WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-phase fluid inclusions

  1. Two-phase cooling fluids; Les fluides frigoporteurs diphasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the framework of the diminution of heat transfer fluid consumption, the concept of indirect refrigerating circuits, using cooling intermediate fluids, is reviewed and the fluids that are currently used in these systems are described. Two-phase cooling fluids advantages over single-phase fluids are presented with their thermophysical characteristics: solid fraction, two-phase mixture enthalpy, thermal and rheological properties, determination of heat and mass transfer characteristics, and cold storage through ice slurry

  2. Visual Analysis of Inclusion Dynamics in Two-Phase Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Grzegorz Karol; Beck, Fabian; Ertl, Moritz; Meister, Christian; Schulte, Kathrin; Weigand, Bernhard; Ertl, Thomas; Sadlo, Filip

    2018-05-01

    In single-phase flow visualization, research focuses on the analysis of vector field properties. In two-phase flow, in contrast, analysis of the phase components is typically of major interest. So far, visualization research of two-phase flow concentrated on proper interface reconstruction and the analysis thereof. In this paper, we present a novel visualization technique that enables the investigation of complex two-phase flow phenomena with respect to the physics of breakup and coalescence of inclusions. On the one hand, we adapt dimensionless quantities for a localized analysis of phase instability and breakup, and provide detailed inspection of breakup dynamics with emphasis on oscillation and its interplay with rotational motion. On the other hand, we present a parametric tightly linked space-time visualization approach for an effective interactive representation of the overall dynamics. We demonstrate the utility of our approach using several two-phase CFD datasets.

  3. Coupling two-phase fluid flow with two-phase darcy flow in anisotropic porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, J.

    2014-06-03

    This paper reports a numerical study of coupling two-phase fluid flow in a free fluid region with two-phase Darcy flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic porous medium region. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the anisotropic porous medium region. A Robin-Robin domain decomposition method is used for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Obtained results have shown the anisotropic properties effect on the velocity and pressure of the two-phase flow. 2014 Jie Chen et al.

  4. Coupling Two-Phase Fluid Flow with Two-Phase Darcy Flow in Anisotropic Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a numerical study of coupling two-phase fluid flow in a free fluid region with two-phase Darcy flow in a homogeneous and anisotropic porous medium region. The model consists of coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the anisotropic porous medium region. A Robin-Robin domain decomposition method is used for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition on the interface between the free flow and the porous media regions. Obtained results have shown the anisotropic properties effect on the velocity and pressure of the two-phase flow.

  5. Coupling two-phase fluid flow with two-phase darcy flow in anisotropic porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, J.; Sun, S.; Chen, Z.

    2014-01-01

    in the free fluid region and the two-phase Darcy law in the anisotropic porous medium region. A Robin-Robin domain decomposition method is used for the coupled Navier-Stokes and Darcy system with the generalized Beavers-Joseph-Saffman condition

  6. Thermo-Fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Mamrou

    2011-01-01

    "Thermo-fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow, Second Edition" is focused on the fundamental physics of two-phase flow. The authors present the detailed theoretical foundation of multi-phase flow thermo-fluid dynamics as they apply to: Nuclear reactor transient and accident analysis; Energy systems; Power generation systems; Chemical reactors and process systems; Space propulsion; Transport processes. This edition features updates on two-phase flow formulation and constitutive equations and CFD simulation codes such as FLUENT and CFX, new coverage of the lift force model, which is of part

  7. Fluid-elastic vibration in two-phase cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasakawa, T.; Serizawa, A.; Kawara, Z.

    2003-01-01

    The present work aims at clarifying the mechanisms of fluid elastic vibration of tube bundles in two-phase cross flow. The experiment is conducted using air-water two-phase flow under atmospheric pressure. The test section is a 1.03m long transparent acrylic square duct with 128 x 128 mm 2 cross section, which consists of 3 rod-rows with 5 rods in each row. The rods are 125mm long aluminum rods with 22 mm in diameter (p/D=1.45). The natural frequency of rod vibration is about 30Hz. The result indicated a diversion of observed trend in vibration behavior depending on two-phase flow patterns either bubbly flow or churn flow. Specifically, in churn flow, the fluid elastic vibration has been observed to occur when the frequency in void fraction fluctuation approached to the natural frequency of the rods, but this was not the case in fluid elastic vibration in bubbly flow. This fact suggests the existence of mechanisms closely coupled with two-phase flow structures depending on the flow patterns, that is, static two-phase character-controlled mechanism in bubbly flow and dynamic character- controlled in churn flow

  8. Fluid inclusion geothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C.G.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions trapped within crystals either during growth or at a later time provide many clues to the histories of rocks and ores. Estimates of fluid-inclusion homogenization temperature and density can be obtained using a petrographic microscope with thin sections, and they can be refined using heating and freezing stages. Fluid inclusion studies, used in conjunction with paragenetic studies, can provide direct data on the time and space variations of parameters such as temperature, pressure, density, and composition of fluids in geologic environments. Changes in these parameters directly affect the fugacity, composition, and pH of fluids, thus directly influencing localization of ore metals. ?? 1977 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  9. Fluid dynamics of cryogenic two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, K.; Jahn, W.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the flow behavior of a methane hydrate/methane-liquid hydrogen dispersed two-phase fluid through a given design of a moderator chamber for the ESS target system. The calculations under simplified conditions, e.g., taking no account of heat input from outside, have shown that the computer code used, CFX, was able to simulate the behavior of the two-phase flow through the moderator chamber, producing reasonable results up to a certain level of the solid phase fraction, that allowed a continuous flow process through the chamber. Inlet flows with larger solid phase fractions than 40 vol% were found to be a ''problem'' for the computer code. From the computer runs based on fractions between 20 and 40 vol%, it was observed that with increasing solid phase fraction at the inlet, the resulting flow pattern revealed a strong tendency for blockage within the chamber, supported by the ''heavy weight'' of the pellets compared to the carrying liquid. Locations which are prone to the development of such uneven flow behavior are the areas around the turning points in the semispheres and near the exit of the moderator. The considered moderator chamber with horizontal inlet and outlet flow for a solid-liquid two-phase fluid does not seem to be an appropriate design. (orig.)

  10. Two-phase flow characteristics of HFC and HCFC fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, T.; Matsuda, K.; Kusakabe, T.

    1998-01-01

    Some two-phase flow characteristics of HFC and HCFC fluid have been investigated experimentally. Fluids used in this experiment are HCFC22 (hereinafter called 'R22'), HCFC123 (hereinafter called 'R123') and Mixture of HFC fluid (hereinafter called 'R407C'). The fluid R407C are mixture of HFC32, HFC134a and HFC125, and their concentrations are 23wt%, 52wt% and 25wt%, respectively. This paper presents main flow parameters such as void fraction, interfacial velocities, bubble diameter distribution and pressure drop multiplier, which can characterize flow behavior. The void fractions and interfacial velocities were measured at some local positions in the single pipe using the bi-optical probe(hereinafter called 'BOP'). The procedure to calculate the void fraction from the void signals obtained by BOP were adopted the so-called slice method. The effects of slice levels on the void fraction were discussed taking into account bubble diameter. The new correlation of slice level as the function of void fraction has been proposed. The area-averaged void fractions obtained from BOP's void signals using new correlation were compared with void fractions obtained from pressure drops. The area-averaged interfacial velocities were also compared with the superficial gas velocities. It was concluded that the accuracy of BOP measurements are 5% for void fraction and less than 8.5% for interfacial velocity

  11. Immiscible two-phase fluid flows in deformable porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Sposito, Garrison; Majer, Ernest

    Macroscopic differential equations of mass and momentum balance for two immiscible fluids in a deformable porous medium are derived in an Eulerian framework using the continuum theory of mixtures. After inclusion of constitutive relationships, the resulting momentum balance equations feature terms characterizing the coupling among the fluid phases and the solid matrix caused by their relative accelerations. These terms, which imply a number of interesting phenomena, do not appear in current hydrologic models of subsurface multiphase flow. Our equations of momentum balance are shown to reduce to the Berryman-Thigpen-Chen model of bulk elastic wave propagation through unsaturated porous media after simplification (e.g., isothermal conditions, neglect of gravity, etc.) and under the assumption of constant volume fractions and material densities. When specialized to the case of a porous medium containing a single fluid and an elastic solid, our momentum balance equations reduce to the well-known Biot model of poroelasticity. We also show that mass balance alone is sufficient to derive the Biot model stress-strain relations, provided that a closure condition for porosity change suggested by de la Cruz and Spanos is invoked. Finally, a relation between elastic parameters and inertial coupling coefficients is derived that permits the partial differential equations of the Biot model to be decoupled into a telegraph equation and a wave equation whose respective dependent variables are two different linear combinations of the dilatations of the solid and the fluid.

  12. Thermo-fluid dynamics of two-phase flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Mamoru; Ishii, Mamoru; Ishii, M

    2006-01-01

    Provides a very systematic treatment of two phase flow problems from a theoretical perspectiveProvides an easy to follow treatment of modeling and code devlopemnt of two phase flow related phenomenaCovers new results of two phase flow research such as coverage of fuel cells technology.

  13. Superplastic flow of two-phase ceramics containing rigid inclusions-zirconia/mullite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, C.K.; Chen, I.W.

    1990-01-01

    A continuum theory for non-newtonian flow of a two-phase composite containing rigid inclusions is presented. It predicts flow suppression by a factor of (1 - V) q , where V is the volume fraction of the rigid inclusion and q depends on the stress exponent and the inclusion shape. Stress concentrations in the rigid inclusion have also been evaluated. As the stress exponent increases, flow suppression is more pronounced even though stress concentration is less severe. To test this theory, superplastic flow of zirconia/mullite composites, in which zirconia is a soft, non-Newtonian super-plastic matrix and mullite is a rigid phase of various size, shape, and amount, is studied. The continuum theory is found to describe the two-phase superplastic flow reasonably well

  14. Fluid dynamics of airlift reactors; Two-phase friction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Calvo, E. (Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Univ. de Alcala, 28871 Alcala de Henares (Spain))

    1992-10-01

    Airlift loop reactors (ALR) are useful equipment in biotechnology in a wide range of uses, however their design is not a simple task since prediction of fluid dynamics in these reactors is difficult. Most of the different strategies found in the literature in order to predict two main parameters, namely, gas holdup and liquid velocity, are based on energy or momentum balances. The balances include frictional effects, and it is not yet clear how to predict these effects. The objective of this article is to show how criteria corresponding to one-phase flow may be used in order to predict the frictional effects in ALRs. Based on a model proposed by Garcia-Calvo (1989, 1991), we simulated experimental data of liquid velocity profiles and gas holdup obtained by Young et al. in an ALR with two different configurations. Experimental data obtained in other three external ALRs with different shapes and sizes are also simulated.

  15. Fluid-elastic force measurements acting on a tube bundle in two-phase cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Fumio; Kawamura, Koji; Yasuo, Akira

    1996-01-01

    Fluid-elastic force acting on a square tube bundle of P/D = 1.47 in air-water two-phase cross flow was measured to investigate the characteristics and to clarify whether the fluid elastic vibration characteristics could be expressed using two-phase mixture characteristics. Measured fluid elastic forces were separated into fluid-elastic force coefficients such as added mass, added stiffness, and added damping coefficient. The added damping coefficient was separated into a two-phase damping and a flow-dependent component as in previous research (Carlucci, 1981 and 1983; Pettigrew, 1994). These coefficients were nondimensionalized with two-phase mixture characteristics such as void fraction, mixture density and mixture velocity, which were obtained using the drift-flux model with consideration given to the model. The result was compared with the result obtained with the homogeneous model. It was found that fluid-elastic force coefficients could be expressed with two-phase flow mixture characteristics very well in the experimental result, and that better result can be derived using the slip model as compared to the homogeneous model. Added two-phase flow, which could be expressed as a function of void fraction, where two-phase damping was nondimensionalized with the relative velocity between the gas and liquid phases used as a reference velocity. Using these, the added stiffness coefficient and flow-dependent component of damping could be expressed very well as a function of nondimensional mixture velocity

  16. Long-wave equivalent viscoelastic solids for porous rocks saturated by two-phase fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. E.; Savioli, G. B.

    2018-04-01

    Seismic waves traveling across fluid-saturated poroelastic materials with mesoscopic-scale heterogeneities induce fluid flow and Biot's slow waves generating energy loss and velocity dispersion. Using Biot's equations of motion to model these type of heterogeneities would require extremely fine meshes. We propose a numerical upscaling procedure to determine the complex and frequency dependent P-wave and shear moduli of an effective viscoelastic medium long-wave equivalent to a poroelastic solid saturated by a two-phase fluid. The two-phase fluid is defined in terms of capillary pressure and relative permeability flow functions. The P-wave and shear effective moduli are determined using harmonic compressibility and shear experiments applied on representative samples of the bulk material. Each experiment is associated with a boundary value problem that is solved using the finite element method. Since a poroelastic solid saturated by a two-phase fluid supports the existence of two slow waves, this upscaling procedure allows to analyze their effect on the mesoscopic-loss mechanism in hydrocarbon reservoir formations. Numerical results show that a two-phase Biot medium model predicts higher attenuation than classic Biot models.

  17. RELAP5 two-phase fluid model and numerical scheme for economic LWR system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransom, V.H.; Wagner, R.J.; Trapp, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The RELAP5 two-phase fluid model and the associated numerical scheme are summarized. The experience accrued in development of a fast running light water reactor system transient analysis code is reviewed and example of the code application are given

  18. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreepada, Sastry R.; Rippel, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  19. Scaling of two-phase flow transients using reduced pressure system and simulant fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; Ishii, M.

    1987-01-01

    Scaling criteria for a natural circulation loop under single-phase flow conditions are derived. Based on these criteria, practical applications for designing a scaled-down model are considered. Particular emphasis is placed on scaling a test model at reduced pressure levels compared to a prototype and on fluid-to-fluid scaling. The large number of similarty groups which are to be matched between modell and prototype makes the design of a scale model a challenging tasks. The present study demonstrates a new approach to this clasical problen using two-phase flow scaling parameters. It indicates that a real time scaling is not a practical solution and a scaled-down model should have an accelerated (shortened) time scale. An important result is the proposed new scaling methodology for simulating pressure transients. It is obtained by considerung the changes of the fluid property groups which appear within the two-phase similarity parameters and the single-phase to two-phase flow transition prameters. Sample calculations are performed for modeling two-phase flow transients of a high pressure water system by a low-pressure water system or a Freon system. It is shown that modeling is possible for both cases for simulation pressure transients. However, simulation of phase change transitions is not possible by a reduced pressure water system without distortion in either power or time. (orig.)

  20. Validation of model predictions of pore-scale fluid distributions during two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultreys, Tom; Lin, Qingyang; Gao, Ying; Raeini, Ali Q.; AlRatrout, Ahmed; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2018-05-01

    Pore-scale two-phase flow modeling is an important technology to study a rock's relative permeability behavior. To investigate if these models are predictive, the calculated pore-scale fluid distributions which determine the relative permeability need to be validated. In this work, we introduce a methodology to quantitatively compare models to experimental fluid distributions in flow experiments visualized with microcomputed tomography. First, we analyzed five repeated drainage-imbibition experiments on a single sample. In these experiments, the exact fluid distributions were not fully repeatable on a pore-by-pore basis, while the global properties of the fluid distribution were. Then two fractional flow experiments were used to validate a quasistatic pore network model. The model correctly predicted the fluid present in more than 75% of pores and throats in drainage and imbibition. To quantify what this means for the relevant global properties of the fluid distribution, we compare the main flow paths and the connectivity across the different pore sizes in the modeled and experimental fluid distributions. These essential topology characteristics matched well for drainage simulations, but not for imbibition. This suggests that the pore-filling rules in the network model we used need to be improved to make reliable predictions of imbibition. The presented analysis illustrates the potential of our methodology to systematically and robustly test two-phase flow models to aid in model development and calibration.

  1. Mathematical well-posedness of a two-fluid equations for bubbly two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Tomio; Kataoka, Isao

    2000-01-01

    It is widely known that two-fluid equations used in most engineering applications do not satisfy the necessary condition for being mathematical well-posed as initial-value problems. In the case of stratified two-phase flows, several researchers have revealed that differential models satisfying the necessary condition are to be derived if the pressure difference between the phases is related to the spatial gradient of the void fraction through the effects of gravity or surface tension. While, in the case of dispersed two-phase flows, no physically reasonable method to derive mathematically well-posed two-fluid model has been proposed. In the present study, particularly focusing on the effect of interfacial pressure terms, we derived the mathematically closed form of the volume-averaged two-fluid model for bubbly two-phase flows. As a result of characteristic analyses, it was shown that the proposed two-fluid equations satisfy the necessary condition of mathematical well-posedness if the void fraction is sufficiently small. (author)

  2. Introduction to investigations of the negative corona and EHD flow in gaseous two-phase fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerzy, MIZERACZYK; Artur, BERENDT

    2018-05-01

    Research interests have recently been directed towards electrical discharges in multi-phase environments. Natural electrical discharges, such as lightning and coronas, occur in the Earth’s atmosphere, which is actually a mixture of gaseous phase (air) and suspended solid and liquid particulate matters (PMs). An example of an anthropogenic gaseous multi-phase environment is the flow of flue gas through electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), which are generally regarded as a mixture of a post-combustion gas with solid PM and microdroplets suspended in it. Electrical discharges in multi-phase environments, the knowledge of which is scarce, are becoming an attractive research subject, offering a wide variety of possible discharges and multi-phase environments to be studied. This paper is an introduction to electrical discharges in multi-phase environments. It is focused on DC negative coronas and accompanying electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flows in a gaseous two-phase fluid formed by air (a gaseous phase) and solid PM (a solid phase), run under laboratory conditions. The introduction is based on a review of the relevant literature. Two cases will be considered: the first case is of a gaseous two-phase fluid, initially motionless in a closed chamber before being subjected to a negative corona (with the needle-to-plate electrode arrangement), which afterwards induces an EHD flow in the chamber, and the second, of a gaseous two-phase fluid flowing transversely with respect to the needle-to-plate electrode axis along a chamber with a corona discharge running between the electrodes. This review-based introductory paper should be of interest to theoretical researchers and modellers in the field of negative corona discharges in single- or two-phase fluids, and for engineers who work on designing EHD devices (such as ESPs, EHD pumps, and smoke detectors).

  3. Two-phase flow modeling for low concentration spherical particle motion through a Newtonian fluid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit GJF

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available the necessity to model the discrete nature of sep- cite this article in press as: G.J.F. Smit et al., Two-phase flow modeling for low concentration spherical particle motion through a ian fluid, Appl. Math. Comput. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.amc.2010.07.055 2... and Ribberin large-scale and long term morphologica Please cite this article in press as: G.J.F. Smit Newtonian fluid, Appl. Math. Comput. (2010), � 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. modeling of multiphase flow has increasingly become the subject...

  4. Study of Two-Phase Heat Transfer in Nano-fluids for Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.J.; Truong, B.; Buongiorno, J.; Hu, L.W.; Bang, I.C.

    2006-01-01

    Nano-fluids are engineered colloidal suspensions of nano-particles in a base fluid. We are investigating the two-phase heat transfer behavior of water-based nano-fluids, to evaluate their potential use in nuclear applications, including the PWR primary coolant and PWR and BWR safety systems. A simple pool boiling wire experiment shows that a significant increase in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) can be achieved at modest nano-particle concentrations. For example, the CHF increases by 50% in nano-fluids with alumina nano-particles at 0.001%v concentration. The CHF enhancement appears to correlate with the presence of a layer of nano-particles that builds up on the heated surface during nucleate boiling. A review of the prevalent Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) theories suggests that an alteration of the nucleation site density (brought about by the nano-particle layer) could plausibly explain the CHF enhancement. (authors)

  5. A Two-Phase Solid/Fluid Model for Dense Granular Flows Including Dilatancy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2015-04-01

    We propose a thin layer depth-averaged two-phase model to describe solid-fluid mixtures such as debris flows. It describes the velocity of the two phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure, that itself modifies the friction within the granular phase (Iverson et al., 2010). The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by Jackson (2000) based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work (Bouchut et al., 2014). In particular, Pitman and Le replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's equations. We close the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation involving a critical density, or equivalently a critical pressure. Moreover, we relax one boundary condition, making it possible for the fluid to escape the granular media when compression of the granular mass occurs. Furthermore, we introduce second order terms in the equations making it possible to describe the evolution of the pore fluid pressure in response to the compression/dilatation of the granular mass without prescribing an extra ad-hoc equation for the pore pressure. We prove that the energy balance associated with this Jackson closure is dissipative, as well as its thin layer associated model. We present several numerical tests for the 1D case that are compared to the

  6. Study of single- and two-phase fluid transfer between subchannels at Kumamoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadatomi, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Firstly, the definitions of turbulent mixing, void drift and diversion cross-flow, which are three components of fluid transfer between subchannels, are given together with the relations of each component with equilibrium or non-equilibrium two-phase subchannel flows. Secondly, measuring techniques of the three components are briefly presented in turn together with typical measurement results. In turbulent mixing measurement, a tracer injection method has been adopted at Kumamoto University, while an isokinetic discharge method for both void drift an diversion cross-flow measurements. In the experiment of hydraulically non-equilibrium flow with both void drift and/or diversion cross-flow, experimental data on flow redistribution process have been obtained. The data include the axial variations of gas and liquid flow rates and void fraction in each subchannel and pressure difference between the subchannels. After analyzing these variations, some correlations on the void drift and the diversion cross-flow are obtained. Finally, a subchannel analysis code used at Kumamoto University is presented together with the results of its validation test against the experimental data on flow redistribution process mentioned above. The code is based on a two-phase two-fluid model, and is applicable to adiabatic two-phase flows under steady state condition. Basic equations in the code are the conservation equations of mass, axial momentum and lateral momentum, while the constitutive equations include the correlations of void diffusion coefficient, both interfacial and wall friction coefficients for the cross-flow, etc. (author)

  7. Simulation of horizontal pipe two-phase slug flows using the two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega Malca, Arturo J. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Nucleo de Simulacao Termohidraulica de Dutos (SIMDUT); Nieckele, Angela O. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2005-07-01

    Slug flow occurs in many engineering applications, mainly in the transport of hydrocarbon fluids in pipelines. The intermittency of slug flow causes severe unsteady loading on the pipelines carrying the fluids, which gives rise to design problems. Therefore, it is important to be able to predict the onset and development of slug flow as well as slug characteristics. The present work consists in the simulation of two-phase flow in slug pattern through horizontal pipes using the two-fluid model in its transient and one-dimensional form. The advantage of this model is that the flow field is allowed to develop naturally from a given initial conditions as part of the transient calculation; the slug evolves automatically as a product of the computed flow development. Simulations are then carried out for a large number of flow conditions that lead a slug flow. (author)

  8. Workshop on Two-Phase Fluid Behavior in a Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Editor); Juhasz, AL (Editor); Long, W. Russ (Editor); Ottenstein, Laura (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Workshop was successful in achieving its main objective of identifying a large number of technical issues relating to the design of two-phase systems for space applications. The principal concern expressed was the need for verified analytical tools that will allow an engineer to confidently design a system to a known degree of accuracy. New and improved materials, for such applications as thermal storage and as heat transfer fluids, were also identified as major needs. In addition to these research efforts, a number of specific hardware needs were identified which will require development. These include heat pumps, low weight radiators, advanced heat pipes, stability enhancement devices, high heat flux evaporators, and liquid/vapor separators. Also identified was the need for a centralized source of reliable, up-to-date information on two-phase flow in a space environment.

  9. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  10. Numerical modeling of two-phase binary fluid mixing using mixed finite elements

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu

    2012-07-27

    Diffusion coefficients of dense gases in liquids can be measured by considering two-phase binary nonequilibrium fluid mixing in a closed cell with a fixed volume. This process is based on convection and diffusion in each phase. Numerical simulation of the mixing often requires accurate algorithms. In this paper, we design two efficient numerical methods for simulating the mixing of two-phase binary fluids in one-dimensional, highly permeable media. Mathematical model for isothermal compositional two-phase flow in porous media is established based on Darcy\\'s law, material balance, local thermodynamic equilibrium for the phases, and diffusion across the phases. The time-lag and operator-splitting techniques are used to decompose each convection-diffusion equation into two steps: diffusion step and convection step. The Mixed finite element (MFE) method is used for diffusion equation because it can achieve a high-order and stable approximation of both the scalar variable and the diffusive fluxes across grid-cell interfaces. We employ the characteristic finite element method with moving mesh to track the liquid-gas interface. Based on the above schemes, we propose two methods: single-domain and two-domain methods. The main difference between two methods is that the two-domain method utilizes the assumption of sharp interface between two fluid phases, while the single-domain method allows fractional saturation level. Two-domain method treats the gas domain and the liquid domain separately. Because liquid-gas interface moves with time, the two-domain method needs work with a moving mesh. On the other hand, the single-domain method allows the use of a fixed mesh. We derive the formulas to compute the diffusive flux for MFE in both methods. The single-domain method is extended to multiple dimensions. Numerical results indicate that both methods can accurately describe the evolution of the pressure and liquid level. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  11. On heat transfer to pulsatile flow of a two-phase fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Chakraborty

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer to pulsatile flow of a two-phase fluid-particle system contained in a channel bounded by two infinitely long rigid impervious parallel walls has been studied in this paper. The solutions for the steady and the fluctuating temperature distributions are obtained. The rates of heat transfer at the walls are also calculated. The results are discussed numerically with graphical presentations. It is shown that the presence of the particles not only diminishes the steady and unsteady temperature fields but also decreases the reversal of heat flux at the hotter wall irrespective of the influences of other flow parameters.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrey Ioilev; Maskhud Samigulin; Vasily Ustinenko; Simon Lo; Adrian Tentner

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The goal of this project is to develop an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle under various operating conditions. This code will include more fundamental physical models than the current generation of sub-channel codes and advanced numerical algorithms for improved computational accuracy, robustness, and speed. It is highly desirable to understand the detailed two-phase flow phenomena inside a BWR fuel bundle. These phenomena include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for the analysis of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is still too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Recent progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), coupled with the rapidly increasing computational power of massively parallel computers, shows promising potential for the fine-mesh, detailed simulation of fuel assembly two-phase flow phenomena. However, the phenomenological models available in the commercial CFD programs are not as advanced as those currently being used in the sub-channel codes used in the nuclear industry. In particular, there are no models currently available which are able to reliably predict the nature of the flow regimes, and use the appropriate sub-models for those flow regimes. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD Code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. The paper describes the model development strategy which has been adopted by the development team for the

  13. Interface model coupling in fluid dynamics: application to two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galie, Th.

    2009-03-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of interface model coupling problems in space between different models of compressible flows. We consider one-dimensional problems where the interface is sharp, fixed and separating two regions of space corresponding to the two coupled models. Our goal is to define a coupling condition at the interface and to solve numerically the coupling problem with this condition. After a state of art on the interface model coupling of hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, we propose a new coupling condition by adding in the equations of the coupled problem a measure source term at the interface. We first suppose a given constant weight associated to this source term. Two Riemann solvers are developed and one of them is based on a relaxation approach preserving equilibrium solutions of the coupled problem. This relaxation method is then used in an optimization problem, defined by several motivations at the interface, which permits to calculate a time dynamical weight. In a second part, we develop an approached Riemann solver for a two-phase two-pressure model in the particular case of a two-phase isentropic flow. Such a model contains non conservative terms that we write under the form of measure source terms. The previous relaxation method is thus extended to the case of the two-phase two-pressure model with an a priori estimation of the non conservative term contributions. The method allows us to solve, in the next and last chapter, the coupling problem of a two-fluid two-pressure model with a drift-flux model thanks to the father model approach. (authors)

  14. Design of a Subscale Propellant Slag Evaluation Motor Using Two-Phase Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Dill, Richard A.; Purinton, David C.; Sambamurthi, Jay K.

    1996-01-01

    Small pressure perturbations in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) are caused by the periodic expulsion of molten aluminum oxide slag from a pool that collects in the aft end of the motor around the submerged nozzle nose during the last half of motor operation. It is suspected that some motors produce more slag than others due to differences in aluminum oxide agglomerate particle sizes that may relate to subtle differences in propellant ingredient characteristics such as particle size distributions or processing variations. A subscale motor experiment was designed to determine the effect of propellant ingredient characteristics on the propensity for slag production. An existing 5 inch ballistic test motor was selected as the basic test vehicle. The standard converging/diverging nozzle was replaced with a submerged nose nozzle design to provide a positive trap for the slag that would increase the measured slag weights. Two-phase fluid dynamic analyses were performed to develop a nozzle nose design that maintained similitude in major flow field features with the full scale RSRM. The 5 inch motor was spun about its longitudinal axis to further enhance slag collection and retention. Two-phase flow analysis was used to select an appropriate spin rate along with other considerations, such as avoiding bum rate increases due to radial acceleration effects. Aluminum oxide particle distributions used in the flow analyses were measured in a quench bomb for RSRM type propellants with minor variations in ingredient characteristics. Detailed predictions for slag accumulation weights during motor bum compared favorably with slag weight data taken from defined zones in the subscale motor and nozzle. The use of two-phase flow analysis proved successful in gauging the viability of the experimental program during the planning phase and in guiding the design of the critical submerged nose nozzle.

  15. Microtomography and pore-scale modeling of two-phase Fluid Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Tomutsa, L.; Benson, S.; Patzek, T.

    2010-10-19

    Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (micro CT) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) line 8.3.2 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory produces three-dimensional micron-scale-resolution digital images of the pore space of the reservoir rock along with the spacial distribution of the fluids. Pore-scale visualization of carbon dioxide flooding experiments performed at a reservoir pressure demonstrates that the injected gas fills some pores and pore clusters, and entirely bypasses the others. Using 3D digital images of the pore space as input data, the method of maximal inscribed spheres (MIS) predicts two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. Verification against the tomography images shows a good agreement between the computed fluid distribution in the pores and the experimental data. The model-predicted capillary pressure curves and tomography-based porosimetry distributions compared favorably with the mercury injection data. Thus, micro CT in combination with modeling based on the MIS is a viable approach to study the pore-scale mechanisms of CO{sub 2} injection into an aquifer, as well as more general multi-phase flows.

  16. CFD simulation of gas and non-Newtonian fluid two-phase flow in anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an Eulerian multiphase flow model that characterizes gas mixing in anaerobic digesters. In the model development, liquid manure is assumed to be water or a non-Newtonian fluid that is dependent on total solids (TS) concentration. To establish the appropriate models for different TS levels, twelve turbulence models are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops of gas and non-Newtonian fluid two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from a correlation analysis. The commercial CFD software, Fluent12.0, is employed to simulate the multiphase flow in the digesters. The simulation results in a small-sized digester are validated against the experimental data from literature. Comparison of two gas mixing designs in a medium-sized digester demonstrates that mixing intensity is insensitive to the TS in confined gas mixing, whereas there are significant decreases with increases of TS in unconfined gas mixing. Moreover, comparison of three mixing methods indicates that gas mixing is more efficient than mixing by pumped circulation while it is less efficient than mechanical mixing.

  17. Geometric analysis of the solutions of two-phase flows: two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kestin, J.; Zeng, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains a lightly edited draft of a study of the two-fluid model in two-phase flow. The motivation for the study stems from the authors' conviction that the construction of a computer code for any model should be preceded by a geometrical analysis of the pattern of trajectories in the phase space appropriate for the model. Such a study greatly facilitates the understanding of the phenomenon of choking and anticipates the computational difficulties which arise from the existence of singularities. The report contains a derivation of the six conservation equations of the model which includes a consideration of the simplifications imposed on a one-dimensional treatment by the presence of boundary layers at the wall and between the phases. The model is restricted to one-dimensional adiabatic flows of a single substance present in two phases, but thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases is not assumed. The role of closure conditions is defined but no specific closure conditions, or explicit equations of state, are introduced

  18. Modeling and analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities in two-phase flow using two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J.; Podowski, M.Z.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the practical importance of two-phase flow instabilities, especially in boiling water nuclear reactor technology, substantial efforts have been made to date to understand the physical phenomena governing such instabilities and to develop computational tools to model the dynamics of marginally-stable/unstable boiling systems. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrated methodology for the analysis of flow-induced instabilities in boiling channels and systems. The major novel aspects of the proposed approach are: (a) it is based on the combined frequency-domain and time-domain methods, the former used to quantify stability margins and to determine the onset of instability conditions, the latter to study the nonlinear system response outside the stability boundaries identified using the nearly-exact results of the frequency-domain analysis; (b) the two-fluid model of two-phase flow has been used for the first time to analytically derive the boiling channel transfer functions for the parallel-channel and channel-to-channel instability modes. In this way, the major characteristics of a boiling system, including the onset-of-instability conditions, can be readily evaluated by using the qualitative frequency-domain approach, whereas the explicit time-domain integration is performed, if necessary, only for the operating conditions that have already been identified as unstable. Both methods use the same physical two-fluid model that, in one case, is linearized and used to derive a rigorous analytical solution in the complex domain, and, in the other case, is solved numerically using an algorithm developed especially for this purpose. The results using both methods have been compared against each other and extensively tested. The testing and validation of the new model included comparisons of the predicted steady-state distributions of major parameters and of the transient channel response against experimental data

  19. Two-Phase Fluid Simulation Using a Diffuse Interface Model with Peng--Robinson Equation of State

    KAUST Repository

    Qiao, Zhonghua; Sun, Shuyu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, two-phase fluid systems are simulated using a diffusive interface model with the Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS), a widely used realistic EOS for hydrocarbon fluid in the petroleum industry. We first utilize the gradient theory

  20. Implicit approximate Riemann solver for two fluid two phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, P.; Toumi, I.; Kumbaro, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the description of new numerical methods developed for the numerical treatment of two phase flow models with two velocity fields which are now widely used in nuclear engineering for design or safety calculations. These methods are finite volumes numerical methods and are based on the use of Approximate Riemann Solver's concepts in order to define convective flux versus mean cell quantities. The first part of the communication will describe the numerical method for a three dimensional drift flux model and the extensions which were performed to make the numerical scheme implicit and to have fast running calculations of steady states. Such a scheme is now implemented in the FLICA-4 computer code devoted to 3-D steady state and transient core computations. We will present results obtained for a steady state flow with rod bow effect evaluation and for a Steam Line Break calculation were the 3-D core thermal computation was coupled with a 3-D kinetic calculation and a thermal-hydraulic transient calculation for the four loops of a Pressurized Water Reactor. The second part of the paper will detail the development of an equivalent numerical method based on an approximate Riemann Solver for a two fluid model with two momentum balance equations for the liquid and the gas phases. The main difficulty for these models is due to the existence of differential modelling terms such as added mass effects or interfacial pressure terms which make hyperbolic the model. These terms does not permit to write the balance equations system in a conservative form, and the classical theory for discontinuity propagation for non-linear systems cannot be applied. Meanwhile, the use of non-conservative products theory allows the study of discontinuity propagation for a non conservative model and this will permit the construction of a numerical scheme for two fluid two phase flow model. These different points will be detailed in that section which will be illustrated by

  1. Evaluation of two-phase flow solvers using Level Set and Volume of Fluid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, C.; Aboukhedr, M.; Vogiatzaki, K.; Cant, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    Two principal methods have been used to simulate the evolution of two-phase immiscible flows of liquid and gas separated by an interface. These are the Level-Set (LS) method and the Volume of Fluid (VoF) method. Both methods attempt to represent the very sharp interface between the phases and to deal with the large jumps in physical properties associated with it. Both methods have their own strengths and weaknesses. For example, the VoF method is known to be prone to excessive numerical diffusion, while the basic LS method has some difficulty in conserving mass. Major progress has been made in remedying these deficiencies, and both methods have now reached a high level of physical accuracy. Nevertheless, there remains an issue, in that each of these methods has been developed by different research groups, using different codes and most importantly the implementations have been fine tuned to tackle different applications. Thus, it remains unclear what are the remaining advantages and drawbacks of each method relative to the other, and what might be the optimal way to unify them. In this paper, we address this gap by performing a direct comparison of two current state-of-the-art variations of these methods (LS: RCLSFoam and VoF: interPore) and implemented in the same code (OpenFoam). We subject both methods to a pair of benchmark test cases while using the same numerical meshes to examine a) the accuracy of curvature representation, b) the effect of tuning parameters, c) the ability to minimise spurious velocities and d) the ability to tackle fluids with very different densities. For each method, one of the test cases is chosen to be fairly benign while the other test case is expected to present a greater challenge. The results indicate that both methods can be made to work well on both test cases, while displaying different sensitivity to the relevant parameters.

  2. Unsteady flow of two-phase fluid in circular pipes under applied external magnetic and electrical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedik, Engin; Recebli, Ziyaddin; Kurt, Hueseyin; Kecebas, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The unsteady viscous incompressible and electrically conducting of two-phase fluid flow in circular pipes with external magnetic and electrical field is considered in this present study. Effects of both uniform transverse external magnetic and electrical fields applied perpendicular to the fluid and each other on the two-phase (solid/liquid) unsteady flow is investigated numerically. While iron powders are being used as the first phase of two-phase fluid, pure water was used as the second phase. The system of the derived governing equations, which are based on the Navier-Stokes equations including Maxwell equations, are solved numerically by using Pdex4 function on the Matlab for both phases. The originality of this study is that, in addition to magnetic field, the effect of electrical field on two-phase unsteady fluids is being examined. The magnetic field which is applied on flow decreases the velocity of both phases, whereas the electrical field applied along with magnetic field acted to increase and decrease the velocity values depending on the direction of electrical field. Electrical field alone did not display any impact on two-phase flow. On the other hand, analytical and numerical results are compared and favorable agreements have been obtained. (authors)

  3. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  4. Analysis of the two-fluid model in fully-developed two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azpitarte, Osvaldo Enrique

    2003-01-01

    The two fluid model is analysed and applied to solve vertical fully-developed bubbly two-phase flows, both in laminar and turbulent conditions.The laminar model is reduced to two differential equations to solve the gas fraction (ε G ) and the velocity (υ L ).For the turbulent condition, a k - ε model for low Reynolds number is implemented, resulting in a set of differential equations to solve the four variables (ε G , υ L , k and ε) along the whole radial domain (including the laminar sub layer).For laminar condition, the system is initially reduced to a single non-dimensional ordinary equation (O D E) to solve ε G in the central region of the duct, without considering the effect of the wall.The equation is solved using Mathematic a.Analysing the solutions it can be concluded that an exact compensation of the applied pressure gradient with the hydrostatic force ρ e ff g occurs (ρ e ff : effective density of the mixture).This compensation implies that the value of ε G at the center of the duct only depends on the applied pressure gradient (dependency is linear), and that the ε G and υ L profiles are necessarily fl ato The complete problem is dealt numerically through the implementation of a finite element co deo The effect of the walls is included via a model of wall force.When the code is applied to a laminar condition, the conclusions previously obtained solving the O D E are confirmed.It is also possible to analyse the regime in which the pressure gradient is greater than the weight of the pure liquid, in which case a region of strictly zero void fraction develops surrounding the axis of the duct (in upward flow).When the code is applied to a turbulent condition, it is shown that the conclusions obtained for laminar condition can also be applied, but within a range of pressure gradient limited by two transition values (θ 1 and θ 2 ).An analysis of transitions θ 1 and θ 2 allows u s to conclude that their origin is a sudden increase of lateral

  5. Assessment of fluid distribution and flow properties in two phase fluid flow using X-ray CT technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Wu, Bohao; Li, Xingbo; Wang, Sijia; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xinhuan; Zhang, Yi

    2018-04-01

    To study on microscale distribution of CO2 and brine during two-phase flow is crucial for understanding the trapping mechanisms of CO2 storage. In this study, CO2-brine flow experiments in porous media were conducted using X-ray computed tomography. The porous media were packed with glass beads. The pore structure (porosity/tortuosity) and flow properties at different flow rates and flow fractions were investigated. The results showed that porosity of the packed beads differed at different position as a result of heterogeneity. The CO2 saturation is higher at low injection flow rates and high CO2 fractions. CO2 distribution at the pore scale was also visualized. ∅ Porosity of porous media CT brine_ sat grey value of sample saturated with brine CT dry grey value of sample saturated with air CT brine grey value of pure brine CT air grey value of pure air CT flow grey values of sample with two fluids occupying the pore space {CT}_{CO_2_ sat} grey value of sample saturated with CO2 {f}_{CO_2}({S}_{CO_2}) CO2 fraction {q}_{CO_2} the volume flow rate for CO2 q brine the volume flow rate for brine L Thickness of the porous media, mm L e a bundle of capillaries of equal length, mm τ Tortuosity, calculated from L e / L.

  6. Analysis of two-phase flow inter-subchannel mass and momentum exchanges by the two-fluid model approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninokata, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Deguchi, A. [ENO Mathematical Analysis, Tokyo (Japan); Kawahara, A. [Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    A new void drift model for the subchannel analysis method is presented for the thermohydraulics calculation of two-phase flows in rod bundles where the flow model uses a two-fluid formulation for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. A void drift model is constructed based on the experimental data obtained in a geometrically simple inter-connected two circular channel test sections using air-water as working fluids. The void drift force is assumed to be an origin of void drift velocity components of the two-phase cross-flow in a gap area between two adjacent rods and to overcome the momentum exchanges at the phase interface and wall-fluid interface. This void drift force is implemented in the cross flow momentum equations. Computational results have been successfully compared to experimental data available including 3x3 rod bundle data.

  7. A Well-Posed Two Phase Flow Model and its Numerical Solutions for Reactor Thermal-Fluids Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    A 7-equation two-phase flow model and its numerical implementation is presented for reactor thermal-fluids applications. The equation system is well-posed and treats both phases as compressible flows. The numerical discretization of the equation system is based on the finite element formalism. The numerical algorithm is implemented in the next generation RELAP-7 code (Idaho National Laboratory (INL)’s thermal-fluids code) built on top of an other INL’s product, the massively parallel multi-implicit multi-physics object oriented code environment (MOOSE). Some preliminary thermal-fluids computations are presented.

  8. A Well-Posed Two Phase Flow Model and its Numerical Solutions for Reactor Thermal-Fluids Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray; Martineau, Richard

    2016-01-01

    A 7-equation two-phase flow model and its numerical implementation is presented for reactor thermal-fluids applications. The equation system is well-posed and treats both phases as compressible flows. The numerical discretization of the equation system is based on the finite element formalism. The numerical algorithm is implemented in the next generation RELAP-7 code (Idaho National Laboratory (INL)'s thermal-fluids code) built on top of an other INL's product, the massively parallel multi-implicit multi-physics object oriented code environment (MOOSE). Some preliminary thermal-fluids computations are presented.

  9. Theory for added mass of a vibrating circular rod in a two-phase air-water fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohgo, Osamu; Hara, Fumio

    1985-01-01

    It has been well known that there are added mass and attenuation effect due to surrounding fluid in a structure vibrating in the fluid, and those are different according to the density and viscosity of the fluid and the form of the structure. In this study, in order to clarify added mass, the model of the vapor-liquid two-phase fluid with discontinuous density distribution was made. That is, bubbles were assumed to be a bubble column without bending stiffness and mass, and potential analysis was applied to a two-dimensional fluid field composed of a round section beam and the bubble column, thus their relative motion was hydrodynamically analyzed, and the theory for evaluating added mass was developed. The added mass experimentally determined from the response gain of a single round section cantilever when it was oscillated steadily, uniformly and at random in the vapor-liquid two-phase fluid being stationary as a whole and the theoretical result were examined by comparison, and equivalent bubble diameter was considered, thereafter, the validity of the model was examined. (Kako, I.)

  10. 3D Volumetric Analysis of Fluid Inclusions Using Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, A.; Mulukutla, G.; Sahagian, D.; Bodnar, B.

    2009-05-01

    Fluid inclusions preserve valuable information regarding hydrothermal, metamorphic, and magmatic processes. The molar quantities of liquid and gaseous components in the inclusions can be estimated from their volumetric measurements at room temperatures combined with knowledge of the PVTX properties of the fluid and homogenization temperatures. Thus, accurate measurements of inclusion volumes and their two phase components are critical. One of the greatest advantages of the Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) in application to fluid inclsion analsyis is that it is affordable for large numbers of samples, given the appropriate software analysis tools and methodology. Our present work is directed toward developing those tools and methods. For the last decade LSCM has been considered as a potential method for inclusion volume measurements. Nevertheless, the adequate and accurate measurement by LSCM has not yet been successful for fluid inclusions containing non-fluorescing fluids due to many technical challenges in image analysis despite the fact that the cost of collecting raw LSCM imagery has dramatically decreased in recent years. These problems mostly relate to image analysis methodology and software tools that are needed for pre-processing and image segmentation, which enable solid, liquid and gaseous components to be delineated. Other challenges involve image quality and contrast, which is controlled by fluorescence of the material (most aqueous fluid inclusions do not fluoresce at the appropriate laser wavelengths), material optical properties, and application of transmitted and/or reflected confocal illumination. In this work we have identified the key problems of image analysis and propose some potential solutions. For instance, we found that better contrast of pseudo-confocal transmitted light images could be overlayed with poor-contrast true-confocal reflected light images within the same stack of z-ordered slices. This approach allows one to narrow

  11. Two-phase fluid flow measurements in small diameter channels using real-time neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlisle, B.S.; Johns, R.C.; Hassan, Y.A.

    2004-01-01

    A series of real-time, neutron radiography, experiments are ongoing at the Texas A and M Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). These tests determine the resolving capabilities for radiographic imaging of two phase water and air flow regimes through small diameter flow channels. Though both film and video radiographic imaging is available, the real-time video imaging was selected to capture the dynamic flow patterns with results that continue to improve. (author)

  12. Observation of Droplet Size Oscillations in a Two-Phase Fluid under Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbin, Laurent; Panizza, Pascal; Salmon, Jean-Baptiste

    2004-01-01

    Experimental observations of droplet size sustained oscillations are reported in a two-phase flow between a lamellar and a sponge phase. Under shear flow, this system presents two different steady states made of monodisperse multilamellar droplets, separated by a shear-thinning transition. At low and high shear rates, the droplet size results from a balance between surface tension and viscous stress, whereas for intermediate shear rates it becomes a periodic function of time. A possible mechanism for such kinds of oscillations is discussed.

  13. The analysis of two-phase flow and heat transfer using a multidimensional, four field, two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahey, Richard T.; Drew, Donald A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the prediction of multidimensional multiphase flow and heat transfer phenomena using a four field, two-fluid model. It is shown that accurate mechanistic computational fluid dynamic (CFD) predictions are possible for a wide variety of adiabatic and diabatic flows using this computational model. In particular, the model is able to predict the bubbly air/water upflow data of Serizawa (Serizawa, A., 1974. Fluid dynamic characteristics of two-phase flow. Ph.D. thesis, (Nuclear Engineering), Kyoto University, Japan), the downflow data of Wang et al. (Wang, S.K., Lee, S.J., Lahey Jr., R.T., Jones, O.C., 1987. 3-D turbulence structure and phase distribution measurements in bubbly two-phase flows. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 13 (3), 327-343), the isosceles triangle upflow data of Lopez de Bertodano et al. (Lopez de Bertodano, M., Lahey Jr., R.T., Jones, O.C., 1994b. Phase distribution in bubbly two-phase flow in vertical ducts. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 20 (5), 805-818), the heated annular R-113 subcooled boiling data of Velidandala, et al. (Velidandla, V., Pulta, S., Roy, P., Kaira, S.P., 1995. Velocity field in turbulent subcooled boiling flow. ASME Preprint HTD-314, 107-123) and the R-113 CHF data of Hino and Ueda (Hino, R., Ueda, T., 1985. Studies on heat transfer and flow characteristics in subcooled boiling-part 2, flow characteristics. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 11, 283-297). It can also predict external two-phase flows, such as those for spreading two-phase jets (Bonetto, F., Lahey Jr., R.T., 1993. An experimental study on air carryunder due to a plunging liquid jet. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 19 (2), 281-294) and multiphase flows around the hull of naval surface ships (Carrica, P.M., Bonetto, F., Drew, D.A., Lahey, R.T., 1999. A polydispersed model for bubbly two-phase flow around a surface ship. Int. J. Multiphase Flow 25 (2), 257-305)

  14. Fluid inclusions in salt: an annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    An annotated bibliography is presented which was compiled while searching the literature for information on fluid inclusions in salt for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's study on the deep-geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The migration of fluid inclusions in a thermal gradient is a potential hazard to the safe disposal of nuclear waste in a salt repository. At the present time, a prediction as to whether this hazard precludes the use of salt for waste disposal can not be made. Limited data from the Salt-Vault in situ heater experiments in the early 1960's (Bradshaw and McClain, 1971) leave little doubt that fluid inclusions can migrate towards a heat source. In addition to the bibliography, there is a brief summary of the physical and chemical characteristics that together with the temperature of the waste will determine the chemical composition of the brine in contact with the waste canister, the rate of fluid migration, and the brine-canister-waste interactions

  15. A numerical model of two-phase flow at the micro-scale using the volume-of-fluid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Mosayeb; Raeini, Ali Q.; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a simple and robust numerical scheme to model two-phase flow in porous media where capillary forces dominate over viscous effects. The volume-of-fluid method is employed to capture the fluid-fluid interface whose dynamics is explicitly described based on a finite volume discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations. Interfacial forces are calculated directly on reconstructed interface elements such that the total curvature is preserved. The computed interfacial forces are explicitly added to the Navier-Stokes equations using a sharp formulation which effectively eliminates spurious currents. The stability and accuracy of the implemented scheme is validated on several two- and three-dimensional test cases, which indicate the capability of the method to model two-phase flow processes at the micro-scale. In particular we show how the co-current flow of two viscous fluids leads to greatly enhanced flow conductance for the wetting phase in corners of the pore space, compared to a case where the non-wetting phase is an inviscid gas.

  16. Modeling Two-Phase Flow and Vapor Cycles Using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda D.; Majumdar, Alok K.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents three new applications for the general purpose fluid network solver code GFSSP developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: (1) cooling tower, (2) vapor-compression refrigeration system, and (3) vapor-expansion power generation system. These systems are widely used across engineering disciplines in a variety of energy systems, and these models expand the capabilities and the use of GFSSP to include fluids and features that are not part of its present set of provided examples. GFSSP provides pressure, temperature, and species concentrations at designated locations, or nodes, within a fluid network based on a finite volume formulation of thermodynamics and conservation laws. This paper describes the theoretical basis for the construction of the models, their implementation in the current GFSSP modeling system, and a brief evaluation of the usefulness of the model results, as well as their applicability toward a broader spectrum of analytical problems in both university teaching and engineering research.

