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Sample records for two-point biasing probe

  1. Beyond Kaiser bias: mildly non-linear two-point statistics of densities in distant spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, C.; Codis, S.; Kim, J.; Pichon, C.; Bernardeau, F.; Pogosyan, D.; Park, C.; L'Huillier, B.

    2017-04-01

    We present simple parameter-free analytic bias functions for the two-point correlation of densities in spheres at large separation. These bias functions generalize the so-called Kaiser bias to the mildly non-linear regime for arbitrary density contrasts and grow as b(ρ) - b(1) ∝ (1 - ρ-13/21)ρ1 + n/3 with b(1) = -4/21 - n/3 for a power-law initial spectrum with index n. We carry out the derivation in the context of large-deviation statistics while relying on the spherical collapse model. We use a logarithmic transformation that provides a saddle-point approximation that is valid for the whole range of densities and show its accuracy against the 30 Gpc cube state-of-the-art Horizon Run 4 simulation. Special configurations of two concentric spheres that allow us to identify peaks are employed to obtain the conditional bias and a proxy for the BBKS extremum correlation functions. These analytic bias functions should be used jointly with extended perturbation theory to predict two-point clustering statistics as they capture the non-linear regime of structure formation at the per cent level down to scales of about 10 Mpc h-1 at redshift 0. Conversely, the joint statistics also provide us with optimal dark matter two-point correlation estimates that can be applied either universally to all spheres or to a restricted set of biased (over- or underdense) pairs. Based on a simple fiducial survey, we show that the variance of this estimator is reduced by five times relative to the traditional sample estimator for the two-point function. Extracting more information from correlations of different types of objects should prove essential in the context of upcoming surveys like Euclid, DESI and WFIRST.

  2. Beyond Kaiser bias: mildly non-linear two-point statistics of densities in distant spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Uhlemann, C; Kim, J; Pichon, C; Bernardeau, F; Pogosyan, D; Park, C; L'Huillier, B

    2016-01-01

    Simple parameter-free analytic bias functions for the two-point correlation of densities in spheres at large separation are presented. These bias functions generalize the so-called Kaiser bias to the mildly non-linear regime for arbitrary density contrasts. The derivation is carried out in the context of large deviation statistics while relying on the spherical collapse model. A logarithmic transformation provides a saddle approximation which is valid for the whole range of densities and shown to be accurate against the 30 Gpc cube state-of-the-art Horizon Run 4 simulation. Special configurations of two concentric spheres that allow to identify peaks are employed to obtain the conditional bias and a proxy to BBKS extrema correlation functions. These analytic bias functions should be used jointly with extended perturbation theory to predict two-point clustering statistics as they capture the non-linear regime of structure formation at the percent level down to scales of about 10 Mpc/h at redshift 0. Conversely...

  3. Probing the bias of radio sources at high redshift

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Passmoor, S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the clustering of dark matter and that of luminous matter is often described using the bias parameter. Here, we provide a new method to probe the bias of intermediate-to-high-redshift radio continuum sources for which...

  4. Neuroticism, recall bias and attention bias for valenced probes : a twin study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijsdijk, F. V.; Riese, H.; Tops, M.; Snieder, H.; Brouwer, W. H.; Smid, H. G. O. M.; Ormel, J.

    Background. Prior research on the nature of the vulnerability of neuroticism to psychopathology suggests biases in information processing towards emotional rather than neutral information. It is unclear to what extent this relationship can be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Method.

  5. Assessing probe-specific dye and slide biases in two-color microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg Zelanna

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A primary reason for using two-color microarrays is that the use of two samples labeled with different dyes on the same slide, that bind to probes on the same spot, is supposed to adjust for many factors that introduce noise and errors into the analysis. Most users assume that any differences between the dyes can be adjusted out by standard methods of normalization, so that measures such as log ratios on the same slide are reliable measures of comparative expression. However, even after the normalization, there are still probe specific dye and slide variation among the data. We define a method to quantify the amount of the dye-by-probe and slide-by-probe interaction. This serves as a diagnostic, both visual and numeric, of the existence of probe-specific dye bias. We show how this improved the performance of two-color array analysis for arrays for genomic analysis of biological samples ranging from rice to human tissue. Results We develop a procedure for quantifying the extent of probe-specific dye and slide bias in two-color microarrays. The primary output is a graphical diagnostic of the extent of the bias which called ECDF (Empirical Cumulative Distribution Function, though numerical results are also obtained. Conclusion We show that the dye and slide biases were high for human and rice genomic arrays in two gene expression facilities, even after the standard intensity-based normalization, and describe how this diagnostic allowed the problems causing the probe-specific bias to be addressed, and resulted in important improvements in performance. The R package LMGene which contains the method described in this paper has been available to download from Bioconductor.

  6. RCP: a novel probe design bias correction method for Illumina Methylation BeadChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Liang; Xu, Zongli; Taylor, Jack A

    2016-09-01

    The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip has been extensively utilized in epigenome-wide association studies. This array and its successor, the MethylationEPIC array, use two types of probes-Infinium I (type I) and Infinium II (type II)-in order to increase genome coverage but differences in probe chemistries result in different type I and II distributions of methylation values. Ignoring the difference in distributions between the two probe types may bias downstream analysis. Here, we developed a novel method, called Regression on Correlated Probes (RCP), which uses the existing correlation between pairs of nearby type I and II probes to adjust the beta values of all type II probes. We evaluate the effect of this adjustment on reducing probe design type bias, reducing technical variation in duplicate samples, improving accuracy of measurements against known standards, and retention of biological signal. We find that RCP is statistically significantly better than unadjusted data or adjustment with alternative methods including SWAN and BMIQ. We incorporated the method into the R package ENmix, which is freely available from the Bioconductor website (https://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/ENmix.html). niulg@ucmail.uc.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Attentional bias modification based on visual probe task: methodological issues, results and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attentional bias, the tendency that a person has to drive or maintain attention to a specific class of stimuli, may play an important role in the etiology and persistence of mental disorders. Attentional bias modification has been studied as a form of additional treatment related to automatic processing. Objectives: This systematic literature review compared and discussed methods, evidence of success and potential clinical applications of studies about attentional bias modification (ABM using a visual probe task. Methods: The Web of Knowledge, PubMed and PsycInfo were searched using the keywords attentional bias modification, attentional bias manipulation and attentional bias training. We selected empirical studies about ABM training using a visual probe task written in English and published between 2002 and 2014. Results: Fifty-seven studies met inclusion criteria. Most (78% succeeded in training attention in the predicted direction, and in 71% results were generalized to other measures correlated with the symptoms. Conclusions: ABM has potential clinical utility, but to standardize methods and maximize applicability, future studies should include clinical samples and be based on findings of studies about its effectiveness.

  8. Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy on organic field-effect transistors during gate bias stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijssen, S. G. J.; Cölle, M.; Mank, A. J. G.; Kemerink, M.; Bobbert, P. A.; de Leeuw, D. M.

    2007-05-01

    The reliability of organic field-effect transistors is studied using both transport and scanning Kelvin probe microscopy measurements. A direct correlation between the current and potential of a p-type transistor is demonstrated. During gate bias stress, a decrease in current is observed, that is correlated with the increased curvature of the potential profile. After gate bias stress, the potential changes consistently in all operating regimes: the potential profile gets more convex, in accordance with the simultaneously observed shift in threshold voltage. The changes of the potential are attributed to positive immobile charges, which contribute to the potential, but not to the current.

  9. Attentional bias in excessive Internet gamers: Experimental investigations using an addiction Stroop and a visual probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeromin, Franziska; Nyenhuis, Nele; Barke, Antonia

    2016-03-01

    Background and aims Internet Gaming Disorder is included in the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5(th) edition) as a disorder that merits further research. The diagnostic criteria are based on those for Substance Use Disorder and Gambling Disorder. Excessive gamblers and persons with Substance Use Disorder show attentional biases towards stimuli related to their addictions. We investigated whether excessive Internet gamers show a similar attentional bias, by using two established experimental paradigms. Methods We measured reaction times of excessive Internet gamers and non-gamers (N = 51, 23.7 ± 2.7 years) by using an addiction Stroop with computer-related and neutral words, as well as a visual probe with computer-related and neutral pictures. Mixed design analyses of variance with the between-subjects factor group (gamer/non-gamer) and the within-subjects factor stimulus type (computer-related/neutral) were calculated for the reaction times as well as for valence and familiarity ratings of the stimulus material. Results In the addiction Stroop, an interaction for group × word type was found: Only gamers showed longer reaction times to computer-related words compared to neutral words, thus exhibiting an attentional bias. In the visual probe, no differences in reaction time between computer-related and neutral pictures were found in either group, but the gamers were faster overall. Conclusions An attentional bias towards computer-related stimuli was found in excessive Internet gamers, by using an addiction Stroop but not by using a visual probe. A possible explanation for the discrepancy could lie in the fact that the visual probe may have been too easy for the gamers.

  10. Two-Point Fuzzy Ostrowski Type Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amer Latif

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Two-point fuzzy Ostrowski type inequalities are proved for fuzzy Hölder and fuzzy differentiable functions. The two-point fuzzy Ostrowski type inequality for M-lipshitzian mappings is also obtained. It is proved that only the two-point fuzzy Ostrowski type inequality for M-lipshitzian mappings is sharp and as a consequence generalize the two-point fuzzy Ostrowski type inequalities obtained for fuzzy differentiable functions.

  11. Particles as probes for complex plasmas in front of biased surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Basner, R; Loffhagen, D; Schubert, G; Fehske, H; Kersten, H

    2008-01-01

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purposes. Local electric fields can be determined from the behaviour of particles in the plasma, e.g. particles may serve as electrostatic probes. Since in many cases of applications in plasma technology it is of great interest to describe the electric field conditions in front of floating or biased surfaces, the confinement and behaviour of test particles is studied in front of floating walls inserted into a plasma as well as in front of additionally biased surfaces. For the latter case, the behaviour of particles in front of an adaptive electrode, which allows for an efficient confinement and manipulation of the grains, has been experimentally studied in dependence on the discharge parameters and on different bias conditions of the electrode. The effect of the partially biased surface (dc, rf) on the charged micro-particles has been inves...

  12. Supernovae as probes of cosmic parameters: estimating the bias from under-dense lines of sight

    CERN Document Server

    Busti, V C; Clarkson, C

    2013-01-01

    Correctly interpreting observations of sources such as type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) require knowledge of the power spectrum of matter on AU scales - which is very hard to model accurately. Because under-dense regions account for much of the volume of the universe, light from a typical source probes a mean density significantly below the cosmic mean. The relative sparsity of sources implies that there could be a significant bias when inferring distances of SNe Ia, and consequently a bias in cosmological parameter estimation. While the weak lensing approximation should in principle give the correct prediction for this, linear perturbation theory predicts an effectively infinite variance in the convergence for ultra-narrow beams. We attempt to quantify the effect typically under-dense lines of sight might have in parameter estimation by considering three alternative methods for estimating distances, in addition to the usual weak lensing approximation. We find in each case this not only increases the errors in the...

  13. Supernovae as probes of cosmic parameters: estimating the bias from under-dense lines of sight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busti, V.C.; Clarkson, C. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Center (ACGC), and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town (South Africa); Holanda, R.F.L., E-mail: vinicius.busti@uct.ac.za, E-mail: holanda@uepb.edu.br, E-mail: chris.clarkson@uct.ac.za [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58429-500, Campina Grande – PB (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    Correctly interpreting observations of sources such as type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) require knowledge of the power spectrum of matter on AU scales — which is very hard to model accurately. Because under-dense regions account for much of the volume of the universe, light from a typical source probes a mean density significantly below the cosmic mean. The relative sparsity of sources implies that there could be a significant bias when inferring distances of SNe Ia, and consequently a bias in cosmological parameter estimation. While the weak lensing approximation should in principle give the correct prediction for this, linear perturbation theory predicts an effectively infinite variance in the convergence for ultra-narrow beams. We attempt to quantify the effect typically under-dense lines of sight might have in parameter estimation by considering three alternative methods for estimating distances, in addition to the usual weak lensing approximation. We find in each case this not only increases the errors in the inferred density parameters, but also introduces a bias in the posterior value.

  14. The fixed-bias Langmuir probe on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite: calibration and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenzing, J; Rowland, D

    2012-11-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. C/NOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H(+) and O(+). The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the C/NOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on C/NOFS.

  15. The Fixed-Bias Langmuir Probe on the Communication-Navigation Outage Forecast System Satellite: Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.

    2012-01-01

    A fixed-bias spherical Langmuir probe is included as part of the Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) suite on the Communication Navigation Outage Forecast System (CNOFS) satellite.CNOFS gathers data in the equatorial ionosphere between 400 and 860 km, where the primary constituent ions are H+ and O+. The ion current collected by the probe surface per unit plasma density is found to be a strong function of ion composition. The calibration of the collected current to an absolute density is discussed, and the performance of the spherical probe is compared to other in situ instruments on board the CNOFS satellite. The application of the calibration is discussed with respect to future fixed-bias probes; in particular, it is demonstrated that some density fluctuations will be suppressed in the collected current if the plasma composition rapidly changes along with density. This is illustrated in the observation of plasma density enhancements on CNOFS.

  16. Facial expression movement enhances the measurement of temporal dynamics of attentional bias in the dot-probe task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudek, Corrado; Ceccarini, Francesco; Sica, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The facial dot-probe task is one of the most common experimental paradigms used to assess attentional bias toward emotional information. In recent years, however, the psychometric properties of this paradigm have been questioned. In the present study, attentional bias to emotional face stimuli was measured with dynamic and static images of realistic human faces in 97 college students (63 women) who underwent either a positive or a negative mood-induction prior to the experiment. We controlled the bottom-up salience of the stimuli in order to dissociate the top-down orienting of attention from the effects of the bottom-up physical properties of the stimuli. A Bayesian analysis of our results indicates that 1) the traditional global attentional bias index shows a low reliability, 2) reliability increases dramatically when biased attention is analyzed by extracting a series of bias estimations from trial-to-trial (Zvielli, Bernstein, & Koster, 2015), 3) dynamic expression of emotions strengthens biased attention to emotional information, and 4) mood-congruency facilitates the measurement of biased attention to emotional stimuli. These results highlight the importance of using ecologically valid stimuli in attentional bias research, together with the importance of estimating biased attention at the trial level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Two Point Pade Approximants and Duality

    CERN Document Server

    Banks, Tom

    2013-01-01

    We propose the use of two point Pade approximants to find expressions valid uniformly in coupling constant for theories with both weak and strong coupling expansions. In particular, one can use these approximants in models with a strong/weak duality, when the symmetries do not determine exact expressions for some quantity.

  18. Probing boundary magnetization through exchange bias in heterostructures with competing anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Binek, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Cr2O3 (chromia) is a magnetoelectric antiferromagnet with a bulk TN of 307 K. It has been utilized for electrically controlled exchange bias (EB) by taking advantage of voltage-controllable boundary magnetization (BM) occurring as a generic property in magnetoelectric single domain antiferromagnets.[2] In the perpendicular Cr2O3(0001)/CoPd EB system the EB-field shows an order parameter type T-dependence close to TN reflecting the T-dependence of the BM. At about 150 K a decrease of the EB-field sets in with decreasing temperature suggesting canting of the BM. To evidence this mechanism we use EB as a probe. Specifically, we investigate EB in Permalloy(5nm)/Cr2O3 (0001)(100nm) with Permalloy and chromia having competing anisotropies. We measure easy axis magnetic hysteresis loops via longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect for various temperatures after perpendicular and in-plane magnetic field-cooling. The T-dependence of the EB field supports the canting mechanism. In addition to the all thin film EB system, we explore a Permalloy(10nm)/Cr2O3(0001 single crystal) heterostructure where magnetoelectric annealing allows selecting Cr2O3 single domain states. Here the effect of T-dependent canting of the BM is compared with findings in the complementary perpendicular EB system. Financial support by NSF through MRSEC and the Nanoelectronic Research Initiative.

  19. Lack of attentional bias for emotional information in clinically depressed children and adolescents on the dot probe task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshat-Doost, H T; Moradi, A R; Taghavi, M R; Yule, W; Dalgleish, T

    2000-03-01

    The present study utilised a cognitive paradigm to investigate attentional biases in clinically depressed children and adolescents. Two groups of children and adolescents--clinically depressed (N = 19) and normal controls (N = 26)--were asked to complete a computerised version of the attentional dot probe paradigm similar to that used by MacLeod, Mathews, and Tata (1986). Results provided no support for an attentional bias, either toward depression-related words or threat words, in the depressed group. This finding is discussed in the context of cognitive theories of anxiety and depression.

  20. The effects of priming in a cued dot-probe task on appearance-related attentional biases in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Ben R; Mulgrew, Kate E; Mahar, Doug; White, Melanie J; Loughnan, Siobhan A

    2017-07-01

    The dot-probe task (DPT) is a reaction time measure of attentional bias. Research using this task has found inconsistent patterns of appearance-related attentional biases in women. This study examined the effects of a novel priming variation of the DPT, which incorporated additional cues into each trial of the task, on measurement of such biases. The study also examined associations between these biases and body image, a component of eating disorder symptomatology. A convenience sample of women from the general community (N = 103) completed body image measures online and attended a laboratory session to complete one of four DPTs: (1) an appearance-cued DPT containing images of thin-ideal models between each trial; (2) neutral-cued DPT containing images of forests; (3) time-delayed DPT controlling for time in place of an image; or (4) typical DPT containing only word stimuli. Women who completed the appearance-cued DPT demonstrated a stronger attentional bias for positive, but not negative, appearance words than women who completed the other DPT versions. Furthermore, for the appearance-cued and time-delayed DPTs, this bias correlated with poorer body image across several indicators (appearance evaluation, body dissatisfaction, self-evaluative salience of appearance, and state body satisfaction). Although it was unexpected that no attentional bias for negative-appearance words was found, the attentional bias for positive-appearance words may suggest that effects were driven by the ego-threat of positive-appearance words. Further research is warranted to determine whether such biases contribute to and maintain body image disturbance and disordered eating. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Two-point optical coherency matrix tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouraddy, Ayman F; Kagalwala, Kumel H; Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2014-04-15

    The two-point coherence of an electromagnetic field is represented completely by a 4×4 coherency matrix G that encodes the joint polarization-spatial-field correlations. Here, we describe a systematic sequence of cascaded spatial and polarization projective measurements that are sufficient to tomographically reconstruct G--a task that, to the best of our knowledge, has not yet been realized. Our approach benefits from the correspondence between this reconstruction problem in classical optics and that of quantum state tomography for two-photon states in quantum optics. Identifying G uniquely determines all the measurable correlation characteristics of the field and, thus, lifts ambiguities that arise from reliance on traditional scalar descriptors, especially when the field's degrees of freedom are correlated or classically entangled.

  2. Effect of a Biased Probe on the Afterglow Operation of an ECR4 Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, C E; Wenander, F; Wolf, B H

    2000-01-01

    Various experiments have been performed on a 14.5 GHz ECR4 in order to improve the ion yield. The source runs in pulsed afterglow mode, and provides currents ~120 emA of Pb27+ to the CERN Heavy Ion Facility on an operational basis. In the search for higher beam intensities, the effects of a pulsed biased disk on axis at the injection side were investigated with different pulse timing and voltage settings. No proof for absolute higher intensities was seen for any of these modifications. However, the yield from a poorly tuned/low-performing source could be improved and the extracted pulse was less noisy with bias voltage applied. The fast response on the bias implies that increases/decreases are not due to ionisation processes. A good tune for high yield of high charge states during the afterglow coincides with a high plasma potential.

  3. Application of an RF Biased Langmuir Probe to Etch Reactor Chamber Matching, Fault Detection and Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Douglas; Booth, Jean-Paul; Benjamin, Neil; Thorgrimsson, Chris; Brooks, Mitchell; Nagai, Mikio; Albarede, Luc; Kim, Jung

    2008-10-01

    Semiconductor device manufacturing typically occurs in an environment of both increasing equipment costs and per unit sale price shrinkage. Profitability in such a conflicted economic environment depends critically on yield, throughput and cost-of-ownership. This has resulted in increasing interest in improved fault detection, process diagnosis, and advanced process control. Achieving advances in these areas requires an integrated understanding of the basic physical principles driving the processes of interest and the realities of commercial manufacturing. Following this trend, this work examines the usefulness of an RF-biased planar Langmuir probe^1. This method delivers precise real-time (10 Hz) measurements of ion flux and tail weighted electron temperature. However, it is also mechanically non-intrusive, reliable and insensitive to contamination and deposition on the probe. Since the measured parameters are closely related to physical processes occurring at the wafer-plasma interface, significant improvements in process control, chamber matching and fault detection are achieved. Examples illustrating the improvements possible will be given. ^1J.P. Booth, N. St. J. Braithwaite, A. Goodyear and P. Barroy, Rev.Sci.Inst., Vol.71, No.7, July 2000, pgs. 2722-2727.

  4. Two-point orientation discrimination versus the traditional two-point test for tactile spatial acuity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jonathan; Mao, Oliver; Goldreich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Two-point discrimination is widely used to measure tactile spatial acuity. The validity of the two-point threshold as a spatial acuity measure rests on the assumption that two points can be distinguished from one only when the two points are sufficiently separated to evoke spatially distinguishable foci of neural activity. However, some previous research has challenged this view, suggesting instead that two-point task performance benefits from an unintended non-spatial cue, allowing spuriously good performance at small tip separations. We compared the traditional two-point task to an equally convenient alternative task in which participants attempt to discern the orientation (vertical or horizontal) of two points of contact. We used precision digital readout calipers to administer two-interval forced-choice versions of both tasks to 24 neurologically healthy adults, on the fingertip, finger base, palm, and forearm. We used Bayesian adaptive testing to estimate the participants' psychometric functions on the two tasks. Traditional two-point performance remained significantly above chance levels even at zero point separation. In contrast, two-point orientation discrimination approached chance as point separation approached zero, as expected for a valid measure of tactile spatial acuity. Traditional two-point performance was so inflated at small point separations that 75%-correct thresholds could be determined on all tested sites for fewer than half of participants. The 95%-correct thresholds on the two tasks were similar, and correlated with receptive field spacing. In keeping with previous critiques, we conclude that the traditional two-point task provides an unintended non-spatial cue, resulting in spuriously good performance at small spatial separations. Unlike two-point discrimination, two-point orientation discrimination rigorously measures tactile spatial acuity. We recommend the use of two-point orientation discrimination for neurological assessment.

  5. Two-point orientation discrimination versus the traditional two-point test for tactile spatial acuity assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eTong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-point discrimination is widely used to measure tactile spatial acuity. The validity of the two-point threshold as a spatial acuity measure rests on the assumption that two points can be distinguished from one only when the two points are sufficiently separated to evoke spatially distinguishable foci of neural activity. However, some previous research has challenged this view, suggesting instead that two-point task performance benefits from an unintended non-spatial cue, allowing spuriously good performance at small tip separations. We compared the traditional two-point task to an equally convenient alternative task in which participants attempt to discern the orientation (vertical or horizontal of two points of contact. We used precision digital readout calipers to administer two-interval forced-choice versions of both tasks to 24 neurologically healthy adults, on the fingertip, finger base, palm, and forearm. We used Bayesian adaptive testing to estimate the participants’ psychometric functions on the two tasks. Traditional two-point performance remained significantly above chance levels even at zero point separation. In contrast, two-point orientation discrimination approached chance as point separation approached zero, as expected for a valid measure of tactile spatial acuity. Traditional two-point performance was so inflated at small point separations that 75%-correct thresholds could be determined on all tested sites for fewer than half of participants. The 95%-correct thresholds on the two tasks were similar, and correlated with receptive field spacing. In keeping with previous critiques, we conclude that the traditional two-point task provides an unintended non-spatial cue, resulting in spuriously good performance at small spatial separations. Unlike two-point discrimination, two-point orientation discrimination rigorously measures tactile spatial acuity. We recommend the use of two-point orientation discrimination for neurological

  6. Holographic Two-Point Functions in Conformal Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Ahmad; Naseh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we compute the holographic two-point functions of four dimensional conformal gravity. Precisely we calculate the two-point functions for Energy-Momentum (EM) and Partially Massless Response (PMR) operators that have been identified as two response functions for two independent sources in the dual CFT. The correlation function of EM with PMR tensors turns out to be zero which is expected according to the conformal symmetry. The two-point function of EM is that of a transverse and traceless tensor, and the two-point function of PMR which is a traceless operator contains two distinct parts, one for a transverse-traceless tensor operator and another one for a vector field, both of which fulfill criteria of a CFT. We also discuss about the unitarity of the theory.

  7. The jump-into-contact effect in biased AFM probes on dielectric films and its application to quantify the dielectric permittivity of thin layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Reynier I

    2016-07-01

    The jump-into-contact (JIC) phenomenon in biased atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes on dielectric films is studied. The influence of the film thickness on the position at which the AFM tip collapses irreversibly into the sample surface was theoretically analyzed using a widely accepted analytical expression of the probe-sample electrostatic interaction force. It was demonstrated that for relatively high values of voltage (V > 10-20 V) applied between the probe and the substrate the cantilever deflection at the JIC is independent of the dielectric film thickness for thin-ultrathin layers (h film thickness. Based on this effect an empirical model was formulated to estimate the dielectric permittivity of thin/ultrathin dielectric films using the jump-into-contact distance. The procedure was successfully applied on thin PVD-SiO2 films, obtaining good agreement with a dielectric constant value previously reported for the same material.

  8. Computational complexity for the two-point block method

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Phang Pei; Majid, Zanariah Abdul

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we discussed and compared the computational complexity for two-point block method and one-point method of Adams type. The computational complexity for both methods is determined based on the number of arithmetic operations performed and expressed in O(n). These two methods will be used to solve two-point second order boundary value problem directly and implemented using variable step size strategy adapted with the multiple shooting technique via three-step iterative method. Two numerical examples will be tested. The results show that the computational complexity of these methods is reliable to estimate the cost of these methods in term of the execution time. We conclude that the two-point block method has better computational performance compare to the one-point method as the total number of steps is larger.

  9. Two-point functions on deformed space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Trampetic, Josip

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of one-loop photon (\\Pi) and neutrino (\\Sigma) two-point functions in a covariant and deformed U(1) gauge-theory on d-dimensional noncommutative spaces, determined by a constant antisymmetric tensor \\theta, and by a parameter-space (\\kappa_f,\\kappa_g), respectively. For the general fermion-photon S_f(\\kappa_f) and photon self-interaction S_g(\\kappa_g) the closed form results reveal two-point functions with all kind of pathological terms: the UV divergence, the quadratic UV/IR mixing terms as well as a logarithmic IR divergent term of the type ln(\\mu^2(\\theta p)^2). In addition, the photon-loop produces new tensor structures satisfying transversality condition by themselves. We show that the photon two-point function in four-dimensional Euclidean spacetime can be reduced to two finite terms by imposing a specific full rank of \\theta and setting deformation parameters (\\kappa_f,\\kappa_g)=(0,3). In this case the neutrino two-point function vanishes. Thus for a specific point (0,3) in the para...

  10. Similarity of solution branches for two-point semilinear problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Korman

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available For semilinear autonomous two-point problems, we show that all Neumann branches and all Dirichlet branches with odd number of interior roots have the same shape. On the other hand, Dirichlet branches with even number of roots may look differently. While this result has been proved previously by Schaaf cite{S}, our approach appears to be simpler.

  11. Direct imaging of thermally-activated grain-boundary diffusion in Cu/Co/IrMn/Pt exchange-bias structures using atom-probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letellier, F.; Lardé, R.; Le Breton, J.-M., E-mail: jean-marie.lebreton@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR 6634 CNRS/Université et INSA de Rouen, F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Lechevallier, L. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR 6634 CNRS/Université et INSA de Rouen, F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Département de GEII, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Akmaldinov, K. [SPINTEC, Univ. Grenoble-Alpes/CNRS/INAC-CEA, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CROCUS Technology, F-38025 Grenoble (France); Auffret, S.; Dieny, B.; Baltz, V., E-mail: vincent.baltz@cea.fr [SPINTEC, Univ. Grenoble-Alpes/CNRS/INAC-CEA, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-11-28

    Magnetic devices are often subject to thermal processing steps, such as field cooling to set exchange bias and annealing to crystallize amorphous magnetic electrodes. These processing steps may result in interdiffusion and the subsequent deterioration of magnetic properties. In this study, we investigated thermally-activated diffusion in Cu/Co/IrMn/Pt exchange biased polycrystalline thin-film structures using atom probe tomography. Images taken after annealing at 400 °C for 60 min revealed Mn diffusion into Co grains at the Co/IrMn interface and along Pt grain boundaries for the IrMn/Pt stack, i.e., a Harrison type C regime. Annealing at 500 °C showed further Mn diffusion into Co grains. At the IrMn/Pt interface, annealing at 500 °C led to a type B behavior since Mn diffusion was detected both along Pt grain boundaries and also into Pt grains. The deterioration of the films' exchange bias properties upon annealing was correlated to the observed diffusion. In particular, the topmost Pt capping layer thickness turned out to be crucial since a faster deterioration of the exchange bias properties for thicker caps was observed. This is consistent with the idea that Pt acts as a getter for Mn, drawing Mn out of the IrMn layer.

  12. Total Ossiculoplasty: Advantages of Two-Point Stabilization Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Berenholz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluate a porous polyethylene prosthesis with two-point stabilization in total ossiculoplasty. This approach utilizes a lateral as well as a medial graft to stabilize a total ossicular prosthesis (TOP. Study Design. Retrospective cohort review of total ossiculoplasty. Methods. All patients who underwent total ossiculoplasty during the years 2004–2007 were included in the study group. Only five patients (10% had primary surgery whereas 45 (90% underwent revision surgery. Cartilage grafts covering the prosthesis (Sheehy, Xomed laterally were used in all patients with areolar tissue being used for medial stabilization at the stapes footplate. Follow-up examination and audiometrics were performed a mean of 8.1 months following surgery. Results. The percentage of patients closing their ABG to within 10 dB was 44% with 66% closing their ABG to within 20 dB. The mean four-frequency hearing gain was 15.7 dB. The mean postoperative ABG was 15.7 dB. Conclusion. Audiometric results following total ossiculoplasty surgery using two-point stabilization exceeded results from the otologic literature. Proper two-point fixation with areolar tissue and stabilization utilizing cartilage were the keys to achieving a relatively high percentage of success in chronic ear disease in this sample.

  13. Theory of resistor networks: the two-point resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, F Y [Department of Physics, Northeastern University Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2004-07-02

    The resistance between two arbitrary nodes in a resistor network is obtained in terms of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the Laplacian matrix associated with the network. Explicit formulae for two-point resistances are deduced for regular lattices in one, two and three dimensions under various boundary conditions including that of a Moebius strip and a Klein bottle. The emphasis is on lattices of finite sizes. We also deduce summation and product identities which can be used to analyse large-size expansions in two and higher dimensions.

  14. Two-point correlation functions in inhomogeneous and anisotropic cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcori, Oton H.; Pereira, Thiago S.

    2017-02-01

    Two-point correlation functions are ubiquitous tools of modern cosmology, appearing in disparate topics ranging from cosmological inflation to late-time astrophysics. When the background spacetime is maximally symmetric, invariance arguments can be used to fix the functional dependence of this function as the invariant distance between any two points. In this paper we introduce a novel formalism which fixes this functional dependence directly from the isometries of the background metric, thus allowing one to quickly assess the overall features of Gaussian correlators without resorting to the full machinery of perturbation theory. As an application we construct the CMB temperature correlation function in one inhomogeneous (namely, an off-center LTB model) and two spatially flat and anisotropic (Bianchi) universes, and derive their covariance matrices in the limit of almost Friedmannian symmetry. We show how the method can be extended to arbitrary N-point correlation functions and illustrate its use by constructing three-point correlation functions in some simple geometries.

  15. Two-point functions in (loop) quantum cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Gielen, Steffen; Oriti, Daniele, E-mail: calcagni@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: gielen@aei.mpg.de, E-mail: doriti@aei.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany)

    2011-06-21

    The path-integral formulation of quantum cosmology with a massless scalar field as a sum-over-histories of volume transitions is discussed, with particular but non-exclusive reference to loop quantum cosmology. Exploiting the analogy with the relativistic particle, we give a complete overview of the possible two-point functions, pointing out the choices involved in their definitions, deriving their vertex expansions and the composition laws they satisfy. We clarify the origin and relations of different quantities previously defined in the literature, in particular the tie between definitions using a group averaging procedure and those in a deparametrized framework. Finally, we draw some conclusions about the physics of a single quantum universe (where there exist superselection rules on positive- and negative-frequency sectors and different choices of inner product are physically equivalent) and multiverse field theories where the role of these sectors and the inner product are reinterpreted.

  16. Two-point functions in (loop) quantum cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Gianluca; Oriti, Daniele [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Gielen, Steffen [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    We discuss the path-integral formulation of quantum cosmology with a massless scalar field as a sum-over-histories of volume transitions, with particular but non-exclusive reference to loop quantum cosmology (LQC). Exploiting the analogy with the relativistic particle, we give a complete overview of the possible two-point functions, pointing out the choices involved in their definitions, deriving their vertex expansions and the composition laws they satisfy. We clarify the origin and relations of different quantities previously defined in the literature, in particular the tie between definitions using a group averaging procedure and those in a deparametrized framework. Finally, we draw some conclusions about the physics of a single quantum universe (where there exist superselection rules on positive- and negative-frequency sectors and different choices of inner product are physically equivalent) and multiverse field theories where the role of these sectors and the inner product are reinterpreted.

  17. Two-point Correlator Fits on HISQ Ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Bouchard, C; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Foley, J; Freeland, E D; Gamiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Hetrick, J E; Kim, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Lightman, M; Mackenzie, P B; Neil, E T; Oktay, M; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2012-01-01

    We present our methods to fit the two point correlators for light, strange, and charmed pseudoscalar meson physics with the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action. We make use of the least-squares fit including the full covariance matrix of the correlators and including Gaussian constraints on some parameters. We fit the correlators on a variety of the HISQ ensembles. The lattice spacing ranges from 0.15 fm down to 0.06 fm. The light sea quark mass ranges from 0.2 times the strange quark mass down to the physical light quark mass. The HISQ ensembles also include lattices with different volumes and with unphysical values of the strange quark mass. We use the results from this work to obtain our preliminary results of $f_D$, $f_{D_s}$, $f_{D_s}/f_{D}$, and ratios of quark masses presented in another talk [1].

  18. Probing the ground state and zero-field cooled exchange bias by magnetoresistance measurement in Mn50Ni41Sn9 ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiyun; Tu, Ruikang; Fang, Xiaoting; Gu, Quanchao; Zhou, Yanying; Cui, Rongjing; Han, Zhida; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Chengliang; Jiang, Xuefan

    2017-03-01

    Recently, a new type of exchange bias (EB) after zero-field cooling has attracted considerable interest mainly in bulk magnetic competing systems. Here, we use a detailed magnetotransport investigation to probe the ground state and zero-field cooled EB (ZEB) in Mn50Ni41Sn9 ribbon. Both ZEB and field cooled EB were detected in magnetoresistance results consistent with magnetic measurement. A pure spin-glass ground state is proposed based on parabolic shape of low-field magnetoresistance combined with AC magnetization, memory effect. The appearance of ZEB is attributed to the field-induced nucleation and growth of ferromagnetic domains in the spin glass matrix forming unidirectional anisotropy at the interface.

  19. A multiscale two-point flux-approximation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møyner, Olav; Lie, Knut-Andreas

    2014-10-01

    A large number of multiscale finite-volume methods have been developed over the past decade to compute conservative approximations to multiphase flow problems in heterogeneous porous media. In particular, several iterative and algebraic multiscale frameworks that seek to reduce the fine-scale residual towards machine precision have been presented. Common for all such methods is that they rely on a compatible primal-dual coarse partition, which makes it challenging to extend them to stratigraphic and unstructured grids. Herein, we propose a general idea for how one can formulate multiscale finite-volume methods using only a primal coarse partition. To this end, we use two key ingredients that are computed numerically: (i) elementary functions that correspond to flow solutions used in transmissibility upscaling, and (ii) partition-of-unity functions used to combine elementary functions into basis functions. We exemplify the idea by deriving a multiscale two-point flux-approximation (MsTPFA) method, which is robust with regards to strong heterogeneities in the permeability field and can easily handle general grids with unstructured fine- and coarse-scale connections. The method can easily be adapted to arbitrary levels of coarsening, and can be used both as a standalone solver and as a preconditioner. Several numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate that the MsTPFA method can be used to solve elliptic pressure problems on a wide variety of geological models in a robust and efficient manner.

  20. Flow speed measurement using two-point collective light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemeier, N.P

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of turbulence in plasmas and fluids using the technique of collective light scattering have always been plagued by very poor spatial resolution. In 1994, a novel two-point collective light scattering system for the measurement of transport in a fusion plasma was proposed. This diagnostic method was design for a great improvement of the spatial resolution, without sacrificing accuracy in the velocity measurement. The system was installed at the W7-AS steallartor in Garching, Germany, in 1996, and has been operating since. This master thesis is an investigation of the possible application of this new method to the measurement of flow speeds in normal fluids, in particular air, although the results presented in this work have significance for the plasma measurements as well. The main goal of the project was the experimental verification of previous theoretical predictions. However, the theoretical considerations presented in the thesis show that the method can only be hoped to work for flows that are almost laminar and shearless, which makes it of very small practical interest. Furthermore, this result also implies that the diagnostic at W7-AS cannot be expected to give the results originally hoped for. (au) 1 tab., 51 ills., 29 refs.

  1. Transcript profiling of two alfalfa genotypes with contrasting cell wall composition in stems using a cross-species platform: optimizing analysis by masking biased probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array, developed for Medicago truncatula, is a suitable platform for transcript profiling in tetraploid alfalfa [Medicago sativa (L.) subsp. sativa]. However, previous research involving cross-species hybridization (CSH) has shown that sequence variation between two species can bias transcript profiling by decreasing sensitivity (number of expressed genes detected) and the accuracy of measuring fold-differences in gene expression. Results Transcript profiling using the Medicago GeneChip® was conducted with elongating stem (ES) and post-elongation stem (PES) internodes from alfalfa genotypes 252 and 1283 that differ in stem cell wall concentrations of cellulose and lignin. A protocol was developed that masked probes targeting inter-species variable (ISV) regions of alfalfa transcripts. A probe signal intensity threshold was selected that optimized both sensitivity and accuracy. After masking for both ISV regions and previously identified single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs), the number of differentially expressed genes between the two genotypes in both ES and PES internodes was approximately 2-fold greater than the number detected prior to masking. Regulatory genes, including transcription factor and receptor kinase genes that may play a role in development of secondary xylem, were significantly over-represented among genes up-regulated in 252 PES internodes compared to 1283 PES internodes. Several cell wall-related genes were also up-regulated in genotype 252 PES internodes. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR of differentially expressed regulatory and cell wall-related genes demonstrated increased sensitivity and accuracy after masking for both ISV regions and SFPs. Over 1,000 genes that were differentially expressed in ES and PES internodes of genotypes 252 and 1283 were mapped onto putative orthologous loci on M. truncatula chromosomes. Clustering simulation analysis of the differentially expressed genes suggested co

  2. Transcript profiling of two alfalfa genotypes with contrasting cell wall composition in stems using a cross-species platform: optimizing analysis by masking biased probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hans-Joachim G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GeneChip® Medicago Genome Array, developed for Medicago truncatula, is a suitable platform for transcript profiling in tetraploid alfalfa [Medicago sativa (L. subsp. sativa]. However, previous research involving cross-species hybridization (CSH has shown that sequence variation between two species can bias transcript profiling by decreasing sensitivity (number of expressed genes detected and the accuracy of measuring fold-differences in gene expression. Results Transcript profiling using the Medicago GeneChip® was conducted with elongating stem (ES and post-elongation stem (PES internodes from alfalfa genotypes 252 and 1283 that differ in stem cell wall concentrations of cellulose and lignin. A protocol was developed that masked probes targeting inter-species variable (ISV regions of alfalfa transcripts. A probe signal intensity threshold was selected that optimized both sensitivity and accuracy. After masking for both ISV regions and previously identified single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs, the number of differentially expressed genes between the two genotypes in both ES and PES internodes was approximately 2-fold greater than the number detected prior to masking. Regulatory genes, including transcription factor and receptor kinase genes that may play a role in development of secondary xylem, were significantly over-represented among genes up-regulated in 252 PES internodes compared to 1283 PES internodes. Several cell wall-related genes were also up-regulated in genotype 252 PES internodes. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR of differentially expressed regulatory and cell wall-related genes demonstrated increased sensitivity and accuracy after masking for both ISV regions and SFPs. Over 1,000 genes that were differentially expressed in ES and PES internodes of genotypes 252 and 1283 were mapped onto putative orthologous loci on M. truncatula chromosomes. Clustering simulation analysis of the differentially expressed genes

  3. Numerical solutions of sheath structures around a moderate negative biased electron-emitting cylindrical probe in low-density isotropic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Alif

    2017-09-01

    The potential structures around a moderate negative biased electron-emitting cylindrical probe in low-density isotropic plasma are calculated in the collisionless sheath region. The formalisms, equations, and solutions for the entire electron emitting range (i.e., subcritical, critical, and supercritical) from the cylindrical emitter and collector surface are discussed. The plasma-electron and emitted-electron are assumed to have half Maxwellian velocity distributions at their respective sheath entering boundaries with cold plasma ions. Poisson's equation is solved numerically in the sheath region for the subcritical, critical, and supercritical emissions. The I-V characteristics for these three cases are presented in tabular form. The results show that we need very high emitted-electron current to solve Poisson's equation for the critical and spercritical emissions. Thus, the floating potential is far away in these scenarios. Also, the number density of emitted-and plasma-electron are comparable at the sheath edge so we cannot neglect the density of former in comparison with latter at the sheath edge.

  4. A prescription for galaxy biasing evolution as a nuisance parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, L.; Kirk, D.; Lahav, O.; Abdalla, F. B.; Gaztañaga, E.

    2015-04-01

    There is currently no consistent approach to modelling galaxy bias evolution in cosmological inference. This lack of a common standard makes the rigorous comparison or combination of probes difficult. We show that the choice of biasing model has a significant impact on cosmological parameter constraints for a survey such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), considering the two-point correlations of galaxies in five tomographic redshift bins. We find that modelling galaxy bias with a free biasing parameter per redshift bin gives a Figure of Merit (FoM) for dark energy equation of state parameters w0, wa smaller by a factor of 10 than if a constant bias is assumed. An incorrect bias model will also cause a shift in measured values of cosmological parameters. Motivated by these points and focusing on the redshift evolution of linear bias, we propose the use of a generalized galaxy bias which encompasses a range of bias models from theory, observations and simulations, b(z) = c + (b0 - c)/D(z)α, where parameters c, b0 and α depend on galaxy properties such as halo mass. For a DES-like galaxy survey, we find that this model gives an unbiased estimate of w0, wa with the same number or fewer nuisance parameters and a higher FoM than a simple b(z) model allowed to vary in z-bins. We show how the parameters of this model are correlated with cosmological parameters. We fit a range of bias models to two recent data sets, and conclude that this generalized parametrization is a sensible benchmark expression of galaxy bias on large scales.

  5. Optimal Constraints on Local Primordial Non-Gaussianity from the Two-Point Statistics of Large-Scale Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaus, Nico; Desjacques, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    One of the main signatures of primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type is a scale-dependent correction to the bias of large-scale structure tracers such as galaxies or clusters, whose amplitude depends on the bias of the tracers itself. The dominant source of noise in the power spectrum of the tracers is caused by sampling variance on large scales (where the non-Gaussian signal is strongest) and shot noise arising from their discrete nature. Recent work has argued that one can avoid sampling variance by comparing multiple tracers of different bias, and suppress shot noise by optimally weighting halos of different mass. Here we combine these ideas and investigate how well the signatures of non-Gaussian fluctuations in the primordial potential can be extracted from the two-point correlations of halos and dark matter. On the basis of large $N$-body simulations with local non-Gaussian initial conditions and their halo catalogs we perform a Fisher matrix analysis of the two-point statistics. Compared to the st...

