and the energy-dependent spatial structure of solar flare coronal sources are studied quantitatively. The altitude of the coronal X-ray source is observed to increase with energy by ~+0.2 arcsec/keV between 10 and 25 keV. Although...

  15. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection of Flux-rope Structures as a Precursor to an Eruptive X-class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Yang, Kai; Hou, Yijun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We present the quasi-periodic slipping motion of flux-rope structures prior to the onset of an eruptive X-class flare on 2015 March 11, obtained by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The slipping motion occurred at the north part of the flux rope and seemed to successively peel off the flux rope. The speed of the slippage was 30-40 km s-1, with an average period of 130 ± 30 s. The Si iv λ1402.77 line showed a redshift of 10-30 km s-1 and a line width of 50-120 km s-1 at the west legs of slipping structures, indicative of reconnection downflow. The slipping motion lasted about 40 minutes, and the flux rope started to rise up slowly at the late stage of the slippage. Then an X2.1 flare was initiated, and the flux rope was impulsively accelerated. One of the flare ribbons swept across a negative-polarity sunspot, and the penumbral segments of the sunspot decayed rapidly after the flare. We studied the magnetic topology at the flaring region, and the results showed the existence of a twisted flux rope, together with quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) structures binding the flux rope. Our observations imply that quasi-periodic slipping magnetic reconnection occurs along the flux-rope-related QSLs in the preflare stage, which drives the later eruption of the flux rope and the associated flare.

  16. Comparative Study of Non-Thermal Emissions and Electron Transport in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Takashi; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Masuda, Satoshi

    It is well known that a large amount of non-thermal electrons are produced in a solar flare. To understand their acceleration and transport mechanisms, hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave observations are the most powerful means. HXRs are emitted primarily by electrons with energy below several hundred keV via bremsstrahlung (Brown 1971), while microwaves are by electrons with energy above several hundred keV via gyrosynchrotron radiation (e.g., Ramaty 1969). Therefore these two sources of emissions provide information on electrons in two different energy ranges. A comparative study by using both HXR and microwave observations is useful for understanding the physics of electrons over a wide range of energies. We observed a solar flare occurred on 2003 May 29 with HXRs taken by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and microwaves by the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). In particular, we focus on characteristics of higher energy (>100 keV) HXRs. They are emitted from both footpoints of the flare loop in the same manner as the lower energy (energy HXRs is more similar to that of the microwaves than to that of the lower energy HXRs. To understand the observed characteristics in terms of an energy-dependent transport effect of electrons, we develop a more general treatment of trap-plus-precipitation (TPP; Melrose and Brown, 1976) by using the gyro-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. We model the time evolution of the electron phase space distribution under the influence of Coulomb collisions and magnetic mirror, and then calculate the resulting HXR and microwave emissions for comparison with the observation. It is found that the TPP model in the weak diffusion regime well explains the observed characteristics. Further, we conclude from both the observation and the modelling that the observed time profile of the spectral index of the higher energy HXRs can be explained if the pitch-angle distribution of the

  17. Si XII X-ray Satellite Lines in Solar Flare Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, K. J.; Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Dubau, J.

    2005-05-01

    We demonstrate the temperature dependence of the intensity ratio of dielectronic satellite lines due to Li-like Si (Si XII) to nearby He-like Si (Si XIII) 1s2 - 1snp(n=3, 4, 5) lines emitted in solar flare X-ray spectra. These lines, which occur in the wavelength range 5.253~Å--5.818~Å, have been observed by the RESIK bent crystal spectrometer on the Russian CORONAS-F solar mission. Line features made up of several strong satellites with transitions 1s2 n'l' - 1s n'l' nl lie near the `parent' Si XIII lines, transition 1s2 1S0 - 1snp 1P1; thus, the feature at 5.818~Å is made up of several blended Si XII satellites with `spectator' electrons n'l'=2s or 2p and nl=3p or 3d, and lies on the long-wavelength side of the Si XIII 1s2 - 1s3p line at 5.681~Å. A similar n=4 satellite feature at 5.565~Å is on the long-wavelength side of the Si XIII 1s2 - 1s4p line at 5.384~Å. The Si XII satellites are formed by dielectronic recombination and direct (inner-shell) excitation. The ratio Is/IHe (Is = Si XII satellite line flux, IHe = Si XIII line flux) depends on electron temperature approximately as Te-1. The atomic data needed to calculate Is/IHe for individual n=3 and n=4 Si XII satellite lines have been calculated and will be presented in this paper; excitation mechanisms including those by dielectronic recombination and inner-shell excitation were included using the SUPERSTRUCTURE and Distorted Wave formalisms. With these and theoretical fluxes of the Si XIII lines, synthetic spectra were calculated and compared with RESIK solar flare spectra. Values of Is/IHe measured from RESIK spectra during the decay of four long-duration solar flares, together with temperatures estimated both from the ratio of the GOES channels and from the ratio of total fluxes in two of the four RESIK channels, enable a comparison to be made with theoretical curves. The agreement with the theoretical curve based on synthetic spectra is within expected uncertainties, and the Te-1 dependence is