  17. Two-Phase Flow in Wire Coating with Heat Transfer Analysis of an Elastic-Viscous Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work considers two-phase flow of an elastic-viscous fluid for double-layer coating of wire. The wet-on-wet (WOW coating process is used in this study. The analytical solution of the theoretical model is obtained by Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM. The expression for the velocity field and temperature distribution for both layers is obtained. The convergence of the obtained series solution is established. The analytical results are verified by Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM. The obtained velocity field is compared with the existing exact solution of the same flow problem of second-grade fluid and with analytical solution of a third-grade fluid. Also, emerging parameters on the solutions are discussed and appropriate conclusions are drawn.

  18. Two-Phase Acto-Cytosolic Fluid Flow in a Moving Keratocyte: A 2D Continuum Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikmaneshi, M R; Firoozabadi, B; Saidi, M S

    2015-09-01

    The F-actin network and cytosol in the lamellipodia of crawling cells flow in a centripetal pattern and spout-like form, respectively. We have numerically studied this two-phase flow in the realistic geometry of a moving keratocyte. Cytosol has been treated as a low viscosity Newtonian fluid flowing through the high viscosity porous medium of F-actin network. Other involved phenomena including myosin activity, adhesion friction, and interphase interaction are also discussed to provide an overall view of this problem. Adopting a two-phase coupled model by myosin concentration, we have found new accurate perspectives of acto-cytosolic flow and pressure fields, myosin distribution, as well as the distribution of effective forces across the lamellipodia of a keratocyte with stationary shape. The order of magnitude method is also used to determine the contribution of forces in the internal dynamics of lamellipodia.

  19. Continued development of a semianalytical solution for two-phase fluid and heat flow in a porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, C.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Over the past few years the authors have developed a semianalytical solution for transient two-phase water, air, and heat flow in a porous medium surrounding a constant-strength linear heat source, using a similarity variable {eta} = r/{radical}t. Although the similarity transformation approach requires a simplified geometry, all the complex physical mechanisms involved in coupled two-phase fluid and heat flow can be taken into account in a rigorous way, so that the solution may be applied to a variety of problems of current interest. The work was motivated by adverse to predict the thermohydrological response to the proposed geologic repository for heat-generating high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in a partially saturated, highly fractured volcanic formation. The paper describes thermal and hydrologic conditions near the heat source; new features of the model; vapor pressure lowering; and the effective-continuum representation of a fractured/porous medium.

  20. Thermal Marangoni convection in two-phase flow of dusty Casson fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanthesh, B.; Gireesha, B. J.

    2018-03-01

    This paper deals with the thermal Marangoni convection effects in magneto-Casson liquid flow through suspension of dust particles. The transpiration cooling aspect is accounted. The surface tension is assumed to be fluctuating linearly with temperature. The fluid and dust particle's temperature of the interface is chosen as a quadratic function of interface arc length. The governing problem is modelled by conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy for fluid and dust particle phase. Stretching transformation technique is utilized to form ordinary differential equations from the partial differential equations. Later, the numerical solutions based on Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method are established. The momentum and heat transport distributions are focused on the outcome of distinct governing parameters. The results of Nusselt number is also presented and discussed. It is established that the heat transfer rate is higher in the case of dusty non-Newtonian fluid than dusty Newtonian fluid. The rate of heat transfer can be enhanced by suspending dust particles in a base liquid.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.

    2009-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  2. Observation of Droplet Size Oscillations in a Two Phase Fluid under Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbin, Laurent; Panizza, Pascal

    2004-11-01

    It is well known that complex fluids exhibit strong couplings between their microstructure and the flow field. Such couplings may lead to unusual non linear rheological behavior. Because energy is constantly brought to the system, richer dynamic behavior such as non linear oscillatory or chaotic response is expected. We report on the observation of droplet size oscillations at fixed shear rate. At low shear rates, we observe two steady states for which the droplet size results from a balance between capillary and viscous stress. For intermediate shear rates, the droplet size becomes a periodic function of time. We propose a phenomenological model to account for the observed phenomenon and compare numerical results to experimental data.

  3. Fluid-Elastic Instability of U-Tube Bundle in Air-Water Two-Phase Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, In Cheol; Lee, Chang Hee; Yun, Young Jung; Chung, Heung June

    2007-03-01

    Using steam generator U-tube flow-induced vibration test facility, the flow-induced vibration characteristics of U-tube in row 34-44 and line 71-77 were investigated. Air and water at room temperature and near atmospheric pressure were used as working fluids. In the present experiments, followings were evaluated under two-phase cross-flow condition: the fundamental vibration responses and the critical gap velocity for a fluid-elastic instability of U-tubes, the damping ratio and hydrodynamic mass of U-tubes. In addition, the fluid-elastic instability factor, K, was preliminary assessed using Connors' relation. In the case of the U-tubes which are not supported by partial egg-crate in OPR100 steam generator, it has been found that the vibration displacement of those U-tubes are highly possible to exceed the design limit even by a turbulent excitation mechanism. The damping ratio of U-tubes measured in the present experiments was significantly higher than the OPR1000 steam generator design value. The fluid-elastic instability factor of U-tube bundle obtained in the present experiments were preliminary evaluated to be mostly in the range of 6.5-10.5

  4. Dynamics of snap-off and pore-filling events during two-phase fluid flow in permeable media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamaljit; Menke, Hannah; Andrew, Matthew; Lin, Qingyang; Rau, Christoph; Blunt, Martin J; Bijeljic, Branko

    2017-07-12

    Understanding the pore-scale dynamics of two-phase fluid flow in permeable media is important in many processes such as water infiltration in soils, oil recovery, and geo-sequestration of CO 2 . The two most important processes that compete during the displacement of a non-wetting fluid by a wetting fluid are pore-filling or piston-like displacement and snap-off; this latter process can lead to trapping of the non-wetting phase. We present a three-dimensional dynamic visualization study using fast synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography to provide new insights into these processes by conducting a time-resolved pore-by-pore analysis of the local curvature and capillary pressure. We show that the time-scales of interface movement and brine layer swelling leading to snap-off are several minutes, orders of magnitude slower than observed for Haines jumps in drainage. The local capillary pressure increases rapidly after snap-off as the trapped phase finds a position that is a new local energy minimum. However, the pressure change is less dramatic than that observed during drainage. We also show that the brine-oil interface jumps from pore-to-pore during imbibition at an approximately constant local capillary pressure, with an event size of the order of an average pore size, again much smaller than the large bursts seen during drainage.

  5. Gas-liquid Two Phase Flow Modelling of Incompressible Fluid and Experimental Validation Studies in Vertical Centrifugal Casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J X; Shen, X; Yin, Y J; Guo, Z; Wang, H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Gas-liquid two phase flow mathematic models of incompressible fluid were proposed to explore the feature of fluid under certain centrifugal force in vertical centrifugal casting (VCC). Modified projection-level-set method was introduced to solve the mathematic models. To validate the simulation results, two methods were used in this study. In the first method, the simulation result of basic VCC flow process was compared with its analytic solution. The relationship between the numerical solution and deterministic analytic solution was presented to verify the correctness of numerical algorithms. In the second method, systematic water simulation experiments were developed. In this initial experiment, special experimental vertical centrifugal device and casting shapes were designed to describe typical mold-filling processes in VCC. High speed camera system and data collection devices were used to capture flow shape during the mold-filling process. Moreover, fluid characteristic at different rotation speed (from 40rpm, 60rpmand 80rpm) was discussed to provide comparative resource for simulation results. As compared with the simulation results, the proposed mathematical models could be proven and the experimental design could help us advance the accuracy of simulation and further studies for VCC. (paper)

  6. Two-phase pressurized thermal shock investigations using a 3D two-fluid modeling of stratified flow with condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, W.; Coste, P.; Bestion, D.; Boucker, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a local 3D two-fluid model for a turbulent stratified flow with/without condensation, which can be used to predict two-phase pressurized thermal shock, is presented. A modified turbulent K- model is proposed with turbulence production induced by interfacial friction. A model of interfacial friction based on a interfacial sublayer concept and three interfacial heat transfer models, namely, a model based on the small eddies controlled surface renewal concept (HDM, Hughes and Duffey, 1991), a model based on the asymptotic behavior of the Eddy Viscosity (EVM), and a model based on the Interfacial Sublayer concept (ISM) are implemented into a preliminary version of the NEPTUNE code based on the 3D module of the CATHARE code. As a first step to apply the above models to predict the two-phase thermal shock, the models are evaluated by comparison of calculated profiles with several experiments: a turbulent air-water stratified flow without interfacial heat transfer; a turbulent steam-water stratified flow with condensation; turbulence induced by the impact of a water jet in a water pool. The prediction results agree well with the experimental data. In addition, the comparison of three interfacial heat transfer models shows that EVM and ISM gave better prediction results while HDM highly overestimated the interfacial heat transfers compared to the experimental data of a steam water stratified flow

  7. Some numerical methods for two-fluid two-phase flows in oil pipes; Quelques methodes numeriques pour les ecoulements diphasiques bi-fluide en conduites petrolieres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masella, J.M.

    1997-05-29

    This thesis is devoted to the numerical simulation of some two-fluid models describing gas-liquid two-phase flow in pipes. The numerical models developed here can be more generally used in the modelling of a wide class of physical models which can be put under an hyperbolic form. We introduce first two isothermal two-fluid models, composed of a mass balance equation and a momentum equation written in each phase, describing respectively a stratified two-phase flow and a dispersed two-phase flow. These models are hyperbolic under some physical assumptions and can be written under a nonconservative vectorial system. We define and analyse a new numerical finite volume scheme (v{integral}Roe) founded on a linearized Riemann solver. This scheme does not need any analytical calculation and gives good results in the tracking of shocks. We compare this new scheme with the classical Roe scheme. Then we propose and study some numerical models, with and without flux splitting method, which are adapted to the discretization of the two-fluid models. This numerical models are given by a finite volume integration of the equations, and lean on the v{integral} scheme. In order to reducing cpu time, due to the low Mach number of two-phase flows, acoustic waves are implicit. Afterwards we proposed a discretization of boundary conditions, which allows the generation of transient flows in pipe. Some numerical academic and more physical tests show the good behaviour of the numerical methods. (author) 77 refs.

  8. A stochastic asymptotic-preserving scheme for a kinetic-fluid model for disperse two-phase flows with uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Shi, E-mail: sjin@wisc.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Institute of Natural Sciences, School of Mathematical Science, MOELSEC and SHL-MAC, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shu, Ruiwen, E-mail: rshu2@math.wisc.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper we consider a kinetic-fluid model for disperse two-phase flows with uncertainty. We propose a stochastic asymptotic-preserving (s-AP) scheme in the generalized polynomial chaos stochastic Galerkin (gPC-sG) framework, which allows the efficient computation of the problem in both kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes. The s-AP property is proved by deriving the equilibrium of the gPC version of the Fokker–Planck operator. The coefficient matrices that arise in a Helmholtz equation and a Poisson equation, essential ingredients of the algorithms, are proved to be positive definite under reasonable and mild assumptions. The computation of the gPC version of a translation operator that arises in the inversion of the Fokker–Planck operator is accelerated by a spectrally accurate splitting method. Numerical examples illustrate the s-AP property and the efficiency of the gPC-sG method in various asymptotic regimes.

  9. Structural steady states and relaxation oscillations in a two-phase fluid under shear flow: Experiments and phenomenological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbin, L.; Benayad, A.; Panizza, P.

    2006-01-01

    By means of several rheophysics techniques, we report on an extensive study of the couplings between flow and microstructures in a two-phase fluid made of lamellar (Lα) and sponge (L3) phases. Depending on the nature of the imposed dynamical parameter (stress or shear rate) and on the experimental conditions (brine salinity or temperature), we observe several different structural steady states consisting of either multilamellar droplets (with or without a long range order) or elongated (L3) phase domains. Two different astonishing phenomena, shear-induced phase inversion and relaxation oscillations, are observed. We show that (i) phase inversion is related to a shear-induced topological change between monodisperse multilamellar droplets and elongated structures and (ii) droplet size relaxation oscillations result from a shear-induced change of the surface tension between both coexisting (Lα) and (L3) phases. To explain these relaxation oscillations, we present a phenomenological model and compare its numerical predictions to our experimental results.

  10. Numerical simulation of transient, adiabatic, two-dimensional two-phase flow using the two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves Conti, T. das.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method is developed to simulate adiabatic, transient, two-dimensional two-phase flow. The two-fluid model is used to obtain the mass and momentum conservation equations. These are solved by an iterative algorithm emphoying a time-marching scheme. Based on the corrective procedure of Hirt and Harlow a poisson equation is derived for the pressure field. This equation is finite-differenced and solved by a suitable matrix inversion technique. In the absence of experiment results several numerical tests were made in order to chec accuracy, convergence and stability of the proposed method. Several tests were also performed to check whether the behavior of void fraction and phasic velocities conforms with previous observations. (Author) [pt

  11. Two-Phase Fluid Simulation Using a Diffuse Interface Model with Peng--Robinson Equation of State

    KAUST Repository

    Qiao, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, two-phase fluid systems are simulated using a diffusive interface model with the Peng-Robinson equation of state (EOS), a widely used realistic EOS for hydrocarbon fluid in the petroleum industry. We first utilize the gradient theory of thermodynamics and variational calculus to derive a generalized chemical equilibrium equation, which is mathematically a second-order elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) in molar density with a strongly nonlinear source term. To solve this PDE, we convert it to a time-dependent parabolic PDE with the main interest in its final steady state solution. A Lagrange multiplier is used to enforce mass conservation. The parabolic PDE is then solved by mixed finite element methods with a semi-implicit time marching scheme. Convex splitting of the energy functional is proposed to construct this time marching scheme, where the volume exclusion effect of an EOS is treated implicitly while the pairwise attraction effect of EOS is calculated explicitly. This scheme is proved to be unconditionally energy stable. Our proposed algorithm is able to solve successfully the spatially heterogeneous two-phase systems with the Peng-Robinson EOS in multiple spatial dimensions, the first time in the literature. Numerical examples are provided with realistic hydrocarbon components to illustrate the theory. Furthermore, our computational results are compared with laboratory experimental data and verified with the Young-Laplace equation with good agreement. This work sets the stage for a broad extension of efficient convex-splitting semi-implicit schemes for numerical simulation of phase field models with a realistic EOS in complex geometries of multiple spatial dimensions.

  12. Fluid inclusion brine compositions from Palo Duro Basin salt sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The fluid inclusion analyses were done on salt samples from Lower San Andres Cycle 4 and 5. The stable isotope composition of the fluid inclusion brines was measured on duplicate samples taken from the same fluid inclusion brine for correlation of geochemical content with the stable isotopic content. The analyzed Palo Duro Basin salt fluid inclusions are predominantly one phase, i.e., the presence of a fluid only. However, many of the larger fluid inclusions do have a small vapor bubble. This liquid/vapor ratio is so high in these vapor-containing fluid inclusions that their behavior in a thermal gradient would be almost identical to that of all liquid inclusions. Closely associated with the fluid inclusions are cryptomelane where some fibers penetrate into halite host crystal. The fluid inclusions have a wide variability in content for those components that were analyzed, even within the same salt type. The fluid inclusion brines are also acidic, ranging from 3 to 6 as measured with pH test papers

  13. Magmatic gases in fluid inclusions from hydrothermal ore deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graney, J.; Kesler, S. (University of Michigan, MI (United States))

    1992-08-31

    In this study, magmatic gases in fluid inclusions from hydrothermal ore deposits have been analyzed. The gas composition of fluid inclusions from a wide range of extinct hydrothermal systems as represented by different ore deposit types was determined using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Most samples used for analysis consisted of transparent quartz, although barite, jasperoid, opal, sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite were also analyzed. H2O was the dominant volatile component in fluid inclusions, and composed 95-99 mole percent of the inclusion fluid. CO2 comprised most of the remaining volatile component and the other gases were generally present in amounts smaller than 0.1 mole percent. Analysis from porphyry and acid-sulfate deposits, in which magmatic gas contributions are considered to be largest, plotted closest to the fumarolic gas compositions. These inclusion fluid volatile component comparisons have shown that there are systematic differences in inclusion fluids from different hydrothermal systems. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Thermal regulation in terrestrial environment using a two-phase fluid loop with capillary pumping; Regulation thermique en environnement terrestre par boucle fluide diphasique a pompage capillaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butto, C [Universite Paul Sabatier, LESETH, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1997-12-31

    Two-phase fluid loops with capillary pumping are particularly interesting silent devices which allow energy savings and do not create any noise pollution (no mechanical vibrations). In terrestrial environment, the gravity field, when judiciously used, allows to improve their performances and thus, their use in thermal regulation of big computers, power electronic components, transformers, etc, is particularly interesting. In this study, the main results concerning the functioning of such a loop in the gravity field are presented and used to highlight the conditions that allow to take advantage of this field and the improvements obtained. (J.S.) 5 refs.

  15. A Two-Phase Flow Solver for Incompressible Viscous Fluids, Using a Pure Streamfunction Formulation and the Volume of Fluid Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    Accurate multi-phase flow solvers at low Reynolds number are of particular interest for the simulation of interface instabilities in the co-processing of multilayered material. We present a two-phase flow solver for incompressible viscous fluids which uses the streamfunction as the primary variable...... of the flow. Contrary to fractional step methods, the streamfunction formulation eliminates the pressure unknowns, and automatically fulfills the incompressibility constraint by construction. As a result, the method circumvents the loss of temporal accuracy at low Reynolds numbers. The interface is tracked...

  16. A Two-Phase Flow Solver for Incompressible Viscous Fluids, Using a Pure Streamfunction Formulation and the Volume of Fluid Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    Accurate multi-phase flow solvers at low Reynolds number are of particular interest for the simulation of interface instabilities in the co-processing of multilayered material. We present a two-phase flow solver for incompressible viscous fluids which uses the streamfunction as the primary variable...... of the flow. Contrary to fractional step methods, the streamfunction formulation eliminates the pressure unknowns, and automatically fulfills the incompressibility constraint by construction. As a result, the method circumvents the loss of temporal accuracy at low Reynolds numbers. The interface is tracked...

  17. Thermal regulation in terrestrial environment using a two-phase fluid loop with capillary pumping; Regulation thermique en environnement terrestre par boucle fluide diphasique a pompage capillaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butto, C. [Universite Paul Sabatier, LESETH, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1996-12-31

    Two-phase fluid loops with capillary pumping are particularly interesting silent devices which allow energy savings and do not create any noise pollution (no mechanical vibrations). In terrestrial environment, the gravity field, when judiciously used, allows to improve their performances and thus, their use in thermal regulation of big computers, power electronic components, transformers, etc, is particularly interesting. In this study, the main results concerning the functioning of such a loop in the gravity field are presented and used to highlight the conditions that allow to take advantage of this field and the improvements obtained. (J.S.) 5 refs.

  18. Three-dimensional fluid mechanics of particulate two-phase flows in U-bend and helical conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Prashant; Antal, Steven P.; Podowski, Michael Z.

    2006-04-01

    The results of numerous studies performed to date have shown that the performance of various hydraulic systems can be significantly improved by using curved conduit geometries instead of straight tubes. In particular, the formation of Dean vortices, which enhance the development of centrifugal instabilities, has been identified as a factor behind reducing the near-wall concentration buildup in particulate flow devices (e.g., in membrane filtration modules). Still, several issues regarding the effect of conduit curvature on local multidimensional phenomena governing fluid flow still remain open. A related issue is concerned with the impact that conduit geometry makes on the concentration distribution of a dispersed phase in two-phase flows in general, and in particulate flows (solid/liquid or solid/gas suspensions) in particular. It turns out that only very limited efforts have been made in the past to understand the fluid mechanics of such flows via advanced computer simulations. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of full three-dimensional (3D) theoretical and numerical analyses of single- and two-phase dilute particle/liquid flows in U-bend and helical curved conduits. The numerical analysis is based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations performed using a state-of-the-art multiphase flow computer code, NPHASE. The major issues discussed in the first part of the paper are concerned with the effect of curved/coiled geometry on the evolution of flow field and the associated wall shear. It has been demonstrated that the primary curvature (a common factor for both the U-bend and helix geometries) may cause a substantial asymmetry in the radial distribution of the main flow velocity. This, in turn, leads to a significant, albeit highly nonuniform, increase in the wall shear stress. Specifically, the wall shear around the outer half of tube circumference may become twice the corresponding value for a straight tube, and gradually decrease to

  19. Hydrothermal Fluid evolution in the Dalli porphyry Cu-Au Deposit: Fluid Inclusion microthermometry studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zarasvandi

    2015-10-01

    from drill cores DH01, DH02, DH06, and DH07, and outcrop samples. Microthermometric data were obtained by freezing and heating of fluid inclusions on a Linkam THMSG600 mounted on an Olympus microscope at Lorestan University. Results 1 Five main veintypes were identified, belonging to three stages of mineralization:type (I: barren quartz, type (II: quartz + pyrite + chalcopyrite ± bornite ± chalcocite ± covelite, type (III: quartz + magnetite ± chalcopyrite, type (IV: K-feldspar± quartz ± chalcopyrite, type (V: chlorite + biotite. 2 Seven groups of fluid inclusionswere observed: (IA liquid-rich mono-phase, (IB vapor-rich mono-phase, (IIA liquid-rich two-phase (liquid + vapor, (IIB vapor-rich two-phase (vapor + liquid, (IIIA high salinity simple fluids (liquid + vapor + halite, (IIIB high salinity opaque mineral-bearing fluids (liquid + vapor + halite + pyrite + chalcopyrite + hematite, (IIIAB multi-phase fluids (liquid + vapor + halite + sylvite + hematite + magnetite + pyrite + chalcopyrite ± erythrosiderite 3 Multiphase fluid inclusions with predominant homogenization temperatures 420 to 620˚C and predominant salinities 70 to 75 wt.%NaCl, are thought to be the early fluids involved in mineralization. 4 The coexistence of high saline liquid and vapor rich fluid inclusions (IIIAB, IIIB, IIIA and IIA types resulted either from fluid entrapment during the boiling process or the co-presence of two immiscible fluids generated from the magma. 5 Dalliporphyry Cu-Au deposit was formed in a magmatic-meteoric system. Discussion Two conventional thermometric procedures, freezing and heating, were employed for the measurement of temperature of homogenization and approximate salinity. Freezing was conducted mainly for halite-under saturated inclusions (types IIA and IIB, to measure the initial melting temperature (Te and the last melting point (Tmice, whereas heating was carried out on the halite-bearing inclusions (types IIIA, IIIB and IIIAB. Based on the microthermometric

  20. Strongly coupled fluid-particle flows in vertical channels. I. Reynolds-averaged two-phase turbulence statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of strongly coupled (i.e., high-mass-loading) fluid-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of understanding the fundamental physics of wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. The exact Reynolds-averaged (RA) equations for high-mass-loading suspensions are presented, and the unclosed terms that are retained in the context of fully developed channel flow are evaluated in an Eulerian–Lagrangian (EL) framework for the first time. A key distinction between the RA formulation presented in the current work and previous derivations of multiphase turbulence models is the partitioning of the particle velocity fluctuations into spatially correlated and uncorrelated components, used to define the components of the particle-phase turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and granular temperature, respectively. The adaptive spatial filtering technique developed in our previous work for homogeneous flows [J. Capecelatro, O. Desjardins, and R. O. Fox, “Numerical study of collisional particle dynamics in cluster-induced turbulence,” J. Fluid Mech. 747, R2 (2014)] is shown to accurately partition the particle velocity fluctuations at all distances from the wall. Strong segregation in the components of granular energy is observed, with the largest values of particle-phase TKE associated with clusters falling near the channel wall, while maximum granular temperature is observed at the center of the channel. The anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses both near the wall and far away is found to be a crucial component for understanding the distribution of the particle-phase volume fraction. In Part II of this paper, results from the EL simulations are used to validate a multiphase Reynolds-stress turbulence model that correctly predicts the wall-normal distribution of the two-phase turbulence statistics.

  1. Strongly coupled fluid-particle flows in vertical channels. I. Reynolds-averaged two-phase turbulence statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-03-01

    Simulations of strongly coupled (i.e., high-mass-loading) fluid-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of understanding the fundamental physics of wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. The exact Reynolds-averaged (RA) equations for high-mass-loading suspensions are presented, and the unclosed terms that are retained in the context of fully developed channel flow are evaluated in an Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) framework for the first time. A key distinction between the RA formulation presented in the current work and previous derivations of multiphase turbulence models is the partitioning of the particle velocity fluctuations into spatially correlated and uncorrelated components, used to define the components of the particle-phase turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and granular temperature, respectively. The adaptive spatial filtering technique developed in our previous work for homogeneous flows [J. Capecelatro, O. Desjardins, and R. O. Fox, "Numerical study of collisional particle dynamics in cluster-induced turbulence," J. Fluid Mech. 747, R2 (2014)] is shown to accurately partition the particle velocity fluctuations at all distances from the wall. Strong segregation in the components of granular energy is observed, with the largest values of particle-phase TKE associated with clusters falling near the channel wall, while maximum granular temperature is observed at the center of the channel. The anisotropy of the Reynolds stresses both near the wall and far away is found to be a crucial component for understanding the distribution of the particle-phase volume fraction. In Part II of this paper, results from the EL simulations are used to validate a multiphase Reynolds-stress turbulence model that correctly predicts the wall-normal distribution of the two-phase turbulence statistics.

  2. Modeling and investigation of refrigeration system performance with two-phase fluid injection in a scroll compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Rui

    Vapor compression cycles are widely used in heating, refrigerating and air-conditioning. A slight performance improvement in the components of a vapor compression cycle, such as the compressor, can play a significant role in saving energy use. However, the complexity and cost of these improvements can block their application in the market. Modifying the conventional cycle configuration can offer a less complex and less costly alternative approach. Economizing is a common modification for improving the performance of the refrigeration cycle, resulting in decreasing the work required to compress the gas per unit mass. Traditionally, economizing requires multi-stage compressors, the cost of which has restrained the scope for practical implementation. Compressors with injection ports, which can be used to inject economized refrigerant during the compression process, introduce new possibilities for economization with less cost. This work focuses on computationally investigating a refrigeration system performance with two-phase fluid injection, developing a better understanding of the impact of injected refrigerant quality on refrigeration system performance as well as evaluating the potential COP improvement that injection provides based on refrigeration system performance provided by Copeland.

  3. Numerical approximation of a binary fluid-surfactant phase field model of two-phase incompressible flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Guangpu

    2018-04-17

    In this paper, we consider the numerical approximation of a binary fluid-surfactant phase field model of two-phase incompressible flow. The nonlinearly coupled model consists of two Cahn-Hilliard type equations and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Using the Invariant Energy Quadratization (IEQ) approach, the governing system is transformed into an equivalent form, which allows the nonlinear potentials to be treated efficiently and semi-explicitly. we construct a first and a second-order time marching schemes, which are extremely efficient and easy-to-implement, for the transformed governing system. At each time step, the schemes involve solving a sequence of linear elliptic equations, and computations of phase variables, velocity and pressure are totally decoupled. We further establish a rigorous proof of unconditional energy stability for the semi-implicit schemes. Numerical results in both two and three dimensions are obtained, which demonstrate that the proposed schemes are accurate, efficient and unconditionally energy stable. Using our schemes, we investigate the effect of surfactants on droplet deformation and collision under a shear flow. The increase of surfactant concentration can enhance droplet deformation and inhibit droplet coalescence.

  4. Numerical approximation of a binary fluid-surfactant phase field model of two-phase incompressible flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Guangpu; Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu; Yao, Jun; Li, Aifen

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the numerical approximation of a binary fluid-surfactant phase field model of two-phase incompressible flow. The nonlinearly coupled model consists of two Cahn-Hilliard type equations and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Using the Invariant Energy Quadratization (IEQ) approach, the governing system is transformed into an equivalent form, which allows the nonlinear potentials to be treated efficiently and semi-explicitly. we construct a first and a second-order time marching schemes, which are extremely efficient and easy-to-implement, for the transformed governing system. At each time step, the schemes involve solving a sequence of linear elliptic equations, and computations of phase variables, velocity and pressure are totally decoupled. We further establish a rigorous proof of unconditional energy stability for the semi-implicit schemes. Numerical results in both two and three dimensions are obtained, which demonstrate that the proposed schemes are accurate, efficient and unconditionally energy stable. Using our schemes, we investigate the effect of surfactants on droplet deformation and collision under a shear flow. The increase of surfactant concentration can enhance droplet deformation and inhibit droplet coalescence.

  5. Two-fluid model of two-phase flow in a pin bundle of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, T.C.; Ishii, M.

    1980-01-01

    By considering two-phase flow as a field which is subdivided into two turbulent single-phase regions with moving boundaries separating the two constituent phases, such that the differential balances for three-dimensional turbulent flow hold for each subregion and for the interface, we perform the Eulerian area averaging over the cross-sectional area of each phase in a given channel and segment averaging of transverse momentum equation along the phase intercepts at the interchannel boundaries. To simplify the governing equations obtained as a result of these operations, we invoke the assumption that the motion of the fluid in each phase is dominantly in axial direction, that is the transverse components of velocity are small compared to axial components. We further assume that the variation of axial component of velocity within a channel is much stronger than the variation along the axial direction. We also assume that similar arguments can also be applied to the variation of enthalpy in a channel. As a result of these considerations, we obtain two sets of continuity, momentum, and energy equations describing motion of each phase in the axial direction. The phasic interaction terms which appear in these equations are governed by interfacial transfer conditions obtained from interface balances. The segment-averaged transverse-momentum equation for each phase provides the governing equation for cross flow. (author)

  6. An interfacial shear term evaluation study for adiabatic dispersed air–water two-phase flow with the two-fluid model using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S.L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Schlegel, J.P. [Department of Mining and Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Buchanan, J.R.; Hogan, K.J. [Bettis Laboratory, Naval Nuclear Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA (United States); Guilbert, P.W. [ANSYS UK Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Closure form of the interfacial shear term in three-dimensional form is investigated. • Assessment against adiabatic upward bubbly air–water flow data using CFD. • Effect of addition of the interfacial shear term on the phase distribution. - Abstract: In commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as ANSYS CFX and Fluent, the interfacial shear term is missing in the field momentum equations. The derivation of the two-fluid model (Ishii and Hibiki, 2011) indicates the presence of this term as a momentum source in the right hand side of the field momentum equation. The inclusion of this term is considered important for proper modeling of the interfacial momentum coupling between phases. For separated flows, such as annular flow, the importance of the shear term is understood in the one-dimensional (1-D) form as the major mechanism by which the wall shear is transferred to the gas phase (Ishii and Mishima, 1984). For gas dispersed two-phase flow CFD simulations, it is important to assess the significance of this term in the prediction of phase distributions. In the first part of this work, the closure of this term in three-dimensional (3-D) form in a CFD code is investigated. For dispersed gas–liquid flow, such as bubbly or churn-turbulent flow, bubbles are dispersed in the shear layer of the continuous phase. The continuous phase shear stress is mainly due to the presence of the wall and the modeling of turbulence through the Boussinesq hypothesis. In a 3-D simulation, the continuous phase shear stress can be calculated from the continuous fluid velocity gradient, so that the interfacial shear term can be closed using the local values of the volume fraction and the total stress of liquid phase. This form also assures that the term acts as an action-reaction force for multiple phases. In the second part of this work, the effect of this term on the volume fraction distribution is investigated. For testing the model two-phase

  7. Evaluation of the thermal performance of a solar water heating thermosyphon versus a two-phase closed thermosyphon using different working fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordaz-Flores, A. [Posgrado en Ingenieria (Energia), Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Garcia-Valladares, O.; Gomez, V.H. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    A water heating closed two-phase thermosyphon solar system was designed and built. The system consists of a flat plate solar collector coupled to a thermotank by a continuous copper tubing in which the working fluid circulates. The working fluid evaporates in the collector and condensates in the thermotank transferring its latent heat to the water through a coil heat exchanger. The tested fluids are acetone and R134a. The thermal performance of the proposed systems is compared with a conventional solar water thermosyphon under the same operating conditions. Advantages of a two-phase system include the elimination of freezing, fouling, scaling and corrosion. Geometry and construction materials are the same except for the closed circuit presented in the two-phase system. Data were collected from temperature and pressure sensors throughout the two systems. Early results suggest that R134a may provide a better performance than acetone for this kind of systems. (orig.)

  8. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry. Final report, September 1988--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  9. Results of the Workshop on Two-Phase Flow, Fluid Stability and Dynamics: Issues in Power, Propulsion, and Advanced Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John; Rame, Enrique; Kassemi, Mohammad; Singh, Bhim; Motil, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The Two-phase Flow, Fluid Stability and Dynamics Workshop was held on May 15, 2003 in Cleveland, Ohio to define a coherent scientific research plan and roadmap that addresses the multiphase fluid problems associated with NASA s technology development program. The workshop participants, from academia, industry and government, prioritized various multiphase issues and generated a research plan and roadmap to resolve them. This report presents a prioritization of the various multiphase flow and fluid stability phenomena related primarily to power, propulsion, fluid and thermal management and advanced life support; and a plan to address these issues in a logical and timely fashion using analysis, ground-based and space-flight experiments.

  10. A study to investigate viscous coupling effects on the hydraulic conductance of fluid layers in two-phase flow at the pore level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Mosayeb; Raeini, Ali Q; Blunt, Martin J; Bijeljic, Branko

    2018-07-15

    This paper examines the role of momentum transfer across fluid-fluid interfaces in two-phase flow. A volume-of-fluid finite-volume numerical method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase flow at the micro-scale. The model is applied to investigate viscous coupling effects as a function of the viscosity ratio, the wetting phase saturation and the wettability, for different fluid configurations in simple pore geometries. It is shown that viscous coupling effects can be significant for certain pore geometries such as oil layers sandwiched between water in the corner of mixed wettability capillaries. A simple parametric model is then presented to estimate general mobility terms as a function of geometric properties and viscosity ratio. Finally, the model is validated by comparison with the mobilities computed using direct numerical simulation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluid Inclusion Study of Quartz Xenocrysts in Mafic Dykes from Kawant Area, Chhota Udaipur District, Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randive Kirtikumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Unusual mafic dykes occur in the proximity of the Ambadongar Carbonatite Complex, Lower Narmada Valley, Gujarat, India. The dykes contain dense population of quartz xenocrysts within the basaltic matrix metasomatised by carbonate-rich fluids. Plagioclase feldspars, relict pyroxenes, chlorite, barite, rutile, magnetite, Fe-Ti oxides and glass were identified in the basaltic matrix. Quartz xenocrysts occur in various shapes and sizes and form an intricate growth pattern with carbonates. The xenocrysts are fractured and contain several types of primary and secondary, single phase and two-phase fluid inclusions. The two-phase inclusions are dominated by aqueous liquid, whereas the monophase inclusions are composed of carbonic gas and the aqueous inclusions homogenize to liquid between 226°C and 361°C. Majority of the inclusions are secondary in origin and are therefore unrelated to the crystallization of quartz. Moreover, the inclusions have mixed carbonic-aqueous compositions that inhibit their direct correlation with the crustal or mantle fluids. The composition of dilute CO2-rich fluids observed in the quartz xenocrysts appear similar to those exsolved during the final stages of evolution of the Amba Dongar carbonatites. However, the carbonates are devoid of fluid inclusions and therefore their genetic relation with the quartz xenocrysts cannot be established.

  12. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu; Wang, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick

  13. Integration of two-phase solid fluid equations in a catchment model for flashfloods, debris flows and shallow slope failures

    KAUST Repository

    Bout, B.; Lombardo, Luigi; van Westen, C.J.; Jetten, V.G.

    2018-01-01

    An integrated, modeling method for shallow landslides, debris flows and catchment hydrology is developed and presented in this paper. Existing two-phase debris flow equations and an adaptation on the infinite slope method are coupled with a full

  14. Pressure-temperature-fluid constraints for the Emmaville-Torrington emerald deposit, New South Wales, Australia: Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughrey, Lara; Marshall, Dan; Jones, Peter; Millsteed, Paul; Main, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    The Emmaville-Torrington emeralds were first discovered in 1890 in quartz veins hosted within a Permian metasedimentary sequence, consisting of meta-siltstones, slates and quartzites intruded by pegmatite and aplite veins from the Moule Granite. The emerald deposit genesis is consistent with a typical granite-related emerald vein system. Emeralds from these veins display colour zonation alternating between emerald and clear beryl. Two fluid inclusion types are identified: three-phase (brine+vapour+halite) and two-phase (vapour+liquid) fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion studies indicate the emeralds were precipitated from saline fluids ranging from approximately 33 mass percent NaCl equivalent. Formational pressures and temperatures of 350 to 400 °C and approximately 150 to 250 bars were derived from fluid inclusion and petrographic studies that also indicate emerald and beryl precipitation respectively from the liquid and vapour portions of a two-phase (boiling) system. The distinct colour zonations observed in the emerald from these deposits is the first recorded emerald locality which shows evidence of colour variation as a function of boiling. The primary three-phase and primary two-phase FITs are consistent with alternating chromium-rich `striped' colour banding. Alternating emerald zones with colourless beryl are due to chromium and vanadium partitioning in the liquid portion of the boiling system. The chemical variations observed at Emmaville-Torrington are similar to other colour zoned emeralds from other localities worldwide likely precipitated from a boiling system as well.

  15. Deciphering fluid inclusions in high-grade rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfons van den Kerkhof

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of fluid inclusions in high-grade rocks is especially challenging as the host minerals have been normally subjected to deformation, recrystallization and fluid-rock interaction so that primary inclusions, formed at the peak of metamorphism are rare. The larger part of the fluid inclusions found in metamorphic minerals is typically modified during uplift. These late processes may strongly disguise the characteristics of the “original” peak metamorphic fluid. A detailed microstructural analysis of the host minerals, notably quartz, is therefore indispensable for a proper interpretation of fluid inclusions. Cathodoluminescence (CL techniques combined with trace element analysis of quartz (EPMA, LA-ICPMS have shown to be very helpful in deciphering the rock-fluid evolution. Whereas high-grade metamorphic quartz may have relatively high contents of trace elements like Ti and Al, low-temperature re-equilibrated quartz typically shows reduced trace element concentrations. The resulting microstructures in CL can be basically distinguished in diffusion patterns (along microfractures and grain boundaries, and secondary quartz formed by dissolution-reprecipitation. Most of these textures are formed during retrograde fluid-controlled processes between ca. 220 and 500 °C, i.e. the range of semi-brittle deformation (greenschist-facies and can be correlated with the fluid inclusions. In this way modified and re-trapped fluids can be identified, even when there are no optical features observed under the microscope.

  16. Petrography and fluid inclusions study in Marbin porphyry Molybdenum (Sn) index (northeast of Isfahan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaei, M.; Bagheri, H.; Ayati, F.

    2016-01-01

    Marbin Tin and Molybdenum index is located in north of Zefreh Village the Isfahan Province and Uromieh-Dokhtar magmatic zone. The main rock units in this area are Eocene subvolcanic and volcanic rocks with rhyolite to dacite composition. Based on petrography studies the main minerals are plagioclase, quartz, sanidine and biotite and secondary minerals are chlorite, calcite, epidote and sericite. The main hydrothermal alterations are including sericitic, propylitic, intermediate argillic and silisification. Average grade of tin, molybdenum, copper and gold is about 4850, 157, 330 ppm and 82 ppb, respectively. Microthermometric studies on silica veins and veinlet indicate five different types of fluid inclusion, 1-three-phase type (L+V+S→L), 2- three-phase type (L+V+S→V), 3- two-phase type (L+V→L), 4- two-phase type (V+L→V), 5- vapor rich single phase type (V). Fluid inclusion studies in mineralized veins in phyllic and propylitic zones, show the wide range of homogenization temperature from 248 to 600 ºC and salinity from 28 to 65 wt% NaCl equivalent. The temperature, salinity and density of fluids decrease from phyllic to propylitic alteration zone. The wide range of homogenization temperatures for the studied fluid inclusions in index show dilution with surface water and fluid boiling, as the most important factor in ore deposition. According to field, mineralogical, geochemical and fluid inclusion studies Marbin index has been considered as a porphyry deposit type which show the most similarity with Mo porphyry systems in world wide.

  17. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilley, Lorie M. [Hattenburg Dilley & Linnell, LLC, Anchorage, AL (United States)

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) evaluate the relationship between geothermal fluid processes and the compositions of the fluid inclusion gases trapped in the reservoir rocks; and 2) develop methodologies for interpreting fluid inclusion gas data in terms of the chemical, thermal and hydrological properties of geothermal reservoirs. Phase 1 of this project was designed to conduct the following: 1) model the effects of boiling, condensation, conductive cooling and mixing on selected gaseous species; using fluid compositions obtained from geothermal wells, 2) evaluate, using quantitative analyses provided by New Mexico Tech (NMT), how these processes are recorded by fluid inclusions trapped in individual crystals; and 3) determine if the results obtained on individual crystals can be applied to the bulk fluid inclusion analyses determined by Fluid Inclusion Technology (FIT). Our initial studies however, suggested that numerical modeling of the data would be premature. We observed that the gas compositions, determined on bulk and individual samples were not the same as those discharged by the geothermal wells. Gases discharged from geothermal wells are CO2-rich and contain low concentrations of light gases (i.e. H2, He, N, Ar, CH4). In contrast many of our samples displayed enrichments in these light gases. Efforts were initiated to evaluate the reasons for the observed gas distributions. As a first step, we examined the potential importance of different reservoir processes using a variety of commonly employed gas ratios (e.g. Giggenbach plots). The second technical target was the development of interpretational methodologies. We have develop methodologies for the interpretation of fluid inclusion gas data, based on the results of Phase 1, geologic interpretation of fluid inclusion data, and integration of the data. These methodologies can be used in conjunction with the relevant geological and hydrological information on the system to

  18. Fluid inclusion characteristics and geological significance of the Dajinshan W-Sn polymetallic deposit in Yunfu, Guangdong Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhangfa; Chen, Maohong; Zhao, Haijie

    2015-05-01

    The Dajinshan tungsten-tin polymetallic deposit is a quartz-vein-type ore deposit located in Western Guangdong Province. The ore bodies show a fairly simple shape and mainly occur as tungsten-tin polymetallic-bearing sulfide quartz veins, including quartz vein, quartz-greisens, and sulfide quartz veins, and their distribution is spatially related to Dajinshan granitoids. The formation of the deposit experienced three stages: a wolframite-molybdenite-quartz stage, a wolframite-cassiterite-sulfide-quartz stage, and a fluorite-calcite-carbonate stage. Based on detailed petrographic observations, we conducted microthermometric and Raman microspectroscopic studies of fluid inclusions formed at different ore-forming stages in the Dajinshan tungsten-tin polymetallic deposit, identifying four dominant types of fluid inclusions: aqueous two-phase inclusions, CO2-bearing inclusions, solid or daughter mineral-bearing inclusions, and gas-rich inclusions. The gas compositions of ore-forming fluids in the Dajinshan tungsten-tin polymetallic deposit are mostly CO2, CH4, and H2O. The hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur isotopic data imply that the ore-forming fluids in the Dajinshan tungsten-tin polymetallic deposit were mainly derived from magmatic fluids, mixed with meteoric water in the ore-formation process. These results indicate that the fluid mixing and boiling led to the decomposition of the metal complex in ore-forming fluids and ore deposition.

  19. Fluid inclusion investigations in Nagra's boreholes of Northern Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullis, J.

    1987-01-01

    Fluid inclusions studied in quartz and calcite from 6 Nagra-boreholes and the oil exploration well Pfaffnau in northern Switzerland were used to evaluate the evolution of fluid composition and trapping conditions. The studied boreholes covered representative sections of the Tertiary, Mesozoic and Permo-Carboniferous sedimentary rocks in addition to the underlying crystalline basement. Two fluid groups were identified, one containing salt-poor NaCl-(KCl) fluids of Upper Carboniferous age, and a second group containing salt-rich to salt-poor CaCl 2 -NaCl-(MgCl 2 ) fluids trapped between Permian and Tertiary times. The inclusions of the first group were trapped at relatively high temperatures (100 degrees to 350 degrees C, rarely up to 400 degrees C) and low pressures (probably below 1 kbar). Their widespread occurrence along healed fractures in rock forming minerals of the crystalline basement and in detrital quartz grains of the Permo-Carboniferous and Triassic sandstones imply a tectonic/thermic event on a regional scale during late Variscan orogeny. The second group of fluids comprises early salt-rich and late salt-poor inclusions. The inclusions were trapped between 30 degrees and 140 degrees C and are detected preferentially in fissure minerals and porefilling cements. The widespread occurrence of the salt-poor fluids along healed fractures inside the host minerals imply major tectonic events especially during Tertiary times. These tectonic events are probably responsible for increased fluid migration and possibly also for brine dilution. The two fluid groups display a considerable similarity with the high-temperature/low-saliniferous Variscan fluid system of the Black Forest and Oberpfalz. (author) 44 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Fluid-elastic Instability of Helical Tubes Subjected to Single-Phase External Flow and Two-Phase Internal Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong Chull Jo; Myung Jo Jhung; Woong Sik Kim; Hho Jung Kim

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the fluid-elastic instability characteristics of steam generator helical type tubes in operating nuclear power plants. The thermal-hydraulic conditions of both tube side and shell side flow fields are predicted by a general purpose computational fluid dynamics code employing the finite volume element modeling. To get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and participation factor, modal analyses are performed for helical type tubes with various conditions. Investigated are the effects of the helix angle, the number of supports and the status of the inner fluid on the modal, and fluid-elastic instability characteristics of the tubes, which are expressed in terms of the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape, and stability ratio. (authors)

  1. [Models for quantification of fluid saturation in two-phase flow system by light transmission method and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Hong; Ye, Shu-Jun; Wu, Ji-Chun

    2014-06-01

    Based on light transmission method in quantification of liquid saturation and its application in two-phase flow system, two groups of sandbox experiments were set up to study the migration of gas or Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) in water saturated porous media. The migration of gas or DNAPL was monitored in the study. Two modified Light Intensity-Saturation (LIS) models for water/gas two-phase system were applied and verified by the experiment data. Moreover two new LIS models for NAPL/water system were developed and applied to simulate the DNAPL infiltration experiment data. The gas injection experiment showed that gas moved upward to the top of the sandbox in the form of 'fingering' and finally formed continuous distribution. The results of DNAPL infiltration experiment showed that TCE mainly moved downward as the result of its gravity, eventually formed irregular plume and accumulated at the bottom of the sandbox. The outcomes of two LIS models for water/gas system (WG-A and WG-B) were consistent to the measured data. The results of two LIS models for NAPL/water system (NW-A and NW-B) fit well with the observations, and Model NW-A based on assumption of individual drainage gave better results. It could be a useful reference for quantification of NAPL/water saturation in porous media system.

  2. Analysis of linear stability in nuclear systems associated to two-phase fluid flow and in thermodynamic balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, O.B.; Amorim, E.S. do; D'Oliveira, A.B.

    1981-03-01

    Under special conditions a water-cooled reactor or other multiphase process can be subject to instabilities as the so called density-wave oscillations phenomenon. The purpose of this investigation is to derive the stability limits of a boiling channel for the dynamic response to an inlet velocity perturbation. The solution scheme allowed a coupling for the single and two-phase regions together with a model for the dynamic thermal response of the heated surface. The frequency response of a rational transfer function is obtained and a Nyquist plot is used for stability analysis. The model is, although simplified, quite capable of predicting the threshold for self-excited system or the trends given by more exact solution. (Author) [pt

  3. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered.

  4. Integration of two-phase solid fluid equations in a catchment model for flashfloods, debris flows and shallow slope failures

    KAUST Repository

    Bout, B.

    2018-04-09

    An integrated, modeling method for shallow landslides, debris flows and catchment hydrology is developed and presented in this paper. Existing two-phase debris flow equations and an adaptation on the infinite slope method are coupled with a full hydrological catchment model. We test the approach on the 4 km2 Scaletta catchment, North-Eastern Sicily, where the 1-10-2009 convective storm caused debris flooding after 395 shallow landslides. Validation is done based on the landslide inventory and photographic evidence from the days after the event. Results show that the model can recreate the impact of both shallow landslides, debris flow runout, and debris floods with acceptable accuracy (91 percent inventory overlap with a 0.22 Cohens Kappa). General patterns in slope failure and runout are well-predicted, leading to a fully physically based prediction of rainfall induced debris flood behavior in the downstream areas, such as the creation of a debris fan at the coastal outlet.

  5. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered

  6. Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

    2008-06-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

  7. Nuclear microscopy of fluid inclusions at the CSIRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, C.; Van Achterbergh, E.; Win, T.T.; McInnes, B.; Cripps, G.; Suter, G.; Liu, W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The deep penetration of a MeV energy proton beam and the predictable nature of X-ray production using proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) make the nuclear microprobe ideally suited to the imaging and analysis of fluid and melt inclusions in minerals. MeV protons interact with a target through electronic interactions with a loss of ∼100 eV per collision. Such small energy loss leads to a smooth and predictable slowing down behaviour with a small energy uncertainty. Furthermore, the small momentum transfers in these collisions result in negligible spreading of the beam (e.g. ∼1 μm at 40 μm depth in quartz). Hence, the proton path can be regarded as linear. The principle mechanisms for proton energy loss, proton-induced ionization, secondary fluorescence and X-ray absorption and detection are understood and well characterized. This enables the integration of expected PIXE X-ray yields along the path of the proton beam and provides the foundation for a standardless microanalytical method. A strength of standardless PIXE analysis enables the approach to be extended to complex problems where the production of standards becomes impractical or unrepresentative of natural samples. One such problem is the study of ore metal transport and ore formation processes using the non-destructive analysis of fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals using a raster-scanned proton probe. In this case, the integration of PIXE X-rays can be confined to the volume of the fluid inclusion in order to calculate the yield of elemental X-rays per ppm of an element. This calculation is illustrated, which shows one volume element of the fluid inclusion excited by the beam and the X-ray path to a detector. The CSIRO-GEMOC Nuclear Microprobe can focus a 3 MeV proton beam into a 1.3 μm beam spot for fluid inclusion analysis and intense beams for mineral imaging at 1.8 μm resolution (Ryan et al., 2001a). Quantitative elemental images are projected using the Dynamic Analysis

  8. A Finite-Volume approach for compressible single- and two-phase flows in flexible pipelines with fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daude, F.; Galon, P.