  6. A NEW METHOD TO CORRECT FOR FIBER COLLISIONS IN GALAXY TWO-POINT STATISTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Hong; Zehavi, Idit [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Zheng Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    In fiber-fed galaxy redshift surveys, the finite size of the fiber plugs prevents two fibers from being placed too close to one another, limiting the ability to study galaxy clustering on all scales. We present a new method for correcting such fiber collision effects in galaxy clustering statistics based on spectroscopic observations. The target galaxy sample is divided into two distinct populations according to the targeting algorithm of fiber placement, one free of fiber collisions and the other consisting of collided galaxies. The clustering statistics are a combination of the contributions from these two populations. Our method makes use of observations in tile overlap regions to measure the contributions from the collided population, and to therefore recover the full clustering statistics. The method is rooted in solid theoretical ground and is tested extensively on mock galaxy catalogs. We demonstrate that our method can well recover the projected and the full three-dimensional (3D) redshift-space two-point correlation functions (2PCFs) on scales both below and above the fiber collision scale, superior to the commonly used nearest neighbor and angular correction methods. We discuss potential systematic effects in our method. The statistical correction accuracy of our method is only limited by sample variance, which scales down with (the square root of) the volume probed. For a sample similar to the final SDSS-III BOSS galaxy sample, the statistical correction error is expected to be at the level of 1% on scales {approx}0.1-30 h {sup -1} Mpc for the 2PCFs. The systematic error only occurs on small scales, caused by imperfect correction of collision multiplets, and its magnitude is expected to be smaller than 5%. Our correction method, which can be generalized to other clustering statistics as well, enables more accurate measurements of full 3D galaxy clustering on all scales with galaxy redshift surveys.

  7. Finite-size scaling of two-point statistics and the turbulent energy cascade generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleve, Jochen; Dziekan, Thomas; Schmiegel, Jürgen; Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E; Pearson, Bruce R; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R; Greiner, Martin

    2005-02-01

    Within the framework of random multiplicative energy cascade models of fully developed turbulence, finite-size-scaling expressions for two-point correlators and cumulants are derived, taking into account the observationally unavoidable conversion from an ultrametric to an Euclidean two-point distance. The comparison with two-point statistics of the surrogate energy dissipation, extracted from various wind tunnel and atmospheric boundary layer records, allows an accurate deduction of multiscaling exponents and cumulants, even at moderate Reynolds numbers for which simple power-law fits are not feasible. The extracted exponents serve as input for parametric estimates of the probabilistic cascade generator. Various cascade generators are evaluated.

  8. Approach to the origin of turbulence on the basis of two-point kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, S.

    1974-01-01

    Equations for the fluctuation correlation in an incompressible shear flow are derived on the basis of kinetic theory, utilizing the two-point distribution function which obeys the BBGKY hierarchy equation truncated with the hypothesis of 'ternary' molecular chaos. The step from the molecular to the hydrodynamic description is accomplished by a moment expansion which is a two-point version of the thirteen-moment method, and which leads to a series of correlation equations, viz., the two-point counterparts of the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equation, etc. For almost parallel shearing flows the two-point equation is separable and reduces to two Orr-Sommerfeld equations with different physical implications.

  9. New two-point scleral-fixation technique for foldable intraocular lenses with four hollow haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He-Ting; Jiang, Zheng-Xuan; Tao, Li-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The study was to report a new two-point scleral-fixation technique for foldable intraocular lenses with four haptics. Lenses were slid into the anterior chamber from a 2.8 mm corneal incision and fixed under two sclera flaps at two opposite points. The postoperative best-corrected visual acuities (BCVAs) of all patients were significantly better than their preoperative BCVA. The results demonstrate that two-point, scleral fixations of foldable, intraocular lenses might be practicable and effective.

  10. Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Andrei Shleifer

    2002-01-01

    There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

  11. Mistakes and Pitfalls Associated with Two-Point Compression Ultrasound for Deep Vein Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Zitek, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Two-point compression ultrasound is purportedly a simple and accurate means to diagnose proximal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT, but the pitfalls of this technique have not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study is to determine the accuracy of emergency medicine resident-performed two-point compression ultrasound, and to determine what technical errors are commonly made by novice ultrasonographers using this technique. Methods: This was a prospective diagnostic test assessment of a convenience sample of adult emergency department (ED patients suspected of having a lower extremity DVT. After brief training on the technique, residents performed two-point compression ultrasounds on enrolled patients. Subsequently a radiology department ultrasound was performed and used as the gold standard. Residents were instructed to save videos of their ultrasounds for technical analysis. Results: Overall, 288 two-point compression ultrasound studies were performed. There were 28 cases that were deemed to be positive for DVT by radiology ultrasound. Among these 28, 16 were identified by the residents with two-point compression. Among the 260 cases deemed to be negative for DVT by radiology ultrasound, 10 were thought to be positive by the residents using two-point compression. This led to a sensitivity of 57.1% (95% CI [38.8-75.5] and a specificity of 96.1% (95% CI [93.8-98.5] for resident-performed two-point compression ultrasound. This corresponds to a positive predictive value of 61.5% (95% CI [42.8-80.2] and a negative predictive value of 95.4% (95% CI [92.9-98.0]. The positive likelihood ratio is 14.9 (95% CI [7.5-29.5] and the negative likelihood ratio is 0.45 (95% CI [0.29-0.68]. Video analysis revealed that in four cases the resident did not identify a DVT because the thrombus was isolated to the superior femoral vein (SFV, which is not evaluated by two-point compression. Moreover, the video analysis revealed that the

  12. Gauge-fixing parameter dependence of two-point gauge variant correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhai, C

    1996-01-01

    The gauge-fixing parameter \\xi dependence of two-point gauge variant correlation functions is studied for QED and QCD. We show that, in three Euclidean dimensions, or for four-dimensional thermal gauge theories, the usual procedure of getting a general covariant gauge-fixing term by averaging over a class of covariant gauge-fixing conditions leads to a nontrivial gauge-fixing parameter dependence in gauge variant two-point correlation functions (e.g. fermion propagators). This nontrivial gauge-fixing parameter dependence modifies the large distance behavior of the two-point correlation functions by introducing additional exponentially decaying factors. These factors are the origin of the gauge dependence encountered in some perturbative evaluations of the damping rates and the static chromoelectric screening length in a general covariant gauge. To avoid this modification of the long distance behavior introduced by performing the average over a class of covariant gauge-fixing conditions, one can either choose ...

  13. Holographic two-point functions for 4d log-gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Niklas; Zojer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We compute holographic one- and two-point functions of critical higher curvature gravity in four dimensions. The two most important operators are the stress tensor and its logarithmic partner, sourced by ordinary massless and by logarithmic non-normalisable gravitons, respectively. In addition, the logarithmic gravitons source two ordinary operators, one with spin-one and one with spin-zero. The one-point function of the stress tensor vanishes for all Einstein solutions, but has a non-zero contribution from logarithmic gravitons. The two-point functions of all operators match the expectations from a three-dimensional logarithmic conformal field theory.

  14. Numerical methods for stiff systems of two-point boundary value problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, J. E.; Omalley, R. E., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical procedures are developed for constructing asymptotic solutions of certain nonlinear singularly perturbed vector two-point boundary value problems having boundary layers at one or both endpoints. The asymptotic approximations are generated numerically and can either be used as is or to furnish a general purpose two-point boundary value code with an initial approximation and the nonuniform computational mesh needed for such problems. The procedures are applied to a model problem that has multiple solutions and to problems describing the deformation of thin nonlinear elastic beam that is resting on an elastic foundation.

  15. Verified solutions of two-point boundary value problems for nonlinear oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, Florian

    Using techniques introduced by Nakao [4], Oishi [5, 6] and applied by Takayasu, Oishi, Kubo [11, 12] to certain nonlinear two-point boundary value problems (see also Rump [7], Chapter 15), we provide a numerical method for verifying the existence of weak solutions of two-point boundary value problems of the form -u″ = a(x, u) + b(x, u)u‧, 0 b are functions that fulfill some regularity properties. The numerical approximation is done by cubic spline interpolation. Finally, the method is applied to the Duffing, the van der Pol and the Toda oscillator. The rigorous numerical computations were done with INTLAB [8].

  16. Adaptation of a two-point boundary value problem solver to a vector-multiprocessor environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, S.J. (Mathematics Dept., North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (US)); Pereyra, V. (Weidlinger Associates, Los Angeles, CA (US))

    1990-05-01

    Systems of linear equations arising from finite-difference discretization of two-point boundary value problems have coefficient matrices that are sparse, with most or all of the nonzeros clustered in blocks near the main diagonal. Some efficiently vectorizable algorithms for factorizing these types of matrices and solving the corresponding linear systems are described. The relative effectiveness of the different algorithms varies according to the distribution of initial, final, and coupled end conditions. The techniques described can be extended to handle linear systems arising from other methods for two-point boundary value problems, such as multiple shooting and collocation. An application to seismic ray tracing is discussed.

  17. A Computationally Efficient Approach for Calculating Galaxy Two-Point Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Demina, Regina; BenZvi, Segev; Hindrichs, Otto

    2016-01-01

    We develop a modification to the calculation of the two-point correlation function commonly used in the analysis of large scale structure in cosmology. An estimator of the two-point correlation function is constructed by contrasting the observed distribution of galaxies with that of a uniformly populated random catalog. Using the assumption that the distribution of random galaxies in redshift is independent of angular position allows us to replace pairwise combinatorics with fast integration over probability maps. The new method significantly reduces the computation time while simultaneously increasing the precision of the calculation.

  18. Intergroup bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility.

  19. Meta-conformal invariance and the boundedness of two-point correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Malte; Stoimenov, Stoimen

    2016-11-01

    The covariant two-point functions, derived from Ward identities in direct space, can be affected by consistency problems and can become unbounded for large time- or space-separations. This difficulty arises for several extensions of dynamical scaling, for example Schrödinger-invariance, conformal Galilei invariance or meta-conformal invariance, but not for standard ortho-conformal invariance. For meta-conformal invariance in (1+1) dimensions, which acts as a dynamical symmetry of a simple advection equation, these difficulties can be cured by going over to a dual space and an extension of these dynamical symmetries through the construction of a new generator in the Cartan sub-algebra. This provides a canonical interpretation of meta-conformally covariant two-point functions as correlators. Galilei-conformal correlators can be obtained from meta-conformal invariance through a simple contraction. In contrast, by an analogus construction, Schrödinger-covariant two-point functions are causal response functions. All these two-point functions are bounded at large separations, for sufficiently positive values of the scaling exponents.

  20. Meta-conformal invariance and the boundedness of two-point correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Malte

    2016-01-01

    The covariant two-point functions, derived from Ward identities in direct space, can be affected by consistency problems and can become unbounded for large time- or space-separations. This difficulty arises for several extensions of dynamical scaling, for example Schr\\"odinger-invariance, conformal Galilei invariance or meta-conformal invariance, but not for standard ortho-conformal invariance. For meta-conformal invariance in 1+1 dimensions, these difficulties can be cured by going over to a dual space and an extension of these dynamical symmetries through the construction of a new generator in the Cartan sub-algebra. This provides a canonical interpretation of meta-conformally covariant two-point functions as correlators. Galilei-conformal correlators can be obtained from meta-conformal invariance through a simple contraction. In contrast, by an analogus construction, Schr\\"odinger-covariant two-point functions are causal response functions. All these two-point functions are bounded at large separations, fo...

  1. Holographic two-point functions for 4d log-gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, Niklas; Naseh, Ali; Zojer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We compute holographic one- and two-point functions of critical higher-curvature gravity in four dimensions. The two most important operators are the stress tensor and its logarithmic partner, sourced by ordinary massless and by logarithmic non-normalisable gravitons, respectively. In addition, the

  2. Solvability for a Class of Abstract Two-Point Boundary Value Problems Derived from Optimal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lianwen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The solvability for a class of abstract two-point boundary value problems derived from optimal control is discussed. By homotopy technique existence and uniqueness results are established under some monotonic conditions. Several examples are given to illustrate the application of the obtained results.

  3. Solvability for a Class of Abstract Two-Point Boundary Value Problems Derived from Optimal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianwen Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The solvability for a class of abstract two-point boundary value problems derived from optimal control is discussed. By homotopy technique existence and uniqueness results are established under some monotonic conditions. Several examples are given to illustrate the application of the obtained results.

  4. Modification of the Two-Point Touch Cane Technique: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, William H.; Ehresman, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Four blind adults were observed to determine the extent of the natural movement of their centers of gravity in relation to arc height during the two-point touch technique for long cane travel. The Ss learned and practiced a modified technique using their center of gravity as much as possible. (Author)

  5. Two-point discrimination of the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Soon-Hee; An, Ho-Jung; Moon, Ok-Gon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yun, Young-Dae; Park, Joo-Hyun; Min, Kyoung-Ok

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The present study attempted to measure two-point discrimination in the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20's. [Subjects and Methods] Using a three-point esthesiometer, we conducted an experiment with a group of 256 college students (128 male and 128 female), attending N University in Chonan, Republic of Korea. [Results] Females showed two-point discrimination at a shorter distance than males at the following points: (i) 5 cm above the elbow joint, the middle part, and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the anterior upper arm; (ii) 5 cm above the elbow joint and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the posterior upper arm; (iii) 5 cm above the front of the wrist joint of the forearm; 5 cm below the elbow joint, the palmar part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the thumb, the dorsal part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the middle and little fingers. It was also found that females showed greater two-point discrimination than males in distal regions rather than proximal regions. [Conclusion] The findings of this study will help establish normal values for two-point discrimination of upper extremities of young Koreans in their 20's.

  6. Logarithmic two-Point Correlation Functions from a z = 2 Lifshitz Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zingg, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Einstein-Proca action is known to have asymptotically locally Lifshitz spacetimes as classical solutions. For dynamical exponent z=2, two-point correlation functions for fluctuations around such a geometry are derived analytically. It is found that the retarded correlators are stable in the sens

  7. Problem with two-point conditions for parabolic equation of second order on time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Symotyuk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The  correctness of a problem with two-point conditions ontime-variable and of  Dirichlet-type conditions  on spatialcoordinates for the linear  parabolic equations with variablecoefficients are established. The metric theorem on estimationsfrom below of small denominators of the problem (the notions of Hausdorff measure is proved.

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TWO-POINT CONTACT BETWEEN WHEEL AND RAIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhang; Shouguang Sun; Xuesong Jin

    2009-01-01

    The elastic-plastic contact problem with rolling friction of wheel-rail is solved using the FE parametric quadratic programming method. Thus, the complex elastic-plastic contact problem can be calculated with high accuracy and efficiency, while the Hertz's hypothesis and the elastic semi-space assumption are avoided. Based on the 'one-point' contact calculation of wheel-rail, the computational model of 'two-point' contact are established and calculated when the wheel flange is close to the rail. In the case of 'two-point' contact, the changing laws of wheelrail contact are introduced and contact forces in various load cases are carefully analyzed. The main reason of wheel flange wear and rail side wear is found. Lubrication computational model of the wheel flange is constructed. Comparing with the result without lubrication, the contact force between wheel flange and rail decreases, which is beneficial for reducing the wear of wheel-rail.

  9. A NEW TWO-POINT ADAPTIVENONLINEAR APPROXIMATION METHOD FOR RELIABILITY ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuShutian

    2004-01-01

    A two-point adaptive nonlinear approximation (referred to as TANA4) suitable for reliability analysis is proposed. Transformed and normalized random variables in probabilistic analysis could become negative and pose a challenge to the earlier developed two-point approximations; thus a suitable method that can address this issue is needed. In the method proposed, the nonlinearity indices of intervening variables are limited to integers. Then, on the basis of the present method, an improved sequential approximation of the limit state surface for reliability analysis is presented. With the gradient projection method, the data points for the limit state surface approximation are selected on the original limit state surface, which effectively represents the nature of the original response function. On the basis of this new approximation, the reliability is estimated using a first-order second-moment method. Various examples, including both structural and non-structural ones, are presented to show the effectiveness of the method proposed.

  10. Equal-time two-point correlation functions in Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Campagnari, D; Reinhardt, H; Astorga, F; Schleifenbaum, W

    2009-01-01

    We apply a new functional perturbative approach to the calculation of the equal-time two-point correlation functions and the potential between static color charges to one-loop order in Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory. The functional approach proceeds through a solution of the Schroedinger equation for the vacuum wave functional to order g^2 and derives the equal-time correlation functions from a functional integral representation via new diagrammatic rules. We show that the results coincide with those obtained from the usual Lagrangian functional integral approach, extract the beta function and determine the anomalous dimensions of the equal-time gluon and ghost two-point functions and the static potential under the assumption of multiplicative renormalizability to all orders.

  11. Two-point functions of conformal primary operators in $\\mathcal{N}=1$ superconformal theories

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Daliang

    2014-01-01

    In $\\mathcal{N}=1$ superconformal theories in four dimensions the two-point function of superconformal multiplets is known up to an overall constant. A superconformal multiplet contains several conformal primary operators, whose two-point function coefficients can be determined in terms of the multiplet's quantum numbers. In this paper we work out these coefficients in full generality, i.e. for superconformal multiplets that belong to any irreducible representation of the Lorentz group with arbitrary scaling dimension and R-charge. From our results we recover the known unitarity bounds, and also find all shortening conditions, even for non-unitary theories. For the purposes of our computations we have developed a Mathematica package for the efficient handling of expansions in Grassmann variables.

  12. Probing the material in front of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter with energy flow from sqrt(s)=7 TeV minimum bias events

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    In early April 2010, ATLAS collected several million of minimum bias events at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. Counting the number of energy deposits above 5 times the measured electronic noise in all electromagnetic calorimeter cells allows a channel by channel check of the response to physics. A readout cabling inversion and a high voltage cable swap, affecting 0.4% of the total number of cells in the region |eta|<2.5, were identified and corrected. The method is also sensitive to the total amount of material in front of the calorimeter, complementing other analyses which are only sensitive to the tracker material. The amount of material of the inner detector services running at constant phi in front of the barrel calorimeter, representing ~0.2 X0, is found in good agreement between data and simulations. Up to 1 X0 lack of material in the ATLAS description has been observed in the localised regions close to the rails supporting the inner detector, which can be fed into new Monte Carlo geometry.

  13. State feedback control of surge oscillations of two-point mooring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, R. K.; Banik, A. K.; Chatterjee, S.

    2017-01-01

    Stability analysis of surge oscillations of two-point mooring system under state feedback control with time-delay is investigated. The two-point mooring system is harmonically excited and essentially represents a strongly nonlinear Duffing oscillator. In this paper, a frequency domain based method viz. incremental harmonic balance method along with arc-length continuation technique (IHBC) is first employed to identify the primary and higher order subharmonic responses which may be present in such system. The IHBC is then reformulated in a manner to treat two-point mooring system under state feedback control with time-delay and is applied to obtain control of responses in an efficient and systematic way. The stability of uncontrolled responses for primary and higher order subharmonic oscillations is obtained by Floquet's theory using Hsu' scheme; whereas the stability of controlled responses is obtained by applying semi-discretization method for delay differential equation. The study focussed on the controlling primary, higher order subharmonics and chaotic responses by considering appropriate feedback gains and delay by way of (i) appreciable reduction of primary, subharmonic responses, (ii) exclusion of all higher order subharmonics 2T, 3T, 5T and 9T (1/n subharmonics or period-n solutions), and (iii) reduction of the extent of domain of all instability phenomena represented by various type of bifurcation of solutions, jump phenomena, chaotic responses etc. In the study, negative velocity feedback is observed to be much effective than state feedback for better controlling of surge oscillation of two-point mooring system. Also, the effect of larger gain values is investigated by an extensive parametric study for vibration control with different delay values.

  14. A rapid and accurate two-point ray tracing method in horizontally layered velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yue; CHEN Xiao-fei

    2005-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for two-point ray tracing in horizontally layered velocity model is presented in this paper. Numerical experiments show that this method provides stable and rapid convergence with high accuracies, regardless of various 1-D velocity structures, takeoff angles and epicentral distances. This two-point ray tracing method is compared with the pseudobending technique and the method advanced by Kim and Baag (2002). It turns out that the method in this paper is much more efficient and accurate than the pseudobending technique, but is only applicable to 1-D velocity model. Kim(s method is equivalent to ours for cases without large takeoff angles, but it fails to work when the takeoff angle is close to 90o. On the other hand, the method presented in this paper is applicable to cases with any takeoff angles with rapid and accurate convergence. Therefore, this method is a good choice for two-point ray tracing problems in horizontally layered velocity model and is efficient enough to be applied to a wide range of seismic problems.

  15. Comparison of Optimization and Two-point Methods in Estimation of Soil Water Retention Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian-Alavijeh, B.; Liaghat, A. M.; Huang, G.

    2009-04-01

    Soil water retention curve (SWRC) is one of the soil hydraulic properties in which its direct measurement is time consuming and expensive. Since, its measurement is unavoidable in study of environmental sciences i.e. investigation of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and solute transport, in this study the attempt is to predict soil water retention curve from two measured points. By using Cresswell and Paydar (1996) method (two-point method) and an optimization method developed in this study on the basis of two points of SWRC, parameters of Tyler and Wheatcraft (1990) model (fractal dimension and air entry value) were estimated and then water content at different matric potentials were estimated and compared with their measured values (n=180). For each method, we used both 3 and 1500 kPa (case 1) and 33 and 1500 kPa (case 2) as two points of SWRC. The calculated RMSE values showed that in the Creswell and Paydar (1996) method, there exists no significant difference between case 1 and case 2. However, the calculated RMSE value in case 2 (2.35) was slightly less than case 1 (2.37). The results also showed that the developed optimization method in this study had significantly less RMSE values for cases 1 (1.63) and 2 (1.33) rather than Cresswell and Paydar (1996) method.

  16. Calculating two-point resistances in distance-regular resistor networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarizadeh, M A [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sufiani, R [Department of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarizadeh, S [Department of Electrical and computer engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-05-11

    An algorithm for the calculation of the resistance between two arbitrary nodes in an arbitrary distance-regular resistor network is provided, where the calculation is based on stratification introduced in Jafarizadeh and Salimi (2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 1-29) and the Stieltjes transform of the spectral distribution (Stieltjes function) associated with the network. It is shown that the resistances between a node {alpha} and all nodes {beta} belonging to the same stratum with respect to the {alpha} (R{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}{sup (i)}}), {beta} belonging to the ith stratum with respect to the {alpha}) are the same. Also, the analytical formulae for two-point resistances R{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}{sup (i)}}, i=1,2,3, are given in terms of the size of the network and corresponding intersection numbers. In particular, the two-point resistances in a strongly regular network are given in terms of its parameters (v, {kappa}, {lambda}, {mu}). Moreover, the lower and upper bounds for two-point resistances in strongly regular networks are discussed.

  17. Covariant and infrared-free graviton two-point function in de Sitter spacetime. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejhan, Hamed; Rahbardehghan, Surena

    2016-11-01

    The solution to the linearized Einstein equation in de Sitter (dS) spacetime and the corresponding two-point function are explicitly written down in a gauge with two parameters "a " and "b ". The quantization procedure, independent of the choice of the coordinate system, is based on a rigorous group theoretical approach. Our result takes the form of a universal spin-two (transverse-traceless) sector and a gauge-dependent spin-zero (pure-trace) sector. Scalar equations are derived for the structure functions of each part. We show that the spin-two sector can be written as the resulting action of a second-order differential operator (the spin-two projector) on a massless minimally coupled scalar field (the spin-two structure function). The operator plays the role of a symmetric rank-2 polarization tensor and has a spacetime dependence. The calculated spin-two projector grows logarithmically with distance and also no dS-invariant solution for either structure functions exist. We show that the logarithmically growing part and the dS-breaking contribution to the spin-zero part can be dropped out, respectively, for suitable choices of parameters "a " and "b ". Considering the transverse-traceless graviton two-point function, however, shows that dS breaking is universal (cannot be gauged away). More exactly, if one wants to respect the covariance and positiveness conditions, the quantization of the dS graviton field (as for any gauge field) cannot be carried out directly in a Hilbert space and involves unphysical negative norm states. However, a suitable adaptation (Krein spaces) of the Gupta-Bleuler scheme for massless fields, based on the group theoretical approach, enables us to obtain the corresponding two-point function satisfying the conditions of locality, covariance, transversality, index symmetrizer, and tracelessness.

  18. Futures market efficiency diagnostics via temporal two-point correlations. Russian market case study

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhail Kopytin; Evgeniy Kazantsev

    2013-01-01

    Using a two-point correlation technique, we study emergence of market efficiency in the emergent Russian futures market by focusing on lagged correlations. The correlation strength of leader-follower effects in the lagged inter-market correlations on the hourly time frame is seen to be significant initially (2009-2011) but gradually goes down, as the erstwhile leader instruments -- crude oil, the USD/RUB exchange rate, and the Russian stock market index -- seem to lose the leader status. An i...

  19. Covalent docking using autodock: Two-point attractor and flexible side chain methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Giulia; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S; Olson, Arthur J

    2016-01-01

    We describe two methods of automated covalent docking using Autodock4: the two-point attractor method and the flexible side chain method. Both methods were applied to a training set of 20 diverse protein-ligand covalent complexes, evaluating their reliability in predicting the crystallographic pose of the ligands. The flexible side chain method performed best, recovering the pose in 75% of cases, with failures for the largest inhibitors tested. Both methods are freely available at the AutoDock website (http://autodock.scripps.edu). © 2015 The Protein Society.

  20. A Note on Reflection Positivity and the Kallen-Lehmann Representation of Two Point Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Usui, Kouta

    2012-01-01

    It will be proved that a model of lattice field theories which satisfies (A1) Hermiticity, (A2) translational invariance, (A3) reflection positivity, and (A4) polynomial boundedness of correlations, permits the Kallen-Lehmann representation of two point correlation functions with positive spectral density function. Then, we will also argue that positivity of spectral density functions is necessary for a lattice theory to satisfy conditions (A1) - (A4). As an example, a lattice overlap scalar boson model will be discussed. We will find that the overlap scalar boson violates the reflection positivity.

  1. Two-point Functions at Two Loops in Three Flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Amorós, G; Talavera, P; Amoros, Gabriel; Bijnens, Johan; Talavera, Pere

    2000-01-01

    The vector and axial-vector two-point functions are calculated to next-to-next-to-leading order in Chiral Perturbation Theory for three light flavours. We also obtain expressions at the same order for the masses, $m_\\pi^2$, $m_K^2$ and $m_\\eta^2$, and the decay constants, $F_\\pi$, $F_K$ and $F_\\eta$. We present some numerical results after a simple resonance estimate of some of the new ${\\cal O}(p^6)$ constants.

  2. Exact relation with two-point correlation functions and phenomenological approach for compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Galtier, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Compressible isothermal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is analyzed under the assumption of statistical homogeneity and in the asymptotic limit of large kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers. Following Kolmogorov we derive an exact relation for some two-point correlation functions which generalizes the expression recently found for hydrodynamics. We show that the magnetic field brings new source and flux terms into the dynamics which may act on the inertial range similarly as a source or a sink for the mean energy transfer rate. The introduction of a uniform magnetic field simplifies significantly the exact relation for which a simple phenomenology may be given. A prediction for axisymmetric energy spectra is eventually proposed.

  3. Two-point correlators revisited: Fast and slow scales in multifield models of Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ghersi, José T Gálvez

    2016-01-01

    We study the structure of two-point correlators of the inflationary field fluctuations in order to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the existing spectral methods. We present a description motivated by the separation of the fast and slow evolving components of the spectrum. Our purpose is to rephrase all the relevant equations of motion in terms of slowly varying quantities. This is important in order to consider the contribution from high-frequency modes to the spectrum without affecting computational performance. The slow-roll approximation is not required to reproduce the main distinctive features in the power spectrum for each specific model of inflation.

  4. Solving Directly Two Point Non Linear Boundary Value Problems Using Direct Adams Moulton Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanariah A. Majid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study, a direct method of Adams Moulton type was developed for solving non linear two point Boundary Value Problems (BVPs directly. Most of the existence researches involving BVPs will reduced the problem to a system of first order Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs. This approach is very well established but it obviously will enlarge the systems of first order equations. However, the direct method in this research will solved the second order BVPs directly without reducing it to first order ODEs. Approach: Lagrange interpolation polynomial was applied in the derivation of the proposed method. The method was implemented using constant step size via shooting technique in order to determine the approximated solutions. The shooting technique will employ the Newton’s method for checking the convergent of the guessing values for the next iteration. Results: Numerical results confirmed that the direct method gave better accuracy and converged faster compared to the existing method. Conclusion: The proposed direct method is suitable for solving two point non linear boundary value problems.

  5. Statistics of the two-point cross-covariance function of solar oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kaori; Sekii, Takashi; Gizon, Laurent; Birch, Aaron C.

    2016-09-01

    Context. The cross-covariance of solar oscillations observed at pairs of points on the solar surface is a fundamental ingredient in time-distance helioseismology. Wave travel times are extracted from the cross-covariance function and are used to infer the physical conditions in the solar interior. Aims: Understanding the statistics of the two-point cross-covariance function is a necessary step towards optimizing the measurement of travel times. Methods: By modeling stochastic solar oscillations, we evaluate the variance of the cross-covariance function as function of time-lag and distance between the two points. Results: We show that the variance of the cross-covariance is independent of both time-lag and distance in the far field, that is, when they are large compared to the coherence scales of the solar oscillations. Conclusions: The constant noise level for the cross-covariance means that the signal-to-noise ratio for the cross-covariance is proportional to the amplitude of the expectation value of the cross-covariance. This observation is important for planning data analysis efforts.

  6. Two-point concrete resistivity measurements: interfacial phenomena at the electrode-concrete contact zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, W. J.; Taha, H. M.; Suryanto, B.; Starrs, G.

    2015-08-01

    Ac impedance spectroscopy measurements are used to critically examine the end-to-end (two-point) testing technique employed in evaluating the bulk electrical resistivity of concrete. In particular, this paper focusses on the interfacial contact region between the electrode and specimen and the influence of contacting medium and measurement frequency on the impedance response. Two-point and four-point electrode configurations were compared and modelling of the impedance response was undertaken to identify and quantify the contribution of the electrode-specimen contact region on the measured impedance. Measurements are presented in both Bode and Nyquist formats to aid interpretation. Concretes mixes conforming to BSEN206-1 and BS8500-1 were investigated which included concretes containing the supplementary cementitious materials fly ash and ground granulated blast-furnace slag. A measurement protocol is presented for the end-to-end technique in terms of test frequency and electrode-specimen contacting medium in order to minimize electrode-specimen interfacial effect and ensure correct measurement of bulk resistivity.

  7. Statistics of the two-point cross-covariance function of solar oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Nagashima, Kaori; Gizon, Laurent; Birch, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    Context: The cross-covariance of solar oscillations observed at pairs of points on the solar surface is a fundamental ingredient in time-distance helioseismology. Wave travel times are extracted from the cross-covariance function and are used to infer the physical conditions in the solar interior. Aims: Understanding the statistics of the two-point cross-covariance function is a necessary step towards optimizing the measurement of travel times. Methods: By modeling stochastic solar oscillations, we evaluate the variance of the cross-covariance function as function of time-lag and distance between the two points. Results: We show that the variance of the cross-covariance is independent of both time-lag and distance in the far field, i.e., when they are large compared to the coherence scales of the solar oscillations. Conclusions: The constant noise level for the cross-covariance means that the signal-to-noise ratio for the cross-covariance is proportional to the amplitude of the expectation value of the cross-...

  8. Logarithmic two-point correlation functions from a z=2 Lifshitz model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zingg, T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Universiteit Utrecht,Leuvenlaan 4, 3584 CE Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-01-21

    The Einstein-Proca action is known to have asymptotically locally Lifshitz spacetimes as classical solutions. For dynamical exponent z=2, two-point correlation functions for fluctuations around such a geometry are derived analytically. It is found that the retarded correlators are stable in the sense that all quasinormal modes are situated in the lower half-plane of complex frequencies. Correlators in the longitudinal channel exhibit features that are reminiscent of a structure usually obtained in field theories that are logarithmic, i.e. contain an indecomposable but non-diagonalizable highest weight representation. This provides further evidence for conjecturing the model at hand as a candidate for a gravity dual of a logarithmic field theory with anisotropic scaling symmetry.

  9. Inverted catenoid as a fluid membrane with two points pulled together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Villarreal, Pavel; Guven, Jemal

    2007-07-01

    Under inversion in any (interior) point, a catenoid transforms into a deflated compact geometry which touches at two points (its poles). The catenoid is a minimal surface and, as such, is an equilibrium shape of a symmetric fluid membrane. The conformal symmetry of the Hamiltonian implies that inverted minimal surfaces are also equilibrium shapes. However, they will exhibit curvature singularities at their poles. Such singularities are the geometrical signature of the external forces required to pull the poles together. These forces will set up stresses in the inverted shapes. Tuning the force corresponds geometrically to the translation of the point of inversion. For any fixed surface area, there will be a maximum force. The associated shape is a symmetric discocyte. Lowering the external force will induce a transition from the discocyte to a cup-shaped stomatocyte.

  10. An improved iterative technique for solving nonlinear doubly singular two-point boundary value problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roul, Pradip

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new iterative technique for solving nonlinear singular two-point boundary value problems with Neumann and Robin boundary conditions. The method is based on the homotopy perturbation method and the integral equation formalism in which a recursive scheme is established for the components of the approximate series solution. This method does not involve solution of a sequence of nonlinear algebraic or transcendental equations for the unknown coefficients as in some other iterative techniques developed for singular boundary value problems. The convergence result for the proposed method is established in the paper. The method is illustrated by four numerical examples, two of which have physical significance: The first problem is an application of the reaction-diffusion process in a porous spherical catalyst and the second problem arises in the study of steady-state oxygen-diffusion in a spherical cell with Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics.

  11. A High Performance Spread Spectrum Clock Generator Using Two-Point Modulation Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yao-Huang; Hsieh, Yi-Bin

    A new spread spectrum clock generator (SSCG) using two-point delta-sigma modulation is presented in this paper. Not only the divider is varied, but also the voltage controlled oscillator is modulated. This technique can enhance the modulation bandwidth so that the effect of EMI suppression is improved with lower order ΣΔ modulator and can simultaneously optimize the jitter and the modulation profile. In addition, the method of two-path is applied to the loop filter to reduce the capacitance value such that the total integration can be achieved. The proposed SSCG has been fabricated in a 0.35μm CMOS process. The clock of 400MHz with center spread ratios of 1.25% and 2.5% are verified. The peak EMI reduction is 19.73dB for the case of 2.5%. The size of chip area is 0.90×0.89mm2.

  12. Implementation of the Two-Point Angular Correlation Function on a High-Performance Reconfigurable Computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr V. Kindratenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a parallel implementation of an algorithm for calculating the two-point angular correlation function as applied in the field of computational cosmology. The algorithm has been specifically developed for a reconfigurable computer. Our implementation utilizes a microprocessor and two reconfigurable processors on a dual-MAP SRC-6 system. The two reconfigurable processors are used as two application-specific co-processors. Two independent computational kernels are simultaneously executed on the reconfigurable processors while data pre-fetching from disk and initial data pre-processing are executed on the microprocessor. The overall end-to-end algorithm execution speedup achieved by this implementation is over 90× as compared to a sequential implementation of the algorithm executed on a single 2.8 GHz Intel Xeon microprocessor.

  13. Two-point gauge invariant quark Green's functions with polygonal phase factor lines

    CERN Document Server

    Sazdjian, H

    2013-01-01

    Polygonal lines are used for the paths of the gluon field phase factors entering in the definition of gauge invariant quark Green's functions. This allows classification of the Green's functions according to the number of segments the polygonal lines contain. Functional relations are established between Green's functions with polygonal lines with different numbers of segments. An integrodifferential equation is obtained for the quark two-point Green's function with a path along a single straight line segment where the kernels are represented by a series of Wilson loop averages along polygonal contours. The equation is exactly and analytically solved in the case of two-dimensional QCD in the large-$N_c$ limit. The solution displays generation of an infinite number of dynamical quark masses accompanied with branch point singularities that are stronger than simple poles. An approximation scheme, based on the counting of functional derivatives of Wilson loops, is proposed for the resolution of the equation in fou...

  14. Applying inversion to construct planar, rational spirals that satisfy two-point G(2) Hermite data

    CERN Document Server

    Kurnosenko, A

    2010-01-01

    A method of two-point G(2) Hermite interpolation with spirals is proposed. To construct a sought for curve, the inversion is applied to an arc of some other spiral. To illustrate the method, inversions of parabola are considered in detail. The resulting curve is 4th degree rational. The method allows the matching of a wide range of boundary conditions, including those which require an inflection. Although not all G(2) Hermite data can be matched with a spiral generated from a parabolic arc, introducing one intermediate G(2) data solves the problem. Expanding the method by involving other spirals arcs is also discussed. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Asymptotic behaviour of two-point functions in multi-species models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol K. Kozlowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We extract the long-distance asymptotic behaviour of two-point correlation functions in massless quantum integrable models containing multi-species excitations. For such a purpose, we extend to these models the method of a large-distance regime re-summation of the form factor expansion of correlation functions. The key feature of our analysis is a technical hypothesis on the large-volume behaviour of the form factors of local operators in such models. We check the validity of this hypothesis on the example of the SU(3-invariant XXX magnet by means of the determinant representations for the form factors of local operators in this model. Our approach confirms the structure of the critical exponents obtained previously for numerous models solvable by the nested Bethe Ansatz.

  16. Asymptotic behaviour of two-point functions in multi-species models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Karol K.; Ragoucy, Eric

    2016-05-01

    We extract the long-distance asymptotic behaviour of two-point correlation functions in massless quantum integrable models containing multi-species excitations. For such a purpose, we extend to these models the method of a large-distance regime re-summation of the form factor expansion of correlation functions. The key feature of our analysis is a technical hypothesis on the large-volume behaviour of the form factors of local operators in such models. We check the validity of this hypothesis on the example of the SU (3)-invariant XXX magnet by means of the determinant representations for the form factors of local operators in this model. Our approach confirms the structure of the critical exponents obtained previously for numerous models solvable by the nested Bethe Ansatz.

  17. Expansion schemes for gravitational clustering: computing two-point and three-point functions

    CERN Document Server

    Valageas, P

    2007-01-01

    We describe various expansion schemes that can be used to study gravitational clustering. Obtained from the equations of motion or their path-integral formulation, they provide several perturbative expansions that are organized in different fashion or involve different partial resummations. We focus on the two-point and three-point correlation functions, but these methods also apply to all higher-order correlation and response functions. We present the general formalism, which holds for the gravitational dynamics as well as for similar models, such as the Zeldovich dynamics, that obey similar hydrodynamical equations of motion with a quadratic nonlinearity. We give our explicit analytical results up to one-loop order for the simpler Zeldovich dynamics. For the gravitational dynamics, we compare our one-loop numerical results with numerical simulations. We check that the standard perturbation theory is recovered from the path integral by expanding over Feynman's diagrams. However, the latter expansion is organ...

  18. Quantization of fluctuations in DSR: the two-point function and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Magueijo, Joao

    2015-01-01

    We show that the two-point function of a quantum field theory with de Sitter momentum space (herein called DSR) can be expressed as the product of a standard delta function and an energy-dependent factor. This is a highly non-trivial technical result in any theory without a preferred frame. Applied to models exhibiting running of the dimensionality of space, this result is essential in proving that vacuum fluctuations are generally scale-invariant at high energies whenever there is running to two dimensions. This is equally true for theories with and without a preferred frame, with differences arising only as we consider higher order correlators. Specifically, the three-point function of DSR has a unique structure of "open triangles", as shown here.

  19. Two-point resistance of a resistor network embedded on a globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Zhong; Essam, J W; Wu, F Y

    2014-07-01

    We consider the problem of two-point resistance in an (m-1) × n resistor network embedded on a globe, a geometry topologically equivalent to an m × n cobweb with its boundary collapsed into one single point. We deduce a concise formula for the resistance between any two nodes on the globe using a method of direct summation pioneered by one of us [Z.-Z. Tan, L. Zhou, and J. H. Yang, J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 46, 195202 (2013)]. This method is contrasted with the Laplacian matrix approach formulated also by one of us [F. Y. Wu, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 37, 6653 (2004)], which is difficult to apply to the geometry of a globe. Our analysis gives the result in the form of a single summation.

  20. Measuring baryon acoustic oscillations with angular two-point correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaniz, Jailson S; Bernui, Armando; Carvalho, Joel C; Benetti, Micol

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) imprinted a characteristic correlation length in the large-scale structure of the universe that can be used as a standard ruler for mapping out the cosmic expansion history. Here, we discuss the application of the angular two-point correlation function, $w(\\theta)$, to a sample of luminous red galaxies of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and derive two new measurements of the BAO angular scale at $z = 0.235$ and $z = 0.365$. Since noise and systematics may hinder the identification of the BAO signature in the $w - \\theta$ plane, we also introduce a potential new method to localize the acoustic bump in a model-independent way. We use these new measurements along with previous data to constrain cosmological parameters of dark energy models and to derive a new estimate of the acoustic scale $r_s$.

  1. Two-point paraxial traveltime formula for inhomogeneous isotropic and anisotropic media: Tests of accuracy

    KAUST Repository

    Waheed, Umair bin

    2013-09-01

    On several simple models of isotropic and anisotropic media, we have studied the accuracy of the two-point paraxial traveltime formula designed for the approximate calculation of the traveltime between points S\\' and R\\' located in the vicinity of points S and R on a reference ray. The reference ray may be situated in a 3D inhomogeneous isotropic or anisotropic medium with or without smooth curved interfaces. The twopoint paraxial traveltime formula has the form of the Taylor expansion of the two-point traveltime with respect to spatial Cartesian coordinates up to quadratic terms at points S and R on the reference ray. The constant term and the coefficients of the linear and quadratic terms are determined from quantities obtained from ray tracing and linear dynamic ray tracing along the reference ray. The use of linear dynamic ray tracing allows the evaluation of the quadratic terms in arbitrarily inhomogeneous media and, as shown by examples, it extends the region of accurate results around the reference ray between S and R (and even outside this interval) obtained with the linear terms only. Although the formula may be used for very general 3D models, we concentrated on simple 2D models of smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic and anisotropic (~8% and ~20% anisotropy) media only. On tests, in which we estimated twopoint traveltimes between a shifted source and a system of shifted receivers, we found that the formula may yield more accurate results than the numerical solution of an eikonal-based differential equation. The tests also indicated that the accuracy of the formula depends primarily on the length and the curvature of the reference ray and only weakly depends on anisotropy. The greater is the curvature of the reference ray, the narrower its vicinity, in which the formula yields accurate results.

  2. Forecasts on neutrino mass constraints from the redshift-space two-point correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracca, F.; Marulli, F.; Moscardini, L.; Cimatti, A.; Carbone, C.; Angulo, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    We provide constraints on the accuracy with which the neutrino mass fraction, fν, can be estimated when exploiting measurements of redshift-space distortions, describing in particular how the error on neutrino mass depends on three fundamental parameters of a characteristic galaxy redshift survey: density, halo bias and volume. In doing this, we make use of a series of dark matter halo catalogues extracted from the BASICC simulation. The mock data are analysed via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo likelihood analysis. We find a fitting function that well describes the dependence of the error on bias, density and volume, showing a decrease in the error as the bias and volume increase, and a decrease with density down to an almost constant value for high-density values. This fitting formula allows us to produce forecasts on the precision achievable with future surveys on measurements of the neutrino mass fraction. For example, a Euclid-like spectroscopic survey should be able to measure the neutrino mass fraction with an accuracy of δfν ≈ 3.1 × 10-3 (which is equivalent to δ∑mν ≈ 0.039eV), using redshift-space clustering once all the other cosmological parameters are kept fixed to the ΛCDM case.

  3. Attentional bias in math anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms. PMID:26528208

  4. Attentional Bias in Math Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly eRubinsten

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math. Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of math anxiety and 13 with low levels of math anxiety were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of 6 types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, were presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks. Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in math anxiety. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words. These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense math anxiety symptoms.