  18. 2D MHD and 1D HD models of a solar flare -- a comprehensive comparison of the results

    CERN Document Server

    Falewicz, R; Murawski, K; Srivastava, A K

    2015-01-01

    Without any doubt solar flaring loops possess a multi-thread internal structure that is poorly resolved and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modelling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of 1D hydrodynamic and 2D magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in the AR10126 on September 20, 2002 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The non-ideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy loss mechanisms, while the non-ideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy loss mechanisms only. The 2...

  19. Origin of the 30 THz emission detected during the 2012 March 13 solar flare at 17:20 UT

    CERN Document Server

    Trottet, G; MacKinnon, A; de Castro, G Giménez; Simões, P J A; Cabezas, D; de La Luz, V; Luoni, M; Kaufmann, P

    2015-01-01

    Solar observations in the infrared domain can bring important clues on the response of the low solar atmosphere to primary energy released during flares. At present the infrared continuum has been detected at 30 THz (10 $\\mu$m) in only a few flares. In this work we present a detailed multi-frequency analysis of SOL2012-03-13, including observations at radio millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths, in hard X-rays (HXR), gamma-rays (GR), H-alpha, and white-light. HXR/GR spectral analysis shows that the event is a GR line flare and allows estimating the numbers of and energy contents in electrons, protons and alpha particles produced during the flare. The energy spectrum of the electrons producing the HXR/GR continuum is consistent with a broken power-law with an energy break at ~800 keV. It is shown that the high-energy part (above ~800 keV) of this distribution is responsible for the high-frequency radio emission (> 20 GHz) detected during the flare. By comparing the 30 THz emission expected from semi-empiri...

  20. Evidence of Solar Flare Triggering due to Loop-Loop Interaction Caused by Footpoint Shear-Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pankaj; Somov, B V; Manoharan, P K; Erdelyi, R; Uddin, Wahab

    2010-01-01

    We analyze multi-wavelength data of a M7.9/1N class solar flare which occurred on 27 April, 2006 from AR NOAA 10875. GOES soft X-ray images provide the most likely signature of two interacting loops and their reconnection, which triggers the solar flare. TRACE 195 A images also reveal the loop-loop interaction and the formation of `X' points with converging motion (~30 km/s) at the reconnection site in-between this interacting loop system. This provides the evidence of progressive reconnection and flare maximization at the interaction site in the active region. The absence of type III radio burst during this time period indicates no opening of magnetic field lines during the flare energy release, which implies only the change of field lines connectivity/orientation during the loop-loop interaction and reconnection process. The Ondrejov dynamic radio spectrum shows an intense decimetric (DCIM) radio burst (2.5--4.5 GHz, duration ~3 min) during flare initiation, which reveals the signature of particle accelerat...

  1. Application of a deep-learning method to the forecast of daily solar flare occurrence using Convolution Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seulki; Moon, Yong-Jae; Chu, Hyoungseok

    2017-08-01

    As the application of deep-learning methods has been succeeded in various fields, they have a high potential to be applied to space weather forecasting. Convolutional neural network, one of deep learning methods, is specialized in image recognition. In this study, we apply the AlexNet architecture, which is a winner of Imagenet Large Scale Virtual Recognition Challenge (ILSVRC) 2012, to the forecast of daily solar flare occurrence using the MatConvNet software of MATLAB. Our input images are SOHO/MDI, EIT 195Å, and 304Å from January 1996 to December 2010, and output ones are yes or no of flare occurrence. We select training dataset from Jan 1996 to Dec 2000 and from Jan 2003 to Dec 2008. Testing dataset is chosen from Jan 2001 to Dec 2002 and from Jan 2009 to Dec 2010 in order to consider the solar cycle effect. In training dataset, we randomly select one fifth of training data for validation dataset to avoid the overfitting problem. Our model successfully forecasts the flare occurrence with about 0.90 probability of detection (POD) for common flares (C-, M-, and X-class). While POD of major flares (M- and X-class) forecasting is 0.96, false alarm rate (FAR) also scores relatively high(0.60). We also present several statistical parameters such as critical success index (CSI) and true skill statistics (TSS). Our model can immediately be applied to automatic forecasting service when image data are available.