    2018-06-01

    A Finite-Volume scheme for the numerical computations of compressible single- and two-phase flows in flexible pipelines is proposed based on an approximate Godunov-type approach. The spatial discretization is here obtained using the HLLC scheme. In addition, the numerical treatment of abrupt changes in area and network including several pipelines connected at junctions is also considered. The proposed approach is based on the integral form of the governing equations making it possible to tackle general equations of state. A coupled approach for the resolution of fluid-structure interaction of compressible fluid flowing in flexible pipes is considered. The structural problem is solved using Euler-Bernoulli beam finite elements. The present Finite-Volume method is applied to ideal gas and two-phase steam-water based on the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) in conjunction with a tabulated equation of state in order to demonstrate its ability to tackle general equations of state. The extensive application of the scheme for both shock tube and other transient flow problems demonstrates its capability to resolve such problems accurately and robustly. Finally, the proposed 1-D fluid-structure interaction model appears to be computationally efficient.

  9. Computer analysis of an adiabatic Stirling cryocooler using a two-phase two-component working fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfroe, D.A.; Cheung, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the performance and behavior of a Stirling cyrocooler incorporating a working fluid composed of helium and nitrogen. At the operating temperature of the cryocooler (80 K), the nitrogen component will condense in the freezer section. It is shown that the phase change in the working fluid increased the heat lifted for a given size and weight of machine and the coefficient of performance. The magnitude of these effects was dependent on the mass ratio of nitrogen to helium, phase angle between the compression and expansion processes, and the ratio of the compression space volume to the expansion space volume. The optimum heat lifted performance was obtained for a mass ratio of four parts of nitrogen to one part of helium, a phase angle of approximately 100 degrees, and a volume ratio of two which resulted in a heat lifted increase of 75% over the single phase, 90 degree phase angle configuration. The coefficient of performance showed a 20% improvement

  10. A Gas-Kinetic Method for Hyperbolic-Elliptic Equations and Its Application in Two-Phase Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    1999-01-01

    A gas-kinetic method for the hyperbolic-elliptic equations is presented in this paper. In the mixed type system, the co-existence and the phase transition between liquid and gas are described by the van der Waals-type equation of state (EOS). Due to the unstable mechanism for a fluid in the elliptic region, interface between the liquid and gas can be kept sharp through the condensation and evaporation process to remove the "averaged" numerical fluid away from the elliptic region, and the interface thickness depends on the numerical diffusion and stiffness of the phase change. A few examples are presented in this paper for both phase transition and multifluid interface problems.

  11. Validation of two-phase CFD models for propellant tank self-pressurization: Crossing fluid types, scales, and gravity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga; Hylton, Sonya

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines our computational ability to capture the transport and phase change phenomena that govern cryogenic storage tank pressurization and underscores our strengths and weaknesses in this area in terms of three computational-experimental validation case studies. In the first study, 1g pressurization of a simulant low-boiling point fluid in a small scale transparent tank is considered in the context of the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment to showcase the relatively strong capability that we have developed in modelling the coupling between the convective transport and stratification in the bulk phases with the interfacial evaporative and condensing heat and mass transfer that ultimately control self-pressurization in the storage tank. Here, we show that computational predictions exhibit excellent temporal and spatial fidelity under the moderate Ra number - high Bo number convective-phase distribution regimes. In the second example, we focus on 1g pressurization and pressure control of the large-scale K-site liquid hydrogen tank experiment where we show that by crossing fluid types and physical scales, we enter into high Bo number - high Ra number flow regimes that challenge our ability to predict turbulent heat and mass transfer and their impact on the tank pressurization correctly, especially, in the vapor domain. In the final example, we examine pressurization results from the small scale simulant fluid Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TCPE) performed in microgravity to underscore the fact that in crossing into a low Ra number - low Bo number regime in microgravity, the temporal evolution of the phase front as affected by the time-dependent residual gravity and impulse accelerations becomes an important consideration. In this case detailed acceleration data are needed to predict the correct rate of tank self-pressurization.

  12. Turbulent mixing between subchannels in a gas-liquid two-phase flow. For the equilibrium flow without net fluid transfer between subchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Akimaro; Sadatomi, Michio; Sato, Yoshifusa; Saito, Hidetoshi.

    1995-01-01

    To provide data necessary for modeling turbulent mixing between subchannels in a nuclear fuel rod bundle, three experiments were made in series for equilibrium two-phase flows, in which net mass exchange does not occur between subchannels for each phase. The first one was the measurement of turbulent mixing rates of both gas and liquid phases by a tracer technique, using air and water as the working fluids. Three kinds of vertical test channels consisting of two subchannels were used. The data have shown that the turbulent mixing rate of each phase in a two-phase flow is strongly dependent on flow regime. So, to see the relation between turbulent mixing and two-phase flow configuration in the subchannels, the second experiment, flow visualization, was made. It was observed in slug and churn flows that a lateral inter-subchannel liquid flow of a large scale is caused by the successive axial transit of large gas bubbles in each subchannel, and the turbulent mixing for the liquid phase is dominated by this lateral flow. To investigate a driving force of such large scale lateral flow, the third experiment, the measurement of an instantaneous pressure differential between the subchannels, was made. The result showed that there is a close relationship between the liquid phase mixing rate and the magnitude of the pressure differential fluctuation. (author)

  13. Derivation of simplified basic equations of gas-liquid two-phase dispersed flow based on two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Isao; Tomiyama, Akio

    2004-01-01

    The simplified and physically reasonable basic equations for the gas-liquid dispersed flow were developed based on some appropriate assumptions and the treatment of dispersed phase as isothermal rigid particles. Based on the local instant formulation of mass, momentum and energy conservation of the dispersed flow, time-averaged equations were obtained assuming that physical quantities in the dispersed phase are uniform. These assumptions are approximately valid when phase change rate and/or chemical reaction rate are not so large at gas-liquid interface and there is no heat generation in within the dispersed phase. Detailed discussions were made on the characteristics of obtained basic equations and physical meanings of terms consisting the basic equations. It is shown that, in the derived averaged momentum equation, the terms of pressure gradient and viscous momentum diffusion do not appear and, in the energy equation, the term of molecular thermal diffusion heat flux does not appear. These characteristics of the derived equations were shown to be very consistent concerning the physical interpretation of the gas-liquid dispersed flow. Furthermore, the obtained basic equations are consistent with experiments for the dispersed flow where most of averaged physical quantities are obtained assuming that the distributions of those are uniform within the dispersed phase. Investigation was made on the problem whether the obtained basic equations are well-posed or ill-posed for the initial value problem. The eigenvalues of the simplified mass and momentum equations are calculated for basic equations obtained here and previous two-fluid basic equations with one pressure model. Well-posedness and ill-posedness are judged whether the eigenvalues are real or imaginary. The result indicated the newly developed basic equations always constitute the well-posed initial value problem while the previous two-fluid basic equations based on one pressure model constitutes ill

  14. Basic study on an energy conversion system using boiling two-phase flows of temperature-sensitive magnetic fluid. Theoretical analysis based on thermal nonequilibrium model and flow visualization using ultrasonic echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Kamiyama, Shinichi; Okubo, Masaaki.

    1995-01-01

    Effects of magnetic field on the characteristics of boiling two-phase pipe flow of temperature-sensitive magnetic fluid are clarified in detail both theoretically and experimentally. Firstly, governing equations of two-phase magnetic fluid flow based on the thermal nonequilibrium two-fluid model are presented and numerically solved considering evaporation and condensation between gas- and liquid-phases. Next, behaviour of vapor bubbles is visualized with ultrasonic echo in the region of nonuniform magnetic field. This is recorded and processed with an image processor. As a result, the distributions of void fraction in the two-phase flow are obtained. Furthermore, detailed characteristics of the two-phase magnetic fluid flow are investigated using a small test loop of the new energy conversion system. From the numerical and experimental results, it is known that the precise control of the boiling two-phase flow and bubble generation is possible by using the nonuniform magnetic field effectively. These fundamental studies on the characteristics of two-phase magnetic fluid flow will contribute to the development of the new energy conversion system using a gas-liquid boiling two-phase flow of magnetic fluid. (author)

  15. Fluid inclusion study of the Witwatersrand gold-uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    Fluid inclusions, preserved in quartz pebbles of the uraniferous and auriferous Precambrian oligomictic conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin, provide a unique insight into the genesis of the ores. Using differences in inclusion characteristics in conjunction with intra- and inter-deformational textures for adjacent pebbles, a distinction is made between pre- and post-depositional inclusions. Excluding those related to subsequent brittle fracture, the former comprise five principal types; two of which are distinguished by the development of liquid carbon dioxide. Collectively they indicate a moderate to high pressure-temperature environment of vein quartz formation. Systematic variation in the relative abundance of these inclusion assemblages for different sections of the orefield demonstrates the importance of well-defined provenance areas or multiple entry points into the basins. A marked sympathetic relationship between uraniferous banket ores and the presence of vein quartz rich in liquid carbon dioxide inclusions, together with a corresponding antipathetic relationship for gold, strongly suggests separate sources for the metals. The temporal and spatial aspects of the association 'U-CO 2 ' also imply a uranium influx into the basin from discrete areas of the hinterland contemporaneous with the sediments. Post-depositional inclusions are subordinate and offer no support for the alternative epigenetic model and show only a later interaction of relatively cool circulating groundwaters. A discussion is given of the probable nature and origin of uranium in the source rocks and its mode of transportation. In conclusion, a proposal is made for the use of applied fluid inclusion research in the evaluation of and exploration for similar deposits. (author)

  16. Simulating single-phase and two-phase non-Newtonian fluid flow of a digital rock scanned at high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembely, Moussa; Alsumaiti, Ali M.; Jouini, Mohamed S.; Rahimov, Khurshed; Dolatabadi, Ali

    2017-11-01

    Most of the digital rock physics (DRP) simulations focus on Newtonian fluids and overlook the detailed description of rock-fluid interaction. A better understanding of multiphase non-Newtonian fluid flow at pore-scale is crucial for optimizing enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The Darcy scale properties of reservoir rocks such as the capillary pressure curves and the relative permeability are controlled by the pore-scale behavior of the multiphase flow. In the present work, a volume of fluid (VOF) method coupled with an adaptive meshing technique is used to perform the pore-scale simulation on a 3D X-ray micro-tomography (CT) images of rock samples. The numerical model is based on the resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations along with a phase fraction equation incorporating the dynamics contact model. The simulations of a single phase flow for the absolute permeability showed a good agreement with the literature benchmark. Subsequently, the code is used to simulate a two-phase flow consisting of a polymer solution, displaying a shear-thinning power law viscosity. The simulations enable to access the impact of the consistency factor (K), the behavior index (n), along with the two contact angles (advancing and receding) on the relative permeability.

  17. Gas chromatographic analysis of volatiles in fluid and gas inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawes, F.; Holzer, G.; Roedder, E.; Gibson, E.K.; Oro, John

    1984-01-01

    Most geological samples and some synthetic materials contain fluid inclusions. These inclusions preserve for us tiny samples of the liquid and/or the gas phase that was present during formation, although in some cases they may have undergone significant changes from the original material. Studies of the current composition of the inclusions provide data on both the original composition and the change since trapping.These inclusions are seldom larger than 1 millimeter in diameter. The composition varies from a single major compound (e.g., water) in a single phase to a very complex mixture in one or more phases. The concentration of some of the compounds present may be at trace levels.We present here some analyses of inclusions in a variety of geological samples, including diamonds. We used a sample crusher and a gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (GC—MS) system to analyze for organic and inorganic volatiles present as major to trace constituents in inclusions. The crusher is a hardened stainless-steel piston cylinder apparatus with tungsten carbide crusing surfaces, and is operated in a pure helium atmosphere at a controlled temperature.Samples ranging from 1 mg to 1 g were crushed and the released volatiles were analyzed using multi-chromatographic columns and detectors, including the sensitive helium ionization detector. Identification of the GC peaks was carried out by GC—MS. This combination of procedures has been shown to provide geochemically useful information on the process involved in the history of the samples analyzed.

  18. Geological setting of silica in Dehnow-Abid region (Eshghabad northeast using fluid inclusions studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Yazdanpanah

    2017-02-01

    , fine and coarse grains arkosic and lithic arkose sandstones (Tucker, 1994 that show low grade metamorphic texture which may be attributed to these sediments metamorphosed Jurassic age, but their equivalence is more with Shemshak forrnation (Aghanabati, 1994. Silica mineralization occurred as veins, veinlets and in some parts show silica mass of lense. In this area, there are two generations of faults with trends of northeast-southwest and north-south. Based on the geological section, the North – South faults is the second generation that cut system North-East to South-West faults (Kosari, 2004. In microscopic studies of fluid inclusions different characteristics such as their relationship with the host mineral, phase contents, size, shape, necking down and degree of filling were investigated. Microscopic investigates at room temperature, based on the criteria provided by Van den Kerkhof and Hein, 2001; Shepherd et al., 1985; Rodder, 1984 were performed. These studies indicated that as genetically point fluid inclusions in quartz area are able to divide into three groups (primary, secondary and pseudo secondary. The shapes of fluid inclusions are very different, but partly follow mineral crystallization system. Size of fluid inclusion varies between 5 to 120 microns, but most abundant fluid inclusions have size of 20 to 60 microns. According to a survey done on double polishing sections in laboratory conditions, the phase contents of fluid inclusions may be divided into six groups that include : monophase liquid (L, monophase vapor (V, two phases rich of liquid (L+V, two phases rich of vapor (V+L, three phases (L+V+S and immiscible liquid (L1+L2+V. The presence of CO2 around gas bubbles can represent metamorphism environments (Yardley and Bodnar, 2014; Van den Kerkhof et al., 2014. Heating analysis was done on 113 samples of fluid inclusions studied in order to investigate the situation homogenization temperature, and cooling analysis was done on 99 selected samples

  19. Scrutinization of thermal radiation, viscous dissipation and Joule heating effects on Marangoni convective two-phase flow of Casson fluid with fluid-particle suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanthesh, B.; Gireesha, B. J.

    2018-03-01

    The impact of Marangoni convection on dusty Casson fluid boundary layer flow with Joule heating and viscous dissipation aspects is addressed. The surface tension is assumed to vary linearly with temperature. Physical aspects of magnetohydrodynamics and thermal radiation are also accounted. The governing problem is modelled under boundary layer approximations for fluid phase and dust particle phase and then Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method based numeric solutions are established. The momentum and heat transport mechanisms are focused on the result of distinct governing parameters. The Nusselt number is also calculated. It is established that the rate of heat transfer can be enhanced by suspending dust particles in the base fluid. The temperature field of fluid phase and temperature of dust phase are quite reverse for thermal dust parameter. The radiative heat, viscous dissipation and Joule heating aspects are constructive for thermal fields of fluid and dust phases. The velocity of dusty Casson fluid dominates the velocity of dusty fluid while this trend is opposite in the case of temperature. Moreover qualitative behaviour of fluid phase and dust phase temperature/velocity are similar.

  20. A study on the performance of condensation heat transfer for various working fluid of two-phase closed thermosyphons with various helical grooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Kyu Il; Cho, Dong Hyun

    2005-01-01

    This study concerns the performance of condensing heat transfer in two-phase closed thermosyphons with various helical grooves. Distilled water, methanol, ethanol have been used as the working fluid. In the present work, a copper tube of the length of 1200mm and 14.28mm of inside diameter is used as the container of the thermosyphon. Each of the evaporator and the condenser section has a length of 550mm, while the remaining part of the thermosyphon tube is adiabatic section. A experimental study was carried out for analyzing the performances of having 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 helical grooves. A plain thermosyphon having the same inner and outer diameter as the grooved thermosyphons is also tested for the comparison. The type of working fluid and the numbers of grooves of the thermosyphons with various helical grooves have been used as the experimental parameters. The experimental results have been assessed and compared with existing theories. The results show that the type of working fluids are very important factors for the operation of thermosyphons. And the maximum enhancement (i.e. the ratio of the heat transfer coefficients the helical thermosyphons to plain thermosyphons) is 1.5∼2 for condensation

  1. Two-phase flows during a discharge of liquefied gases, initially at saturation. Effect of the nature of the fluid; Ecoulements diphasiques lors de la vidange de gaz liquefies initialement a saturation. Influence de la nature du fluide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alix, P.

    1997-10-03

    In the case of a confinement loss (breakage of a connection piece) on a pressurized liquefied gas tank, a critical two-phase (liquid-vapour) flow is generated. This thesis is aimed at the validation of models describing these flows with various fluids (water, R 11, methanol, ethyl acetate, pure butane, commercial butane), using a pilot experimental plant. Results show that reduced upstream pressure is the main parameter, thus indicating that a model can be validated using minimal fluids. The homogenous models DEM and HRM appear to be more precise

  2. An energy stable evolution method for simulating two-phase equilibria of multi-component fluids at constant moles, volume and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-02-25

    In this paper, we propose an energy-stable evolution method for the calculation of the phase equilibria under given volume, temperature, and moles (VT-flash). An evolution model for describing the dynamics of two-phase fluid system is based on Fick’s law of diffusion for multi-component fluids and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The mobility is obtained from diffusion coefficients by relating the gradient of chemical potential to the gradient of molar density. The evolution equation for moles of each component is derived using the discretization of diffusion equations, while the volume evolution equation is constructed based on the mechanical mechanism and the Peng-Robinson equation of state. It is proven that the proposed evolution system can well model the VT-flash problem, and moreover, it possesses the property of total energy decay. By using the Euler time scheme to discretize this evolution system, we develop an energy stable algorithm with an adaptive choice strategy of time steps, which allows us to calculate the suitable time step size to guarantee the physical properties of moles and volumes, including positivity, maximum limits, and correct definition of the Helmhotz free energy function. The proposed evolution method is also proven to be energy-stable under the proposed time step choice. Numerical examples are tested to demonstrate efficiency and robustness of the proposed method.

  3. Fluid inclusions study in thermal gradient wells, Nevado del Ruiz Volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruena Suarez, Cindy L; Zuluaga, Carlos A; Molano, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    A fluid inclusions study in the Nevado del Ruiz volcano hydrothermal system allowed to characterize fluids involved in the evolution of the geothermal system. Fluid inclusions hosted in quartz, plagioclase and carbonate from samples of the deepest parts of three thermal gradient wells were analyzed to understand fluid-rock interaction. Fluid inclusions hosted in carbonate veins with coloform microestructure represent hydrothermal fluids with temperatures higher than 250 Celsius degrade. This interpretation is supported by microprobe and cathodoluminescence analysis that also indicate a hydrothermal origin for the veins. Fluid inclusions hosted in quartz (mylonite) were originated by metamorphic fluids and fluid inclusions hosted in plagioclase (andesitic lavas) are considered to be originated from magmatic fluids (H 2 O + CO 2 system).

  4. Fluid-flow pressure measurements and thermo-fluid characterization of a single loop two-phase passive heat transfer device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinca, A.; Mangini, D.; Mameli, M.; Fioriti, D.; Filippeschi, S.; Araneo, L.; Roth, N.; Marengo, M.

    2017-11-01

    A Novel Single Loop Pulsating Heat Pipe (SLPHP), with an inner diameter of 2 mm, filled up with two working fluids (Ethanol and FC-72, Filling Ratio of 60%), is tested in Bottom Heated mode varying the heating power and the orientation. The static confinement diameter for Ethanol and FC-72, respectively 3.4 mm and 1.7mm, is above and slightly under the inner diameter of the tube. This is important for a better understanding of the working principle of the device very close to the limit between the Loop Thermosyphon and Pulsating Heat Pipe working modes. With respect to previous SLPHP experiments found in the literature, such device is designed with two transparent inserts mounted between the evaporator and the condenser allowing direct fluid flow visualization. Two highly accurate pressure transducers permit local pressure measurements just at the edges of one of the transparent inserts. Additionally, three heating elements are controlled independently, so as to vary the heating distribution at the evaporator. It is found that peculiar heating distributions promote the slug/plug flow motion in a preferential direction, increasing the device overall performance. Pressure measurements point out that the pressure drop between the evaporator and the condenser are related to the flow pattern. Furthermore, at high heat inputs, the flow regimes recorded for the two fluids are very similar, stressing that, when the dynamic effects start to play a major role in the system, the device classification between Loop Thermosyphon and Pulsating Heat Pipe is not that sharp anymore.

  5. Contribution to numerical methods for all Mach flow regimes and to fluid-porous coupling for the simulation of homogeneous two-phase flows in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaza, Chady

    2015-01-01

    The numerical simulation of steam generators of pressurized water reactors is a complex problem, involving different flow regimes and a wide range of length and time scales. An accidental scenario may be associated with very fast variations of the flow with an important Mach number. In contrast in the nominal regime the flow may be stationary, at low Mach number. Moreover whatever the regime under consideration, the array of U-tubes is modelled by a porous medium in order to avoid taking into account the complex geometry of the steam generator, which entails the issue of the coupling conditions at the interface with the free-fluid. We propose a new pressure-correction scheme for cell-centered finite volumes for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes and Euler equations at all Mach number. The existence of a discrete solution, the consistency of the scheme in the Lax sense and the positivity of the internal energy were proved. Then the scheme was extended to the homogeneous two-phase flow models of the GENEPI code developed at CEA. Lastly a multigrid-AMR algorithm was adapted for using our pressure-correction scheme on adaptive grids. Regarding the second issue addressed in this work, the numerical simulation of a fluid flow over a porous bed involves very different length scales. Macroscopic interface models - such as Ochoa-Tapia-Whitaker or Beavers-Joseph law for a viscous flow - represent the transition region between the free-fluid and the porous region by an interface of discontinuity associated with specific transmission conditions. An extension to the Beavers-Joseph law was proposed for the convective regime. By introducing a jump in the kinetic energy at the interface, we recover an interface condition close to the Beavers-Joseph law but with a non-linear slip coefficient, which depends on the free-fluid velocity at the interface and on the Darcy velocity. The validity of this new transmission condition was assessed with direct numerical simulations at

  6. An experimental validation of the influence of flow profiles and stratified two-phase flow to Lorentz force velocimetry for weakly conducting fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Andreas; Ebert, Reschad; Resagk, Christian; Research Training Group: "Lorentz Force Velocimetry; Lorentz Force Eddy Current Testing" Team

    2016-11-01

    We report about the feasibility of Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) for various flow profiles. LFV is a contactless non-invasive technique to measure flow velocity and has been developed in the last years in our institute. This method is advantageous if the fluid is hot, aggressive or opaque like glass melts or liquid metal flows. The conducted experiments shall prove an increased versatility for industrial applications of this method. For the force measurement we use an electromagnetic force compensation balance. As electrolyte salty water is used with an electrical conductivity in the range of 0.035 which corresponds to tap water up to 20 Sm-1. Because the conductivity is six orders less than that of liquid metals, here the challenging bottleneck is the resolution of the measurement system. The results show only a slight influence in the force signal at symmetric and strongly asymmetric flow profiles. Furthermore we report about the application of LFV to stratified two-phase flows. We show that it is possible to detect interface instabilities, which is important for the dimensioning of liquid metal batteries. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG.

  7. Analysis of the two-fluid model and the drift-flux model for numerical calculation of two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munkejord, Svend Tollak

    2006-05-11

    This thesis analyses models for two-phase flows and methods for the numerical resolution of these models. It is therefore one contribution to the development of reliable design tools for multiphase applications. Such tools are needed and expected by engineers in a range of fields, including in the oil and gas industry. The approximate Riemann solver of Roe has been studied. Roe schemes for three different two-phase flow models have been implemented in the framework of a standard numerical algorithm for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws. The schemes have been analysed by calculation of benchmark tests from the literature, and by comparison with each other. A Roe scheme for the four-equation one-pressure two-fluid model has been implemented, and a second-order extension based on wave decomposition and flux-difference splitting was shown to work well and to give improved results compared to the first-order scheme. The convergence properties of the scheme were tested on smooth and discontinuous solutions. A Roe scheme has been proposed for a five-equation two-pressure two-fluid model with pressure relaxation. The use of analogous numerical methods for the five-equation and four-equation models allowed for a direct comparison of a method with and without pressure relaxation. Numerical experiments demonstrated that the two approaches converged to the same results, but that the five-equation pressure-relaxation method was significantly more dissipative, particularly for contact discontinuities. Furthermore, even though the five-equation model with instantaneous pressure relaxation has real eigenvalues, the calculations showed that it produced oscillations for cases where the four-equation model had complex eigenvalues. A Roe scheme has been constructed for the drift-flux model with general closure laws. For the case of the Zuber-Findlay slip law describing bubbly flows, the Roe matrix is completely analytical. Hence the present Roe scheme is more efficient than

  8. Quartz-Amethyst Hosted Hydrocarbon-Bearing Fluid Inclusions from the Green Ridge Breccia in the Snoqualmie Granite, North Cascades, WA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Feely

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Green Ridge Breccia cuts the composite Miocene Snoqualmie Batholith in King County, WA, USA. The granite was emplaced at ~5 km depth between ~17 and 20 Ma and the crosscutting NW trending breccia contains large angular blocks of the host granite (<1 m in longest dimension. The brecciated granite blocks are cemented by quartz-amethyst euhedra (<10 cm in longest dimension bearing vugs. A notable feature is the presence of centimetric scale amber coloured oil inclusions within the quartz-amethyst crystals. Fluid inclusion studies using Transmitted Light Petrography, UV Microscopy, Microthermometry, Laser Raman Microspectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry record the presence and the fluid composition of three fluid inclusion types hosted by the euhedra: primary Type 1 (liquid rich two-phase (L + V aqueous inclusions and secondary Type 2 bituminous two-phase (S + L inclusions and Type 3 amber coloured oil bearing two-phase immiscible liquid inclusions. The Green Ridge Breccia was the locus for convective hydrothermal fluid flow that formed the quartz-amethyst vugs formed at T~390 °C assuming a trapping pressure of ~1.65 kb. Later, hydrocarbon fluids migrated downwards from the roof source rock (e.g., the Guye Sedimentary Member and were trapped in the euhedra. This was followed by unroofing of the batholith and exposure of the Green Ridge Breccia. This study highlights the potential for other oil migrations into the Snoqualmie Batholith in areas where it forms the basement capped by the Guye Sedimentary Member.

  9. RAMAN SPECTRA OF AQUEOUS FLUID INCLUSIONS: EFFECT OF MINERAL BIREFRINGENCE AND METASTABILITY ON SALINITY MEASUREMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Caumon , Marie-Camille; Tarantola , Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Introduction: Crustal fluids play a major role in ore deposits, basin diagenesis and metamorphic reactions, among others. The knowledge of the chemical composition of individual fluid inclusions is essential for the understanding of past fluid transport and circulations. Microthermometry, by the observation of specific phase transitions as a function of temperature, is the general approach to determine salinity in aqueous fluid inclusions [1]. However in some cases, th...

  10. On modifications of fluid inclusions in quartz : re-equilibration experiments and thermodynamical calculations on fluids in natural quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Fluids in rocks can be traced to great depths, and are found in crustal rocks as well as in mantle rocks. Information about the deep fluid which is obtained from fluid inclusions must be handled with care, for the way up after entrapment in a crystal is long and full of interferences at different

  11. [Application of in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy to analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Lin, Cheng-yan; Yu, Wen-quan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ai-guo

    2010-01-01

    Identification of salts is a principal problem for analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. The fluid inclusions from deep natural gas reservoirs in Minfeng sub-sag were analyzed by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The type of fluid inclusions was identified by Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. The Raman spectra show that the inclusions contain methane-bearing brine aqueous liquids. The fluid inclusions were analyzed at -180 degrees C by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The spectra show that inclusions contain three salts, namely NaCl2, CaCl2 and MgCl2. Sodium chloride is most salt component, coexisting with small calcium chloride and little magnesium chloride. The origin of fluids in inclusions was explained by analysis of the process of sedimentation and diagenesis. The mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs was also given in this paper. The results of this study indicate that in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy is an available method to get the composition of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. Based on the analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy with combination of the history of sedimentation and diagenesis, the authors can give important evidence for the type and mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs.

  12. Two phase sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Zahoor; Hanif, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The development of estimators of population parameters based on two-phase sampling schemes has seen a dramatic increase in the past decade. Various authors have developed estimators of population using either one or two auxiliary variables. The present volume is a comprehensive collection of estimators available in single and two phase sampling. The book covers estimators which utilize information on single, two and multiple auxiliary variables of both quantitative and qualitative nature. Th...

  13. Characterization of fluid inclusions and sulfur isotopes in the Iju porphyry copper deposit, North West of Shahr-e-Babak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Golestani

    2017-07-01

    homogenization temperatures between 140 to 480°C and salinity between 0.18 to >52.99 wt.% NaCl equiv., which are most similar to the results of the other Iranian porphyry copper deposits. Being located in the quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration zone, the results of thermometry indicates that ore deposition in the Iju deposit has occurred via mixing of magmatic and surface fluids. Variations in salinity and paragenesis of the saline multiphase fluid inclusions and two-phase gas-rich fluid inclusions indicate the occurrence of boiling phenomenon in some samples of the Iju deposit. The amount of δ34S for pyrite has a limited range close to zero (average, 0.229‰ that shows a magmatic origin for sulfur. Considering the presence of subvolcanic rocks, the type and extension of alteration zones, the structure and texture of ore bodies, thermometry results of fluid inclusions and sulfur isotope values, the Iju deposit is similar to porphyry copper deposits. Discussion In the quartz-sericite-pyrite zone, three main groups of veinlets have been identified. The quartz+pyrite veinlets are more abundant than the other types and they were selected for fluid inclusions and stable isotope studies. Petrographic studies of fluid inclusions identifies two groups of fluids including: 1- fluid inclusions without the halite phase, including the types L+V, L+V+S1 and (L+V+S1+S2, that is secondary, 2- fluid inclusions with halite phase, including the types L+V+H, L+V+H+S1, L+V+H+S1+S2 and L+V+H+S1+An. Homogenization temperature and salinity for the fluid inclusions without halite phase are as follows: 140 to 380°C and 0.18 to 24 wt.% NaCl (Fig. 8A and C and for the fluid inclusions with halite phase they range from 230 to 480°C and 30 to 52 wt.% NaCl (Fig. 9A, B and D, In addition, the pressure and depth for the fluid inclusions containing halite phase are 750 bar and 3500 m on the average. Fluid inclusions available at the quartz veinlets of porphyry copper deposits can be formed in a wide range of

  14. The fluid inclusion study in petroleum exploration; O estudo de inclusoes fluidas na exploracao de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Carlos Eduardo Silva [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Gerencia da Geoquimica]. E-mail: cescoelho@petrobras.com.br

    2005-05-01

    Several oil companies and research centers have been studying petroleum fluid inclusions in reservoirs since the 1980's. The first works have used the fluid inclusion microthermometry technique in order to interpret the thermal history and petroleum migration in relation to the burial history and diagenesis. Lately, the micro thermometric data is being used as a calibration parameter for thermal history modeling in sedimentary basins and reservoirs. Recently, new fluid inclusion study techniques are being used in petroleum exploration. Geochemical data of low molecular weight (up to C{sub 15}) oil-bearing fluid inclusions has been used with the purpose of pinpointing oil-bearing intervals in wells that have not revealed the presence of oil by conventional techniques. Molecular geochemical analyses of oils inside the inclusions technique enable oil-source correlations, oil-oil correlations, and maturity determination. (author)

  15. Development of a Front Tracking Method for Two-Phase Micromixing of Incompressible Viscous Fluids with Interfacial Tension in Solvent Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yijie [ORNL; Lim, Hyun-Kyung [ORNL; de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Navamita, Ray [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Wang, Shuqiang [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Glimm, James G [ORNL; Li, Xiao-lin [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Jiao, Xiangmin [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    This progress report describes the development of a front tracking method for the solution of the governing equations of motion for two-phase micromixing of incompressible, viscous, liquid-liquid solvent extraction processes. The ability to compute the detailed local interfacial structure of the mixture allows characterization of the statistical properties of the two-phase mixture in terms of droplets, filaments, and other structures which emerge as a dispersed phase embedded into a continuous phase. Such a statistical picture provides the information needed for building a consistent coarsened model applicable to the entire mixing device. Coarsening is an undertaking for a future mathematical development and is outside the scope of the present work. We present here a method for accurate simulation of the micromixing dynamics of an aqueous and an organic phase exposed to intense centrifugal force and shearing stress. The onset of mixing is the result of the combination of the classical Rayleigh- Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. A mixing environment that emulates a sector of the annular mixing zone of a centrifugal contactor is used for the mathematical domain. The domain is small enough to allow for resolution of the individual interfacial structures and large enough to allow for an analysis of their statistical distribution of sizes and shapes. A set of accurate algorithms for this application requires an advanced front tracking approach constrained by the incompressibility condition. This research is aimed at designing and implementing these algorithms. We demonstrate verification and convergence results for one-phase and unmixed, two-phase flows. In addition we report on preliminary results for mixed, two-phase flow for realistic operating flow parameters.

  16. Au-bearing magnetite mineralizaion in Kashmar (alteration, mineralization, geochemistry, geochemistry and fluid inclusions;

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Almasi

    2017-02-01

    fractures of rocks are filled with tourmaline (Dumortierite type and iron oxides. Kashmar surface mineralization is described in the ore-bearing quartz veins. Principal mineralization textures are layered, comb and Brecciation. The most important types of veins are those containing Chalcopyrite - Quartz veins, Specularite-rich veins – Quartz-Galena veins accompany with hydrothermal Breccias. Barren barite veins also exist in the region. The Chalcopyrite - Quartz veins occur on the main fracture zone and next to the Argillic alterations and silica cap in three regions (Bahariyeh, Uch Palang and Sarsefidal. Hydrothermal Breccias, Spicularite- rich veins, Quartz - Galena and barite veins occurred within Hematite- Carbonate-Chlorite-Silicification alterations in the Kamarmard area. Geochemistry of veins indicates anomalies of gold, copper, lead and zinc in them. Most enrichments of gold are accompanied with copper, lead and zinc and they occurs in hydrothermal Breccias and then specularite- rich veins. Gold values up to about 15 ppm and Cu, Pb and Zn each to > 1%. Temperature – salinity studies of fluid inclusions of ore-bearing Quartz veins in Kashmar show the fluid temperature and salinity values in all veins are close together. Temperatures are moderate to relatively high and between 245° C and 530 ° C and salinities are relatively low to moderate and between 14 to 18 (wt% NaCl. Maximum and minimum of temperatures and salinities are related to fluid inclusions of hydrothermal Breccias and Quartz-Galena vein. Co-existence between two-phase liquid-vapor rich fluids and single-phase gas fluids in the veins indicate that conditions were close to boiling, and maybe a little boiling occurred, which strengthened with brecciaing of rock and view rare CO2-bearing fluid inclusion in veins on the Kamarmard peak. Non-existence of vuggy Quartz in silica caps in the region shows this issue. The frequency of oxide minerals (Specularite, Barite, H2O-NaCl-CaCl2 system, and the low

  17. The non-destructive analysis of fluid inclusions in minerals using the proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, C.G.; Van Achterbergy, E. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Heinrich, C.A. [ETH Zentrum, Zurich, (Switzerland). Department Erdwissenschaften; Mernagh, T.P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany); Zaw, K. [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The study of ore forming fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals is the key to understanding fluid flow paths at the time of ore formation and to predicting the location of ore bodies within large-scale magmatic hydrothermal systems. The large penetration depths and the predictable nature of MeV proton trajectories and X-ray absorption enables reliable modelling of PIXE yields and the development of standardless quantitative analytical methods. This permits quantitative microanalysis of minerals at ppm levels, and more recently has enabled the development of methods for quantitative trace-element imaging and the quantitative, non-destructive analysis of individual fluid inclusions. This paper reports on recent developments in Proton Microprobe techniques with special emphasis on ore systems and fluid inclusion analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  18. The non-destructive analysis of fluid inclusions in minerals using the proton microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, C G; Van Achterbergy, E [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Heinrich, C A [ETH Zentrum, Zurich, (Switzerland). Department Erdwissenschaften; Mernagh, T P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany); Zaw, K [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The study of ore forming fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals is the key to understanding fluid flow paths at the time of ore formation and to predicting the location of ore bodies within large-scale magmatic hydrothermal systems. The large penetration depths and the predictable nature of MeV proton trajectories and X-ray absorption enables reliable modelling of PIXE yields and the development of standardless quantitative analytical methods. This permits quantitative microanalysis of minerals at ppm levels, and more recently has enabled the development of methods for quantitative trace-element imaging and the quantitative, non-destructive analysis of individual fluid inclusions. This paper reports on recent developments in Proton Microprobe techniques with special emphasis on ore systems and fluid inclusion analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Fluid Characteristics in the Giant Quartz Reef System of the Bundelkhand Craton, India: Constraints from Fluid Inclusion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, D.; Panigrahi, M. K.; Pati, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    Giant quartz reefs are anomalous features indicating extensive mobilization of silica in the crust. Such reefs in the Abitibi belt, Canada and elsewhere are believed to be the result of activity of fluid of diverse sources on terrain boundaries. The Bundelkhand granitoid complex constituting a major part of the Bundelkhnad Craton in north-Central India is traversed by numerous such quartz reefs all across for a length of about 500 km. There are about 20 major reefs having dimensions of 35 to 40 km in length, 50 to 60 m in width standing out as prominent ridges in the region. Almost all are aligned parallel to each other in a sub-vertical to vertical manner following the NE-SW to NNE-SSW trend. Fluid inclusion petrography in quartz from these reefs reveal four types of inclusions viz. aqueous biphase (type-I), pure carbonic (type-II), aqueous carbonic (type-III) and polyphase (type-IV) inclusions. The type-I aqueous biphase inclusions are the dominant type in all the samples studied so far. Salinities calculated from temperature of melting of last ice (Tm) values are low to moderate, ranging from 0.18 to 18.19 wt% NaCl equivalents. Temperature of liquid-vapor homogenization (Th) values of these inclusions show a wide range from 101 ºC to 386 ºC (cluster around 150-250 ºC) essentially into liquid phase ruling out boiling during its course of evolution. Besides, aqueous Biphase inclusions, some data on pure CO2 inclusions furnish a near constant value of TmCO2 at -56.6 ºC in the Bundelkhand Craton indicating absence of CH4. Bivariate plot between Th and salinity suggest three possible water types which are controlling the overall activity of fluid in quartz reefs of Bundelkhand Craton viz. low-T low saline, high-T low saline and moderate-T and moderate saline. A low saline and CO2-bearing and higher temperature nature resembles a metamorphic fluid that may be a source for these giant quartz reefs. The low temperature low-salinity component could be a meteoric

  20. The Cocos Ridge hydrothermal system revealed by microthermometry of fluid and melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, J.; Kurz, W.; Krenn, K.

    2017-12-01

    Microthermometric analyses of fluid and melt inclusions in hydrothermal veins and in the Cocos Ridge (CCR) basalt were used to reveal the CCR thermal history at IODP Site 344-U1414 and to constrain fluid source and flow. Hydrothermal veins are hosted by lithified sediments and CCR basalt . Site 344-U1414, located 1 km seaward of the Middle American Trench offshore Costa Rica, serves to evaluate fluid/rock interaction, the hydrologic system and geochemical processes linked with the tectonic evolution of the incoming Cocos Plate from the Early Miocene up to recent times. The veins in the sedimentary rocks are mainly filled by blocky calcite, containing numerous fluid inclusions, and sometimes crosscut fibrous quartz/chalcedony veins. The veins in the basalt can be differentiated into three types: antitaxial fibrous calcite veins, composite veins with fibrous calcite and clay minerals at the vein margins and spherulitic quartz in the center, and syntaxial blocky aragonite veins surrounded by a clay selvage in the uppermost CCR basalt sections. Secondary minerals, clay minerals, fibrous calcite, quartz/chalcedony and pyrite also filled vesicles in the basalt. Fluid inclusions were mainly found in the aragonite veins and rarely in quartz in the composite veins and vesicles. Blocky veins with embedded wall rock fragments appear in the sediments and in the basalt indicate hydraulic fracturing. The occurrence of decrepitated fluid inclusions show high homogenization temperatures up to 400 °C. Decrepitated fluid inclusions are formed by increased internal overpressure, related to isobaric heating. Elongated fluid inclusion planes, arc-like fluid inclusions and low homogenization temperatures indicate subsequent isobaric cooling. The results obtained so far from Raman spectroscopy and microthermometry indicate CO2 inclusions and petrographic observations suggest the presence of silicate melt inclusions in phenocrysts in the basalt (mainly in clinopyroxene and plagioclase

  1. Trace element analyses of fluid inclusions using laser ablation ICP-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-ying Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluid inclusions are records of the physico-chemical conditions of fluid–rock interactions during magmatism, mineralization and fluid percolation and mixing processes. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS is a powerful tool for in situ analyses of small samples at micrometer levels. Here we report in situ analyses of fluid inclusions using LA-ICP-MS method. NIST SRM glasses and 23Na are generally used as external and internal standards for LA-ICP-MS analysis of fluid inclusion, respectively, although the RSD of microthermometric estimation of 23Na is about 20% and even worse, the background signal of Na is high for most ICP-MS. Using well-characterized natural fluids inclusion, we show that RESOlution S-155 laser system analyze fluid inclusions in quartz and determine the trace element concentrations. Resonetics RESOlution S-155 laser has the advantage of the motorized Z stage can be used to accommodate variation of sample height or sample topography and height difference between samples, which is very important for analyzing the fluid inclusion in quartz. Our results suggest laser energy density is 25 J/cm2, laser pulse repetition rates are commonly between 6 and 10 Hz to avoid the fissuring of quartz and obtain adequate results. For this LA-ICP-MS analysis, uncertainty on 35Cl content is around 40% because of intensity of the 35Cl signal is three orders of magnitude less intense than the intensity of the 23Na signal. Nevertheless, it is still a useful reference for fluid inclusion analyses in addition to 23Na. This technique can be applied to a range of hydrothermal geology problems, including determining the origins of ore forming brines and ore deposition processes, mapping metamorphic and hydrothermal fluid provinces and pathways, and constraining the effects of fluid–rock reactions and fluid mixing.

  2. Physical and chemical properties of fluid and melt inclusions of the Lagoa Real uraniferous albitites (Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, Alexandre de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Data of melt and fluid inclusions obtained by LA-ICP-MS and microthermometry techniques represent an important investigation complement to understand geological processes which took place in Lagoa Real uraniferous albitites (Brazil). Melt inclusions found in augite structure, which reveals the previous presence of U in the syenitic magma. Primary fluid inclusions in magmatic augite of the albitites contain Na, denoting once more its presence in original magma. The formation of andradite from augite during shear events that generated the metamorphosed syenite (uraniferous albitite) was certified by the ICP-MS signals and uranium released by magmatic titanite (U source mineral)during the 1.9 Ga metamorphism was recorded in the fluid inclusions found in andradite, mineral that was formed in this same metamorphic event which recrystallized titanite crystals. Such uranium was responsible by precipitation of the disseminated uraninite found inside andradite. (author)

  3. Fluid inclusion studies of calcite veins from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Tuffs: Environment of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedder, E.; Whelan, J.F.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Calcite vein and vug fillings at fourth depths (130-314m), all above the present water table in USW G-1 bore hole at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contain primary fluid inclusions with variable vapor/liquid ratios: most of these inclusions are either full of liquid or full of vapor. The liquid-filled inclusions show that most of the host calcite crystallized from fluids at 2 vapor phase at open-quotes 100 degrees Cclose quotes. Our new studies reveal the additional presence of major methane in the vapor-filled inclusion, indicating even lower temperatures of trapping, perhaps at near-surface temperatures. They also show that the host calcite crystals grew from a flowing film of water on the walls of fractures open to the atmosphere, the vapor-filled inclusions representing bubbles that exsolved from this film onto the crystal surface

  4. Fluid inclusion studies of calcite veins from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Tuffs: Environment of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedder, E.; Whelan, J.F.; Vaniman, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Calcite vein and vug fillings at four depths (130-314m), all above the present water table in USW G-1 bore hole at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contain primary fluid inclusions with variable vapor/liquid raitos: Most of these inclusions are either full of liquid or full of vapor. The liquid-filled inclusions show that most of the host calcite crystallized from fluids at 2 vapor phase at ''<100 degrees C''. Our new studies reveal the additional presence of major methane in the vapor-filled inclusion, indicating even lower temperatures of trapping, perhaps at near-surface temperatures. They also show that the host calcite crystals grew from a flowing film of water on the walls of fractures open to the atmosphere, the vapor-filled inclusions representing bubbles that exsolved from this film onto the crystal surface

  5. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  6. Pressure–Temperature–Fluid Constraints for the Poona Emerald Deposits, Western Australia: Fluid Inclusion and Stable Isotope Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Marshall

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerald from the deposits at Poona shows micrometre-scale chemical, optical, and cathodoluminescence zonation. This zonation, combined with fluid inclusion and isotope studies, indicates early emerald precipitation from a single-phase saline fluid of approximately 12 weight percent NaCl equivalent, over the temperature range of 335–525 °C and pressures ranging from 70 to 400 MPa. The large range in pressure and temperature likely reflects some post entrapment changes and re-equilibration of oxygen isotopes. Secondary emerald-hosted fluid inclusions indicate subsequent emerald precipitation from higher salinity fluids. Likewise, the δ18O-δD of channel fluids extracted from Poona emerald is consistent with multiple origins yielding both igneous and metamorphic signatures. The combined multiple generations of emerald precipitation, different fluid compositions, and the presence of both metamorphic and igneous fluids trapped in emerald, likely indicate a protracted history of emerald precipitation at Poona conforming to both an igneous and a metamorphic origin at various times during regional lower amphibolite to greenschist facies metamorphism over the period ~2710–2660 Ma.

  7. Analysis of I-Br-Cl in single fluid inclusions by LA-ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giehl, C.; Fusswinkel, T.; Beermann, O.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Scholten, L.; Wagner, T.

    2017-12-01

    Halogens are excellent tracers of hydrothermal fluid sources and in-situ LA-ICP-MS analysis of Cl and Br in single fluid inclusions has provided fundamentally new insight into hydrothermal fluid flow and ore formation. There is mounting evidence that enrichment and depletion of Br relative to Cl may be caused by a number of processes beyond seawater evaporation and halite dissolution which cannot be discriminated on the basis of Br/Cl ratios alone. Expanding the analytical capabilities of fluid inclusion LA-ICP-MS analysis to include iodine would allow to discern between selective and coupled enrichment processes of Cl, Br and I, even in geologically complex samples that are inaccessible to bulk extraction techniques. We present iodine concentration data determined by LA-ICP-MS analysis of synthetic fluid inclusions, using the Sca17 scapolite reference material for external standardization (Seo et al., 2011). Iodine concentrations in Sca17 were determined using the Durango apatite standard. Four starting solutions containing I (0.3, 1.5, 27, 78 µg/g), Br (941, 1403, 2868, 4275 µg/g), Na (30.7, 94.7 mg/g), and Cl (50, 137 mg/g) (analyzed by ICP-OES and ICP-MS at CAU Kiel) were prepared by dissolving reagent grade chemical powders in ultra-pure water. Spherical inclusions (up to 40 µm) were synthesized from the starting solutions in pre-cracked, HF-treated synthetic quartz crystals which were placed in gold capsules and equilibrated at 600°C, 100/200 MPa in cold seal pressure vessels. Fluid inclusion LA-ICP-MS analysis (University of Helsinki) yielded average I concentrations in excellent agreement with the starting solutions (27.3 µg/g ± 14 %RSD for the 27 µg/g solution and 77.6 µg/g ± 8.3 %RSD for the 78 µg/g solution). Average Br and I concentrations deviate less than 10 % from solution concentration values. For the low I concentration solutions, the synthetic inclusions were too small to detect I. Thus, given suitable standard materials and sufficient

  8. Analysis of single oil-bearing fluid inclusions in mid-Proterozoic sandstones (Roper Group, Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljeström, Sandra; Volk, Herbert; George, Simon C.; Lausmaa, Jukka; Sjövall, Peter; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Hode, Tomas

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbons and organic biomarkers extracted from black shales and other carbonaceous sedimentary rocks are valuable sources of information on the biodiversity and environment of early Earth. However, many Precambrian hydrocarbons including biomarkers are suspected of being younger contamination. An alternative approach is to study biomarkers trapped in oil-bearing fluid inclusions by bulk crushing samples and subsequently analysing the extracted hydrocarbons with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. However, this method does not constrain the hydrocarbons to one particular oil inclusion, which means that if several different generations of oil inclusions are present in the sample, a mix of the content from these oil inclusions will be analysed. In addition, samples with few and/or small inclusions are often below the detection limit. Recently, we showed that it is possible to detect organic biomarkers in single oil-bearing fluid inclusions using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). In the present study, single fluid inclusion analysis has been performed on Proterozoic samples for the first time. Four individual oil-bearing fluid inclusions, found in 1430 Ma sandstone from the Roper Superbasin in Northern Australia, were analysed with ToF-SIMS. The ToF-SIMS spectra of the oil in the different inclusions are very similar to each other and are consistent with the presence of n-alkanes/branched alkanes, monocyclic alkanes, bicyclic alkanes, aromatic hydrocarbons, and tetracyclic and pentacyclic hydrocarbons. These results are in agreement with those obtained from bulk crushing of inclusions trapped in the same samples. The capability to analyse the hydrocarbon and biomarker composition of single oil-bearing fluid inclusions is a major breakthrough, as it opens up a way of obtaining molecular compositional data on ancient oils without the ambiguity of the origin of these hydrocarbons. Additionally, this finding suggests that it will be possible

  9. Two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, J.

    1990-01-01

    The design, operation and safety of nuclear components requires increasingly accurate knowledge of two-phase flows. This knowledge is also necessary for some studies related to electricity applications. The author presents some concrete examples showing the range of problems and the complexity of the phenomena involved in these types of flows. Then, the basic principles of their numerical modelling are explained, as well as the new tendency to use increasingly local and refined models. The newest computer codes developed at EDF are briefly presented. Experimental studies dealing with twophase flow are also referred to, and their connections to numerical modelling are explained. Emphasis is placed on the major efforts devoted to the development of new test rigs and instrumentation [fr

  10. Study of genesis in Qahr-Abad fluorite deposit using fluid inclusion, southeast of Saqqez, the Kurdistan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Barati

    2017-07-01

    Department of geology of the Karazmy University. Results Petrography and classification of inclusions: The samples used for the inclusion study were doubly polished sections of fluorite from mineralization stages 1 to 2. A number of inclusion types were identified. These include negative crystals and elongate round, polygonal or irregular shapes with a size range from <1 µm to several tens of µm. Based on their petrographic characteristics at room temperature and phase change characteristics during the heating process, inclusions were grouped into three principal types. Here we just discuss primary and pseudo secondary fluid inclusions, mainly including three fluid inclusions as follows: 1 (vapor + liquid or (L+V and negative crystal fluid inclusions, each of which will provide more believable information for the mineralization hydrothermal fluid. These fluid inclusions in fluorite are, isolated, and irregular or rectangular with 10 μm to 20μm long major axes. They include two phases at room temperature, an aqueous liquid (L and some kind of carbonic vapor phase (V, and have L/ (V +L Fillinge ratio values of 90–95%. Abundant fluid inclusions are present. 2 fluorite that are generally quadrilateral in shape, have 2–20 μm long major axes, and occur as clusters or form trails. These fluid inclusions contain three phases at room temperature depending on the density of the nonaqueous gases in the fluid inclusions and have nonaqueous phase ratios of around 5%. They have major axes 2–15 μm long. They contain two phases and have L/ (V + L volume ratio values around 0.95%. 3 Fluid inclusions in some fluorite are rare. Most of them are isolated and roughly circular. They have 2–10 μm long major axes, and contain four phases as (liquid+ vapor + daughter mineral 1+ daughter mineral 2 or (L+V+S1+S2 and have L/(V + L volume ratios of 90–92% at room temperature. Some twin fluid inclusions were also identified in this type and analyzed during this study

  11. Practical aspects of quantitative laser Raman microprobe spectroscopy for the study of fluid inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasteris, J.D.; Wopenka, B.; Seitz, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is addressed to both geologists who use laser Raman microprobe (LRM) spectroscopy to analyze fluid inclusions and to those who want to evaluate analyses done by this technique. Emphasis is on how to obtain quantitative analyses of fluid inclusions. The authors discuss the basic method of fluid inclusion analysis by LRM spectroscopy and the levels of accuracy and precision attainable with this technique. They evaluate which kinds of fluid inclusions and host mineral matrices will yield the most reliable compositional data. Necessary sample preparations, detection limits, problems with fluorescence, dependence of Raman scattering efficiencies on density, and many other questions asked at the workshop on Raman spectroscopy during the 1987 ACROFI meeting also are addressed. The complementary nature, advantages, and disadvantages of both LRM spectroscopy and microthermometry, the two techniques most frequently used for the analysis of individual fluid inclusions, are emphasized. Some discussions are intended to held LRM users calibrate, and evaluate the optical characteristics of, their particular instruments. It is hoped that this paper will further LRM users in finding a common ground on which to discuss the differences and similarities among different LRM instruments, and that it will encourage a future consensus on efficient means of calibration and on interlaboratory standards

  12. Fluid inclusion studies of calcite veins from Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Tuffs: Environment of formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedder, E. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Whelan, J.F. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Vaniman, D.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Calcite vein and vug fillings at four depths (130-314m), all above the present water table in USW G-1 bore hole at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, contain primary fluid inclusions with variable vapor/liquid raitos: Most of these inclusions are either full of liquid or full of vapor. The liquid-filled inclusions show that most of the host calcite crystallized from fluids at <100{degrees}C. The vapor-filled inclusions provide evidence that a separate vapor phase was present in the fluid during crystallization. Studies of these vapor-filled inclusions on the microscope crushing stage were interpreted in an earlier paper as indicating trapping of an air-water-CO{sub 2} vapor phase at ``<100{degrees}C``. Our new studies reveal the additional presence of major methane in the vapor-filled inclusion, indicating even lower temperatures of trapping, perhaps at near-surface temperatures. They also show that the host calcite crystals grew from a flowing film of water on the walls of fractures open to the atmosphere, the vapor-filled inclusions representing bubbles that exsolved from this film onto the crystal surface.