  5. Attentional bias in math anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms.

  6. Two-point L1 shortest path queries in the plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Z. Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Let $P$ be a set of $h$ pairwise-disjoint polygonal obstacles with a total of $n$ vertices in the plane. We consider the problem of building a data structure that can quickly compute an $L_1$ shortest obstacle-avoiding path between any two  query points $s$ and $t$. Previously, a data structure of size $O(n^2\\log n$ was constructed in $O(n^2\\log^2 n$ time that answers each two-point query in $O(\\log^2 n+k$ time, i.e., the shortest path length is reported in $O(\\log^2 n$ time and an actual path is reported in additional $O(k$ time, where $k$ is the number of edges of the output path. In this paper, we build a new data structure of size $O(n+h^2 \\log h 4^{\\sqrt{\\log h}}$ in $O(n+h^2 \\log^{2}h 4^{\\sqrt{\\log h}}$ time that answers each query in $O(\\log n+k$ time. (In contrast, for the Euclidean version of this two-point query problem, the best known algorithm uses $O(n^{11}$ space to achieve an $O(\\log n+k$ query time. Further, we extend our techniques to the weighted rectilinear version in which the ``obstacles" of $P$ are rectilinear regions with ``weights" and allow $L_1$ paths to travel through them with weighted costs. Previously, a data structure of size $O(n^2\\log^2 n$ was built in $O(n^2\\log^2 n$ time that answers each query in $O(\\log^2 n+k$ time. Our new algorithm answers each query in $O(\\log n+k$ time with a data structure of size $O(n^2 \\log n 4^{\\sqrt{\\log n}}$ that is built in $O(n^2 \\log^2 n 4^{\\sqrt{\\log n}}$ time.

  7. An Attempt to Derive the epsilon Equation from a Two-Point Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to derive the equation for the turbulence dissipation rate epsilon for a shear-driven flow. In 1961, Davydov used a one-point closure model to derive the epsilon equation from first principles but the final result contained undetermined terms and thus lacked predictive power. Both in 1987 and in 2001, attempts were made to derive the epsilon equation from first principles using a two-point closure, but their methods relied on a phenomenological assumption. The standard practice has thus been to employ a heuristic form of the equation that contains three empirical ingredients: two constants, c(sub 1 epsilon), and c(sub 2 epsilon), and a diffusion term D(sub epsilon) In this work, a two-point closure is employed, yielding the following results: 1) the empirical constants get replaced by c(sub 1), c(sub 2), which are now functions of Kappa and epsilon; 2) c(sub 1) and c(sub 2) are not independent because a general relation between the two that are valid for any Kappa and epsilon are derived; 3) c(sub 1), c(sub 2) become constant with values close to the empirical values c(sub 1 epsilon), c(sub epsilon 2), (i.e., homogenous flows); and 4) the empirical form of the diffusion term D(sub epsilon) is no longer needed because it gets substituted by the Kappa-epsilon dependence of c(sub 1), c(sub 2), which plays the role of the diffusion, together with the diffusion of the turbulent kinetic energy D(sub Kappa), which now enters the new equation (i.e., inhomogeneous flows). Thus, the three empirical ingredients c(sub 1 epsilon), c(sub epsilon 2), D (sub epsilon)are replaced by a single function c(sub 1)(Kappa, epsilon ) or c(sub 2)(Kappa, epsilon ), plus a D(sub Kappa)term. Three tests of the new equation for epsilon are presented: one concerning channel flow and two concerning the shear-driven planetary boundary layer (PBL).

  8. Probing cosmological isotropy with Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengaly, C. A. P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I. S.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    We probe the statistical isotropy hypothesis of the large-scale structure with the second Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (PSZ2) galaxy clusters data set. Our analysis adopts a statistical-geometrical method that compares the two-point angular-correlation function of objects in antipodal patches of the sky. Given possible observational biases, such as the presence of anisotropic sky cuts and the non-uniform exposure of Planck's instrumentation, ensembles of Monte Carlo realizations are produced in order to assess the significance of our results. When these observational effects are properly taken into account, we find neither evidence for preferred directions in the sky nor signs of large-angle features in the galaxy clusters celestial distribution. The PSZ2 data set is, therefore, in good concordance with the fundamental hypothesis of large-angle isotropy of cosmic objects.

  9. Covariant and infrared-free graviton two-point function in de Sitter spacetime II

    CERN Document Server

    Pejhan, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    The solution to the linearized Einstein equation in de Sitter (dS) spacetime and the corresponding two-point function are explicitly written down in a gauge with two parameters `$a$' and `$b$'. The quantization procedure, independent of the choice of the coordinate system, is based on a rigorous group theoretical approach. Our result takes the form of a universal spin-two (transverse-traceless) sector and a gauge-dependent spin-zero (pure-trace) sector. Scalar equations are derived for the structure functions of each part. We show that the spin-two sector can be written as the resulting action of a second-order differential operator (the spin-two projector) on a massless minimally coupled scalar field (the spin-two structure function). The operator plays the role of a symmetric rank-$2$ polarization tensor and has a spacetime dependence. The calculated spin-two projector grows logarithmically with distance and also no dS-invariant solution for either structure functions exist. We show that the logarithmically...

  10. Possible Complications of Ureteroscopy in Modern Endourological Era: Two-Point or “Scabbard” Avulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Gaizauskas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indication has led ureteroscopy to be a worldwide technique, with the expected appearance of multiple types of complications. Severe complications are possible including ureteral perforation or avulsion. Ureteral avulsion has been described as an upper urinary tract injury related to the action of blunt trauma, especially from traffic accidents, being the mechanism of injury, the result of an acute deceleration/acceleration movement. With the advent of endourology, that term is also applied to the extensive degloving injury resulting from a mechanism of stretching of the ureter that eventually breaks at the most weakened site, or ureteral avulsion is referred to as a discontinuation of the full thickness of the ureter. The paper presents a case report and literature review of the two-point or “scabbard” avulsion. The loss of long segment of the upper ureter, when end-to-end anastomosis is not technically feasible, presents a challenge to the urological surgeon. In the era of small calibre ureteroscopes these complications, due to growing incidence of renal stones will become more and more actual. Our message to other urologists is to know such a complication, to know the ways of treatment, and to analyse ureteroscopic signs, when to stop or pay attention.

  11. The Two-Point Correlation Function of Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the spacial distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using a sample of 373 objects. We subdivide the GRB data into two redshift intervals over the redshift range $0two-point correlation function (2PCF), $\\xi(r)$ of the GRBs. In determining the separation distance of the GRB pairs, we consider two representative cosmological models: a cold dark matter universe plus a cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, with $(\\Omega_{{\\rm m}}, \\Omega_{{\\rm \\Lambda}})=(0.28,0.72)$ and an Einstein-de Sitter (EdS) universe, with $(\\Omega_{{\\rm m}}, \\Omega_{{\\rm \\Lambda}})=(1,0)$. We find a $z$-decreasing correlation of the GRB distribution, which is in agreement with the predictions of the current structure formation theory. We fit a power-law model $\\xi(r)=(r/r_0)^{-\\gamma}$ to the measured $\\xi(r)$ and obtain an amplitude and slope of $r_0= 1235.2 \\pm 342.6~h^{-1}$ Mpc and $\\gamma = 0.80\\pm 0.19 $ ($1\\sigma$ confidence level) over the scales $r=200$ to $10^4~h^{-1}$ Mpc. Our ...

  12. Exteroceptive aspects of nociception: insights from graphesthesia and two-point discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Andersen, Ole K; Quevedo, Alexandre S; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Coghill, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    The exteroceptive capabilities of the nociceptive system have long been thought to be considerably more limited than those of the tactile system. However, most investigations of spatio-temporal aspects of the nociceptive system have largely focused on intensity coding as consequence of spatial or temporal summation. Graphesthesia, the identification of numbers "written" on the skin, and assessment of the two-point discrimination thresholds were used to compare the exteroceptive capabilities of the tactile and nociceptive systems. Numbers were "written" on the forearm and the abdomen by tactile stimulation and by painful non-contact infrared laser heat stimulation. Subjects performed both graphesthesia tasks better than chance. The tactile graphesthesia tasks were performed with 89% (82-97%) correct responses on the forearm and 86% (79-94%) correct responses on the abdomen. Tactile graphesthesia tasks were significantly better than painful heat graphesthesia tasks that were performed with 31% (23-40%) and 44% (37-51%) correct responses on the forearm and abdomen, respectively. These findings demonstrate that the central nervous system is capable of assembling complex spatio-temporal patterns of nociceptive information from the body surface into unified mental objects with sufficient accuracy to enable behavioral discrimination.

  13. The real space clustering of galaxies in SDSS DR7: I. Two point correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Feng; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Youcai; Mo, H J; Bosch, Frank C van den; Li, Shijie; Liu, Chengze; Lu, Yi; Tweed, Dylan; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Using a method to correct redshift space distortion (RSD) for individual galaxies, we present the measurements of real space two-point correlation functions (2PCFs) of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7). Galaxy groups selected from the SDSS are used as proxies of dark matter halos to correct the virial motions of galaxies in dark matter halos, and to reconstruct the large-scale velocity field. We use an ensemble of mock catalogs to demonstrate the reliability of our method. Over the range $0.2 < r < 20 h^{-1}{\\rm {Mpc}}$, the 2PCF measured directly in reconstructed real space is better than the measurement error due to cosmic variance, if the reconstruction uses the correct cosmology. Applying the method to the SDSS DR7, we construct a real space version of the main galaxy catalog, which contains 396,068 galaxies in the North Galactic Cap with redshifts in the range $0.01 \\leq z \\leq 0.12$. The Sloan Great Wall, the largest known structure in the nearby Universe, is not...

  14. Assessing Performance of Multipurpose Reservoir System Using Two-Point Linear Hedging Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasireka, K.; Neelakantan, T. R.

    2017-07-01

    Reservoir operation is the one of the important filed of water resource management. Innovative techniques in water resource management are focussed at optimizing the available water and in decreasing the environmental impact of water utilization on the natural environment. In the operation of multi reservoir system, efficient regulation of the release to satisfy the demand for various purpose like domestic, irrigation and hydropower can lead to increase the benefit from the reservoir as well as significantly reduces the damage due to floods. Hedging rule is one of the emerging techniques in reservoir operation, which reduce the severity of drought by accepting number of smaller shortages. The key objective of this paper is to maximize the minimum power production and improve the reliability of water supply for municipal and irrigation purpose by using hedging rule. In this paper, Type II two-point linear hedging rule is attempted to improve the operation of Bargi reservoir in the Narmada basin in India. The results obtained from simulation of hedging rule is compared with results from Standard Operating Policy, the result shows that the application of hedging rule significantly improved the reliability of water supply and reliability of irrigation release and firm power production.

  15. Analysis of errors in the measurement of energy dissipation with two-point LDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducci, A.; Yianneskis, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, King' s College London, Experimental and Computational Laboratory for the Analysis of Turbulence (ECLAT), London (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to identify and quantify, with a rigorous analytical approach, all possible sources of error involved in the estimation of the fluctuating velocity gradients ({partial_derivative}u{sub i}/{partial_derivative}x{sub j}){sup 2} when a two-point laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) technique is employed. Measurements were carried out in a grid-generated turbulence flow where the local dissipation rate can be calculated from the decay of kinetic energy. An assessment of the cumulative error determined through the analysis has been made by comparing the values of the spatial gradients directly measured with the gradient estimated from the decay of kinetic energy. The main sources of error were found to be related to the length of the two control volumes and to the fitting range, as well as the function used to interpolate the correlation coefficient when the Taylor length scale (or({partial_derivative}u{sub i}/{partial_derivative}x{sub j}){sup 2}) are estimated. (orig.)

  16. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: measuring the cosmic growth rate with the two-point galaxy correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Carlos; Poole, Gregory B; Marin, Felipe; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Croton, Darren; Davis, Tamara M; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K; Yee, H K C; 10.1093/mnras/sts608

    2013-01-01

    The growth history of large-scale structure in the Universe is a powerful probe of the cosmological model, including the nature of dark energy. We study the growth rate of cosmic structure to redshift $z = 0.9$ using more than $162{,}000$ galaxy redshifts from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We divide the data into four redshift slices with effective redshifts $z = [0.2,0.4,0.6,0.76]$ and in each of the samples measure and model the 2-point galaxy correlation function in parallel and transverse directions to the line-of-sight. After simultaneously fitting for the galaxy bias factor we recover values for the cosmic growth rate which are consistent with our assumed $\\Lambda$CDM input cosmological model, with an accuracy of around 20% in each redshift slice. We investigate the sensitivity of our results to the details of the assumed model and the range of physical scales fitted, making close comparison with a set of N-body simulations for calibration. Our measurements are consistent with an independent power-spe...

  17. Reliability of the two-point measurement of the spatial correlation length from Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals in fusion-grade plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jaewook; Lampert, M; Ghim, Y -c

    2016-01-01

    A statistical method for the estimation of spatial correlation lengths of Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals with two measurement points is examined to quantitatively evaluate its reliability (variance) and accuracy (bias error). The standard deviation of the correlation value is analytically derived for randomly distributed Gaussian shaped fluctuations satisfying stationarity and homogeneity, allowing us to evaluate, as a function of fluctuation-to-noise ratios, sizes of averaging time windows and ratios of the distance between the two measurement points to the true correlation length, the goodness of the two-point measurement for estimating the spatial correlation length. Analytic results are confirmed with numerically generated synthetic data and real experimental data obtained with the KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Our results can be applied to Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals where a correlation length must be measured with only two measurement points.

  18. Reliability of the two-point measurement of the spatial correlation length from Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals in fusion-grade plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewook; Nam, Y. U.; Lampert, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2016-10-01

    A statistical method for the estimation of the spatial correlation lengths of Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals with two measurement points is examined to quantitatively evaluate its reliability (variance) and accuracy (bias error). The standard deviation of the correlation value is analytically derived for randomly distributed Gaussian shaped fluctuations satisfying stationarity and homogeneity, allowing us to evaluate, as a function of fluctuation-to-noise ratios, the sizes of averaging time windows and the ratios of the distance between the two measurement points to the true correlation length, and the goodness of the two-point measurement for estimating the spatial correlation length. Analytic results are confirmed with numerically generated synthetic data and real experimental data obtained with the KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Our results can be applied to Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals where a correlation length must be measured with only two measurement points.

  19. Characterization of mantle convection experiments using two-point correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puster, Peter; Jordan, Thomas H.; Hager, Bradford H.

    1995-04-01

    Snapshots of the temperature T(r, phi, t), horizontal flow velocity u(r, phi, t), and radial flow velocity w(r, phi, t) obtained from numerical convection experiments of time-dependent flows in annular cylindrical geometry are taken to be samples of stationary, rotationally invariant random fields. For such a field f(r, phi, t), the spatio-temporal two-point correlation function, C(sub ff)(r, r-prime, delta, t(sub *)), is constructed by averaging over rotational transformations of this ensemble. To assess the structural differences among mantle convection experiments we construct three spartial subfunctions of C(sub ff)(r, r-prime, delta, t(sub *)): the rms variation, sigma(sub f)(r), the radial correlation function, R(sub f)(r, r-prime), and the angular correlation function, A(sub f)(r, delta). R(sub f)(r, r-prime) and A(sub f)(r, r-prime) are symmetric about the loci r = r-prime and delta = 0, respectively, where they achieve their maximum value of unity. The falloff of R(sub f) and A(sub f) away from their symmetry can be quantified by a correlation length rho(sub f)(r) and a correlation angle alpha(sub f)(r), which we define to be the half widths of the central peaks at the correlation level 0.75. The behavior of rho(sub f) is a diagnostic of radial structure, while alpha(sub f) measures average plume width. We have used two-point correlation functions of the temperature field (T-diagnostics) and flow velocity fields (V-diagnostics) to quantify some important aspects of mantle convection experiments. We explore the dependence of different correlation diagnostics on Rayleigh number, internal heating rate, and depth- and temperature-dependent viscosity. For isoviscous flows in an annulus, we show how radial averages of sigma(sub T), rho(sub T), and alpha(sub T) scale with Rayleigh number for various internal heating rates. A break in the power-law relationship at the transition from steady to time-dependent regimes is evident for rho(sub T) and alpha(sub T) but

  20. Accuracy of two points correlation length measurement and its applications in H-1NF heliac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewook; Michael, C. A.; Nam, Y. U.; Lampert, M.; Ghim, Y. C.

    2016-10-01

    Anomalous transport observed in fusion-grade plasmas is widely accepted to be correlated with spatial and temporal correlation characteristics of the turbulent eddies. While temporal and 2D spatial (radial and poloidal) correlation characteristics have been studied in detail, the lack of such information in the parallel direction, with respect to the background magnetic field, of hot core plasmas precludes us from full understanding and controlling plasma turbulence. KSTAR is equipped with a couple of 2D diagnostic systems measuring ion-scale density fluctuations, namely the BES and MIR systems, at two different toroidal locations. These systems provide a possibility to measure a parallel correlation length. As it is necessary to identify how reliably one can measure correlation length with only two spatial positions, there has been such a study [Jaewook Kim et al., Nucl. Fusion accepted] recently. Based on this recent study, we experimentally obtained 3D correlation functions from H-1NF heliac using the data from a set of Langmuir probes. One probe is spatially fixed, while the second one is scanned radially and poloidally at a different toroidal location. H1-NF heliac plasmas are highly reproducible, therefore we construct the 3D correlation functions with multi-discharges.

  1. Linear and non-linear bias: predictions vs. measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Kai; Gaztanaga, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We study the linear and non-linear bias parameters which determine the mapping between the distributions of galaxies and the full matter density fields, comparing different measurements and predictions. Accociating galaxies with dark matter haloes in the MICE Grand Challenge N-body simulation we directly measure the bias parameters by comparing the smoothed density fluctuations of halos and matter in the same region at different positions as a function of smoothing scale. Alternatively we measure the bias parameters by matching the probablility distributions of halo and matter density fluctuations, which can be applied to observations. These direct bias measurements are compared to corresponding measurements from two-point and different third-order correlations, as well as predictions from the peak-background model, which we presented in previous articles using the same data. We find an overall variation of the linear bias measurements and predictions of $\\sim 5 \\%$ with respect to results from two-point corr...

  2. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  3. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  4. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  5. Experimental Study of the Convergence of Two-Point Cross-Correlation Toward the Green's Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouedard, P.; Roux, P.; Campillo, M.; Verdel, A.; Campman, X.

    2007-12-01

    It has been shown theoretically by several authors that cross-correlation of the seismic motion recorded at two points could yield the Green's Function (GF) between these points. Convergence of cross-correlations toward the GF depends on sources positions and/or the nature of the wavefield. Direct waves from an even distribution of sources can be used to retrieve the GF. On the other hand, in an inhomogeneous medium, recording the diffuse field (coda) is theoretically sufficient to retrieve the GF whatever the sources distribution is. Since none of these two conditions (even distribution of sources or a perfectly diffuse field) is satisfied in practice, the question of convergence toward the GF has to be investigated with real data. A 3D exploration survey with sources and receivers on a dense grid offers such an opportunity. We used a high- resolution survey recorded by Petroleum Development Oman in North Oman. The data have been obtained in a 1x1~km area covered with 1600 geophones located on a 25x25~m-cell grid. Records are 4-seconds long. A unique feature of this survey is that vibrators (working in the [8-120~Hz] frequency band), were located on a similar grid shifted with respect to the receiver grid by half a cell (12.5~m) in both directions. This allows us to compare estimated GF's with measured direct waves (GF's) between the geophones. The shallow subsurface is highly heterogeneous and records include seismic coda. From this dataset, we selected two receiver locations (Ra and Rb) distant from d=158~m. We used both different sets of source locations and time windows to compute the cross-correlation between these two receivers. Then we compared the derivatives of correlation functions with the actual GF measured in Rb (resp.~Ra) for a source close to Ra (resp.~Rb). By doing so, we show the actual influence of source locations and scattering (governed by the records' selected time window) on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed GF. When using

  6. In-situ Instrumental Setup for Influence Study of Hard-axis Bias Magnetic Field on MR transfer curves of sing MTJ sensor and MTJs array sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L; Pong, P W T

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of home-made measurement setups for the characterization of MR sensor is proposed and described here. The MR loops of MR sensors can be obtained with the instrument using two-point probe measurement and four-point probe measurement. Two pairs of Helmholtz coils can supply a hard-axis magnetic field and a soft-axis magnetic field for the sensor. The single MTJ sensor and MTJs array sensor in Wheatstone bridge were characterized and compared here. The influence of hard-bias magnetic field on MR transfer curves of sing MTJ sensor and MTJs array sensor are investigated. The corresponding optimal hard-axis magnetic fields were obtained through Helmholtz coils to eliminate the hysteresis for linear response of single MTJ sensor and MTJs array sensor.

  7. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  8. Two-point discrimination of the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Soon-Hee; An, Ho-Jung; Moon, Ok-Gon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yun, Young-Dae; Park, Joo-Hyun; Min, Kyoung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study attempted to measure two-point discrimination in the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20’s. [Subjects and Methods] Using a three-point esthesiometer, we conducted an experiment with a group of 256 college students (128 male and 128 female), attending N University in Chonan, Republic of Korea. [Results] Females showed two-point discrimination at a shorter distance than males at the following points: (i) 5 cm above the elbow joint, the middle part, and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the anterior upper arm; (ii) 5 cm above the elbow joint and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the posterior upper arm; (iii) 5 cm above the front of the wrist joint of the forearm; 5 cm below the elbow joint, the palmar part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the thumb, the dorsal part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the middle and little fingers. It was also found that females showed greater two-point discrimination than males in distal regions rather than proximal regions. [Conclusion] The findings of this study will help establish normal values for two-point discrimination of upper extremities of young Koreans in their 20’s. PMID:27134375

  9. Two-point boundary value problems and exact controllability for several kinds of linear and nonlinear wave equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong Dexing [Department of Mathematics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Sun Qingyou, E-mail: qysun@cms.zju.edu.cn [Center of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-04-01

    All articles must In this paper we introduce some new concepts for second-order hyperbolic equations: two-point boundary value problem, global exact controllability and exact controllability. For several kinds of important linear and nonlinear wave equations arising from physics and geometry, we prove the existence of smooth solutions of the two-point boundary value problems and show the global exact controllability of these wave equations. In particular, we investigate the two-point boundary value problem for one-dimensional wave equation defined on a closed curve and prove the existence of smooth solution which implies the exact controllability of this kind of wave equation. Furthermore, based on this, we study the two-point boundary value problems for the wave equation defined on a strip with Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions and show that the equation still possesses the exact controllability in these cases. Finally, as an application, we introduce the hyperbolic curvature flow and obtain a result analogous to the well-known theorem of Gage and Hamilton for the curvature flow of plane curves.

  10. Critical two-point functions and the lace expansion for spread-out high-dimensional percolation and related models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Hofstad, R.; Hara, T.; Slade, G.

    2003-01-01

    We consider spread-out models of self-avoiding walk, bond percolation, lattice trees and bond lattice animals on ${\\mathbb{Z}^d}$, having long finite-range connections, above their upper critical dimensions $d=4$ (self-avoiding walk), $d=6$ (percolation) and $d=8$ (trees and animals). The two-point

  11. EXISTENCE OF POSITIVE SOLUTION TO TWO-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR A SYSTEM OF SECOND ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a two-point boundary value problem for a system of second order ordinary differential equations. Under some conditions, we show the existence of positive solution to the system of second order ordinary differential equa-tions.

  12. HIGH ACCURACY FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT METHOD FOR TWO-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM OF SECOND ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王同科

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a high accuracy finite volume element method is presented for two-point boundary value problem of second order ordinary differential equation, which differs fromthe high order generalized difference methods. It is proved that the method has optimal order er-ror estimate O(h3) in H1 norm. Finally, two examples show that the method is effective.

  13. Does neurocognitive function affect cognitive bias toward an emotional stimulus? Association between general attentional ability and attentional bias toward threat

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although poorer cognitive performance has been found to be associated with anxiety, it remains unclear whether neurocognitive function affects biased cognitive processing toward emotional information. We investigated whether general cognitive function evaluated with a standard neuropsychological test predicts biased cognition, focusing on attentional bias toward threat. Methods: One hundred and five healthy young adults completed a dot-probe task measuring attentional bias and ...

  14. On a two-point boundary value problem for second-order differential inclusions on Riemannian manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Obukhovskiĭ

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider second-order differential inclusions on a Riemannian manifold with lower semicontinuous right-hand sides. Several existence theorems for solutions of two-point boundary value problem are proved to be interpreted as controllability of special mechanical systems with control on nonlinear configuration spaces. As an application, a statement of controllability under extreme values of controlling force is obtained.

  15. Extension of normal values on sensory function for facial areas using clinical tests on touch and two-point discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriens, J P M; van der Glas, H W

    2009-11-01

    The threshold value of a sensory test provides a numerical measure of the sensory function. In order to decide whether a threshold value from an affected site indicates 'abnormal' sensory function, it can be compared with normal values from a healthy control population. The aim of this study was to extend current information on normal values for static light touch and static two-point discrimination for facial sites. Using simple hand-held devices, 95% upper limits of confidence intervals of threshold values were determined for facial sites other than those studied previously and for a large sample of 100 healthy subjects. The MacKinnon-Dellon Disk-Criminator and the Aesthesiometer were used to measure novel normal values of two-point discrimination. As threshold values for two-point discrimination from the Aesthesiometer were similar to those obtained using the Disk-Criminator, the use of the Aesthesiometer might not be indicated. Apart from the Pressure Specified Sensory Device (a device with pressure control), Semmes-Weinstein nylon monofilaments and the Disk-Criminator are useful devices for studying sensory function, in particular under clinical test conditions in which easy and fast application are advantageous.

  16. Rigid internal fixation of zygoma fractures: A comparison of two-point and three-point fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parashar Atul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Displaced fractures of the zygomatic bone can result in significant functional and aesthetic sequelae. Therefore the treatment must achieve adequate and stable reduction at fracture sites so as to restore the complex multidimensional relationship of the zygoma to the surrounding craniofacial skeleton. Many experimental biophysical studies have compared stability of zygoma after one, two and three-point fixation with mini plates. We conducted a prospective clinical study comparing functional and aesthetic results of two-point and three-point fixation with mini plates in patients with fractures of zygoma. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two patients with isolated zygomatic fractures over a period of one year were randomly assigned into two-point and three-point fixation groups. Results of fixation were analyzed after completion of three months. This included clinical, radiological and photographic evaluation. Results: The three-point fixation group maintained better stability at fracture sites resulting in decreased incidence of dystopia and enophthalmos. This group also had better malar projection and malar height as measured radiologically, when compared with the two-point fixation group. Conclusion: We recommend three-point rigid fixation of fractured zygoma after accurate reduction so as to maintain adequate stabilization against masticatory forces during fracture healing phase.

  17. Van der Waals like behavior and equal area law of two point correlation function of f(R) AdS black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Lin, Ze-Tao; Zeng, Xiao-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    To gain holographic insight into critical phenomena of $f(R)$ AdS black holes, we investigate their two point correlation function, which are dual to the geodesic length in the bulk. We solve the equation of motion constrained by the boundary condition numerically and probe both the effect of boundary region size and $f(R)$ gravity. Moreover, we introduce an analogous specific heat related to $\\delta L$. It is shown in the $T-\\delta L$ graph for the case $Q

  18. Cognitive bias measurement and social anxiety disorder: Correlating self-report data and attentional bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Miloff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social anxiety disorder (SAD and attentional bias are theoretically connected in cognitive behavioral therapeutic models. In fact, there is an emerging field focusing on modifying attentional bias as a stand-alone treatment. However, it is unclear to what degree these attentional biases are present before commencing treatment. The purpose of this study was to measure pre-treatment attentional bias in 153 participants diagnosed with SAD using a home-based Internet version of the dot-probe paradigm. Results showed no significant correlation for attentional bias (towards or away from negative words or faces and the self-rated version of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR. However, two positive correlations were found for the secondary measures Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9. These indicated that those with elevated levels of anxiety and depression had a higher bias towards negative faces in neutral–negative and positive–negative valence combinations, respectively. The unreliability of the dot-probe paradigm and home-based Internet delivery are discussed to explain the lack of correlations between LSAS-SR and attentional bias. Changes to the dot-probe task are suggested that could improve reliability.

  19. Fracture resistance, two point bending strength and morphological characteristics of pulpless teeth restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tibúrcio Nunes Pires

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fiber-reinforced composite posts (FRC posts have been used for tooth reinforcement after endodontic treatment. The mechanical characteristics of FRC posts can influence the clinical prognostic. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength and fracture resistance of commercially available FRC posts Material and methods: Fourteen human single-rooted premolars with completely formed apices were selected and received endodontic treatment. The specimens were divided into two groups related to the post system: i Group A – cylindrical-conical fiber-reinforced post (White post DC, FGM, and ii group B – conical fiber-reinforced post (EXACTO, Angelus. The fracture resistance was evaluated and two point bending tests were carried out. The glass fiber characteristics and the tag penetration of the luting material into the radicular dentin structure were evaluated through scanning electronic microscopy in an illustrative way. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (α = 0.05 were applied. Results: The values obtained for fracture resistance and two point bending test were, respectively, 399.29 N and 109.5 N for group A, and 386.25 N and 119.5 N for group B. No significant differences in strength values among the groups were found. Conclusion: There were no significant statistical differences between the two post groups regarding to fracture strength and two point bending strength. It can be concluded that the posts selected for this study performed satisfactorily in terms of mechanical properties so that they can be used for tooth reinforcement after endodontic treatment.

  20. Surgical treatment of zygomatic bone fracture using two points fixation versus three point fixation-a randomised prospective clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Majeed

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zygoma plays an important role in the facial contour for both cosmetic and functional reasons; therefore zygomatic bone injuries should be properly diagnosed and adequately treated. Comparison of various surgical approaches and their complications can only be done objectively using outcome measurements which in turn require protocol management and long-term follow up. The preference for open reduction and internal fixation of zygomatic fractures at three points has continued to grow in response to observations of inadequate results from two point and one point fixation techniques. The objectives of this study were to compare the efficacy of zygomatic bone after treatment with ORIF using 2 point fixation and ORIF using 3 point fixation and compare the outcome of two procedures. Methods 100 patients were randomly divided equally into two groups. In group A, 50 patients were treated by ORIF using two point fixation by miniplates and in group B, 50 patients were treated by ORIF using three point fixation by miniplates. They were evaluated for their complications during and after surgery with their advantages and disadvantages and the difference between the two groups was observed. Results A total of 100 fractures were sustained. We found that postoperative complication like decreased malar height and vertical dystopia was more common in those patients who were treated by two point fixation than those who were treated with three point fixation. Conclusions Based on this study open reduction and internal fixation using three point fixation by miniplates is the best available method for the treatment zygomatic bone fractures.

  1. Explicit Proof of Equivalence of Two-Point Functions in the Two Formalisms of Thermal Field Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bang-Rong

    2002-01-01

    We give an explicit proof of equivalence of the two-point function to one-loop order in the two formalisms of thermal λ3 theory based on the expressions in the real-time formalism and indicate that the key point of completing the proof is to separate carefully the imaginary part of the zero-temperature loop integralfrom relevant expressions and this fact will certainly be very useful for examination of the equivalent problem of two formalisms of thermal field theory in other theories, including the one of the propagators for scalar bound states in an NJL model.

  2. Two-point estimate method for probabilistic optimal power flow computation including wind farms with correlated parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xue; Cao, Jia; Du, Dajun [Shanghai Univ. (China). Key Lab. of Power Station Automation Technology

    2013-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the probabilistic optimal power flow (POPF) calculation including wind farms with correlated parameters which contains nodal injections. The two-point estimate method (2PEM) is employed to solve the POPF. Moreover, the correlation samples between nodal injections and line parameters are generated by Cholesky Factorization method. Simulation results show that 2PEM is feasible and effective to solve the POPF including wind farms with correlated parameters, while the 2PEM has higher computation precision and consume less CPU time than Monte Carlo Simulation.

  3. Doppler term in the galaxy two-point correlation function: wide-angle, velocity, Doppler lensing and cosmic acceleration effects

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Bertacca, Daniele; Jeong, Donghui; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the parity-odd part (that we shall call Doppler term) of the linear galaxy two-point correlation function that arises from wide-angle, velocity, Doppler lensing and cosmic acceleration effects. As it is important at low redshift and at large angular separations, the Doppler term is usually neglected in the current generation of galaxy surveys. For future wide-angle galaxy surveys such as Euclid, SPHEREx and SKA, however, we show that the Doppler term must be included. The effect of t...

  4. On the solution of two-point linear differential eigenvalue problems. [numerical technique with application to Orr-Sommerfeld equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antar, B. N.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique is presented for locating the eigenvalues of two point linear differential eigenvalue problems. The technique is designed to search for complex eigenvalues belonging to complex operators. With this method, any domain of the complex eigenvalue plane could be scanned and the eigenvalues within it, if any, located. For an application of the method, the eigenvalues of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation of the plane Poiseuille flow are determined within a specified portion of the c-plane. The eigenvalues for alpha = 1 and R = 10,000 are tabulated and compared for accuracy with existing solutions.

  5. ON THE EXISTENCE OF SOLUTION OF A NONLINEAR TWO-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM ARISING FROM A LIQUID METAL FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Xiaoliang; Ying Weiting

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the existence of solution of a nonlinear two-point boundary value problem with a positive parameter Q arising in the study of surfacetension-induced flows of a liquid metal or semiconductor. By applying the Schauder's fixed-point theorem, we prove that the problem admits a solution for 0 ≤ Q ≤ 14.306.It improves the result of 0 ≤ Q < 1 in [2] and 0 ≤ Q ≤ 13.213 in [3].

  6. Awareness Reduces Racial Bias

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Can raising awareness of racial bias subsequently reduce that bias? We address this question by exploiting the widespread media attention highlighting racial bias among professional basketball referees that occurred in May 2007 following the release of an academic study. Using new data, we confirm that racial bias persisted in the years after the study's original sample, but prior to the media coverage. Subsequent to the media coverage though, the bias completely disappeared. We examine poten...

  7. Joint positioning sense, perceived force level and two-point discrimination tests of young and active elderly adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila G. Franco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Changes in the proprioceptive system are associated with aging. Proprioception is important to maintaining and/or recovering balance and to reducing the risk of falls.Objective:To compare the performance of young and active elderly adults in three proprioceptive tests.Method:Twenty-one active elderly participants (66.9±5.5 years and 21 healthy young participants (24.6±3.9 years were evaluated in the following tests: perception of position of the ankle and hip joints, perceived force level of the ankle joint, and two-point discrimination of the sole of the foot.Results:No differences (p>0.05 were found between groups for the joint position and perceived force level. On the other hand, the elderly participants showed lower sensitivity in the two-point discrimination (higher threshold when compared to the young participants (p < 0.01.Conclusion:Except for the cutaneous plantar sensitivity, the active elderly participants had maintained proprioception. Their physical activity status may explain similarities between groups for the joint position sense and perceived force level, however it may not be sufficient to prevent sensory degeneration with aging.

  8. Exact two-point resistance, and the simple random walk on the complete graph minus N edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chair, Noureddine, E-mail: n.chair@ju.edu.jo

    2012-12-15

    An analytical approach is developed to obtain the exact expressions for the two-point resistance and the total effective resistance of the complete graph minus N edges of the opposite vertices. These expressions are written in terms of certain numbers that we introduce, which we call the Bejaia and the Pisa numbers; these numbers are the natural generalizations of the bisected Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. The correspondence between random walks and the resistor networks is then used to obtain the exact expressions for the first passage and mean first passage times on this graph. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain exact formulas for the two-point resistance of the complete graph minus N edges. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtain also the total effective resistance of this graph. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modified Schwatt's formula on trigonometrical power sum to suit our computations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We introduced the generalized bisected Fibonacci and Lucas numbers: the Bejaia and the Pisa numbers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first passage and mean first passage times of the random walks have exact expressions.

  9. The covariant and infrared-free graviton two-point function in de Sitter space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Pejhan, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the two-point function of linearized gravitons on de Sitter (dS) space is presented. Technically, respecting the dS ambient space notation, the field equation is given by the coordinate-independent Casimir operators of the de Sitter group. Analogous to the quantization of the electromagnetic field in Minkowski space, the field equation admits gauge solutions. The notation allows to exhibit the formalism of Gupta-Bleuler triplets for the present field in exactly the same manner as it occurs for the electromagnetic field. In this regard, centering on the traceless part, the field solution is written as a product of a generalized polarization tensor and a minimally coupled massless scalar field. Then, admitting a de Sitter-invariant vacuum through the so-called "Krein Space Quantization", the de Sitter fully covariant two-point function is calculated. This function is interestingly free of pathological large distance behavior (infrared divergence). Moreover, the pure-trace part (conformal sector) ...

  10. Gauge-invariant two-point correlator of energy density in deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    The thesis is considering aspects of SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics in its deconfining high-temperature phase. We calculate the two-point correlation function of the energy density of the photon in a thermalized gas, at first in the conventional U(1) gauge theory, followed by a calculation, where the photon is identified with the massless gauge mode in deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics. Apart from the fact, that this calculation is interesting from a technical point of view, we can consider several aspects of phenomenological relevance. Since we interpret the two-point correlator of energy density as a measure for the energy transfer, and thus for the electromagnetic interaction of microscopic objects, such as atoms immersed into a photon gas, we are able to give an explanation for the unexpected stability of cold, innergalactic clouds consisting of atomic hydrogen. Subsequently, we evaluate the spatial string tension in deconfining SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics, which can be regarded as measure ...

  11. Edge biasing in the WEGA stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischtschenko, Oliver

    2009-02-27

    The WEGA stellarator is used to confine low temperature, overdense (densities exceeding the cut-off density of the heating wave) plasmas by magnetic fields in the range of B=50-500 mT. Microwave heating systems are used to ignite gas discharges using hydrogen, helium, neon or argon as working gases. The produced plasmas have been analyzed using Langmuir and emissive probes, a single-channel interferometer and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy. For a typical argon discharge in the low field operation, B=56 mT, the maximum electron density is n{sub e}{proportional_to}10{sup 18} m{sup -3} with temperatures in the range of T=4-12 eV. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probes and are cross-checked with interferometry. It is demonstrated within this work that the joint use of emissive probes and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy allows a precise measurement of the radial electric field. The focus of this work is on demonstrating the ability to modify the existing radial electric field in a plasma by using the biasing probe. This work commences with a basic approach and first establishes the diagnostic tools in a well-known discharge. Then the perturbation caused by the biasing probe is assessed. Following the characterization of the unperturbed plasmas, plasma states altered by the operation of the energized biasing probe are characterized. During biasing the plasma two different stable plasma states have been found. The two observed plasma states differ in plasma parameter profiles, such as density, temperature, electric field and confined energy. (orig.)

  12. Intrinsic alignments of galaxies in the MassiveBlack-II simulation: analysis of two-point statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Tenneti, Ananth; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Feng, Yu; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic alignment of galaxies with the large-scale density field is an important astrophysical contaminant in upcoming weak lensing surveys whilst offering insights into galaxy formation and evolution. We present detailed measurements of the galaxy intrinsic alignments and associated ellipticity-direction (ED) and projected shape ($w_{g+}$) correlation functions for galaxies in the cosmological hydrodynamic MassiveBlack-II (MB-II) simulation. We carefully assess the effects on galaxy shapes, misalignments and two-point statistics of iterative weighted (by mass, luminosity, and color) definitions of the (reduced and unreduced) inertia tensor. We find that iterative procedures must be adopted for a reliable measurement of reduced tensor but that luminosity versus mass weighting has only negligible effects. Blue galaxies exhibit stronger misalignments and suppressed $w_{g+}$ amplitude. Both ED and $w_{g+}$ correlations increase in amplitude with subhalo mass (in the range of $10^{10} - 6.0\\times 10^{14}h^{...

  13. New Approach for Solving a Class of Doubly Singular Two-Point Boundary Value Problems Using Adomian Decomposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose two new modified recursive schemes for solving a class of doubly singular two-point boundary value problems. These schemes are based on Adomian decomposition method (ADM and new proposed integral operators. We use all the boundary conditions to derive an integral equation before establishing the recursive schemes for the solution components. Thus we develop recursive schemes without any undetermined coefficients while computing successive solution components, whereas several previous recursive schemes have done so. This modification also avoids solving a sequence of nonlinear algebraic or transcendental equations for the undetermined coefficients with multiple roots, which is required to complete calculation of the solution by several earlier modified recursion schemes using the ADM. The approximate solution is computed in the form of series with easily calculable components. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is tested by considering four examples and results are compared with previous known results.

  14. The influence of age on pressure perception of static and moving two-point discrimination in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Atsushi; Asai, Noriyoshi; Kanda, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of age on digital pressure perception as measured by two-point discrimination (2PD) testing. The subjects were 177 normal volunteers ranging in age from 20 to 79 years. Perceptible pressure of static and moving 2PD was measured on the index finger and little finger, using the Pressure-specifying Sensory Device. The threshold of pressure perception increased significantly with advancing age in both static and moving 2PD tests. There was a marked increase in subjects older than 60 years. Pressure perception was significantly higher for static 2PD than for moving 2PD in subjects 70-79 years of age. The threshold of pressure perception for static and moving 2PD gradually increased with advancing age, and was markedly elevated in subjects older than 60 years.

  15. Transforming activity of the c-Ha-ras oncogene having two point mutations in codons 12 and 61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, T; Prassolov, V S; Fushimi, M; Nishimura, S

    1985-09-01

    A recombinant plasmid carrying the human c-Ha-ras gene with two point mutations in codons 12 and 61 was constructed and its transforming activity on mouse NIH 3T3 cells was compared with those of genes with a single mutation in either codon 12 or 61. Quantitative analyses revealed that the gene with two mutations had essentially the same transforming activity as the genes with single mutations. These results indicate that a single mutation of the c-Ha-ras gene in either codon 12 or 61 is sufficient to activate the gene and that neither of the two mutation sites involved in activation of the gene needs to be intact for transforming activity.

  16. Attentional bias to moving spiders in spider fearful individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijsen, J.N.; Fleurkens, P.F.T.; Nieuwboer, W.; Rinck, M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated if an attentional bias for spiders in spider fearful individuals (SFs) can also be found for moving spiders, rather than static images. In Study 1, 28 SFs and 33 non-anxious controls (NACs) participated in a modified version of the dot probe paradigm: they had to react to a probe

  17. Revisiting van der Waals like behavior of f(R AdS black holes via the two point correlation function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Xiong Mo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Van der Waals like behavior of f(R AdS black holes is revisited via two point correlation function, which is dual to the geodesic length in the bulk. The equation of motion constrained by the boundary condition is solved numerically and both the effect of boundary region size and f(R gravity are probed. Moreover, an analogous specific heat related to δL is introduced. It is shown that the T−δL graphs of f(R AdS black holes exhibit reverse van der Waals like behavior just as the T−S graphs do. Free energy analysis is carried out to determine the first order phase transition temperature T⁎ and the unstable branch in T−δL curve is removed by a bar T=T⁎. It is shown that the first order phase transition temperature is the same at least to the order of 10−10 for different choices of the parameter b although the values of free energy vary with b. Our result further supports the former finding that charged f(R AdS black holes behave much like RN-AdS black holes. We also check the analogous equal area law numerically and find that the relative errors for both the cases θ0=0.1 and θ0=0.2 are small enough. The fitting functions between log⁡|T−Tc| and log⁡|δL−δLc| for both cases are also obtained. It is shown that the slope is around 3, implying that the critical exponent is about 2/3. This result is in accordance with those in former literatures of specific heat related to the thermal entropy or entanglement entropy.

  18. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johan B.C.; Khatib, Mohammed G.; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data chan

  19. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  20. Bias modulated scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; Perry, David; Byers, Joshua C; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-04-01

    Nanopipets are versatile tools for nanoscience, particularly when used in scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to determine, in a noncontact manner, the topography of a sample. We present a new method, applying an oscillating bias between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in the SICM nanopipet probe and a second QRCE in the bulk solution, to generate a feedback signal to control the distance between the end of a nanopipet and a surface. Both the amplitude and phase of the oscillating ion current, induced by the oscillating bias and extracted using a phase-sensitive detector, are shown to be sensitive to the probe-surface distance and are used to provide stable feedback signals. The phase signal is particularly sensitive at high frequencies of the oscillating bias (up to 30 kHz herein). This development eliminates the need to physically oscillate the probe to generate an oscillating ion current feedback signal, as needed for conventional SICM modes. Moreover, bias modulation allows a feedback signal to be generated without any net ion current flow, ensuring that any polarization of the quasi reference counter electrodes, electro-osmotic effects, and perturbations of the supporting electrolyte composition are minimized. Both feedback signals, magnitude and phase, are analyzed through approach curve measurements to different surfaces at a range of distinct frequencies and via impedance measurements at different distances from a surface. The bias modulated response is readily understood via a simple equivalent circuit model. Bias modulated (BM)-SICM is compared to conventional SICM imaging through measurements of substrates with distinct topographical features and yields equivalent results. Finally, BM-SICM with both amplitude and phase feedback is used for topographical imaging of subtle etch features in a calcite crystal surface. The 2 modes yield similar results, but phase-detection opens up the prospect of faster imaging.