  2. On the relationship between sunspot structure and magnetic field changes associated with solar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yongliang

    2016-01-01

    Many previous studies have shown that magnetic fields as well as sunspot structures present rapid and irreversible changes associated with solar flares. In this paper we first use five X-class flares observed by SDO/HMI to show that not only the magnetic fields and sunspot structures do show rapid, irreversible changes but also these changes are closely related, both spatially and temporally. The magnitudes of the correlation coefficients between the temporal variations of horizontal magnetic field and sunspot intensity are all larger than 0.90, with a maximum value of 0.99 and an average value of 0.96. Then using four active regions in quiescent times, three observed and one simulated, we show that in sunspot penumbra regions there also exists a close correlation between sunspot intensity and horizontal magnetic field strength, in addition to the well-known one between sunspot intensity and normal magnetic field strength. Connecting these two observational phenomena, we show that the sunspot structure change...

  3. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATION OF RECONNECTION INFLOW AND OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2010 AUGUST 18 SOLAR FLARE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasao, Shinsuke; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Asai, Ayumi; Isobe, Hiroaki, E-mail: takasao@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2012-01-20

    We report the simultaneous extreme-ultraviolet observation of magnetic reconnection inflow and outflow in a flare on 2010 August 18 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We found that during the rise phase of the flare, some plasma blobs appeared in the sheet structure above the hot loops. The plasma blobs were ejected bidirectionally along the sheet structure (outflow), at the same time as the threads visible in extreme-ultraviolet images moved toward the sheet structure (inflow). The upward and downward ejection velocities are 220-460 km s{sup -1} and 250-280 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The inflow speed changed from 90 km s{sup -1} to 12 km s{sup -1} in 5 minutes. By using these velocities, we estimated the nondimensional reconnection rate, which we found to vary during this period from 0.20 to 0.055. We also found that the plasma blobs in the sheet structure collided or merged with each other before they were ejected from the sheet structure. We hypothesize that the sheet structure is the current sheet and that these plasma blobs are plasmoids or magnetic islands, which could be important for understanding the dynamics of the reconnection region.

  4. First flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Nicole; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Bain, H. M.; Amman, M.; Mochizuki, B. A.; Hoberman, J.; Olson, J.; Maruca, B. A.; Godbole, N. M.; Smith, D. M.; Sample, J.; Kelley, N. A.; Zoglauer, A.; Caspi, A.; Kaufmann, P.; Boggs, S.; Lin, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument is a balloon-borne telescope designed to study solar- are particle acceleration and transport. We describe GRIPS's first Antarctic long-duration flight in January 2016 and report preliminary calibration and science results. Electron and ion dynamics, particle abundances and the ambient plasma conditions in solar flares can be understood by examining hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emission (20 keV to 10 MeV). Enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of are emissions in this energy range are needed to study particle acceleration and transport questions. The GRIPS instrument is specifically designed to answer questions including: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? GRIPS's key technological improvements over the current solar state of the art at HXR/gamma-ray energies, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), include 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulation collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs have spectral FWHM resolution of a few hundred keV and spatial resolution 150 keV, the energy deposition sites can be tracked, providing polarization measurements as well as enhanced background reduction through Compton imaging. Each of GRIPS's detectors has 298 electrode strips read out with ASIC/FPGA electronics. In GRIPS's energy range, indirect imaging methods provide higher resolution than focusing optics or Compton imaging techniques. The MPRM gridimaging system has a single-grid design which provides twice the throughput of a bi-grid imaging system like RHESSI. The grid is composed of 2.5 cm deep tungsten-copper slats, and quasi

  5. On the origin of 140 GHz emission from the 4 July 2012 solar flare

    CERN Document Server

    Tsap, Yuriy T; Morgachev, Alexander S; Motorina, Galina G; Kontar, Eduard P; Nagnibeda, Valery G; Strekalova, Polina V

    2016-01-01

    The sub-THz event observed on the 4 July 2012 with the Bauman Moscow State Technical University Radio Telescope RT-7.5 at 93 and 140~GHz as well as Kislovodsk and Mets\\"ahovi radio telescopes, Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), GOES, RHESSI, and SDO orbital stations is analyzed. The spectral flux between 93 and 140 GHz has been observed increasing with frequency. On the basis of the SDO/AIA data the differential emission measure has been calculated. It is shown that the thermal coronal plasma with the temperature above 0.5~MK cannot be responsible for the observed sub-THz flare emission. The non-thermal gyrosynchrotron mechanism can be responsible for the microwave emission near $10$~GHz but the observed millimeter spectral characteristics are likely to be produced by the thermal bremsstrahlung emission from plasma with a temperature of about 0.1~MK.