  13. Transient two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Y.Y.

    1974-01-01

    The following papers related to two-phase flow are summarized: current assumptions made in two-phase flow modeling; two-phase unsteady blowdown from pipes, flow pattern in Laval nozzle and two-phase flow dynamics; dependence of radial heat and momentum diffusion; transient behavior of the liquid film around the expanding gas slug in a vertical tube; flooding phenomena in BWR fuel bundles; and transient effects in bubble two-phase flow. (U.S.)

  14. Stable isotope signatures of gases liberated from fluid inclusions in bedrock at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, F.; Meier, D.; Haemmerli, J.; Diamond, L.

    2010-12-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartzes of the Olkiluoto bedrock contain gaseous N 2 , CO 2 , H 2 , CH 4 , and higher hydrocarbons in varying proportions. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of the gas phases give valuable information on their origin and the formation conditions. In previous studies, a method to liberate and quantify the gases trapped in fluid inclusions was developed. It allowed determining the carbon isotope signatures of liberated CO 2 , CH 4 and higher hydrocarbons (HHC), but no hydrogen isotope data were acquired. The method was advanced and, in this study, also stable hydrogen isotopes of CH 4 and H 2 liberated from fluid inclusions could be analysed. The stable carbon signatures of methane and higher hydrocarbons, as well as the hydrogen isotope signatures of methane indicate a predominant thermogenic provenance for those gases. (orig.)

  15. Ancient microbes from halite fluid inclusions: optimized surface sterilization and DNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Krithivasan; Timofeeff, Michael N; Spathis, Rita; Lowenstein, Tim K; Lum, J Koji

    2011-01-01

    Fluid inclusions in evaporite minerals (halite, gypsum, etc.) potentially preserve genetic records of microbial diversity and changing environmental conditions of Earth's hydrosphere for nearly one billion years. Here we describe a robust protocol for surface sterilization and retrieval of DNA from fluid inclusions in halite that, unlike previously published methods, guarantees removal of potentially contaminating surface-bound DNA. The protocol involves microscopic visualization of cell structures, deliberate surface contamination followed by surface sterilization with acid and bleach washes, and DNA extraction using Amicon centrifugal filters. Methods were verified on halite crystals of four different ages from Saline Valley, California (modern, 36 ka, 64 ka, and 150 ka), with retrieval of algal and archaeal DNA, and characterization of the algal community using ITS1 sequences. The protocol we developed opens up new avenues for study of ancient microbial ecosystems in fluid inclusions, understanding microbial evolution across geological time, and investigating the antiquity of life on earth and other parts of the solar system.

  16. Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

    2001-01-01

    The(sup 207)Pb/(sup 235)U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88(+-) 0.05 and 9.7(+-) 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event

  17. Fluid inclusion and stable isotopes studies of epithermal gold-bearing veins in the SE Afar Rift (Djibouti)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, N.; Boiron, M. C.; Grassineau, N.; Fouquet, Y.; Le Gall, B.; Mohamed, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Afar rift results from the interaction of a number of actively-propagating tectono-magmatic axes. Recent field investigations in the SE Afar rift have emphasized the importance of hydrothermal system in rift-related volcanic complexes. Mineralization occur as gold-silver bearing veins and are associated with felsic volcanism. Late carbonate veins barren of sulfides and gold are common. The morphologies and textures of quartz show crustiform colloform banding, massive and breccias. Microthermometric measurements were made on quartz-hosted two phases (liquid + vapor) inclusions; mean homogenization temperature range from 150°C to 340°C and ice-melting temperatures range from -0.2° to 1.6°C indicating that inclusion solutions are dilute and contain 0.35 to 2.7 equivalent wt. % NaCl. Furthermore, δ18O and δ13C values from calcite range from 3.7 to 26.6 ‰ and -7.5 to 0.3‰, respectively. The presence of platy calcite and adularia indicate that boiling condition existed. This study shows that precious-metal deposition mainly occurred from hydrothermal fluids at 200°C at around 300 and 450 m below the present-day surface in a typical low-sulphidation epithermal environment.

  18. A mixed markers and volume-of-fluid method for the reconstruction and advection of interfaces in two-phase and free-boundary flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulisa, Eugenio; Manservisi, Sandro; Scardovelli, Ruben

    2003-01-01

    In this work we present a new mixed markers and volume-of-fluid (VOF) algorithm for the reconstruction and advection of interfaces in the two-dimensional space. The interface is described by using both the volume fraction function C, as in VOF methods, and surface markers, which locate the interface within the computational cells. The C field and the markers are advected by following the streamlines. New markers are determined by computing the intersections of the advected interface with the grid lines, then other markers are added inside each cut cell to conserve the volume fraction C. A smooth motion of the interface is obtained, typical of the marker approach, with a good volume conservation, as in standard VOF methods. In this article we consider a few typical two-dimensional tests and compare the results of the mixed algorithm with those obtained with VOF methods. Translations, rotations and vortex tests are performed showing that many problems of the VOF technique can be solved and a good accuracy in the geometrical motion and mass conservation can be achieved

  19. Geochemical and geophysical investigations, and fluid inclusion studies in the exploration area of Zafarghand (Northeast Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alaminia

    2017-11-01

    producing maps resulting from the detecting of anomaly or threshold values from the background (Aitchison, 1986; Sun et al., 2009. Anomalies of Cu, Mo, Au, Ag, Pb, Zn and Sb were determined by Mean + 2 standard deviation (Cheng, 2007; Zuo et al., 2009; Chen et al., 2016. Geochemical maps for these elements in rocks and soils (Fig. 4 show significant contrasts in haloes concentrations within the diorite and dacite rocks in the southeast of the study area. The addition of concentrations in rocks is suggested indicating that a district-scale geochemical present is confined to either base metals or precious metals. The obtained fluid inclusion results are compiled in Table 3. Primary fluid inclusions in quartz mostly consist of two-phases and rarely three phases. Homogenization temperatures (Th in quartz samples represent wide variations from 123° to 550°C. They were classified according to the mode of homogenization into two immiscible types (Fig. 8: These are early inclusions stage with a high Th (between 328° and 550°C and late stage inclusions with a low Th (between 123° and 390°C. The salinity measured using the equation of Bodnar (1993 for fluid inclusions varies from 1.15 to 43 eqv.wt% NaCl. It was divided into two groups including high salinity (32 to 43 eqv.wt% NaCl and low salinity (1.15 to 5.16 eqv.wt% NaCl. Discussion The predictive results obtained by field observations, geochemical and micro thermometric studies are in good agreement with the known deposits. Geochemical anomalies are associated with phyllic and rare silicified altered rocks. The host rocks of anomalies are mainly dacite and diorite, respectively with an Eocene and younger age. District-scale geochemical patterns of several elements (Cu, Mo, Au, Pb, Ag, As, and Sb in the surface coincide with the southeastern area and can be used to explore for epithermal and/or porphyry-type deposits. Anomalies of Cu and Mo are suitable for targeting Cu-Mo mineralization. Weak anomalies associated with Au

  20. A New Equivalent Statistical Damage Constitutive Model on Rock Block Mixed Up with Fluid Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, there are few studies concerning the effect of closed “fluid inclusions” on the macroscopic constitutive relation of deep rock. Fluid-matrix element (FME is defined based on rock element in statistical damage model. The properties of FME are related to the size of inclusions, fluid properties, and pore pressure. Using FME, the equivalent elastic modulus of rock block containing fluid inclusions is obtained with Eshelby inclusion theory and the double M-T homogenization method. The new statistical damage model of rock is established on the equivalent elastic modulus. Besides, the porosity and confining pressure are important influencing factors of the model. The model reflects the initial damage (void and fluid inclusion and the macroscopic deformation law of rock, which is an improvement of the traditional statistical damage model. Additionally, the model can not only be consistent with the rock damage experiment date and three-axis compression experiment date of rock containing pore water but also describe the locked-in stress experiment in rock-like material. It is a new fundamental study of the constitutive relation of locked-in stress in deep rock mass.

  1. Cold distribution networks. Cold distribution by two-phase refrigerant fluid. Case of ice slurries; Reseaux de distribution de froid. Distribution de froid par fluide frigoporteur diphasique. Cas du coulis de glace stabilisee (2002 - 2004). Rapport final (1er juillet 2004). Programme energie. PRI 9.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), Centre de Thermique de Lyon (CETHIL), UMR 5008, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Mercier, P. [CEA Grenoble, Groupement pour la Recherche sur les Echangeurs Thermiques (GRETH), 38 (France); Royon, L. [Paris-1 Univ., Lab. de Biorheologie et d' Hydrodynamique Physico-Chimique, 75 (France); Dumas, J.P. [L' Ecole Nationale Superieure en Genie des Technologies Industrielles, Lab. de Thermique Energetique et Procedes, 64 - Pau (France); Guilpart, J. [URGPAN/CEMAGRE, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2004-07-01

    This PRI aims to participate to the development of alternate solutions for refrigerant fluids, for the cold transport and more specially a two phase refrigerant fluid: the stabilized ice slurry. The research program presented three main axis: design, realization and characterization of stabilized ice slurry, experimental studies of transport and transfer properties, study of online measurement process of the solid content. A simulation has been realized to evaluate the energy efficiency of this refrigerant use. (A.L.B.)

  2. Rheological study of an hydrate slurry as secondary two-phase refrigerant. Experimental results and modelling; Etude rheologique d'une suspension d'hydrates en tant que fluide frigoporteur diphasique: resultats experimentaux et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darbouret, M.

    2005-12-15

    Secondary two-phase fluids are suspensions of solid crystals. Thanks to the melting latent heat, they present a great interest for cold transportation. Moreover, they are a mean of reducing the amount of classical refrigerant. In the refrigeration field, ice slurries are already used. The goal is now to extend this technology to other temperature ranges suitable for other applications like freezing or air-conditioning. For an air-conditioning application, a TBAB (Tetra-Butyl-Ammonium Bromide) aqueous solution is studied. Under atmospheric pressure and for positive temperatures, this solution crystallizes into ice-like compounds named 'hydrates'. First, the physical properties of the aqueous solution and its crystallisation conditions were studied. Two different types of hydrates can appear. The goal of the experimental set-up is to study the rheological behaviour of two-phase fluids. Slurries are made in brushed-surface heat exchanger and pumped into pipes where flow rates and pressure drops are measured. The rheological behaviour of TBAB hydrates slurries can be described using a Bingham fluid model. We highlight that the two rheological parameters, which are the apparent viscosity and the yield shear stress, depend on the volume fraction of crystal of course, but also on the hydrate type, and on the initial concentration of the solution. The yield shear stress is interpreted as the consequence of the Van der Waals inter-particle interaction forces. Finally, possible stratification effects are modelled with a finite difference method. The principle is to calculate particle concentration and velocity profiles following the flow of the slurry. Calculations are validated with experimental velocity profiles published by P. Reghem (2002). This model underlines the influence of the particle distribution in the pipe on pressure drops. (author)

  3. Pumped two-phase heat transfer loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Fred

    1988-01-01

    A pumped loop two-phase heat transfer system, operating at a nearly constant temperature throughout, includes several independently operating grooved capillary heat exchanger plates supplied with working fluid through independent flow modulation valves connected to a liquid supply line, a vapor line for collecting vapor from the heat exchangers, a condenser between the vapor and the liquid lines, and a fluid circulating pump between the condenser and the heat exchangers.

  4. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorie M. Dilley

    2011-03-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Open or recently closed fractures would be more susceptible to enhancing the permeability of the system. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will assist in fracture stimulation site selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures (Moore, Morrow et al. 1987), and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. These fluid inclusions are faithful records of pore fluid chemistry. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. This report presents the results of the project to determine fracture locations by the chemical signatures from gas analysis of fluid inclusions. With this project we hope to test our assumptions that gas chemistry can distinguish if the fractures are open and bearing production fluids or represent prior active fractures and whether there are chemical signs of open fracture systems in the wall rock above the fracture. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method developed for the geothermal industry which applies the mass quantification of fluid inclusion gas data from drill cuttings and applying known gas ratios and compositions to determine depth profiles of fluid barriers in a modern geothermal system (Dilley, 2009; Dilley et al., 2005; Norman et al., 2005). Identifying key gas signatures associated with fractures for isolating geothermal fluid production is the latest advancement in the application of FIS to geothermal systems (Dilley and Norman, 2005; Dilley and Norman, 2007). Our hypothesis is that peaks in FIS data are related to location of fractures. Previous work (DOE Grant DE-FG36-06GO16057) has indicated differences in the

  5. Origin and evolution of mineralizing fluids and exploration of the Cerro Quema Au-Cu deposit (Azuero Peninsula, Panama) from a fluid inclusion and stable isotope perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Isaac; Cardellach, Esteve; Corbella, Merce; Canals, Angels; Griera, Albert; Gomez-Gras, David; Johnson, Craig A.

    2017-01-01

    Cerro Quema is a high sulfidation epithermal Au-Cu deposit with a measured, indicated and inferred resource of 35.98 Mt. @ 0.77 g/t Au containing 893,600 oz. Au (including 183,930 oz. Au equiv. of Cu ore). It is characterized by a large hydrothermal alteration zone which is interpreted to represent the lithocap of a porphyry system. The innermost zone of the lithocap is constituted by vuggy quartz with advanced argillic alteration locally developed on its margin, enclosed by a well-developed zone of argillic alteration, grading to an external halo of propylitic alteration. The mineralization occurs in the form of disseminations and microveinlets of pyrite, chalcopyrite, enargite, tennantite, and trace sphalerite, crosscut by quartz, barite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena veins.Microthermometric analyses of two phase (L + V) secondary fluid inclusions in igneous quartz phenocrysts in vuggy quartz and advanced argillically altered samples indicate low temperature (140–216 °C) and low salinity (0.5–4.8 wt% NaCl eq.) fluids, with hotter and more saline fluids identified in the east half of the deposit (Cerro Quema area).Stable isotope analyses (S, O, H) were performed on mineralization and alteration minerals, including pyrite, chalcopyrite, enargite, alunite, barite, kaolinite, dickite and vuggy quartz. The range of δ34S of sulfides is from − 4.8 to − 12.7‰, whereas δ34S of sulfates range from 14.1 to 17.4‰. The estimated δ34SΣS of the hydrothermal fluid is − 0.5‰. Within the advanced argillic altered zone the δ34S values of sulfides and sulfates are interpreted to reflect isotopic equilibrium at temperatures of ~ 240 °C. The δ18O values of vuggy quartz range from 9.0 to 17.5‰, and the δ18O values estimated for the vuggy quartz-forming fluid range from − 2.3 to 3.0‰, indicating that it precipitated from mixing of magmatic fluids with surficial fluids. The δ18O of kaolinite ranges from 12.7 to 18.1‰ and

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Population Balance Model Simulation of Effects of Cell Design and Operating Parameters on Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows and Bubble Distribution Characteristics in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuiqing; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Zhentao; Yang, Jianhong

    2018-02-01

    The effects of different cell design and operating parameters on the gas-liquid two-phase flows and bubble distribution characteristics under the anode bottom regions in aluminum electrolysis cells were analyzed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-population balance model. These parameters include inter-anode channel width, anode-cathode distance (ACD), anode width and length, current density, and electrolyte depth. The simulations results show that the inter-anode channel width has no significant effect on the gas volume fraction, electrolyte velocity, and bubble size. With increasing ACD, the above values decrease and more uniform bubbles can be obtained. Different effects of the anode width and length can be concluded in different cell regions. With increasing current density, the gas volume fraction and electrolyte velocity increase, but the bubble size keeps nearly the same. Increasing electrolyte depth decreased the gas volume fraction and bubble size in particular areas and the electrolyte velocity increased.

  7. Composition of fluid inclusions in Permian salt beds, Palo Duro Basin, Texas, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedder, E.; d'Angelo, W. M.; Dorrzapf, A.F.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    Several methods have been developed and used to extract and chemically analyze the two major types of fluid inclusions in bedded salt from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. Data on the ratio K: Ca: Mg were obtained on a few of the clouds of tiny inclusions in "chevron" salt, representing the brines from which the salt originally crystallized. Much more complete quantitative data (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr, Cl, SO4 and Br) were obtained on ??? 120 individual "large" (mostly ???500 ??m on an edge, i.e., ??? ??? 1.6 ?? 10-4 g) inclusions in recrystallized salt. These latter fluids have a wide range of compositions, even in a given piece of core, indicating that fluids of grossly different composition were present in these salt beds during the several (?) stages of recrystallization. The analytical results indicating very large inter-and intra-sample chemical variation verify the conclusion reached earlier, from petrography and microthermometry, that the inclusion fluids in salt and their solutes are generally polygenetic. The diversity in composition stems from the combination of a variety of sources for the fluids (Permian sea, meteoric, and groundwater, as well as later migrating ground-, formation, or meteoric waters of unknown age), and a variety of subsequent geochemical processes of dissolution, precipitation and rock-water interaction. The compositional data are frequently ambiguous but do provide constraints and may eventually yield a coherent history of the events that produced these beds. Such an understanding of the past history of the evaporite sequence of the Palo Duro Basin should help in predicting the future role of the fluids in the salt if a nuclear waste repository is sited there. ?? 1987.

  8. Modelling aspects of two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayinger, F.

    1977-01-01

    In two phase flow scaling is much more limited to very narrowly defined physical phenomena than in single phase fluids. For complex and combined phenomena it can be achieved not by using dimensionless numbers alone but in addition a detailed mathematical description of the physical problem - usually in the form of a computer program - must be available. An important role plays the scaling of the thermodynamic data of the modelling fluid. From a literature survey and from own scaling experiments the conclusion can be drawn that Freon is a quite suitable modelling fluid for scaling steam-water mixtures. However, whithout a theoretical description of the phenomena nondimensional numbers for scaling two phase flow must be handled very carefully. (orig.) [de

  9. Fluid-inclusion data on samples from Creede, Colorado, in relation to mineral paragenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, T.L.; Roedder, Edwin; Bethke, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Published and unpublished data on 2575 fluid inclusions in ore and gangue minerals from the Creede, Colorado, Ag-Pb-Zn-Cu vein deposit collected in our laboratories from 1959 to 1981 have shown that the average salinity (wt. % NaCl equivalent, hereinafter termed wt.% eq.) and homogenization temperature (Th), and the ranges of these two parameters for fluid inclusions in sphalerite, quartz, fluorite, and rhodochrosite, respectively, are 8.1 (4.6 - 13.4), 239?C (195-274?C); 6.1 (1.1-10.0), 260?C (190->400?C); 10.7 (6.1-11.1), 217?C (213-229?C) and 260?C (247-268?C) (bimodal distribution of Th); and 9.9 (9.3 - 10.6), 214?C (185-249?C). Inclusions have been measured in minerals from four of the five stages of mineralization previously recognized at Creede. The few inclusions of fluids depositing rhodochrosite (A-stage, earliest in the paragenesis) yield Th and salinity values more similar to those of the low-temperature (average Th 217?C) fluids forming some of the much later fluorite (C-stage) than to any of the other fluids. Th measurements on A-stage quartz range from 192?C to 263?C and average 237?C. The early, fine-grained, B-stage sphalerites yielded Th of 214 to 241?C and salinities of 6.1 to 10.2 wt. % eq. D-stage sphalerite (late in the paragenesis) has been studied in detail (growth-zone by growth-zone) for several localities along the OH vein and reveals a generally positive correlation among Th, salinity and iron content of the host sphalerite. The deposition of D-stage sphalerite was characterized by repeated cycling through different regions of salinity/Th space, as Th and salinity generally decreased with time. Seventeen salinity-Th measurements were made on D-stage sphalerite from one locality on the Bulldog Mountain vein system, which, like the OH vein, is one of four major ore-producing vein systems at Creede. These data suggest a lower Th for a given salinity fluid from sphalerite on the Bulldog Mountain vein than on the OH vein. The very high values

  10. Isotope analysis of water trapped in fluid inclusions in deep sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonhof, Hubert; Reijmer, John; Feenstra, Eline; Mienis, Furu

    2015-04-01

    Extant Lophelia pertusa deep sea coral specimens from the Loachev mound region in the North Atlantic Ocean contain water filled fluid inclusions in their skeleton. This fluid inclusion water was extracted with a crushing device, and its hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios analysed. The resulting data span a wide range of isotope values which are remarkably different from the seawater isotope composition of the sites studied. Comparison with food source isotope signatures suggests that coral inclusion water contains a high, but variable proportion of metabolic water. The isotope composition of the inclusion water appears to vary with the position on the deep see coral reef, and shows a correlation with the stable isotope composition of the coral aragonite. This correlation seems to suggest that growth rate and other ecological factors play an important role in determining the isotope composition of fluids trapped in the coral skeleton, which can potentially be developed as a proxy for non-equilibrium isotope fractionation observed in the aragonite skeleton of many of the common deep sea coral species.

  11. The Lagoa Real uranium province, Bahia state, Brazil: some petrographic aspects and fluid inclusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuzikawa, K.; Alves, J.V.; Cuney, M.; Kostolanyl, C.; Poti, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Lagoa Real Uranium Province in the central-southern Bahia State, consisting of six deposits and several prospects, has a reserve of near one hundred tons of U 3 O 8 . The main lithological unit in the area is the Lagoa Real Complex which is formed by granites and gneisses derived from them. The unit overthrusts the Espinhaco metasediments the west. The Complex is the host of albities which may contain uraninite. The mineralization is manly associated with pyroxene and garnet. Petrographic and field relations indicate the overthrusting as the latest event, having left implants in the orebodies and their hosts. Fluid inclusion studies indicated fluids of different characteristics in the Espinhaco and the Lagoa Real Complex although they were similar in composition (carbonic and aqueous). The types inclusions detected are in agreement with the geologic processes suggested for the area: emplacement of the Sao Timoteo granite at 1.72 Ga; albitization and uranium mineralization at ∼ 1.4 Ga; and metamorphism at ∼ 0.49 Ga. The study is an example of fluid inclusion behaviour in a metamorphic process with very limited amount of fluids. (author) [pt

  12. A new method for synthesizing fluid inclusions in fused silica capillaries containing organic and inorganic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Song, Yucai; Burruss, R. C.

    2008-11-01

    Considerable advances in our understanding of physicochemical properties of geological fluids and their roles in many geological processes have been achieved by the use of synthetic fluid inclusions. We have developed a new method to synthesize fluid inclusions containing organic and inorganic material in fused silica capillary tubing. We have used both round (0.3 mm OD and 0.05 or 0.1 mm ID) and square cross-section tubing (0.3 × 0.3 mm with 0.05 × 0.05 mm or 0.1 × 0.1 mm cavities). For microthermometric measurements in a USGS-type heating-cooling stage, sample capsules must be less than 25 mm in length. The square-sectioned capsules have the advantage of providing images without optical distortion. However, the maximum internal pressure ( P; about 100 MPa at 22 °C) and temperature ( T; about 500 °C) maintained by the square-sectioned capsules are less than those held by the round-sectioned capsules (about 300 MPa at room T, and T up to 650 °C). The fused silica capsules can be applied to a wide range of problems of interest in fluid inclusion and hydrothermal research, such as creating standards for the calibration of thermocouples in heating-cooling stages and frequency shifts in Raman spectrometers. The fused silica capsules can also be used as containers for hydrothermal reactions, especially for organic samples, including individual hydrocarbons, crude oils, and gases, such as cracking of C 18H 38 between 350 and 400 °C, isotopic exchanges between C 18H 38 and D 2O and between C 19D 40 and H 2O at similar temperatures. Results of these types of studies provide information on the kinetics of oil cracking and the changes of oil composition under thermal stress. When compared with synthesis of fluid inclusions formed by healing fractures in quartz or other minerals or by overgrowth of quartz at elevated P- T conditions, the new fused-silica method has the following advantages: (1) it is simple; (2) fluid inclusions without the presence of water can be

  13. The PDF method for Lagrangian two-phase flow simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, J.P.; Pozorski, J.

    1996-04-01

    A recent turbulence model put forward by Pope (1991) in the context of PDF modelling has been used. In this approach, the one-point joint velocity-dissipation pdf equation is solved by simulating the instantaneous behaviour of a large number of Lagrangian fluid particles. Closure of the evolution equations of these Lagrangian particles is based on stochastic models and more specifically on diffusion processes. Such models are of direct use for two-phase flow modelling where the so-called fluid seen by discrete inclusions has to be modelled. Full Lagrangian simulations have been performed for shear-flows. It is emphasized that this approach gives far more information than traditional turbulence closures (such as the K-ε model) and therefore can be very useful for situations involving complex physics. It is also believed that the present model represents the first step towards a complete Lagrangian-Lagrangian model for dispersed two-phase flow problems. (authors). 21 refs., 6 figs

  14. Study of fluid inclusions in rodioactive mineralized pegmatites, dara area northern eastern desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, B.H.; Abdel Warith, A.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous pegmatite pockets of un zoned and zoned types are the most important rock types from the radioactive point of view. They occur at the marginal parts and higher topographic level of G.Dara younger granites. Zoned pegmatites are composed of extremely coarse-grained milky quartz core, intermediate zone and wall zone. The alteration zone is found at the contact between quartz core and intermediate zone. It is recorded the highest radioactive values due to their mineral composition, as a result of alteration processes associated with radioactive minerals. Only two alteration zones (P1 and P2) has been studied in this paper. The late magmatic alteration process (hematization, kaolinization, chloritization and fluortization) of the pegmatite resulted in the formation of chlorite, fluorite, clay minerals and carbonates (calcite) in the alteration zones as mineral assemblage. opaque minerals are found as pyrite, iron oxyhydroxide and garnet. Fluid inclusion studies by microthermometry were carried out on authigenic minerals (such as quartz and fluorite) in alteration zones (primary fluid inclusions). This study revealed that, at least two stages of the post-magmatic hydrothermal alteration are involved. The first stages of high temperature, low saline fluids are involved. The first stage is of high temperature, low saline fluids which characterized with hematization and/or chloritization resulted from fluid-rock interaction with late magmatic fluids that very probably mixed with external low salinity fluids along brittle structure. The second stage is of low temperature the main role in re high saline fluids characterized the fluoritized alteration due to consequent reaction with wall rocks and mixing with meteoric water. Mixing of low salinity meteoric water with hot a sending saline hydrothermal solution leads to ph change and continuous interaction with wall rock

  15. Two-phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaje, Dzh.

    1984-01-01

    General hypothesis used to simplify the equations, describing two-phase flows, are considered. Two-component and one-component models of two-phase flow, as well as Zuber and Findlay model for actual volumetric steam content, and Wallis model, describing the given phase rates, are presented. The conclusion is made, that the two-component model, in which values averaged in time are included, is applicable for the solving of three-dimensional tasks for unsteady two-phase flow. At the same time, using the two-component model, including values, averaged in space only one-dimensional tasks for unsteady two-phase flow can be solved

  16. Lithospheric magma dynamics beneath the El Hierro Volcano, Canary Islands: insights from fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglialoro, E.; Frezzotti, M. L.; Ferrando, S.; Tiraboschi, C.; Principe, C.; Groppelli, G.; Villa, I. M.

    2017-10-01

    At active volcanoes, petrological studies have been proven to be a reliable approach in defining the depth conditions of magma transport and storage in both the mantle and the crust. Based on fluid inclusion and mineral geothermobarometry in mantle xenoliths, we propose a model for the magma plumbing system of the Island of El Hierro (Canary Islands). The peridotites studied here were entrained in a lava flow exposed in the El Yulan Valley. These lavas are part of the rift volcanism that occurred on El Hierro at approximately 40-30 ka. The peridotites are spinel lherzolites, harzburgites, and dunites which equilibrated in the shallow mantle at pressures between 1.5 and 2 GPa and at temperatures between 800 and 950 °C (low-temperature peridotites; LT), as well as at higher equilibration temperatures of 900 to 1100 °C (high-temperature peridotites; HT). Microthermometry and Raman analyses of fluid inclusions reveal trapping of two distinct fluid phases: early type I metasomatic CO2-N2 fluids ( X N2 = 0.01-0.18; fluid density (d) = 1.19 g/cm3), coexisting with silicate-carbonate melts in LT peridotites, and late type II pure CO2 fluids in both LT (d = 1.11-1.00 and 0.75-0.65 g/cm3) and HT ( d = 1.04-1.11 and 0.75-0.65 g/cm3) peridotites. While type I fluids represent metasomatic phases in the deep oceanic lithosphere (at depths of 60-65 km) before the onset of magmatic activity, type II CO2 fluids testify to two fluid trapping episodes during the ascent of xenoliths in their host mafic magmas. Identification of magma accumulation zones through interpretation of type II CO2 fluid inclusions and mineral geothermobarometry indicate the presence of a vertically stacked system of interconnected small magma reservoirs in the shallow lithospheric mantle between a depth of 22 and 36 km (or 0.67 to 1 GPa). This magma accumulation region fed a short-lived magma storage region located in the lower oceanic crust at a depth of 10-12 km (or 0.26-0.34 GPa). Following our model

  17. Preliminary results on the petrology and fluid inclusions of the Rossing uraniferous alaskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.

    1980-01-01

    Petrography, radioactivity distribution and fluid inclusions have been studied in three samples of the Rossing alaskites from the S.H. anomaly outside of the Rossing deposit. After the crystallization of the alaskitic magma which involved oligoclase, biotite, orthoclase and quartz, a deuteric alteration produced a quartz, microcline, albite, muscovite, calcite plus minus chlorite mineral association similar to those observed in several French uraniferous granites. Uranium redistribution occurred during this alteration. From fluid inclusions data, the pressure at the time of the intrusion is estimated to have been at least 6kbar for a temperature of 625 degrees Celsius. Reaction of the magma with the marbles of the Rossing formation led to the boiling of the magma by an increase in the CO 2 partial pressure as well as to its crystallization. Immiscibility between a dense saline (more than 30 per cent NaCl) and CO 2 -rich fluid is proposed to have occurred simultaneously or after the fluid oversaturation of the magma. Part of uraninite is formed at the magmatic stage, another part crystallized from the magmatic fluids in the biotite-rich selvages of the alaskites or in the uraninite-fluorite veins. Uraninite crystallization appears to be mainly controlled by the oxygen fugacity prevailing in the magma and in the surrounding rocks

  18. Motions of deformable inclusions in a horizontally oscillating vessel with a compressible fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demidov, I.V.; Sorokin, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the analysis of rigid particle and compressible gas bubble motion in a horizontally oscillating vessel with a compressible fluid. A nonlinear differential equation describing motion of inclusions with respect to the vessel is derived and solved by the method of direct...... of the bubbles which are affected by the negligible vibrational force is found. Also an approximate expression has been obtained for the average velocity of bubble׳s motion in the fluid; relationship between this velocity and bubble radius and vibration parameters has been revealed. A simple physical explanation...

  19. Preliminary studies on fluid inclusions in metasomatic albite grains from Lagoa Real, Caetite, Ba, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuzikawa, K.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary fluid inclusion studies in metasomatic albite grains from the Lagoa Real uranium deposit pointed out to mixing of strong brines (23 wt% NaCl equivalent) with low salinity fluids (2.3 wt% NaCl equivalent). Microthermometry and crushing tests indicated elevated pressures and the presence of hidrocarbons in larger amount than CO 2 . The remobilization of uranium as uranyl carbonate complexes and its precipitation, reducing U 6 + to U 4 + by CH 4 , is considered as a possibility. (Author) [pt

  20. Fluids in the Siilinjärvi carbonatite complex, eastern Finland: Fluid inclusion evidence for the formation conditions of zircon and apatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poutiainen, M.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available In the studied zircon and apatite crystals, data recorded two different compositional types of fluid inclusions: Type 1 H2O-CO2, low salinity inclusions (XCO2 = 0.42 to 0.87; XNaCl = 0.001 to 0.005 with bulk densities of 0.73 to 0.87 g/cm3, and Type 2 H2O moderate salinity (XNaCl = 0.03 to 0.06 inclusions with densities of 0.83 to 1.02 g/cm3. The Type 1 inclusions are not present in apatite. In zircon, the observed fluid inclusion types occur in separate domains: around (Type 1 and outside (Type 2 the apparent core. Fluid inclusions are further subdivided into pseudosecondary and secondary inclusions. Using a combination of SEM-EDS, optical characteristics and crushing-stage, various daughter and captive minerals were identified. The fluid inclusion data suggest that the pseudosecondary Type 1 and Type 2 inclusions in zircon and apatite were trapped during the pre-emplacement evolution of the carbonatite at mid-crustal conditions (P≥4 kbar, T≥625°C. The Type 1 fluid was depleted in CO2, during crystal fractionation and cooling leading to a fluid phase enriched in water and alkalies. Fenitization was obviously induced by these saline aqueous fluids. During emplacement of the carbonatite to the present level, zircon phenocrysts were intensively fractured, some Type 1 inclusions were re-equilibrated, and multiphase Type 2 inclusions were trapped. It is assumed that all these inclusions in zircon and the pseudosecondary Type 2 inclusions in apatite have a magmatic origin. In apatite, calcite inclusions occur side-by-side with the secondary Type 2 inclusions. These calcites co-existed with the aqueous fluid during fracturing and metamorphic re-crystallization of apatites. Probably, this metamorphic fluid also is responsible for the transport and deposition of at least some of the calcite at low temperatures (200-350°C.

  1. Two-phase characteristics of the feeding fluid of Cerro Prieto IV wells (Mexico) obtained by gas equilibrium; Caracteristicas bifasicas del fluido de alimentacion de pozos de Cerro Prieto IV (Mexico), obtenidas por equilibrio gaseoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan-Reyes, Rosa Maria; Arellano-Gomez, Victor Manuel; Portugal-Marin, Enrique [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (Mexico); De Leon-Vivar, Jesus [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Residencia General de Cerro Prieto, B.C (Mexico)

    2008-10-15

    The gas composition of fluids produced by CP IV geothermal wells from the Cerro Prieto field was studied in order to identify different types of fluids entering the wells by estimating their temperature and excess steam. A method based on the Fischer Tropsch reaction and H2S equilibrium with pyrite-pyrrhotite as mineral buffer (FTHSH3) was used. The results for the reservoir natural state indicated the presence of fluids with heterogeneous reservoir temperature (between 275 and 310 degrees Celsius) and excess steam values, which were found from negative (boiled liquid that has lost steam when flowing to the well) to one (steam phase with zero liquid saturation). The study for individual wells in which boiling processes were identified, showed that through time, the feeding fluids consist of a two-phase mixture with different liquid/steam proportions. Also, the results suggested that a steam phase could occur at CP IV which is added to the feeding fluid, depending on the operation conditions of the wells. The origin of this steam could be the boiling of the deeper liquid due to a pressure drop. [Spanish] Se estudio la composicion gaseosa de los fluidos producidos por pozos geotermicos del sector CP IV del campo de Cerro Prieto para tratar de distinguir aportes de fluidos diferentes mediante la estimacion de su temperatura de yacimiento y del exceso de vapor. Se utilizo un metodo de equilibrio gaseoso basado en la reaccion de Fischer Tropsch y el equilibrio combinado pirita-pirrotita (FT-HSH3). Los resultados obtenidos indican que en el estado inicial del yacimiento existen fluidos que muestran heterogeneidad en los valores de temperatura de yacimiento (entre 275 y 310 grados Celsius), asi como en el exceso de vapor con valores desde negativos (liquido que despues de ebullir ha perdido vapor en su trayecto hacia el pozo) hasta uno (vapor con cero saturacion de liquido). El estudio individual de los pozos con fenomenos de ebullicion muestra que a traves del tiempo

  2. Ancient microbes from halite fluid inclusions: optimized surface sterilization and DNA extraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krithivasan Sankaranarayanan

    Full Text Available Fluid inclusions in evaporite minerals (halite, gypsum, etc. potentially preserve genetic records of microbial diversity and changing environmental conditions of Earth's hydrosphere for nearly one billion years. Here we describe a robust protocol for surface sterilization and retrieval of DNA from fluid inclusions in halite that, unlike previously published methods, guarantees removal of potentially contaminating surface-bound DNA. The protocol involves microscopic visualization of cell structures, deliberate surface contamination followed by surface sterilization with acid and bleach washes, and DNA extraction using Amicon centrifugal filters. Methods were verified on halite crystals of four different ages from Saline Valley, California (modern, 36 ka, 64 ka, and 150 ka, with retrieval of algal and archaeal DNA, and characterization of the algal community using ITS1 sequences. The protocol we developed opens up new avenues for study of ancient microbial ecosystems in fluid inclusions, understanding microbial evolution across geological time, and investigating the antiquity of life on earth and other parts of the solar system.

  3. Modelling and numerical simulation of two-phase flows using the two-fluid two-pressure approach; Modelisation et simulation numerique des ecoulements diphasiques par une approche bifluide a deux pressions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemaud, V

    2007-03-15

    This thesis is devoted to the modelling and numerical simulation of liquid-vapor flows. In order to describe these phase transition flows, a two-fluid two-pressure approach is considered. This description of the liquid-vapor mixing is associated to the seven-equation model introduced by Baer and Nunziato. This work investigates the properties of this model in order to simulate the phase transition flows occurring in nuclear engineering. First, a theoretical thermodynamic framework is constructed to describe the liquid-vapor mixing. Provided with this framework, various modelling choices are suggested for the interaction terms between the phases. These closure laws comply with an entropy inequality. The mathematical properties of this model are thereafter examined. The convective part is associated to a nonconservative hyperbolic system. First, we focus on the definition of its weak solutions. Several flow regimes for the two-phase mixing derive from this analysis. Such regimes for the two-phase flows are analogous to the torrential and fluvial regimes for the shallow-water equations. Furthermore, we establish the linear and nonlinear stabilities of the liquid-vapor equilibrium. Finally, the implementation of a turbulence model and the introduction of a reconstruction process for the interfacial area are investigated in order to refine the description of the interfacial transfers. Using a fractional step approach, a Finite Volume method is at last constructed to simulate this model. First, various nonconservative adaptations of standard Riemann solvers are developed to approach the convective part. Unlike the classic nonconservative framework, these schemes converge towards the same solution. Furthermore, a new relaxation scheme is proposed to approach the interfacial transfers. Provided with these schemes, the whole numerical method preserves the liquid-vapor equilibria. Using this numerical method, a careful comparison between the one- and two-pressure two-fluid

  4. Characterization of fluid inclusions from mineralized pegmatites of the Damara Belt, Namibia: insight into late-stage fluid evolution and implications for mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Luisa; Kinnaird, Judith Ann; Nex, Paul Andrew Martin; Erasmus, Rudolph Marthinus; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech Józef

    2018-05-01

    Mineralized NYF and LCT pegmatites occur throughout the northeast-trending Neoproterozoic Damara Belt, Namibia. Mineralization in the pegmatites varies geographically, from the northeast, where they are enriched in Li-Be, to the southwest, where they also contain notable Sn and U. Similar fluid inclusion populations occur throughout the pegmatites, regardless of their respective metal enrichments, and primary fluid inclusion textures were destroyed by continued fluid activity. Pseudosecondary to secondary inclusions are aqueo-carbonic, carbonic, and aqueous in composition, and have been divided into five types. The earliest populations are saline (>26.3 eq. wt.% NaCl), homogenizing at temperatures in excess of 300 °C. Their carbonic phase is composed of CO2, with minor CH4, and micro-elemental mapping indicates they contain trace metals, including Ca, Fe, Zn, Cu, and K. Type 3 inclusions formed later, homogenize at 325 °C, and are less saline, with a carbonic phase composed of CO2. Type 4 carbonic inclusions are composed of pure CO2, and represent the latest stages of fluid evolution, while Type 5 aqueous inclusions are believed to be unrelated to the crystallization of the pegmatites, and rather the result of regional Cretaceous magmatism, or the ingress of meteoric water. The similarities in fluid inclusion populations observed in the pegmatites suggest that differences in mineralization were driven by magma composition rather than fluid activity alone, however saline fluids facilitated the enrichment and deposition of metals during the late stages of crystallization. Furthermore, the similarities between fluid inclusion populations in different pegmatites suggests they share a similar fluid evolution.

  5. Investigations of alteration zones based on fluid inclusion microthermometry at Sungun porphyry copper deposit, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid ASGHARI

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Sungun porphyry copper deposit is located in East Azerbaijan, NW of Iran. The porphyries occur as stocks and dikes ranging in composition from quartz monzodiorite to quartz monzonite. Four types of hypogene alteration are developed; potassic, phyllic, propylitic and argillic. Three types of fluid inclusions are typically observed at Sungun; (1 vapor-rich, (2 liquid-rich and (3 multi-phase. Halite is the principal solid phase in the latter. The primary multiphase inclusions within the quartz crystals were chosen for micro-thermometric analyses and considered to calculate the geological pressure and hydrothermal fluid density. In potassic zone, the average of homogenization temperature is 413.6 °C while in phyllic alteration, 375.9 °C. As expected in potassic alteration, the temperature of hydrothermal solutions is higher than that in the phyllic zone. The salinity of the hydrothermal fluids has a high coherency with homogenization temperature, so the average of salinity in potassic samples is 46.3 (wt% NaCl which is higher than phyllic samples. Based on the location of potassic alteration, as expected, the lithostatic pressure is much more than the phyllic one. Finally, the average density of hydrothermal fluids in the potassically altered samples is 1.124 (gr/cm3 which is higher than the ones in phyllic zone (1.083 gr/cm3 .

  6. Fluid flow and radionuclide transport in complex repository mines. Synthesis report part 1/2. Two-phase flow in a saline repository using the example ERAM; Fluidstroemung und Radionuklidtransport in komplexen Endlagerbergwerken. Synthesebericht Teil 1/2. Zweiphasenfluss in einem salinaren Endlager am Beispiel des ERAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kock, Ingo; Frieling, Gerd; Navarro, Martin

    2016-10-15

    The aim of the project is the understanding of two-phase flow processes in a complex final repository system. The consideration of two-phase flow processes for calculations concerning the modeled final repository system induces processes and effects that influence the fluid and radionuclide transport significantly. Two-phase flow processes cover not only capillary pressures and the relative permeability but also a basic competition of phases for the pore volume with respect to storage and transport and density driven vertical phase separation.

  7. Limit for the Survivability from Potassium Decay of Bacterial Spores in Halite Fluid Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kminek, G.; Bada, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    Vreeland et al.1 recently claimed to have isolated and cultured a viable spore forming halotolerant bacterium from a 250 million year old brine inclusion present in a salt crystal from the Salado formation. An earlier report suggested that viable bacterial spores could be revived from samples obtained from insects entombed in 25-40 million year old Dominican amber2. On the bases of these reports, Parkes3 raised the question of whether bacterial spores under some conditions might be effectively immortal. Sporulation, induced by an adverse change in the environmental conditions, is able to stabilize the DNA primarily against hydrolytic depurination for extended periods of time4. However, the organism is still exposed to ionizing radiation from the environment. Dormant spores have a reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation per se, but unlike active organisms are unable to repair DNA damage encountered during long-term exposure to ionizing radiation. The accumulated damage may overwhelm any repair mechanism that starts in the early stage of spore germination5. The main radionuclide in a halite fluid inclusion is 40K, which accounts for 0.0117% of natural potassium. 40K decays via beta decay to 40Ca and via electron capture to 40Ar, releasing a primary gamma-ray. About 83.3 % of the beta's emitted are in the energy range of 0.3-1.3 MeV. We assume 7 g/l for an average concentration of natural potassium in a halite fluid inclusion, which means that the amount of 40K in a 10 μ l fluid inclusion is 8.19 ng. We have chosen a 10 μ l because this volume is typical of that used to obtain chemical data and in the attempts to extract bacteria. Less than a percent of the gamma decay energy is absorbed in a fluid inclusion of 10 μ l. Thus, we will not take the gamma decay energy into account for the further discussion. Almost all the beta energy is absorbed in the fluid inclusion. The total decay energy absorbed in a time period of 250 million years is about 87 kGy. The most

  8. Magmatic fluid inclusions from the Zaldivar Deposits, Northern Chile: The role of early metal-bearing fluids in a Porphyry copper system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs Campos, E.; Touret, J.L.R.; Nikogosian, I.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of a distinct type of multi-solid, highly-saline fluid inclusions, hosted in igneous quartz phenocrysts from the Llamo porphyry, in the Zaldívar porphyry copper deposit of northern Chile is documented. Total homogenization of the multi-solid type inclusions occurs at magmatic

  9. "Magmatic fluid inclusions from the Zaldivar deposit, Northern Chile: The role of Early metal-bearing fluids in a porphyry copper system."

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs Campos, E.; Touret, J.L.R.; Nikogosian, I.

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of a distinct type of multi-solid, highly-saline fluid inclusions, hosted in igneous quartz phenocrysts from the Llamo porphyry, in the Zaldívar porphyry copper deposit of northern Chile is documented. Total homogenization of the multi-solid type inclusions occurs at magmatic

  10. Organic compounds in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz-Analogues of prebiotic chemistry on early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Ulrich; Mayer, Christian; Schmitz, Oliver J; Rosendahl, Pia; Bronja, Amela; Greule, Markus; Keppler, Frank; Mulder, Ines; Sattler, Tobias; Schöler, Heinz F

    2017-01-01

    The origin of life is still an unsolved mystery in science. Hypothetically, prebiotic chemistry and the formation of protocells may have evolved in the hydrothermal environment of tectonic fault zones in the upper continental crust, an environment where sensitive molecules are protected against degradation induced e.g. by UV radiation. The composition of fluid inclusions in minerals such as quartz crystals which have grown in this environment during the Archean period might provide important information about the first organic molecules formed by hydrothermal synthesis. Here we present evidence for organic compounds which were preserved in fluid inclusions of Archean quartz minerals from Western Australia. We found a variety of organic compounds such as alkanes, halocarbons, alcohols and aldehydes which unambiguously show that simple and even more complex prebiotic organic molecules have been formed by hydrothermal processes. Stable-isotope analysis confirms that the methane found in the inclusions has most likely been formed from abiotic sources by hydrothermal chemistry. Obviously, the liquid phase in the continental Archean crust provided an interesting choice of functional organic molecules. We conclude that organic substances such as these could have made an important contribution to prebiotic chemistry which might eventually have led to the formation of living cells.

  11. Some carbonates from Lagoa Real uranium province, State of Bahia: studies on fluid inclusion and stable isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuzikawa, K.