  1. Assessment of styling performance in hair gels and hair sprays by means of a new two-point stiffness test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoessel, Peter; Riemann, Solveig; Knebl, Robert; Schroeder, Jens; Schuh, Gerd; Castillo, Catalina

    2010-01-01

    A new two-point bending stiffness method on flat hair strands was developed and validated after application of hair styling gels and hair styling sprays. A special mold was used to align single hair fibers after applying the formulations to the hair. The styling gels used contain different commercially available thickeners and styling polymers, e.g., carbomer, acrylates/beheneth-25 methacrylate copolymer, Polyquaternium-86, PVP, VP/VA copolymers, and VP/methacrylamide/vinylimidazole copolymer. Evaluation of hair sprays was performed after spray application on flat hair strands. Commercially available hair styling resins were used, e.g. acrylates/t-butylacrylamide copolymer, octylacrylamide/acrylates/butylaminoethyl methacrylate copolymer, and VP/VA copolymer (30:70). The new stiffness test method provided the best correlation with practically relevant sensory assessments on hair strands and a panel test in which styling gels were evaluated. However, we did not observe a correlation between the new stiffness method on flat hair strands and practical assessments in hair spray application. We postulate that different polymer/hair composites are responsible for these discrepancies. Hairs on model heads for half-side testing are spot-welded after spray application, while hairs are seam-welded in the stiffness test after alignment of single hair fibers. This alignment is necessary to achieve reproducible results.

  2. Existence of solutions of nonlinear two-point boundary value problems for 4nth-order nonlinear differential equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高永馨

    2002-01-01

    Studies the existence of solutions of nonlinear two point boundary value problems for nonlinear 4n-th-order differential equation y(4n)= f( t,y,y' ,y",… ,y(4n-1) ) (a) with the boundary conditions g2i(y(2i) (a) ,y(2i+1) (a)) = 0,h2i(y(2i) (c) ,y(2i+1) (c)) = 0, (I= 0,1,…,2n - 1 ) (b) where the functions f, gi and hi are continuous with certain monotone properties. For the boundary value problems of nonlinear nth order differential equation y(n) = f(t,y,y',y",… ,y(n-1)) many results have been given at the present time. But the existence of solutions of boundary value problem (a), (b) studied in this paper has not been covered by the above researches. Moreover, the corollary of the important theorem in this paper, I.e. Existence of solutions of the boundary value problem. Y(4n) = f(t,y,y',y",… ,y(4n-1) ) a2iy(2i) (at) + a2i+1y(2i+1) (a) = b2i ,c2iy(2O ( c ) + c2i+1y(2i+1) ( c ) = d2i, ( I = 0,1 ,…2n - 1) has not been dealt with in previous works.

  3. Differences in two-point discrimination and sensory threshold in the blind between braille and text reading: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Ji-Woong; Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kang, Ji-Hye; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated two-point discrimination (TPD) and the electrical sensory threshold of the blind to define the effect of using Braille on the tactile and electrical senses. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight blind participants were divided equally into a text-reading and a Braille-reading group. We measured tactile sensory and electrical thresholds using the TPD method and a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator. [Results] The left palm TPD values were significantly different between the groups. The values of the electrical sensory threshold in the left hand, the electrical pain threshold in the left hand, and the electrical pain threshold in the right hand were significantly lower in the Braille group than in the text group. [Conclusion] These findings make it difficult to explain the difference in tactility between groups, excluding both palms. However, our data show that using Braille can enhance development of the sensory median nerve in the blind, particularly in terms of the electrical sensory and pain thresholds.

  4. The redshift-space two-point correlation functions of galaxies and groups in the Nearby Optical Galaxy sample

    CERN Document Server

    Giuricin, G; Girardi, M; Mezzetti, M; Marinoni, C; Giuricin, Giuliano; Samurovic, Srdjan; Girardi, Marisa; Mezzetti, Marino; Marinoni, Christian

    2001-01-01

    We use the two-point correlation function in redshift space, $\\xi(s)$, to study the clustering of the galaxies and groups of the Nearby Optical Galaxy (NOG) sample, which is a nearly all-sky, complete, magnitude-limited sample of $\\sim$7000 bright and nearby optical galaxies. The correlation function of galaxies is well described by a power law, $\\xi(s)=(s/s_0)^{-\\gamma}$, with slope $\\gamma\\sim1.5$ and $s_0\\sim6.4 h^{-1}$Mpc (on scales $2.7 - 12 h^{-1}$Mpc), in agreement with previous results of several redshift surveys of optical galaxies. We confirm the existence of morphological segregation between early- and late-type galaxies and, in particular, we find a gradual decreasing of the strength of clustering from the S0 galaxies to the late-type spirals, on intermediate scales. Furthermore, luminous galaxies turn out to be more clustered than dim galaxies. The luminosity segregation, which is significant for both early- and late-type objects, starts to become appreciable only for galaxies brighter than $M_B\\...

  5. Attitude reconstruction of ROSETTA's Lander PHILAE using two-point magnetic field observations by ROMAP and RPC-MAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinisch, Philip; Auster, Hans-Ulrich; Richter, Ingo; Hercik, David; Jurado, Eric; Garmier, Romain; Güttler, Carsten; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2016-08-01

    As part of the European Space Agency's ROSETTA Mission the Lander PHILAE touched down on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 12, 2014. The magnetic field has been measured onboard the orbiter and the lander. The orbiter's tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer RPC-MAG is one of five sensors of the ROSETTA Plasma Consortium. The lander is also equipped with a tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer as part of the ROSETTA Lander Magnetometer and Plasma-Monitor package (ROMAP). This unique setup makes a two point measurement between the two spacecrafts in a relatively small distance of less than 50 km possible. Both magnetometers were switched on during the entire descent, the initial touchdown, the bouncing between the touchdowns and after the final touchdown. We describe a method for attitude determination by correlating magnetic low-frequency waves, which was tested under different conditions and finally used to reconstruct PHILAE's attitude during descent and after landing. In these cases the attitude could be determined with an accuracy of better than ± 5 °. These results were essential not only for PHILAE operations planning but also for the analysis of the obtained scientific data, because nominal sources for this information, like solar panel currents and camera pictures could not provide sufficient information due to the unexpected landing position.

  6. CPI Bias in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Chung

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the CPI bias in Korea by employing the approach of Engel’s Law as suggested by Hamilton (2001. This paper is the first attempt to estimate the bias using Korean panel data, Korean Labor and Income Panel Study(KLIPS. Following Hamilton’s model with non­linear specification correction, our estimation result shows that the cumulative CPI bias over the sample period (2000-2005 was 0.7 percent annually. This CPI bias implies that about 21 percent of the inflation rate during the period can be attributed to the bias. In light of purchasing power parity, we provide an interpretation of the estimated bias.

  7. Bias in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    By writing scientific articles we communicate science among colleagues and peers. By doing this, it is our responsibility to adhere to some basic principles like transparency and accuracy. Authors, journal editors and reviewers need to be concerned about the quality of the work submitted for publication and ensure that only studies which have been designed, conducted and reported in a transparent way, honestly and without any deviation from the truth get to be published. Any such trend or deviation from the truth in data collection, analysis, interpretation and publication is called bias. Bias in research can occur either intentionally or unintentionally. Bias causes false conclusions and is potentially misleading. Therefore, it is immoral and unethical to conduct biased research. Every scientist should thus be aware of all potential sources of bias and undertake all possible actions to reduce or minimize the deviation from the truth. This article describes some basic issues related to bias in research.

  8. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strongest ef...

  9. CFHTLenS: Cosmological constraints from a combination of cosmic shear two-point and three-point correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Liping; Erben, Thomas; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Kitching, Thomas D; Mellier, Yannick; Miller, Lance; Semboloni, Elisabetta; Simon, Patrick; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Coupon, Jean; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Hudson, Michael J; Kuijken, Konrad; Rowe, Barnaby; Schrabback, Tim; Vafaei, Sanaz; Velander, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Higher-order, non-Gaussian aspects of the large-scale structure carry valuable information on structure formation and cosmology, which is complementary to second-order statistics. In this work we measure second- and third-order weak-lensing aperture-mass moments from CFHTLenS and combine those with CMB anisotropy probes. The third moment is measured with a significance of $2\\sigma$. The combined constraint on $\\Sigma_8 = \\sigma_8 (\\Omega_{\\rm m}/0.27)^\\alpha$ is improved by 10%, in comparison to the second-order only, and the allowed ranges for $\\Omega_{\\rm m}$ and $\\sigma_8$ are substantially reduced. Including general triangles of the lensing bispectrum yields tighter constraints compared to probing mainly equilateral triangles. Second- and third-order CFHTLenS lensing measurements improve Planck CMB constraints on $\\Omega_{\\rm m}$ and $\\sigma_8$ by 26% for flat $\\Lambda$CDM. For a model with free curvature, the joint CFHTLenS-Planck result is $\\Omega_{\\rm m} = 0.28 \\pm 0.02$ (68% confidence), which is an i...

  10. The Solution of Two-Point Boundary Value Problem of a Class of Duffing-Type Systems with Non-C1 Perturbation Term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Zhengxian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a two-point boundary value problem of a class of Duffing-type systems with non-C1 perturbation term. Several existence and uniqueness theorems were presented.

  11. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms.

  12. Linear and non-linear bias: predictions versus measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, K.; Bel, J.; Gaztañaga, E.

    2017-02-01

    We study the linear and non-linear bias parameters which determine the mapping between the distributions of galaxies and the full matter density fields, comparing different measurements and predictions. Associating galaxies with dark matter haloes in the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE) Grand Challenge N-body simulation, we directly measure the bias parameters by comparing the smoothed density fluctuations of haloes and matter in the same region at different positions as a function of smoothing scale. Alternatively, we measure the bias parameters by matching the probability distributions of halo and matter density fluctuations, which can be applied to observations. These direct bias measurements are compared to corresponding measurements from two-point and different third-order correlations, as well as predictions from the peak-background model, which we presented in previous papers using the same data. We find an overall variation of the linear bias measurements and predictions of ˜5 per cent with respect to results from two-point correlations for different halo samples with masses between ˜1012and1015 h-1 M⊙ at the redshifts z = 0.0 and 0.5. Variations between the second- and third-order bias parameters from the different methods show larger variations, but with consistent trends in mass and redshift. The various bias measurements reveal a tight relation between the linear and the quadratic bias parameters, which is consistent with results from the literature based on simulations with different cosmologies. Such a universal relation might improve constraints on cosmological models, derived from second-order clustering statistics at small scales or higher order clustering statistics.

  13. Gender Roles:Biases or Differences?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏静

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to probe into the two distinct gender roles-males and females-in several ways, and further answers the question“what on earth cause the salient differentiation in gender roles, biases or differences? ”In conclusion, the author holds that it is the physiological and psychological differences in the two sexes that result in the differed distribution of such vari-ous duties which males and females are supposed to fulfill as the current society has expected.

  14. Political bias is tenacious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Peter H; Wojcik, Sean P; Chen, Eric Evan; Grady, Rebecca Hofstein; Ringel, Megan M

    2015-01-01

    Duarte et al. are right to worry about political bias in social psychology but they underestimate the ease of correcting it. Both liberals and conservatives show partisan bias that often worsens with cognitive sophistication. More non-liberals in social psychology is unlikely to speed our convergence upon the truth, although it may broaden the questions we ask and the data we collect.

  15. Biases in categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    On what grounds can we conclude that an act of categorization is biased? In this chapter, it is contended that in the absence of objective norms of what categories actually are, biases in categorization can only be specified in relation to theoretical understandings of categorization. Therefore, the

  16. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed to in an inter......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  17. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Media Bias and Reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Gentzkow; Jesse M. Shapiro

    2005-01-01

    A Bayesian consumer who is uncertain about the quality of an information source will infer that the source is of higher quality when its reports conform to the consumer's prior expectations. We use this fact to build a model of media bias in which firms slant their reports toward the prior beliefs of their customers in order to build a reputation for quality. Bias emerges in our model even though it can make all market participants worse off. The model predicts that bias will be less severe w...

  19. Biased predecision processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Aaron L

    2003-07-01

    Decision makers conduct biased predecision processing when they restructure their mental representation of the decision environment to favor one alternative before making their choice. The question of whether biased predecision processing occurs has been controversial since L. Festinger (1957) maintained that it does not occur. The author reviews relevant research in sections on theories of cognitive dissonance, decision conflict, choice certainty, action control, action phases, dominance structuring, differentiation and consolidation, constructive processing, motivated reasoning, and groupthink. Some studies did not find evidence of biased predecision processing, but many did. In the Discussion section, the moderators are summarized and used to assess the theories.

  20. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  1. A comparison between a refined two-point model for the limited tokamak SOL and self-consistent plasma turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wersal, C.; Ricci, P.; Loizu, J.

    2017-04-01

    A refined two-point model is derived from the drift-reduced Braginskii equations for the limited tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) by balancing the parallel and perpendicular transport of plasma and heat and taking into account the plasma–neutral interaction. The model estimates the electron temperature drop along a field line, from a region far from the limiter to the limiter plates. Self-consistent first-principles turbulence simulations of the SOL plasma including its interaction with neutral atoms are performed with the GBS code and compared to the refined two-point model. The refined two-point model is shown to be in very good agreement with the turbulence simulation results.

  2. Berkson’s bias, selection bias, and missing data

    OpenAIRE

    Westreich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    While Berkson’s bias is widely recognized in the epidemiologic literature, it remains underappreciated as a model of both selection bias and bias due to missing data. Simple causal diagrams and 2×2 tables illustrate how Berkson’s bias connects to collider bias and selection bias more generally, and show the strong analogies between Berksonian selection bias and bias due to missing data. In some situations, considerations of whether data are missing at random or missing not at random is less i...

  3. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  4. Increasingly minimal bias routing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataineh, Abdulla; Court, Thomas; Roweth, Duncan

    2017-02-21

    A system and algorithm configured to generate diversity at the traffic source so that packets are uniformly distributed over all of the available paths, but to increase the likelihood of taking a minimal path with each hop the packet takes. This is achieved by configuring routing biases so as to prefer non-minimal paths at the injection point, but increasingly prefer minimal paths as the packet proceeds, referred to herein as Increasing Minimal Bias (IMB).

  5. Prospective blind comparative clinical study of two point fixation of zygomatic complex fracture using wire and mini plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandi Lakshmi N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The zygomatic maxillary complex (ZMC fractures are one of the most frequent injuries of the facial skeleton due to its position and facial contour. Assaults, road traffic accidents and falls are the principal etiologic factors that may cause fractures of zygomatic bone. The different fixation methods are applied to treat the zygomatic bone fractures, with many more classifications which have been described in the literature for the ease of management. The type of the fracture, its severity and associated facial fractures usually interferes the treatment modality. Purpose of study The aim of this paper is to show the results of 18yrs prospective blind comparative study using wire and plate osteosynthesis which needed open reduction and internal fixation involving Type II to Type IV Spissel and Schroll ZMC fractures. Materials and methods Total 80 cases included in the study out of 1780 ZMC cases which were treated using wire and plate osteosynthesis over a period of 18 yrs, involving only Type II to Type IV Spissel and Schroll ZMC fractures. Other types excluded from study to prevent observer bias. All the fixations carried out through Standard Dingman's incision using stainless steel 26 gauze wire and titanium 1.5 mm mini plate system under general anesthesia by single maxillofacial surgeon and evaluated by another maxillofacial surgeon who is blinded for surgical procedure after 2 and 4 wks of follow-up for facial symmetry, wound healing, functional assessment (mouth opening, diplopia, and sensory disturbance. All the data tabulated in Excel software (Microsoft for statistical analysis. P-value calculated to know the Significance of treatment modality in all aspects. Results Result shows no significant p-values indicating both the operating techniques are equally efficient in the surgical management of ZMC fracture. Conclusion Osteosynthesis by mini plates is simple, logical and effective treatment compared to wire

  6. Biased causal inseparable game

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Some Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the \\emph{causal inseparable} game introduced in [\\href{http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n10/full/ncomms2076.html}{Nat. Commun. {\\bf3}, 1092 (2012)}], but it's biased version. Two separated parties, Alice and Bob, generate biased bits (say input bit) in their respective local laboratories. Bob generates another biased bit (say decision bit) which determines their goal: whether Alice has to guess Bob's bit or vice-verse. Under the assumption that events are ordered with respect to some global causal relation, we show that the success probability of this biased causal game is upper bounded, giving rise to \\emph{biased causal inequality} (BCI). In the \\emph{process matrix} formalism, which is locally in agreement with quantum physics but assume no global causal order, we show that there exist \\emph{inseparable} process matrices that violate the BCI for arbitrary bias in the decision bit. In such scenario we also derive the maximal violation of the BCI under local operations involving tracele...

  7. On the problem of mass dependence of the two-point function of the real scalar free massive field on the light cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Peter [Institut fuer Informatik, TU Muenchen, Boltzmannstrasse 3, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Werner, Ernst [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2006-05-19

    We investigate the generally assumed inconsistency in light cone quantum field theory that the restriction of a massive, real scalar free field to the nullplane {sigma} = {l_brace}x{sup 0} + x{sup 3} = 0{r_brace} is independent of mass (Leutwyler, Klauder and Streit 1970 Nuovo Cimento A 66 536), but the restriction of the two-point function is mass dependent (see, e.g., Nakanishi and Yamawaki 1977 Nucl. Phys. B 122 15; Yamawaki K 1997 Proc. Int. Workshop New Nonperturbative Methods and Quantization on the Light Cone (Les Houches, France) Preprint hep-th/9707141). We resolve this inconsistency by showing that the two-point function has no canonical restriction to {sigma} in the sense of distribution theory. Only the so-called tame restriction of the two-point function, which we have introduced in (Ullrich P 2004 Uniqueness in the characteristic Cauchy problem of the Klein-Gordon equation and tame restrictions of generalized functions Preprint math-ph/0408022 (submitted)) exists. Furthermore, we show that this tame restriction is indeed independent of the mass. Hence the inconsistency is induced by the erroneous assumption that the two-point function has a (canonical) restriction to {sigma}.

  8. The Application of Two-Point Touch Cane Technique to Theories of Motor Control and Learning Implications for Orientation and Mobility Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Ronald V.; Jacobson, William H.

    1986-01-01

    Basic behavioral processes involved in motor control based on theories of motor control and learning are outlined using the teaching of two-point touch cane technique as an application of the theories. The authors assert the importance of repetition, practice, and sufficient learning time. (Author/CL)

  9. Mode-sum construction of the covariant graviton two-point function in the Poincaré patch of de Sitter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröb, Markus B.; Higuchi, Atsushi; Lima, William C. C.

    2016-06-01

    We construct the graviton two-point function for a two-parameter family of linear covariant gauges in n -dimensional de Sitter space. The construction is performed via the mode-sum method in the Bunch-Davies vacuum in the Poincaré patch, and a Fierz-Pauli mass term is introduced to regularize the infrared (IR) divergences. The resulting two-point function is de Sitter invariant and free of IR divergences in the massless limit (for a certain range of parameters), although analytic continuation with respect to the mass for the pure-gauge sector of the two-point function is necessary for this result. This general result agrees with the propagator obtained by analytic continuation from the sphere [Phys. Rev. D 34, 3670 (1986); Classical Quantum Gravity 18, 4317 (2001)]. However, if one starts with strictly zero mass theory, the IR divergences are absent only for a specific value of one of the two parameters, with the other parameter left generic. These findings agree with recent calculations in the Landau (exact) gauge [J. Math. Phys. 53, 122502 (2012)], where IR divergences do appear in the spin-two (tensor) part of the two-point function. However, we find the strength (including the sign) of the IR divergence to be different from the one found in this reference.

  10. A Prescription for Galaxy Biasing Evolution as a Nuisance Parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Clerkin, L; Lahav, O; Abdalla, F B; Gaztanaga, E

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no consistent approach to modelling galaxy bias evolution in cosmological inference. This lack of a common standard makes the rigorous comparison or combination of probes difficult. We show that the choice of biasing model has a significant impact on cosmological parameter constraints for a survey such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), considering the 2-point correlations of galaxies in five tomographic redshift bins. We find that modelling galaxy bias with a free biasing parameter per redshift bin gives a Figure of Merit (FoM) for Dark Energy equation of state parameters $w_0, w_a$ smaller by a factor of 10 than if a constant bias is assumed. An incorrect bias model will also cause a shift in measured values of cosmological parameters. Motivated by these points and focusing on the redshift evolution of linear bias, we propose the use of a generalised galaxy bias which encompasses a range of bias models from theory, observations and simulations, $b(z) = c + (b_0 - c)/D(z)^\\alpha$, where $c, ...

  11. Characterizing the relative role of low-frequency and turbulent processes in the nocturnal boundary layer through the analysis of two-point correlations of the wind components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichrieb, Claudio A.; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Degrazia, Gervásio A.; Moraes, Osvaldo L. L.; Roberti, Débora R.; Zimermann, Hans R.; Santos, Daniel M.; Alves, Rita C. M.

    2013-03-01

    The study presents an analysis of two-point correlations between time series of nocturnal atmospheric wind, obtained from two micrometeorological towers, 45 m horizontally apart, each equipped with two sonic anemometers, 2.5 m vertically apart. It focuses on the scale dependence of the two-point correlations obtained from sensors vertically and horizontally separated. In particular, the role of low-frequency non-turbulent processes in the correlations is assessed, and compared to that of the turbulent scales of motion. The vertical correlations of the streamwise and vertical wind components show little dependence on the turbulence intensity, but those of the spanwise component decrease appreciably as it gets more turbulent. Multiresolution decomposition shows that the two-point correlations become increasingly dominated by low-frequency scales as it gets less turbulent, and that such large-scale processes are largely reduced in fully turbulent conditions. It is also shown that the vertical correlations of the spanwise wind component is negative for very small time scales. Horizontal two-point correlations obtained at the 45 m separation distance between the towers are almost entirely dominated by low-frequency motions, regardless of the turbulence intensity, but the magnitude of such correlations decreases with increasing turbulence intensity for any wind components. A comparison between the horizontal two-point correlations and autocorrelations taken with a time lag given by the ratio of the horizontal separation to the mean wind component in the direction that connects the two towers leads to the conclusion that the statistical properties of turbulence are often preserved over the horizontal distance, despite the lack of turbulence correlations for that separation.

  12. Distinguishing Selection Bias and Confounding Bias in Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneuse, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) aims to provide patients and physicians with evidence-based guidance on treatment decisions. As researchers conduct CER they face myriad challenges. Although inadequate control of confounding is the most-often cited source of potential bias, selection bias that arises when patients are differentially excluded from analyses is a distinct phenomenon with distinct consequences: confounding bias compromises internal validity, whereas selection bias compromises external validity. Despite this distinction, however, the label "treatment-selection bias" is being used in the CER literature to denote the phenomenon of confounding bias. Motivated by an ongoing study of treatment choice for depression on weight change over time, this paper formally distinguishes selection and confounding bias in CER. By formally distinguishing selection and confounding bias, this paper clarifies important scientific, design, and analysis issues relevant to ensuring validity. First is that the 2 types of biases may arise simultaneously in any given study; even if confounding bias is completely controlled, a study may nevertheless suffer from selection bias so that the results are not generalizable to the patient population of interest. Second is that the statistical methods used to mitigate the 2 biases are themselves distinct; methods developed to control one type of bias should not be expected to address the other. Finally, the control of selection and confounding bias will often require distinct covariate information. Consequently, as researchers plan future studies of comparative effectiveness, care must be taken to ensure that all data elements relevant to both confounding and selection bias are collected.

  13. Measuring Agricultural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    . For the 15 sample countries, the results indicate that the agricultural price incentive bias, which was generally perceived to exist during the 1980s, was largely eliminated during the 1990s. The results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics - including trade...... shares and intersectoral linkages - are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of trade policy bias. The GE-ERP measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on agricultural price incentives. A Monte Carlo procedure confirms that the results are robust...

  14. Measuring agricultural policy bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate that the agricul......Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate...... protection measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on relative agricultural price incentives....

  15. Holographic Phase Transition Probed by Nonlocal Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiong Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the viewpoint of holography, the phase structure of a 5-dimensional Reissner-Nordström-AdS black hole is probed by the two-point correlation function, Wilson loop, and entanglement entropy. As the case of thermal entropy, we find for all the probes that the black hole undergoes a Hawking-Page phase transition, a first-order phase transition, and a second-order phase transition successively before it reaches a stable phase. In addition, for these probes, we find that the equal area law for the first-order phase transition is valid always and the critical exponent of the heat capacity for the second-order phase transition coincides with that of the mean field theory regardless of the size of the boundary region.

  16. Aging and attentional biases for emotional faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Mara; Carstensen, Laura L

    2003-09-01

    We examined age differences in attention to and memory for faces expressing sadness, anger, and happiness. Participants saw a pair of faces, one emotional and one neutral, and then a dot probe that appeared in the location of one of the faces. In two experiments, older adults responded faster to the dot if it was presented on the same side as a neutral face than if it was presented on the same side as a negative face. Younger adults did not exhibit this attentional bias. Interactions of age and valence were also found for memory for the faces, with older adults remembering positive better than negative faces. These findings reveal that in their initial attention, older adults avoid negative information. This attentional bias is consistent with older adults' generally better emotional well-being and their tendency to remember negative less well than positive information.

  17. The breadth and mnemonic consequences of the youth bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppel, Jonathan; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    .e., deaths of public figures, US Presidential elections, and sporting events). We then investigated the possible role of the youth bias in structuring recall for public events, by probing, within-subjects, for the relation between: (1) These expectations of the timing, in a typical person’s life, of the most...

  18. Simulating currency substitution bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boon (Martin); C.J.M. Kool (Clemens); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe sign and size of estimates of the elasticity of currency substitution critically depend on the definition of the oppurtunity costs of holding money. We investigate possible biases by means of Monte Carlo experiments, as sufficient real data are not available.

  19. Sex Bias in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalk, Sue Rosenberg; And Others

    This study investigated children's sex biased attitudes as a function of the sex, age, and race of the child as well as a geographical-SES factor. Two attitudes were measured on a 55-item questionnaire: Sex Pride (attributing positive characteristics to a child of the same sex) and Sex Prejudice (attributing negative characteristics to a child of…

  20. Quarter-sweep Gauss-Seidel method with quadratic spline scheme applied to fourth order two-point boundary value problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Fauzi, Norizyan Izzati; Sulaiman, Jumat

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the application of Quarter-Sweep Gauss-Seidel (QSGS) iterative method using quadratic spline scheme for solving fourth order two-point linear boundary value problems. In the line to derive approximation equations, firstly the fourth order problems need to be reduced onto a system of second-order two-point boundary value problems. Then two linear systems have been constructed via discretization process by using the corresponding quarter-sweep quadratic spline approximation equations. The generated linear systems have been solved using the proposed QSGS iterative method to show the superiority over Full-Sweep Gauss-Seidel (FSGS) and Half-Sweep Gauss-Seidel (HSGS) methods. Computational results are provided to illustrate that the effectiveness of the proposed QSGS method is more superior in terms of computational time and number of iterations as compared to other tested methods.

  1. Bias versus bias: harnessing hindsight to reveal paranormal belief change beyond demand characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael J; Core, Tammy J; Hunt, R Reed

    2010-04-01

    Psychological change is difficult to assess, in part because self-reported beliefs and attitudes may be biased or distorted. The present study probed belief change, in an educational context, by using the hindsight bias to counter another bias that generally plagues assessment of subjective change. Although research has indicated that skepticism courses reduce paranormal beliefs, those findings may reflect demand characteristics (biases toward desired, skeptical responses). Our hindsight-bias procedure circumvented demand by asking students, following semester-long skepticism (and control) courses, to recall their precourse levels of paranormal belief. People typically remember themselves as previously thinking, believing, and acting as they do now, so current skepticism should provoke false recollections of previous skepticism. Given true belief change, therefore, skepticism students should have remembered themselves as having been more skeptical than they were. They did, at least about paranormal topics that were covered most extensively in the course. Our findings thus show hindsight to be useful in evaluating cognitive change beyond demand characteristics.

  2. Stueckelberg massive electromagnetism in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spacetimes: Two-point functions and renormalized stress-energy tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Belokogne, Andrei; Queva, Julien

    2016-01-01

    By considering Hadamard vacuum states, we first construct the two-point functions associated with Stueckelberg massive electromagnetism in de Sitter and anti-de Sitter spacetimes. Then, from the general formalism developed in [A. Belokogne and A. Folacci, Phys. Rev. D \\textbf{93}, 044063 (2016)], we obtain an exact analytical expression for the vacuum expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor of the massive vector field propagating in these maximally symmetric spacetimes.

  3. Identifying nonlinear wave interactions in plasmas using two-point measurements a case study of Short Large Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Dudok de Wit, T; Dunlop, M; Luehr, H

    1999-01-01

    A framework is described for estimating Linear growth rates and spectral energy transfers in turbulent wave-fields using two-point measurements. This approach, which is based on Volterra series, is applied to dual satellite data gathered in the vicinity of the Earth's bow shock, where Short Large Amplitude Magnetic Structures (SLAMS) supposedly play a leading role. The analysis attests the dynamic evolution of the SLAMS and reveals an energy cascade toward high-frequency waves.

  4. Existence of Positive Solutions for Two-Point Boundary Value Problems of Nonlinear Finite Discrete Fractional Differential Equations and Its Application

    OpenAIRE

    Caixia Guo; Jianmin Guo; Ying Gao; Shugui Kang

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the two-point boundary value problems of nonlinear finite discrete fractional differential equations. On one hand, we discuss some new properties of the Green function. On the other hand, by using the main properties of Green function and the Krasnoselskii fixed point theorem on cones, some sufficient conditions for the existence of at least one or two positive solutions for the boundary value problem are established.

  5. Working Memory Regulates Trait Anxiety-Related Threat Processing Biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Robert W; Mackintosh, Bundy; Sharma, Dinkar

    2016-12-19

    High trait anxious individuals tend to show biased processing of threat. Correlational evidence suggests that executive control could be used to regulate such threat-processing. On this basis, we hypothesized that trait anxiety-related cognitive biases regarding threat should be exaggerated when executive control is experimentally impaired by loading working memory. In Study 1, 68 undergraduates read ambiguous vignettes under high and low working memory load; later, their interpretations of these vignettes were assessed via a recognition test. Trait anxiety predicted biased interpretation of social threat vignettes under high working memory load, but not under low working memory load. In Study 2, 53 undergraduates completed a dot probe task with fear-conditioned Japanese characters serving as threat stimuli. Trait anxiety predicted attentional bias to the threat stimuli but, again, this only occurred under high working memory load. Interestingly however, actual eye movements toward the threat stimuli were only associated with state anxiety, and this was not moderated by working memory load, suggesting that executive control regulates biased threat-processing downstream of initial input processes such as orienting. These results suggest that cognitive loads can exacerbate trait anxiety-related cognitive biases, and therefore represent a useful tool for assessing cognitive biases in future research. More importantly, since biased threat-processing has been implicated in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety, poor executive control may be a risk factor for anxiety disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Mode-sum construction of the covariant graviton two-point function in the Poincar\\'e patch of de Sitter space

    CERN Document Server

    Fröb, Markus B; Lima, William C C

    2016-01-01

    We construct the graviton two-point function for a two-parameter family of linear covariant gauges in n-dimensional de Sitter space. The construction is performed via the mode-sum method in the Bunch-Davies vacuum in the Poincar\\'e patch, and a Fierz-Pauli mass term is introduced to regularize the infrared (IR) divergences. The resulting two-point function is de Sitter-invariant, and free of IR divergences in the massless limit (for a certain range of parameters) though analytic continuation with respect to the mass for the pure-gauge sector of the two-point function is necessary for this result. This general result agrees with the propagator obtained by analytic continuation from the sphere [Phys. Rev. D 34, 3670 (1986); Class. Quant. Grav. 18, 4317 (2001)]. However, if one starts with strictly zero mass theory, the IR divergences are absent only for a specific value of one of the two parameters, with the other parameter left generic. These findings agree with recent calculations in the Landau (exact) gauge ...

  7. An Eye Tracking Investigation of Attentional Biases towards Affect in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, Jessica L.; Barry-Anwar, Ryan A.; Rivera, Susan M.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines attentional biases in the presence of angry, happy and neutral faces using a modified eye tracking version of the dot probe task (DPT). Participants were 111 young children between 9 and 48 months. Children passively viewed an affective attention bias task that consisted of a face pairing (neutral paired with either neutral,…

  8. Large-scale bias of dark matter halos

    CERN Document Server

    Valageas, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    We build a simple analytical model for the bias of dark matter halos that applies to objects defined by an arbitrary density threshold, $200\\leq\\delta\\leq 1600$, and that provides accurate predictions from low-mass to high-mass halos. We point out that it is possible to build simple and efficient models, with no free parameter for the halo bias, by using integral constraints that govern the behavior of low-mass and typical halos, whereas the properties of rare massive halos are derived through explicit asymptotic approaches. We also describe how to take into account the impact of halo motions on their bias, using their linear displacement field. We obtain a good agreement with numerical simulations for the halo mass functions and large-scale bias at redshifts $0\\leq z \\leq 2.5$, for halos defined by nonlinear density threshold $200\\leq\\delta\\leq 1600$. We also evaluate the impact on the halo bias of two common approximations, i) neglecting halo motions, and ii) linearizing the halo two-point correlation.

  9. Temperature trend biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  10. Bias in collegiate courts

    OpenAIRE

    Olowofoyeku, AA

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the issues attending common law collegiate courts’ engagements with allegations of bias within their own ranks. It will be argued that, in such cases, it would be inappropriate to involve the collegiate panel or any member thereof in the decision, since such involvement inevitably encounters difficulties. The common law’s dilemmas require drastic solutions, but the common law arguably is illequipped to implement the required change. The answer, it will be argued, is ...

  11. The planar two point algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Booij; Z. Zivkovic

    2009-01-01

    Vision-based localization, mapping and navigation is often performed by searching for corresponding image points and estimating the epipolar geometry. It is known that the possible relative poses of a camera mounted on a mobile robot that moves over a planar ground floor, has two degrees of freedom.

  12. The Effect of Colour and Size on Attentional Bias to Alcohol-Related Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil R.; McCann, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Attentional bias plays an important role in the development and maintenance of alcohol addiction, and has often been measured with a visual probe task, where reaction times are compared for probes replacing either a substance-related cue or a neutral cue. Systematic low-level differences between image classes are a potential cause of low internal…

  13. Exchange bias measurements of CoFe/IrMn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H.; Dahlberg, E. Dan; Hou, C.

    2001-06-01

    The exchange bias anisotropy field in CoFe/IrMn ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers has been investigated by two different experimental probes. One was the traditional hysteresis loop shift technique and the other was a recently developed technique which monitors small reversible rotations of the magnetization with the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). All the samples show approximately twice the exchange bias anisotropy field measured with the AMR technique compared to that measured with the traditional hysteresis loop method. Based on similar experiments in other materials, there is a portion of the exchange bias uniaxial anisotropy which rotates in a hysteresis loop measurement. It is surmised it is this energy which the hysteresis loop technique neglects and that the AMR technique is a better measure of the exchange bias anisotropy energy. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Behavioral Biases in Interpersonal Contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Liu (Ning)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis presents evidence suggesting that the same types of biases in individual decision making under uncertainty pertain in interpersonal contexts. The chapters above demonstrate in specific contexts how specific interpersonal factors attenuate, amplify, or replicate these bias

  15. Far-from-equilibrium initial conditions probed by a nonlocal observable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahkarami, L.; Ebrahim, H.; Ali-Akbari, M.; Charmchi, F.

    2017-10-01

    Using the gauge/gravity duality, we investigate the evolution of an out-of-equilibrium strongly-coupled plasma from the viewpoint of the two-point function of scalar gauge-invariant operators with large conformal dimension. This system is out of equilibrium due to the presence of anisotropy and/or a massive scalar field. Considering various functions for the initial anisotropy and scalar field, we conclude that the effect of the anisotropy on the evolution of the two-point function is considerably more than the effect of the scalar field. We also show that the ordering of the equilibration time of the one-point function for the non-probe scalar field and the correlation function between two points with a fixed separation can be reversed by changing the initial configuration of the plasma, when the system is out of the equilibrium due to the presence of at least two different sources like our problem. In addition, we find the equilibration time of the two-point function to be linearly increasing with respect to the separation of the two points with a fixed slope, regardless of the initial configuration that we start with. Finally we observe that, for larger separations the geodesic connecting two points on the boundary crosses the event horizon after it has reached its final equilibrium value, meaning that the two-point function can probe behind the event horizon.

  16. Assessing Bias in Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowshowitz, Abbe; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the measurement of bias in search engines on the Web, defining bias as the balance and representation of items in a collection retrieved from a database for a set of queries. Assesses bias by measuring the deviation from the ideal of the distribution produced by a particular search engine. (Author/LRW)

  17. Comparison of two point-of-care testing (POCT) methods for glycated haemoglobin(HbA1c) testing%糖化血红蛋白两种床旁检测方法性能的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王薇; 杨雪; 胡丽涛; 王治国

    2012-01-01

    目的 比较两种H bA1c床旁检测方法的性能.方法 通过对已发表的两种HbA1c床旁检测方法(POC A,POC B)与两种中心实验室仪器(Central X,Central Y)验证试验的数据分析得到两种HbA1c床旁检测仪器与中心实验室仪器相比的不精密度(CV%)、偏倚(Bias%),并将其与质量要求进行比较.结果 POC A测定HbA1c在6.0%和10.4%浓度水平时的变异系数(CV)分别为3.8%、3.7%,与中心实验室仪器(Central X)比对测得的偏倚分别为10.33%、13.58%,与中心实验室仪器(Central Y)比对得到的偏倚分别为7.83%、10.44%;POCB测定HbA1 c在5.5%和11.9%浓度水平时的CV分别为3.4%、7.3%,与CentralX比对测得的偏倚分别为0.45%、11.08%,与CentralY比对得到的偏倚分别为3.73%、9.57%.结论 两种HbA1c床旁检测方法的性能不能满足目前对HbA1 c检测的质量要求.%Objective To evaluate the performance of two point-of-care testing (POCT) methods for HbA1c testing. Methods Using published data from a study, the two POCT HbA1c devices with two central laboratory instruments for HbA1c measurement were compared. The imprecision bias for the two methods of POC A and POC B was determined by verification tests with two central laboratory instruments of Central X and Central Y, from the published data, and then was compared with the requirement of quality. Results At HbA, c level 6. 0% and 10. 4%, the total CV of POC A was 3. 8% and 3. 7% respectively and when comparing with Central X, the bias of POC A was 10. 33% and 13. 58%. Comparing with Central Y, the bias was 7. 83% and 10. 44%. At A,C level 5. 5% and 11. 9% the total CV of POC B was 3. 4%, 7. 3% respectively, and when comparing with Central X, the bias was 0. 45% and 11. 08%. Comparing with Central Y, the bias was 3. 73% and 9. 57%respectively. Conclusions The performance of the two methods for HbA1c testing cannot meet the current quality requirements for the HbA1c testing .

  18. Two-point spin-1/2-spin-1/2 sl(2,bfC) conformal Kac-Moody blocks on the torus and their monodromies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyrnakis, J.M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    1995-10-02

    Two issues of the SU(2) Wess-Zumino-Witten model are examined here, namely the computation of the untwisted conformal Kac-Moody blocks on the torus and their monodromy representations. Using the free field representation developed by Bernard and Felder, an integral representation of the twisted two point spin-1/2-spin-1/2 conformal Kac-Moody blocks on the torus is computed. From this, an integral representation of the untwisted blocks is computed after careful removal of infinities. Finally, the untwisted blocks are used to get a representation of the Braid Group on the torus on two strings, in terms of quantum group q-numbers. (orig.).

  19. Bias aware Kalman filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, J.-P.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2006-01-01

    . The colored noise filter formulation is extended to correct both time correlated and uncorrelated model error components. A more stable version of the separate filter without feedback is presented. The filters are implemented in an ensemble framework using Latin hypercube sampling. The techniques...... are illustrated on a simple one-dimensional groundwater problem. The results show that the presented filters outperform the standard Kalman filter and that the implementations with bias feedback work in more general conditions than the implementations without feedback. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  1. The Anisotropic Line Correlation Function as a Probe of Anisotropies in Galaxy Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Eggemeier, Alexander; Smith, Robert E; Niemeyer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We propose an anisotropic generalisation of the line correlation function (ALCF) to separate and quantify phase information in the large-scale structure of galaxies. The line correlation function probes the strictly non-linear regime of structure formation and since phase information drops out of the power spectrum, the line correlation function provides a complementary tool to commonly used techniques based on two-point statistics. Furthermore, it is independent of linear bias as well as the Gaussian variance on the modulus of the density field and thus may also prove to be advantageous compared to the bispectrum or similar higher-order statistics for certain cases. For future applications it is vital, though, to be able to account for observational effects that cause anisotropies in the distribution of galaxies. Based on a number of numerical studies, we find that our ALCF is well suited to accomplish this task and we demonstrate how the Alcock-Paczynski effect and kinematical redshift-space distortions can...

  2. Attentional biases for emotional faces in young children of mothers with chronic or recurrent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawa, Autumn J; Torpey, Dana; Kim, Jiyon; Hajcak, Greg; Rose, Suzanne; Gotlib, Ian H; Klein, Daniel N

    2011-01-01

    Attentional biases for negative stimuli have been observed in school-age and adolescent children of depressed mothers and may reflect a vulnerability to depression. The direction of these biases and whether they can be identified in early childhood remains unclear. The current study examined attentional biases in 5-7-year-old children of depressed and non-depressed mothers. Following a mood induction, children participated in a dot-probe task assessing biases for sad and happy faces. There was a significant interaction of group and sex: daughters of depressed mothers attended selectively to sad faces, while children of controls and sons of depressed mothers did not exhibit biases. No effects were found for happy stimuli. These findings suggest that attentional biases are discernible in early childhood and may be vulnerability markers for depression. The results also raise the possibility that sex differences in cognitive biases are evident before the emergence of sex differences in the prevalence of depression.

  3. Automated two-point dixon screening for the evaluation of hepatic steatosis and siderosis: comparison with R2*-relaxometry and chemical shift-based sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henninger, B.; Rauch, S.; Schocke, M.; Jaschke, W.; Kremser, C. [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Zoller, H. [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Internal Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Kannengiesser, S. [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, MR Applications Development, Erlangen (Germany); Zhong, X. [Siemens Healthcare, MR R and D Collaborations, Atlanta, GA (United States); Reiter, G. [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, MR R and D Collaborations, Graz (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the automated two-point Dixon screening sequence for the detection and estimated quantification of hepatic iron and fat compared with standard sequences as a reference. One hundred and two patients with suspected diffuse liver disease were included in this prospective study. The following MRI protocol was used: 3D-T1-weighted opposed- and in-phase gradient echo with two-point Dixon reconstruction and dual-ratio signal discrimination algorithm (''screening'' sequence); fat-saturated, multi-gradient-echo sequence with 12 echoes; gradient-echo T1 FLASH opposed- and in-phase. Bland-Altman plots were generated and correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the sequences. The screening sequence diagnosed fat in 33, iron in 35 and a combination of both in 4 patients. Correlation between R2* values of the screening sequence and the standard relaxometry was excellent (r = 0.988). A slightly lower correlation (r = 0.978) was found between the fat fraction of the screening sequence and the standard sequence. Bland-Altman revealed systematically lower R2* values obtained from the screening sequence and higher fat fraction values obtained with the standard sequence with a rather high variability in agreement. The screening sequence is a promising method with fast diagnosis of the predominant liver disease. It is capable of estimating the amount of hepatic fat and iron comparable to standard methods. (orig.)

  4. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat $\\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\\Lambda$CDM) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of >68,000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino backgrou...