  6. On the origin of 140 GHz emission from the 4 July 2012 solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsap, Yuriy T.; Smirnova, Victoria V.; Morgachev, Alexander S.; Motorina, Galina G.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Nagnibeda, Valery G.; Strekalova, Polina V.

    2016-04-01

    The sub-THz event observed on the 4 July 2012 with the Bauman Moscow State Technical University Radio Telescope RT-7.5 at 93 and 140 GHz as well as Kislovodsk and Metsähovi radio telescopes, Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), GOES, RHESSI, and SDO orbital stations is analyzed. The spectral flux between 93 and 140 GHz has been observed increasing with frequency. On the basis of the SDO/AIA data the differential emission measure has been calculated. It is shown that the thermal coronal plasma with the temperature above 0.5 MK cannot be responsible for the observed sub-THz flare emission. The non-thermal gyrosynchrotron mechanism can be responsible for the microwave emission near 10 GHz but the observed millimeter spectral characteristics are likely to be produced by the thermal bremsstrahlung emission from plasma with a temperature of about 0.1 MK.

  7. Numbers of Electrons in Solar Flares as Deduced from Microwave and X-Ray Bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xing-Feng; YAO Jin-Xing

    2001-01-01

    We discuss whether the numbers of x-ray and radio-produced electrons in solar flares are the same. The number of radio-produced electrons that is estimated with an inhomogeneous source increases by a factor of 103 - 104because of the inhomogeneity and the decreased magnetic field (B = 120 G) of the radio source. The number of x-ray-produced electrons decreases by a factor of 10 - 30 due to the increase of the number density of ions (3 × 1010 cm-3). These are the reasons why the number of radio-produced electrons is approximately equal tothat of x-ray-produced electrons in the 1981 April 27 burst.

  8. Spontaneous current-layer fragmentation and cascading reconnection in solar flares: I. Model and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bárta, Miroslav; Karlický, Marian; Skála, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is commonly considered as a mechanism of solar (eruptive) flares. A deeper study of this scenario reveals, however, a number of open issues. Among them is the fundamental question, how the magnetic energy is transferred from large, accumulation scales to plasma scales where its actual dissipation takes place. In order to investigate this transfer over a broad range of scales we address this question by means of high-resolution MHD simulation. The simulation results indicate, that the magnetic-energy transfer to small scales is realized via a cascade of consecutive smaller and smaller flux-ropes (plasmoids), in analogy with the vortex-tube cascade in (incompressible) fluid dynamics. Both tearing and (driven) coalescence processes are equally important for the consecutive fragmentation of the magnetic field (and associated current density) to smaller elements. At the later stages a dynamic balance between tearing and coalescence processes reveals a steady (power-law) scaling typical for ca...

  9. Ellerman Bombs, Type II White-light Flares and Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Lower Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Ellerman bombs and Type II white-light flares share many common features despite the large energy gap between them. Both are considered to result from local heating in the solar lower atmosphere. This paper presents numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection occurring in such a deep atmosphere, with the aim to account for the common features of the two phenomena. Our numerical results manifest the following two typical characteristics of the assumed reconnection process: (1) magnetic reconnection saturates in ~600-900 s, which is just the lifetime of the two phenomena; (2) ionization in the upper chromosphere consumes quite a large part of the energy released through reconnection, making the heating effect most significant in the lower chromosphere. The application of the reconnection model to the two phenomena is discussed in detail.

  10. Interplanetary dust collected in the earth's stratosphere - The question of solar flare tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraundorf, P.; Flynn, G. J.; Walker, R. M.; Shirck, J.

    1980-01-01

    The negative result of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) search for solar flare tracks in 10 micron interplanetary dust particles (Flynn et al., 1978) which have been collected in the earth's stratosphere with a program of sampling initiated by Brownlee et al. (1976) has been reported previously. In this paper, it is shown that silicates in the particles record laboratory iron-ion tracks which are detectable in the TEM. The absence of tracks in the silicates could be due to track annealing on atmospheric entry, and may indicate a particle emissivity below 0.3, or that many of the particles broke up on encounter with the atmosphere. Alternatively, the lifetime of 10 micron dust particles at 1 AU could be shorter than that given by previous estimates.

  11. Propagation of Alfv\\'enic Waves From Corona to Chromosphere and Consequences for Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Alexander J B

    2013-01-01

    How do magnetohydrodynamic waves travel from the fully ionized corona, into and through the underlying partially ionized chromosphere, and what are the consequences for solar flares? To address these questions, we have developed a 2-fluid model (of plasma and neutrals) and used it to perform 1D simulations of Alfv\\'en waves in a solar atmosphere with realistic density and temperature structure. Studies of a range of solar features (faculae, plage, penumbra and umbra) show that energy transmission from corona to chromosphere can exceed 20% of incident energy fo