    1982-01-01

    The geochemical conditions of the uraniferous carbonates of Lagoa Real province were studied using the fluid inclusions method and the isotopic determinations of the carbon and oxygen of these carbonates. (A.B.) [pt

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizwan-uddin

    1986-01-01

    Unstable flow conditions can occur in a wide variety of laboratory and industry equipment that involve two-phase flow. Instabilities in industrial equipment, which include boiling water reactor (BWR) cores, steam generators, heated channels, cryogenic fluid heaters, heat exchangers, etc., are related to their nonlinear dynamics. These instabilities can be of static (Ledinegg instability) or dynamic (density wave oscillations) type. Determination of regions in parameters space where these instabilities can occur and knowledge of system dynamics in or near these regions is essential for the safe operation of such equipment. Many two-phase flow engineering components can be modeled as heated channels. The set of partial differential equations that describes the dynamics of single- and two-phase flow, for the special case of uniform heat flux along the length of the channel, can be reduced to a set of two coupled ordinary differential equations [in inlet velocity v/sub i/(t) and two-phase residence time tau(t)] involving history integrals: a nonlinear ordinary functional differential equation and an integral equation. Hence, to solve these equations, the dependent variables must be specified for -(nu + tau) ≤ t ≤ 0, where nu is the single-phase residence time. This system of nonlinear equations has been solved analytically using asymptotic expansion series for finite but small perturbations and numerically using finite difference techniques

  13. Research on one-dimensional two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi

    1988-10-01

    In Part I the fundamental form of the hydrodynamic basic equations for a one-dimensional two-phase flow (two-fluid model) is described. Discussions are concentrated on the treatment of phase change inertial force terms in the equations of motion and the author's equations of motion which have a remarkable uniqueness on the following three points. (1) To express force balance of unit mass two-phase fluid instead of that of unit volume two-phase fluid. (2) To pick up the unit existing mass and the unit flowing mass as the unit mass of two-phase fluid. (3) To apply the kinetic energy principle instead of the momentum low in the evaluation of steady inertial force term. In these three, the item (1) is for excluding a part of momentum change or kinetic energy change due to mass change of the examined part of fluid, which is independent of force. The item (2) is not to introduce a phenomenological physical model into the evaluation of phase change inertial force term. And the item (3) is for correctly applying the momentum law taking into account the difference of representative velocities between the main flow fluid (vapor phase or liquid phase) and the phase change part of fluid. In Part II, characteristics of various kinds of high speed two-phase flow are clarified theoretically by the basic equations derived. It is demonstrated that the steam-water two-phase critical flow with violent flashing and the airwater two-phase critical flow without phase change can be described with fundamentally the same basic equations. Furthermore, by comparing the experimental data from the two-phase critical discharge test and the theoretical prediction, the two-phase discharge coefficient, C D , for large sharp-edged orifice is determined as the value which is not affected by the experimental facility characteristics, etc. (author)

  14. Fluorine concentrations of ore fluids in the Illinois-Kentucky district: Evidence from SEM-EDS analysis of fluid inclusion decrepitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenderes, Stuart M.; Appold, Martin S.

    2017-08-01

    The Illinois-Kentucky district is an atypical occurrence of Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) mineralization that consists predominantly of fluorite rather than metal sulfide minerals. A long-standing assumption for the predominance of fluorite in the Illinois-Kentucky district is that the ore fluids there were anomalously rich in dissolved fluorine compared to typical sedimentary brines and other MVT ore fluids. This hypothesis is based on the unusual close temporal and spatial association of fluorine-rich ultramafic igneous rocks to MVT mineralization in the district, high K and Sr concentrations in the igneous rocks and in MVT ore-hosted fluid inclusions, a significant mantle 3He/4He component in ore-hosted fluid inclusions, and reaction path models that show titration of a HF-rich fluid into sedimentary brine is capable of producing a fluorite-dominated MVT ore mineral assemblage. The purpose of the present study was to test this hypothesis more directly by determining the fluorine concentration of the Illinois-Kentucky ore fluid through SEM-EDS analysis of evaporative solute mounds resulting from thermal decrepitation of fluid inclusions hosted in sphalerite. All 26 evaporative solute mounds from Illinois-Kentucky sphalerite samples analyzed contained detectable concentrations of fluorine of 1-4 weight percent. Based on calibration to standard solutions and previously published fluid inclusion major element concentrations, these solute mound fluorine concentrations correspond to fluid inclusion fluorine concentrations of about 680-4300 ppm, indicating that the Illinois-Kentucky ore fluids were quite rich in fluorine compared to typical sedimentary brines, which have fluorine concentrations mainly on the order of 1's to 10's of ppm. In contrast, solute mounds from sphalerite-hosted fluid inclusions from the Tri-State district did not contain fluorine in excess of the detection limit. The detection limit equates to an aqueous fluorine concentration between 87 and

  15. C-O-H-S magmatic fluid system in shrinkage bubbles of melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robidoux, P.; Frezzotti, M. L.; Hauri, E. H.; Aiuppa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Magmatic volatiles include multiple phases in the C-O-H-S system of shrinkage bubbles for which a conceptual model is still unclear during melt inclusion formation [1,2,3,4]. The present study aims to qualitatively explore the evolution of the volatile migration, during and after the formation of the shrinkage bubble in melt inclusions trapped by olivines from Holocene to present at San Cristóbal volcano (Nicaragua), Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). Combined scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy observations allow to define the mineral-fluid phases inside typical shrinkage bubbles at ambient temperature. The existence of residual liquid water is demonstrated in the shrinkage bubbles of naturally quenched melt inclusion and this water could represents the principal agent for chemical reactions with other dissolved ionic species (SO42-, CO32-, etc.) and major elements (Mg, Fe, Cu, etc.) [4,5]. With the objective of following the cooling story of the bubble-inclusion system, the new methodological approach here estimate the interval of equilibrium temperatures for each SEM-Raman identified mineral phase (carbonates, hydrous carbonates, sulfurs, sulfates, etc.). Finally, two distinct mechanisms are proposed to describe the evolution of this heterogeneous fluid system in bubble samples at San Cristóbal which imply a close re-examination for similar volcanoes in subduction zone settings: (1) bubbles are already contracted and filled by volatiles by diffusion processes from the glass and leading to a C-O-H-S fluid-glass reaction enriched in Mg-Fe-Cu elements (2) bubbles are formed by oversaturation of the volatiles from the magma which is producing an immiscible metal-rich fluid. [1]Moore et al. (2015). Am. Mineral. 100, 806-823 [2]Wallace et al. (2015). Am. Mineral. 100, 787-794 [3]Lowenstern (2015). Am. Mineral. 100, 672-673 [4]Esposito, et al. (2016). Am. Mineral. 101, 1691-1708 [5]Kamenetsky et al. (2001). Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 184, 685-702

  16. Fluid inclusion and oxygen isotope studies of the Nabarlek and Jabiluka uranium deposits, Northern Territory, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ypma, P.J.M.; Fuzikawa, K.

    1980-01-01

    We lack a basic understanding of the solutions producing the uranium deposits of the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF). Several theories have been proposed ranging from syngenetic, epigenetic hydrothermal, epigenetic metamorphogenic, surficial origin (Ferguson et al., this volume), and mobilization by evaporite deposits. As for a precipitation mechanism, we do not seem to find much beyond the presence of graphite in some ore-bearing and intra-formational strata, and pre-uranium sulphides, none of which reducing factors are common throughout all ore bodies. This study was initiated with the aim of obtaining direct fluid inclusion evidence of the solution transport and precipitation of uranium

  17. Constitutive equations for two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boure, J.A.

    1974-12-01

    The mathematical model of a system of fluids consists of several kinds of equations complemented by boundary and initial conditions. The first kind equations result from the application to the system, of the fundamental conservation laws (mass, momentum, energy). The second kind equations characterize the fluid itself, i.e. its intrinsic properties and in particular its mechanical and thermodynamical behavior. They are the mathematical model of the particular fluid under consideration, the laws they expressed are so called the constitutive equations of the fluid. In practice the constitutive equations cannot be fully stated without reference to the conservation laws. Two classes of model have been distinguished: mixture model and two-fluid models. In mixture models, the mixture is considered as a single fluid. Besides the usual friction factor and heat transfer correlations, a single constitutive law is necessary. In diffusion models, the mixture equation of state is replaced by the phasic equations of state and by three consitutive laws, for phase change mass transfer, drift velocity and thermal non-equilibrium respectively. In the two-fluid models, the two phases are considered separately; two phasic equations of state, two friction factor correlations, two heat transfer correlations and four constitutive laws are included [fr

  18. Ice-VII inclusions in diamonds: Evidence for aqueous fluid in Earth’s deep mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschauner, O.; Huang, S.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Ma, C.; Rossman, G. R.; Shen, A. H.; Zhang, D.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Tait, K.

    2018-03-01

    Water-rich regions in Earth’s deeper mantle are suspected to play a key role in the global water budget and the mobility of heat-generating elements. We show that ice-VII occurs as inclusions in natural diamond and serves as an indicator for such water-rich regions. Ice-VII, the residue of aqueous fluid present during growth of diamond, crystallizes upon ascent of the host diamonds but remains at pressures as high as 24 gigapascals; it is now recognized as a mineral by the International Mineralogical Association. In particular, ice-VII in diamonds points toward fluid-rich locations in the upper transition zone and around the 660-kilometer boundary.

  19. Sr isotope geochemistry of East Alpine mineral deposits and mass spectrometric analyses of fluid inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grum, W.

    1995-05-01

    Strontium isotope geochemistry and deformational history of selected carbonate-hosted deposits from different tectonic positions in the Eastern Alps were studied. In this context an equipment has been constructed to analyze the composition of volatile components of fluid inclusions (FI). Based on the results of Sr-isotopic investigations two groups of deposits are discriminated: Deposits formed by formation waters and/or metamorphogenic fluids: Tux (magnesite, scheelite), Otterzug (barite), Lassing (magnesite), Rabenwald (talc), Laussa and Mooseck (fluorite). The mineralizing fluids are derived from different sedimentary rock series and therefore 87 Sr/ 86 Sr-ratios vary between 0.707 and 0.719. Deposits situated along fault zones: Lassing (talc), Gasteiner Tal (Silberpfennig area; gold), Schlaining (stibnite) and Waldenstein (specularite). Sr isotope ratios of the mineralizing fluids from Lassing, Waldenstein and Schlaining ranges from 0.7112 to 0.7127 and are therefore thought to have scavenged the East Alpine crystalline. The mineralizing solutions of the Gasteiner Tal deposit may either have equilibrated with low radiogenic sedimentary or with (ultra-)basic rocks. A cracking chamber has been constructed in order to open FI by cracking for mass spectrometric analysis of volatile components. Gases are analysed using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The desorption of gas from metal and sample surfaces during cracking can be neglected. The amount of gas released from the mineral lattices was studied. With that fast method ore bearing from barren host rocks have been distinguished by different composition of the FI at the Brixlegg barite mineralization (Eastern Alps). Within the Galway fluorite deposit (Ireland) different fluids were involved and mass spectrometric analysis were carried out to characterize these different fluids and to identify their origin. (author)

  20. Salinity of the Archaean oceans from analysis of fluid inclusions in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Bernard; Avice, Guillaume; Bekaert, David V.; Broadley, Michael W.

    2018-05-01

    Fluids trapped in inclusions in well-characterized Archaean hydrothermal quartz crystals were analyzed by the extended argon-argon method, which permits the simultaneous measurement of chlorine and potassium concentrations. Argon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of the trapped fluids were also determined by static mass spectrometry. Fluids were extracted by stepwise crushing of quartz samples from North Pole (NW Australia) and Barberton (South Africa) 3.5-3.0-Ga-old greenstone belts. The data indicate that fluids are a mixture of a low salinity end-member, regarded as the Archaean oceanic water, and several hydrothermal end-members rich in Cl, K, N, and radiogenic parentless 40Ar. The low Cl-K end-member suggests that the salinity of the Archaean oceans was comparable to the modern one, and that the potassium content of the Archaean oceans was lower than at present by about 40%. A constant salinity of the oceans through time has important implications for the stabilization of the continental crust and for the habitability of the ancient Earth.

  1. Calcite Fluid Inclusion, Paragenetic, and Oxygen Isotopic Records of Thermal Event(s) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, B.; Moscati, R.

    2000-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is under consideration as a potential high-level radioactive waste repository situated above the water table in 12.7 Ma tuffs. A wealth of textural and geochemical evidence from low-temperature deposits of calcite and silica, indicates that their genesis is related to unsaturated zone (UZ) percolation and that the level of the potential repository has never been saturated. Nonetheless, some scientists contend that thermal waters have periodically risen to the surface depositing calcite and opal in the tuffs and at the surface. This hypothesis received some support in 1996 when two-phase fluid inclusions (FIs) with homogenization temperatures (Th) between 35 and 75 C were reported from UZ calcite. Calcite deposition likely followed closely on the cooling of the tuffs and continues into the present. The paragenetic sequence of calcite and silica in the UZ is early stage calcite followed by chalcedony and quartz, then calcite with local opal during middle and late stages. Four types of FIs are found in calcite assemblages: (1) all-liquid (L); (2) all-vapor (V); (3) 2-phase with large and variable V:L ratios; and (4) a few 2-phase with small and consistent V:L ratios. Late calcite contains no FI assemblages indicating elevated depositional temperatures. In early calcite, the Th of type 4 FIs ranges from ∼ 40 to ∼ 85 C. Such temperatures (sub-boiling) and the assemblage of FIs are consistent with deposition in the UZ. Some delta 18O values < 10 permil in early calcite support such temperatures. Type 4 FIs, however, seem to be restricted to the early calcite stage, during which either cooling of the tuffs or regional volcanism were possible heat sources. Nonetheless, at present there is no compelling evidence of upwelling water as a source for the calcite/opal deposits

  2. Microgravity Two-Phase Flow Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, M.; Chao, D.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase flows under microgravity condition find a large number of important applications in fluid handling and storage, and spacecraft thermal management. Specifically, under microgravity condition heat transfer between heat exchanger surfaces and fluids depend critically on the distribution and interaction between different fluid phases which are often qualitatively different from the gravity-based systems. Heat transfer and flow analysis in two-phase flows under these conditions require a clear understanding of the flow pattern transition and development of appropriate dimensionless scales for its modeling and prediction. The physics of this flow is however very complex and remains poorly understood. This has led to various inadequacies in flow and heat transfer modeling and has made prediction of flow transition difficult in engineering design of efficient thermal and flow systems. In the present study the available published data for flow transition under microgravity condition are considered for mapping. The transition from slug to annular flow and from bubbly to slug flow are mapped using dimensionless variable combination developed in a previous study by the authors. The result indicate that the new maps describe the flow transitions reasonably well over the range of the data available. The transition maps are examined and the results are discussed in relation to the presumed balance of forces and flow dynamics. It is suggested that further evaluation of the proposed flow and transition mapping will require a wider range of microgravity data expected to be made available in future studies.

  3. Fluid Inclusion Analysis of other Host Minerals besides Quartz: Application to Granite-Related Quartz-Topaz Veins and Garnet Skarns in Porphyry Copper-Gold Ore Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schlöglova, Katerina

    2018-01-01

    Fluid inclusions are the only available samples of paleo-fluids responsible for crystallization of hydrothermal minerals including ore phases. Analysis of fluid inclusions implicitly assumes that the inclusions have preserved their chemical composition since the time of their entrapment. There is, however, an increasing evidence from experimental work and analytical studies of natural samples showing that inclusions hosted in quartz – a ubiquitous host in many ore-forming systems – can experi...

  4. A review of damping of two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio

    1993-01-01

    Damping of two-phase flows has been recognized as one of the most unknown parameters in analyzing vibrational characteristics of structures subjected to two-phase flows since it seems to be influenced by many physical parameters involved in the physics of dynamic energy dissipation of a vibrating structure, for example, liquid viscosity, surface tension, flow velocity, mass ratio, frequency, void fraction, flow regime and so forth. This paper deals with a review of scientific works done to date on the damping of two phase flows and discussions about what has been clarified and what has not been known to us, or what kinds of research are needed about two-phase flow damping. The emphasis is put on the definition of two-phase fluid damping, damping measurement techniques, damping characteristics in relation to two phase flow configurations, and damping generation mechanisms

  5. A note on fluid inclusion study of quartz from uraniferous migmatites from Sirsoti area, Sonbhadra district, Uttar Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramana Murthy, K.V.; Shobhita, K.; Gorikhan, R.A.; Bhattacharya, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    Fluid inclusion study has been carried out on quartz from uraniferous migmatitic rocks of Sirsoti area of Sonbhadra District, Uttar Pradesh. The fluid inclusions in quartz are of two types viz. (i) H 2 O liquid + vapour and (ii) H 2 O liquid + CO 2 liquid + CO 2 gas. Homogenization temperatures of H 2 O liquid + vapour type inclusions indicate that the temperature of formation varied between 150-350degC. Ice melting temperatures indicate that the hydrothermal solutions were CO 2 -bearing with a salinity of 6-8% NaCl. A common range of homogenization temperature for both liquid-rich as well as vapour-rich inclusions provides evidence for the boiling of the ore fluids. (author). 5 refs., 7 figs

  6. The Use of Integrated Fluid Inclusion Studies for Constraining Petroleum Charge History at Parsons Pond, Western Newfoundland, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Conliffe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study, based on fluid inclusion petrography, microthermometry and ultraviolet microspectroscopy of inclusion oil, investigates the petroleum charge history at Parsons Pond, western Newfoundland. To address this matter, drill core and cuttings samples of allochthonous and autochthonous strata in the Parson’s Pond area were collected from three exploration wells. Fluid inclusions were examined from fragments of calcite and quartz veins, diagenetic cements in sandstone, and in large hydrothermal dolomite and calcite crystals. Primary aqueous inclusions in authigenic sandstone cements indicate that cementation occurred at relatively shallow depths and low temperatures (<50 °C. Hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions (petroleum, wet gas and gas are generally restricted to calcite and quartz veins, indicating that petroleum and gas migration at Parson’s Pond is fracture-controlled. No hydrocarbons were observed in the diagenetic cements of the essentially tight sandstones. Fluid inclusion microthermometry and ultraviolet microspectroscopy indicate the presence of multiple generations of hydrocarbon fluid, ranging in composition from ~33 API gravity petroleum to pure CH4. Petrographic evidence suggests that hydrocarbons were generated multiple times during progressive burial and heating. In addition, the distribution of hydrocarbon bearing inclusions with depth suggests that deeper levels are gas-prone, with petroleum confined to relatively shallow depths. Although only gas flow was encountered during the drilling of exploration wells at Parson’s Pond, the presence of petroleum-bearing fluid inclusions in calcite and quartz veins indicates that the historical production from shallow wells in the Parsons Pond area likely tapped small reservoirs of fractured petroliferous strata.

  7. Final state effects in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering from nuclei: Clues from quantum fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, R.N.; Clark, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The impulse approximation (IA) predicts that momentum distributions, n/sub k/, in many-body systems should be measurable by inclusive quasielastic scattering at high energy and momentum (w,Q) transfer. The observations that the cross section appears to satisfy ''Y-scaling'' (i.e., is a function not of both w and Q of a single variable, Y) is usually taken as a signature of the IA. In nuclear physics, inelastic electron scattering at GeV energies should reveal the high momentum components of the nuclear wave function. In quantum fluids, neutron scattering at hundreds of MeV energies should measure the Bose condensate in superfluid /sup 4/He and the Fermi surface discontinuity and depletion of the Fermi sea in /sup 3/He. In molecular and condensed matter systems, X-ray Compton scattering at keV energies reveals electronic n/sub k/. Such experiments test many-body wave functions calculated by methods such as Green Function and Path Integral Monte Carlo, and Fermi Hypernetted Chain. However, an outstanding issue has been the corrections to the IA due to the scattering of the recoiling particle from neighboring particles, which are termed ''final state effects'' (FSE). The FSE should be especially important in nuclei and quantum fluids where the potentials have steeply repulsive cores. While there have been a variety of theories proposed for FSE, until now none has been adequately tested by experiment. Recently, the ''hard core perturbation theory'' (HCPT) for FSE in quantum fluids by Silver has been successfully compared to new neutron scattering measurements on /sup 4/He by P. E. Sokol and colleagues. In this paper, we shall discuss the lessons of this success for the extraction of n/sub k/ in nuclei by inclusive ''quasielastic electron-nucleus scattering'' (QENS). 19 refs., 12 figs

  8. Laser microprobe analyses of Cl, Br, I, and K in fluid inclusions: Implications for sources of salinity in some ancient hydrothermal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Irwin, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The relative concentrations of Cl, Br, I, and K in fluid inclusions in hydrothermal minerals were measured by laser microprobe noble gas mass spectrometry on irradiated samples containing 10−10 to 10−8 L of fluid. Distinctive halogen signatures indicate contrasting sources of fluid salinity in fluid inclusions from representative “magmatic” (St. Austell), “metamorphic” (Alleghany), and “geothermal” (Creede, Salton Sea) aqueous systems. Br/Cl mol ratios are lowest at Salton Sea (0.27–0.33 × 10−3), where high salinities are largely due to halite dissolution; intermediate at St. Austell (0.85 × 10−3), possibly representative of magmatic volatiles; and highest (near that of seawater) at Creede (1.5–2.1 × 10−3) and Alleghany (1.2–2.4 × 10−3), where dissolved halogens probably were leached from volcanic and (or) nonevaporitic sedimentary rocks. IC1">IC1 mol ratios are lowest (near that of seawater) at Creede (1–14 × 10−6), possibly because organisms scavenged I during low temperature recharge; intermediate at Salton Sea (24–26 × 10−6) and St. Austell (81× 10−6); and highest at Alleghany (320–940 × 10−6), probably because the fluids interacted with organic-rich sediments at high temperatures before being trapped. KCl">KCl mol ratios indicate disequilibrium with respect to hypothetical feldspathic alkali-Al-silicate mineral buffers at fluid inclusion trapping temperatures at Creede, and large contributions of (Na, K)-bicarbonate to total fluid ionic strength at Alleghany. Significant variations in Cl/Br/I/K ratios among different fluid inclusion types are correlated with previously documented mineralization stages at Creede, and with the apparent oxidation state of dissolved carbon at Alleghany. The new data indicate that Cl/ Br/I ratios in hydrothermal fluid inclusions vary by several orders of magnitude, as they do in modern surface and ground waters. This study demonstrates that halogen signatures of fluid inclusions

  9. Paleoclimatic implications from fluid inclusion data in Messinian halite of Italian sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranza, G.; Tecce, F.; Cosentino, D.; Faccenna, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Neogene sedimentary succession of the Mediterranean Basin includes a thick evaporitic succession (gypsum and halite) deposited during the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC), which occurred between 5.96 and 5,33 Ma. While several studies have been carried out to define the water budget of the MSC, the temperature of the Mediterranean water system is poorly constrained. The purpose of this work is to collect the first dataset of homogenization temperatures (Th) from primary fluid inclusions in Messinian halite from different Italian sites. Such data yield very useful information on water temperature at salt deposition time and thus on the climatic conditions in the peak desiccation stage of the Mediterranean sea. We focused our attention on three areas: the Volterra Basin (Tuscany), the Crotone Basin (Calabria) and the Caltanissetta Basin (Sicily). These basins are filled by Neogene sedimentary sequences, including Messinian gypsum deposits and halite. Halite samples were taken directly from salt diapirs outcrops (Crotone Basin), from borehole S1113 cores drilled by the Italian Solvay company (Volterra Basin) and inside salt mines of Petralia Sottana, Racalmuto and Realmonte (Caltanissetta Basin). Halite chips were manually prepared carefully avoiding water and controlling the temperature. Halite minerals contain abundant fluid inclusions. The majority of them are monophase liquid inclusions, showing a very regular cubic or rectangular shape. They occur along chevron and growth planes and thus were considered to have a primary origin. Some others contain solids and/or organic matter. During microthermometry, vapor bubbles nucleation has been produced directly into the stage chamber, slightly modifying the traditional "cooling" method; we could then nucleate the bubbles and at the same time constantly control the sample temperature, avoiding any sudden change that can lead to useless altered data. Microthermometric data were measured from 218 primary all liquid fluid

  10. Stable isotope composition of fluid inclusions preserved in halite derived from Wieliczka and Bochnia beds (southern Poland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulinski, M.; Rozanski, K.; Alexandrowicz, Z.; Chmura, A.

    1999-01-01

    Halite deposits located in the southern Poland, near Krakow, are famous mostly due to medieval salt mine located in Wieliczka. Contrary to most salt deposits in Europe forming large domes, the halite deposits near Krakow form distinct beds, extending from west to east on the area of ca. 10 km 2 , with several types of salt identified. The deposits were formed in Miocene, ca. 15 mln years ago. Stable isotope composition of fluid inclusions trapped in the halite crystals originating from Wieliczka and Bochnia salt mines was investigated. Two distinct groups of samples were analyzed: (i) samples derived from so-called 'green salt' beds forming extensive horizontal structures, and (ii) large monocrystals of halite collected in crystal caves which form a part of the tourist tract within the Wieliczka Salt Mine. The samples belonging to the first group were heated under vacuum to extract the fluid inclusions, according to the procedure developed in our laboratory and used previously to extract inclusions from speleothem samples. The macro-inclusions present in some monocrystals of halite collected in crystal caves were removed or analysis without any thermal treatment. The concentration of bivalent cations (Ca 2+ , Mg 2- was measured in the bulk material and in fluid inclusions (only second group). The 2 H and 18 O isotope composition of fluid inclusions extracted from halite samples was measured

  11. Extremely halophilic archaea from ancient salt sediments and their possible survival in halite fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan-Lotter, H.; Fendrihan, S.; Gerbl, F. W.; Dornmayr-Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Frethem, C.

    2008-09-01

    Halophilic archaebacteria (haloarchaea) thrive in environments with salt concentrations approaching saturation, such as natural brines, marine solar salterns and alkaline salt lakes; they have also been isolated from ancient subsurface salt sediments of great geological age (195-280 million years) and some of those strains were described as novel species (1). The cells survived perhaps while being enclosed within small fluid inclusions in the halite. The characterization of subsurface microbial life is of astrobiological relevance since extraterrestrial halite has been detected and since microbial life on Mars, if existent, may have retreated into the subsurface. We attempted to simulate the embedding process of extremely halophilic archaea and to analyse any cellular changes which might occur. When enclosing haloarchaea in laboratory grown halite, cells accumulated preferentially in fluid inclusions, as could be demonstrated by pre-staining with fluorescent dyes. With increased time of embedding, rod-shaped cells of Halobacterium salinarum strains were found to assume roundish morphologies. Upon dissolution of the salt crystals, these spheres were stable and viable for months when kept in buffers containing 4 M NaCl. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following fixation with glutaraldehyde suggested a potentially gradual transformation from rods to spheres. This notion was supported by fluorescence microscopy of Halobacterium cells, following embedding in halite and staining with SYTO 9. One-dimensional protein patterns of rods and spheres, following SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were similar except that the S-layer protein appeared reduced by about 15 - 20 % in spheres. The reddish-orange pigmentation of spheres was much lighter compared to that of rod-shaped cells, suggesting lowered concentrations of carotenoids; this was confirmed by extraction and spectrometry of pigments. The data suggested that Halobacterium cells are capable of forming specific

  12. Cu-Mo-Au mineralization in Qarachilar area, Qaradagh batholith (NW Iran): Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies and Re-Os dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Vartan; Moazzen, Mohssen

    2015-04-01

    The Qaradagh batholith is located in NW Iran, neighboring the Meghri-Ordubad granitoid in southern Armenia. This magmatic complex is emplaced in the northwestern part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc, which formed through north-eastward subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the central Iranian domain in the late-Mesozoic and early-Cenozoic and hosts most of the porphyry copper deposits and prospects in Iran, such as Sarcheshmeh and Sungun. The Qaradagh batholith is comprised of Eocene-Oligocene intrusive rocks occurring as multi-episode stocks, where the dominant rock type is granodiorite. Hydrothermal alterations have also occurred in these rocks including potassic, phyllic-sericitic, argillic and propylitic alterations and silicification. These alterations are accompanied by vein-type and disseminated Cu, Mo and Au mineralization. The Qarachilar area is located in the central part of the Qaradagh batholith, which hosts mono-mineralic and quartz-sulfide veins and veinlets (several mm to <1 m thick and 50-700 m long) and silicic zones containing Cu-Mo-Au-Ag ore minerals (mainly pyrite, chalcopyrite and molybdenite). Microthermometric studies on the fluid inclusions of quartz-sulfide veins-veinlets show that the salinity ranges between 15-70 wt% NaCl, with the highest peak between 35-40 wt% NaCl. The homogenization temperature for primary 2-phase and multi-phase inclusions ranges between 220 and 540 °C. Two-phase inclusions homogenizing by vapor disappearance have TH values between 280 and 440 °C (mainly between 300 and 360 °C). A few of them homogenize into vapor state with TH values of 440-540 °C. Multi-phase inclusions show 3 types of homogenization. Most of them homogenize by simultaneous disappearance of vapor bubble and dissolution of halite daughter crystal, for which the TH value is 240-420 °C (mostly between 260 and 340 °C). Those homogenizing by halite dissolution show TH values about 220-360 °C and a few homogenizing by vapor

  13. Fluid inclusion study of the Cachoeira uranium deposit, Caetite, state of Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, J.V.; Fuzikawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    The Cachoeira uranium deposit is presently the richest deposit among those in the Lagoa Real Uranium Province. The mineralization is associated to the albitites formed during the onset of strong sodium metasomatism on the granite-gnaissic rocks of the area. Fluid inclusion study of several uraniferous albitites indicated the presence of strong brines (approx. 20 weight percent NaCl equivalent) and the dominance of hydrocarbons over CO 2 in the gas phase. In country rocks, which host the albitites, as well as in unmineralized albities the salinity of aqueous solution is variable and light hydrocarbons are the predominant gas phase. These data were obtained by microthermometry and crushing tests from a larger set of samples than that used in previous studies. However, the results do not differ significantly from the data of these earlier works and reinforce the hypothesis of the importance of CH 4 in Uo 2 precipitation. (Author) [pt

  14. Two-phase systems. Fundamentals and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woillez, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Two-phase flows are omnipresent in industrial processes in different sectors with the behaviour and control of non-mixing mixtures of gas and liquids, of several liquids, of solids and fluids which are present in the production of raw materials, in the environment, in energy production, in chemistry, in pharmaceutical or food industry. The author presents the fundamentals elements which are needed to perform hardware predictive calculations and to understand typical phenomena associated with these flows. The chapters address fluids mechanics (movement equations, Bernoulli equation, load losses, turbulence, heat exchange coefficients, thermodynamics, compressible flows), two-phase systems (characteristic values, modes of appearance of two-phase flows, conduct flows, suspension mechanics, mass transfers, similarity, numerical simulation), the applications (energy production, agitation and mixing, phase separation, sprays), and peculiar phenomena (Marangoni effect, the tea cup effect, entry jets, water hammer effect, sound speed, two-phase pumping, fluidization)

  15. In situ quantification of Br and Cl in minerals and fluid inclusions by LA-ICP-MS: a powerful tool to identify fluid sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerli, Johannes; Rusk, Brian; Spandler, Carl; Emsbo, Poul; Oliver, Nicholas H.S.

    2013-01-01

    Bromine and chlorine are important halogens for fluid source identification in the Earth's crust, but until recently we lacked routine analytical techniques to determine the concentration of these elements in situ on a micrometer scale in minerals and fluid inclusions. In this study, we evaluate the potential of in situ Cl and Br measurements by LA-ICP-MS through analysis of a range of scapolite grains with known Cl and Br concentrations. We assess the effects of varying spot sizes, variable plasma energy and resolve the contribution of polyatomic interferences on Br measurements. Using well-characterised natural scapolite standards, we show that LA-ICP-MS analysis allows measurement of Br and Cl concentrations in scapolite, and fluid inclusions as small as 16 μm in diameter and potentially in sodalite and a variety of other minerals, such as apatite, biotite, and amphibole. As a demonstration of the accuracy and potential of Cl and Br analyses by LA-ICP-MS, we analysed natural fluid inclusions hosted in sphalerite and compared them to crush and leach ion chromatography Cl/Br analyses. Limit of detection for Br is ~8 μg g−1, whereas relatively high Cl concentrations (> 500 μg g−1) are required for quantification by LA-ICP-MS. In general, our LA-ICP-MS fluid inclusion results agree well with ion chromatography (IC) data. Additionally, combined cathodoluminescence and LA-ICP-MS analyses on natural scapolites within a well-studied regional metamorphic suite in South Australia demonstrate that Cl and Br can be quantified with a ~25 μm resolution in natural minerals. This technique can be applied to resolve a range of hydrothermal geology problems, including determining the origins of ore forming brines and ore deposition processes, mapping metamorphic and hydrothermal fluid provinces and pathways, and constraining the effects of fluid–rock reactions and fluid mixing.

  16. Two-phase computer codes for zero-gravity applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krotiuk, W.J.

    1986-10-01

    This paper discusses the problems existing in the development of computer codes which can analyze the thermal-hydraulic behavior of two-phase fluids especially in low gravity nuclear reactors. The important phenomenon affecting fluid flow and heat transfer in reduced gravity is discussed. The applicability of using existing computer codes for space applications is assessed. Recommendations regarding the use of existing earth based fluid flow and heat transfer correlations are made and deficiencies in these correlations are identified

  17. Stochastic modelling of two-phase flows including phase change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurisse, O.; Minier, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic modelling has already been developed and applied for single-phase flows and incompressible two-phase flows. In this article, we propose an extension of this modelling approach to two-phase flows including phase change (e.g. for steam-water flows). Two aspects are emphasised: a stochastic model accounting for phase transition and a modelling constraint which arises from volume conservation. To illustrate the whole approach, some remarks are eventually proposed for two-fluid models. (authors)

  18. Fluid inclusions of the Horní Slavkov Sn-W ore deposit, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic: evidence for non-magmatic source of greisenizing fluids?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dolníček, Z.; René, Miloš; Prochaska, W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 87, - (2011), s. 68-69 ISSN 1017-8880. [Ecrofi XXI. 09.08.2011-11.08.2011, Leoben] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : fluid inclusion * greisen * tin ore Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  19. Two-phase-flow models and their limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, M.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1982-01-01

    An accurate prediction of transient two-phase flow is essential to safety analyses of nuclear reactors under accident conditions. The fluid flow and heat transfer encountered are often extremely complex due to the reactor geometry and occurrence of transient two-phase flow. Recently considerable progresses in understanding and predicting these phenomena have been made by a combination of rigorous model development, advanced computational techniques, and a number of small and large scale supporting experiments. In view of their essential importance, the foundation of various two-phase-flow models and their limitations are discussed in this paper

  20. Geochemical Signature of Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluids Exsolved from the Beauvoir Rare-Metal Granite (Massif Central, France: Insights from LA-ICPMS Analysis of Primary Fluid Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Harlaux

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Beauvoir granite (Massif Central, France represents an exceptional case in the European Variscan belt of a peraluminous rare-metal granite crosscutting an early W stockwork. The latter was strongly overprinted by rare-metal magmatic-hydrothermal fluids derived from the Beauvoir granite, resulting in a massive topazification of the quartz-ferberite vein system. This work presents a complete study of primary fluid inclusions hosted in quartz and topaz from the Beauvoir granite and the metasomatized stockwork, in order to characterize the geochemical composition of the magmatic fluids exsolved during the crystallization of this evolved rare-metal peraluminous granite. Microthermometric and Raman spectrometry data show that the earliest fluid (L1 is of high temperature (500 to >600°C, high salinity (17–28 wt.% NaCl eq, and Li-rich (Te100 m and interaction with external fluids.

  1. AqSo_NaCl: Computer program to calculate p-T-V-x properties in the H2O-NaCl fluid system applied to fluid inclusion research and pore fluid calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Ronald J.

    2018-06-01

    The program AqSo_NaCl has been developed to calculate pressure - molar volume - temperature - composition (p-V-T-x) properties, enthalpy, and heat capacity of the binary H2O-NaCl system. The algorithms are designed in BASIC within the Xojo programming environment, and can be operated as stand-alone project with Macintosh-, Windows-, and Unix-based operating systems. A series of ten self-instructive interfaces (modules) are developed to calculate fluid inclusion properties and pore fluid properties. The modules may be used to calculate properties of pure NaCl, the halite-liquidus, the halite-vapourus, dew-point and bubble-point curves (liquid-vapour), critical point, and SLV solid-liquid-vapour curves at temperatures above 0.1 °C (with halite) and below 0.1 °C (with ice or hydrohalite). Isochores of homogeneous fluids and unmixed fluids in a closed system can be calculated and exported to a.txt file. Isochores calculated for fluid inclusions can be corrected according to the volumetric properties of quartz. Microthermometric data, i.e. dissolution temperatures and homogenization temperatures, can be used to calculated bulk fluid properties of fluid inclusions. Alternatively, in the absence of total homogenization temperature the volume fraction of the liquid phase in fluid inclusions can be used to obtain bulk properties.

  2. Mathematical modeling of disperse two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Morel, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book develops the theoretical foundations of disperse two-phase flows, which are characterized by the existence of bubbles, droplets or solid particles finely dispersed in a carrier fluid, which can be a liquid or a gas. Chapters clarify many difficult subjects, including modeling of the interfacial area concentration. Basic knowledge of the subjects treated in this book is essential to practitioners of Computational Fluid Dynamics for two-phase flows in a variety of industrial and environmental settings. The author provides a complete derivation of the basic equations, followed by more advanced subjects like turbulence equations for the two phases (continuous and disperse) and multi-size particulate flow modeling. As well as theoretical material, readers will discover chapters concerned with closure relations and numerical issues. Many physical models are presented, covering key subjects including heat and mass transfers between phases, interfacial forces and fluid particles coalescence and breakup, a...

  3. Oscillatory two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boure, J.A.

    1974-12-01

    Two-phase flow instabilities are classified according to three criteria: the static or dynamic nature of the phenomenon, the necessity or not of a triggering phenomenon, and the pure or compound character of the phenomenon. Tables give the elementary instability phenomena, and the practical types of instability. Flow oscillations (or dynamic instabilities) share a number of characteristics which are dealt with, they are caused by the dynamic interactions between the flow parameters (flow rate, density, pressure, enthalpy and their distributions). Oscillation types are discussed: pure oscillations are density wave oscillations, acoustic oscillations may also occur, various compound oscillations involve either the density wave or the acoustic wave mechanism, interacting with some of the boundary conditions in the device. The analysis of slow oscillations has been made either by means of a simplified model (prediction of the thresholds) or of computer codes. Numerous computer codes are available [fr

  4. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  5. Fluid inclusions and PVTX modelling: examples from the Garn Formation in well 6507/2-2, Haltenbanken, Mid-Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teinturier, S.; Pironon, J. [CREGU-UMR, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Walgenwitz, F. [CSTJF, TotalFinaElf, Pau (France)

    2002-06-01

    Fluid inclusions study and multi-techniques quantitative analyses have been coupled to reconstitute PVTX conditions of aqueous and petroleum fluid entrapment of a local Haltenbanken area (well 6507/2-2) from the Garn Formation. Unusual low temperature behaviour showing the liquid portion separating into two liquids has been described. This behaviour is typical of a gas condensate/volatile mixture with high methane content and heavy alkanes. The variable liquid-vapour ratio, compositions and morphologies of all petroleum inclusions can be interpreted as a result of a combination of heterogeneous trapping and necking down. Thus, all petroleum inclusions can be related to a single petroleum source. Three main episodes of fluid entrapment can be distinguished. The first one corresponds to the water trapped within detrital quartz microfractures, at around 50{sup o}C and 50 bar; the second to the petroleum fluid arrival in the biphase field of a critical system around 100-120{sup o}C and 190-230 bar. The third one to the main trapping of present-day petroleum inclusions during the recrystallisation of quartz cements (around 110-160{sup o}C and 230-280 bar) within the last few million years of a short and relatively rapid burial.(author)

  6. Petrology, isotopic and fluid inclusion studies of eclogites from Sujiahe, NW Dabie Shan (China), July 1 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, B.; Zheng, Y.-F.; Touret, J.L.R.

    2002-01-01

    In addition to the Triassic Hong'an low-T-high-P eclogite and the Xinxian coesite-bearing kyanite-glaucophane eclogite, Silurian coesite-free amphibole eclogites occur in the Sujiahe region, NW Dabie Shan of central China. A comprehensive study of petrology, Nd-Sr, O-H isotopes and fluid inclusions

  7. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in east Tennessee Mississippi Valley-type districts: Evidence for immiscibility and implications for depositional mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.D.; Kesler, S.E. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Analyses of fluid inclusion gases from Mississippi Valley-type districts in east Tennessee reveal the presence of several distinct aqueous solutions and vapors that were part of the mineralizing process. Inclusion contents were released by crushing 5 to 25 mg mineral samples and by decrepitating individual inclusions; all analyses were obtained by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Most analyzed inclusion fluids consist of H{sub 2}O with significant amounts of CH{sub 4} (0.3 to 2.9 mol%), CO{sub 2} (0.1 to 4.7 mol%), and smaller amounts of C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and Ar. Compositional similarities in the inclusion fluids from three districts imply that mineralization probably formed from fluids that permeated the entire region. Saturation pressures calculated for these fluid compositions range from 300 to 2,200 bars. Burial depths for the host unit have been estimated to be about 2 to 3 km during Devonian time, the age of mineralization indicated by recent isotopic ages. Exsolution of a vapor phase from the mineralizing brines should cause precipitation of carbonate and sulfide minerals, but reaction path modeling indicates that the resulting sparry dolomite:sphalerite ratios would be too high to form an ore-grade deposit. If the vapor phase was from a preexisting sour gas cap that was intercepted by a Zn-rich brine, large amounts of spalerite would precipitate in a fairly small region. Preliminary mass balance calculations suggest that a gas cap of dimensions similar to the individual districts in east Tennessee could have contained enough H{sub 2}S to account for the total amount of sphalerite precipitated.

  8. Fluid inclusions in jadeitite and jadeite-rich rock from serpentinite mélanges in northern Hispaniola: Trapped ambient fluids in a cold subduction channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Hertwig, Andreas; Schertl, Hans-Peter; Maresch, Walter V.

    2018-05-01

    Freezing-point depression was measured in aqueous fluid inclusions to determine salinities in six samples of jadeitite and jadeite-rich rock from the Jagua Clara serpentinite mélange of the Rio San Juan Complex, Dominican Republic. The mélange represents a fossil subduction-zone channel from a cold, mature subduction zone with a geothermal gradient of 6 °C/km. One hundred and twenty-five determinations of salinity in primary inclusions hosted in jadeite, quartz, apatite and lawsonite range between extremes of 1.2 and 8.7, but yield a well-defined mean of 4.5 ± 1.1 wt% (±1 s.d.) NaCl equiv, slightly higher than mean seawater (3.5 wt%). In one sample, eight additional fluid inclusions in quartz aligned along grain boundaries yield slightly lower values of 2.7 ± 1.3 wt% NaCl equiv. Homogenization temperatures were also measured for 47 fluid inclusions in two samples, but primary entrapment densities are not preserved. It is significant that the suite includes two types of samples: those precipitated directly from an aqueous fluid as well as examples of metasomatic replacement of a pre-existing magmatic rock. Nevertheless, the results indicate identical salinity for both types and suggest a much stronger genetic link between the two types of jadeitite and jadeite-rich rock than has previously been assumed. Based on the results of conductivity measurements in modern subduction zones, we envision a pervasive fluid in the subduction channel that evolved from salinity levels lower than those in sea-water up to the measured values due to on-going but largely completed serpentinization in the subduction channel. The present data represent a reference marker for the subduction channel of the Rio San Juan intra-oceanic subduction zone at 30-50 km depth and after 50-60 Myr of operation.

  9. Continental basinal origin of ore fluids from southwestern Massif central fluorite veins (Albigeois, France): evidence from fluid inclusion and stable isotope analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, M.; Boyce, A.J.; Courjault-Rade, P.; Fallick, A.E.; Tollon, F.

    1999-01-01

    The most important fluorspar mining district in France is located in the Palaeozoic basement of the Albigeois in southwestern French Massif Central. The massive fluorite is hosted within large E-W striking fractures, crosscutting Cambro-Ordovician clastics, associated with large zones of hypersilicified tectonic breccia which form the wall of the mined deposits. Fluid inclusion data for pre-fluorite and fluorite stage fluids have salinities between 20-26 wt% NaCl equiv., with homogenisation temperatures between 85-170C. Furthermore, low first ice melting temperatures (around -50C) indicates the presence of significant CaCl 2 and possibly MgCl 2 together with NaCl. Calculated fluid δ 18 O for pre-fluorite quartz ranges from -9.1per thousand to -5.2per thousand, with δD between -55per thousand to -64per thousand, placing the data directly on the present day meteoric water line. Fluorite stage fluids have δ 18 O between +0.1per thousand to +3.2per thousand, and δD ranging from -53per thousand to -75per thousand, indicating an interacted meteoric fluid origin. Combining the fluid inclusion and stable isotope data illustrates that the main fluorite depositing fluid has characteristics typical of a basinal brine. The authors have no evidence that a magmatic system was involved in the deposit genesis. The proposed model highlights that mineralisation was related to major Mesozoic extensional events coinciding with the gradual opening of the Atlantic and Tethys oceans. In order to account for the chemistry of the fluids, and the siting of the deposits, the authors postulate a genetic relationship with local, continental, evaporite-bearing basins coincident with, and controlled by the E-W fractures. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. The nature of hydrothermal fluids in the Kahang porphyry copper deposit (Northeast of Isfahan based on mineralography, fluid inclusion and stable isotopic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salimeh Sadat Komeili

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Kahang Cu- Mo deposit is situated approximately 73 Km northeast of Isfahan. Asadi (2007 identified a geological reserve of 40 Mt (proven reserve grading at 0.53 Cu, 0.02 Mo and estimated reserve of 120 Mt. All the rock types in the region have been subjected to hydrothermal solutions which gave rise to three different alteration facies. The dacite and rhyodacite volcanic rocks and granitic- granodioritic stocks have experienced phyllic alteration. Disseminated and stockwork siliceous veins are the major styles of mineralization in this zone. Intermediate argillitic alteration developed on a part of dacitic and rhyodacitic rocks whereas andesite and basaltic-andesite plus related pyroclastic rocks have been subjected to propyllitic alteration. This paper presents the results of geological and mineralogical studies carried out in the Kahang area. This preliminary information is integrated with additional data on ore mineralogy, fluid inclusions and stable isotopes in view of understanding the genesis of the Cu- Mo deposit and the nature of the fluids involved in ore formation. Materials and Methods A total of 18 polished thin sections were prepared at the University of Isfahan for optical study. Fluid inclusions study was carried out on 8 double polished quartz thin sections (stockworks containing ore mineralization from phyllic zone. H – O stable isotope analysis was performed on 4 quartz samples from siliceous stockworks (from phyllic altered zone and one vein epidote sample (from propyllitic zone. All isotopic analyses were performed at the University of Oregan, Oregan, USA. Discussion In the investigated mineralization area, the hypogene zone is characterized by the presence of pyrite, chalcopyrite, bornite and magnetite. Hematite, goethite, jarosite, malachite and azurite are the predominant minerals of supergene zone. The major textures of the primary sulfides are disseminated, vein and veinlet. Pyrite is the most common

  11. Fluid Inclusion Study of The Tumpangpitu High Sulfidation Epithermal Gold Deposit in Banyuwangi District, East Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yu Myaing

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Tumpangpitu high sulfidation (HS epithermal gold deposit is located in the south coast of East Java, Banyuwangi District, East Java Province, Indonesia. This area lies within the central portion of the Cenozoic Sunda‐Banda magmatic arc which trends southeast from northern Sumatra to west Java then eastward through east Java, Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa and terminating at Banda sea. The geology of the Tumpangpitu is predominantly occupied by Late Oligocene to Middle Miocene low-K calc-alkaline to alkaline andesitic volcanic rocks and interbedded with volcaniclastic rock sequences, which are associated with low-K intermediate intrusions. The mineralization style at the Tumpangpitu area is composed of a high‐sulfidation (HS epithermal gold-copper system which is typically associated with concealed gold-rich porphyry copper system. The HS epithermal mineralization is hosted by volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks in this research area. The mineralization domains are divided into Zone A, Zone B and Zone C which are situated along NW-SE-trending silica ledges zones. The HS epithermal mineralization is texturally occurs as vuggy replacements mineralization as well as stockworks, disseminated forms, fractures and veins. Fluid inclusion study was conducted for 6 quartz vein samples which petrographically entrapped fluid inclusions. Homogenization temperature (Th and melting temperature (Tm can microthermometrically be determined by fluid inclusion analysis. The average homogenization temperature (Th of the fluid inclusions gives 180˚C to 342˚C and melting temperature are from -0.1 ˚C to -1.4˚C. Tm corresponds to the salinities ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 wt% NaCl equivalent. The paleodepth of ore formation can be estimated from the salinity of fluid. Since the deposit was not formed at boiling condition, the minimum paleodepth of ore (quartz samples taken from both shallow level (53.35 m and deep level (135.15 m is determined at 650m and 1,220 m

  12. Transient two-phase performance of LOFT reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Performance characteristics of Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor coolant pumps under transient two-phase flow conditions were obtained based on the analysis of two large and small break loss-of-coolant experiments conducted at the LOFT facility. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the transient two-phase flow effects on the LOFT reactor coolant pump performance during the first quadrant operation. The measured pump characteristics are presented as functions of pump void fraction which was determined based on the measured density. The calculated pump characteristics such as pump head, torque (or hydraulic torque), and efficiency are also determined as functions of pump void fractions. The importance of accurate modeling of the reactor coolant pump performance under two-phase conditions is addressed. The analytical pump model, currently used in most reactor analysis codes to predict transient two-phase pump behavior, is assessed

  13. Ore Characteristics and Fluid Inclusion of the Base Metal Vein Deposit in Moncong Bincanai Area, Gowa, South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmariyadi Asmariyadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v7i4.146This paper is dealing with ore characteristics and fluid inclusion of the Moncong Bincanai, Biringbulu Subregency of Gowa Regency, South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. The mineralization is a vein type, with the orientation of N170oE /65oSW, hosted in open-space filling within basalt. The mineralization consists of galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite. Vein thickness ranges from 5 - 17 cm, showing a crustiform banding texture, with a sequence from outer to centre: quartz, carbonate (siderite, sulphide. The quartz displays primary growth textures such as comb, crystalline, saccharoidal, and colloform. Analytical methods applied include AAS and fluid inclusion microthermometry. Chemical composition of the vein indicates an average of Pb = 47.92%, Cu = 1.27%, Zn = 1.02%, and Fe = 9.46%, which shows a significant concentration of Pb. Fluid inclusion microthermometry results indicate a range of formation temperature of 240 - 250C and salinity of the responsible hydrothermal fluid of 2.1 - 2.5 wt.% NaCl eq. The deposit is categorized into low-sulfidation epithermal deposits, which was formed within a range of 410 - 440 m below paleosurface.