  5. Editorial bias in scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, J; García-Ramos, R

    2011-01-01

    Many authors believe that there are biases in scientific publications. Editorial biases include publication bias; which refers to those situations where the results influence the editor's decision, and editorial bias refers to those situations where factors related with authors or their environment influence the decision. This paper includes an analysis of the situation of editorial biases. One bias is where mainly articles with positive results are accepted, as opposed to those with negative results. Another is latent bias, where positive results are published before those with negative results. In order to examine editorial bias, this paper analyses the influence of where the article originated; the country or continent, academic centre of origin, belonging to cooperative groups, and the maternal language of the authors. The article analyses biases in the editorial process in the publication of funded clinical trials. Editorial biases exists. Authors, when submitting their manuscript, should analyse different journals and decide where their article will receive adequate treatment. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. 图片点探测任务法观察加压诱发的实验性疼痛对健康人注意偏向的影响%The effect of experimental pain on attentional bias in a pictorial dot-probe task

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗艳琳; 崔敏; 杨延辉; 窦鑫; 于洋; 韩松; 李俊发

    2012-01-01

    目的 采用图片点探测任务法观察加压诱发的实验性疼痛对健康人注意偏向的影响.方法 健康大学生志愿受试者32例,在受试者左侧上臂肘横纹上1~2cm处捆绑血压计的止血带,加压到26.66kPa并维持这个压力10min来诱发疼痛.在加压(诱发疼痛)或不加压(无痛)情况下进行正性、负性和中性三类情绪图片点探测认知实验.记录受试者进行认知任务的反应时和错误率,同时记录受试者的实时疼痛强度和疼痛不适度.结果 采用左上臂26.66kPa持续加压10min诱发受试者出现中重度疼痛强度(4.9±1.6)与疼痛不适度(4.8±1.8).结果显示,在无加压(F(1,2)=10.37,P=0.002)与加压实验(F(1.2)=8.16,P=0.005)中,男性受试者的反应时[无加压(482±73)ms,加压(466±82)ms]均短于女性受试者[无加压(536±90)ms,加压(519±100)ms],差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01).加压疼痛时错误率为(2.38±1.49)%,明显高于无加压的(1.09±0.82)%,差异有统计学意义(F(1,2)=10.89,P=0.001);且在加压疼痛实验中,对负性图片加工的错误率为(3.81±1.73)%,显著高于正性图片的(1.66±0.97)%和中性图片(1.68±0.80)%(P<0.05).偏向指数结果显示,在加压疼痛与无加压条件下,受试者对正性图片[加压实验(-5.1±4.8)ms和无加压实验(-4.6±4.0)ms]和负性图片[加压实验(-3.43±6.0)ms和无加压实验(-0.79+4.1)ms]均存在轻度注意回避倾向,且加压疼痛与无加压条件比较,偏向指数差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 加压疼痛影响图片点探测任务的错误率,且对负性图片错误率的影响最为显著.%Objective To investigate the effect of moderate pain on attentional bias towards emotional pictures among healthy subjects.Methods Thirty-two healthy college students aged from 17 to 26 (21.8±2.2;16 males and 16 females) participated in this study.A tourniquet was tied to each subject's left upper arm 1 to 2cm above the cubits horizontal grain

  7. Publication and other reporting biases in cognitive sciences: detection, prevalence, and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, John P A; Munafò, Marcus R; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Nosek, Brian A; David, Sean P

    2014-05-01

    Recent systematic reviews and empirical evaluations of the cognitive sciences literature suggest that publication and other reporting biases are prevalent across diverse domains of cognitive science. In this review, we summarize the various forms of publication and reporting biases and other questionable research practices, and overview the available methods for probing into their existence. We discuss the available empirical evidence for the presence of such biases across the neuroimaging, animal, other preclinical, psychological, clinical trials, and genetics literature in the cognitive sciences. We also highlight emerging solutions (from study design to data analyses and reporting) to prevent bias and improve the fidelity in the field of cognitive science research.

  8. Outcome predictability biases learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Oren; Mitchell, Chris J; Bethmont, Anna; Lovibond, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Much of contemporary associative learning research is focused on understanding how and when the associative history of cues affects later learning about those cues. Very little work has investigated the effects of the associative history of outcomes on human learning. Three experiments extended the "learned irrelevance" paradigm from the animal conditioning literature to examine the influence of an outcome's prior predictability on subsequent learning of relationships between cues and that outcome. All 3 experiments found evidence for the idea that learning is biased by the prior predictability of the outcome. Previously predictable outcomes were readily associated with novel predictive cues, whereas previously unpredictable outcomes were more readily associated with novel nonpredictive cues. This finding highlights the importance of considering the associative history of outcomes, as well as cues, when interpreting multistage designs. Associative and cognitive explanations of this certainty matching effect are discussed.

  9. Treatment with escitalopram improves the attentional bias toward negative facial expressions in patients with major depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenhe; Cao, Suxia; Li, Hengfen; Li, Youhui

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesized that treatment with escitalopram would improve cognitive bias and contribute to the recovery process for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Many previous studies have established that patients with MDD tend to pay selective attention to negative stimuli. The assessment of the level of cognitive bias is regarded as a crucial dimension of treatment outcomes for MDD. To our knowledge, no prior studies have been reported on the effects of treatment with escitalopram on attentional bias in MDD, employing a dot probe task of facial expression. We studied 25 patients with MDD and 25 controls, and used a dot probe task of facial expression to measure cognitive bias. The patients' psychopathologies were rated using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram. All participants performed the facial expression dot probe task. The results revealed that the 8 week escitalopram treatment decreased the HAMD scores. The patients with MDD at baseline exhibited an attentional bias towards negative faces, however, no significant bias toward either negative or happy faces were observed in the controls. After the 8 week escitalopram treatment, no significant bias toward negative faces was observed in the patient group. In conclusion, patients with MDD pay more attention to negative facial expressions, and treatment with escitalopram improves this attentional bias toward negative facial expressions. This is the first study, to our knowledge, on the effects of treatment with escitalopram on attentional bias in patients with MDD that has employed a dot probe task of facial expression.

  10. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  11. Dynamics of single photon transport in a one-dimensional waveguide two-point coupled with a Jaynes-Cummings system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwen; Zhang, Yongyou; Zhang, Qingyun; Zou, Bingsuo; Schwingenschlogl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of an ultrafast single photon pulse in a one-dimensional waveguide two-point coupled with a Jaynes-Cummings system. We find that for any single photon input the transmissivity depends periodically on the separation between the two coupling points. For a pulse containing many plane wave components it is almost impossible to suppress transmission, especially when the width of the pulse is less than 20 times the period. In contrast to plane wave input, the waveform of the pulse can be modified by controlling the coupling between the waveguide and Jaynes-Cummings system. Tailoring of the waveform is important for single photon manipulation in quantum informatics. PMID:27653770

  12. A procedure for tuning automatic controllers with determining a second-order plant model with time delay from two points of a complex frequency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzishchin, V. F.; Petrov, S. V.

    2012-10-01

    The problem of obtaining the mathematical model of a plant in the course of adaptively tuning the operating automatic closed-loop control systems is considered. A new method is proposed for calculating the parameters of a model with four free coefficients represented by two inertial sections with a time delay. The model parameters are calculated from the data of experiments on determining two points of a plant's complex frequency response. The results from checking the performance of the method in combination with obtaining information on the plant dynamics by applying the Fourier transform to the impulse transient response of the system are presented. The PID controller is tuned using a parameter scanning algorithm with directly checking the amplitude-frequency response of the closed-loop system, using which the stability margin can be calculated and different quality criteria can be applied.

  13. New algorithms for solving third- and fifth-order two point boundary value problems based on nonsymmetric generalized Jacobi Petrov-Galerkin method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doha, E H; Abd-Elhameed, W M; Youssri, Y H

    2015-09-01

    Two families of certain nonsymmetric generalized Jacobi polynomials with negative integer indexes are employed for solving third- and fifth-order two point boundary value problems governed by homogeneous and nonhomogeneous boundary conditions using a dual Petrov-Galerkin method. The idea behind our method is to use trial functions satisfying the underlying boundary conditions of the differential equations and the test functions satisfying the dual boundary conditions. The resulting linear systems from the application of our method are specially structured and they can be efficiently inverted. The use of generalized Jacobi polynomials simplify the theoretical and numerical analysis of the method and also leads to accurate and efficient numerical algorithms. The presented numerical results indicate that the proposed numerical algorithms are reliable and very efficient.

  14. Dynamics of single photon transport in a one-dimensional waveguide two-point coupled with a Jaynes-Cummings system

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuwen

    2016-09-22

    We study the dynamics of an ultrafast single photon pulse in a one-dimensional waveguide two-point coupled with a Jaynes-Cummings system. We find that for any single photon input the transmissivity depends periodically on the separation between the two coupling points. For a pulse containing many plane wave components it is almost impossible to suppress transmission, especially when the width of the pulse is less than 20 times the period. In contrast to plane wave input, the waveform of the pulse can be modified by controlling the coupling between the waveguide and Jaynes-Cummings system. Tailoring of the waveform is important for single photon manipulation in quantum informatics. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Theoretical investigation of exchange bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Zhi-Jie; Wang Huai-Yu; Ding Ze-Jun

    2007-01-01

    The exchange bias of bilayer magnetic films consisting of ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) layers in an uncompensated case is studied by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory.The effects of the layer thickness and temperature and the interfacial coupling strength on the exchange bias HE are investigated. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM layer thickness and temperature is qualitatively in agreement with experimental results. When temperature varies, both the coercivity HC and HE decrease with the temperature increasing. For each FM thickness, there exists a least AFM thickness in which the exchange bias occurs,which is called pinning thickness.

  16. Non-local bias contribution to third-order galaxy correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Bel, Julien; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    We study halo clustering bias with second- and third-order statistics of halo and matter density fields in the MICE Grand Challenge simulation. We verify that two-point correlations deliver reliable estimates of the linear bias parameters at large scales, while estimations from the variance can be significantly affected by non-linear and possibly non-local contributions to the bias function. Combining three-point auto- and cross-correlations we find, for the first time in configuration space, evidence for the presence of such non-local contributions. These contributions are consistent with predicted second-order non-local effects on the bias functions originating from the dark matter tidal field. Samples of massive haloes show indications of bias (local or non-local) beyond second order. Ignoring non-local bias causes $20-30$\\% and $5-10$\\% overestimation of the linear bias from three-point auto- and cross-correlations respectively. We study two third-order bias estimators which are not affected by second-ord...

  17. Deadly Attraction - Attentional Bias toward Preferred Cigarette Brand in Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaradzka, Ewa; Bielecki, Maksymilian

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that biases in visual attention might be evoked by affective and personally relevant stimuli, for example addiction-related objects. Despite the fact that addiction is often linked to specific products and systematic purchase behaviors, no studies focused directly on the existence of bias evoked by brands. Smokers are characterized by high levels of brand loyalty and everyday contact with cigarette packaging. Using the incentive-salience mechanism as a theoretical framework, we hypothesized that this group might exhibit a bias toward the preferred cigarette brand. In our study, a group of smokers (N = 40) performed a dot probe task while their eye movements were recorded. In every trial a pair of pictures was presented - each of them showed a single cigarette pack. The visual properties of stimuli were carefully controlled, so branding information was the key factor affecting subjects' reactions. For each participant, we compared gaze behavior related to the preferred vs. other brands. The analyses revealed no attentional bias in the early, orienting phase of the stimulus processing and strong differences in maintenance and disengagement. Participants spent more time looking at the preferred cigarettes and saccades starting at the preferred brand location had longer latencies. In sum, our data shows that attentional bias toward brands might be found in situations not involving choice or decision making. These results provide important insights into the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of attentional biases to stimuli of personal relevance and might serve as a first step toward developing new attitude measurement techniques.

  18. Effects of Cognitive Bias Modification Training via Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranming Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Negative cognitive biases have been linked to anxiety and mood problems. Accumulated data from laboratory studies show that positive and negative interpretation styles with accompanying changes in mood can be induced through cognitive bias modification (CBM paradigms. Despite the therapeutic potential of positive training effects, few studies have explored training paradigms administered via smartphones. The current study aimed to compare the effectiveness of three different types of training programmes (cognitive bias modification-attention, CBM-A; cognitive bias modification-interpretation, CBM-I; attention and interpretation modification, AIM administered via smart-phones by using a control condition (CC.Methods:Seventy-six undergraduate participants with high social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, LSAS ≥ 30 were randomly assigned to four groups: CBM-A (n = 20, CBM-I (n = 20, AIM (n = 16, and CC (n = 20.Results: The results showed that the effects of CBM training, CBM-I training, or AIM training vs. CC for attention yielded no significant differences in dot-probe attention bias scores. The CBM-I group showed significantly less threat interpretation and more benign interpretation than the CC group on interpretation bias scores.Conclusions: The present results supported the feasibility of delivering CBM-I via smartphones, but the effectiveness of CBM-A and AIM training via smartphones was limited.

  19. The breadth and mnemonic consequences of the youth bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppel, Jonathan; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    .e., deaths of public figures, US Presidential elections, and sporting events). We then investigated the possible role of the youth bias in structuring recall for public events, by probing, within-subjects, for the relation between: (1) These expectations of the timing, in a typical person’s life, of the most...... question were correlated with the age at which the recalled event occurred, but only where particularly salient historical events did not play a central role in driving recall (i.e., for sporting events). We conclude that the youth bias holds across different types of public events and provides a default......We have recently demonstrated the existence of the youth bias, referring to a tendency to favor adolescence and early adulthood over other lifetime periods when making inferences about the timing of important public events across the lifespan of a typical individual within one’s culture. The youth...

  20. An improved probe noise approach for acoustic feedback cancellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    -state error of the adaptive algorithm in a multiple-microphone and single-loudspeaker audio system. This is obtained through a specifically designed probe noise signal and a corresponding probe noise enhancement strategy. We show the effects of the proposed probe noise approach by deriving analytical......The perhaps most challenging problem in acoustic feedback cancellation using adaptive filters is the bias problem. It is well-known that a probe noise approach can effectively prevent this problem. However, when the probe noise must be inaudible and the steady-state error of the adaptive filter...... must be unchanged, this approach causes a significantly decreased convergence rate of the adaptive filter, and might thereby be less useful in practical applications. In this work, we propose a new probe noise approach which significantly increases the convergence rate while maintaining the steady...

  1. Probing the electronic properties of p-doped gallium arsenide nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Probing the electronic properties of nm-scaled object is a challenge but is required for doping optimalization and using the nm-scaled objects as building blocks in future devices. In the present study, electron beam induced deposition of platinum was used for contacting and creating two-point probes to beryllium-doped gallium arsenide nanowires. Thereby, a metal-semiconductor-metal structure with rectifying metal-semiconductor contact characteristic is formed (i.e. back-to-back Schottky diod...

  2. Attentional bias in snus users: an experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Aune Mentzoni

    Full Text Available The use of nicotine in the form of "snus" is substantial and increasing in some geographic areas, in particular among young people. It has previously been suggested that addictions may operate through a mechanism of attentional bias, in which stimuli representative of the dependent substance increase in salience, thus increasing the addictive behavior. However, this hypothesis has not been tested for the case of snus. The current experiment used a modified Stroop task and a dot-probe task to investigate whether 40 snus users show an attentional bias towards snus-relevant stimuli, compared to 40 non-snus users. There were no significant differences between the two groups on reaction times or accuracy on either Stroop or dot-probe task, thus failing to show an attentional bias towards snus-relevant stimuli for snus users. This could imply that other mechanisms may contribute to maintenance of snus use than for other addictions. However, this is the first experimental study investigating attentional bias in snus users, and more research is warranted.

  3. Attention bias modification in specific fears: Spiders versus snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xijia; Ikani, Nessa; Barth, Anja; Rengers, Lea; Becker, Eni; Rinck, Mike

    2015-12-01

    Attention Bias Modification (ABM) is used to manipulate attention biases in anxiety disorders. It has been successful in reducing attention biases and anxious symptoms in social anxiety and generalized anxiety, but not yet in specific fears and phobias. We designed a new version of the dot-probe training task, aiming to train fearful participants' attention away from or towards pictures of threatening stimuli. Moreover, we studied whether the training also affected participants' avoidance behavior and their physical arousal upon being confronted with a real threat object. In Experiment 1, students with fear of spiders were trained. We found that the attention manipulation was successful, but the training failed to affect behavior or arousal. In Experiment 2, the same procedure was used on snake-fearful students. Again, attention was trained in the expected directions. Moreover, participants whose attention had been trained away from snakes showed lower physiological arousal upon being confronted with a real snake. The study involved healthy students with normal distribution of the fear of spider/snake. Future research with clinical sample could help with determining the generalizability of the current findings. The effect of ABM on specific phobia is still in question. The finding in the present study suggested the possibility to alter attentional bias with a dot-probe task with general positive stimuli and this training could even affect the behavior while encountering a real threat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  5. Bias in clinical intervention research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2006-01-01

    Research on bias in clinical trials may help identify some of the reasons why investigators sometimes reach the wrong conclusions about intervention effects. Several quality components for the assessment of bias control have been suggested, but although they seem intrinsically valid, empirical...

  6. Bias in the Mass Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Robert

    Non-language elements of bias in mass media--such as images, sounds, tones of voices, inflection, and facial expressions--are invariably integrated with the choice of language. Further, they have an emotional impact that is often greater than that of language. It is essential that the teacher of English deal with this non-language bias since it is…

  7. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  8. Attentional bias to respiratory- and anxiety-related threat in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, Helen; Newman, Emily; Sharp, Kirstin; McMurray, Ann

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated attentional biases in children with asthma. The study aimed at testing whether children with asthma are vigilant to asthma and/or anxiety cues. Thirty-six children (18 with asthma and 18 healthy controls) aged 9-12 completed a computerised dot probe task designed to measure attentional bias to three different categories of words: asthma, anxiety symptom and general negative emotion. Main caregiver anxiety was also assessed, as was frequency of inhaler use for those with asthma. Children with asthma showed an attentional bias towards asthma words but not anxiety or general negative emotion words. Children without asthma showed no significant attentional biases to any word categories. Caregiver anxiety was correlated with asthma word attentional bias in the asthma group. The findings indicate that attentional bias is present in children with asthma. Further research is required to ascertain if this exacerbates or maintains health-related problems.

  9. Large-Scale Galaxy Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, Vincent; Schmidt, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of galaxy bias, that is, the statistical relation between the distribution of galaxies and matter. We focus on large scales where cosmic density fields are quasi-linear. On these scales, the clustering of galaxies can be described by a perturbative bias expansion, and the complicated physics of galaxy formation is absorbed by a finite set of coefficients of the expansion, called bias parameters. The review begins with a pedagogical proof of this very important result, which forms the basis of the rigorous perturbative description of galaxy clustering, under the assumptions of General Relativity and Gaussian, adiabatic initial conditions. Key components of the bias expansion are all leading local gravitational observables, which includes the matter density but also tidal fields and their time derivatives. We hence expand the definition of local bias to encompass all these contributions. This derivation is followed by a presentation of the peak-background split in i...

  10. Publication bias in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Nazish

    2011-06-01

    Communication of research findings is the utmost responsibility of all scientists. Publication bias occurs if scientific studies with negative or null results fail to get published. This can happen due to bias in submitting, reviewing, accepting, publishing or aggregating scientific literature that fails to show positive results on a particular topic. Publication bias can make scientific literature unrepresentative of the actual research studies. This can give the reader a false impression about the beneficial effects of a particular treatment or intervention and can influence clinical decision making. Publication bias is more common than it is actually considered to be, but there are ways to detect and prevent it. This paper comments on the occurrence, types and consequences of publication bias and the strategies employed to detect and control it.

  11. Non-perturbative aspects of Euclidean Yang-Mills theories in linear covariant gauges: Nielsen identities and a BRST invariant two-point correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Capri, M A L; Pereira, A D; Fiorentini, D; Guimaraes, M S; Mintz, B W; Palhares, L F; Sorella, S P

    2016-01-01

    In order to construct a gauge invariant two-point function in a Yang-Mills theory, we propose the use of the all-order gauge invariant transverse configurations A^h. Such configurations can be obtained through the minimization of the functional A^2_{min} along the gauge orbit within the BRST invariant formulation of the Gribov-Zwanziger framework recently put forward in [1,2] for the class of the linear covariant gauges. This correlator turns out to provide a characterization of non-perturbative aspects of the theory in a BRST invariant and gauge parameter independent way. In particular, it turns out that the poles of are the same as those of the transverse part of the gluon propagator, which are also formally shown to be independent of the gauge parameter entering the gauge condition through the Nielsen identities. The latter follow from the new exact BRST invariant formulation introduced before. Moreover, the correlator enables us to attach a BRST invariant meaning to the possible positivity violation of ...

  12. A Parameter-Uniform Finite Difference Method for a Coupled System of Convection-Diffusion Two-Point Boundary Value Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eugene O'Riordan; Jeanne Stynes; Martin Stynes

    2008-01-01

    A system of m (≥ 2) linear convection-diffusion two-point boundary value problems is examined, where the diffusion term in each equation is multiplied by a small parameter e and the equations are coupled through their convective and reactive terms via matrices B and A respectively. This system is in general singularly perturbed. Unlike the case of a single equation, it does not satisfy a conventional maximum princi-ple. Certain hypotheses are placed on the coupling matrices B and A that ensure exis-tence and uniqueness of a solution to the system and also permit boundary layers in the components of this solution at only one endpoint of the domain; these hypotheses can be regarded as a strong form of diagonal dominance of B. This solution is decomposed into a sum of regular and layer components. Bounds are established on these compo-nents and their derivatives to show explicitly their dependence on the small parameterε. Finally, numerical methods consisting of upwinding on piecewise-uniform Shishkin meshes are proved to yield numerical solutions that are essentially first-order conver-gent, uniformly in ε, to the true solution in the discrete maximum norm. Numerical results on Shishkin meshes are presented to support these theoretical bounds.

  13. Investigation of a 2D two-point maximum entropy regularization method for signal-to-noise ratio enhancement: application to CT polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jirasek, A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Matthews, Q [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Hilts, M [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency-Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria BC V8R 6V5 (Canada); Schulze, G [Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Blades, M W [Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Turner, R F B [Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2006-05-21

    This study presents a new method of image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement by utilizing a newly developed 2D two-point maximum entropy regularization method (TPMEM). When utilized as an image filter, it is shown that 2D TPMEM offers unsurpassed flexibility in its ability to balance the complementary requirements of image smoothness and fidelity. The technique is evaluated for use in the enhancement of x-ray computed tomography (CT) images of irradiated polymer gels used in radiation dosimetry. We utilize a range of statistical parameters (e.g. root-mean square error, correlation coefficient, error histograms, Fourier data) to characterize the performance of TPMEM applied to a series of synthetic images of varying initial SNR. These images are designed to mimic a range of dose intensity patterns that would occur in x-ray CT polymer gel radiation dosimetry. Analysis is extended to a CT image of a polymer gel dosimeter irradiated with a stereotactic radiation therapy dose distribution. Results indicate that TPMEM performs strikingly well on radiation dosimetry data, significantly enhancing the SNR of noise-corrupted images (SNR enhancement factors >15 are possible) while minimally distorting the original image detail (as shown by the error histograms and Fourier data). It is also noted that application of this new TPMEM filter is not restricted exclusively to x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry image data but can in future be extended to a wide range of radiation dosimetry data.

  14. Investigation of a 2D two-point maximum entropy regularization method for signal-to-noise ratio enhancement: application to CT polymer gel dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirasek, A; Matthews, Q; Hilts, M; Schulze, G; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2006-05-21

    This study presents a new method of image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement by utilizing a newly developed 2D two-point maximum entropy regularization method (TPMEM). When utilized as an image filter, it is shown that 2D TPMEM offers unsurpassed flexibility in its ability to balance the complementary requirements of image smoothness and fidelity. The technique is evaluated for use in the enhancement of x-ray computed tomography (CT) images of irradiated polymer gels used in radiation dosimetry. We utilize a range of statistical parameters (e.g. root-mean square error, correlation coefficient, error histograms, Fourier data) to characterize the performance of TPMEM applied to a series of synthetic images of varying initial SNR. These images are designed to mimic a range of dose intensity patterns that would occur in x-ray CT polymer gel radiation dosimetry. Analysis is extended to a CT image of a polymer gel dosimeter irradiated with a stereotactic radiation therapy dose distribution. Results indicate that TPMEM performs strikingly well on radiation dosimetry data, significantly enhancing the SNR of noise-corrupted images (SNR enhancement factors >15 are possible) while minimally distorting the original image detail (as shown by the error histograms and Fourier data). It is also noted that application of this new TPMEM filter is not restricted exclusively to x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry image data but can in future be extended to a wide range of radiation dosimetry data.

  15. One- and two-point velocity distribution functions and velocity autocorrelation functions for various Reynolds numbers in decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Iwao

    2007-01-01

    A decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence is treated on the combined bases of the Kolmogorov hypothesis and the cross-independence hypothesis (for a closure of the Monin-Lundgren (ML) hierarchy of many-point velocity distributions) in turbulence. Similarity solutions for one- and two-point velocity distributions are obtained in the viscous, inertial and large-scale ranges of separation distance, from which we can give a reasonable picture of longitudinal and transverse velocity autocorrelation functions for any Reynolds number, even though they are distant from exact solutions of the infinite ML hierarchy. Possibility of non-similarity solutions with other reasonable and more realistic features is unveiled within the same theoretical framework. The cross-independence hypothesis is proved to be inconsistent with the Kolmogorov [1941b. Dissipation of energy in locally isotropic turbulence. Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 32, 16-18.] theory in the inertial range. This is the main factor by which our special strategy (described in Introduction) is taken for solving this problem.

  16. Measurements of the asymmetric, dynamic sheath around a pulse biased sphere immersed in flowing metal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2008-06-13

    A long-probe technique was utilized to record the expansion and retreat of the dynamic sheath around a spherical substrate immersed in pulsed cathode arc metal plasma. Positively biased, long cylindrical probes were placed on the side and downstream of a negatively pulsed biased stainless steel sphere of 1" (25.4 mm) diameter. The amplitude and width of the negative high voltage pulses (HVP) were 2 kV, 5 kV, 10 kV, and 2 mu s, 4 mu s, 10 mu s, respectively. The variation of the probe (electron) current during the HVP is a direct measure for the sheath expansion and retreat. Maximum sheath sizes were determined for the different parameters of the HVP. The expected rarefaction zone behind the biased sphere (wake) due to the fast plasma flow was clearly established and quantified.

  17. Properties of Ultrasound Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Rusina, M.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the measurement properties of ultrasound probes. Ultrasound probes and their parameters significantly affect the quality of the final image. In this work there are described the possibility of measuring the spatial resolution, sensitivity of the probe and measuring the length of the dead zone. Ultrasound phantom ATS Multi Purpose Phantom Type 539 was used for measurements.

  18. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  19. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  20. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  1. Biases from neutrino bias: to worry or not to worry?

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Verde, Licia; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The relation between the halo field and the matter fluctuations (halo bias), in the presence of massive neutrinos depends on the total neutrino mass, massive neutrinos introduce an additional scale-dependence of the bias which is usually neglected in cosmological analyses. We investigate the magnitude of the systematic effect on interesting cosmological parameters induced by neglecting this scale dependence, finding that while it is not a problem for current surveys, it is non-negligible for ...

  2. Scaling behavior of the exchange-bias training effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Binek, Christian

    2008-03-01

    The dependence of the exchange-bias training effect on temperature and ferromagnetic film thickness is studied in detail and scaling behavior of the data is presented.^ Thickness-dependent exchange bias and its training are measured using the magneto-optical Kerr effect. A focused laser beam is scanned across a Co wedge probing local hysteresis loops of the Co film which is pinned by an antiferromagnetic CoO layer of uniform thickness. A phenomenological theory is best fitted to the exchange-bias training data resembling the evolution of the exchange-bias field on subsequently cycled hysteresis loops. Best fits are done for various temperatures and Co thicknesses. Data collapse on respective master curves is achieved for the thickness and temperature-dependent fitting parameters as well as the exchange bias and coercive fields of the initial hysteresis loops. The scaling behavior is strong evidence for the validity and the universality of the underlying theoretical approach based on triggered relaxation of the pinning layer towards quasi-equilibrium. ^Srinivas Polisetty, Sarbeswar Sahoo, Christian Binek, Phys. Rev. B 76, 184423 (2007).

  3. Cognitive biases, linguistic universals, and constraint-based grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Smolensky, Paul; Wilson, Colin

    2013-07-01

    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology-the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages-and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed pattern of results of artificial grammar experiments on noun-phrase word order (Culbertson, Smolensky, & Legendre, 2012). Our proposal has several novel properties that distinguish it from prior work in the domains of linguistic theory, computational cognitive science, and machine learning. This study illustrates how ideas from these domains can be synthesized into a model of language learning in which biases range in strength from hard (absolute) to soft (statistical), and in which language-specific and domain-general biases combine to account for data from the macro-level scale of typological distribution to the micro-level scale of learning by individuals. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  4. Comparison of multimicrophone probe design and processing methods in measuring acoustic intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Curtis P; Gee, Kent L; Blotter, Jonathan D; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Giraud, Jarom H

    2014-05-01

    Three multimicrophone probe arrangements used to measure acoustic intensity are the four-microphone regular tetrahedral, the four-microphone orthogonal, and the six-microphone designs. Finite-sum and finite-difference processing methods can be used with such probes to estimate pressure and particle velocity, respectively. A numerical analysis is performed to investigate the bias inherent in each combination of probe design and processing method. Probes consisting of matched point sensor microphones both embedded and not embedded on the surface of a rigid sphere are considered. Results are given for plane wave fields in terms of root-mean-square average bias and maximum bias as a function of angle of incidence. An experimental verification of the analysis model is described. Of the combinations considered and under the stated conditions, the orthogonal probe using the origin microphone for the pressure estimate is shown to have the lowest amount of intensity magnitude bias. Lowest intensity direction bias comes from the six-microphone probe using an average of the 15 intensity components calculated using all microphone pairs. Also discussed are how multimicrophone probes can advantageously use correction factors calculated from a numerical analysis and how the results of such an analysis depend on the chosen definition of the dimensionless frequency.

  5. Magnetic bearings with zero bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic bearing operating without a bias field has supported a shaft rotating at speeds up to 12,000 rpm with the usual four power supplies and with only two. A magnetic bearing is commonly operated with a bias current equal to half of the maximum current allowable in its coils. This linearizes the relation between net force and control current and improves the force slewing rate and hence the band width. The steady bias current dissipates power, even when no force is required from the bearing. The power wasted is equal to two-thirds of the power at maximum force output. Examined here is the zero bias idea. The advantages and disadvantages are noted.

  6. MLE's bias pathology motivates MCMLE

    OpenAIRE

    Yatracos, Yannis G.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum likelihood estimates are often biased. It is shown that this pathology is inherent to the traditional ML estimation method for two or more parameters, thus motivating from a different angle the use of MCMLE.

  7. Cognitive biases and language universals

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Puglisi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Language universals have been longly attributed to an innate Universal Grammar. An alternative explanation states that linguistic universals emerged independently in every language in response to shared cognitive, though non language-specific, biases. A computational model has recently shown how this could be the case, focusing on the paradigmatic example of the universal properties of color naming patterns, and producing results in accurate agreement with the experimental data. Here we investigate thoroughly the role of a cognitive bias in the framework of this model. We study how, and to what extent, the structure of the bias can influence the corresponding linguistic universal patterns. We show also that the cultural history of a group of speakers introduces population-specific constraints that act against the uniforming pressure of the cognitive bias, and we clarify the interplay between these two forces. We believe that our simulations can help to shed light on the possible mechanisms at work in the evol...

  8. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  9. A new method to measure galaxy bias by combining the density and weak lensing fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Arnau; Chang, Chihway; Gaztañaga, Enrique; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre; Bacon, David J.; Carretero, Jorge; Castander, Francisco J.; Crocce, Martin; Fosalba, Pablo; Manera, Marc; Vikram, Vinu

    2016-10-01

    We present a new method to measure redshift-dependent galaxy bias by combining information from the galaxy density field and the weak lensing field. This method is based on the work of Amara et al., who use the galaxy density field to construct a bias-weighted convergence field κg. The main difference between Amara et al.'s work and our new implementation is that here we present another way to measure galaxy bias, using tomography instead of bias parametrizations. The correlation between κg and the true lensing field κ allows us to measure galaxy bias using different zero-lag correlations, such as / or /. Our method measures the linear bias factor on linear scales, under the assumption of no stochasticity between galaxies and matter. We use the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE) simulation to measure the linear galaxy bias for a flux-limited sample (i < 22.5) in tomographic redshift bins using this method. This article is the first that studies the accuracy and systematic uncertainties associated with the implementation of the method and the regime in which it is consistent with the linear galaxy bias defined by projected two-point correlation functions (2PCF). We find that our method is consistent with a linear bias at the per cent level for scales larger than 30 arcmin, while non-linearities appear at smaller scales. This measurement is a good complement to other measurements of bias, since it does not depend strongly on σ8 as do the 2PCF measurements. We will apply this method to the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data in a follow-up article.

  10. Attentional and evaluative biases for smoking cues in nicotine dependence: component processes of biases in visual orienting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, B; Field, M; Mogg, K; De Houwer, J

    2004-02-01

    The present study investigated attentional and evaluative biases for smoking-related cues in cigarette smokers and non-smokers. Using a visual probe task, we manipulated the presentation conditions of the stimuli to examine: (1). whether smokers have a bias to allocate attention towards smoking-related pictures that appear below the threshold of conscious awareness; and (2). whether attentional biases for smoking-related pictures that appear above the threshold of awareness operate both in initial orienting and in the maintenance of attention. We also obtained explicit and implicit measures of the valence of the smoking-related pictures from pleasantness ratings and from behavioural responses on a stimulus-response compatibility (SRC) task. Results showed that smokers, but not non-smokers, had an attentional bias for smoking-related pictures which had been presented at two exposure durations (200 and 2000 ms). The bias was not found in a brief (17 ms) masked exposure condition, so there was no evidence that it operated preconsciously. Smokers also showed greater preferences for smoking-related than control cues, compared with non-smokers, on both the explicit and implicit indices of stimulus valence. Results are discussed with reference to incentive and cognitive models of addiction.

  11. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  12. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  13. The North Atlantic Cold Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatbatch, Richard; Drews, Annika; Ding, Hui; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic cold bias, associated with a too zonal path of the North Atlantic Current and a missing "northwest corner", is a common problem in coupled climate and forecast models. The bias affects the North Atlantic and European climate mean state, variability and predictability. We investigate the use of a flow field correction to adjust the path of the North Atlantic Current as well as additional corrections to the surface heat and freshwater fluxes. Results using the Kiel Climate Model show that the flow field correction allows a northward flow into the northwest corner, largely eliminating the bias below the surface layer. A surface cold bias remains but can be eliminated by additionally correcting the surface freshwater flux, without adjusting the surface heat flux seen by the ocean model. A model version in which only the surface fluxes of heat and freshwater are corrected continues to exhibit the incorrect path of the North Atlantic Current and a strong subsurface bias. Removing the bias impacts the multi-decadal time scale variability in the model and leads to a better representation of the SST pattern associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability than the uncorrected model.

  14. Evidence for biasing in the CfA survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1988-01-01

    Intrinsically bright galaxies appear systematically more correlated than faint galaxies in the Center for Astrophysics redshift survey. The amplification of the two-point correlation function behaves exponentially with luminosity, being essentially flat up to the knee of the luminosity function, then increasing markedly. The amplification reaches a factor of 3.5e + or - 0.4 in the very brightest galaxies. The effect is dominated by spirals rather than ellipticals, so that the correlation function of bright spirals becomes comparable to that of normal ellipticals. Similar results are obtained whether the correlation function is measured in two or three dimensions. The effect persists to separations of a correlation length or more, and is not confined to the cores of the Virgo, Coma, and Abell 1367 clusters, suggesting that the effect is caused by biasing, that is, galaxies kindle preferentially in more clustered regions, rather than by gravitational relaxation.

  15. The estimation method of GPS instrumental biases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of estimating the global positioning system (GPS) instrumental biases and the methods to calculate the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver are presented. The calculated results of GPS instrumental biases, the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver, and total electron content (TEC) are also shown. Finally, the stability of GPS instrumental biases as well as that of satellite and receiver instrumental biases are evaluated, indicating that they are very stable during a period of two months and a half.

  16. Formulas for precisely and efficiently estimating the bias and variance of the length measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuqiang; Yang, Yuanxi; Dang, Yamin

    2016-10-01

    Error analysis in length measurements is an important problem in geographic information system and cartographic operations. The distance between two random points—i.e., the length of a random line segment—may be viewed as a nonlinear mapping of the coordinates of the two points. In real-world applications, an unbiased length statistic may be expected in high-precision contexts, but the variance of the unbiased statistic is of concern in assessing the quality. This paper suggesting the use of a k-order bias correction formula and a nonlinear error propagation approach to the distance equation provides a useful way to describe the length of a line. The study shows that the bias is determined by the relative precision of the random line segment, and that the use of the higher-order bias correction is only needed for short-distance applications.

  17. Holographic phase transition probed by non-local observables

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Xiao-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    From the viewpoint of holography, the phase structure of a 5-dimensional Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m-AdS black hole is probed by the two point correlation function, Wilson loop, and entanglement entropy. As the case of thermal entropy, we find for all the probes, the black hole undergos a Hawking-Page phase transition, a first order phase transition and a second order phase transition successively before it reaches to a stable phase. In addition, for these probes, we find the equal area law for the first order phase transition is valid always and the critical exponent of the heat capacity for the second order phase transition coincides with that of the mean field theory regardless of the size of the boundary region.

  18. Band Excitation in Scanning Probe Microscopy: Recognition and Functional Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Vasudevan, Dr. Rama [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Collins, Liam [University College, Dublin; Strelcov, Evgheni [ORNL; Okatan, Mahmut B [ORNL; Belianinov, Alex [ORNL; Baddorf, Arthur P [ORNL; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Field confinement at the junction between a biased scanning probe microscope s (SPM) tip and solid surface enables local probing of various bias-induced transformations such as polarization switching, ionic motion, or electrochemical reactions to name a few. The nanoscale size of the biased region is smaller or comparable to features like grain boundaries and dislocations, potentially allows for the study of kinetics and thermodynamics at the level of a single defect. In contrast to classical statistically averaged approaches, this allows one to link structure to functionality and deterministically decipher associated mesoscopic and atomistic mechanisms. Furthermore, this type of information can serve as a fingerprint of local material functionality, allowing for local recognition imaging. Here, current progress in multidimensional SPM techniques based on band-excitation time and voltage spectroscopies is illustrated, including discussions on data acquisition, dimensionality reduction, and visualization along with future challenges and opportunities for the field.

  19. Influence of the pre-ionization background and simulation of the optical emission of a streamer discharge in preheated air at atmospheric pressure between two point electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdon, A; Bonaventura, Z [Ecole Centrale Paris, EM2C Laboratory, UPR CNRS 288, Grande voie des vignes, 92295 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Celestin, S, E-mail: anne.bourdon@em2c.ecp.f [Communications and Space Sciences Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents simulations of positive and negative streamers propagating between two point electrodes in preheated air at atmospheric pressure. As many discharges have occurred before the simulated one, seed charges are taken into account in the interelectrode gap. First, for a pre-ionization background of 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}, we have studied the influence of the data set used for transport parameters and reaction rates for air on the simulation results. We have compared results obtained in 1997 using input parameters from Morrow and Lowke and from Kulikovsky. Deviations as large as 20% of streamer characteristics (i.e. electric field in the streamer head and body, streamer velocity, streamer radius, streamer electron density) have been observed for this point-to-point configuration. Second, we have studied the influence of the pulsed voltage frequency on the discharge structure. For the studied discharge regime, a change in the applied voltage frequency corresponds to a change in the pre-ionization background. In this work, we have considered a wide range of pre-ionization values from 10{sup 4} and up to 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}. We have noted that the value of the pre-ionization background has a small influence on the electron density, electric field and location of the negative streamer head. Conversely, it has a significant influence on the positive streamer characteristics. Finally, we have compared instantaneous and time-averaged optical emissions of the three band systems of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}{sup +} (1PN{sub 2}, 2PN{sub 2} and 1NN{sub 2}{sup +}) during the discharge propagation. We have shown that the emission of the 2PN{sub 2} is the strongest of the three bands, in agreement with experimental observations. It is interesting to note that even with a short time averaging of a few nanoseconds, which corresponds to currently used instruments, the structure of the time-averaged emission of the 2PN{sub 2} is different from the instantaneous one and shows

  20. "Two-point" assembling of Zn(II) and Co(II) metalloporphyrins derivatized with a crown ether substituent in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noworyta, Krzysztof; Marczak, Renata; Tylenda, Rafal; Sobczak, Janusz W; Chitta, Raghu; Kutner, Wlodzimierz; D'Souza, Francis

    2007-02-27

    The effect of "two-point" interactions of Zn(II) and Co(II) metalloporphyrins, bearing 15-crown-5 ether peripheral substituents, on their assembling in Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films was investigated. That is, simultaneously, the central metal ion of the porphyrin was axially ligated by a nitrogen-containing ligand in the emerged part of the Langmuir film on one hand, and a suitably selected cation pertaining in the subphase solution was supramolecularly complexed by the crown ether moiety in the submerged part of the film on the other. The compression and polarity properties of the Langmuir films of the derivatized free-base 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(benzo-15-crown-5)porphyrin, H2(TPMCP), and the corresponding cobalt(II) and zinc(II) metalloporphyrins, denoted as Co(TPMCP) and Zn(TPCMP), respectively, as well as inclusion complexes of the metalloporphyrins with selected cations were investigated. For the axial ligation of Zn(II) and Co(II), pyrazine (pyz) and 4,4'-bipyridnine (bpy) aromatic as well as piperazine (ppz) and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) cyclic heteroaliphatic ligands were selected. The films were formed on the water subphase solution in the absence and presence of LiCl, NaCl, or NH4Cl. The Langmuir films were built of monolayer J-type aggregates of tilted porphyrin macrocycles. The porphyrins formed rather labile complexes with the cations in the subphase. Nevertheless, the XPS analysis revealed that these cations were LB transferred together with the porphyrins onto solid substrates. In the Co(TPMCP) Langmuir films formed on the water subphases, Co(II) was complexed by aromatic but not cyclic heteroaliphatic ligands, while, in these films formed on the NaCl subphase solutions, the metalloporphyrin was also complexed by DABCO. In Langmuir films spread on alkaline subphase solutions, both aromatic and heteroaliphatic ligands formed complexes with Co(TPMCP) of different stoichiometries. The X-ray reflectivity and GIXD measurements

  1. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, S Prem

    2015-01-01

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of N=8 supergravity on AdS_4, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor a_{max} . Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy E \\leq a_{max}, while geodesics with E > a_{max} terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved "outw...

  2. Threat-based cognitive biases in anxious children: comparison with non-anxious children before and after cognitive behavioural treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Allison M; Wharton, Trisha A; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Craske, Michelle G

    2008-03-01

    Attention and interpretation biases for threat stimuli were assessed in 19 anxious (ANX) children before and after cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and compared with responses from 19 non-anxious (NA) control children collected over the same period. Attentional bias was assessed using a picture version of the visual probe task with threat, neutral and pleasant pictures. Threat interpretation bias was assessed using both a homographs task in which children used homograph words in a sentence and their neutral or threatening meaning was assessed, and a stories task in which children rated their negative emotion, danger judgments, and influencing ability in ambiguous situations. ANX children showed attention biases towards threat on the visual probe task and threat interpretation biases on the stories task but not the homographs task at pre-treatment in comparison with NA children. Following treatment, ANX children's threat interpretation biases as assessed on the stories task reduced significantly to within levels comparable to NA children. However, ANX children continued to show larger attentional biases towards threat than pleasant pictures on the visual probe task at post-treatment, whereas NA children did not show attentional biases. Moreover, a residual threat interpretation style on the stories task at post-treatment was associated with higher anxiety symptoms in both ANX and NA children.

  3. Tokamak edge plasma rotation in the presence of the biased electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Mohammadi, S. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Elahi, A. Salar, E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arvin, R. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Electrode biasing system was designed, constructed, and installed on the IR-T1 tokamak, and then biasing experiments were carried out. Also, using a Mach probes the effects of radial electric field (produced by biased electrode) on the poloidal and toroidal components of the edge plasma velocity were investigated. The results showed an increase in both toroidal and poloidal components of the edge plasma velocity during biasing regime. Results compared and discussed. During positive biasing, increased E{sub r} tends to slow the poloidal rotation in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, i.e., to speed up rotation in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. An increased toroidal rotation velocity has the opposite effect on the poloidal rotation.

  4. Relation between education and dementia: the role of test bias revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmand, B; Lindeboom, J; Hooijer, C; Jonker, C

    1995-01-01

    Several authors have suggested that dementia screening tests may be biased against low levels of education, whereas others find that a low level of education is a genuine risk factor for dementia. The present paper attempts to reconcile these conflicting views by examining item bias and test bias indices of the mini mental state examination (MMSE). Psychometric calculations and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analyses of sensitivity and specificity as performed by earlier studies were replicated and extended from the database of the Amsterdam Study of the Elderly. This is a population survey on cognitive decline and dementia (age range 65-84). Subjects with a low level of education (primary school) were compared with better educated subjects (at least some secondary education). Cases were matched by age and sex. The results indicate that the MMSE is not educationally biased as far as item characteristics, reliability, and construct validity are concerned. Yet its predictive validity as a screening test for dementia is educationally biased. This bias will effectively be eliminated with a two point higher cut off score for the subjects whose education extends beyond primary school. Even after such score correction, a low level of education probably remains a genuine risk factor for dementia. PMID:7629532

  5. Atom probe crystallography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of "atom probe crystallography", a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic...

  6. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  7. Cognitive biases to appearance-related stimuli in body dissatisfaction: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Rachel F; DuBois, Russell H

    2016-06-01

    Emerging literature has documented the presence of cognitive biases toward body image related stimuli among individuals with high levels of body image concerns compared to those with low levels of body image concerns. However, the robustness and nature of these cognitive biases are unclear. The aims of this study were to conduct a systematic literature search and perform a critical synthesis of studies examining the relationship between cognitive biases toward body image-related stimuli and body image concerns. Our review identified 32 studies meeting inclusion criteria. Dot-probe, Stroop, free recall, and eye-tracking were among the most frequently used paradigms. The extant literature provides robust support for the presence of attention biases toward body image-related stimuli among individuals with high levels of body dissatisfaction compared to those with lower levels of concerns. Evidence was also found for the existence of judgment biases and memory biases. Furthermore, results suggest that body image-related cognitive biases, and levels of body dissatisfaction can be manipulated. Initial evidence was also found for differential patterns of biases toward "fat" and "thin" stimuli. These findings confirm the importance of considering cognitive biases within etiological models of body image concerns and suggest that these processes might provide novel treatment targets.

  8. Gender bias in academic recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abramo, Giovanni; D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Rosati, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that women are underrepresented in the academic systems of many countries. Gender discrimination is one of the factors that could contribute to this phenomenon. This study considers a recent national academic recruitment campaign in Italy, examining whether women are subject...... to more or less bias than men. The findings show that no gender-related differences occur among the candidates who benefit from positive bias, while among those candidates affected by negative bias, the incidence of women is lower than that of men. Among the factors that determine success in a competition...... for an academic position, the number of the applicant’s career years in the same university as the committee members assumes greater weight for male candidates than for females. Being of the same gender as the committee president is also a factor that assumes greater weight for male applicants. On the other hand...

  9. Anchoring Bias in Online Voting

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Voting online with explicit ratings could largely reflect people's preferences and objects' qualities, but ratings are always irrational, because they may be affected by many unpredictable factors like mood, weather, as well as other people's votes. By analyzing two real systems, this paper reveals a systematic bias embedding in the individual decision-making processes, namely people tend to give a low rating after a low rating, as well as a high rating following a high rating. This so-called \\emph{anchoring bias} is validated via extensive comparisons with null models, and numerically speaking, the extent of bias decays with interval voting number in a logarithmic form. Our findings could be applied in the design of recommender systems and considered as important complementary materials to previous knowledge about anchoring effects on financial trades, performance judgements, auctions, and so on.

  10. Without Bias: A Guidebook for Nondiscriminatory Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Judy E., Ed.; And Others

    This guidebook discusses ways to eliminate various types of discrimination from business communications. Separately authored chapters discuss eliminating racial and ethnic bias; eliminating sexual bias; achieving communication sensitive about handicaps of disabled persons; eliminating bias from visual media; eliminating bias from meetings,…

  11. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  12. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  13. Unpacking the Evidence of Gender Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Connie L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender bias in pre-service principals using the Gender-Leader Implicit Association Test. Analyses of student-learning narratives revealed how students made sense of gender bias (biased or not-biased) and how each reacted to evidence (surprised or not-surprised). Two implications were: (1) the need for…

  14. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  15. Codon Pair Bias Is a Direct Consequence of Dinucleotide Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Kunec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Codon pair bias is a remarkably stable characteristic of a species. Although functionally uncharacterized, robust virus attenuation was achieved by recoding of viral proteins using underrepresented codon pairs. Because viruses replicate exclusively inside living cells, we posited that their codon pair preferences reflect those of their host(s. Analysis of many human viruses showed, however, that the encoding of viruses is influenced only marginally by host codon pair preferences. Furthermore, examination of codon pair preferences of vertebrate, insect, and arthropod-borne viruses revealed that the latter do not utilize codon pairs overrepresented in arthropods more frequently than other viruses. We found, however, that codon pair bias is a direct consequence of dinucleotide bias. We conclude that codon pair bias does not play a major role in the encoding of viral proteins and that virus attenuation by codon pair deoptimization has the same molecular underpinnings as attenuation based on an increase in CpG/TpA dinucleotides.

  16. The Threshold of Embedded M Collider Bias and Confounding Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelcey, Benjamin; Carlisle, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Of particular import to this study, is collider bias originating from stratification on retreatment variables forming an embedded M or bowtie structural design. That is, rather than assume an M structural design which suggests that "X" is a collider but not a confounder, the authors adopt what they consider to be a more reasonable…

  17. Time-course of attention biases in social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Casey A; Inhoff, Albrecht W; Coles, Meredith E

    2013-10-01

    Theoretical models of social phobia implicate preferential attention to social threat in the maintenance of anxiety symptoms, though there has been limited work characterizing the nature of these biases over time. The current study utilized eye-movement data to examine the time-course of visual attention over 1500ms trials of a probe detection task. Nineteen participants with a primary diagnosis of social phobia based on DSM-IV criteria and 20 non-clinical controls completed this task with angry, fearful, and happy face trials. Overt visual attention to the emotional and neutral faces was measured in 50ms segments across the trial. Over time, participants with social phobia attend less to emotional faces and specifically less to happy faces compared to controls. Further, attention to emotional relative to neutral expressions did not vary notably by emotion for participants with social phobia, but control participants showed a pattern after 1000ms in which over time they preferentially attended to happy expressions and avoided negative expressions. Findings highlight the importance of considering attention biases to positive stimuli as well as the pattern of attention between groups. These results suggest that attention "bias" in social phobia may be driven by a relative lack of the biases seen in non-anxious participants.

  18. Low-bias negative differential conductance controlled by electrode separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Ran; Bi, Jun-Jie; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Chuan-Kui; Li, Zong-Liang

    2016-12-01

    The electronic transport properties of a single thiolated arylethynylene molecule with 9,10-dihydroanthracene core, denoted as TADHA, is studied by using non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with ab initio calculations. The numerical results show that the TADHA molecule exhibits excellent negative differential conductance (NDC) behavior at lower bias regime as probed experimentally. The NDC behavior of TADHA molecule originates from the Stark effect of the applied bias voltage, by which the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the HOMO-1 are pulled apart and become localized. The NDC behavior of TADHA molecular system is tunable by changing the electrode distance. Shortening the electrode separation can enhance the NDC effect which is attributed to the possible increase of coupling between the two branches of TADHA molecule. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374195 and 11405098) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2013FM006).

  19. Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Alpha Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nolen, Steven Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Terry R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Travis John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-06

    A 1/N bias in the estimate of the neutron time-constant (commonly denoted as α) has been seen in dynamic neutronic calculations performed with MCATK. In this paper we show that the bias is most likely caused by taking the logarithm of a stochastic quantity. We also investigate the known bias due to the particle population control method used in MCATK. We conclude that this bias due to the particle population control method is negligible compared to other sources of bias.

  20. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  1. Attentional bias to threat in the general population is contingent on target competition, not on attentional control settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Benedikt Emanuel; Wentura, Dirk

    2017-03-17

    Dot-probe studies usually find an attentional bias towards threatening stimuli only in anxious participants. Here, we investigated under what conditions such a bias occurs in unselected samples. According to contingent-capture theory, an irrelevant cue only captures attention if it matches an attentional control setting. Therefore, we first tested the hypothesis that an attentional control setting tuned to threat must be activated in (non-anxious) individuals. In Experiment 1, we used a dot-probe task with a manipulation of attentional control settings ("threat"-set vs. control set). Surprisingly, we found an (anxiety-independent) attentional bias to angry faces that was not moderated by attentional control settings. Since we presented two stimuli (i.e., a target and a distractor) on the target screen in Experiment 1 (a necessity to realise the test of contingent capture), but most dot-probe studies only employ a single target, we conducted Experiment 2 to test the hypothesis that attentional bias in the general population is contingent on target competition. Participants performed a dot-probe task involving presentation of a stand-alone target or a target competing with a distractor. We found an (anxiety-independent) attentional bias towards angry faces in the latter but not the former condition. This suggests that attentional bias towards angry faces in unselected samples is not contingent on attentional control settings, but on target competition.

  2. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which is ...

  3. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against

  4. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  5. Stereotype Formation : Biased by Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences ill the extent its which social groups have previously been predictive elf behavioral or physical properties Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness o

  6. Sex Bias in Counseling Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harway, Michele

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews findings of bias in counseling materials and presents results of three original studies. Indications are that textbooks used by practitioners present the sexes in stereotypical fashion, and a greater proportion of college catalog context is devoted to men than to women. (Author)

  7. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, J.D.; Thomas, T.; Berkum, van E.C.; Arem, van B.

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  8. Measurement Bias in Multilevel Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, Frans J.; Dolan, Conor V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement bias can be detected using structural equation modeling (SEM), by testing measurement invariance with multigroup factor analysis (Jöreskog, 1971;Meredith, 1993;Sörbom, 1974) MIMIC modeling (Muthén, 1989) or restricted factor analysis (Oort, 1992,1998). In educational research, data often

  9. Measurement bias in multilevel data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, S.; Oort, F.J.; Dolan, C.V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement bias can be detected using structural equation modeling (SEM), by testing measurement invariance with multigroup factor analysis (Jöreskog, 1971;Meredith, 1993;Sörbom, 1974) MIMIC modeling (Muthén, 1989) or restricted factor analysis (Oort, 1992,1998). In educational research, data often

  10. Early somatosensory event-related potentials reveal attentional bias for internal stimuli in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yoshihiro; Nittono, Hiroshi; Kubo, Kenta; Sasaki-Aoki, Shoko; Iwanaga, Makoto

    2012-03-01

    The present study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to investigate allocation of attentional resources to internal and external stimuli in individuals with social anxiety. High and low socially anxious individuals were presented with depictions of various facial expressions or household objects, followed by an internal (vibration presented to the finger) or external probe (the letter "E"). Participants were told that the vibration signals physiological changes and were asked to detect both probes. High socially anxious individuals showed larger front-central N140 amplitudes in response to vibratory internal probes as compared to non-anxious controls. ERPs elicited by picture stimuli and external probes and reaction times in response to both probe types did not differ between high and low social anxiety individuals. Early somatosensory ERPs reveal an attentional bias for internal stimuli that does not appear in overt behavior.

  11. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  12. Bias Adjusted Precipitation Threat Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mesinger

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the wide variety of performance measures available for the assessment of skill of deterministic precipitation forecasts, the equitable threat score (ETS might well be the one used most frequently. It is typically used in conjunction with the bias score. However, apart from its mathematical definition the meaning of the ETS is not clear. It has been pointed out (Mason, 1989; Hamill, 1999 that forecasts with a larger bias tend to have a higher ETS. Even so, the present author has not seen this having been accounted for in any of numerous papers that in recent years have used the ETS along with bias "as a measure of forecast accuracy".

    A method to adjust the threat score (TS or the ETS so as to arrive at their values that correspond to unit bias in order to show the model's or forecaster's accuracy in extit{placing} precipitation has been proposed earlier by the present author (Mesinger and Brill, the so-called dH/dF method. A serious deficiency however has since been noted with the dH/dF method in that the hypothetical function that it arrives at to interpolate or extrapolate the observed value of hits to unit bias can have values of hits greater than forecast when the forecast area tends to zero. Another method is proposed here based on the assumption that the increase in hits per unit increase in false alarms is proportional to the yet unhit area. This new method removes the deficiency of the dH/dF method. Examples of its performance for 12 months of forecasts by three NCEP operational models are given.

  13. Attentional bias toward safety predicts safety behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaoshan; Li, Yongjuan; Wang, Guangxi; Yuan, Xiao; Ding, Weidong; Shen, Zhongxiang

    2014-10-01

    Safety studies have primarily focused on how explicit processes and measures affect safety behavior and subsequent accidents and injuries. Recently, safety researchers have paid greater attention to the role of implicit processes. Our research focuses on the role of attentional bias toward safety (ABS) in workplace safety. ABS is a basic, early-stage cognitive process involving the automatic and selective allocation of attentional resources toward safety cues, which reflect the implicit motivational state of employees regarding safety goal. In this study, we used two reaction time-based paradigms to measure the ABS of employees in three studies: two modified Stroop tasks (Studies 1 and 2) and a visual dot-probe task (Study 3). Results revealed that employees with better safety behavior showed significant ABS (Study 2), and greater ABS than employees with poorer safety behavior (Studies 1 and 2). Moreover, ABS was positively associated with the perceived safety climate and safety motivation of employees, both of which mediate the effect of ABS on safety behavior (Study 3). These results contributed to a deeper understanding of how early-stage automatic perceptual processing affects safety behavior. The practical implications of these results were also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental pain induces attentional bias that is modified by enhanced motivation: An eye tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z-K; Wang, J-Y; Luo, F

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effects of prior pain experience and motivation on attentional bias towards pain-related information were investigated within two visual-probe tasks via eye movement behaviours. It is hypothesized that pain experience would induce stronger attentional bias and such bias could be suppressed by the motivation to avoid impeding pain. All participants took part in visual-probe tasks with pictures and words as stimuli that are typically used in studies of attentional bias. They were allocated to three groups: no-pain (NP) group, performing tasks without experiencing pain; pain-experience (PE) group, performing the same tasks following painful stimuli; and pain-experience-with-motivation (PEM) group, undergoing the same procedure as PE group with additional instructions about avoiding impeding pain. Eye movements were recorded during the tasks. The eye movement data showed that: (1) participants in the PE group exhibited stronger attention bias towards painful pictures than those in the NP group; (2) the attentional bias towards painful pictures was significantly reduced in the PEM group as compared to the PE group. By contrast, the verbal task failed to find these effects using sensory pain words as stimuli. This study was the first that revealed the impact of acute experimental pain on attentional bias towards pain-related information in healthy individuals through eye tracking. It may provide a possible solution to reduce hypervigilance towards pain-related information by altering the motivational relevance. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: (1) This study revealed the impact of experimental pain on attentional bias in healthy individuals; (2) This study may provide a possible approach of altering motivational relevance to control the pain-induced attentional bias towards pain-related information. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  15. Attentional bias for threat in older adults: moderation of the positivity bias by trait anxiety and stimulus modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lewina O; Knight, Bob G

    2009-09-01

    Socioemotional selectivity theory suggests that emotion regulation goals motivate older adults to preferentially allocate attention to positive stimuli and away from negative stimuli. This study examined whether anxiety moderates the effect of the positivity bias on attention for threat. The authors employed the dot probe task to compare subliminal and supraliminal attention for threat in 103 young and 44 older adults. Regardless of anxiety, older but not young adults demonstrated a vigilant-avoidant response to angry faces. Anxiety influenced older adults' attention such that anxious individuals demonstrated a vigilant-avoidant reaction to sad faces but an avoidant-vigilant reaction to negative words.

  16. Information environment, behavioral biases, and home bias in analysts’ recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Taouss, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    ’ recommendations. Using a large data of analysts’ recommendations from Asian emerging markets, we show that local analysts issue more optimistic recommendations than their foreign counterparts. However, optimism difference between the two groups is greater for firms with poor information environment. Our results......Can information environment of a firm explain home bias in analysts’ recommendations? Can the extent of agency problems explain optimism difference between foreign and local analysts? This paper answers these questions by documenting the effect of information environment on home bias in analysts...... show that optimism difference between the two groups is more than twice as much in firms with poor information environment than in firms with better information environment. We argue that poor information environment pose greater information asymmetries to foreign analysts regarding local firms...

  17. Gas composition influence on ion energy distribution functions in an industrial ICP reactor with biased cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David; Shannon, Steven; Coumou, David; White, Scott

    2016-09-01

    An industrial ICP reactor consisting of a top planar coil and RF biased lower electrode has been characterized using a hairpin resonator probe and gridded ion energy analyzer to measure electron density in the bulk plasma and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) at the surface of the biased cathode. Argon and oxygen were run at constant total flow with 20mTorr downstream pressure control with varying flow ratios between the two gases ranging from 0% to 100% oxygen content. ICP and bias power were adjusted to maintain constant electron density and sheath bias over this mixing matrix at four different setpoints reflecting high density / high bias, high density / low bias, low density / high bias, and low density / low bias. Although the fundamental parameters governing RF sheath behavior were held constant, several trends in ion energy distribution are observed with respect to gas composition (aside from the obvious influence of ion mass) that show considerable variation in measured IEDF particularly that can be attributed to ion collisions in the sheath as well as gas heating variation due to gas composition.

  18. Attentional Bias in Children with Asthma with and without Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudeney, Joanne; Sharpe, Louise; Sicouri, Gemma; Lorimer, Sarah; Dear, Blake F; Jaffe, Adam; Selvadurai, Hiran; Hunt, Caroline

    2017-01-09

    Children with asthma have a high prevalence of anxiety disorders, however, very little is known about the mechanisms that confer vulnerability for anxiety in this population. This study investigated whether children with asthma and anxiety disorders display attentional biases towards threatening stimuli, similar to what has been seen in children with anxiety disorders more generally. We also examined the relationships between attentional biases and anxiety symptomatology and asthma control for children with asthma. Ninety-three children, aged 8-13, took part in the study and were recruited into one of four conditions (asthma/anxiety, asthma, anxiety, control). Asthma was medically confirmed and anxiety was assessed through clinical interview. We used self- and parent-report questionnaires to measure child asthma (ATAQ) and anxiety (SCAS, CASI) variables. Participants completed a visual dot-probe task designed to measure attentional bias towards two types of stimuli: asthma related words and general threat words, as well as tasks to assess reading ability and attentional control. Results showed that attentional biases did not differ between the groups, although children with anxiety disorders displayed poorer attentional control. A significant correlation was found between poor asthma control and an attentional bias of asthma stimuli. While we found no evidence that anxiety disorders in children with asthma were associated with threat- or asthma-related attentional biases, preliminary evidence suggested that children with poor asthma control displayed biases towards asthma-specific stimuli. Future research is needed to explore whether these attentional biases are adaptive.

  19. Alcohol-cue exposure effects on craving and attentional bias in underage college-student drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jason J; Monti, Peter M; Colwill, Ruth M

    2015-06-01

    The effect of alcohol-cue exposure on eliciting craving has been well documented, and numerous theoretical models assert that craving is a clinically significant construct central to the motivation and maintenance of alcohol-seeking behavior. Furthermore, some theories propose a relationship between craving and attention, such that cue-induced increases in craving bias attention toward alcohol cues, which, in turn, perpetuates craving. This study examined the extent to which alcohol cues induce craving and bias attention toward alcohol cues among underage college-student drinkers. We designed within-subject cue-reactivity and visual-probe tasks to assess in vivo alcohol-cue exposure effects on craving and attentional bias on 39 undergraduate college drinkers (ages 18-20). Participants expressed greater subjective craving to drink alcohol following in vivo cue exposure to a commonly consumed beer compared with water exposure. Furthermore, following alcohol-cue exposure, participants exhibited greater attentional biases toward alcohol cues as measured by a visual-probe task. In addition to the cue-exposure effects on craving and attentional bias, within-subject differences in craving across sessions marginally predicted within-subject differences in attentional bias. Implications for both theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Attentional bias in older adults: effects of generalized anxiety disorder and cognitive behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlman, Jan; Price, Rebecca B; Vietri, Jeff

    2013-08-01

    Attentional biases are known to play a contributing, and perhaps even causal role in the etiology of anxiety and other negative affective states. The prevalence of anxiety disorders in the older cohort is growing, and there are both theoretical and empirical reasons to suspect that age-related factors could moderate attentional bias effects in the context of late-life anxiety. The current study included one of the most widely-used measures of attentional bias, the dot-probe task (Mathews & MacLeod, 1985). Participants were older adults who were either nonanxious or diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. The patient subsample also completed cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or an equivalent wait list condition, after which the dot probe was administered a second time. Results showed that clinical anxiety had no particular importance for the deployment of attention, casting doubt on the universality of biased attention in older anxiety patients. Although there were no maladaptive biases detected toward either threat or depression words at pretreatment, there was nevertheless a marginally significant differential reduction in bias toward threat words following CBT. This reduction did not occur among those in the wait list condition. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How does a probe inserted into the discharge influence the plasma structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, D.; Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.

    2016-05-01

    Shielding the bias applied to the probe by the sheath formed around it and determination of parameters of unperturbed plasmas are in the basis of the probe diagnostics. The results from a two-dimensional model of a discharge with a probe inserted in it show that the probe influences the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the entire discharge. The increase (although slight) in the electron temperature, due to the increased losses of charged particles on the additional wall in the discharge (mainly the probe holder), leads to redistribution of the plasma density and plasma potential, as shown by the results obtained at the floating potential of the probe. The deviations due to the bias applied to the probe tip are stronger in the ion saturation region of the probe characteristics. The pattern of the spatial redistribution of the plasma parameters advances together with the movement of the probe deeper in the discharge. Although probe sheaths and probe characteristics resulting from the model are shown, the study does not aim at discussions on the theories for determination of the plasma density from the ion saturation current. Regardless of the modifications in the plasma behavior in the entire discharge, the deviations of the plasma parameters at the position of the probe tip and, respectively, the uncertainty which should be added as an error when the accuracy of the probe diagnostics is estimated do not exceed 10%. Consequently, the electron density and temperature obtained, respectively, at the position of the plasma potential on the probe characteristics and from its transition region are in reasonable agreement with the results from the model of the discharge without a probe. Being in the scope of research on a source of negative hydrogen ions with the design of a matrix of small radius inductive discharges, the model is specified for a low-pressure hydrogen discharge sustained in a small-radius tube.

  2. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Prem; Vaganov, Vladislav

    2016-02-01

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of {N}=8 supergravity on AdS4, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor ã max. Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy Ɛ ≲ ã max, while geodesics with Ɛ > ã max terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved "outward" in the Penrose diagram for the deformed AdS backgrounds, and thus geodesic limits of the antipodal correlators do not directly probe the crunch. Beyond the geodesic limit, we point out that the scalar wave equation, analytically continued into the FRW patch, has a potential which is singular at the crunch along with complex WKB turning points in the vicinity of the FRW crunch. We then argue that the frequency space Green's function has a branch point determined by ã max which corresponds to the lowest quasinormal frequency.

  3. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, E.; Bennett, Charles L.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat ? cold dark matter (Lambda Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of > 68, 000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino background, flatness of spatial geometry of the universe, a deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum of initial scalar fluctuations, and that the current universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The WMAP observations provide the strongest ever support for inflation; namely, the structures we see in the universe originate from quantum fluctuations generated during inflation.

  4. A New Probe Noise Approach For Acoustic Feedback Cancellation In Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    systems is the biased adaptive filter estimation problem, especially when tonal signals such as music and alarm tones enter the hearing aid microphones. The consequences of this biased estimation might be significant sound distortion or even worse, howling. In principle, unbiased adaptive filter...... noise level makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in hearing aid applica-tions. We present a new probe noise approach which utilizes a low-level probe noise signal, which is inaudible in the presence of the receiver signal even for people with normal hearing. The probe noise signal...... and howling as consequences, whereas the new probe noise based AFC approach is able to remove feedback artifacts caused by the feedback path change in no more than a few hundred milliseconds....

  5. A New Probe Noise Approach For Acoustic Feedback Cancellation In Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    Acoustic feedback is a big challenge in hearing aids. If not appropriately treated, the feedback limits the maximum possible amplification and may lead to significant sound distortions. In a state-of-the-art hearing aid, an acoustic feedback cancellation (AFC) system is used to compensate...... systems is the biased adaptive filter estimation problem, especially when tonal signals such as music and alarm tones enter the hearing aid microphones. The consequences of this biased estimation might be significant sound distortion or even worse, howling. In principle, unbiased adaptive filter...... estimation can be achieved by adding a probe noise signal to the receiver signal and basing the estimation on the probe noise signal. However, the traditional probe noise approach requires a high-level probe noise signal, which is clearly audible and annoying for the hearing aid user. Hence, this high probe...

  6. Types of Research Bias Encountered in IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Ahmed; Kallini, Joseph Ralph; Desai, Kush; Hickey, Ryan; Thornburg, Bartley; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-04-01

    Bias is a systemic error in studies that leads to inaccurate deductions. Relevant biases in the field of IR and interventional oncology were identified after reviewing articles published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. Biases cited in these articles were divided into three categories: preinterventional (health care access, participation, referral, and sample biases), periinterventional (contamination, investigator, and operator biases), and postinterventional (guarantee-time, lead time, loss to follow-up, recall, and reporting biases). Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Combined Impedance Probe and Langmuir Probe Studies of the Low-Latitude E Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, D. E.; Pfaff, R. F.; Steigies, C. T.

    2008-01-01

    The EQUIS-2 sounding rocket and radar campaign, launched from Kwajalein Atoll in 2004, included a mission to study low-latitude irregularities and electrodynamics, led by NASA GSFC. This mission included two instrumented rockets launched into the nighttime E region (apogee near 120 km), which included comprehensive electrodynamics and neutral density instrumentation. These rockets carried the first of a new generation of impedance probes, that utilize a wide-band drive signal to simultaneously measure the impedance of an antenna in a plasma as a function of frequency from 7 kEIz to 4 MHz. at a rapid cadence. This technique promises to permit true plasma spectroscopy, and resulted in the identification of multiple plasma resonances and accurate measurements of the plasma density, even in the low density nighttime E region. We present analyses of the technique and resulting spectra, and show how these data may be combined with fixed-bias Langmuir Probe data to infer the temperature structure of the E region as well as providing accurate absolute calibrations for the very high time resolution fixed-bias probe data. The data is shown to agree well with data from ionosonde, the ALTAIR radar, and the Peruvian beacon experiment.

  8. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  9. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  10. Probability biases as Bayesian inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre; C. R. Martins

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I will show how several observed biases in human probabilistic reasoning can be partially explained as good heuristics for making inferences in an environment where probabilities have uncertainties associated to them. Previous results show that the weight functions and the observed violations of coalescing and stochastic dominance can be understood from a Bayesian point of view. We will review those results and see that Bayesian methods should also be used as part of the explanation behind other known biases. That means that, although the observed errors are still errors under the be understood as adaptations to the solution of real life problems. Heuristics that allow fast evaluations and mimic a Bayesian inference would be an evolutionary advantage, since they would give us an efficient way of making decisions. %XX In that sense, it should be no surprise that humans reason with % probability as it has been observed.

  11. Belief bias and relational reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Maxwell J; Sykes, Elizabeth D A

    2003-01-01

    When people evaluate categorical syllogisms, they tend to reject unbelievable conclusions and accept believable ones irrespective of their validity. Typically, this effect is particularly marked for invalid conclusions that are possible, but do not necessarily follow, given the premises. However, smaller believability effects can also be detected for other types of conclusion. Three experiments are reported here, in which an attempt was made to determine whether belief bias effects can manifest themselves on the relational inference task. Subjects evaluated the validity of conclusions such as William the Conqueror was king after the Pyramids were built (temporal task) or Manchester is north of Bournemouth (spatial task) with respect to their premises. All of the major findings for equivalent categorical syllogism tasks were replicated. However, the overall size of the main effect of believability appears to be related to task presentation, a phenomenon not previously identified for categorical syllogisms and which current theories of belief bias have difficulty explaining.

  12. Mindfulness reduces the correspondence bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopthrow, Tim; Hooper, Nic; Mahmood, Lynsey; Meier, Brian P; Weger, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    The correspondence bias (CB) refers to the idea that people sometimes give undue weight to dispositional rather than situational factors when explaining behaviours and attitudes. Three experiments examined whether mindfulness, a non-judgmental focus on the present moment, could reduce the CB. Participants engaged in a brief mindfulness exercise (the raisin task), a control task, or an attention to detail task before completing a typical CB measure involving an attitude-attribution paradigm. The results indicated that participants in the mindfulness condition experienced a significant reduction in the CB compared to participants in the control or attention to detail conditions. These results suggest that mindfulness training can play a unique role in reducing social biases related to person perception.

  13. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Allahverdyan, A E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings: We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect|when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preferenc...

  14. Are temperature reconstructions regionally biased?

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, O

    2012-01-01

    Are temperature reconstructions possibly biased due to regionally differing density of utilized proxy-networks? This question is assessed utilizing a simple process-based forward model of tree growth in the virtual reality of two simulations of the climate of the last millennium with different amplitude of solar forcing variations. The pseudo-tree ring series cluster in high latitudes of the northern hemisphere and east Asia. Only weak biases are found for the full network. However, for a strong solar forcing amplitude the high latitudes indicate a warmer first half of the last millennium while mid-latitudes and Asia were slightly colder than the extratropical hemispheric average. Reconstruction skill is weak or non-existent for two simple reconstruction schemes, and comparison of virtual reality target and reconstructions reveals strong deficiencies. The temporal resolution of the proxies has an influence on the reconstruction task and results are sensitive to the construction of the proxy-network. Existing ...

  15. Competition and Commercial Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    A. Blasco; F. Sobbrio

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical evidence on commercial media bias (i.e., advertisers influence over media accuracy) and then introduces a simple model to summarize the main elements of the theoretical literature. The analysis provides three main policy insights for media regulators: i) Media regulators should target their monitoring efforts towards news contents upon which advertisers are likely to share similar preferences; ii) In advertising industries characterized by high correlation in ...

  16. BEHAVIORAL BIASES IN TRADING SECURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turcan Ciprian Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main thesis of this paper represents the importance and the effects that human behavior has over capital markets. It is important to see the link between the asset valuation and investor sentiment that motivate to pay for an asset a certain prices over/below the intrinsic value. The main behavioral aspects discussed are emotional factors such as: fear of regret, overconfidence, perseverance, loss aversion ,heuristic biases, misinformation and thinking errors, herding and their consequences.

  17. Measuring bias from unbiased observable

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2014-01-01

    Since Kaiser introduced galaxies as a biased tracer of the underlying total mass field, the linear galaxies bias, b(z) appears ubiquitously both in theoretical calculations and in observational measurements related to galaxy surveys. However, the generic approaches to the galaxy density is a non-local and stochastic function of the underlying dark matter density and it becomes difficult to make the analytic form of b(z). Due to this fact, b(z) is known as a nuisance parameter and the effort has been made to measure bias free observable quantities. We provide the exact and analytic function of b(z) which also can be measured from galaxy surveys using the redshift space distortions parameters, more accurately unbiased observable \\beta \\sigma_{\\rm{gal}} = f \\sigma_8. We also introduce approximate solutions for b(z) for different gravity theories. One can generalize these approximate solutions to be exact when one solves the exact evolutions for the dark matter density fluctuation of given gravity theories. These...

  18. Response bias in plaintiffs' histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees-Haley, P R; Williams, C W; Zasler, N D; Marguilies, S; English, L T; Stevens, K B

    1997-11-01

    This study investigated response bias in self-reported history of factors relevant to the assessment of traumatic brain injury, toxic brain injury and related emotional distress. Response bias refers to systematic error in self-report data. A total of 446 subjects (comprising 131 litigating and 315 non-litigating adults from five locations in the United States) completed a symptom questionnaire. Data were obtained from university faculty and students, from patients in clinics specializing in physiatry neurology, and family medicine, and from plaintiffs undergoing forensic neuropsychological evaluations. Comparisons were made for litigant and non litigant ratings of their past and current cognitive and emotional functioning, including life in general, ability to concentrate, memory, depression, anxiety, alcohol, drugs, ability to work or attend school, irritability, headaches, confusion, self-esteem, and fatigue. Although there is no basis for hypothesizing plaintiffs to be healthier than the general population, plaintiffs rated their pre-injury functioning superior to non-plaintiffs. These findings suggest that response biases need to be taken into account by forensic examiners when relying on litigants' self-reports of pre-injury status.

  19. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  20. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen E Allahverdyan

    Full Text Available Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science.We formulate a (non-Bayesian model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency or the first opinion (primacy -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties.The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  1. Internal reliability of the alcohol-related visual probe task is increased by utilising personalised stimuli and eye-tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Paul; Mansfield, Rosie; Duckworth, Jay; Field, Matt; Jones, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    In the current study, we investigated whether the internal reliability of the visual probe task measure of attentional bias for substance-related cues could be improved by incorporating eye-tracking methods and personalised stimuli. Sixty social drinkers completed two visual probe tasks: one with a broad range of different alcohol pictures, the other containing only images of the participants' preferred drink. Attentional bias was inferred from manual reaction times to probes replacing the pictures, and from the duration of eye movement fixations towards the pictures (gaze dwell time). Internal reliability was highest for personalised (versus general) alcohol stimuli, and for eye-tracking (versus manual reaction time) measures of attentional bias. The internal reliability of both reaction time (α=.73) and gaze dwell time measures (α=.76) of attentional bias for personalised alcohol stimuli was acceptable. Internal reliability of indices of attentional bias for general alcohol stimuli was inferior, although better for the gaze dwell time (α=.51) compared to the reaction time measure (α=.19). Attentional bias towards personalised stimuli was larger than bias to general stimuli, but only for the reaction time measure. There were no statistically significant associations between measures of attentional bias and alcohol consumption or craving. Adopting personalised stimuli and eye movement monitoring significantly improves the internal reliability of the alcohol-related visual probe task. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Matrilateral Bias in Human Grandmothering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Daly

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Children receive more care and resources from their maternal grandmothers than from their paternal grandmothers. This asymmetry is the “matrilateral bias” in grandmaternal investment. Here, we synopsize the evolutionary theories that predict such a bias, and review evidence of its cross-cultural generality and magnitude. Evolutionists have long maintained that investing in a daughter’s child yields greater fitness returns, on average, than investing in a son’s child because of paternity uncertainty: the son’s putative progeny may have been sired by someone else. Recent theoretical work has identified an additional natural selective basis for the matrilateral bias that may be no less important: supporting grandchildren lightens the load on their mother, increasing her capacity to pursue her fitness in other ways, and if she invests those gains either in her natal relatives or in children of a former or future partner, fitness returns accrue to the maternal, but not the paternal, grandmother. In modern democracies, where kinship is reckoned bilaterally and no postmarital residence norms restrict grandmaternal access to grandchildren, many studies have found large matrilateral biases in contact, childcare, and emotional closeness. In other societies, patrilineal ideology and postmarital residence with the husband’s kin (virilocality might be expected to have produced a patrilateral bias instead, but the available evidence refutes this hypothesis. In hunter-gatherers, regardless of professed norms concerning kinship and residence, mothers get needed help at and after childbirth from their mothers, not their mothers-in-law. In traditional agricultural and pastoral societies, patrilineal and virilocal norms are common, but young mothers still turn to their natal families for crucial help, and several studies have documented benefits, including reduced child mortality, associated with access to maternal, but not paternal, grandmothers. Even

  3. Bias-correction in vector autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the properties of various methods for bias-correcting parameter estimates in both stationary and non-stationary vector autoregressive models. First, we show that two analytical bias formulas from the existing literature are in fact identical. Next, based on a detailed simulation study......, we show that when the model is stationary this simple bias formula compares very favorably to bootstrap bias-correction, both in terms of bias and mean squared error. In non-stationary models, the analytical bias formula performs noticeably worse than bootstrapping. Both methods yield a notable...... improvement over ordinary least squares. We pay special attention to the risk of pushing an otherwise stationary model into the non-stationary region of the parameter space when correcting for bias. Finally, we consider a recently proposed reduced-bias weighted least squares estimator, and we find...

  4. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  5. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  6. A Pharmacological Primer of Biased Agonism

    OpenAIRE

    Andresen, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    Biased agonism is one of the fastest growing topics in G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology; moreover, biased agonists are used in the clinic today: carvedilol (Coreg®) is a biased agonist of beta-adrenergic receptors. However, there is a general lack of understanding of biased agonism when compared to traditional pharmacological terminology. Therefore, this review is designed to provide a basic introduction to classical pharmacology as well as G protein-coupled receptor signal transductio...

  7. Personality Type Influences Attentional Bias in Individuals with Chronic Back Pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë C Franklin

    Full Text Available Attentional biases reflect an individual's selective attention to salient stimuli within their environment, for example an experience of back pain. Eysenck suggests that different personality types show different attentional biases to threatening information. This study is the first to test Eysenck's theory within a chronic back pain population by investigating the attentional biases of four different personality types using a back pain specific dot-probe paradigm. Participants were 70 volunteers (45 female recruited from a back rehabilitation program at an NHS Trust. The four groups were selected on their trait anxiety and defensiveness scores: defensive high-anxious; high-anxious; repressor and non-extreme. Participants completed a dot probe task comprising 20 practice trials and 250 experimental trials. The experimental trials contained 100 threat-neutral pairs, 100 positive-neutral pairs and 50 neutral-neutral image pairings. The threat images were taken from the Photograph Series of Daily Activities (PHODA and the neutral and positive images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS image bank. The results provided partial support for Eysenck's theory; defensive high-anxious individuals showed an attentional bias for threatening information compared to high-anxious individuals who demonstrated no bias. Repressors showed an avoidant bias to threatening images and an attentional bias to positive stimuli relative to neutral images. The clear difference in responses demonstrated by high-anxious individuals who vary in defensiveness highlight the need for separate investigation of these heterogeneous groups and help to explain the cognitive processes of defensive high-anxious individuals within a pain population. The demonstration of an attentional bias in this group to threatening information could explain why defensive high-anxious individuals are more likely to re-present for treatment.

  8. Personality Type Influences Attentional Bias in Individuals with Chronic Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Zoë C; Holmes, Paul S; Smith, Nickolas C; Fowler, Neil E

    2016-01-01

    Attentional biases reflect an individual's selective attention to salient stimuli within their environment, for example an experience of back pain. Eysenck suggests that different personality types show different attentional biases to threatening information. This study is the first to test Eysenck's theory within a chronic back pain population by investigating the attentional biases of four different personality types using a back pain specific dot-probe paradigm. Participants were 70 volunteers (45 female) recruited from a back rehabilitation program at an NHS Trust. The four groups were selected on their trait anxiety and defensiveness scores: defensive high-anxious; high-anxious; repressor and non-extreme. Participants completed a dot probe task comprising 20 practice trials and 250 experimental trials. The experimental trials contained 100 threat-neutral pairs, 100 positive-neutral pairs and 50 neutral-neutral image pairings. The threat images were taken from the Photograph Series of Daily Activities (PHODA) and the neutral and positive images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) image bank. The results provided partial support for Eysenck's theory; defensive high-anxious individuals showed an attentional bias for threatening information compared to high-anxious individuals who demonstrated no bias. Repressors showed an avoidant bias to threatening images and an attentional bias to positive stimuli relative to neutral images. The clear difference in responses demonstrated by high-anxious individuals who vary in defensiveness highlight the need for separate investigation of these heterogeneous groups and help to explain the cognitive processes of defensive high-anxious individuals within a pain population. The demonstration of an attentional bias in this group to threatening information could explain why defensive high-anxious individuals are more likely to re-present for treatment.

  9. Attentional bias predicts heroin relapse following treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.E. Marissen; I.H.A. Franken; A.J. Waters; P. Blanken; W. van den Brink; V.M. Hendriks

    2006-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have shown that abstinent heroin addicts exhibit an attentional bias to heroin-related stimuli. It has been suggested that attentional bias may represent a vulnerability to relapse into drug use. In the present study, the predictive value of pre-treatment attentional bias on re

  10. Using Newspapers to Study Media Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that students can learn to recognize media bias by studying media reports of current events or historical topics. Describes a study unit using media coverage of the second anniversary of the Palestinian uprising against Israel. Discusses lesson objectives, planning, defining bias teaching procedures, and criteria for determining bias. (DK)

  11. Culturally Biased Assumptions in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul B.

    2003-01-01

    Eight clusters of culturally biased assumptions are identified for further discussion from Leong and Ponterotto's (2003) article. The presence of cultural bias demonstrates that cultural bias is so robust and pervasive that is permeates the profession of counseling psychology, even including those articles that effectively attack cultural bias…

  12. How are galaxies assigned to halos? Searching for assembly bias in the SDSS galaxy clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Vakili, Mohammadjavad

    2016-01-01

    Clustering of dark matter halos has been shown to depend on halo properties beyond mass such as halo concentration, a phenomenon referred to as halo assembly bias. Standard halo occupation modeling (HOD) in large scale structure studies assumes that halo mass alone is sufficient in characterizing the connection between galaxies and halos. Modeling of galaxy clustering can face systematic effects if the number or properties of galaxies are correlated with other halo properties. Using the Small MultiDark-Planck high resolution $N$-body simulation and the measurements of the projected two-point correlation function and the number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 main galaxy sample, we investigate the extent to which the dependence of halo occupation on halo concentration can be constrained, and to what extent allowing for this dependence can improve our modeling of galaxy clustering. Given the SDSS clustering data, our constraints on HOD with assembly bias, suggests that satellite population is not...

  13. The effects of early foster care intervention on attention biases in previously institutionalized children in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troller-Renfree, Sonya; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Nelson, Charles A; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A

    2015-09-01

    Children raised in institutions experience psychosocial deprivation that can negatively impact attention skills and emotion regulation, which subsequently may influence behavioral regulation and social relationships. The current study examined visual attention biases in 8-year-old children who were part of the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP). Relations among attention biases and concurrent social outcomes were also investigated. In early childhood, 136 children abandoned at birth or shortly thereafter into institutional care were randomized to receive a high-quality foster care intervention or care-as-usual within the context of the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP). At 8 years of age, 50 care-as-usual, 55 foster care, and 52 community controls performed a behavioral dot-probe task, and indices of attention biases to threat and positive stimuli were calculated. Concurrent data on social behavior were collected. Children placed into the foster care intervention had a significant attention bias toward positive stimuli, while children who received care-as-usual had a significant bias toward threat. Children in the foster care intervention had a significantly larger positive bias when compared to the care-as-usual group. A positive bias was related to more social engagement, more prosocial behavior, less externalizing disorders, and less emotionally withdrawn behavior. The magnitude of positive bias was predicted by age of placement into foster care among children with a history of institutionalization. An attention bias towards positive stimuli was associated with reduced risk for behavioral problems amongst children who experienced early psychosocial deprivation. Research assessing attention biases in children experiencing early environmental stress may refine our understanding of the mechanisms underlying risk for later psychiatric and social disorders and inform prevention efforts. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Attention bias in adults with anorexia nervosa, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneier, Franklin R; Kimeldorf, Marcia B; Choo, Tse Hwei; Steinglass, Joanna E; Wall, Melanie M; Fyer, Abby J; Simpson, H Blair

    2016-08-01

    Attention bias to threat (selective attention toward threatening stimuli) has been frequently found in anxiety disorder samples, but its distribution both within and beyond this category is unclear. Attention bias has been studied extensively in social anxiety disorder (SAD) but relatively little in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), historically considered an anxiety disorder, or anorexia nervosa (AN), which is often characterized by interpersonal as well as body image/eating fears. Medication-free adults with SAD (n = 43), OCD (n = 50), or AN (n = 30), and healthy control volunteers (HC, n = 74) were evaluated for attention bias with an established dot probe task presenting images of angry and neutral faces. Additional outcomes included attention bias variability (ABV), which summarizes fluctuation in attention between vigilance and avoidance, and has been reported to have superior reliability. We hypothesized that attention bias would be elevated in SAD and associated with SAD severity. Attention bias in each disorder did not differ from HC, but within the SAD group attention bias correlated significantly with severity of social avoidance. ABV was significantly lower in OCD versus HC, and it correlated positively with severity of OCD symptoms within the OCD group. Findings do not support differences from HC in attention bias to threat faces for SAD, OCD, or AN. Within the SAD sample, the association of attention bias with severity of social avoidance is consistent with evidence that attention bias moderates development of social withdrawal. The association of ABV with OCD diagnosis and severity is novel and deserves further study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Review of Studies on Media Bias at Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛一丹

    2015-01-01

    Bias is widely existed nowadays.Domestic scholars have done a lot of research on the bias,especially the media bias.They studied the media bias from different perspectives,such as the bias on China image,the bias of a certain media FOX,the bias on the venerable group,the bias on women and so on.The author plans to give a review of the studies on media bias at home in this paper.