  14. Mathematical modeling and the two-phase constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boure, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The problems raised by the mathematical modeling of two-phase flows are summarized. The models include several kinds of equations, which cannot be discussed independently, such as the balance equations and the constitutive equations. A review of the various two-phase one-dimensional models proposed to date, and of the constitutive equations they imply, is made. These models are either mixture models or two-fluid models. Due to their potentialities, the two-fluid models are discussed in more detail. To avoid contradictions, the form of the constitutive equations involved in two-fluid models must be sufficiently general. A special form of the two-fluid models, which has particular advantages, is proposed. It involves three mixture balance equations, three balance equations for slip and thermal non-equilibriums, and the necessary constitutive equations [fr

  15. The mangazeya Ag-Pb-Zn vein deposit hosted in sedimentary rocks, Sakha-Yakutia, Russia: Mineral assemblages, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes (C, O, S), and origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikina, E. Yu.; Bortnikov, N. S.; Klubnikin, G. K.; Gamyanin, G. N.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The succession of mineral assemblages, chemistry of gangue and ore minerals, fluid inclusions, and stable isotopes (C, O, S) in minerals have been studied in the Mangazeya silver-base-metal deposit hosted in terrigenous rocks of the Verkhoyansk Fold-Thrust Belt. The deposit is localized in the junction zone of the Kuranakh Anticlinorium and the Sartanga Synclinorium at the steep eastern limb of the Endybal Anticline. The deposit is situated at the intersection of the regional Nyuektame and North Tirekhtyakh faults. Igneous rocks are represented by the Endybal massif of granodiorite porphyry 97.8 ± 0.9 Ma in age and dikes varying in composition. One preore and three types of ore mineralization separated in space are distinguished: quartz-pyrite-arsenopyrite (I), quartz-carbonate-sulfide (II), and silver-base-metal (III). Quartz and carbonate (siderite) are predominant in ore veins. Ore minerals are represented by arsenopyrite, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, fahlore, and less frequent sulfosalts. Three types of fluid inclusions in quartz differ in phase compositions: two- or three-phase aqueous-carbon dioxide (FI I), carbon dioxide gas (FI II), and two-phase (FI III) containing liquid and a gas bubble. The homogenization temperature and salinity fall within the ranges of 367-217°C and 13.8-2.6 wt % NaCl equiv in FI I; 336-126°C and 15.4-0.8 wt % NaCl equiv in FI III. Carbon dioxide in FI II was homogenized in gas at +30.2 to +15.3°C and at +27.2 to 29.0°C in liquid. The δ34S values for minerals of type I range from-1.8 to +4.7‰ (V-CDT); of type II, from-7.4 to +6.6‰; and of type III, from-5.6 to +7.1‰. δ13C and δ18O vary from-7.0 to-6.7‰ (V-PDB) and from +16.6 to +17.1 (V-SMOW) in siderite-I; from-9.1 to-6.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +18.9 (V-SMOW) in siderite-II; from-5.4 to-3.1‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +19.5 (V-SMOW) in ankerite; and from-4.2 to-2.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +13.5 to +16.8 (V-SMOW) in calcite. The data on mineral assemblages, fluid

  16. Geothermometry obtained from the calcite twin and fluid inclusions in barite (Irankuh Pb-Zn deposit, Southwest of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alijan Aftabi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Irankuh mining district is located 20 km southwest of Isfahan and is geologically situated in Sanandaj - Sirjan zone and the lower Cretaceous sequence of Isfahan-Malayer ore mineralization area. The ore minerals are emplaced in the faulted contact of Jurassic shale and Cretaceous carbonates and include pyrite, galena, sphalerite, calcite, barite, dolomite, quartz as well as minor marcasite, smithsonite, cerussite, gypsum, malachite, hematite and goethite. The mineralization is mainly occurred as hydrothermal veins and veinlets associated with fractures and faults, suggesting the deposit is likely to be of epigenetic type. A comparison between geothermometric results obtained from calcite twins and fluid inclusions showed a similar temperature range for the mineralization (less than 170ºc. Fluid inclusion studies indicate the temperature, salinity and density ranges of 80-166ºc, 5.39-20.94 wt.% NaCl and 0.95-1.12, respectively. The obtained data share many similarities with those of the MVT deposits

  17. External micro-PIXE analysis of fluid inclusions: Test of the LABEC facility on samples of quartz veins from Apuan Alps (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino 50019, Firenze (Italy)], E-mail: massi@fi.infn.it; Calusi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN sezione di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giuntini, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita and INFN sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino 50019, Firenze (Italy); Ruggieri, G. [CNR - Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse sezione di Firenze, via G. La Pira 4, Firenze 50121 (Italy); Dini, A. [CNR - Istituto di Geoscienze e Georisorse sezione di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Fluid inclusions are small portions, usually smaller than 100 {mu}m, of fluid trapped within minerals during or after growth. Their characteristics provide therefore fundamental information on nature and evolution of fluids present in the past in different geological environments. At the LABEC laboratory in Firenze, high-salinity fluid inclusions in quartz crystals, coming from the Apuan Alps metamorphic complex, were analysed at the external scanning microbeam. Results, although still preliminary, have already provided us with hints on fluid-rock interaction processes during the metamorphism of the Apuan Alps.

  18. External micro-PIXE analysis of fluid inclusions: Test of the LABEC facility on samples of quartz veins from Apuan Alps (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massi, M.; Calusi, S.; Giuntini, L.; Ruggieri, G.; Dini, A.

    2008-01-01

    Fluid inclusions are small portions, usually smaller than 100 μm, of fluid trapped within minerals during or after growth. Their characteristics provide therefore fundamental information on nature and evolution of fluids present in the past in different geological environments. At the LABEC laboratory in Firenze, high-salinity fluid inclusions in quartz crystals, coming from the Apuan Alps metamorphic complex, were analysed at the external scanning microbeam. Results, although still preliminary, have already provided us with hints on fluid-rock interaction processes during the metamorphism of the Apuan Alps

  19. An isotopic and fluid inclusion study of fracture calcite from borehole OL-KR1 at the Olkiluoto site, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, A.; Frape, S.; Blomqvist, R.; Nissinen, P.; McNutt, R.

    1998-04-01

    A study of the geochemistry of fracture filling calcite in borehole OL-KR1 at the radioactive waste disposal investigation site Olkiluoto (in Finland) was undertaken in 1998. The purpose of the present study is to characterize the fracture calcite using mineralogy, oxygen, carbon and strontium isotopes, and fluid inclusions in order to determine past and present chemical and isotopic condition at the site

  20. An isotopic and fluid inclusion study of fracture calcite from borehole OL-KR1 at the Olkiluoto site, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyth, A.; Frape, S. [Univ. of Waterloo, ON (Canada); Blomqvist, R.; Nissinen, P. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); McNutt, R. [McMaster Univ. of Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1998-04-01

    A study of the geochemistry of fracture filling calcite in borehole OL-KR1 at the radioactive waste disposal investigation site Olkiluoto (in Finland) was undertaken in 1998. The purpose of the present study is to characterize the fracture calcite using mineralogy, oxygen, carbon and strontium isotopes, and fluid inclusions in order to determine past and present chemical and isotopic condition at the site 39 refs.

  1. Mineralogical and Fluid Inclusions Evidence For The Genesis of Umm Addebaa-Umm Kabu Beryl Belt, South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, S.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Beryl mineralization in quartz veins and pegmatites, are common deposits of tectonic-hydrothermal and/or igneous origin. The beryl-specialized granites association at Umm Addebaa-Umm Kabu belt is manifested in the field by the development of a system of beryl-bearing pegmatitic pods and quartz veins. The emplacement of these syn-tectonic pegmatitic leucogranites from which K- and Be-rich fluid phases were derived, are confined to the shear zones, as well as a broad zone of alkali metasomatism. Microthermometic studies of primary fluid inclusions within beryl growth zones are consistent with beryl precipitation from H 2 O-CO 2 ± CH 4 bearing saline brines. The estimated fluid composition is approximately 0.88 mol% H 2 O, 0.017 mol% CO 2 ± 0.001 mol% CH 4 and 0.10 mol% NaCl (2- 11 wt.% NaCl eq.). Fluid inclusion results are consistent with that mineralization in pegmatites and quartz veins that are formed by two genetic stages. The first stage is characterized by temperature of formation in the range of 216.4 - 378.3 °C, with corresponding pressures along fluid inclusion isochore paths ranging from 1.04 to 2.25 bar. The second stage is of aqueous fluid represented with low temperature (177-255°C) and pressure ≤ 1 bar, but high saline (16-22 wt.% NaCl eq.) which might explain mixing of the early carbonaceous fluid with late meteoric water accompanied with pressure release. Thus, it can be inferred that the Be-bearing solutions were moderately saline, but CO 2 (and possible CH 4 )-rich fluid implies that Be was most probably complexed by carbonate ( + CH 4 ) - chloride base. The different paragenetic types of emerald and beryl associated with granitoid rocks indicates that the chemistry of the Be-bearing fluids (rather than that of the bulk rock), and syn-tectonic intrusions of leucogranites and pegmatites (Be deriving sources) along major ductile shear zones are the important factors controlling the crystallization of beryl.

  2. NASA Physical Sciences - Presentation to Annual Two Phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis; Motil, Brian; McQuillen, John

    2014-01-01

    The Two-phase Heat Transfer International Topical Team consists of researchers and members from various space agencies including ESA, JAXA, CSA, and RSA. This presentation included descriptions various fluid experiments either being conducted by or planned by NASA for the International Space Station in the areas of two-phase flow, flow boiling, capillary flow, and crygenic fluid storage.

  3. Thermomigration of fluid inclusions in rock salt. Implications for the disposal of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noack, W.; Runge, K.

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical model has been suggested to predict the time-dependent accumulation of brine at nuclear waste packages emplaced in a rock salt repository owing to thermomigration of brine inclusions. The model is based mainly on a description of the migration rate as a function of the temperature, temperature gradient, inclusion size and gas/liquid ratio of inclusions. Other factors are treated merely as disturbing quantities with respect to the migration rate. (author)

  4. Pressure-temperature condition and hydrothermal-magmatic fluid evolution of the Cu-Mo Senj deposit, Central Alborz: fluid inclusion evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Tale Fazel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Senj deposit has significant potential for different types of mineralization, particularly porphyry-like Cu deposits, associated with subduction-related Eocene–Oligocene calc-alkaline porphyritic volcano-plutonic rocks. The study of fluid inclusions in hydrothermal ore deposits aims to identify and characterize the pressure, temperature, volume and fluid composition, (PTX conditions of fluids under which they were trapped (Heinrich et al., 1999; Ulrich and Heinrich, 2001; Redmond et al., 2004. Different characteristics of the deposit such as porphyrtic nature, alteration assemblage and the quartz-sulfide veins of the stockwork were poorly known. In this approach on the basis of alterations, vein cutting relationship and field distribution of fluid inclusions, the physical and chemical evolution of the hydrothermal system forming the porphyry Cu-Mo (±Au-Ag deposit in Senj is reconstructed. Materials and Methods Over 1000 m of drill core was logged at a scale of 1:1000 by Pichab Kavosh Co. and samples containing various vein and alteration types from different depths were collected for laboratory analyses. A total of 14 samples collected from the altered and least altered igneous rocks in the Senj deposit were analyzed for their major oxide concentrations by X-ray fluorescence in the SGS Mineral Services (Toronto, Canada. The detection limit for major oxide analysis is 0.01%. Trace and rare earth elements (REE were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometery (ICP-MS, in the commercial laboratory of SGS Mineral Services. The analytical error for most elements is less than 2%. The detection limit for trace elements and REEs analysis is 0.01 to 0.1 ppm. Fluid inclusion microthermometry was conducted using a Linkam THMS600 heating–freezing stage (-190 °C to +600 °C mounted on a ZEISS Axioplan2 microscope in the fluid inclusion laboratory of the Iranian Mineral Processing Research Center (Karaj, Iran. Results

  5. Damping and fluidelastic instability in two-phase cross-flow heat exchanger tube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Joaquin E.

    flux, and its dependency is a function of void fraction. A dimensional analysis was carried out to investigate the relationship between damping and two-phase flow related parameters. As a result, the inclusion of surface tension in the form of the Capillary number appears to be useful when combined with the two-phase component of the damping ratio (interfacial damping). A strong dependence of damping on flow regime was observed when plotting the interfacial damping versus the void fraction, introducing an improvement over the previous result obtained by normalizing the two-phase damping, which does not exhibit this behaviour. The interfacial velocity model was selected to represent the fluidelastic data in two-phase experiments, due to the inclusion of the tube array geometry and density ratio effects, which does not exist for the pitch velocity approach. An essential component in reliably establishing the velocity threshold for fluidelastic instability, is a measure of the energy dissipation available in the system to balance the energy input from the flow. The present analysis argues that the damping in-flow is not an appropriate measure and demonstrates that the use of quiescent fluid damping provides a better measure of the energy dissipation, which produces a much more logical trend in the stability behaviour. This value of damping, combined with the RAD density and the interfacial velocity, collapses the available data well and provides the expected trend of two-phase flow stability data over the void fraction range from liquid to gas flows. The resulting stability maps represent a significant improvement over existing maps for predicting fluidelastic instability of tube bundles in two-phase flows. This result also tends to confirm the hypothesis that the basic mechanism of fluidelastic instability is the same for single and two-phase flows.

  6. Contribution to the theory of the two phase blowdown phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutcherson, M.N.

    1975-12-01

    In order to accurately model the two phase portion of a pressure vessel blowdown, it becomes necessary to understand the bubble growth mechanism within the vessel during the early period of the decompression, the two phase flow behavior within the vessel, and the applicability of the available two phase critical flow models to the blowdown transient. To aid in providing answers to such questions, a small scale, separate effects, isothermal blowdown experiment has been conducted in a small pressure vessel. The tests simulated a full open, double ended, guillotine break in a large diameter, short exhaust duct from the vessel. The vaporization process at the initiation of the decompression is apparently that of thermally dominated bubble growth originating from the surface cavities inside the system. Thermodynamic equilibrium of the remaining fluid within the vessel existed in the latter portion of the decompression. A nonuniform distribution of fluid quality within the vessel was also detected in this experiment. By comparison of the experimental results from this and other similar transient, two phase critical flow studies with steady state, small duct, two phase critical flow data, it is shown that transient, two phase critical flow in large ducts appears to be similar to steady state, two phase critical flow in small ducts. Analytical models have been developed to predict the blowdown characteristics of a system during subcooled decompression, the bubble growth regime of blowdown, and also in the nearly dispersed period of depressurization. This analysis indicates that the system pressure history early in the blowdown is dependent on the internal vessel surface area, the internal vessel volume, and also on the exhaust flow area from the system. This analysis also illustrates that the later period of decompression can be predicted based on thermodynamic equilibrium

  7. Lattice Boltzmann model for simulating immiscible two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, T; Phillips, T N

    2007-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation is often promoted as a numerical simulation tool that is particularly suitable for predicting the flow of complex fluids. This paper develops a two-dimensional 9-velocity (D2Q9) lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible binary fluids with variable viscosities and density ratio using a single relaxation time for each fluid. In the macroscopic limit, this model is shown to recover the Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase flows. This is achieved by constructing a two-phase component of the collision operator that induces the appropriate surface tension term in the macroscopic equations. A theoretical expression for surface tension is determined. The validity of this analysis is confirmed by comparing numerical and theoretical predictions of surface tension as a function of density. The model is also shown to predict Laplace's law for surface tension and Poiseuille flow of layered immiscible binary fluids. The spinodal decomposition of two fluids of equal density but different viscosity is then studied. At equilibrium, the system comprises one large low viscosity bubble enclosed by the more viscous fluid in agreement with theoretical arguments of Renardy and Joseph (1993 Fundamentals of Two-Fluid Dynamics (New York: Springer)). Two other simulations, namely the non-equilibrium rod rest and the coalescence of two bubbles, are performed to show that this model can be used to simulate two fluids with a large density ratio

  8. Two-phase alkali-metal experiments in reduced gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-06-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. A literature search of relevant experiments in reduced gravity is reported on here, and reveals a paucity of data for such correlations. The few ongoing experiments in reduced gravity are noted. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. A similar situation exists regarding two-phase alkali-metal flow and heat transfer, even in normal gravity. Existing data are conflicting and indequate for the task of modeling a space reactor using a two-phase alkali-metal coolant. The major features of past experiments are described here. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from the two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Analyses undertaken here give every expectation that the correlations developed from this data base will provide a valid representation of alkali-metal heat transfer and pressure drop in reduced gravity

  9. Behavior of pumps conveying two-phase liquid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grison, Pierre; Lauro, J.-F.

    1979-01-01

    Determination of the two-phase flow (critical or otherwise) through a pump is an essential requirement for complete description of a loss of primary coolant accident in a PWR plant. Theoretical and experimental research at Electricite de France on this subject is described and problems associated with the introduction of a two-phase fluid (with mass transfer) are discussed, with an attempt to single out new phenomena involved and establish their effect on pump behavior. A complementary experimental investigation is described and the results of tests at pressures and temperatures up to 120 bars and 320 0 C respectively are compared with the theoretical model data [fr

  10. Behavior of pumps conveying two-phase liquid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, P; Lauro, J F [Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou. Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1979-01-01

    Determination of the two-phase flow (critical or otherwise) through a pump is an essential requirement for complete description of a loss of primary coolant accident in a PWR plant. Theoretical and experimental research at Electricite de France on this subject is described and problems associated with the introduction of a two-phase fluid (with mass transfer) are discussed, with an attempt to single out new phenomena involved and establish their effect on pump behavior. A complementary experimental investigation is described and the results of tests at pressures and temperatures up to 120 bars and 320/sup 0/C respectively are compared with the theoretical model data.

  11. Two-phase LMMHD mixer-development experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, G.; Dunn, P.F.; Chow, J.C.F.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a series of experiments conducted to evaluate the fluid mechanical performance of various two-phase LMMHD mixer designs are presented. The results from both flow visualization studies of the local two-phase flows downstream from various mixer-element configurations and local measurements performed to characterize these flows are presented. A conceptual LMMHD mixer design is described that insures the generation of small bubbles, prevents the formation of gas slugs and separated regions, and favors the stabilization of a homogeneous foam flow

  12. Mechanistic multidimensional analysis of horizontal two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselishcheva, Elena A.; Antal, Steven P.; Podowski, Michael Z.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the results of analysis of two-phase flow in horizontal tubes. Two flow situations have been considered: gas/liquid flow in a long straight pipe, and similar flow conditions in a pipe with 90 deg. elbow. The theoretical approach utilizes a multifield modeling concept. A complete three-dimensional two-phase flow model has been implemented in a state-of-the-art computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) computer code, NPHASE. The overall model has been tested parametrically. Also, the results of NPHASE simulations have been compared against experimental data for a pipe with 90 deg. elbow.

  13. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, S.; Fleitmann, D.; Leuenberger, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new online method to analyse water isotopes of speleothem fluid inclusions using a wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) instrument is presented. This novel technique allows us to simultaneously measure hydrogen and oxygen isotopes for a released aliquot of water. To do so, we designed a new simple line that allows the on-line water extraction and isotope analysis of speleothem samples. The specificity of the method lies in the fact that fluid inclusions release is made on a standard water background, which mainly improves the δD reliability. To saturate the line, a peristaltic pump continuously injects standard water into the line that is permanently heated to 140 °C and flushed with dry nitrogen gas. This permits instantaneous and complete vaporisation of the standard water resulting in an artificial water background with well-known δD and δ18O values. The speleothem sample is placed into a copper tube, attached to the line and after system stabilisation is crushed using a simple hydraulic device to liberate speleothem fluid inclusions water. The released water is carried by the nitrogen/standard water gas stream directly to a Picarro L1102-i for isotope determination. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of the line and to measure standard water during speleothem measurements a syringe injection unit was added to the line. Peak evaluation is done similarly as in gas chromatography to obtain δD and δ18O isotopic composition of measured water aliquots. Precision is better than 1.5‰ for δD and 0.4‰ for δ18O for water measurement for an extended range (-210 to 0‰ for δD and -27 to 0‰ for δ18O) primarily dependent on the amount of water released from speleothem fluid inclusions and secondarily on the isotopic composition of the sample. The results show that WS-CRDS technology is suitable for speleothem fluid inclusion measurements and gives results that are comparable to Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technique.

  14. New online method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, S.; Fleitmann, D.; Leuenberger, M.

    2014-07-01

    A new online method to analyse water isotopes of speleothem fluid inclusions using a wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) instrument is presented. This novel technique allows us simultaneously to measure hydrogen and oxygen isotopes for a released aliquot of water. To do so, we designed a new simple line that allows the online water extraction and isotope analysis of speleothem samples. The specificity of the method lies in the fact that fluid inclusions release is made on a standard water background, which mainly improves the δ D robustness. To saturate the line, a peristaltic pump continuously injects standard water into the line that is permanently heated to 140 °C and flushed with dry nitrogen gas. This permits instantaneous and complete vaporisation of the standard water, resulting in an artificial water background with well-known δ D and δ18O values. The speleothem sample is placed in a copper tube, attached to the line, and after system stabilisation it is crushed using a simple hydraulic device to liberate speleothem fluid inclusions water. The released water is carried by the nitrogen/standard water gas stream directly to a Picarro L1102-i for isotope determination. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of the line and to measure standard water during speleothem measurements, a syringe injection unit was added to the line. Peak evaluation is done similarly as in gas chromatography to obtain &delta D; and δ18O isotopic compositions of measured water aliquots. Precision is better than 1.5 ‰ for δ D and 0.4 ‰ for δ18O for water measurements for an extended range (-210 to 0 ‰ for δ D and -27 to 0 ‰ for δ18O) primarily dependent on the amount of water released from speleothem fluid inclusions and secondarily on the isotopic composition of the sample. The results show that WS-CRDS technology is suitable for speleothem fluid inclusion measurements and gives results that are comparable to the isotope ratio mass

  15. Two-phase flux simulations by robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, F.D.

    1997-01-01

    Two-Phase flow systems are studied following the statistical formulation, which takes into account the bubble population balances. This is done by means of automata simulation. Geometrical automata are associated to the dispersed phase, and are represented by discs on the plane, resembling bubbles moving in a fluid environment. Following pre-determined rules, the automata evolve, and useful statistical information about their interaction is obtained. This information is applied in the present work to study the mechanisms that induce bubble coalescence. Models for one and two sized automata are presented. It was found that in the case of the model for one size, the probability of interaction among bubbles and the pair correlation function depends not only on the void fraction, but also on the number of elements of the dispersed phase. A correlation for the collision probability between two bubbles is obtained, and this result was extended to the pair correlation function. For the case of systems with two characteristic sizes, a model was formulated for analyzing the interaction among bubbles of the two groups. The interaction of bubbles for one and two sized systems were related by a symmetry factor, which shows the dependence of the interaction among bubbles with the size distribution. By means of the automata simulation, the phenomena of bubble confinement and screening were characterized. It was found that the first phenomenon is stronger in systems with greater distance among bubbles, and that the second effect increases with void fraction and bubble number. (author)

  16. Direct 40Ar/39Ar age determination of fluid inclusions using in-vacuo¬ stepwise crushing - Example of garnet from the Cycladic Blueschist Unit on Syros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uunk, Bertram; Postma, Onno; Wijbrans, Jan; Brouwer, Fraukje

    2017-04-01

    Metamorphic minerals and veins commonly trap attending hydrous fluids in fluid inclusions, which yield a wealth of information on the history of the hosting metamorphic system. When these fluids are sufficiently saline, the KCl in the inclusions can be used as a K/Ar geochronologic system, potentially dating inclusion incorporation. Whilst primary fluid inclusions (PFIs) can date fluid incorporation during mineral or vein growth, secondary fluid inclusion trails (SFIs) can provide age constraints on later fluid flow events. At VU Amsterdam, a new in-vacuo crushing apparatus has been designed to extract fluid inclusions from minerals for 40Ar/39Ar analysis. Separates are crushed inside a crusher tube connected to a purification line and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In-vacuo crushing is achieved by lifting and dropping a steel pestle using an externally controlled magnetic field. As the gas can be analyzed between different crushing steps, the setup permits stepwise crushing experiments. Additionally, crushed powder can be heated by inserting the crusher tube in an externally controlled furnace. Dating by 40Ar/39Ar stepwise crushing has the added advantage that, during neutron irradiation to produce 39Ar from 39K, 38Ar and 37Ar are also produced from 38Cl and 40Ca, respectively. Simultaneous analysis of these argon isotopes permits constraining the chemistry of the argon source sampled during the experiment. This allows a distinction between different fluid or crystal lattice sources. Garnet from three samples of the HP metamorphic Cycladic Blueschist Unit on Syros, Greece was stepwise crushed to obtain fluid inclusion ages. Initial steps for all three experiments yield significant components of excess argon, which are interpreted to originate from grain boundary fluids and secondary fluid inclusions trails. During subsequent steps, age results stabilize to a plateau age. One garnet from North Syros yields an unusually old 80 Ma plateau age. However, isochrons

  17. Fluid inclusion from drill hole DW-5, Hohi geothermal area, Japan: Evidence of boiling and procedure for estimating CO2 content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasada, M.; Roedder, E.; Belkin, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid inclusion studies have been used to derive a model for fluid evolution in the Hohi geothermal area, Japan. Six types of fluid inclusions are found in quartz obtained from the drill core of DW-5 hole. They are: (I) primary liquid-rich with evidence of boiling; (II) primary liquid-rich without evidence of boiling; (III) primary vapor-rich (assumed to have been formed by boiling); (IV) secondary liquid-rich with evidence of boiling; (V) secondary liquid-rich without evidence of boiling; (VI) secondary vapor-rich (assumed to have been formed by boiling). Homogenization temperatures (Th) range between 196 and 347??C and the final melting point of ice (Tm) between -0.2 and -4.3??C. The CO2 content was estimated semiquantitatively to be between 0 and 0.39 wt. % based on the bubble behavior on crushing. NaCl equivalent solid solute salinity of fluid inclusions was determined as being between 0 and 6.8 wt. % after minor correction for CO2 content. Fluid inclusions in quartz provide a record of geothermal activity of early boiling and later cooling. The CO2 contents and homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions with evidence of boiling generally increase with depth; these changes, and NaCl equivalent solid solute salinity of the fluid can be explained by an adiabatic boiling model for a CO2-bearing low-salinity fluid. Some high-salinity inclusions without CO2 are presumed to have formed by a local boiling process due to a temperature increase or a pressure decrease. The liquid-rich primary and secondary inclusions without evidence of boiling formed during the cooling process. The salinity and CO2 content of these inclusions are lower than those in the boiling fluid at the early stage, probably as a result of admixture with groundwater. ?? 1986.

  18. Two-Phase Phenomena In Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minzer, U.; Moses, E.J.; Toren, M.; Blumenfeld, Y.

    1998-01-01

    In order to reduce sulfur oxides discharge, Israel Electric Corporation (IEC) is building a wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) facility at Rutenberg B power station. The primary objective of IEC is to minimize the occurrence of stack liquid discharge and avoid the discharge of large droplets, in order to prevent acid rain around the stack. Liquid discharge from the stack is the integrated outcome of two-phase processes, which are discussed in this work. In order to estimate droplets discharge the present investigation employs analytical models, empirical tests, and numerical calculations of two-phase phenomena. The two-phase phenomena are coupled and therefore cannot be investigated separately. The present work concerns the application of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) as an engineering complementary tool in the IEC investigation

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF TWO-PHASE FLOW IN A DISTRIBUTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AZRIDJAL AZIZ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The flow configuration and distribution behavior of two-phase flow in a distributor made of acrylic resin have been investigated experimentally. In this study, air and water were used as two-phase flow working fluids. The distributor consists of one inlet and two outlets, which are set as upper and lower, respectively. The flow visualization at the distributor was made by using a high–speed camera. The flow rates of air and water flowing out from the upper and lower outlet branches were measured. Effects of inclination angle of the distributor were investigated. By changing the inclination angle from vertical to horizontal, uneven distributions were also observed. The distribution of two-phase flow through distributor tends even flow distribution on the vertical position and tends uneven distribution on inclined and horizontal positions. It is shown that even distribution could be achieved at high superficial velocities of both air and water.

  20. Two-phase flow characteristics analysis code: MINCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadashi; Hirano, Masashi; Akimoto, Masayuki; Tanabe, Fumiya; Kohsaka, Atsuo.

    1992-03-01

    Two-phase flow characteristics analysis code: MINCS (Modularized and INtegrated Code System) has been developed to provide a computational tool for analyzing two-phase flow phenomena in one-dimensional ducts. In MINCS, nine types of two-phase flow models-from a basic two-fluid nonequilibrium (2V2T) model to a simple homogeneous equilibrium (1V1T) model-can be used under the same numerical solution method. The numerical technique is based on the implicit finite difference method to enhance the numerical stability. The code structure is highly modularized, so that new constitutive relations and correlations can be easily implemented into the code and hence evaluated. A flow pattern can be fixed regardless of flow conditions, and state equations or steam tables can be selected. It is, therefore, easy to calculate physical or numerical benchmark problems. (author)

  1. Stratified steady and unsteady two-phase flows between two parallel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Woo Gun

    2006-01-01

    To understand fluid dynamic forces acting on a structure subjected to two-phase flow, it is essential to get detailed information about the characteristics of two-phase flow. Stratified steady and unsteady two-phase flows between two parallel plates have been studied to investigate the general characteristics of the flow related to flow-induced vibration. Based on the spectral collocation method, a numerical approach has been developed for the unsteady two-phase flow. The method is validated by comparing numerical result to analytical one given for a simple harmonic two-phase flow. The flow parameters for the steady two-phase flow, such as void fraction and two-phase frictional multiplier, are evaluated. The dynamic characteristics of the unsteady two-phase flow, including the void fraction effect on the complex unsteady pressure, are illustrated

  2. Fluid Force-Induced Detachment Criteria for Nonmetallic Inclusions Adhered to a Refractory/Molten Steel Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez Salgado, Uxia; Weiß, Christian; Michelic, Susanne K.; Bernhard, Christian

    2018-05-01

    Since nonmetallic inclusions (NMIs) in steel cannot be completely avoided, a greater understanding of their development and evolution during the steelmaking process is required. In particular, this includes the adhesion of microinclusions to the refractory/steel interface in the flow control system between the tundish and the mold. This phenomenon, commonly referred to as clogging, causes losses in productivity and product quality. Inclusions transported from the bulk melt to the boundary layer may adhere to the refractory/steel interface due to formation of a fluid cavity. A detailed model was derived for the detachment of NMIs adhering to a nozzle wall and is based on the local hydrodynamic conditions combined with the specific interfacial properties in the system consisting of the inclusions, the refractories, and the steel. The model is evaluated for three different application-oriented cases. This study has been focused on providing a better understanding of fluid flow in the near-wall region in order to reduce clogging during steelmaking.

  3. The study of mineralization and fluid inclusion in Dehsalm Mahour 2 lead deposit, east of Lut block, Central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Mohammadpour

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Mahour 2 lead mineralization area is located, about 145 km west of Nehbandan and 2 km northwest of Mahour polymetal deposit and in the eastern part of Lut Block. The area comprises of volcanic and pyroclastic rocks (Eocene intruded by several intrusive rocks mainly as dioritic dykes and stocks. Mineralization as veins and filling the space, occurred in altered andesitic rocks. Supergene zone is characterized by azurite, malachite, linarite and iron oxides (hematite and limonite whereas, galena, pyrite, chalcopyrite and magnetite are the main minerals of hypogene zone. And, quartz and calcite are main gangue. The area is dominated by four types of alteration including silicic, sericitic, propylitic, and argillic. Fluid inclusions study on quartz mineral sections polished reveals the presence of 1.0 to 5.6 percent salt and homogeneous temperature between 278 to 570 ° C. The high temperature with low salinity zone mineralization in this area is likely related to another generation of mineralization in the area. The results of fluid inclusions show that the mineralization is probably a mixture of magmatic fluid and atmospheric, although there is doubt. Several similar criteria including form of deposit, primary ore deposit, alteration facies, tectonic environment and magmatic series document that there should be a correlation between the origin of the studied mineralization area and that of the Mahour polymetal deposit.

  4. Comment on the treatment of residual water content in “A consistent set of parametric models for the two-phase flow of immiscible fluids in the subsurface” by L. Luckner et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Luckner et al. [1989] (hereinafter LVN) present a clear summary and generalization of popular formulations used for convenient representation of porous media fluid flow characteristics, including water content (θ) related to suction (h) and hydraulic conductivity (K) related to θ or h. One essential but problematic element in the LVN models is the concept of residual water content (θr; in LVN, θw,r). Most studies using θr determine its value as a fitted parameter and make the assumption that liquid flow processes are negligible at θ values less than θr. While the LVN paper contributes a valuable discussion of the nature of θr, it leaves several problems unresolved, including fundamental difficulties in associating a definite physical condition with θr, practical inadequacies of the models at low θ values, and difficulties in designating a main wetting curve.

  5. Fluid inclusion and noble gas studies of the Dongping gold deposit, Hebei Province, China: A mantle connection for mineralization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Li, Y.; Goldfarb, R.; He, Y.; Zaw, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Dongping gold deposit (>100 t Au) occurs about 200 km inboard of the northern margin of the North China craton. The deposit is mainly hosted by syenite of a middle Paleozoic alkalic intrusive complex that was emplaced into Late Archean basement rocks. Both groups of rocks are intruded by Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous crustal-melt granite dikes and stocks, some within a few kilometers of the deposit. The gold ores were deposited during this latter magmatic period at about 150 Ma, a time that was characterized by widespread regional north-south compression that formed the east-west-trending Yanshan deformational belt. The ores include both the telluride mineral-bearing, low sulfide quartz veins and the highly K-feldspar-altered syenite, with most of the resource concentrated in two orebodies (1 and 70). Fluid inclusion microthermometry indicates heterogeneous trapping of low-salinity (e.g., 5-7 wt % NaCl equiv) fluids that varied from a few to 60 mole percent nonaqueous volatile species. Laser Raman spectroscopy confirms that the vapor phase in these inclusions is dominated by CO2, but may be comprised of as much as 9 mole percent H2S and 20 mole percent N2; methane concentrations in the vapor phase are consistently interaction of ore fluids with surrounding crustal rocks, which may have contributed additional He to the fluids. A mantle source for at least some of the components of the gold-forming fluid is consistent with upwelling of hot asthenosphere and erosion of as much as 100 to 150 km of cool Archean lithosphere beneath the craton during this time. The Dongping deposit is located along the 100-km-wide north-south gravity lineament, which marks the western border of the thinned crust. As both regional metamorphism of Mesoproterozoic and younger cover rocks, and widespread granite magmatism, also occurred at ca. 150 Ma, it is unclear as to whether one or both of these also contributed fluid and/or metals to the hydrothermal system. Importantly, these

  6. A review of solid-fluid selection options for optical-based measurements in single-phase liquid, two-phase liquid-liquid and multiphase solid-liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stuart F.; Zadrazil, Ivan; Markides, Christos N.

    2017-09-01

    Experimental techniques based on optical measurement principles have experienced significant growth in recent decades. They are able to provide detailed information with high-spatiotemporal resolution on important scalar (e.g., temperature, concentration, and phase) and vector (e.g., velocity) fields in single-phase or multiphase flows, as well as interfacial characteristics in the latter, which has been instrumental to step-changes in our fundamental understanding of these flows, and the development and validation of advanced models with ever-improving predictive accuracy and reliability. Relevant techniques rely upon well-established optical methods such as direct photography, laser-induced fluorescence, laser Doppler velocimetry/phase Doppler anemometry, particle image/tracking velocimetry, and variants thereof. The accuracy of the resulting data depends on numerous factors including, importantly, the refractive indices of the solids and liquids used. The best results are obtained when the observational materials have closely matched refractive indices, including test-section walls, liquid phases, and any suspended particles. This paper reviews solid-liquid and solid-liquid-liquid refractive-index-matched systems employed in different fields, e.g., multiphase flows, turbomachinery, bio-fluid flows, with an emphasis on liquid-liquid systems. The refractive indices of various aqueous and organic phases found in the literature span the range 1.330-1.620 and 1.251-1.637, respectively, allowing the identification of appropriate combinations to match selected transparent or translucent plastics/polymers, glasses, or custom materials in single-phase liquid or multiphase liquid-liquid flow systems. In addition, the refractive indices of fluids can be further tuned with the use of additives, which also allows for the matching of important flow similarity parameters such as density and viscosity.

  7. Two-phase flow characteristics in BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katono, Kenichi; Aoyama, Goro; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Yasuda, Kenichi; Nishida, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Reliable prediction of two-phase flow characteristics is important for safety and economy improvements of BWR plants. We have been developing two-phase flow measurement tools and techniques for BWR thermal hydraulic conditions, such as a 3D time-averaged X-ray CT system, an ultrasonic liquid film sensor and a wire-mesh sensor. We applied the developed items in experiments using the multi-purpose steam-water test facility known as HUSTLE, which can simulate two-phase thermal-hydraulic conditions in a BWR reactor pressure vessel, and we constructed a detailed instrumentation database. We validated a 3D two-phase flow simulator using the database and developed the reactor internal two-phase flow analysis system. (author)

  8. Multiparticle imaging velocimetry measurements in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Y.A.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental flow visualization tool, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), is being extended to determine the velocity fields in two and three-dimensional, two-phase fluid flows. In the past few years, the technique has attracted quite a lot of interest. PIV enables fluid velocities across a region of a flow to be measured at a single instant in time in global domain. This instantaneous velocity profile of a given flow field is determined by digitally recording particle (microspheres or bubbles) images within the flow over multiple successive video frames and then conducting flow pattern identification and analysis of the data. This paper presents instantaneous velocity measurements in various two and three- dimensional, two-phase flow situations. (author)

  9. Stability of interfacial waves in two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W S [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The influence of the interfacial pressure and the flow distribution in the one-dimensional two-fluid model on the stability problems of interfacial waves is discussed. With a proper formulation of the interfacial pressure, the following two-phase phenomena can be predicted from the stability and stationary criteria of the interfacial waves: onset of slug flow, stationary hydraulic jump in a stratified flow, flooding in a vertical pipe, and the critical void fraction of a bubbly flow. It can be concluded that the interfacial pressure plays an important role in the interfacial wave propagation of the two-fluid model. The flow distribution parameter may enhance the flow stability range, but only plays a minor role in the two-phase characteristics. (author). 20 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Macroscopic balance equations for two-phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    The macroscopic, or overall, balance equations of mass, momentum, and energy are derived for a two-fluid model of two-phase flows in complex geometries. These equations provide a base for investigating methods of incorporating improved analysis methods into computer programs, such as RETRAN, which are used for transient and steady-state thermal-hydraulic analyses of nuclear steam supply systems. The equations are derived in a very general manner so that three-dimensional, compressible flows can be analysed. The equations obtained supplement the various partial differential equation two-fluid models of two-phase flow which have recently appeared in the literature. The primary objective of the investigation is the macroscopic balance equations. (Auth.)

  11. Cathodoluminescence, fluid inclusions and trace element data for the syntaxial quartz cementation in the sandstones of Ora Formation, northern Iraq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omer, Muhamed Fakhri; Friis, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    Quartz cements of the quartz arenitic sandstones from the Chalky Nasara and Ora section of the (Devonian-Carboniferous) Ora Formation in northern Iraq have been studied. A combination of Hot-Cathodoluminescence (CL), LA-ICP-MS and fluid inclusions microthermometry revealed three syntaxial quartz......-bedded sandstones than in the6 thickly-bedded sandstones filling most of remaining pore space during mesogenesis. The Q3 was formed during early telogenesis stage fully cementing the sandstones and the fractures were filled by hydrothermal chlorite and sulfides. Significant amount of trace elements Al, Li, Ge...

  12. Search for Fluid Inclusions in a Carbonaceous Chondrite Using a New X-Ray Micro-Tomography Technique Combined with FIB Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiyama, A.; Miyake, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Uesugi, K.; Nakano, T.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-01-01

    Early solar system aqueous fluids are preserved in some H chondrites as aqueous fluid inclusions in halite (e.g., [1]). Although potential fluid inclusions are also expected in carbonaceous chondrites [2], they have not been surely confirmed. In order to search for these fluid inclusions, we have developped a new X-ray micro-tomography technique combined with FIB sampling and applied this techniqu to a carbanaceous chondrite. Experimental: A polished thin section of Sutter's Mill meteorite (CM) was observed with an optical microscope and FE-SEM (JEOL 7001F) for chosing mineral grains of carbonates (mainly calcite) and sulfides (FeS and ZnS) 20-50 microns in typical size, which may have aqueous fluid inclusions. Then, a "house" similar to a cube with a roof (20-30 microns in size) is sampled from the mineral grain by using FIB (FEI Quanta 200 3DS). Then, the house was atached to a thin W-needle by FIB and imaged by a SR-based imaging microtomography system with a Fresnel zone plate at beamline BL47XU, SPring-8, Japan. One sample was imaged at two X-ray energies, 7 and 8 keV, to identify mineral phases (dual-enegy microtomography: [3]). The size of voxel (pixel in 3D) was 50-80 nm, which gave the effective spatial resolution of approx. 200 nm. A terrestrial quartz sample with an aqueous fluid inclusion with a bubble was also examined as a test sample by the same method. Results and discussion: A fluid inclusion of 5-8 microns in quartz was clearly identified in a CT image. A bubble of approx. 4 microns was also identified as refraction contrast although the X-ray absorption difference between fluid and bubble is small. Volumes of the fluid and bubble were obtained from the 3D CT images. Fourteen grains of calcite, two grains of iron sulfide and one grain of (Zn,Fe)S were examined. Ten calcite, one iron sulfide and one (Zn,Fe)S grains have inclusions >1 micron in size (the maximum: approx. 5 microns). The shapes are spherical or irregular. Tiny inclusions (tiny solid

  13. Advancing the use of noble gases in fluid inclusions of speleothems as a palaeoclimate proxy. Method and standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, L.; Palcsu, L.; Major, Z.; Svingor, E.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Continental carbonates are essential archives of the past geological and climatological occurrences. Recently, fluid inclusions of carbonates have got into focus of palaeoclimate research. A new approach using temperature dependent gas solubilities might be a way that uses only physical laws, e.g. the Henry's law of solubility and gas partitioning models. The so-called noble gas temperature (NGT) can be calculated from the measured noble gas concentrations. This report describes how our first advancing steps towards obtaining NGT's from fluid inclusions and tiny water amounts have been preformed. To extract the water inclusions from the carbonate matrix, the most suitable treatment is to crush the carbonate under vacuum. The water released from the inclusions is then collected in a cold finger by freezing. The amount of the liberated water is measured via its vapour pressure in a certain volume (Fig. 1). The liberated dissolved noble gases which were in the fluid inclusions are separated by a cryo system, and then admitted into the static mode noble gas mass spectrometer sequentially. The calibration of the noble gas mass spectrometric measurements is performed by means of well known air aliquots. To check the reliability of the whole measurement procedure standard water samples have to be measured. As for standard samples, first we have prepared air equilibrated water (AEW) in conditioned circumstances. We fill copper capillaries with AEW. Having completed the copper capillary assemblage, the AEW is letting flow through the capillary (Fig. 2). The error of such a water determination is less than 1% in case of 1 μl of liquid water (Fig. 1) that allows us to determine accurate noble gas concentrations. The reproducibility of 40 Ar measurements is better than 0.6 %, while those of neon, krypton and xenon isotopes are 0.6-1.6 %, 0.9-2.2 % and 0.8-2.0 %, respectively. Theoretically, these precisions for noble gas concentrations

  14. Origin and Timing of Dauphiné Twins Using Fluid Inclusions in Quartz-Cement Fractures in Sandstones from Diagenetic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, A.; Ukar, E.; Laubach, S.

    2016-12-01

    Dauphiné twins in quartz are widespread in many tectonometamorphic environments. Under diagenetic temperatures (fluid inclusion trails. The association of Dauphiné twins and fluid inclusion trails from which temperature and possibly timing can be inferred provides a way to research mechanism and timing of twinning, and potentially the magnitude of paleostrain and stress in some diagenetic settings. Using examples from East Texas and Colorado cores, we show that twins are associated with crack-seal microstructure and fluid inclusions. Fracture wall-parallel and wall-normal inclusion trails contain coexisting aqueous and hydrocarbon gas inclusions, so homogenization temperatures of aqueous inclusions, ranging from 130°C to 159°C in the East Texas Basin, and from 162°C to 176°C in the Piceance Basin, record true trapping temperatures. Inclusions in wall-normal trails are large and irregularly shaped compared to those in wall-parallel trails, but both show similar liquid-to-vapor ratios. Trapping temperatures for wall-normal inclusion trails are usually higher than those in the wall-parallel trails. Wall-normal fluid inclusion assemblage temperatures typically match the highest temperatures of wall-parallel assemblages trapped during sequential widening, but not necessarily the most recent. In context of burial histories for these samples, this temperature pattern implies that wall-normal assemblages form at discrete times during or after crack-seal fracture widening. Stacking transmitted light images with scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) images demonstrates that the twin boundaries are localized along wall-normal inclusion trails. Localization in isolated, potentially high-stress quartz deposits in fractures is compatible with a mechanical origin for these Dauphiné twins. Punctuated temperature values and discrepant sizes and shapes of inclusions in wall-normal trails imply that twinning is

  15. Fluid properties control degassing or storage of abiogenic CH4 during slab exhumation: the fluid inclusion record from the Western Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, S.; Castelli, D.; Frezzotti, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Abiogenic CH4 can be produced by interaction between carbonates and reducing fluids derived from the hydration of ultramafics (e.g., mantle peridotite or HP Ol-serpentinite). This process occurs during slab exhumation because cooling promotes serpentinization of olivine in presence of water (Fo + H2O = Atg + Brc and the linked reactions: Fa + H2O = Fe-Atg + Mag + H2 and Atg + CaCO3 + H2 = Di + Brc + CH4 + H2O) at ca. 500-375°C (P=2.0-0.2 GPa). Experiments in the CH4-H2O-NaCl system indicate that, at these conditions, fluids are immiscible even for very low salinity (ca. 3 wt%) and that the NaCl content in the aqueous part of the fluid increases with temperature whereas the CH4 content in the gaseous part shows an opposite trend (Lamb et al., 2002; Li, 2017).In HP rodingite from the Piemonte ophiolite Zone (W Alps), primary fluid inclusions consisting of a brine (6 wt% CaCl2 + 6 wt% NaCl) with H2 + CH4 ≤ 1 mol % [CH4/(H2+CH4) = 0.37-10] occur in vesuvianite veins that formed at P=0.2 GPa and T=375°C. We interpret them as the aqueous part of an immiscible reducing fluid produced during late Alpine serpentinization of the surrounding ultramafics. Interestingly, CH4-H2 gaseous fluids are never reported in rodingite, whereas early CH4-H2O-H2±graphite and CH4-H2±graphite fluid inclusions, with variable gas-water proportions, trapped in calcite at P≤1.0 GPa and T≤450°C, are recently reported from HP "graphitized" ophicarbonate from the Lanzo peridotite Massif (W Alps; Vitale Brovarone et al., 2017).Both HP ophiolites and partially-serpentinized peridotite massifs are, thus, efficient lithologies to produce CH4 during exhumation. The amount of released CH4 depends on the amount of water available during exhumation. However, when fluids immiscibility occurs, the gaseous-rich part (CH4-H2) of the immiscible fluid produced in ultramafics likely remains confined in the slab because it is less mobile with respect to the aqueous-rich part due to its high dihedral

  16. Metamorphic fluid flow in the northeastern part of the 3.8-3.7 Ga Isua Greenstone Belt (SW Greenland): A re-evalution of fluid inclusion evidence for early Archean seafloor-hydrothermal systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heijlen, Wouter; Appel, P. W. U.; Frezzotti, M. L.

    2006-01-01

    . In most quartz crystals, however, recrystallization obliterated such early fluid inclusion assemblages and left graphite and carbonate as solid inclusions in recrystallized grains. Intragranular fluid inclusion trails in the recrystallized grains of breccia cementing and crosscutting quartz veins have CO2...... density (ranging from 48.0 to > 105.3 cm(3)/Mol) and metastable H2O NaCl(-other salt?) brines (similar to 28 eq. wt% NaCl). Finally, the youngest fluid inclusion assemblages are found in non-luminescent secondary quartz and contain low-density CH4 (molar volume > 105.33 cm(3)/Mol) and low-salinity H2O.......5-2 kbar. The quartz globules in the pillow fragments only contain sporadic CH4(+H-2) and brine inclusions, corresponding with the late generations present in the cementing and crosscutting veins. We argue that due to the large extent of static recrystallization in quartz globules in the pillow breccia...

  17. Ore genesis constraints on the Idaho Cobalt Belt from fluid inclusion gas, noble gas isotope, and ion ratio analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, Albert H.; Landis, Gary P.

    2012-01-01

    The Idaho cobalt belt is a 60-km-long alignment of deposits composed of cobaltite, Co pyrite, chalcopyrite, and gold with anomalous Nb, Y, Be, and rare-earth elements (REEs) in a quartz-biotite-tourmaline gangue hosted in Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Lemhi Group. It is the largest cobalt resource in the United States with historic production from the Blackbird Mine. All of the deposits were deformed and metamorphosed to upper greenschist-lower amphibolite grade in the Cretaceous. They occur near a 1377 Ma anorogenic bimodal plutonic complex. The enhanced solubility of Fe, Co, Cu, and Au as chloride complexes together with gangue biotite rich in Fe and Cl and gangue quartz containing hypersaline inclusions allows that hot saline fluids were involved. The isotopes of B in gangue tourmaline are suggestive of a marine source, whereas those of Pb in ore suggest a U ± Th-enriched source. The ore and gangue minerals in this belt may have trapped components in fluid inclusions that are distinct from those in post-ore minerals and metamorphic minerals. Such components can potentially be identified and distinguished by their relative abundances in contrasting samples. Therefore, we obtained samples of Co and Cu sulfides, gangue quartz, biotite, and tourmaline and post-ore quartz veins as well as Cretaceous metamorphic garnet and determined the gas, noble gas isotope, and ion ratios of fluid inclusion extracts by mass spectrometry and ion chromatography. The most abundant gases present in extracts from each sample type are biased toward the gas-rich population of inclusions trapped during maximum burial and metamorphism. All have CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios of evolved crustal fluids, and many yield a range of H2-CH4-CO2-H2S equilibration temperatures consistent with the metamorphic grade. Cretaceous garnet and post-ore minerals have high RH and RS values suggestive of reduced sulfidic conditions. Most extracts have anomalous 4He produced by decay of U and Th and

  18. Stable isotope and fluid inclusion signatures of hydrothermal fluids in transcrustal fault zones: significance for orogenic, Archean lode-gold mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumayr, P.; Hagemann, S.G.; Groves, D.I.