  16. A Review of Studies on Media Bias at Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛一丹

    2015-01-01

    Bias is widely existed nowadays. Domestic scholars have done a lot of research on the bias, especially the media bias. They studied the media bias from different perspectives, such as the bias on China image,the bias of a certain media FOX, the bias on the venerable group, the bias on women and so on. The author plans to give a review of the studies on media bias at home in this paper.

  17. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Background Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect–when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) –and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. Conclusions The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development. PMID:25007078

  18. Operation circuits of emissive probes for determination of potentials in discharge plasmas; Circuitos de operacao de sondas emissivas para a determinacao de potenciais em plasmas de descargas eletricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petraconi, G.; Maciel, H.S.; Borges, C. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica. Lab. de Plasmas e Processos

    1999-12-01

    In this paper two circuits for plasma potential measurement are presented. The first one is an emissive probe control circuit for fast probe characteristics reading. The second one is a differential emissive probe control circuit that adjusts the bias voltage automatically and allows a direct potential measurement. These circuits present inconveniences if the characteristic of the probe does not exhibit an ideal saturation of the current as show the results obtained in continuous current discharge and RF discharge. (author)

  19. Maternal anxiety and cognitive biases towards threat in their own and their child's environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Kathryn J; Field, Andy P; Cartwright-Hatton, Sam

    2012-10-01

    Cognitive biases are known to play an important role in anxiety. In this study we investigate whether maternal anxiety is associated with biases in interpretation, attention, and catastrophic processing about self-referent stimuli that may signal potential threat in the mother's own environment. We also investigate whether maternal anxiety is associated with biases about stimuli that their own child may encounter or to child-related stimuli more broadly. Three hundred mothers with a child aged 6 to 10 years participated. All participants completed a trait anxiety measure and an ambiguous sentences task to assess interpretation bias for self- and child-referent situations. A subset of the sample completed a catastrophizing interview about a self- (n = 194) or child-referent (n = 99) worry topic and an attentional dot-probe task (n = 99) with general threat and child threat stimuli. Maternal anxiety was not significantly associated with an attentional bias for general or child threat stimuli but was significantly associated with a bias for threat interpretations of both self and child-referent situations. Higher maternal anxiety was also significantly associated with generating more catastrophic outcomes to both a self-referent and child-referent hypothetical worry situation. We consider whether maternal cognitive biases, which extend to influence how mothers process potential threats in their child's world, may be an important mechanism through which intergenerational transmission of anxiety could occur.

  20. On Floating Potential of Emissive Probes in a Partially-Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Kraus, Brian

    2016-10-01

    We compare measurements of plasma potential in a cross-field Penning discharge from two probes: swept biased Langmuir probe and floating emissive probe. The plasma potential was deduced from the first derivative of the Langmuir probe characteristic. In previous studies, the emissive and swept biased probes were placed at the channel exit of a Hall thruster (HT). Measurements showed that the emissive probe floats below the plasma potential, in agreement with conventional theories. However, recent measurements in the Penning discharge indicate a floating potential of a strongly-emitting hot probe above the plasma potential. In both probe applications, xenon plasmas have magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions with similar plasma densities (1010 - 1011 cm-3) . Though their electron temperatures differ by an order of magnitude (Penning 5 eV, HT 50 eV), this difference cannot explain the difference in measurement values of the hot floating potential because both temperatures are much higher than the emitting wire. In this work, we investigate how the ion velocity and other plasma parameters affect this discrepancy between probe measurements of the plasma potential. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  1. Bias in Peripheral Depression Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Brunoni, André R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To aid in the differentiation of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) from healthy controls, numerous peripheral biomarkers have been proposed. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the existence of bias favoring the publication of significant results or inflating effect...... sizes has been conducted. METHODS: Here, we performed a comprehensive review of meta-analyses of peripheral nongenetic biomarkers that could discriminate individuals with MDD from nondepressed controls. PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched through April 10, 2015. RESULTS: From 15...

  2. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which...... is a general tendency to focus on numerators and pay insufficient attention to denominators in ratios. Using a population-based survey experiment, I demonstrate how differently framed but logically equivalent representations of the exact same numerical value can have large effects on citizens’ preferences...

  3. Magnetoelectric switching of exchange bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Pavel; Hochstrat, Andreas; Chen, Xi; Kleemann, Wolfgang; Binek, Christian

    2005-03-25

    The perpendicular exchange bias field, H(EB), of the magnetoelectric heterostructure Cr2O3(111)/(Co/Pt)(3) changes sign after field cooling to below the Néel temperature of Cr2O3 in either parallel or antiparallel axial magnetic and electric freezing fields. The switching of H(EB) is explained by magnetoelectrically induced antiferromagnetic single domains which extend to the interface, where the direction of their end spins controls the sign of H(EB). Novel applications in magnetoelectronic devices seem possible.

  4. Improved Analysis Techniques for Cylindrical and Spherical Double Probes (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    accounts for the finite, but non -negligible extent of the plasma sheath. One of the most extensive assessments of ion collection by a biased cylindrical...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 4 regardless of rP/λD so long as the electron distribution function is Maxwellian such that...731. 3 J.G. Laframboise, Theory of Spherical and Cylindrical Langmuir Probes in a Collisionless, Maxwellian Plasma at Rest, (University of Toronto

  5. RELIC: a novel dye-bias correction method for Illumina Methylation BeadChip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongli; Langie, Sabine A S; De Boever, Patrick; Taylor, Jack A; Niu, Liang

    2017-01-03

    The Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip and its successor, Infinium MethylationEPIC BeadChip, have been extensively utilized in epigenome-wide association studies. Both arrays use two fluorescent dyes (Cy3-green/Cy5-red) to measure methylation level at CpG sites. However, performance difference between dyes can result in biased estimates of methylation levels. Here we describe a novel method, called REgression on Logarithm of Internal Control probes (RELIC) to correct for dye bias on whole array by utilizing the intensity values of paired internal control probes that monitor the two color channels. We evaluate the method in several datasets against other widely used dye-bias correction methods. Results on data quality improvement showed that RELIC correction statistically significantly outperforms alternative dye-bias correction methods. We incorporated the method into the R package ENmix, which is freely available from the Bioconductor website ( https://www.bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/ENmix.html ). RELIC is an efficient and robust method to correct for dye-bias in Illumina Methylation BeadChip data. It outperforms other alternative methods and conveniently implemented in R package ENmix to facilitate DNA methylation studies.

  6. A Simulation Platform for Quantifying Survival Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayeda, Elizabeth Rose; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Power, Melinda C

    2016-01-01

    Bias due to selective mortality is a potential concern in many studies and is especially relevant in cognitive aging research because cognitive impairment strongly predicts subsequent mortality. Biased estimation of the effect of an exposure on rate of cognitive decline can occur when mortality i......-mortality situations. This simulation platform provides a flexible tool for evaluating biases in studies with high mortality, as is common in cognitive aging research.......Bias due to selective mortality is a potential concern in many studies and is especially relevant in cognitive aging research because cognitive impairment strongly predicts subsequent mortality. Biased estimation of the effect of an exposure on rate of cognitive decline can occur when mortality...... platform with which to quantify the expected bias in longitudinal studies of determinants of cognitive decline. We evaluated potential survival bias in naive analyses under several selective survival scenarios, assuming that exposure had no effect on cognitive decline for anyone in the population. Compared...

  7. Numeracy and framing bias in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunmi; Wong, John B; Mendiratta, Anil; Heiman, Gary A; Hamberger, Marla J

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy are frequently confronted with complex treatment decisions. Communicating treatment risks is often difficult because patients may have difficulty with basic statistical concepts (i.e., low numeracy) or might misconceive the statistical information based on the way information is presented, a phenomenon known as "framing bias." We assessed numeracy and framing bias in 95 adults with chronic epilepsy and explored cognitive correlates of framing bias. Compared with normal controls, patients with epilepsy had significantly poorer performance on the Numeracy scale (P=0.02), despite a higher level of education than normal controls (Pframing bias. Abstract problem solving performance correlated with the degree of framing bias (r=0.631, Pframing bias. Poor numeracy and susceptibility framing bias place patients with epilepsy at risk for uninformed decisions.

  8. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...... and tip Fermi levels. STM here involves coherent two-step interfacial electron transfer between the redox level and the enclosing substrate and tip. We have also extended previous experimental in situ STM studies of the blue copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin, adsorbed on Au(111), to cover...

  9. Peak exclusion, stochasticity and convergence of perturbative bias expansions in 1+1 gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Baldauf, Tobias; Desjacques, Vincent; Pichon, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The Lagrangian peaks of a 1D cosmological random field representing dark matter are used as a proxy for a catalogue of biased tracers in order to investigate the small-scale exclusion in the two-halo term. The two-point correlation function of peaks of a given height is numerically estimated and analytical approximations that are valid inside the exclusion zone are derived. The resulting power spectrum of these tracers is investigated and shows clear deviations from Poisson noise at low frequencies. On large scales, the convergence of a perturbative bias expansion is discussed. Finally, we go beyond Gaussian statistics for the initial conditions and investigate the subsequent evolution of the two-point clustering of peaks through their Zel'dovich ballistic displacement, to clarify how exclusion effects mix up with scale-dependencies induced by nonlinear gravitational evolution. While the expected large-scale separation limit is recovered, significant deviations are found in the exclusion zone that tends in pa...

  10. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  11. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  12. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  13. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  14. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  15. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  16. Observations and Models of Galaxy Assembly Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan A.

    2017-01-01

    The assembly history of dark matter haloes imparts various correlations between a halo’s physical properties and its large scale environment, i.e. assembly bias. It is common for models of the galaxy-halo connection to assume that galaxy properties are only a function of halo mass, implicitly ignoring how assembly bias may affect galaxies. Recently, programs to model and constrain the degree to which galaxy properties are influenced by assembly bias have been undertaken; however, the extent and character of galaxy assembly bias remains a mystery. Nevertheless, characterizing and modeling galaxy assembly bias is an important step in understanding galaxy evolution and limiting any systematic effects assembly bias may pose in cosmological measurements using galaxy surveys.I will present work on modeling and constraining the effect of assembly bias in two galaxy properties: stellar mass and star-formation rate. Conditional abundance matching allows for these galaxy properties to be tied to halo formation history to a variable degree, making studies of the relative strength of assembly bias possible. Galaxy-galaxy clustering and galactic conformity, the degree to which galaxy color is correlated between neighbors, are sensitive observational measures of galaxy assembly bias. I will show how these measurements can be used to constrain galaxy assembly bias and the peril of ignoring it.

  17. The Gigaparsec WiggleZ Simulations: Characterising scale dependant bias and associated systematics in growth of structure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Gregory B; Marin, Felipe A; Power, Chris; Mutch, Simon J; Croton, Darren J; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Drinkwater, Michael J; Glazebrook, Karl

    2014-01-01

    We present the Gigaparsec WiggleZ (GiggleZ) simulation suite and use this resource to characterise the effects of galaxy bias and its scale dependence on the two point correlation function of dark matter halos for a range of redshifts (z~1.2) and dark matter halo masses (100[km/s]~3) at large redshifts (z>~1). However, when smaller scales are incorporated (k_max>~0.2 [h/Mpc]), the combination of reduced statistical uncertainties and increased scale dependent bias effects can result in highly significant systematics for most large halos across all redshifts. We identify several new interesting aspects of scale dependent bias, including a significant halo bias boost for small halos at low-redshifts due to substructure effects (approximately 20% for Milky Way-like systems) and a halo mass that is nearly independent of redshift (corresponding to a redshift-space bias of approximately 1.5 at all redshifts) for which halo bias has no scale dependence on scales greater than 3 [Mpc/h]. This suggests an optimal strate...

  18. A fast spatial scanning combination emissive and mach probe for edge plasma diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmer, R.D.; LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-04-01

    A fast spatially scanning emissive and mach probe has been developed for the measurement of plasma profiles in the PISCES facility at UCLA. A pneumatic cylinder is used to drive a multiple tip probe along a 15cm stroke in less than 400msec, giving single shot profiles while limiting power deposition to the probe. A differentially pumped sliding O-ring seal allows the probe to be moved between shots to infer two and three dimensional profiles. The probe system has been used to investigate the plasma potential, density, and parallel mach number profiles of the presheath induced by a wall surface and scrape-off-layer profile modifications in biased limiter simulation experiments. Details of the hardware, data acquisition electronics, and tests of probe reliability are discussed. 30 refs., 24 figs.

  19. Forecasts: uncertain, inaccurate and biased?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Morten Skou; Ambrasaite, Inga; Salling, Kim Bang

    2012-01-01

    Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is the dominating methodology for appraisal of transport infrastructure projects across the globe. In order to adequately assess the costs and benefits of such projects two types of forecasts are crucial to the validity of the appraisal. First are the forecasts...... accuracy of project benefits. This paper presents results from an on-going research project on uncertainties in transport project evaluation (UNITE) that find forecasts of demand to be not only uncertain, but at times also highly inaccurate and often displaying a concerning degree of bias. Demand for road...... projects appear to be systematically underestimated, while demand for rail projects appears to be systematically overestimated. We compare the findings in the present study with those of previous studies and discuss the implications for the validity of project appraisal in the form of CBA...

  20. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Del Vicario, Michela; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM...

  1. Social reward shapes attentional biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to stimuli that predict a reward outcome is important for an organism to survive and thrive. When visual stimuli are associated with tangible, extrinsic rewards such as money or food, these stimuli acquire high attentional priority and come to automatically capture attention. In humans and other primates, however, many behaviors are not motivated directly by such extrinsic rewards, but rather by the social feedback that results from performing those behaviors. In the present study, I examine whether positive social feedback can similarly influence attentional bias. The results show that stimuli previously associated with a high probability of positive social feedback elicit value-driven attentional capture, much like stimuli associated with extrinsic rewards. Unlike with extrinsic rewards, however, such stimuli also influence task-specific motivation. My findings offer a potential mechanism by which social reward shapes the information that we prioritize when perceiving the world around us.

  2. Forecasts: uncertain, inaccurate and biased?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Morten Skou; Ambrasaite, Inga; Salling, Kim Bang

    2012-01-01

    Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is the dominating methodology for appraisal of transport infrastructure projects across the globe. In order to adequately assess the costs and benefits of such projects two types of forecasts are crucial to the validity of the appraisal. First are the forecasts...... of construction costs, which account for the majority of total project costs. Second are the forecasts of travel time savings, which account for the majority of total project benefits. The latter of these is, inter alia, determined by forecasts of travel demand, which we shall use as a proxy for the forecasting...... accuracy of project benefits. This paper presents results from an on-going research project on uncertainties in transport project evaluation (UNITE) that find forecasts of demand to be not only uncertain, but at times also highly inaccurate and often displaying a concerning degree of bias. Demand for road...

  3. Attentional bias to unhealthy food in individuals with severe obesity and binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluchi, Michelle; Costa, Fabiana Silva; Friedman, Rogério; Gonçalves, Raul; Bizarro, Lisiane

    2017-01-01

    Attentional bias is an implicit cognition relevant to development and maintenance of obesity, but little is known of how binge eating modulates attentional bias in severe obesity. This study investigated attentional bias towards unhealthy foods at different stages of attentional processing in a clinical sample, comparing obese patients (Body Mass Index, BMI>35 kg/m(2)) with and without binge eating behaviors. Participants were separated into two groups according to their score on the Binge Eating Scale (BES): no binge eating (NB; score ≤17; n = 23) and binge eating (BE; score > 17; n = 19). Participants performed a computerized visual probe task designed to evaluate attentional bias in different stages of attentional process; matching pairs of unhealthy food and matching non-food pictures concealed a target for 100, 500 or 2000 ms. Reduced reaction times to targets following food-related images are indicative of attentional bias towards food images. BE group exhibited a greater bias towards food than NB. Both groups showed positive attentional bias to food in the initial orientation stage (100 ms), whereas bias was close to zero in the maintenance of attention stage (2000 ms), suggesting ambivalent approach-avoidance responses to food stimuli. Only the BE group showed a bias towards food images when displayed for 500 ms, indicating disengaging from food-related stimuli was faster in NB group. Although both groups were ambivalent about attending to food cues, slower attentional disengagement from unhealthy food might be a cognitive marker of binge eating behavior in severe obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Improved analysis techniques for cylindrical and spherical double probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beal, Brian; Brown, Daniel; Bromaghim, Daron [Air Force Research Laboratory, 1 Ara Rd., Edwards Air Force Base, California 93524 (United States); Johnson, Lee [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Blakely, Joseph [ERC Inc., 1 Ara Rd., Edwards Air Force Base, California 93524 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    A versatile double Langmuir probe technique has been developed by incorporating analytical fits to Laframboise's numerical results for ion current collection by biased electrodes of various sizes relative to the local electron Debye length. Application of these fits to the double probe circuit has produced a set of coupled equations that express the potential of each electrode relative to the plasma potential as well as the resulting probe current as a function of applied probe voltage. These equations can be readily solved via standard numerical techniques in order to determine electron temperature and plasma density from probe current and voltage measurements. Because this method self-consistently accounts for the effects of sheath expansion, it can be readily applied to plasmas with a wide range of densities and low ion temperature (T{sub i}/T{sub e} Much-Less-Than 1) without requiring probe dimensions to be asymptotically large or small with respect to the electron Debye length. The presented approach has been successfully applied to experimental measurements obtained in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster, which produced a quasineutral, flowing xenon plasma during operation at 200 W on xenon. The measured plasma densities and electron temperatures were in the range of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and 0.5-5.0 eV, respectively. The estimated measurement uncertainty is +6%/-34% in density and +/-30% in electron temperature.

  5. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  6. Biased random walks on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battiston, Federico; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Biased random walks on complex networks are a particular type of walks whose motion is biased on properties of the destination node, such as its degree. In recent years they have been exploited to design efficient strategies to explore a network, for instance by constructing maximally mixing trajectories or by sampling homogeneously the nodes. In multiplex networks, the nodes are related through different types of links (layers or communication channels), and the presence of connections at different layers multiplies the number of possible paths in the graph. In this work we introduce biased random walks on multiplex networks and provide analytical solutions for their long-term properties such as the stationary distribution and the entropy rate. We focus on degree-biased walks and distinguish between two subclasses of random walks: extensive biased walks consider the properties of each node separately at each layer, intensive biased walks deal instead with intrinsically multiplex variables. We study the effec...

  7. Professional Culture and Climate: Addressing Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Patricia

    2016-10-01

    Unconscious bias reflects expectations or stereotypes that influence our judgments of others (regardless of our own group). Everyone has unconscious biases. The end result of unconscious bias can be an accumulation of advantage or disadvantage that impacts the long term career success of individuals, depending on which biases they are subject to. In order to foster a professional culture and climate, being aware of these unconscious biases and mitigating against them is a first step. This is particularly important when judgements are needed, such as in cases for recruitment, choice of speakers for conferences, and even reviewing papers submitted for publication. This presentation will cover how unconscious bias manifests itself, what evidence exists to demonstrate it exists, and ways it can be addressed.

  8. Symmetry as Bias: Rediscovering Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a rational reconstruction of Einstein's discovery of special relativity, validated through an implementation: the Erlanger program. Einstein's discovery of special relativity revolutionized both the content of physics and the research strategy used by theoretical physicists. This research strategy entails a mutual bootstrapping process between a hypothesis space for biases, defined through different postulated symmetries of the universe, and a hypothesis space for physical theories. The invariance principle mutually constrains these two spaces. The invariance principle enables detecting when an evolving physical theory becomes inconsistent with its bias, and also when the biases for theories describing different phenomena are inconsistent. Structural properties of the invariance principle facilitate generating a new bias when an inconsistency is detected. After a new bias is generated. this principle facilitates reformulating the old, inconsistent theory by treating the latter as a limiting approximation. The structural properties of the invariance principle can be suitably generalized to other types of biases to enable primal-dual learning.

  9. A Novel Integrated Structure with a Radial Displacement Sensor and a Permanent Magnet Biased Radial Magnetic Bearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinji Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel integrated structure is proposed in order to reduce the axial length of the high speed of a magnetically suspended motor (HSMSM to ensure the maximum speed, which combines radial displacement sensor probes and the permanent magnet biased radial magnetic bearing in HSMSM. The sensor probes are integrated in the magnetic bearing, and the sensor preamplifiers are placed in the control system of the HSMSM, separate from the sensor probes. The proposed integrated structure can save space in HSMSMs, improve the working frequency, reduce the influence of temperature on the sensor circuit, and improve the stability of HSMSMs.

  10. A novel integrated structure with a radial displacement sensor and a permanent magnet biased radial magnetic bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinji; Zhang, Yin

    2014-01-24

    In this paper, a novel integrated structure is proposed in order to reduce the axial length of the high speed of a magnetically suspended motor (HSMSM) to ensure the maximum speed, which combines radial displacement sensor probes and the permanent magnet biased radial magnetic bearing in HSMSM. The sensor probes are integrated in the magnetic bearing, and the sensor preamplifiers are placed in the control system of the HSMSM, separate from the sensor probes. The proposed integrated structure can save space in HSMSMs, improve the working frequency, reduce the influence of temperature on the sensor circuit, and improve the stability of HSMSMs.

  11. Lensing bias to CMB measurements of compensated isocurvature perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Chen He; Grin, Daniel; Hu, Wayne

    2016-08-01

    Compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs) are modes in which the baryon and dark matter density fluctuations cancel. They arise in the curvaton scenario as well as some models of baryogenesis. While they leave no observable effects on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at linear order, they do spatially modulate two-point CMB statistics and can be reconstructed in a manner similar to gravitational lensing. Due to the similarity between the effects of CMB lensing and CIPs, lensing contributes nearly Gaussian random noise to the CIP estimator that approximately doubles the reconstruction noise power. Additionally, the cross correlation between lensing and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect generates a correlation between the CIP estimator and the temperature field even in the absence of a correlated CIP signal. For cosmic-variance limited temperature measurements out to multipoles l ≤2500 , subtracting a fixed lensing bias degrades the detection threshold for CIPs by a factor of 1.3, whether or not they are correlated with the adiabatic mode.

  12. Development of simple designs of multitip probe diagnostic systems for RF plasma characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, M Y; Shukrullah, S; Ghaffar, A; Rehman, N U

    2014-01-01

    Multitip probes are very useful diagnostics for analyzing and controlling the physical phenomena occurring in low temperature discharge plasmas. However, DC biased probes often fail to perform well in processing plasmas. The objective of the work was to deduce simple designs of DC biased multitip probes for parametric study of radio frequency plasmas. For this purpose, symmetric double probe, asymmetric double probe, and symmetric triple probe diagnostic systems and their driving circuits were designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) source. Using I-V characteristics of these probes, electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current was measured as a function of input power and filling gas pressure. An increasing trend was noticed in electron temperature and electron number density for increasing input RF power whilst a decreasing trend was evident in these parameters when measured against filling gas pressure. In addition, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) was also studied by using an asymmetric double probe. These studies confirmed the non-Maxwellian nature of the EEPF and the presence of two groups of the energetic electrons at low filling gas pressures.

  13. Development of Simple Designs of Multitip Probe Diagnostic Systems for RF Plasma Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Naz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multitip probes are very useful diagnostics for analyzing and controlling the physical phenomena occurring in low temperature discharge plasmas. However, DC biased probes often fail to perform well in processing plasmas. The objective of the work was to deduce simple designs of DC biased multitip probes for parametric study of radio frequency plasmas. For this purpose, symmetric double probe, asymmetric double probe, and symmetric triple probe diagnostic systems and their driving circuits were designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP generated by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF source. Using I-V characteristics of these probes, electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current was measured as a function of input power and filling gas pressure. An increasing trend was noticed in electron temperature and electron number density for increasing input RF power whilst a decreasing trend was evident in these parameters when measured against filling gas pressure. In addition, the electron energy probability function (EEPF was also studied by using an asymmetric double probe. These studies confirmed the non-Maxwellian nature of the EEPF and the presence of two groups of the energetic electrons at low filling gas pressures.

  14. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. Prem; Vaganov, Vladislav [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-03

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of N=8 supergravity on AdS{sub 4}, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor ã{sub max}. Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy E≲ã{sub max}, while geodesics with E>ã{sub max} terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved “outward” in the Penrose diagram for the deformed AdS backgrounds, and thus geodesic limits of the antipodal correlators do not directly probe the crunch. Beyond the geodesic limit, we point out that the scalar wave equation, analytically continued into the FRW patch, has a potential which is singular at the crunch along with complex WKB turning points in the vicinity of the FRW crunch. We then argue that the frequency space Green’s function has a branch point determined by ã{sub max} which corresponds to the lowest quasinormal frequency.

  15. Political Accountability, Electoral Control, and Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Takanori; Hizen, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Are anti-establishment mass media really useful in preventing politicians from behaving dishonestly? This paper proposes a voting model for analyzing how differences in the direction of media bias affect politicians' behavior. In particular, the probability of corruption by an incumbent is higher (than that in the case of no media bias) if and only if the mass media have some degree of "anti-incumbent" bias (i.e., information favorable to the incumbent is converted into unfavorable news about...

  16. Electric control of exchange bias training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtenkamp, W; Binek, Ch

    2013-11-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias training and tunability are introduced. Isothermal voltage pulses are used to reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3), and thus continuously tune the exchange bias of an adjacent CoPd film. Voltage-controlled exchange bias training is initialized by tuning the antiferromagnetic interface into a nonequilibrium state incommensurate with the underlying bulk. Interpretation of these hitherto unreported effects contributes to new understanding in electrically controlled magnetism.

  17. Electric Control of Exchange Bias Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtenkamp, W.; Binek, Ch.

    2013-11-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias training and tunability are introduced. Isothermal voltage pulses are used to reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter of magnetoelectric Cr2O3, and thus continuously tune the exchange bias of an adjacent CoPd film. Voltage-controlled exchange bias training is initialized by tuning the antiferromagnetic interface into a nonequilibrium state incommensurate with the underlying bulk. Interpretation of these hitherto unreported effects contributes to new understanding in electrically controlled magnetism.

  18. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  19. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel L; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-06-01

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty.

  20. Cognitive interference and a food-related memory bias in binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svaldi, Jennifer; Schmitz, Florian; Trentowska, Monika; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Berking, Matthias; Naumann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The present study was concerned with cognitive interference and a specific memory bias for eating-related stimuli in binge eating disorder (BED). Further objectives were to find out under which circumstances such effects would occur, and whether they are related with each other and with reported severity of BED symptoms. A group of women diagnosed with BED and a matched sample of overweight controls completed two paradigms, an n-back task with lures and a recent-probes task. The BED group generally experienced more interference in the n-back task. Additionally, they revealed selectively increased interference for food items in the recent-probes task. Findings can be reconciled with the view that control functions are generally impaired in BED, and that there is an additional bias for eating-related stimuli, both of which were related with reported severity of BED symptoms.

  1. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  2. Guidelines for reducing bias in nursing examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisch, M L

    1994-01-01

    As our nation becomes more diversified, many schools of nursing strive to improve the recruitment and retention of English as a Second Language (ESL) and minority nursing students. An important aspect of this commitment to diversity is the reduction of biased items in nursing examinations, with the goal of making the evaluation process fair for all students. The author defines test and item bias, provides examples of biased items, and presents specific guidelines for decreasing item bias in teacher-made nursing examinations. A discussion of the related topic of whether ESL students should be given extended testing time is included.

  3. Bayesian long branch attraction bias and corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susko, Edward

    2015-03-01

    Previous work on the star-tree paradox has shown that Bayesian methods suffer from a long branch attraction bias. That work is extended to settings involving more taxa and partially resolved trees. The long branch attraction bias is confirmed to arise more broadly and an additional source of bias is found. A by-product of the analysis is methods that correct for biases toward particular topologies. The corrections can be easily calculated using existing Bayesian software. Posterior support for a set of two or more trees can thus be supplemented with corrected versions to cross-check or replace results. Simulations show the corrections to be highly effective.

  4. Attribution bias and social anxiety in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie M. Achim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on attribution biases in schizophrenia have produced mixed results, whereas such biases have been more consistently reported in people with anxiety disorders. Anxiety comorbidities are frequent in schizophrenia, in particular social anxiety disorder, which could influence their patterns of attribution biases. The objective of the present study was thus to determine if individuals with schizophrenia and a comorbid social anxiety disorder (SZ+ show distinct attribution biases as compared with individuals with schizophrenia without social anxiety (SZ− and healthy controls. Attribution biases were assessed with the Internal, Personal, and Situational Attributions Questionnaire in 41 individual with schizophrenia and 41 healthy controls. Results revealed the lack of the normal externalizing bias in SZ+, whereas SZ− did not significantly differ from healthy controls on this dimension. The personalizing bias was not influenced by social anxiety but was in contrast linked with delusions, with a greater personalizing bias in individuals with current delusions. Future studies on attribution biases in schizophrenia should carefully document symptom presentation, including social anxiety.

  5. Functional and structural amygdala - anterior cingulate connectivity correlates with attentional bias to masked fearful faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joshua M; Cha, Jiook; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R

    2013-10-01

    An attentional bias to threat has been causally related to anxiety. Recent research has linked nonconscious attentional bias to threat with variability in the integrity of the amygdala - anterior cingulate pathway, which sheds light on the neuroanatomical basis for a behavioral precursor to anxiety. However, the extent to which structural variability in amygdala - anterior cingulate integrity relates to the functional connectivity within this pathway and how such functional connectivity may relate to attention bias behavior, remain critical missing pieces of the puzzle. In 15 individuals we measured the structural integrity of the amygdala - prefrontal pathway with diffusion tensor-weighted MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), amygdala-seeded intrinsic functional connectivity to the anterior cingulate, and attentional bias toward backward masked fearful faces with a dot-probe task. We found that greater biases in attention to threat predicted greater levels of uncinate fasciculus integrity, greater positive amygdala - anterior cingulate functional connectivity, and greater amygdala coupling with a broader social perception network including the superior temporal sulcus, tempoparietal junction (TPJ), and somatosensory cortex. Additionally, greater levels of uncinate fasciculus integrity correlated with greater levels of amygdala - anterior cingulate intrinsic functional connectivity. Thus, high bias individuals displayed a heightened degree of amygdala - anterior cingulate connectivity during basal conditions, which we believe predisposes these individuals to focus their attention on signals of threat within their environment.

  6. Sleep-related attentional bias in insomnia: A state-of-the-science review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kamelia; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Espie, Colin A; MacMahon, Kenneth M A; Woods, Heather Cleland; Kyle, Simon D

    2015-12-01

    Prominent models of insomnia posit that sleep-related attentional bias plays an important role in the development and maintenance of insomnia. Here we conduct the first systematic review of the sleep-related attentional bias construct, indexed through reaction time-based experimental tasks. Literature search identified 13 studies that met pre-defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies involved between-group comparisons (poor sleepers versus controls), as well as sleep manipulations and correlational investigations with healthy sleepers. For studies involving comparisons between poor sleepers and healthy controls, effect size estimates were computed for task-relevant dependent variables. Six of the nine studies comparing poor sleepers and controls revealed statistically significant group differences in support of a differential sleep-related attentional bias (medium-to-large effect sizes), with flicker, dot-probe and Posner tasks being most sensitive to group effects. Due to the paucity of studies and variability in design and measurement, no conclusions could be reached regarding manipulation or induction of attentional bias in good sleepers. Results from the relatively small number of studies support the presence of sleep-related attentional bias in insomnia; however, its role in the development and/or maintenance of insomnia remains to be elucidated. We set out a research agenda aimed at advancing the understanding of sleep-related attention bias.

  7. G-stack modulated probe intensities on expression arrays - sequence corrections and signal calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasold Mario

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The brightness of the probe spots on expression microarrays intends to measure the abundance of specific mRNA targets. Probes with runs of at least three guanines (G in their sequence show abnormal high intensities which reflect rather probe effects than target concentrations. This G-bias requires correction prior to downstream expression analysis. Results Longer runs of three or more consecutive G along the probe sequence and in particular triple degenerated G at its solution end ((GGG1-effect are associated with exceptionally large probe intensities on GeneChip expression arrays. This intensity bias is related to non-specific hybridization and affects both perfect match and mismatch probes. The (GGG1-effect tends to increase gradually for microarrays of later GeneChip generations. It was found for DNA/RNA as well as for DNA/DNA probe/target-hybridization chemistries. Amplification of sample RNA using T7-primers is associated with strong positive amplitudes of the G-bias whereas alternative amplification protocols using random primers give rise to much smaller and partly even negative amplitudes. We applied positional dependent sensitivity models to analyze the specifics of probe intensities in the context of all possible short sequence motifs of one to four adjacent nucleotides along the 25meric probe sequence. Most of the longer motifs are adequately described using a nearest-neighbor (NN model. In contrast, runs of degenerated guanines require explicit consideration of next nearest neighbors (GGG terms. Preprocessing methods such as vsn, RMA, dChip, MAS5 and gcRMA only insufficiently remove the G-bias from data. Conclusions Positional and motif dependent sensitivity models accounts for sequence effects of oligonucleotide probe intensities. We propose a positional dependent NN+GGG hybrid model to correct the intensity bias associated with probes containing poly-G motifs. It is implemented as a single-chip based calibration

  8. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  9. Probing Properties of Cold Radiofrequency Plasma with Polymer Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward; Multanen, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows estimation of the Debye length of the cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  10. Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows thermal and electrical conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  11. Atom probe tomography today

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Cerezo; Peter H. Clifton; Mark J. Galtrey; Humphreys, Colin J.; Kelly, Thomas. F.; David J. Larson; Sergio Lozano-Perez; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Gang Sha; Keith Thompson; Mathijs Zandbergen; Roger L. Alvis

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments) but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks) and also...

  12. Feasibility Study for Acquiring Sa(z) Value of Background Aerosol Using Two-Point Calibration Method%两点标定法求解背景气溶胶Sa(z)值的可行性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘厚通; 赵建新; 莫须涛; 韩玉峰

    2013-01-01

    对两点标定法求解气溶胶消光后向散射比Sa(z)的可行性进行了研究.讨论了利用两点标定法反演气溶胶消光后向散射比的精度和两标定点之间距离的关系:当两点之间的距离大于1 km时,利用两点标定法得到的气溶胶消光后向散射比是可靠的.对比分析了两标定点间的距离大小及两种不同的迭代方法对两标定点之间气溶胶消光后向散射比反演结果的影响.并对两点标定法用于气溶胶消光后向散射比反演时,预先对反演结果进行误差估计的可行性进行了探讨.实际反演结果表明,利用两点标定法进行气溶胶消光后向散射比的反演,当两标定点之间的距离大于1 km且标定点的气溶胶消光系数的误差为5%时,反演得到两标定点之间气溶胶消光后向散射比的误差一般不会超过6%.%Feasibility of using two-point calibration method to acquire aerosol extinction-to-backscattering ratio is explored. Two-point calibration method is one of the important methods for acquiring aerosol extinction-to-backscattering ratio. The relationship between the distance of the two calibration points and the accuracy of aerosol extinction-to-backscattering ratio acquired by using two-point calibration method is discussed. The aerosol extinction-to-backscattering ratio obtained by using two-point calibration method is reliable when the distance between the two points is greater than 1 km. The influence of the distance between the two calibration points on the inversion results of aerosol extinction-to-backscattering ratio from one calibration point to another one is analyzed. The influence to aerosol extinction-to-backscattering ratio inversion results of two different iterative methods is discussed. The feasibility of beforehand error estimation of inversion results when two-point calibration method is used for the inversion of aerosol extinction-to-backscattering ratio is investigated. The inversion

  13. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  14. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  15. Deaging and Asymmetric Energy Landscapes in Electrically Biased Ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutuncu, Goknur; Damjanovic, Dragan; Chen, Jun; Jones, Jacob L. (Ecole); (UST - China); (Florida)

    2015-09-01

    In ferroic materials, the dielectric, piezoelectric, magnetic, and elastic coefficients are significantly affected by the motion of domain walls. This motion can be described as the propagation of a wall across various types and strengths of pinning centers that collectively constitute a force profile or energetic landscape. Biased domain structures and asymmetric energy landscapes can be created through application of high fields (such as during electrical poling), and the material behavior in such states is often highly asymmetric. In some cases, this behavior can be considered as the electric analogue to the Bauschinger effect. The present Letter uses time-resolved, high-energy x-ray Bragg scattering to probe this asymmetry and the associated deaging effect in the ferroelectric morphotropic phase boundary composition 0.36BiScO{sub 3}-0.64PbTiO{sub 3}.

  16. Control of quantum magnets by atomic exchange bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shichao; Choi, Deung-Jang; Burgess, Jacob A J; Rolf-Pissarczyk, Steffen; Loth, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of discretized states in quantum magnets has a radical impact on their properties. Managing this effect is key for spintronics in the quantum limit. Magnetic fields can modify state mixing and, for example, mitigate destabilizing effects in single-molecule magnets. The exchange bias field has been proposed as a mechanism for localized control of individual nanomagnets. Here, we demonstrate that exchange coupling with the magnetic tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope provides continuous tuning of spin state mixing in an individual nanomagnet. By directly measuring spin relaxation time with electronic pump-probe spectroscopy, we find that the exchange interaction acts analogously to a local magnetic field that can be applied to a specific atom. It can be tuned in strength by up to several tesla and cancel external magnetic fields, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of complete control over individual quantum magnets with atomically localized exchange coupling.

  17. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  18. Effect of biasing on plasma rotation in the edge of IR-T1 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Arvin, R.; Gheydi, M.; Nikmohammadi, A. [Plasma physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O.Box: 14665-768 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorshid, P.; Bolourian, H. [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Electrode biasing experiments were carried out on the IR-T1 Tokamak. The effects of radial electric field (Er) on plasma fluid velocity and magnetic island rotation investigated by a Mach/Langmuir electric probe and an array of 12 Mirnov coils. The Results have shown a change in the fluid velocity during biasing regime. References: [1] Van Oost G. et al. 2001 Czech. J. of Phys. 51 957; [2] Effect of Plasma Biasing on Suppression of Electrostatic Fluctuation in the Edge Region of STP-3(M) Reversed Field Pinch J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 74 (2005) pp.605-612; [3] Weynants R. R. and Van Oost G. 1993 Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 35 B177. (authors)

  19. Effect of particle size on the exchange bias of Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, S. Y.; Yuan, S. L.; Tian, Z. M.; Liu, L.; Wang, C. H.; Zheng, X. F.; Duan, H. N.; Huo, S. X.

    2010-02-01

    Effect of particle size on exchange bias in Fe-doped CuO nanoparticles is investigated, which are sintered at different temperatures from 350 to 650 °C, respectively. The structure and magnetic properties for different particle size samples were probed. It is found that the system shows magnetic properties transition from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic with increasing grain size, and exhibits the variations in exchange bias field (HEB) and coercivity (HC) at low temperature after field-cooled from 300 K. With the increase in the particles size, HEB decreases monotonously. Furthermore, vertical magnetization shift was also observed for the small particles. Exchange bias is attributed to the exchange coupling interactions between ferromagnetic and spin-glass-like (or antiferromagnetic) phase interface layers.

  20. Mapping motion of antiferromagnetic interfacial uncompensated magnetic moment in exchange-biased bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Ma, L.; Shi, Z.; Fan, W. J.; Evans, R. F. L.; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Chantrell, R. W.; Mangin, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhou, S. M.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, disordered-IrMn3/insulating-Y3Fe5O12 exchange-biased bilayers are studied. The behavior of the net magnetic moment ΔmAFM in the antiferromagnet is directly probed by anomalous and planar Hall effects, and anisotropic magnetoresistance. The ΔmAFM is proved to come from the interfacial uncompensated magnetic moment. We demonstrate that the exchange bias and rotational hysteresis loss are induced by partial rotation and irreversible switching of the ΔmAFM. In the athermal training effect, the state of the ΔmAFM cannot be recovered after one cycle of hysteresis loop. This work highlights the fundamental role of the ΔmAFM in the exchange bias and facilitates the manipulation of antiferromagnetic spintronic devices.

  1. The luminosity and stellar mass functions of GRB host galaxies: Insight into the metallicity bias

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, Michele; Jimenez, Raul

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are powerful probes of the star formation history of the Universe, but the correlation between the two depends on the highly debated presence and strength of a metallicity bias. To investigate this correlation, we use a phenomenological model that successfully describes star formation rates, luminosities and stellar masses of star forming galaxies, and apply it to GRB production. We predict the comoving GRB rate and luminosities/stellar masses of host galaxies depending on the presence (or absence) of a metallicity bias, highlighting that apparent conflicts among previous studies might disappear following a comprehensive data-model comparison. We conclude that: (1) Our best fitting model includes a moderate metallicity bias, broadly consistent with the large majority of the long-duration GRBs in metal-poor environments originating from a collapsar (~83%), but with a secondary contribution from a metal-independent production channel, such as binary evolution; (2...

  2. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vicario, Michela; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM and RUCM), unlike the BCM, are able to explain the coexistence of two stable final opinions, often observed in reality. Lastly, we present a mean field approximation of the newly introduced models. PMID:28074874

  3. Zero-bias spin separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganichev, Sergey D.; Bel'Kov, Vasily V.; Tarasenko, Sergey A.; Danilov, Sergey N.; Giglberger, Stephan; Hoffmann, Christoph; Ivchenko, Eougenious L.; Weiss, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; Gerl, Christian; Schuh, Dieter; Stahl, Joachim; de Boeck, Jo; Borghs, Gustaaf; Prettl, Wilhelm

    2006-09-01

    The generation, manipulation and detection of spin-polarized electrons in low-dimensional semiconductors are at the heart of spintronics. Pure spin currents, that is, fluxes of magnetization without charge current, are quite attractive in this respect. A paradigmatic example is the spin Hall effect, where an electrical current drives a transverse spin current and causes a non-equilibrium spin accumulation observed near the sample boundary. Here we provide evidence for an another effect causing spin currents which is fundamentally different from the spin Hall effect. In contrast to the spin Hall effect, it does not require an electric current to flow: without bias the spin separation is achieved by spin-dependent scattering of electrons in media with suitable symmetry. We show, by free-carrier absorption of terahertz (THz) radiation, that spin currents flow in a wide range of temperatures. Moreover, the experimental results provide evidence that simple electron gas heating by any means is already sufficient to yield spin separation due to spin-dependent energy-relaxation processes.

  4. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vicario, Michela; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM and RUCM), unlike the BCM, are able to explain the coexistence of two stable final opinions, often observed in reality. Lastly, we present a mean field approximation of the newly introduced models.

  5. Media bias under direct and indirect government control: when is the bias smaller?

    OpenAIRE

    Abhra Roy

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical framework to compare media bias under direct and indirect government control. In this context, we show that direct control can lead to a smaller bias and higher welfare than indirect control. We further show that the size of the advertising market affects media bias only under direct control. Media bias, under indirect control, is not affected by the size of the advertising market.

  6. Profile Control by Biased Electrodes in Large Diameter RF Produced Pl asma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Yoshinaka, Toshiro

    1998-10-01

    Control of the plasma profile has been carried out, using the voltage biasing method in the large diameter (45 cm) RF (radio frequency) produced plasma in the presence of the uniform magnetic field (less than 1200 G). Under the low filling pressure condition of 0.16 mTorr, changing the biasing voltages to the three individual end plates with concentric circular ring shapes, the radial electron density (about 10^10 cm-3) profile could be changed from the hollow to the peaked one. On the contrary, the nearly flat electron temperature (several eV) profile did not change appreciably. The azimuthal rotation velocity measured by the Mach probe, i.e. directional probe, showed the different radial profiles (but nearly uniform along the axis) depending on the biasing voltage. This velocity became slower with the low magnetic field (less than 200 G) or in the higher pressure regime up to 20 mTorr with the higher electron density. The experimental results by other biasing methods will also be presented.

  7. A set-up for a biased electrode experiment in ADITYA Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyani, Pravesh; Ghosh, Joydeep; Sathyanarayana, K.; Praveenlal, V. E.; Gautam, Pramila; Shah, Minsha; Tanna, R. L.; Kumar, Pintu; Chavda, C.; Patel, N. C.; Panchal, V.; Gupta, C. N.; Jadeja, K. A.; Bhatt, S. B.; Kumar, S.; Raju, D.; Atrey, P. K.; Joisa, S.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-01

    An experimental set-up to investigate the effect of a biased electrode introduced in the edge region on ADITYA tokamak discharges is presented. A specially designed double-bellow mechanical assembly is fabricated for controlling the electrode location as well as its exposed length inside the plasma. The cylindrical molybdenum electrode is powered by a capacitor-bank based pulsed power supply (PPS) using a semiconductor controlled rectifier (SCR) as a switch with forced commutation. A Langmuir probe array for radial profile measurements of plasma potential and density is fabricated and installed. Standard results of improvement of global confinement have been obtained using a biased electrode. In addition to that, in this paper we show for the first time that the same biasing system can be used to avoid disruptions through stabilisation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Real time disruption control experiments have also been carried out by triggering the bias-voltage on the electrode automatically when the Mirnov probe signal exceeds a preset threshold value using a uniquely designed electronic comparator circuit. Most of the results related to the improved confinement and disruption mitigation are obtained in case of the electrode tip being kept at ~3 cm inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS) with an exposed length of ~20 mm in typical discharges of ADITYA tokamak.

  8. Attentional biases in children of depressed mothers: An event-related potential (ERP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Brandon E; Pollak, Seth D; Hajcak, Greg; Owens, Max

    2016-11-01

    Although a number of studies have reported that children of depressed, compared to nondepressed, parents exhibit biased attention to sad facial stimuli, the direction of this bias remains unclear; some studies find evidence of preferential attention toward sad faces whereas others find evidence of attention avoidance. In the current study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to assess children's attention to emotional stimuli using a spatial cueing task. Across all indices of attention bias (N2pc and sustained posterior contralateral negativity [SPCN] time locked to face onset, P3b time locked to probe onset, reaction times [RTs] to probes), children of mothers with a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) during the child's life exhibited less attention to sad faces than children of never depressed mothers. For two of these indices (SPCN and RTs), the attention biases for the offspring of depressed mothers was not specific to sadness and was observed for all emotional expressions. Group differences in the ERP indices were maintained when controlling for the influence of mothers' and children's current symptoms of depression and anxiety, mothers' history of anxiety disorders, and children's history of MDD and anxiety disorders, suggesting that the results are specific to mothers' history of MDD. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Understanding Unconscious Bias and Unintentional Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Unconscious biases affect one's relationships, whether they are fleeting relationships in airports or longer term relationships between teachers and students, teachers and parents, teachers and other educators. In this article, the author argues that understanding one's possible biases is essential for developing community in schools.…

  10. Belief biases and volatility of assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei-Sun, Wen-Zou, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Based on an overlapping generation model, this paper introduces the noise traders with belief biases and rational traders. With an equilibrium analysis, this paper examines the volatility of risky asset. The results show that the belief biases, the probability of economy state, and the domain capability are all the factors that have effects on the volatility of the market.

  11. COVARIATION BIAS AND THE RETURN OF FEAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter; VANDENHOUT, MA; MERCKELBACH, H

    1995-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that phobic fear is accompanied by a covariation bias, i.e. that phobic Ss tend to overassociate fear relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes. Such a covariation bias seems to be a fairly direct and powerful way to confirm danger expectations and enhance fear. Therefore

  12. Bounding the bias of contrastive divergence learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Anja; Igel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Optimization based on k-step contrastive divergence (CD) has become a common way to train restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs). The k-step CD is a biased estimator of the log-likelihood gradient relying on Gibbs sampling. We derive a new upper bound for this bias. Its magnitude depends on k...

  13. Length-biased Weighted Maxwell Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanak Modi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of length-biased distribution can be employed in development of proper models for life-time data. In this paper, we develop the length-biased form of Weighted Maxwell distribution (WMD. We study the statistical properties of the derived distribution including moments, moment generating function, hazard rate, reverse hazard rate, Shannon entropy and estimation of parameters

  14. Developmental Changes in the Whole Number Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, David W.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Many students' knowledge of fractions is adversely affected by whole number bias, the tendency to focus on the separate whole number components (numerator and denominator) of a fraction rather than on the fraction's integrated magnitude (ratio of numerator to denominator). Although whole number bias appears early in the fraction learning process…

  15. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    In stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In Choice Experiments, status quo bias is found to be strongly correlated with protest attitudes...

  16. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    to be superior, i.e. a status quo effect. However, in the stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In the Choice Experiment literature, status quo bias...

  17. Distinctive Characteristics of Sexual Orientation Bias Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question:…

  18. On Measurement Bias in Causal Inference

    CERN Document Server

    Pearl, Judea

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of measurement errors in causal inference and highlights several algebraic and graphical methods for eliminating systematic bias induced by such errors. In particulars, the paper discusses the control of partially observable confounders in parametric and non parametric models and the computational problem of obtaining bias-free effect estimates in such models.

  19. Understanding Implicit Bias: What Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The desire to ensure the best for children is precisely why educators should become aware of the concept of implicit bias: the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. Operating outside of our conscious awareness, implicit biases are pervasive, and they can challenge even the most…

  20. Racially Biased Policing: Determinants of Citizen Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzer, Ronald; Tuch, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    The current controversy surrounding racial profiling in America has focused renewed attention on the larger issue of racial bias by the police. Yet little is known about the extent of police racial bias and even less about public perceptions of the problem. This article analyzes recent national survey data on citizens' views of and reported…

  1. Distinctive Characteristics of Sexual Orientation Bias Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question:…

  2. C12/C13-ratio determination in nanodiamonds by atom-probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Josiah B; Isheim, Dieter; Floss, Christine; Seidman, David N

    2015-12-01

    The astrophysical origins of ∼ 3 nm-diameter meteoritic nanodiamonds can be inferred from the ratio of C12/C13. It is essential to achieve high spatial and mass resolving power and minimize all sources of signal loss in order to obtain statistically significant measurements. We conducted atom-probe tomography on meteoritic nanodiamonds embedded between layers of Pt. We describe sample preparation, atom-probe tomography analysis, 3D reconstruction, and bias correction. We present new data from meteoritic nanodiamonds and terrestrial standards and discuss methods to correct isotopic measurements made with the atom-probe tomograph.

  3. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  4. Probe-based data storage

    CERN Document Server

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Abelmann, L

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based data storage attracted many researchers from academia and industry, resulting in unprecendeted high data-density demonstrations. This topical review gives a comprehensive overview of the main contributions that led to the major accomplishments in probe-based data storage. The most investigated technologies are reviewed: topographic, phase-change, magnetic, ferroelectric and atomic and molecular storage. Also, the positioning of probes and recording media, the cantilever arrays and parallel readout of the arrays of cantilevers are discussed. This overview serves two purposes. First, it provides an overview for new researchers entering the field of probe storage, as probe storage seems to be the only way to achieve data storage at atomic densities. Secondly, there is an enormous wealth of invaluable findings that can also be applied to many other fields of nanoscale research such as probe-based nanolithography, 3D nanopatterning, solid-state memory technologies and ultrafast probe microscopy.

  5. Implicit Social Biases in People With Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, Elina; Stanley, Damian; Nair, Remya; Adolphs, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    Implicit social biases are ubiquitous and are known to influence social behavior. A core diagnostic criterion of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is abnormal social behavior. We investigated the extent to which individuals with ASD might show a specific attenuation of implicit social biases, using Implicit Association Tests (IATs) involving social (gender, race) and nonsocial (nature, shoes) categories. High-functioning adults with ASD showed intact but reduced IAT effects relative to healthy control participants. We observed no selective attenuation of implicit social (vs. nonsocial) biases in our ASD population. To extend these results, we supplemented our healthy control data with data collected from a large online sample from the general population and explored correlations between autistic traits and IAT effects. We observed no systematic relationship between autistic traits and implicit social biases in our online and control samples. Taken together, these results suggest that implicit social biases, as measured by the IAT, are largely intact in ASD.

  6. Adaptive Variable Bias Magnetic Bearing Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    Most magnetic bearing control schemes use a bias current with a superimposed control current to linearize the relationship between the control current and the force it delivers. With the existence of the bias current, even in no load conditions, there is always some power consumption. In aerospace applications, power consumption becomes an important concern. In response to this concern, an alternative magnetic bearing control method, called Adaptive Variable Bias Control (AVBC), has been developed and its performance examined. The AVBC operates primarily as a proportional-derivative controller with a relatively slow, bias current dependent, time-varying gain. The AVBC is shown to reduce electrical power loss, be nominally stable, and provide control performance similar to conventional bias control. Analytical, computer simulation, and experimental results are presented in this paper.

  7. Are all biases missing data problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Chanelle J; Cain, Lauren E; Hogan, Joseph W

    2015-09-01

    Estimating causal effects is a frequent goal of epidemiologic studies. Traditionally, there have been three established systematic threats to consistent estimation of causal effects. These three threats are bias due to confounders, selection, and measurement error. Confounding, selection, and measurement bias have typically been characterized as distinct types of biases. However, each of these biases can also be characterized as missing data problems that can be addressed with missing data solutions. Here we describe how the aforementioned systematic threats arise from missing data as well as review methods and their related assumptions for reducing each bias type. We also link the assumptions made by the reviewed methods to the missing completely at random (MCAR) and missing at random (MAR) assumptions made in the missing data framework that allow for valid inferences to be made based on the observed, incomplete data.

  8. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the spe...

  9. A catalog of biases in questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bernard C K; Pak, Anita W P

    2005-01-01

    Bias in questionnaires is an important issue in public health research. To collect the most accurate data from respondents, investigators must understand and be able to prevent or at least minimize bias in the design of their questionnaires. This paper identifies and categorizes 48 types of bias in questionnaires based on a review of the literature and offers an example of each type. The types are categorized according to three main sources of bias: the way a question is designed, the way the questionnaire as a whole is designed, and how the questionnaire is administered. This paper is intended to help investigators in public health understand the mechanism and dynamics of problems in questionnaire design and to provide a checklist for identifying potential bias in a questionnaire before it is administered.

  10. Eulerian bias and the galaxy density field

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, B M; Heavens, A F; Mann, Bob; Peacock, John; Heavens, Alan

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the effects on cosmological clustering statistics of empirical biasing, where the galaxy distribution is a local transformation of the present-day Eulerian density field. The effects of the suppression of galaxy numbers in voids, and their enhancement in regions of high density, are considered, independently and in combination. We compare results from numerical simulations with the predictions of simple analytic models. We find that the bias is generally scale-dependent, so that the shape of the galaxy power spectrum differs from that of the underlying mass distribution. The degree of bias is always a monotonic function of scale, tending to an asymptotic value on scales where the density fluctuations are linear. The scale dependence is often rather weak, with many reasonable prescriptions giving a bias which is nearly independent of scale. We have investigated whether such an Eulerian bias can reconcile a range of theoretical power spectra with the twin requirements of fitting the galaxy power ...

  11. Sampling Bias on Cup Anemometer Mean Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L.; Hansen, O. F.; Højstrup, J.

    2003-10-01

    The cup anemometer signal can be sampled in several ways to obtain the mean wind speed. Here we discuss the sampling of series of mean wind speeds from consecutive rotor rotations, followed by unweighted and weighted averaging. It is shown that the unweighted averaging creates a positive bias on the long-term mean wind speed, which is at least one order of magnitude larger than the positive bias from the weighted averaging, also known as the sample-and-hold method. For a homogeneous, neutrally stratified flow the first biases are 1%-2%. For comparison the biases due to fluctuations of the three wind velocity components and due to calibration non-linearity are determined under the same conditions. The largest of these is the v-bias from direction fluctuations. The calculations pertain to the Risø P2546A model cup anemometer.

  12. Effects of electrode biasing in STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Nakajima, Masaru; Rohollahi, Akbar; McColl, David; Adegun, Joseph; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira

    2015-11-01

    STOR-M is an iron-core, limiter based tokamak with major and minor radii of 46cm and 12 cm, respectively. Recently, electrode biasing experiments have been carried to study the improved confinement. For this purpose we have developed a DC power supply which can be gated by a high power SCR. The rectangular SS electrode has a height of 10 cm, a width of 2 cm and a thickness of 0.2 cm. The radial position of the electrode throughout the experiments is kept around 4mm inside the limiter in the plasma edge region. After application of positive bias with voltages between +90 V to +110 V during the plasma discharge current flat top with slightly higher edge-qa (nearly 5 to 6), noticeable increment of average plasma density and soft x-ray intensity along the central chord have been observed. No distinguishable change in H α emission has been measured. These phenomena may be attributed to improved confinement formed at the inner region but not at the edge. In the upcoming experimental campaign, Ion Doppler spectroscopy will be used to measure possible velocity shear inside the inner plasma region. Edge plasma pressure gradient will also be measured using Langmuir probes. Detailed experimental results will be presented.

  13. Ion flow and sheath structure near positively biased electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, R.; Scheiner, B.; Baalrud, S. D.; Hopkins, M. M.; Barnat, E. V.; Yee, B. T.; Merlino, R. L.; Skiff, F.

    2016-11-01

    What effect does a dielectric material surrounding a small positively biased electrode have on the ion flow and sheath structure near the electrode? Measurements of the ion velocity distribution function and plasma potential near positively biased electrodes were made using laser-induced fluorescence and an emissive probe. The results were compared with 2D particle-in-cell simulations. Both measurements and simulations showed that when the positive electrode was surrounded by the dielectric material, ions were accelerated toward the electrode to approximately 0.5 times the ion sound speed before being deflected radially by the electron sheath potential barrier of the electrode. The axial potential profile in this case contained a virtual cathode. In comparison, when the dielectric material was removed from around the electrode, both the ion flow and virtual cathode depth near the electrode were dramatically reduced. These measurements suggest that the ion presheath from the dielectric material surrounding the electrode may enclose the electron sheath of the electrode, resulting in a virtual cathode that substantially influences the ion flow profile in the region.

  14. Medical journal peer review: process and bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan D; Boswell, Mark V; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    Scientific peer review is pivotal in health care research in that it facilitates the evaluation of findings for competence, significance, and originality by qualified experts. While the origins of peer review can be traced to the societies of the eighteenth century, it became an institutionalized part of the scholarly process in the latter half of the twentieth century. This was a response to the growth of research and greater subject specialization. With the current increase in the number of specialty journals, the peer review process continues to evolve to meet the needs of patients, clinicians, and policy makers. The peer review process itself faces challenges. Unblinded peer review might suffer from positive or negative bias towards certain authors, specialties, and institutions. Peer review can also suffer when editors and/or reviewers might be unable to understand the contents of the submitted manuscript. This can result in an inability to detect major flaws, or revelations of major flaws after acceptance of publication by the editors. Other concerns include potentially long delays in publication and challenges uncovering plagiarism, duplication, corruption and scientific misconduct. Conversely, a multitude of these challenges have led to claims of scientific misconduct and an erosion of faith. These challenges have invited criticism of the peer review process itself. However, despite its imperfections, the peer review process enjoys widespread support in the scientific community. Peer review bias is one of the major focuses of today's scientific assessment of the literature. Various types of peer review bias include content-based bias, confirmation bias, bias due to conservatism, bias against interdisciplinary research, publication bias, and the bias of conflicts of interest. Consequently, peer review would benefit from various changes and improvements with appropriate training of reviewers to provide quality reviews to maintain the quality and integrity of

  15. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  16. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  17. Experimental probes of axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  18. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  19. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    characterized as being highly nomadic and thus potential users of mobile and ubiquitous technologies. The methodology has been applied in the 1ST MAGNET Beyond project in order to obtain user needs and requirements in the process of developing pilot services. We report on the initial findings from applying......Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...

  20. Design and Analysis of a BLPC Vocoder with Probe Noise for Adaptive Feedback Cancellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Asutosh; Swamy, M.N.S.; Anand, Ankita

    2017-01-01

    a BLPC vocoderbased adaptive feedback canceller with probe noise with an objective of reducing the low-frequency bias in digital hearing-aids. A step-wise mathematical analysis of the proposed feedback canceller is presented employing the recursive least square and normalized least mean square adaptive...

  1. Revisiting plasma hysteresis with an electronically compensated Langmuir probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2012-09-01

    The measurement of electron temperature in plasma by Langmuir probes, using ramped bias voltage, is seriously affected by the capacitive current of capacitance of the cable between the probe tip and data acquisition system. In earlier works a dummy cable was used to balance the capacitive currents. Under these conditions, the measured capacitive current was kept less than a few mA. Such probes are suitable for measurements in plasma where measured ion saturation current is of the order of hundreds of mA. This paper reports that controlled balancing of capacitive current can be minimized to less than 20 μA, allowing plasma measurements to be done with ion saturation current of the order of hundreds of μA. The electron temperature measurement made by using probe compensation technique becomes independent of sweep frequency. A correction of ≤45% is observed in measured electron temperature values when compared with uncompensated probe. This also enhances accuracy in the measurement of fluctuation in electron temperature as δTpk-pk changes by ˜30%. The developed technique with swept rate ≤100 kHz is found accurate enough to measure both the electron temperature and its fluctuating counterpart. This shows its usefulness in measuring accurately the temperature fluctuations because of electron temperature gradient in large volume plasma device plasma with frequency ordering ≤50 kHz.

  2. Probing the High-Redshift Universe Using Fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave and Infrared Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, Joseph Michael

    Background (CIB) continues to be one of the best probes of physics at the early stages of the universe. If the CMB were a purely Gaussian field, all statistical information would be contained in the power spectrum or two-point correlation function. However, non-Gaussianities ensure that new physics may be extracted from higher n-point correlation functions including the bispectrum and trispectrum of the CMB. In this thesis discuss new estimators we have formulated to probe primordial non-Gaussianity in the bispectrum and trispectrum of CMB data and the constraints we have made using WMAP data while discussing implications for inflationary models. I discuss how these same methods may be used to probe CMB Lensing. Finally, I discuss how upcoming measurements of near and far-infrared CIB fluctuations may be used to constrain the redshift of reionization and clustering of various populations of galaxies. Some preliminary results involving CANDELS, Spitzer SDWFS, CIBER and Herschel datasets is presented.

  3. On the power of the test for cluster bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, S.; Oort, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cluster bias refers to measurement bias with respect to the clustering variable in multilevel data. The absence of cluster bias implies absence of bias with respect to any cluster-level (level 2) variable. The variables that possibly cause the bias do not have to be measured to test for cluster

  4. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory for solving two-point boundary value problems: Theory and numerics with application to spacecraft formation flight, optimal control and the study of phase space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibout, Vincent M.

    This dissertation has been motivated by the need for new methods to address complex problems that arise in spacecraft formation design. As a direct result of this motivation, a general methodology for solving two-point boundary value problems for Hamiltonian systems has been found. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi theory in conjunction with the canonical transformation induced by the phase flow, it is shown that generating functions solve two-point boundary value problems. Traditional techniques for addressing these problems are iterative and require an initial guess. The method presented in this dissertation solves boundary value problems at the cost of a single function evaluation, although it requires knowledge of at least one generating function. Properties of this method are presented. Specifically, we show that it includes perturbation theory and generalizes it to nonlinear systems. Most importantly, it predicts the existence of multiple solutions and allows one to recover all of these solutions. To demonstrate the efficiency of this approach, an algorithm for computing the generating functions is proposed and its convergence properties are studied. As the method developed in this work is based on the Hamiltonian structure of the problem, particular attention must be paid to the numerics of the algorithm. To address this, a general framework for studying the discretization of certain dynamical systems is developed. This framework generalizes earlier work on discretization of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems on tangent and cotangent bundles respectively. In addition, it provides new insights into some symplectic integrators and leads to a new discrete Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Most importantly, it allows one to discretize optimal control problems. In particular, a discrete maximum principle is presented. This dissertation also investigates applications of the proposed method to solve two-point boundary value problems. In particular, new techniques for designing

  5. Exchange bias effect in alloys and compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, S; Patra, M; Majumdar, S

    2011-02-23

    The phenomenology of exchange bias effects observed in structurally single-phase alloys and compounds but composed of a variety of coexisting magnetic phases such as ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, spin-glass, cluster-glass and disordered magnetic states are reviewed. The investigations on exchange bias effects are discussed in diverse types of alloys and compounds where qualitative and quantitative aspects of magnetism are focused based on macroscopic experimental tools such as magnetization and magnetoresistance measurements. Here, we focus on improvement of fundamental issues of the exchange bias effects rather than on their technological importance.

  6. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    In stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In Choice Experiments, status quo bias is found to be strongly correlated with protest attitudes...... toward the cost attribute. If economic values are to be elicited, this problem is difficult to remedy. In a split sample framework we test a novel ex-ante entreaty aimed specifically at the cost attribute and find that it effectively reduces status quo bias and improves the internal validity...

  7. Quantum Statistical Calculation of Exchange Bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huai-Yu; DAI Zhen-Hong

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of exchange bias of ferromagnetic (FM) films, which are coupled with an antiferromagnetic (AFM) film, is studied by Heisenberg model by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory for the uncompensated case. Exchange bias HE and coercivity Hc are calculated as functions of the FM film thickness L, temperature, the strength of the exchange interaction across the interface between FM and AFM and the anisotropy of the FM. Hc decreases with increasing L when the FM film is beyond some thickness. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM film thickness and on temperature is also qualitatively in agreement with experiments.

  8. Removing Malmquist bias from linear regressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verter, Frances

    1993-01-01

    Malmquist bias is present in all astronomical surveys where sources are observed above an apparent brightness threshold. Those sources which can be detected at progressively larger distances are progressively more limited to the intrinsically luminous portion of the true distribution. This bias does not distort any of the measurements, but distorts the sample composition. We have developed the first treatment to correct for Malmquist bias in linear regressions of astronomical data. A demonstration of the corrected linear regression that is computed in four steps is presented.

  9. Forecast Bias Correction: A Second Order Method

    CERN Document Server

    Crowell, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The difference between a model forecast and actual observations is called forecast bias. This bias is due to either incomplete model assumptions and/or poorly known parameter values and initial/boundary conditions. In this paper we discuss a method for estimating corrections to parameters and initial conditions that would account for the forecast bias. A set of simple experiments with the logistic ordinary differential equation is performed using an iterative version of a first order version of our method to compare with the second order version of the method.

  10. Probing N=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    CERN Document Server

    Fiol, Bartomeu; Torrents, Genis

    2015-01-01

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian N=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  11. Green's Function Retrieval with Absorbing Probes in Reverberating Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Matthieu; de Rosny, Julien; Besnier, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The cross-correlation of a diffuse wave field converges toward the difference between the anticausal and causal Green's functions between two points. This property has paved the way to passive imaging using ambient noise sources. In this Letter, we investigate Green's function retrieval in electromagnetism. Using a model based on the fluctuation dissipation theorem, we demonstrate theoretically that the cross-correlation function strongly depends on the absorption properties of the receivers. This is confirmed in measurements within a reverberation chamber. In contrast to measurements with noninvasive probes, we show that only the anticausal Green's function can be retrieved with a matched antenna. Finally, we interpret this result as an equivalent time-reversal experiment with an electromagnetic sink.

  12. Probing N=2 superconformal field theories with localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiol, Bartomeu [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Garolera, Blai [Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica,11501-2060 San José (Costa Rica); Torrents, Genís [Departament de Física Fonamental i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona,Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-01-27

    We use supersymmetric localization to study probes of four dimensional Lagrangian N=2 superconformal field theories. We first derive a unique equation for the eigenvalue density of these theories. We observe that these theories have a Wigner eigenvalue density precisely when they satisfy a necessary condition for having a holographic dual with a sensible higher-derivative expansion. We then compute in the saddle-point approximation the vacuum expectation value of 1/2-BPS circular Wilson loops, and the two-point functions of these Wilson loops with the Lagrangian density and with the stress-energy tensor. This last computation also provides the corresponding Bremsstrahlung functions and entanglement entropies. As expected, whenever a finite fraction of the matter is in the fundamental representation, the results are drastically different from those of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  13. A study on investors’ personality characteristics and behavioral biases: Conservatism bias and availability bias in the Tehran Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Moradi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most economic and finance theories are based on the assumption that during economic decision making, people would act totally rational and consider all available information. Nevertheless, behavioral finance focuses on studying of the role of psychological factors on economic participants’ behavior. The study shows that in real-world environment, people are influenced by emotional and cognitive errors and may make irrational financial decisions. In many cases, the participants of financial markets are not aware of their talents for error in decision making, so they are dissatisfied with their investments by considering some behavioral biases decisions. These decisions may often yield undesirable outcomes, which could influence economy, significantly. This paper presents a survey on the relationship between personality dimensions with behavioral biases and availability bias among investment managers in the Tehran Stock Exchange using SPSS software, descriptive and inferential statistics. The necessary data are collected through questionnaire and they are analyzed using some statistical tests. The preliminary results indicate that there is a relationship between personality dimensions and behavioral biases like conservatism bias and availability bias among the investors in the Tehran Stock Exchange.

  14. Children's cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase interact to predict attention bias to threatening stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursache, Alexandra; Blair, Clancy

    2015-01-01

    Physiological responses to threat occur through both the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. Activity in these systems can be measured through salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) and salivary cortisol, respectively. Theoretical work and empirical studies have suggested the importance of examining the coordination of these systems in relation to cognitive functioning and behavior problems. Less is known, however, about whether these systems interactively predict more automatic aspects of attention processing such as attention toward emotionally salient threatening stimuli. We used a dot probe task to assess attention bias toward threatening stimuli in 347 kindergarten children. Cortisol and sAA were assayed from saliva samples collected prior to children's participation in assessments on a subsequent day. Using regression analyses, we examined relations of sAA and cortisol to attention bias. Results indicate that cortisol and sAA interact in predicting attention bias. Higher levels of cortisol predicted greater bias toward threat for children who had high levels of sAA, but predicted greater bias away from threat for children who had low levels of sAA. These results suggest that greater symmetry in HPA and ANS functioning is associated with greater reliance on automatic attention processes in the face of threat.

  15. Is trait resilience characterized by specific patterns of attentional bias to emotional stimuli and attentional control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Judith; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Höfler, Michael; Heinrich, Anke; Zimmermann, Peter; Siegel, Stefan; Schönfeld, Sabine

    2015-09-01

    Attentional processes have been suggested to play a crucial role in resilience defined as positive adaptation facing adversity. However, research is lacking on associations between attentional biases to positive and threat-related stimuli, attentional control and trait resilience. Data stem from the follow-up assessment of a longitudinal study investigating mental health and related factors among German soldiers. Trait resilience was assessed with the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale and attentional control with the Attentional Control Scale. A subset of n = 198 soldiers also completed a dot probe task with happy, neutral and threatening faces. Attentional control was positively related to trait resilience. Results revealed no associations between both attentional biases and trait resilience. However, there was a negative association between attentional bias to threat and trait resilience when attentional control was low and a positive association between attentional bias to threat and trait resilience when attentional control was high. No such associations were found for attentional bias to positive stimuli. Generalizability to other populations may be limited since we exclusively focused on male soldiers. Also, the cross-sectional design does not allow for causal conclusions. Findings suggest that attentional processing may promote trait resilience. Future research on preventive interventions should consider these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. There's that scary picture: attention bias to threatening scenes in Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Helen F; Porter, Melanie A

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with elevated anxiety that is non-social in nature, including generalised anxiety and fears. To date very little research has examined the cognitive processes associated with this anxiety. In the present research, attentional bias for non-social threatening images in WS was examined using a dot-probe paradigm. Participants were 16 individuals with WS aged between 13 and 34 years and two groups of typically developing controls matched to the WS group on chronological age and attentional control ability, respectively. The WS group exhibited a significant attention bias towards threatening images. In contrast, no bias was found for group matched on attentional control and a slight bias away from threat was found in the chronological age matched group. The results are contrasted with recent findings suggesting that individuals with WS do not show an attention bias for threatening faces and discussed in relation to neuroimaging research showing elevated amygdala activation in response to threatening non-social scenes in WS.

  17. Attention bias and anxiety in young children exposed to family violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.; Pollak, Seth D.; Grasso, Damion; Voss, Joel; Mian, Nicholas D.; Zobel, Elvira; McCarthy, Kimberly J.; Wakschlag, Lauren S.; Pine, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Attention bias towards threat is associated with anxiety in older youth and adults and has been linked with violence exposure. Attention bias may moderate the relationship between violence exposure and anxiety in young children. Capitalizing on measurement advances, the current study examines these relationships at a younger age than previously possible. Methods Young children (mean age 4.7, ±0.8) from a cross-sectional sample oversampled for violence exposure (N = 218) completed the dot-probe task to assess their attention biases. Observed fear/anxiety was characterized with a novel observational paradigm, the Anxiety Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Mother-reported symptoms were assessed with the Preschool-Age Psychiatric Assessment and Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children. Violence exposure was characterized with dimensional scores reflecting probability of membership in two classes derived via latent class analysis from the Conflict Tactics Scales: Abuse and Harsh Parenting. Results Family violence predicted greater child anxiety and trauma symptoms. Attention bias moderated the relationship between violence and anxiety. Conclusions Attention bias towards threat may strengthen the effects of family violence on the development of anxiety, with potentially cascading effects across childhood. Such associations may be most readily detected when using observational measures of childhood anxiety. PMID:26716142

  18. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  19. Applications of the Dot Probe Task in Attentional Bias Research in Eating Disorders: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzomska, Malgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing interest in the cognitive approach to eating disorders, which postulates that patients selectively attend to information associated with eating, body shape, and body weight. The unreliability of self-report measures in eating disorders due to strong denial of illness gave rise to experimental studies inspired…

  20. Future Trends in Chlldren's Web Pages: Probing Hidden Biases for Information Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurubacak, Gulsun

    2007-01-01

    As global digital communication continues to flourish, Children's Web pages become more critical for children to realize not only the surface but also breadth and deeper meanings in presenting these milieus. These pages not only are very diverse and complex but also enable intense communication across social, cultural and political restrictions…

  1. Future Trends in Children's Web Pages: Probing Hidden Biases for Information Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurubacak, Gulsun

    2007-01-01

    As global digital communication continues to flourish, Children's Web pages become more critical for children to realize not only the surface but also breadth and deeper meanings in presenting these milieus. These pages not only are very diverse and complex but also enable intense communication across social, cultural and political restrictions…

  2. Cooperative catalysis of metal and O-H···O/sp3-C-H···O two-point hydrogen bonds in alcoholic solvents: Cu-catalyzed enantioselective direct alkynylation of aldehydes with terminal alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takaoki; Watanabe, Ryo; Moriya, Toshimitsu; Ohmiya, Hirohisa; Mori, Seiji; Sawamura, Masaya

    2013-09-27

    Catalyst-substrate hydrogen bonds in artificial catalysts usually occur in aprotic solvents, but not in protic solvents, in contrast to enzymatic catalysis. We report a case in which ligand-substrate hydrogen-bonding interactions cooperate with a transition-metal center in alcoholic solvents for enantioselective catalysis. Copper(I) complexes with prolinol-based hydroxy amino phosphane chiral ligands catalytically promoted the direct alkynylation of aldehydes with terminal alkynes in alcoholic solvents to afford nonracemic secondary propargylic alcohols with high enantioselectivities. Quantum-mechanical calculations of enantiodiscriminating transition states show the occurrence of a nonclassical sp(3)-C-H···O hydrogen bond as a secondary interaction between the ligand and substrate, which results in highly directional catalyst-substrate two-point hydrogen bonding.

  3. Predicting Retear after Repair of Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear: Two-Point Dixon MR Imaging Quantification of Fatty Muscle Degeneration-Initial Experience with 1-year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Tasaki, Atsushi; Horiuchi, Saya; Ochi, Junko; Starkey, Jay; Hara, Takeshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the degree of preoperative fatty degeneration within muscles, postoperative longitudinal changes in fatty degeneration, and differences in fatty degeneration between patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears who do and those who do not experience a retear after surgery. Materials and Methods This prospective study had institutional review board approval and was conducted in accordance with the Committee for Human Research. Informed consent was obtained. Fifty patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tears (18 men, 32 women; mean age, 67.0 years ± 8.0; age range, 41-91 years) were recruited. The degrees of preoperative and postoperative fatty degeneration were quantified by using a two-point Dixon magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence; two radiologists measured the mean signal intensity on in-phase [S(In)] and fat [S(Fat)] images. Estimates of fatty degeneration were calculated with "fat fraction" values by using the formula S(Fat)/S(In) within the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis muscles at baseline preoperative and at postoperative 1-year follow-up MR imaging. Preoperative fat fractions in the failed-repair group and the intact-repair group were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The preoperative fat fractions in the supraspinatus muscle were significantly higher in the failed-repair group than in the intact-repair group (37.0% vs 19.5%, P muscle tended to progress at 1 year postoperatively in only the failed-repair group. Conclusion MR imaging quantification of preoperative fat fractions by using a two-point Dixon sequence within the rotator cuff muscles may be a viable method for predicting postoperative retear. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  4. Popularity, similarity, and the network extraversion bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiler, Daniel C; Kleinbaum, Adam M

    2015-05-01

    Using the emergent friendship network of an incoming cohort of students in an M.B.A. program, we examined the role of extraversion in shaping social networks. Extraversion has two important implications for the emergence of network ties: a popularity effect, in which extraverts accumulate more friends than introverts do, and a homophily effect, in which the more similar are two people's levels of extraversion, the more likely they are to become friends. These effects result in a systematic network extraversion bias, in which people's social networks will tend to be overpopulated with extraverts and underpopulated with introverts. Moreover, the most extraverted people have the greatest network extraversion bias, and the most introverted people have the least network extraversion bias. Our finding that social networks were systematically misrepresentative of the broader social environment raises questions about whether there is a societal bias toward believing other people are more extraverted than they actually are and whether introverts are better socially calibrated than extraverts.

  5. Neurocognition and cognitive biases in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Cristina P; Sacks, Stephanie A; Weisman de Mamani, Amy G

    2012-08-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have been found to exhibit a number of information processing biases that may play a role in the development and exacerbation of symptoms and may impair overall functioning. However, little is known about the factors that are associated with these cognitive biases. Recently, researchers have begun to consider whether neurocognitive deficits, common in schizophrenia, may be risk factors for the development of cognitive biases. In the present study, we assessed neurocognition (verbal learning, delayed verbal recall memory, and verbal recognition memory) and cognitive biases (knowledge corruption and impaired cognitive insight) in 72 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. As hypothesized, poorer delayed verbal recall memory was associated with increased knowledge corruption. Contrary to expectations, verbal learning and verbal memory were not associated with cognitive insight. These findings suggest that an inadequate recall memory system may put patients with schizophrenia at greater risk for cognitive distortions.

  6. Accounting for Unobservable Exposure Time Bias Wh...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Accounting for Unobservable Exposure Time Bias When Using Medicare Prescription Drug Data Unobservable exposure time is common among Medicare Part D beneficiaries,...

  7. Fixed points of occasionally weakly biased mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Mahendra Singh, M. R. Singh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Common fixed point results due to Pant et al. [Pant et al., Weak reciprocal continuity and fixed point theorems, Ann Univ Ferrara, 57(1, 181-190 (2011] are extended to a class of non commuting operators called occasionally weakly biased pair[ N. Hussain, M. A. Khamsi A. Latif, Commonfixed points for JH-operators and occasionally weakly biased pairs under relaxed conditions, Nonlinear Analysis, 74, 2133-2140 (2011]. We also provideillustrative examples to justify the improvements. Abstract. Common fixed point results due to Pant et al. [Pant et al., Weakreciprocal continuity and fixed point theorems, Ann Univ Ferrara, 57(1, 181-190 (2011] are extended to a class of non commuting operators called occasionally weakly biased pair[ N. Hussain, M. A. Khamsi A. Latif, Common fixed points for JH-operators and occasionally weakly biased pairs under relaxed conditions, Nonlinear Analysis, 74, 2133-2140 (2011]. We also provide illustrative examples to justify the improvements.

  8. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant supervision (DS automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs, providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP. However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce noise: (1 bias-dist to model the relative distance between points (instances and classes (relation centers; (2 bias-reward to model the possibility of each heuristically generated label being incorrect. Based on the biases, we propose three noise tolerant models: MIML-dist, MIML-dist-classify, and MIML-reward, building on top of a state-of-the-art distantly supervised learning algorithm. Experimental evaluations compared with three landmark methods on the KBP dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  9. Reducing hypothetical bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Nielsen, Rasmus Christian Fejer

    Hypothetical bias in stated preference studies is an essential problem which reduces the validity of the obtained welfare estimates for non-market goods. In the attempt to mitigate hypothetical bias, a type of reminder known as Cheap Talk, has been applied in previous studies and found to overall...... eliminate some of the hypothetical bias. The present paper tests an addition to Cheap Talk, an Opt-Out Reminder. The Opt-Out Reminder is an objective short script presented prior to the choice sets, prompting the respondent to choose the opt-out alternative, if he/she finds the proposed policy generated...... alternatives in a choice set too expensive. The results suggest that adding an Opt-Out Reminder to Cheap Talk can in fact reduce hypothetical bias even further and reduces some of the ineffectiveness of CT in relation to the survey bid range and experienced respondents....

  10. Autobiographical memory bias in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Julie; de Bree, June; Bryant, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    In social anxiety the psychological self is closely related to the feared stimulus. Socially anxious individuals are, by definition, concerned about how the self is perceived and evaluated by others. As autobiographical memory is strongly related to views of the self it follows that biases in autobiographical memory play an important role in social anxiety. In the present study high (n = 19) and low (n = 29) socially anxious individuals were compared on autobiographical memory bias, current goals, and self-discrepancy. Individuals high in social anxiety showed a bias towards recalling more negative and more social anxiety-related autobiographical memories, reported more current goals related to overcoming social anxiety, and showed larger self-discrepancies. The pattern of results is largely in line with earlier research in individuals with PTSD and complicated grief. This suggests that the relation between autobiographical memory bias and the self is a potentially valuable trans-diagnostic factor.

  11. Statistical framework for estimating GNSS bias

    CERN Document Server

    Vierinen, Juha; Rideout, William C; Erickson, Philip J; Norberg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical framework for estimating global navigation satellite system (GNSS) non-ionospheric differential time delay bias. The biases are estimated by examining differences of measured line integrated electron densities (TEC) that are scaled to equivalent vertical integrated densities. The spatio-temporal variability, instrumentation dependent errors, and errors due to inaccurate ionospheric altitude profile assumptions are modeled as structure functions. These structure functions determine how the TEC differences are weighted in the linear least-squares minimization procedure, which is used to produce the bias estimates. A method for automatic detection and removal of outlier measurements that do not fit into a model of receiver bias is also described. The same statistical framework can be used for a single receiver station, but it also scales to a large global network of receivers. In addition to the Global Positioning System (GPS), the method is also applicable to other dual frequency GNSS s...

  12. Pseudo exchange bias due to rotational anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrmann, A., E-mail: andrea.ehrmann@fh-bielefeld.de [Faculty of Engineering and Mathematics, Bielefeld University of Applied Sciences, 33619 Bielefeld (Germany); Komraus, S.; Blachowicz, T.; Domino, K. [Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Nees, M.K.; Jakobs, P.J.; Leiste, H. [Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mathes, M.; Schaarschmidt, M. [ACCESS e. V., 57072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Ferromagnetic nanostructure arrays with particle dimensions between 160 nm and 400 nm were created by electron-beam lithography. The permalloy structures consist of rectangular-shaped walls around a square open space. While measuring their magnetic properties using the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), in some angular regions an exchange bias (EB) seemed to appear. This paper gives an overview of possible reasons for this “pseudo exchange bias” and shows experimentally and by means of micromagnetic simulations that this effect can be attributed to unintentionally measuring minor loops. - Highlights: • Pseudo exchange bias can be found in square Py nanorings of different dimensions. • Pseudo exchange bias stems from unintentionally measuring minor loops. • New approach in explaining “real” exchange bias effect in coupled FM/AFM systems. • Theoretical base to explain other measurements of a rotational anisotropy.

  13. Affective forecasting bias in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Shalini; Bulley, Adam; von Hippel, William; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Adults are capable of predicting their emotional reactions to possible future events. Nevertheless, they systematically overestimate the intensity of their future emotional reactions relative to how they feel when these events actually occur. The developmental origin of this "intensity bias" has not yet been examined. Two studies were conducted to test the intensity bias in preschool children. In the first study, 5-year-olds (N=30) predicted how they would feel if they won or lost various games. Comparisons with subsequent self-reported feelings indicated that participants overestimated how sad they would feel to lose the games but did not overestimate their happiness from winning. The second study replicated this effect in another sample of 5-year-olds (n=34) and also found evidence of an intensity bias in 4-year-olds (n=30). These findings provide the first evidence of a negative intensity bias in affective forecasting among young children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Micro scanning probes

    CERN Document Server

    Niblock, T

    2001-01-01

    This thesis covers the design methodology, theory, modelling, fabrication and evaluation of a Micro-Scanning-Probe. The device is a thermally actuated bimorph quadrapod fabricated using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems technology. A quadrapod is a structure with four arms, in this case a planar structure with the four arms forming a cross which is dry etched out of a silicon diaphragm. Each arm has a layer of aluminium deposited on it forming a bimorph. Through heating each arm actuation is achieved in the plane of the quadrapod and the direction normal to it. Fabrication of the device has required the development of bulk micromachining techniques to handle post CMOS fabricated wafers and the patterning of thickly sputtered aluminium in bulk micro machined cavities. CMOS fabrication techniques were used to incorporate diodes onto the quadrapod arms for temperature measurement of the arms. Fine tungsten and silicon tips have also been fabricated to allow tunnelling between the tip and the platform at the centr...

  15. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  16. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs) are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY) models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  17. Spontaneous Symmetry Probing

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    For relativistic quantum field theories, we consider Lorentz breaking, spatially homogeneous field configurations or states that evolve in time along a symmetry direction. We dub this situation "spontaneous symmetry probing" (SSP). We mainly focus on internal symmetries, i.e. on symmetries that commute with the Poincare group. We prove that the fluctuations around SSP states have a Lagrangian that is explicitly time independent, and we provide the field space parameterization that makes this manifest. We show that there is always a gapless Goldstone excitation that perturbs the system in the direction of motion in field space. Perhaps more interestingly, we show that if such a direction is part of a non-Abelian group of symmetries, the Goldstone bosons associated with spontaneously broken generators that do not commute with the SSP one acquire a gap, proportional to the SSP state's "speed". We outline possible applications of this formalism to inflationary cosmology.

  18. New probe of naturalness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Nathaniel; Englert, Christoph; McCullough, Matthew

    2013-09-20

    Any new scalar fields that perturbatively solve the hierarchy problem by stabilizing the Higgs boson mass also generate new contributions to the Higgs boson field-strength renormalization, irrespective of their gauge representation. These new contributions are physical, and in explicit models their magnitude can be inferred from the requirement of quadratic divergence cancellation; hence, they are directly related to the resolution of the hierarchy problem. Upon canonically normalizing the Higgs field, these new contributions lead to modifications of Higgs couplings that are typically great enough that the hierarchy problem and the concept of electroweak naturalness can be probed thoroughly within a precision Higgs boson program. Specifically, at a lepton collider this can be achieved through precision measurements of the Higgs boson associated production cross section. This would lead to indirect constraints on perturbative solutions to the hierarchy problem in the broadest sense, even if the relevant new fields are gauge singlets.

  19. Advanced Langmuir Probe (LP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic response of the MK-2 version of the Langmuir probe amplifier was studied. The settling time of the step response is increased by: (1) stray node-to-ground capacitance at series connections between high value feedback resistors; and (2) input capacitance due to the input cable, FET switches, and input source follower. The stray node-to-ground capacitances can be reduced to tolerable levels by elevating the string of feedback resistors above the printing board. A new feedback network was considered, with promising results. The design uses resistances having much lower nominal values, thereby minimizing the effect of stray capacitances. Faster settling times can be achieved by using an operational amplifier having a higher gain-bandwidth product.

  20. Implicit Social Biases in People With Autism

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Implicit social biases are ubiquitous and are known to influence social behavior. A core diagnostic criterion of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is abnormal social behavior. We investigated the extent to which individuals with ASD might show a specific attenuation of implicit social biases, using Implicit Association Tests (IATs) involving social (gender, race) and nonsocial (nature, shoes) categories. High-functioning adults with ASD showed intact but reduced IAT effects relative to healthy ...