    1999-01-01

    mil). Calculated d 18 O fluid compositions for quartz in the CTZ range from 8.0 to 10.3 per mil at 350 deg C (based on arsenopyrite and chlorite thermometry). Hydrogen isotopes from fluid inclusion waters trapped in quartz have a large variation from -62.5 per mil to -7.2 per mil in the CTZ fluids, whereas hydrogen in fluid inclusions in quartz in the second- and third-order shear zones shows a restricted range from -67.6 to -39.8 per mil. The oxygen isotope shift of about 2 per mil from the CTZ to the second- and third-order fault zones may be explained by two competing processes: 1) the hydrothermal fluids in the CTZ equilibrated, at least partially, with metasedimentary rocks in the footwall, and or 2) there was fractionation of oxygen isotopes during phase immiscibility of a combined H 2 O-CO 2 fluid. The preferential trapping of CO 2 -rich fluids in the CTZ, and H 2 O-rich fluids in the second- and third-order fault zones, therefore, could account for the shift in d 18 O. At present, the first process is preferred, because of the ubiquitous presence of the metasedimentary rocks in the footwall and the consistent d 18 O composition of the CTZ, even in hydrothermal quartz veins which contain significant H 2 O. The large variation in the hydrogen isotopes in fluid inclusions in quartz in the CTZ may be explained by late Archean and post-Archean reactivation of the CTZ and the introduction of fluids related to late-fractures fills, whereas apparently minor reactivation of the second- and third-order structures resulted in a restricted range of dD. Copyright (1999) Geological Society of Australia

  19. Effects of post-burial siliceous diagenesis deformations on the microthermometric behaviour of fluid inclusions: an example in the Francevillian uraniferous sandstone reservoir (Gabon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Weber, F.

    1984-01-01

    New data about fluid inclusions associated to a siliceous diagenesis show that a deformation phase in the first stage of catagenesis disturbed their microthermometric behaviour. Nevertheless, temperature and pressure of fluids associated to the uraniferous paragenesis and contemporary with the Oklo natural reactors are estimated at 140-160 0 C and 250-500 bar [fr

  20. Modulating patterns of two-phase flow with electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dingsheng; Hakimi, Bejan; Volny, Michael; Rolfs, Joelle; Anand, Robbyn K; Turecek, Frantisek; Chiu, Daniel T

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the use of electro-hydrodynamic actuation to control the transition between three major flow patterns of an aqueous-oil Newtonian flow in a microchannel: droplets, beads-on-a-string (BOAS), and multi-stream laminar flow. We observed interesting transitional flow patterns between droplets and BOAS as the electric field was modulated. The ability to control flow patterns of a two-phase fluid in a microchannel adds to the microfluidic tool box and improves our understanding of this interesting fluid behavior.

  1. Two-phase flow in refrigeration systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Junjie; Gan, Zhongxue

    2013-01-01

    Two-Phase Flow in Refrigeration Systems presents recent developments from the authors' extensive research programs on two-phase flow in refrigeration systems. This book covers advanced mass and heat transfer and vapor compression refrigeration systems and shows how the performance of an automotive air-conditioning system is affected through results obtained experimentally and theoretically, specifically with consideration of two-phase flow and oil concentration. The book is ideal for university postgraduate students as a textbook, researchers and professors as an academic reference book, and b

  2. Modeling and numerical study of two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champmartin, A.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the modelization and the simulation of two-phase systems composed of droplets moving in a gas. The two phases interact with each other and the type of model to consider directly depends on the type of simulations targeted. In the first part, the two phases are considered as fluid and are described using a mixture model with a drift relation (to be able to follow the relative velocity between the two phases and take into account two velocities), the two-phase flows are assumed at the equilibrium in temperature and pressure. This part of the manuscript consists of the derivation of the equations, writing a numerical scheme associated with this set of equations, a study of this scheme and simulations. A mathematical study of this model (hyperbolicity in a simplified framework, linear stability analysis of the system around a steady state) was conducted in a frame where the gas is assumed baro-tropic. The second part is devoted to the modelization of the effect of inelastic collisions on the particles when the time of the simulation is shorter and the droplets can no longer be seen as a fluid. We introduce a model of inelastic collisions for droplets in a spray, leading to a specific Boltzmann kernel. Then, we build caricatures of this kernel of BGK type, in which the behavior of the first moments of the solution of the Boltzmann equation (that is mass, momentum, directional temperatures, variance of the internal energy) are mimicked. The quality of these caricatures is tested numerically at the end. (author) [fr

  3. Extreme alkali bicarbonate- and carbonate-rich fluid inclusions in granite pegmatite from the Precambrian Rønne granite, Bornholm Island, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rainer; Davidson, Paul; Schmidt, Christian

    2011-02-01

    Our study of fluid and melt inclusions in quartz and feldspar from granite pegmatite from the Precambrian Rønne granite, Bornholm Island, Denmark revealed extremely alkali bicarbonate- and carbonate-rich inclusions. The solid phases (daughter crystals) are mainly nahcolite [NaHCO3], zabuyelite [Li2CO3], and in rare cases potash [K2CO3] in addition to the volatile phases CO2 and aqueous carbonate/bicarbonate solution. Rare melt inclusions contain nahcolite, dawsonite [NaAl(CO3)(OH)2], and muscovite. In addition to fluid and melt inclusions, there are primary CO2-rich vapor inclusions, which mostly contain small nahcolite crystals. The identification of potash as a naturally occurring mineral would appear to be the first recorded instance. From the appearance of high concentrations of these carbonates and bicarbonates, we suggest that the mineral-forming media were water- and alkali carbonate-rich silicate melts or highly concentrated fluids. The coexistence of silicate melt inclusions with carbonate-rich fluid and nahcolite-rich vapor inclusions indicates a melt-melt-vapor equilibrium during the crystallization of the pegmatite. These results are supported by the results of hydrothermal diamond anvil cell experiments in the pseudoternary system H2O-NaHCO3-SiO2. Additionally, we show that boundary layer effects were insignificant in the Bornholm pegmatites and are not required for the origin of primary textures in compositionally simple pegmatites at least.

  4. Two-phased flow component loss data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairhurst, C.P.

    1983-01-01

    Pressure loss measurements were made for valves and orifice plates under horizontal and vertical two-phase, air/water flow. The results displayed similar trends and were successfully correlated using a semi-empirical approach. (author)

  5. Magmatic Vapor Phase Transport of Copper in Reduced Porphyry Copper-Gold Deposits: Evidence From PIXE Microanalysis of Fluid Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowins, S. M.; Yeats, C. J.; Ryan, C. G.

    2002-05-01

    Nondestructive proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) studies of magmatic fluid inclusions in granite-related Sn-W deposits [1] reveal that copper transport out of reduced felsic magmas is favored by low-salinity vapor and not co-existing high-salinity liquid (halite-saturated brine). Copper transport by magmatic vapor also has been documented in oxidized porphyry Cu-Au deposits, but the magnitude of Cu partitioning into the vapor compared to the brine generally is less pronounced than in the reduced magmatic Sn-W systems [2]. Consideration of these microanalytical data leads to the hypothesis that Cu and, by inference, Au in the recently established "reduced porphyry copper-gold" (RPCG) subclass should partition preferentially into vapor and not high-salinity liquid exsolving directly from fluid-saturated magmas [3-4]. To test this hypothesis, PIXE microanalysis of primary fluid inclusions in quartz-sulfide (pyrite, pyrrhotite & chalcopyrite) veins from two RPCG deposits was undertaken using the CSIRO-GEMOC nuclear microprobe. PIXE microanalysis for the ~30 Ma San Anton deposit (Mexico) was done on halite-saturated aqueous brine (deposit (W. Australia) was done on halite-saturated "aqueous" inclusions, which contain a small (deposits of the new RPCG subclass demonstrate the greater potential of these systems, compared to the classically oxidized porphyry Cu-Au systems, to transport Cu and probably precious metals in a magmatic aqueous vapor phase. These PIXE data also support the possibility that Cu partitions preferentially into an immiscible CO2-rich magmatic fluid. References: [1] Heinrich, C.A. et al. (1992) Econ. Geol., 87, 1566-1583. [2] Heinrich, C.A. et al. (1999) Geology, 27, 755-758. [3] Rowins, S.M. (2000) Geology, 28, 491-494. [4] Rowins, S.M. (2000) The Gangue, GAC-MDD Newsletter, 67, 1-7 (www.gac.ca). [5] Rowins, S.M. et al. (1993) Geol. Soc. Australia Abs., 34, 68-70.

  6. Fluid inclusion characteristics and molybdenite Re-Os geochronology of the Qulong porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Selby, David; Feely, Martin; Costanzo, Alessandra; Li, Xian-Hua

    2017-02-01

    The Qulong porphyry copper and molybdenum deposit is located at the southwest margin of the Lhasa Terrane and in the eastern region of the Gangdese magmatic belt. It represents China's largest porphyry copper system, with ˜2200 million tonnes of ore comprising 0.5 % Cu and 0.03 % Mo. The mineralization is associated with Miocene granodiorite, monzogranite and quartz-diorite units, which intruded into Jurassic volcanic units in a post-collisional (Indian-Asian) tectonic setting. Field observations and core logging demonstrate the alteration and mineralization at Qulong are akin to typical porphyry copper systems in subduction settings, which comprise similar magmatic-hydrothermal, potassic, propylitic and phyllic alteration assemblages. Molybdenite Re-Os geochronology confirms the relative timeframe defined by field observations and core logging and indicates that the bulk copper and molybdenum at Qulong were deposited within 350,000 years: between 16.10 ± 0.06 [0.08] (without and with decay constant uncertainty) and 15.88 ± 0.06 [0.08] Ma. This duration for mineralization is in direct contrast to a long-lived intrusive episode associated with mineralization based on previous zircon U-Pb data. Our fluid inclusion study indicates that the ore-forming fluid was oxidized and contained Na, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Mo, Cl and S. The magmatic-hydrothermal transition occurred at ˜425 °C under lithostatic pressure, while potassic, propylitic and phyllic alteration occurred at hydrostatic pressure with temperature progressively decreasing from 425 to 280 °C. The fluid inclusion data presented here suggests that there has been ˜2.3 km of erosion at Qulong after its formation, and this erosion may be related to regional uplift of the Lhasa Terrane.

  7. Fluid inclusion and sulfur stable isotope evidence for the origin of the Ahangran Pb-Ag deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Maanijou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Ahangaran Pb-Ag deposit is located in the Hamedan province, west Iran, 25 km southeast of the city of Malayer . . The deposit lies in the strongly folded Sanandaj-Sirjan tectonic zone, in which the ore bodies occur as thin lenses and layers. The host rocks of the deposit are Early Cretaceous carbonates and sandstones that are unconformably underlain by Jurassic rocks. Ore minerals include galena, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite and supergene iron oxide minerals. Gangue minerals consist of barite, dolomite, chlorite, calcite and quartz. The mineralization occurs as open-space fillings, veins, veinlets, disseminations, and massive replacements. Alteration consists of silicification, sericitization, and dolomitization. In this study, we carried out studies of mineralogy, microthermometry of fluid inclusions and sulfur isotopes to determine the source of sulfur and the physico-chemical conditions of formation. Materials and methods Seventy samples of different host rocks, alteration, and mineralization were collected from surface outcrops and different tunnels. Twenty of the samples were prepared for mineralogical studies at Tarbiat Modarres University in Tehran and 25 for petrological studies at the University of Bu-Ali Sina. Fluid-inclusion studies were done on 5 samples of quartz and calcite at Pouya Zamin Azin Company in Tehran using a Linkam THM 600 model heating-freezing stage (with a range of -196 to 480ºC. The accuracy and precision of the homogenization measurements are about ±1°C. Salinity estimates were determined from the last melting temperatures of ice, utilizing the equations by Bodnar and Vityk (1994 and for CO2 fluids using equations by Chen (1972. Nine samples of sulfides and barite were crushed and separated by handpicking under binocular microscope and powdered with agate mortar and pestle. About one gram of each sample was sent to the Stable Isotope and ICP/MS Laboratory of Queen’s University, Canada for

  8. Numerical simulation for gas-liquid two-phase flow in pipe networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyan; Kuang Bo; Zhou Guoliang; Xu Jijun

    1998-01-01

    The complex pipe network characters can not directly presented in single phase flow, gas-liquid two phase flow pressure drop and void rate change model. Apply fluid network theory and computer numerical simulation technology to phase flow pipe networks carried out simulate and compute. Simulate result shows that flow resistance distribution is non-linear in two phase pipe network

  9. Fluid inclusion study of the uranium mineralised granite cataclasite/mylonite and quartz reef in the Mulapalle area, Cuddapah district, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirupathi, P.V.; Tripathi, B.K.; Umamaheswar, K.; Dhana Raju, R.

    2004-01-01

    Granite cataclasite and mylonite in the basement fracture zones around Mulapalle in the southwestern environs of the Cuddapah basin are uraniferous with the presence of brannerite, U-Ti complex and uraninite. The ENE-WSW trending fracture zone is cut by NW-SE trending quartz reef. Fluid inclusion study carried out on quartz from the mineralized cataclasite and as well as from the quartz reef shows the presence of both primary [8-20 microns] and abundant secondary up to [6 microns] inclusions. Most of the inclusions are bi-phase (L+V) liquid rich having a degree of fill around 0.90 with constant liquid to vapour ratio. Few inclusions are liquid monophase and multiphase [S+L+V]. They behave as H 2 O-NaCl system and homogenize into liquid phase at low temperature range [125 to 200 degC] except some bi-phase inclusions in the barren quartz reef, which are found to behave as an impure H 2 O-NaCl system admixed with other salts. Wide variation of salinity in the range of 3-25 wt%e NaCl is recorded by the inclusions in both the mineralized cataclasite and the barren quartz reef. The trapping pressure [P T ] of the inclusions of barren quartz reef spreads between 200 to 600 bars while those of mineralized cataclasite restricts to upper end of that range. Some inclusions in mineralized cataclasite that homogenize at high temperatures [200 to 250 degC] show P T between 800 to 1000 bars. The presence of more than one population without any change in fluid composition indicate their origin at different stages of deformation modifying the primary inclusions of the granite and from fluids migrated through fractures at later stages. In the barren quartz reef, the distribution of inclusions of contrasting salinity implies the environment of mixing of connectively driven hydrothermal fluid of metamorphic origin and meteoric water. (author)

  10. Tourmalinization at the Darasun goldfield, Eastern Transbaikalia: Compositional, fluid inclusion and isotopic constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vsevolod Prokofiev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zoned tourmaline (schorl-dravite in the matrix of hydrothermal explosive breccia and ore veins in gold deposits, Chita region, Eastern Transbaikalia, Russia, are associated with Na- and K-rich porphyry-type subvolcanic intrusives. δ18O values of tourmaline from three gold deposits (Darasun, Talatui, Teremkinskoye are +8.3‰, +7.6‰, and +6.0‰ and calculated δ18O values of fluids responsible for the tourmalinization are +7.3‰, +7.7‰, and +4.2‰, respectively. These data imply an igneous fluid source, except at the Teremkin deposit where mixing with meteoric water is indicated. Wide ranges of Fe3+/Fetot and the presence of vacancies characterize the Darasun deposit tourmaline indicating wide ranges of ƒ(O2 and pH of mineralizing fluids. Initial stage tourmalines from the gold deposits of the Darasun ore district are dravite or high mg schorl. Second stage tourmaline is characterized by oscillatory zoning but with Fe generally increasing towards crystal rims indicating decreasing temperature. Third stage tourmaline formed unzoned crystals with xMg (mole fraction of Mg close to that of the first stage tourmaline, due to a close association with pyrite and arsenopyrite. From Fe3+/Fetot values, chemical composition and crystallization temperatures, logf(O2 of mineralizing fluids ranged from ca. −25 to −20, much higher than for the gold-bearing beresite–listvenite association, indicating that tourmalinization was not related to gold mineralization.

  11. The pdf approach to turbulent polydispersed two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Peirano, Eric

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a probabilistic approach to turbulent polydispersed two-phase flows. The two-phase flows considered are composed of a continuous phase, which is a turbulent fluid, and a dispersed phase, which represents an ensemble of discrete particles (solid particles, droplets or bubbles). Gathering the difficulties of turbulent flows and of particle motion, the challenge is to work out a general modelling approach that meets three requirements: to treat accurately the physically relevant phenomena, to provide enough information to address issues of complex physics (combustion, polydispersed particle flows, …) and to remain tractable for general non-homogeneous flows. The present probabilistic approach models the statistical dynamics of the system and consists in simulating the joint probability density function (pdf) of a number of fluid and discrete particle properties. A new point is that both the fluid and the particles are included in the pdf description. The derivation of the joint pdf model for the fluid and for the discrete particles is worked out in several steps. The mathematical properties of stochastic processes are first recalled. The various hierarchies of pdf descriptions are detailed and the physical principles that are used in the construction of the models are explained. The Lagrangian one-particle probabilistic description is developed first for the fluid alone, then for the discrete particles and finally for the joint fluid and particle turbulent systems. In the case of the probabilistic description for the fluid alone or for the discrete particles alone, numerical computations are presented and discussed to illustrate how the method works in practice and the kind of information that can be extracted from it. Comments on the current modelling state and propositions for future investigations which try to link the present work with other ideas in physics are made at the end of the paper.

  12. Origin and timing of Dauphiné twins in quartz cement in fractured sandstones from diagenetic environments: Insight from fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, András; Ukar, Estibalitz; Laubach, Stephen E.

    2016-09-01

    Electron backscattered diffraction techniques (EBSD) show that Dauphiné twins in quartz are widespread in many tectonometamorphic environments. Our study documents that under diagenetic temperatures (fluid inclusions. Fracture wall-parallel and wall-normal inclusion trails contain coexisting aqueous and hydrocarbon gas inclusions, so homogenization temperatures of aqueous inclusions record true trapping temperatures. Inclusions in alignments normal to fracture walls are large and irregularly shaped compared to those aligned parallel to walls, but both show similar liquid-to-vapor ratios. Stacking transmitted light images with scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) and EBSD images demonstrates that Dauphiné twin boundaries are localized along wall-normal inclusion trails. Trapping temperatures for wall-normal inclusion trails are usually higher than those aligned parallel to the fracture wall. Wall-normal fluid inclusion assemblage temperatures typically match the highest temperatures of wall-parallel assemblages trapped during sequential widening, but not necessarily the most recent. In context of burial histories for these samples, this temperature pattern implies that wall-normal assemblages form at discrete times during or after crack-seal fracture widening. Localization in isolated, potentially high-stress quartz deposits in fractures is compatible with a mechanical origin for these Dauphiné twins. Punctuated temperature values and discrepant sizes and shapes of inclusions in wall-normal trails implies that twinning is a by-product of the formation of the wall-normal inclusion assemblages. The association of Dauphiné twins and fluid inclusion assemblages from which temperature and possibly timing can be inferred provides a way to research timing as well as magnitude of paleostress in some diagenetic settings.

  13. Mineralogy and fluid inclusion studies in kalchoye Copper- gold deposit, East of Esfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Mehvary

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Kalchoye Copper-gold deposit is located about 110 kilometers east of Esfahan province and within the Eocene volcano sedimentary rocks. Sandy tuff and andesite lava are important members of this complex.The form of mineralization in area is vein and veinlet and quartz as the main gangue phase. The main ore minerals are chalcopyrite, chalcocite, galena and weathered minerals such as goethite, iron oxides, malachite and azurite. Studies in area indicate that ore mineralization Kalchoye is low sulfide, quartz type of hydrothermal ore deposits and results of thermometry studies on quartz minerals low- medium fluid with low potential mineralization is responsible for mineralization in this area.

  14. Mantle metasomatism in the Kaapvaal Craton lithosphere: constraints on the composition of the metasomatic agent from fluid inclusions in MARID-type xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konzett, J.; Krenn, K.; Hauzenberger, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The emplacement of both group I and group II kimberlites in the Kaapvaal Craton of the Kimberley region in South Africa is associated with an intense metasomatic alteration of the country rocks as evidenced by a diverse suite of xenoliths sampled by the kimberlites mainly comprising metasomatized peridotites and minor MARID-type xenoliths. These are characterized by hydrous potassic silicates and LILE-HFSE-rich titanates. Because the metasomatic agent is not preserved in these rocks its composition has to be inferred from that of the metasomatic assemblages. Here we present for the first time data on fluid inclusions from two MARID-xenoliths sampled by group-I kimberlites of the Kimberley cluster. They provide direct evidence for the nature of the metasomatic fluids involved in kimberlite-related metsomatism. The xenoliths contain phlogopite+K-richterite+diopside+ilmenite±rutile±apatite±zircon. Fluid inclusions with 4-10 µm in size were found in diopside, K-richterite and zircon and contain L+V+one-to-several daughter phases. Investigations with the freezing and heating stage indicate two different chemical systems for the fluids: (1) H2O-NaCl dominant fluids found as L+V+S inclusions in zircon together with abundant needle-like apatite, rutile and phlogopite solid inclusions. The fluid inclusions in part occur along zircon host-rutile/apatite inclusion grain boundaries which indicates that the fluids were trapped during zircon growth. They contain 30-32 mass% NaCl and show a density of 0.87-0.94 g/cm3. Halos of tiny fluid inclusions, however, indicate that most if not all zircon inclusions are decrepitated during ascent from depth and/or superheating during entrainment of the xenoliths into the kimberlite. Using EMPA, enstatite and a SiO2 polymorph were identified in opened fluid inclusions exposed at the surface of polished thin sections. Because these phases were exclusively found in the fluid inclusions, they are considered daughter crystals. The enstatite

  15. Reactor vessel and core two-phase flow ultrasonic densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia. Separate effects tests and two-phase flow tests have been conducted to characterize the detector. Tests show the detector can perform in a 343 0 C pressurized water reactor environment and measure the average density of the media surrounding the sensor

  16. Numerical simulation for two-phase jet problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.H.; Shah, V.L.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program TWOP was developed for obtaining the numerical solutions of three-dimensional, transient, two-phase flow system with nonequilibrium and nonhomogeneous conditions. TWOP employs two-fluid model and a set of the conservation equations formulated by Harlow and Amsden along with their Implicit Multi-Field (IMF) numerical technique that allows all degrees of couplings between the two fields. We have further extended the procedure of Harlow and Amsden by incorporating the implicit couplings of phase transition and interfacial heat transfer terms in the energy equations. Numerical results of two tested problems are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the TWOP code. The first problem is the separation of vapor and liquid, showing that the code can handle the computational difficulties such as liquid packing and sharp interface phenomena. The second problem is the high pressure two-phase jet impinged on vertical plate, demonstrating the important role of the interfacial mass and momentum exchange

  17. Visualization in cryogenic environment: Application to two-phase studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, Bernard; Chatain, Denis; Puech, Laurent; Thibault, Pierre; Viargues, François; Wolf, Pierre-Etienne

    2009-10-01

    This paper reviews recent technical developments devoted to the study of cryogenic two-phase fluids. These techniques span from simple flow visualization to quantitative measurements of light scattering. It is shown that simple flow pattern configurations are obtained using classical optical tools (CCD cameras, endoscopes), even in most severe environments (high vacuum, high magnetic field). Quantitative measurements include laser velocimetry, particle sizing, and light scattering analysis. In the case of magnetically compensated gravity boiling oxygen, optical access is used to control the poistioning of a bubble subject to buoyancy forces in an experimental cell. Flow visualization on a two-phase superfluid helium pipe-flow, performed as a support of LHC cooldown studies, leads to flow pattern characterization. Visualization includes stratified and atomized flows. Thanks to the low refractive index contrast between the liquid and its vapor, quantitative results on droplet densities can be obtained even in a multiple scattering regime.

  18. Models for assessing the relative phase velocity in a two-phase flow. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffrath, A.; Ringel, H.

    2000-06-01

    The knowledge of slip or drift flux in two phase flow is necessary for several technical processes (e.g. two phase pressure losses, heat and mass transfer in steam generators and condensers, dwell period in chemical reactors, moderation effectiveness of two phase coolant in BWR). In the following the most important models for two phase flow with different phase velocities (e.g. slip or drift models, analogy between pressure loss and steam quality, ε - ε models and models for the calculation of void distribution in reposing fluids) are classified, described and worked up for a further comparison with own experimental data. (orig.)

  19. Exploration of the phase diagram of liquid water in the low-temperature metastable region using synthetic fluid inclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Chen; Krüger, Yves; Wilke, Max

    2016-01-01

    water with a density of 0.921 kg/m3 remains in a homogeneous state during cooling down to the temperaure of −30.5 °C, where it is transformed into ice whose density corresponds to zero pressure. iii) ice melting. Ice melting temperatures of up to 6.8 °C were measured in absence of the vapour bubble, i......We present new experimental data of the low-temperature metastable region of liquid water derived from high-density synthetic fluid inclusions (996−916 kg/m3) in quartz. Microthermometric measurements include: i) Prograde (upon heating) and retrograde (upon cooling) liquid-vapour homogenisation. We...

  20. Two phase cooling for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.A.; Green, M.A.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    Comments on the use of two phase helium in a closed circuit tubular cooling system and some results obtained with the TPC superconducting magnet are given. Theoretical arguments and experimental evidence are given against a previously suggested method to determine helium two phase flow regimes. Two methods to reduce pressure in the magnet cooling tubes during quenches are discussed; 1) lowering the density of helium in the magnet cooling tubes and 2) proper location of pressure relief valves. Some techniques used to protect the refrigerator from too much cold return gas are also mentioned

  1. Two phase cooling for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.A.; Green, M.A.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Watt, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Comments on the use of two phase helium in a closed circuit tubular cooling system and some results obtained with the TPC superconducting magnet are given. Theoretical arguments and experimental evidence are given against a previously suggested method to determine helium two phase flow regimes. Two methods to reduce pressure in the magnet cooling tubes during quenches are discussed; (1) lowering the density of helium in the magnet cooling tubes and (2) proper location of pressure relief valves. Some techniques used to protect the refrigerator from too much cold return gas are also mentioned. 10 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  2. Raman and micro-thermometric investigation of the fluid inclusions in quartz in a gold-rich formation from Lepaguare mining district (Honduras, Central America).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, D; Salvioli-Mariani, E; Mattioli, M; Menichetti, M; Lottici, P P

    2009-08-01

    Fluid inclusions in the quartz crystals present in gold-rich veins from central Honduras have been studied by means of micro-thermometry and micro-Raman spectroscopy in order to provide information on the physico-chemical conditions and chemical composition of the mineralizing fluids. The use of a confocal micro-Raman apparatus allowed to obtain information on the fluid composition, in particular on the gas phase, minimizing the contributions of the host matrix to the Raman signal. The samples studied were collected from an area (Lepaguare mining district, Northern-Central Honduras) rich in ore deposits due to the Cenozoic magmatic activity, where the gold and sulphide mineralization is connected with a system of quartz veins (few decimetres thick) occurring in low-grade metamorphic rocks and produced by hydrothermal fluids. The quartz crystals present in the gold-rich veins often contain fluid inclusions. Four types of fluid inclusions have been observed, but their assemblage in the same clusters and fracture systems, as well as their comparable salinity and homogenization data, suggest that they have the same origin. Micro-thermometry and Raman spectroscopy provide a composition of the mineralizing fluids attributable to the system H(2)O-NaCl-KCl-CO(2)-CH(4), with temperature and pressure intervals of 210-413 degrees C and 1050-3850 bar, respectively. These data agree with an epigenetic origin of the gold deposit (depth < 6 km) related to granitoid or granodiorite intrusions associated to orogenic environments.

  3. Analysis of hopanes and steranes in single oil-bearing fluid inclusions using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljeström, S; Lausmaa, J; Sjövall, P; Broman, C; Thiel, V; Hode, T

    2010-01-01

    Steranes and hopanes are organic biomarkers used as indicators for the first appearance of eukaryotes and cyanobacteria on Earth. Oil-bearing fluid inclusions may provide a contamination-free source of Precambrian biomarkers, as the oil has been secluded from the environment since the formation of the inclusion. However, analysis of biomarkers in single oil-bearing fluid inclusions, which is often necessary due to the presence of different generations of inclusions, has not been possible due to the small size of most inclusions. Here, we have used time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to monitor in real time the opening of individual inclusions trapped in hydrothermal veins of fluorite and calcite and containing oil from Ordovician source rocks. Opening of the inclusions was performed by using a focused C(60)(+) ion beam and the in situ content was precisely analysed for C(27)-C(29) steranes and C(29)-C(32) hopanes using Bi(3)(+) as primary ions. The capacity to unambiguously detect these biomarkers in the picoliter amount of crude oil from a single, normal-sized (15-30 mum in diameter) inclusion makes the approach promising in the search of organic biomarkers for life's early evolution on Earth.

  4. Heat transfer study of a two-phase refrigerant with liquid-solid phase change inside a smooth plates heat exchanger; Etude des transferts de chaleur d'un fluide frigoporteur diphasique a changement de phase liquide-solide dans un echangeur a plaques lisses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demasles, H.

    2002-05-15

    The purpose of the work is to study two-phase mixture heat exchange composed of water particles suspended in silicone oil circulating in a closed loop. Water, contained in polymer porous matrix, is freezing by successive passages in plane plate heat exchanger. Thermo-hydraulic literature data analysis about these fluids in exchangers shows important blanks in exchange coefficient and pressure drop forecast methods and in experimental data. Experimental results, issued of global energy balance on a test section specifically conceived and made for this study, show doping effect on exchange coefficient. Before phase change, micro-convective effects of rotating particles improve exchange coefficient of 2,3 factor. Supplementary enhancement included between 2 and 16 appeared during phase change. Trial measured discrepancy are certainly induced by bed layer formation due to low flow speed. At the end of particle freezing, when latent heat is not involved anymore in exchange enhancement, important heat transfer reduction is observed. This is attributed to the cooling suspension rheological evolution and the change of flow particle distribution. Modelling results corroborate heat exchange improvement due to phase change: particles act as sources when discharging there latent heat. They stop fluid temperature dropping and enable to keep a high wall temperature gradient. A deepened suspension rheological study is necessary for a better understanding of observed phenomenon, nevertheless these first results show already an important energetic profit brings by particles in range temperature of 0 and -6 deg C. (author)

  5. Studying Suspended Sediment Mechanism with Two-Phase PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinpour, H.; Atkinson, J. F.; Bennett, S. J.; Guala, M.

    2017-12-01

    Suspended sediment transport affects soil erosion, agriculture and water resources quality. Turbulent diffusion is the most primary force to maintain sediments in suspension. Although extensive previous literature have been studying the interactions between turbulent motion and suspended sediment, mechanism of sediments in suspension is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigate suspension of sediments as two distinct phases: one phase of sediments and another phase of fluid with turbulent motions. We designed and deployed a state-of-the-art two-phase PIV measurement technique to discriminate these two phases and acquire velocities of each phase separately and simultaneously. The technique that we have developed is employing a computer-vision based method, which enables us to discriminate sediment particles from fluid tracer particles based on two thresholds, dissimilar particle sizes and different particle intensities. Results indicate that fluid turbulence decreases in the presence of suspended sediments. Obtaining only sediment phase consecutive images enable us to compute fluctuation sediment concentration. This result enlightens understanding of complex interaction between the fluctuation velocities and the fluctuation of associated mass and compares turbulent viscosity with turbulent eddy diffusivity experimentally.

  6. Two phase transitions in Nuclear Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bes, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The status of the art of the problem associated with two phase transitions in the nuclear matter, viz.: the disappearance of the nuclear superfluiditiy with the raising of the rotation velocity and the appearance of an octupolar deformation in the actinide zone, is presented. (L.C.) [pt

  7. Two-phase flow in fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, P.; Long, J.; Zuidema, P.

    1993-11-01

    This report gives the results of a three-day workshop on two-phase flow in fractured rock. The workshop focused on two-phase flow processes that are important in geologic disposal of nuclear waste as experienced in a variety of repository settings. The goals and objectives of the workshop were threefold: exchange information; describe the current state of understanding; and identify research needs. The participants were divided into four subgroups. Each group was asked to address a series of two-phase flow processes. The following groups were defined to address these processes: basic flow processes; fracture/matrix interactions; complex flow processes; and coupled processes. For each process, the groups were asked to address these four issues: (1) describe the two-phase flow processes that are important with respect to repository performance; (2) describe how this process relates to the specific driving programmatic issues given above for nuclear waste storage; (3) evaluate the state of understanding for these processes; and (4) suggest additional research to address poorly understood processes relevant to repository performance. The reports from each of the four working groups are given here

  8. Preliminary report on fluid inclusions from halites in the Castile and lower Salado formations of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, C.L.

    1985-09-01

    A suite of samples composed primarily of halite from the upper Castile and lower Salado Formations of the Permian Basin was selected from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) core for a reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions. Volume percent of these trapped fluids averaged 0.7% to 1%. Freezing-point depressions varied widely and appeared to be unrelated to fluid-inclusion type, to sedimentary facies, or to stratigraphic depth. However, because very low freezing points were usually associated with anhydrite, a relation may exist between freezing-point data and lithology. Dissolved sulfate values were constant through the Castile, then decreased markedly with lesser depth in the lower Salado. This trend correlates very well with observed mineralogy and is consistent with an interpretation of the occurrence of secondary polyhalite as a result of gypsum or anhydrite alteration with simultaneous consumption of dissolved sulfate from the coexisting fluids. Together with the abundance and distribution of fluid inclusions in primary or ''hopper'' crystal structures, this evidence suggests that inclusions seen in these halites did not migrate any significant geographical distance since their formation. 28 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Dynamics of mineral crystallization at inclusion-garnet interface from precipitated slab-derived fluid phase: first in-situ synchrotron x-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, Nadia; Alvaro, Matteo; Campione, Marcello; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Remnants of the fluid phase at ultrahigh pressure (UHP) in subduction environments may be preserved as primary multiphase inclusions in UHP minerals. These inclusions are frequently hosted by minerals stable at mantle depths, such as garnet, and show the same textural features as fluid inclusions. The mineral infillings of the solid multiphase inclusions are generally assumed to have crystallized by precipitation from the solute load of dense supercritical fluids equilibrating with the host rock. Notwithstanding the validity of this assumption, the mode of crystallization of daughter minerals during precipitation within the inclusion and/or the mechanism of interaction between the fluid at supercritical conditions and the host mineral are still poorly understood from a crystallographic point of view. A case study is represented by garnet orthopyroxenites from the Maowu Ultramafic Complex (China) deriving from harzburgite precursors metasomatised at ~ 4 GPa, 750 °C by a silica- and incompatible trace element-rich fluid phase. This metasomatism produced poikilitic orthopyroxene and inclusion-rich garnet porphyroblasts. Solid multiphase primary inclusions in garnet display a size within a few tens of micrometers and negative crystal shapes. Infilling minerals (spinel: 10-20 vol.%; amphibole, chlorite, talc, mica: 80- 90 vol.%) occur with constant volume ratios and derive from trapped solute-rich aqueous fluids. To constrain the possible mode of precipitation of daughter minerals, we performed for the first time a single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiment by means of Synchrotron Radiation at DLS-Diamond Light Source. In combination with electron probe microanalyses, this measurement allowed the unique identification of each mineral phase and their reciprocal orientations. We demonstrated the epitaxial relationship between spinel and garnet and between some hydrous minerals. Epitaxy drives a first-stage nucleation of spinel under near-to-equilibrium conditions

  10. Major element compositions of fluid inclusions from hydrothermal vein-type deposits record eroded sedimentary units in the Schwarzwald district, SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Benjamin F.; Burisch, Mathias; Marks, Michael A. W.; Markl, Gregor

    2017-12-01

    Mixing of sedimentary formation fluids with basement-derived brines is an important mechanism for the formation of hydrothermal veins. We focus on the sources of the sediment-derived fluid component in ore-forming processes and present a comprehensive fluid inclusion study on 84 Jurassic hydrothermal veins from the Schwarzwald mining district (SW Germany). Our data derive from about 2300 fluid inclusions and reveal differences in the average fluid composition between the northern, central, and southern Schwarzwald. Fluids from the northern and southern Schwarzwald are characterised by high salinities (18-26 wt% NaCl+CaCl2), low Ca/(Ca+Na) mole ratios (0.1-0.4), and variable Cl/Br mass ratios (30-1140). In contrast, fluids from the central Schwarzwald show even higher salinities (23-27 wt% NaCl+CaCl2), higher Ca/(Ca+Na) mole ratios (0.2-0.9), and less variable Cl/Br mass ratios (40-130). These fluid compositions correlate with the nature and thickness of the now eroded sedimentary cover rocks. Compared to the northern and the southern Schwarzwald, where halite precipitation occurred during the Middle Triassic, the sedimentary basin in the central Schwarzwald was relatively shallow at this time and no halite was precipitated. Accordingly, Cl/Br ratios of fluids from the central Schwarzwald provide no evidence for the reaction of a sedimentary brine with halite, whereas those from the northern and southern Schwarzwald do. Instead, elevated Ca/(Ca+Na), high SO4 contents, and relatively low Cl/Br imply the presence of a gypsum dissolution brine during vein formation in the central Schwarzwald which agrees with the reconstructed regional Triassic geology. Hence, the information archived in fluid inclusions from hydrothermal veins in the crystalline basement has the potential for reconstructing sedimentary rocks in the former overburden.

  11. Metal-rich fluid inclusions provide new insights into unconformity-related U deposits (Athabasca Basin and Basement, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Antonin; Cathelineau, Michel; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Mercadier, Julien; Banks, David A.; Cuney, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The Paleoproterozoic Athabasca Basin (Canada) hosts numerous giant unconformity-related uranium deposits. The scope of this study is to establish the pressure, temperature, and composition (P-T-X conditions) of the brines that circulated at the base of the Athabasca Basin and in its crystalline basement before, during and after UO2 deposition. These brines are commonly sampled as fluid inclusions in quartz- and dolomite-cementing veins and breccias associated with alteration and U mineralization. Microthermometry and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) data from five deposits (Rabbit Lake, P-Patch, Eagle Point, Millennium, and Shea Creek) complement previously published data for the McArthur River deposit. In all of the deposits investigated, fluid inclusion salinity is between 25 and 40 wt.% NaCl equiv., with compositions displaying a continuum between a "NaCl-rich brine" end-member (Cl > Na > Ca > Mg > K) and a "CaCl2-rich brine" end-member (Cl > Ca ≈ Mg > Na > K). The CaCl2-rich brine has the highest salinity and shows evidence for halite saturation at the time of trapping. The continuum of compositions between the NaCl-rich brine and the CaCl2-rich brine end-members combined with P-T reconstructions suggest anisothermal mixing of the two brines (NaCl-rich brine, 180 ± 30 °C and 800 ± 400 bars; CaCl2-rich brine, 120 ± 30 °C and 600 ± 300 bars) that occurred under fluctuating pressure conditions (hydrostatic to supra-hydrostatic). However, because the two brines were U bearing and therefore oxidized, brine mixing was probably not the driving force for UO2 deposition. Several scenarios are put forward to account for the Cl-Na-Ca-Mg-K composition of the brines, involving combinations of seawater evaporation, halite dissolution, mixing with a halite-dissolution brine, Mg/Ca exchange by dolomitization, Na/Ca exchange by albitization of plagioclase, Na/K exchange by albitization of K-feldspar, and Mg loss by Mg

  12. Dating quartz: Ar/Ar analyses of coexisting muscovite and fluid inclusion - rich quartz from paleocene amorphic aureole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, S.J.; Perez de Arce, C.; Cornejo, P.; Cuitino, L; Klein, J

    2001-01-01

    We present Ar/Ar total fusion and step-heating data for coexisting muscovite and white quartz from the metamorphic aureole of the Lower Paleocene La Copiapina Pluton, 6 km south of Inca de Oro, III Region, Chile. The pluton intrudes the upper clastic sedimentary member of the Punta del Cobre Group (Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous) and the calcareous sedimentary rocks of the Chanarcillo Group (Neocomian), and comprises fine to coarse grained pyroxene-hornblende-biotite quartz diorites and monzodiorites. Its emplacement was controlled on its north-western side by a subvertical NE-trending fault, along which were developed vertically banded skarns (skarn mylonite), suggesting syntectonic intrusion. Biotite K-Ar ages for the pluton fall in the range 61-63 Ma, relating it to a latest Cretaceous to Lowest Paleocene syn-compressional intrusive belt which is present in the area (Matthews and Cornejo, 2000). A metamorphic / metasomatic aureole is developed within the sandstones of the Punta del Cobre Group, on the extreme northern limit of the pluton. In this area, the sedimentary rocks have been replaced by quartz-sericite and quartz-muscovite assemblages, with minor hematite and tourmaline, and late supergene kaolinite and pyrophyllite. A coarse muscovite-quartz-tourmaline-hematite assemblage is developed in and around older (early Upper Cretaceous) andesitic dykes, in the form of replacement / fracture fill veins and replacement zones. Further from the contact with the pluton, fine-grained quartz-sericite rock with coarser muscovite-rich replacement veins represents the dominant lithology. Quartz in the coarse replacement rock is very rich in fluid inclusions. Primary inclusions are mainly of two coexisting types; bi-phase (liquid and gas bubble) and tri-phase (liquid, gas bubble and halite crystal), indicating that the quartz formed in the presence of a boiling fluid. Some inclusions also contain sylvite and occasional hematite daughter crystals. Secondary inclusions

  13. Fluid inclusion and oxygen-isotope evidence for low-temperature Au-Pt-Pd (± U) mineralization at Corronation Hill, NT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, T.

    1992-01-01

    The fluid inclusion and isotope data have been used to constrain the ore genesis models for the Au-Pt-Pd-U mineralization at Coronation Hill. The fluid inclusions demonstrate that the ore fluid was strongly saline with an unusually high CaCl 2 content, and that the mineralisation was probably formed from a boiling fluid at around 140 deg C. Furthermore, the fluids were highly oxidised and the replacement of earlier chlorite by hematite is common throughout the deposit. It is concluded that both U-rich and U-poor Au-Pt-Pd mineralisation were formed by descending, low-temperature, highly oxidised, very saline, meteoric fluids. The segregation of U was controlled by fluid-rock interaction in the feldspathic or carbonate rocks. Interaction with carbonaceous or chloritic rocks resulted in a reduction in fO 2 , and consequent precipitation of U, Au, Pt and Pd. The other two types of metal associations can be explained by further reaction of the mineralizing fluids. 3 figs

  14. Instrumentation for localized measurements in two-phase flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, G.G.; Averill, R.H.; Shurts, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Three types of instrumentation that have been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., and its predecessor, Aerojet Nuclear company, at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to investigate two-phase flow phenomenon in a nuclear reactor at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility are discussed: (a) a combination drag disc-turbine transducer (DTT), (b) a multibeam nuclear hardened gamma densitometer system, and (c) a conductivity sensitive liquid level transducer (LLT). The DTT obtains data on the complex problem of two-phase flow conditions in the LOFT primary coolant system during a loss-os-coolant experiment (LOCE). The discussion of the DTT describes how a turbine, measuring coolant velocity, and a drag disc, measuring coolant momentum flux, can provide valuable mass flow data. The nuclear hardened gamma densitometer is used to obtain density and flow regime information for two-phase flow in the LOFT primary coolant system during a LOCE. The LLT is used to measure water and steam conditions within the LOFT reactor core during a LOCE. The LLT design and the type of data obtained are described

  15. Temporal and spatial distribution of alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusions in the transitional high-sulfidation epithermal-porphyry copper system at Red Mountain, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar; Newton, M. Claiborne; Westman, Erik C.; Kamilli, Robert J.; Canby, Vertrees M.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Red Mountain, Arizona, is a Laramide porphyry Cu system (PCD) that has experienced only a modest level of erosion compared to most other similar deposits in the southwestern United States. As a result, the upper portion of the magmatic–hydrothermal system, which represents the transition from shallower high-sulfidation epithermal mineralization to deeper porphyry Cu mineralization, is well preserved. Within the Red Mountain system, alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusion assemblages show a systematic distribution in both time and space. Early-potassic alteration (characterized by the minerals biotite and magnetite) is paragenetically earlier than late-potassic alteration (K-feldspar–anhydrite) and both are followed by later phyllic (sericite–pyrite) alteration. Advanced argillic alteration (pyrophyllite–alunite–other clay minerals) is thought to be coeval with or postdate phyllic alteration. Minerals characteristic of advanced argillic alteration are present in the near surface. Phyllic alteration extends to greater depths compared to advanced argillic alteration. Early-potassic and late-potassic alteration are only observed in the deepest part of the system. Considerable overlap of phyllic alteration with both early-potassic and late-potassic alteration zones is observed. The hypogene mineralization contains 0.4–1.2% Cu and is spatially and temporally related to the late-potassic alteration event. Molybdenum concentration is typically In the deepest part of the system, an early generation of low-to-moderate density and salinity liquid + vapor inclusions with opaque daughter minerals is followed in time by halite-bearing inclusions that also contain opaque daughter minerals indicating that an early intermediate-density magmatic fluid evolved to a high-density, high-salinity mineralizing fluid. The increase in density and salinity of fluids with time observed in the deeper parts of the system may be the result of immiscibility (“boiling”) of

  16. An introduction to two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemonnier, Herve

    2006-01-01

    This course aims at proposing the necessary background for a rational approach to two-phase flows which are notably present in numerous industrial devices and equipment designed to perform energy transfer or mass transfer. The first part proposes a phenomenological approach to main two-phase flow structures and presents their governing variables. The second part presents some proven measurement techniques. The third part focuses on modelling. It recalls the equation elaboration techniques which are based on basic principles of mechanics and thermodynamics and on the application of different averaging operators to these principles. Some useful models are then presented such as models of pressure loss in a duct. The last chapter addresses some fundamental elements of heat transfers in ebullition and condensation

  17. Apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, John D.; Tong, Long S.

    1977-03-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

  18. Geometrical automata for two phase flow simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, V.; Guido-Lavalle, G.; Clausse, A.

    1996-01-01

    An automaton is an entity defined by a mathematical state which changes following iterative rules representing the interaction with the neighborhood. A model of automata for two-phase flow simulation consisting in a field of disks which are allowed to change their radii and move in a plane is presented. The model is more general than the classical cellular automata in two respects: (1) the grid of cellular automata is dismissed in favor of a trajectory generator; and (2) the rules of interaction involve parameters intended to represent some of the most relevant variables governing the actual physical interactions between phases. Computational experiments show that the algorithm captures the essential physics underlying two-phase flow problems such as bubbly-slug pattern transition and void fraction development along tubes. A comparison with experimental data of void fraction profiles is presented, showing excellent agreement. (orig.)

  19. Review of two-phase water hammer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuthe, T.G.

    1997-01-01

    In a thermalhydraulic system like a nuclear power plant, where steam and water mix and are used to transport large amounts of energy, there is a potential to create two-phase water hammer. Large water hammer pressure transients are a threat to piping integrity and represent an important safety concern. Such events may cause unscheduled plant down time. The objective of this review is to provide a summary of the information on two-phase water hammer available in the open literature with particular emphasis on water hammer occurrences in nuclear power plants. Past reviews concentrated on studies concerned with preventing water hammer. The present review focuses on the fundamental experimental, analytical, and modelling studies. The papers discussed here were chosen from searches covering up to July 1993. (author)

  20. Apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.D.; Tong, L.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods. 3 claims, 9 figures

  1. Two-phase flow experiments through intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, R.P.; Norris, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of critical two-phase water flow, through simulated and actual intergranular stress corrosion cracks, were performed to obtain data to evaluate a leak flow rate model and investigate acoustic transducer effectiveness in detecting and sizing leaks. The experimental program included a parametric study of the effects of crack geometry, fluid stagnation pressure and temperature, and crack surface roughness on leak flow rate. In addition, leak detection, location, and leak size estimation capabilities of several different acoustic transducers were evaluated as functions of leak rate and transducer position. This paper presents flow rate data for several different cracks and fluid conditions. It also presents the minimum flows rate detected with the acoustic sensors and a relationship between acoustic signal strength and leak flow rate

  2. Study of nonequilibrium dispersed two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.N. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of liquid droplets in a superheated steam environment is essential to the accurate prediction of nuclear fuel rod surface temperatures during the blowdown and reflood phase of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). In response to this need, this treatise presents several original and significant contributions to the field of thermofluid physics. The research contained herein presents a statistical derivation of the two-phase mass, momentum, and energy-conservation equations using a droplet continuity equation analogous to that used in the Kinetic Theory of Gases. Unlike the Eulerian volume and time-averaged conservation equations generally used to describe dispersed two-phase flow behavior, this statistical averaging approach results in an additional mass momentum or energy term in each of the respective conservation equations. Further, this study demonstrates that current definitions of the volumetric vapor generation rate used in the mass conservation equation are inappropriate results under certain circumstances. The mass conservation equation derived herein is used to obtain a new definition for the volumetric vapor-generation rate. Last, a simple two phase phenomenological model, based on the statistically averaged conservation equations, is presented and solved analytically. It is shown that the actual quality and vapor temperature, under these circumstances, depend on a single dimensionless group

  3. Review of two-phase instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Han Ok; Seo, Han Ok; Kang, Hyung Suk; Cho, Bong Hyun; Lee, Doo Jeong

    1997-06-01

    KAERI is carrying out a development of the design for a new type of integral reactors. The once-through helical steam generator is important design features. The study on designs and operating conditions which prevent flow instability should precede the introduction of one-through steam generator. Experiments are currently scheduled to understand two-phase instability, evaluate the effect of each design parameter on the critical point, and determine proper inlet throttling for the prevention of instability. This report covers general two-phase instability with review of existing studies on this topics. The general classification of two phase flow instability and the characteristics of each type of instability are first described. Special attention is paid to BWR core flow instability and once-through steam generator instability. The reactivity feedback and the effect of system parameters are treated mainly for BWR. With relation to once-through steam generators, the characteristics of convective heating and dryout point oscillation are first investigated and then the existing experimental studies are summarized. Finally chapter summarized the proposed correlations for instability boundary conditions. (author). 231 refs., 5 tabs., 47 figs

  4. Origin of the Okrouhlá Radouň episyenite-hosted uranium deposit, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic: fluid inclusion and stable isotope constraints

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dolníček, Z.; René, Miloš; Hermannová, S.; Prochaska, W.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2014), s. 409-425 ISSN 0026-4598 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME10083 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * Uranium mineralization * Episyenite * Fluid inclusions Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.561, year: 2014

  5. Bicarbonate-rich fluid inclusions and hydrogen diffusion in quartz from the Libčice orogenic gold deposit, Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrstka, Tomáš; Dubessy, J.; Zachariáš, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 281, 3-4 (2011), s. 317-332 ISSN 0009-2541 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : bicarbonate * fluid inclusions * hydrogen diffusion * orogenic gold deposits * raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.518, year: 2011

  6. Melt, fluid and crystal inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from Kerguelen plume-derived picritic basalts: evidence for interaction with the Kerguelen Plateau lithosphere.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borisova, A.U.; Nikogosian, I.; Shimizu, N.; Weis, D.; Scoates, J.S.; Touret, J.L.R.; Damasceno, D.

    2002-01-01

    Melt, fluid and crystal inclusions have been studied in olivine phenocrysts from a suite of picritic basalts dredged during the "Marion Dufresne" MD 109 cruise (Dredge 6) from a seamount located between the Kerguelen Archipelago and Heard Island (Southern Indian Ocean). A two-stage polybaric

  7. Two-phase flow in volatile oil reservoir using two-phase pseudo-pressure well test method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, M.; Ahmadi, M. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2009-09-15

    A study was conducted to better understand the behaviour of volatile oil reservoirs. Retrograde condensation occurs in gas-condensate reservoirs when the flowing bottomhole pressure (BHP) lowers below the dewpoint pressure, thus creating 4 regions in the reservoir with different liquid saturations. Similarly, when the BHP of volatile oil reservoirs falls below the bubblepoint pressure, two phases are created in the region around the wellbore, and a single phase (oil) appears in regions away from the well. In turn, higher gas saturation causes the oil relative permeability to decrease towards the near-wellbore region. Reservoir compositional simulations were used in this study to predict the fluid behaviour below the bubblepoint. The flowing bottomhole pressure was then exported to a well test package to diagnose the occurrence of different mobility regions. The study also investigated the use of a two-phase pseudo-pressure method on volatile and highly volatile oil reservoirs. It was concluded that this method can successfully predict the true permeability and mechanical skin. It can also distinguish between mechanical skin and condensate bank skin. As such, the two-phase pseudo-pressure method is particularly useful for developing after-drilling well treatment and enhanced oil recovery process designs. However, accurate relative permeability and PVT data must be available for reliable interpretation of the well test in volatile oil reservoirs. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  8. Flashing liquid jets and two-phase droplet dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, Vincent; Bowen, Phil; Witlox, Henk

    2007-01-01

    The large-scale release of a liquid contained at upstream conditions above its local atmospheric boiling point is a scenario often given consideration in process industry risk analysis. Current-hazard quantification software often employs simplistic equilibrium two-phase approaches. Scaled water experiments have been carried out measuring droplet velocity and droplet size distributions for a range of exit orifice aspect ratios (L/d) and conditions representing low to high superheat. 2D Phase-Doppler Anemometry has been utilised to characterise droplet kinematics and spray quality. Droplet size correlations have been developed for non-flashing, the transition between non-flashing and flashing, and fully flashing jets. Using high-speed shadowography, transition between regimes is defined in terms of criteria identified in the external flow structure. An overview companion paper provides a wider overview of the problem and reports implementation of these correlations into consequence models and subsequent validation. The fluid utilised throughout is water, hence droplet correlations are developed in non-dimensional form to allow extrapolation to other fluids through similarity scaling, although verification of model performance for other fluids is required in future studies. Data is reduced via non-dimensionalisation in terms of the Weber number and Jakob number, essentially representing the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the system, respectively. A droplet-size distribution correlation has also been developed, conveniently presented as a volume undersize distribution based on the Rosin-Rammler distribution. Separate correlations are provided for sub-cooled mechanical break-up and fully flashing jets. This form of correlation facilitates rapid estimates of likely mass rainout quantities, as well as full distribution information for more rigorous two-phase thermodynamic modelling in the future

  9. Operation of a cascade air conditioning system with two-phase loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yinshan; Wang, Jinliang; Zhao, Futao; Verma, Parmesh; Radcliff, Thomas D.

    2018-05-29

    A method of operating a heat transfer system includes starting operation of a first heat transfer fluid vapor/compression circulation loop including a fluid pumping mechanism, a heat exchanger for rejecting thermal energy from a first heat transfer fluid, and a heat absorption side of an internal heat exchanger. A first conduit in a closed fluid circulation loop circulates the first heat transfer fluid therethrough. Operation of a second two-phase heat transfer fluid circulation loop is started after starting operation of the first heat transfer fluid circulation loop. The second heat transfer fluid circulation loop transfers heat to the first heat transfer fluid circulation loop through the internal heat exchanger and includes a heat rejection side of the internal heat exchanger, a liquid pump, and a heat exchanger evaporator. A second conduit in a closed fluid circulation loop circulates a second heat transfer fluid therethrough.

  10. Numerical calculation of two-phase turbulent jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saif, A.A.

    1995-05-01

    Two-phase turbulent round jets were numerically simulated using a multidimensional two-phase CFD code based on the two-fluid model. The turbulence phenomena were treated with the standard k-{epsilon} model. It was modified to take into account the additional dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy by the dispersed phase. Within the context of the two-fluid model it is more appropriate and physically justified to treat the diffusion by an interfacial force in the momentum equation. In this work, the diffusion force and the additional dissipation effect by the dispersed phase were modeled starting from the classical turbulent energy spectrum analysis. A cut-off frequency was proposed to decrease the dissipation effect by the dispersed phase when large size particles are introduced in the flow. The cut-off frequency combined with the bubble-induced turbulence effect allows for an increase in turbulence for large particles. Additional care was taken in choosing the right kind of experimental data from the literature so that a good separate effect test was possible for their models. The models predicted the experimental data very closely and they were general enough to predict extreme limit cases: water-bubble and air-droplet jets.

  11. High resolution, high sensitivity imaging and analysis of minerals and inclusions (fluid and melt) using the new CSIRO-GEMOC nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, C.G.; McInnes, B.M.; Van Achterbergh, E.; Williams, P.J.; Dong, G.; Zaw, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The new CSIRO-GEMOC Nuclear Microprobe (NMP) The instrument was designed specifically for minerals analysis and imaging and to achieve ppm to sub-ppm sensitivity at a spatial resolution of 1-2 μm using X-rays and y-rays induced by MeV energy ion beams. The key feature of the design is a unique magnetic quadrupole quintuplet ion focussing system that combines high current with high spatial resolution (Ryan et al., 1999). These design goals have been achieved or exceeded. On the first day of operation, a spot-size of 1.3 μm was obtained at a beam current of 0.5 nA, suitable for fluid inclusion analysis and imaging. The spot-size grows to just 1.8 μm at 10 nA (3 MeV protons), ideal for mineralogical samples with detection limits down to 0.2 ppm achieved in quantitative, high resolution, trace element images. Applications of the NMP include: research into ore deposit processes through trace element geochemistry, mineralogy and fluid inclusion analysis of ancient deposits and active sea-floor environments, ore characterization, and fundamental studies of mantle processes and extraterrestrial material. Quantitative True Elemental Imaging Dynamic Analysis is a method for projecting quantitative major and trace element images from proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) data obtained using the NMP (Ryan et al., 1995). The method un-mixes full elemental spectral signatures to produce quantitative images that can be directly interrogated for the concentrations of all elements in selected areas or line projections, etc. Fluid Inclusion Analysis and Imaging The analysis of fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals holds the key to understanding ore metal pathways and ore formation processes. PIXE analysis using the NMP provides a direct non-destructive method to determine the composition of these trapped fluids with detection limits down to 20 ppm. However, some PIXE results have been controversial, such as the strong partitioning of Cu into the vapour phase (e

  12. Fluid Inclusion and Oxygen Isotope Constraints on the Origin and Hydrothermal Evolution of the Haisugou Porphyry Mo Deposit in the Northern Xilamulun District, NE China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihai Shu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Haisugou porphyry Mo deposit is located in the northern Xilamulun district, northeastern China. Based on alteration and mineralization styles and crosscutting relationships, the hydrothermal evolution in Haisugou can be divided into three stages: an early potassic alteration stage with no significant metal deposition, a synmineralization sericite-chlorite alteration stage with extensive Mo precipitation, and a postmineralization stage characterized by barren quartz and minor calcite and fluorite. The coexistence of high-salinity brine inclusions with low-salinity inclusions both in potassic alteration stage (~440°C and locally in the early time of mineralization stage (380–320°C indicates the occurrence of fluid boiling. The positive correlations between the homogenization temperatures and the salinities of the fluids and the low oxygen isotopic compositions (δ18Ofluid < 3‰ of the syn- to postmineralization quartz together suggest the mixing of magmatic fluids with meteoric water, which dominated the whole mineralization process. The early boiling fluids were not responsible for ore precipitation, whereas the mixing with meteoric water, which resulted in temperature decrease and dilution that significantly reduced the metal solubility, should have played the major role in Mo mineralization. Combined fluid inclusion microthermometry and chlorite geothermometer results reveal that ore deposition mainly occurred between 350 and 290°C in Haisugou.

  13. Stable isotope and fluid inclusion evidence for the origin of the Brandberg West area Sn-W vein deposits, NW Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, Paul; Harris, Chris

    2006-10-01

    The Brandberg West region of NW Namibia is dominated by poly-deformed turbidites and carbonate rocks of the Neoproterozoic Damara Supergoup, which have been regionally metamorphosed to greenschist facies and thermally metamorphosed up to mid-amphibolite facies by Neoproterozoic granite plutons. The meta-sedimentary rocks host Damaran-age hydrothermal quartz vein-hosted Sn-W mineralization at Brandberg West and numerous nearby smaller deposits. Fluid inclusion microthermometric studies of the vein quartz suggests that the ore-forming fluids at the Brandberg West mine were CO2-bearing aqueous fluids represented by the NaCl-CaCl2-H2O-CO2 system with moderate salinity (mean=8.6 wt% NaClequivalent).Temperatures determined using oxygen isotope thermometry are 415-521°C (quartz-muscovite), 392-447°C (quartz-cassiterite), and 444-490°C (quartz-hematite). At Brandberg West, the oxygen isotope ratios of quartz veins and siliciclastic host rocks in the mineralized area are lower than those in the rocks and veins of the surrounding areas suggesting that pervasive fluid-rock interaction occurred during mineralization. The O- and H-isotope data of quartz-muscovite veins and fluid inclusions indicate that the ore fluids were dominantly of magmatic origin, implying that mineralization occurred above a shallow granite pluton. Simple mass balance calculations suggest water/rock ratios of 1.88 (closed system) and 1.01 (open system). The CO2 component of the fluid inclusions had similar δ 13C to the carbonate rocks intercalated with the turbidites. It is most likely that mineralization at Brandberg West was caused by a combination of an impermeable marble barrier and interaction of the fluids with the marble. The minor deposits in the area have quartz veins with higher δ 18O values, which is consistent with these deposits being similar geological environments exposed at higher erosion levels.

  14. The evolution of pegmatite-hosted Sn-W mineralization at Nong Sua, Thailand: Evidence from fluid inclusions and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnen, Robert L.; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.

    1994-01-01

    The Nong Sua aplite-pergmatite complex contains two dominant styles of Sn-W-Ta-Nb mineralization. Cassiterite ± Nb-Ta-Ti oxide minerals are disseminated in the pegmatite, and cassiterite and wolframite are hosted by quartz-tourmaline veins which are contained solely within aplite. The orthomagmatic fluid at Nong Sua is preserved as primary fluid inclusions in the cores of magmatic garnet crystals that have high tin concentrations (garnet cores without fluid inclusions do not contain elevated tin concentrations). These fluid inclusions have a composition of 3 wt% NaCl eq. The low salinity suggests that, at vapor saturation, tin was partitioned in favour of the melt, which allowed cassiterite to initially crystallize directly from the melt. Primary, pseudosecondary, and secondary fluid inclusions in cassiterite, tourmaline, and quartz record three-component mixing of the orthomagmatic fluid with high salinity aqueous and with CO 2-rich fluids. The orthomagmatic water is interpreted to have had δ 18O value of +8.7 to +9.9 per mil and a δD value of -72 to -78 per mil from δ18O analyses of muscovite and quartz, and δD of muscovite. The δ18O composition of muscovite decreased from 10.1 to 8.0 per mil and δD increased from - 106 to - 85 per mil, from the magmatic to the hydrothermal stages of pegmatite evolution. These changes are consistent with an influx of metamorphic fluids or evolved meteoric waters. We consider that the saturation of the melt with vapor caused the pressure in the pegmatite to rise to approximately 3.8 kbar, at a temperature of 650°C. Fluid overpressure caused the aplite to fracture, and veins to form from fluids which migrated into the fracture-induced low pressure zones. This event can be modeled by an isothermal decompression to 2.7 kbar. Cassiterite deposition was probably controlled by increasing fO 2, whereas wolframite deposition resulted from the mixing of W-rich with Fe-Mn-rich fluids. In both cases decompression, cooling, and

  15. Two-phase flow dynamics in ECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albraaten, P.J.

    1981-07-01

    The present report summarizes the achievements within the project ''Two-phase Systems and ECC''. The results during 1978 - 1980 are accounted for in brief as they have been documented in earlier reports. The results during the first half of 1981 are accounted for in greater detail. They contain a new model for the Basset force and test runs with this model using the test code RISQUE. Furthermore, test runs have been performed with TRAC-PD2 MOD 1. This code was implemented on Edwards Pipe Blowdown experiment (a standard test case) and UC-Berkeley Reflooding experiment (a non-standard test case.) (Auth.)

  16. Two phase cooling for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.A.; Green, M.A.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Watt, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    A closed circuit tubular cooling system for superconducting magnets offers advantages of limiting boiloff and containing high pressures during quenches. Proper location of automatic valves to lower pressures and protect the refrigerator in the event of quenches is described. Theoretical arguments and exprimental evidence are given against a previously suggested method to determine He two phase flow regimes. If loss of flow occurs due to some types of refrigeration failure and transfer lines have enough heat leak to warm up, quenches are induced when the flow is restored. Examples are taken from experience with the TPC magnet

  17. Isotope geochemistry of fluid inclusions in Permian halite with implications for the isotopic history of ocean water and the origin of saline formation waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauth, L.P.; Beeunas, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    deltaD and delta 18 O values have been determined for fluid inclusions in 45 samples of Permian halite. The inclusions are enriched in 18 O relative to the meteoric water line but are depleted in D relative to ocean water. Inclusions with the more positive delta-values coincide with the isotopic compositions expected for evaporating sea water which follows a hooked trajectory on a deltaD-delta 18 O diagram. Inclusions with more negative delta-values may represent more highly evaporated sea water but probably reflect synsedimentary or diagenetic mixing to those of a modern evaporite pan to indicate that Permian sea water was isotopically similar to modern sea water. Connate evaporite brines can have negative delta-values because of the probable hooked isotope trajectory of evaporating sea water and/or synsedimentary mixing of evaporite brines with meteoric waters. (author)

  18. Development of One Dimensional Hyperbolic Coupled Solver for Two-Phase Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eoi Jin; Kim, Jong Tae; Jeong, Jae June

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study is a code development for one dimensional two-phase two-fluid flows. In this study, the computations of two-phase flow were performed by using the Roe scheme which is one of the upwind schemes. The upwind scheme is widely used in the computational fluid dynamics because it can capture discontinuities clearly such as a shock. And this scheme is applicable to multi-phase flows by the extension methods which were developed by Toumi, Stadtke, etc. In this study, the extended Roe upwind scheme by Toumi for two-phase flow was implemented in the one-dimensional code. The scheme was applied to a shock tube problem and a water faucet problem. This numerical method seems efficient for non oscillating solutions of two phase flow problems, and also capable for capturing discontinuities

  19. Development of One Dimensional Hyperbolic Coupled Solver for Two-Phase Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eoi Jin; Kim, Jong Tae; Jeong, Jae June

    2008-08-15

    The purpose of this study is a code development for one dimensional two-phase two-fluid flows. In this study, the computations of two-phase flow were performed by using the Roe scheme which is one of the upwind schemes. The upwind scheme is widely used in the computational fluid dynamics because it can capture discontinuities clearly such as a shock. And this scheme is applicable to multi-phase flows by the extension methods which were developed by Toumi, Stadtke, etc. In this study, the extended Roe upwind scheme by Toumi for two-phase flow was implemented in the one-dimensional code. The scheme was applied to a shock tube problem and a water faucet problem. This numerical method seems efficient for non oscillating solutions of two phase flow problems, and also capable for capturing discontinuities.

  20. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  1. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

    2012-09-26

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the

  2. Turbulence in two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, J.P.; Houze, R.N.; Buenger, D.E.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Hot film Anemometry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry have been employed in this work to study the turbulence characteristics of Bubbly and Stratified two-phase flows, respectively. Extensive consistency checks were made to establish the reliability and hence the utility of these experimental techniques for the measurement of turbulence in two-phase flows. Buoyancy-driven turbulence in vertical bubbly flows has been identified experimentally and correlated in terms of a shear velocity superposition approach. This approach provides a criterion for the demarcation of the buoyancy-driven turbulence region from the wall shear-generated turbulence region. Our data confirm the roughly isotropic behavior expected for buoyancy-driven turbulence. Upgrading of our experimental system will permit investigations of the wall-shear dominated regime (i.e., isotropy, superposition approach, etc.). The stratified flow data demonstrate clearly that the maximum in the mean velocity profile does not coincide with the zero shear plane, indicating the existence of a negative eddy viscosity region. Previous studies do not take into account this difference and thus they yield incorrect friction factor data in addition to certain puzzling behavior in the upper wall region. The conditioned turbulence data in the wavy region indicate interesting trends and that an appropriate normalization of intensities must take into account the shear velocity at the interfacial (wavy) region

  3. Two Phase Flow Simulation Using Cellular Automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcel, C.P.

    2002-01-01

    The classical mathematical treatment of two-phase flows is based on the average of the conservation equations for each phase.In this work, a complementary approach to the modeling of these systems based on statistical population balances of aut omata sets is presented.Automata are entities defined by mathematical states that change following iterative rules representing interactions with the neighborhood.A model of automata for two-phase flow simulation is presented.This model consists of fie lds of virtual spheres that change their volumes and move around a certain environment.The model is more general than the classical cellular automata in two respects: the grid of cellular automata is dismissed in favor of a trajectory generator, and the rules of interaction involve parameters representing the actual physical interactions between phases.Automata simulation was used to study unsolved two-phase flow problems involving high heat flux rates. One system described in this work consists of a vertical channel with saturated water at normal pressure heated from the lower surface.The heater causes water to boil and starts the bubble production.We used cellular automata to describe two-phase flows and the interaction with the heater.General rule s for such cellular automata representing bubbles moving in stagnant liquid were used, with special attention to correct modeling of different mechanisms of heat transfer.The results of the model were compared to previous experiments and correlations finding good agreement.One of the most important findings is the confirmation of Kutateladze's idea about a close relation between the start of critical heat flux and a change in the flow's topology.This was analyzed using a control volume located in the upper surface of the heater.A strong decrease in the interfacial surface just before the CHF start was encountered.The automata describe quite well some characteristic parameters such as the shape of the local void fraction in the

  4. The La Unión Au ± Cu prospect, Camagüey District, Cuba: fluid inclusion and stable isotope evidence for ore-forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Miriela María Ulloa; Moura, Márcia Abrahão; Olivo, Gema R.; Botelho, Nilson Francisquini; Kyser, T. Kurtis; Bühn, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The Camagüey district, Cuba, is known for its epithermal precious metal deposits in a Cretaceous volcanic arc setting. Recently, the La Unión prospect was discovered in the southern part of the district, containing gold and minor copper mineralization interpreted as porphyry type. Mineralization is hosted in a 73.0 ± 1.5 Ma calc-alkaline I-type oxidized porphyry quartz diorite intrusive within volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the early Cretaceous Guáimaro Formation. The porphyry is affected by propylitic alteration and crosscut by a network of quartz and carbonate veinlets and veins. Chlorite, epidote, sericite, quartz, and pyrite are the main minerals in the early veins which are cut by late carbonate and zeolite veins. Late barite pseudomorphously replaces pyrite. Gold is associated with pyrite as disseminations in the altered quartz diorite and in the veins, occurring as inclusions or filling fractures in pyrite with 4 g/t Au in bulk samples, and up to 900 ppm Au in in pyrite. Fluid inclusion and oxygen isotope data are consistent with a H2O-NaCl-(KCl) mineralizing fluid, derived from the quartz diorite magma, and trapped at least at 425°C and 1.2 kbar. This primary fluid unmixed into two fluid phases, a hypersaline aqueous fluid and a low-salinity vapor-rich fluid. Boiling during cooling may have played an important role in metal precipitation. Pyrite δ34S values for the La Unión prospect range between 0.71‰ and 1.31‰, consistent with a homogeneous magmatic sulfur source. The fluids in equilibrium with the mineralized rocks have estimated δ18O values from 8‰ to 11.8‰, calculated for a temperature range of 480-505°C. The tectonic environment of the La Unión prospect, its high gold and low copper contents, the physical-chemical characteristics of the mineralizing fluids and the isotopic signature of the alteration minerals and fluids indicate that the La Unión gold mineralization is similar to the porphyry gold type, even though the ore

  5. Na-Cl-Br systematics of fluid inclusions from Mississippi Valley-type deposits, Appalachian Basin: Constraints on solute origin and migration paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesler, S.E.; Martini, A.M.; Appold, M.S.; Walter, L.M.; Huston, T.J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Furman, F.C. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated Na-Cl-Br systematics of fluid inclusion-hosted brines in Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits from the Appalachian Basin. Unlike other geochemical tracers such as lead and strontium isotopes which constrain metal sources, Na-Cl-Br systematics identify sources of brine salinity. Saline formation waters can vary systematically within and between basins with regard to their Na-Cl-Br compositions depending on the importance of halite dissolution relative to retention of subaerially evaporated seawater for the halogen budget. Oil field brine compositions from the Illinois and Appalachian basins are quite distinct in their Na-Cl-Br systematics. Compositions of saline fluid inclusions in MVT deposits generally are consistent with these regional differences. These results shed new light on the extent of regional flow systems and on the geochemical evolution of saline fluids responsible for mineralization. Nearly all fluid inclusions analyzed from the Appalachian MVT deposits have Na/Br and Cl/Br ratios less than modern seawater, consistent with ratios observed in marine brines involved in halite precipitation. The Na-Cl-Br systematics of the brines responsible for Appalachian MVT deposits may be inherited from original marine brines refluxed into the porous carbonate shelf sediments that host these deposits. The Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios of most fluid inclusion-hosted brines from Appalachian MVT sphalerites and fluorites fall into two compositional groups, one from the Lower Cambrian paleoaquifer and another from the Lower Ordovician paleoaquifer. Leachates from most MVT barite deposits form a third compositional group having lower Na/Br and Cl/Br ratios than the other two. Appalachian MVT leachate compositions differ significantly from those in MVT deposits in the Cincinnati arch-midcontinent region suggesting that these two MVT provinces formed from brines of different origin or flow path. 59 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Chemical Compositions of Fluid Inclusions in the Jalal –Abad iron oxide deposit, North West of Zarand, Using LA-ICP-MS Microanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Karimi Shahraki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Poshtebadam Bafq Zarand district in central Iran is a world class iron oxide province. This region contains over two billion tons of iron ore reserves within more than 34 major magnetic anomalies and deposits in an area of 7,500 km2 (Stosch et al., 2011. The Jalal-Abad iron ore deposit (200Mt at 45% Fe, 1.18% S and 0.08% P is located 38 km northwest of Zarand, 16 km southeast of the Rizu town in the Kerman province, Iran. Iron ore deposits are hosted by the Early Cambrian Rizu Series, composed mainly of sedimentary, volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks which are dominated by dolomite, sandstone, shale, siltstone, tuff, ignimbrite and rhyodacite. The origin of the iron oxide deposits is controversial and various genetic models have been suggested. Some researchers believe in magmatic origins or Kiruna type, while others suggest metasomatic replacement from pre-existing rocks (Stosch et al., 2011. LA-ICP-MS has been used to characterize the multi element chemistry of the diverse fluid inclusions found in the Jalal–Abad iron oxide deposit. The aim of this investigation was to understand the genesis of the ore body and identify possible hydrothermal fluid sources in the Jalal-Abad district. Sampling and method of study About 100 samples from different types of ore were collected from surface outcrops and a drill core whose association with mineralization are well established. Thin sections, polished thin sections and polished sections were prepared. SEM studies (FEI 5900LV and LA-ICP-MS analyses of fluid inclusions were carried out in the School of Earth and Environment, the University of Leeds, UK. Fluid inclusions were studied using a Linkam THM-600 heating-freezing stage mounted on Zeiss petrography microscope at the Iranian Mineral Processing Research Center. Result and discussion Jalal Abad deposit is hosted by the early Cambrian volcano-sedimentary rocks of the Rizu series. Stratabound mineralization occurs in a variety of

  7. Two-phase flow induced vibrations in CANDU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The U-Bend region of nuclear steam generators tube bundles have suffered from two-phase cross flow induced vibrations. Tubes in this region have experienced high amplitude vibrations leading to catastrophic failures. Turbulent buffeting and fluid-elastic instability has been identified as the main causes. Previous investigations have focused on flow regime and two-phase flow damping ratio. However, tube bundles in steam generators have vapour generated on the surface of the tubes, which might affect the flow regime, void fraction distribution, turbulent intensity levels and tube-flow interaction, all of which have the potential to change the tube vibration response. A cantilevered tube bundle made of electric cartridges heaters was built and tested in a Freon-11 flow loop at McMaster University. Tubes were arranged in a parallel triangular configuration. The bundle was exposed to two-phase cross flows consisting of different combinations of void from two sources, void generated upstream of the bundle and void generated at the surface of the tubes. Tube tip vibration response was measured optically and void fraction was measured by gamma densitometry technique. It was found that tube vibration amplitude in the transverse direction was reduced by a factor of eight for void fraction generated at the tube surfaces only, when compared to the upstream only void generation case. The main explanation for this effect is a reduction in the correlation length of the turbulent buffeting forcing function. Theoretical calculations of the tube vibration response due to turbulent buffeting under the same experimental conditions predicted a similar reduction in tube amplitude. The void fraction for the fluid-elastic instability threshold in the presence of tube bundle void fraction generation was higher than that for the upstream void fraction generation case. The first explanation of this difference is the level of turbulent buffeting forces the tube bundle was exposed to

  8. Parallel two-phase-flow-induced vibrations in fuel pin model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio; Yamashita, Tadashi

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of vibrations of a fuel pin model -herein meaning the essential form of a fuel pin from the standpoint of vibration- in a parallel air-and-water two-phase flow. The essential part of the experimental apparatus consisted of a flat elastic strip made of stainless steel, both ends of which were firmly supported in a circular channel conveying the two-phase fluid. Vibrational strain of the fuel pin model, pressure fluctuation of the two-phase flow and two-phase-flow void signals were measured. Statistical measures such as power spectral density, variance and correlation function were calculated. The authors obtained (1) the relation between variance of vibrational strain and two-phase-flow velocity, (2) the relation between variance of vibrational strain and two-phase-flow pressure fluctuation, (3) frequency characteristics of variance of vibrational strain against the dominant frequency of the two-phase-flow pressure fluctuation, and (4) frequency characteristics of variance of vibrational strain against the dominant frequency of two-phase-flow void signals. The authors conclude that there exist two kinds of excitation mechanisms in vibrations of a fuel pin model inserted in a parallel air-and-water two-phase flow; namely, (1) parametric excitation, which occurs when the fundamental natural frequency of the fuel pin model is related to the dominant travelling frequency of water slugs in the two-phase flow by the ratio 1/2, 1/1, 3/2 and so on; and (2) vibrational resonance, which occurs when the fundamental frequency coincides with the dominant frequency of the two-phase-flow pressure fluctuation. (auth.)

  9. Analysis of phase dynamics in two-phase flow using latticegas automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, H.; Hashimoto, Y.; Tsumaya, A.; Chen, Y.; Akiyama, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we describe lattice gas automaton models appropriate for two-phase flow simulation and their applications to study various phase dynamics of two-fluid mixtures. Several algorithms are added to the original immiscible Lattice Gas model to adjust surface tension and to introduce density difference between two fluids. Surface tension is controlled by the collision rules an difference in density is due to nonlocal forces between automaton particles. We simulate the relative motion of the dispersed phase in another continuous fluid. Deformation and disintegration of rising drops are reproduced. The interaction between multiple drops is also observed in calculations. Furutre, we obtain the transition of the two-phase flow pattern from bubbly, slug to annular flow. Density difference of two phase is one of the key ingredients to generate the annular flow pattern

  10. Modeling of two-phase slug flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre, J.; Line, A.

    1992-01-01

    When gas and liquid flow in a pipe, over a range of flow rates, a flow pattern results in which sequences of long bubbles, almost filling the pipe cross section, are successively followed by liquid slugs that may contain small bubbles. This flow pattern, usually called slug flow, is encountered in numerous practical situations, such as in the production of hydrocarbons in wells and their transportation in pipelines; the production of steam and water in geothermal power plants; the boiling and condensation in liquid-vapor systems of thermal power plants; emergency core cooling of nuclear reactors; heat and mass transfer between gas and liquid in chemical reactors. This paper provides a review of two phase slug flow modeling

  11. Two-phase ozonation of chlorinated organics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Freshour, A.; West, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the last few years the amount of research being conducted in the field of single-phase ozonation has grown extensively. However, traditional aqueous-phase ozonation systems are limited by a lack of selective oxidation potential, low ozone solubility in water, and slow intermediate decomposition rates. Furthermore, ozone may decompose before it can be utilized for pollutant destruction since ozone can be highly unstable in aqueous solutions. Naturally occurring compounds such as NaHCO 3 also affect ozone reactions by inhibiting the formation of OH-free radicals. To compensate for these factors, excess ozone is typically supplied to a reactor. Since ozone generation requires considerable electric power consumption (16 - 24 kWh/kg of O 3 ), attempts to enhance the ozone utilization rate and stability should lead to more efficient application of this process to hazardous waste treatment. To improve the process, ozonation may be more efficiently carried out in a two-phase system consisting of an inert solvent (saturated with O 3 ) contacted with an aqueous phase containing pollutants. The non-aqueous phase must meet the following criteria: (1) non-toxic, (2) very low vapor pressure, (3) high density (for ease of separation), (4) complete insolubility in water, (5) reusability, (6) selective pollutant extractability, (7) high oxidant solubility, and (8) extended O 3 stability. Previously published studies (1) have indicated that a number of fluorinated hydrocarbon compounds fit these criteria. For this project, FC40 (a product of 3M Co.) was chosen due to its low vapor pressure (3 mm Hg) and high specific gravity (1.9). The primary advantages of the FC40 solvent are that it is non-toxic, reusable, has an ozone solubility 10 times that of water, and that 85 % of the ozone remains in the solvent even after 2 hours. This novel two-phase process has been utilized to study the rapid destruction of organic chlorine compounds and organic mixtures

  12. Geology, geochemistry and fluid inclusion of Qarachilar Cu-Mo-Au quartz veins, northeast of Kharvana, East Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Asiay Soufiani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Qarachilar Cu-Mo-Au occurrence is located in the Arasbaran ore zone (AZ, NW Iran, some 70 km north of Tabriz. The AZ is characterized by occurrence of different types of mineralization and hosts many Cu-Mo porphyry (PCD, Cu skarn, and epithermal Au deposits (Jamali et al., 2010; Jamali and Mehrabi, 2015. The main rock unit exposed in the area is Qaradagh batholith (QDB. A variety of porphyry and vein-type Cu–Mo–Au mineralization are associated with QDB. The most pronounced occurrences are in Qarachilar, Qara-Dareh, Zarli-Dareh, Aniq and Pirbolagh. This type of mineralization can be followed in other parts of northwest Iran, such as Masjed-Daghi porphyry Cu–Au deposit and Mivehrood vein-type Au mineralization in the southwest of the QDB, the Sungun PCD and the related skarn in its southeast, and Astamal Fe skarn deposit in the south of the QDB. To date, no detailed study has been undertaken to understand the characteristics of the Qarachilar occurrence and its mineralization type is controversial. The recent work by Simmonds and Moazzen (2015 also did not present relevant information for an understanding of the Qarachilar occurrence. The Re–Os age data obtained in their work were compared with similar events along the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA and southern Lesser Caucasus in order to elucidate the temporal pattern of mineralization across the whole QDB and the UDMA. The present paper provides an overview of the geological framework, the mineralization characteristics, and the results of geochemistry and fluid inclusion studies of the Qarachilar Cu-Mo-Au occurrence with an application to the ore genesis. Materials and methods More than 37 polished thin sections from Qarachilar host rocks and mineralized and altered zones were studied by conventional petrographic and mineralogic methods at the University of Zanjan. In addition, 9 samples from non-altered and altered host rocks and mineralized veins were analyzed by

  13. Two-phase flow models in unbounded two-phase critical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, G.P.; Cumo, M.; Farello, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    With reference to a Loss-of-Coolant Accident in Light Water Reactors, an analysis of the unbounded two-phase critical flow (i.e. the issuing two-phase jet) has been accomplished. Considering jets external shape, obtained by means of photographic pictures; pressure profiles inside the jet, obtained by means of a movable ''Pitot;'' and jet phases distribution information, obtained by means of X-rays pictures; a characterization of the flow pattern in the unbounded region of a two-phase critical flow is given. Jets X-ray pictures show the existence of a central high density ''core'' gradually evaporating all around, which gives place to a characteristic ''dartflow'' the length of which depends on stagnation thermodynamic conditions

  14. Experimental study of two-phase natural circulation circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, Wanderley Freitas; Su, Jian, E-mail: wlemos@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Faccini, Jose Luiz Horacio, E-mail: faccini@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), RIo de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Termo-Hidraulica Experimental

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on the behavior of fluid flow in natural circulation under single-and two-phase flow conditions. The natural circulation circuit was designed based on concepts of similarity and scale in proportion to the actual operating conditions of a nuclear reactor. This test equipment has similar performance to the passive system for removal of residual heat presents in Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (A PWR). The experiment was carried out by supplying water to primary and secondary circuits, as well as electrical power resistors installed inside the heater. Power controller has available to adjust the values for supply of electrical power resistors, in order to simulate conditions of decay of power from the nuclear reactor in steady state. Data acquisition system allows the measurement and control of the temperature at different points by means of thermocouples installed at several points along the circuit. The behavior of the phenomenon of natural circulation was monitored by a software with graphical interface, showing the evolution of temperature measurement points and the results stored in digital format spreadsheets. Besides, the natural circulation flow rate was measured by a flowmeter installed on the hot leg. A flow visualization technique was used the for identifying vertical flow regimes of two-phase natural circulation. Finally, the Reynolds Number was calculated for the establishment of a friction factor correlation dependent on the scale geometrical length, height and diameter of the pipe. (author)

  15. Reduced order modeling of flashing two-phase jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurecky, William, E-mail: william.gurecky@utexas.edu; Schneider, Erich, E-mail: eschneider@mail.utexas.edu; Ballew, Davis, E-mail: davisballew@utexas.edu

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Accident simulation requires ability to quickly predict two-phase flashing jet's damage potential. • A reduced order modeling methodology informed by experimental or computational data is described. • Zone of influence volumes are calculated for jets of various upstream thermodynamic conditions. - Abstract: In the event of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor, the escaping coolant produces a highly energetic flashing jet with the potential to damage surrounding structures. In LOCA analysis, the goal is often to evaluate many break scenarios in a Monte Carlo style simulation to evaluate the resilience of a reactor design. Therefore, in order to quickly predict the damage potential of flashing jets, it is of interest to develop a reduced order model that relates the damage potential of a jet to the pressure and temperature upstream of the break and the distance from the break to a given object upon which the jet is impinging. This work presents framework for producing a Reduced Order Model (ROM) that may be informed by measured data, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations, or a combination of both. The model is constructed by performing regression analysis on the pressure field data, allowing the impingement pressure to be quickly reconstructed for any given upstream thermodynamic condition within the range of input data. The model is applicable to both free and fully impinging two-phase flashing jets.

  16. Droplets formation and merging in two-phase flow microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hao; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2011-01-01

    Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i) the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution); and (ii) the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed.

  17. CFD Simulations of Pb-Bi Two-Phase Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostal, Vaclav; Zelezny, Vaclav; Zacha, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    In a Pb-Bi cooled direct contact steam generation fast reactor water is injected directly above the core, the produced steam is separated at the top and is send to the turbine. Neither the direct contact phenomenon nor the two-phase flow simulations in CFD have been thoroughly described yet. A first attempt in simulating such two-phase flow in 2D using the CFD code Fluent is presented in this paper. The volume of fluid explicit model was used. Other important simulation parameters were: pressure velocity relation PISO, discretization scheme body force weighted for pressure, second order upwind for momentum and CISCAM for void fraction. Boundary conditions were mass flow inlet (Pb-Bi 0 kg/s and steam 0.07 kg/s) and pressure outlet. The effect of mesh size (0.5 mm and 0.2 mm cells) was investigated as well as the effect of the turbulent model. It was found that using a fine mesh is very important in order to achieve larger bubbles and the turbulent model (k-ε realizable) is necessary to properly model the slug flow. The fine mesh and unsteady conditions resulted in computationally intense problem. This may pose difficulties in 3D simulations of the real experiments. (authors)

  18. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, W.

    1993-01-01

    Two-phase flow models dominate the requirements of economic resources for the development and use of computer codes which serve to analyze thermohydraulic transients in nuclear power plants. An attempt is made to reduce the effort of analyzing reactor transients by combining purpose-oriented modelling with advanced computing techniques. Six principles are presented on mathematical modeling and the selection of numerical methods, along with suggestions on programming and machine selection, all aimed at reducing the cost of analysis. Computer simulation is contrasted with traditional computer calculation. The advantages of run-time interactive access operation in a simulation environment are demonstrated. It is explained that the drift-flux model is better suited than the two-fluid model for the analysis of two-phase flow in nuclear reactors, because of the latter's closure problems. The advantage of analytical over numerical integration is demonstrated. Modeling and programming techniques are presented which minimize the number of needed arithmetical and logical operations and thereby increase the simulation speed, while decreasing the cost. (orig.)

  19. Experimental study of two-phase natural circulation circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, Wanderley Freitas; Su, Jian; Faccini, Jose Luiz Horacio

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on the behavior of fluid flow in natural circulation under single-and two-phase flow conditions. The natural circulation circuit was designed based on concepts of similarity and scale in proportion to the actual operating conditions of a nuclear reactor. This test equipment has similar performance to the passive system for removal of residual heat presents in Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (A PWR). The experiment was carried out by supplying water to primary and secondary circuits, as well as electrical power resistors installed inside the heater. Power controller has available to adjust the values for supply of electrical power resistors, in order to simulate conditions of decay of power from the nuclear reactor in steady state. Data acquisition system allows the measurement and control of the temperature at different points by means of thermocouples installed at several points along the circuit. The behavior of the phenomenon of natural circulation was monitored by a software with graphical interface, showing the evolution of temperature measurement points and the results stored in digital format spreadsheets. Besides, the natural circulation flow rate was measured by a flowmeter installed on the hot leg. A flow visualization technique was used the for identifying vertical flow regimes of two-phase natural circulation. Finally, the Reynolds Number was calculated for the establishment of a friction factor correlation dependent on the scale geometrical length, height and diameter of the pipe. (author)

  20. Droplets Formation and Merging in Two-Phase Flow Microfluidics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Gu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Two-phase flow microfluidics is emerging as a popular technology for a wide range of applications involving high throughput such as encapsulation, chemical synthesis and biochemical assays. Within this platform, the formation and merging of droplets inside an immiscible carrier fluid are two key procedures: (i the emulsification step should lead to a very well controlled drop size (distribution; and (ii the use of droplet as micro-reactors requires a reliable merging. A novel trend within this field is the use of additional active means of control besides the commonly used hydrodynamic manipulation. Electric fields are especially suitable for this, due to quantitative control over the amplitude and time dependence of the signals, and the flexibility in designing micro-electrode geometries. With this, the formation and merging of droplets can be achieved on-demand and with high precision. In this review on two-phase flow microfluidics, particular emphasis is given on these aspects. Also recent innovations in microfabrication technologies used for this purpose will be discussed.

  1. Unsteady interfacial coupling of two-phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurisse, O.

    2006-01-01

    The primary coolant circuit in a nuclear power plant contains several distinct components (vessel, core, pipes,...). For all components, specific codes based on the discretization of partial differential equations have already been developed. In order to obtain simulations for the whole circuit, the interfacial coupling of these codes is required. The approach examined within this work consists in coupling codes by providing unsteady information through the coupling interface. The numerical technique relies on the use of an interface model, which is combined with the basic strategy that was introduced by Greenberg and Leroux in order to compute approximations of steady solutions of non-homogeneous hyperbolic systems. Three different coupling cases have been examined: (i) the coupling of a one-dimensional Euler system with a two-dimensional Euler system; (ii) the coupling of two distinct homogeneous two-phase flow models; (iii) the coupling of a four-equation homogeneous model with the standard two-fluid model. (author)

  2. Numerical modeling of two-phase transonic flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halama, Jan; Benkhaldoun, F.; Fořt, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 88 (2010), s. 1624-1635 ISSN 0378-4754 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA201/08/0012 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : two - phase flow * condensation * fractional step method Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.812, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6V0T-4VNK68X-2-R&_cdi=5655&_user=640952&_pii=S0378475409000421&_origin=search&_coverDate=04%2F30%2F2010&_sk=999199991&view=c&wchp=dGLzVlb-zSkWb&md5=5ba607428fac339a3e5f67035d3996d0&ie=/sdarticle.pdf

  3. Pressure distribution over tube surfaces of tube bundle subjected to two phase cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Woo Gun

    2013-01-01

    Two phase vapor liquid flows exist in many shell and tube heat exchangers such as condensers, evaporators and nuclear steam generators. To understand the fluid dynamic forces acting on a structure subjected to a two phase flow, it is essential to obtain detailed information about the characteristics of a two phase flow. The characteristics of a two phase flow and the flow parameters were introduced, and then, an experiment was performed to evaluate the pressure loss in the tube bundles and the fluid dynamic force acting on the cylinder owing to the pressure distribution. A two phase flow was pre mixed at the entrance of the test section, and the experiments were undertaken using a normal triangular array of cylinders subjected to a two phase cross flow. The pressure loss along the flow direction in the tube bundles was measured to calculate the two phase friction multiplier, and the multiplier was compared with the analytical value. Furthermore, the circular distributions of the pressure on the cylinders were measured. Based on the distribution and the fundamental theory of two phase flow, the effects of the void fraction and mass flux per unit area on the pressure coefficient and the drag coefficient were evaluated. The drag coefficient was calculated by integrating the measured pressure coefficient and the drag coefficient were evaluated. The drag coefficient was calculated by integrating the measured pressure on the tube by a numerical method. It was found that for low mass fluxes, the measured two phase friction multipliers agree well with the analytical results, and good agreement for the effect of the void fraction on the drag coefficients, as calculated by the measured pressure distributions, is shown qualitatively, as compared to the existing experimental results

  4. Experimental and numerical investigation on two-phase flow instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruspini, Leonardo Carlos

    2013-03-01

    Two-phase flow instabilities are experimentally and numerically studied within this thesis. In particular, the phenomena called Ledinegg instability, density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations are investigated. The most important investigations regarding the occurrence of two-phase flow instabilities are reviewed. An extensive description of the main contributions in the experimental and analytical research is presented. In addition, a critical discussion and recommendations for future investigations are presented. A numerical framework using a hp-adaptive method is developed in order to solve the conservation equations modelling general thermo-hydraulic systems. A natural convection problem is analysed numerically in order to test the numerical solver. Moreover, the description of an adaptive strategy to solve thermo-hydraulic problems is presented. In the second part of this dissertation, a homogeneous model is used to study Ledinegg, density wave and pressure drop oscillations phenomena numerically. The dynamic characteristics of the Ledinegg (flow excursion) phenomenon are analysed through the simulation of several transient examples. In addition, density wave instabilities in boiling and condensing systems are investigated. The effects of several parameters, such as the fluid inertia and compressibility volumes, on the stability limits of Ledinegg and density wave instabilities are studied, showing a strong influence of these parameters. Moreover, the phenomenon called pressure drop oscillations is numerically investigated. A discussion of the physical representation of several models is presented with reference to the obtained numerical results. Finally, the influence of different parameters on these phenomena is analysed. In the last part, an experimental investigation of these phenomena is presented. The designing methodology used for the construction of the experimental facility is described. Several simulations and a non

  5. Evolution and paragenetic context of low δD hydrothermal fluids from the Panasqueira W-Sn deposit, Portugal: new evidence from microthermometric, stable isotope, noble gas and halogen analyses of primary fluid inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polya, D. A.; Foxford, K. A.; Stuart, F.; Boyce, A.; Fallick, A. E.

    2000-10-01

    The evolution, paragenetic context and origin of remarkably low δD hydrothermal fluids from the Hercynian Panasqueira W-Sn-Cu(Ag) deposit have been investigated through a combined microthermometric, stable isotope, halogen and noble gas fluid inclusion study. Large variations in δD between -60 ‰ and -134‰ have been observed in primary fluid inclusions from growth zones in a quartz crystal (Pa66) paragenetically constrained to the main sulfide stage (MSS) of ore formation. The same fluids exhibited relatively constant fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures (254 to 260°C), salinities (7.4 to 8.7 wt.% NaCl equivalent) and calculated fluid δ 18O (3.8 to 4.4‰). All the fluids exhibited 40Ar excesses. Mean molar Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios varied from 2.3 × 10 -3-4.2 × 10 -3 and 8 × 10 -4-10 × 10 -4 respectively, with the more Br-rich fluids being associated with the more deuterium-depleted fluids. The low palaeolatitude of Panasqueira throughout the main stages of ore formation and the overwhelming predominance of meteoric fluids in the main, late and post-ore mineralising fluids with δD of -40 to -65‰ lends little support for any models involving low δD palaeometeoric water. The limited range of 40Ar∗/Cl ratios (1.1 × 10 -5-1.6 × 10 -5) also precludes boiling during the MSS or mixing of meteoric water with highly fractionated deuterium-depleted magmatic waters as viable mechanisms for producing the low δD fluids. The high Br/Cl and I/Cl of the MSS fluids indicate significant fluid interactions with organic rich sediments or metasediments, in particular regionally abundant Carboniferous coals or coaly sediments that are inferred to be depleted in deuterium by around 85‰ compared to palaeometeoric water. The large range of δD observed in the MSS fluids may be explained by isotopic exchange of palaeometeoric water with these coals at varying water/rock (wt./wt.) ratios between 0.02 and 0.002 with fluid oxygen isotopic compositions controlled by

  6. Chemical Warfare Agent Simulants in Gamble’s Fluid: Is the Fluid Toxic? Can It Be Made Safer by Inclusion of Solid Nanocrystalline Metal Oxides?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Karote

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of chemical warfare agent simulants, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES and di-i-propyl fluoro phosphate (DFP, in fluids have been investigated. Data analyses confirm the major degradation pathway to be hydrolysis of 2-CEES to 2-hydroxyethyl ethyl sulfide, along with minor self-condensation products. Among the three fluids examined, 2-CEES degradation was the fastest in Gamble’s fluid during a 96 h period. Upon addition of Exceptional Hazard Attenuation Materials (EHAMs to 2-CEES containing Gamble’s fluid, degradation was generally improved during the first 24 h period. The 96 h outcome was similar for fluid samples with or without EHAM 2 and EHAM 4. EHAM 1-added fluid contained only one degradation product, 2-nitroethyl ethyl sulfide. DFP degradation was the slowest in Gamble’s fluid, but was enhanced by the addition of EHAMs. FTIR and solid state 31P NMR confirm the destructive adsorption of 2-CEES and DFP by the EHAMs. The results collectively demonstrate that 2-CEES and DFP decompose to various extents in Gamble’s fluid over a 96 h period but the fluid still contains a considerable amount of intact simulant. EHAM 1 appears to be promising for 2-CEES and DFP mitigation while EHAM 2 and EHAM 4 work well for early on concentration reduction of 2-CEES and DFP.

  7. The origin of the Tongkeng-Changpo tin deposit, Dachang metal district, Guangxi, China: clues from fluid inclusions and He isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minghai, Cai; Jingwen, Mao; Ting, Liang; Pirajno, Franco; Huilan, Huang

    2007-08-01

    Tongkeng-Changpo is the largest tin deposit within the giant Dachang polymetallic tin ore field in Guangxi, southern China, which is part of a large skarn system associated with Cretaceous granitoids. The Tongkeng-Changpo mineralization consists of veins and stockworks in the upper levels and replacement stratiform orebodies (mantos) at lower levels. Based on textural relationships, three major mineralizing stages can be recognized: stage I with cassiterite, sulphides, stannite, tourmaline, and quartz; stage II with cassiterite, sulphides, sulphosalts, quartz, and calcite; and stage III with calcite as the main phase. The study of fluid inclusions has shown that there are two main fluid types: CO2 and NaCl-H2O. Homogenization temperatures are 270 to 365°C, 210 to 240°C, and 140 to 190°C for stages I, II, and III, respectively. Salinities range from 1 to 7 wt.% NaCl equiv. in the early ore stage and 3 to 10 wt.% NaCl equiv. in the late stages. Laser Raman Spectroscopy indicates that the inclusion fluids in stages I and II were of carbono-aqueous composition, with minor amounts of CH4 and H2S, whereas those in stage III were aqueous. Helium isotopic analyses of inclusion fluids indicate that the 3He/4He ratios in the ore veins are in between 1.2 to 2.9 Ra (Ra = 1.4 × 10-6, modern atmospheric ratio), and range from 1.6 to 2.5 Ra in the stratiform orebodies. This range of 3He/4He ratios is significantly higher than that of crustal fluids (0.01-0.05 Ra). The similar characteristics of fluid inclusions and their He isotopic composition, as well as age constraints, indicate that the ore veins and stratiform orebodies of the Tongkeng-Changpo deposit formed from the same hydrothermal system, likely related to granite intrusions of the Mesozoic Yanshanian tectono-thermal event. In addition, the high R/Ra ratios indicate a mantle contribution in the ore fluids.

  8. Raman spectroscopic measurements of CO2 density: Experimental calibration with high-pressure optical cell (HPOC) and fused silica capillary capsule (FSCC) with application to fluid inclusion observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Chou, I-Ming; Hu, W.; Burruss, Robert; Sun, Q.; Song, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method for the determination of CO2 densities in fluid inclusions, especially for those with small size and/or low fluid density. The relationship between CO2 Fermi diad split (Δ, cm−1) and CO2 density (ρ, g/cm3) has been documented by several previous studies. However, significant discrepancies exist among these studies mainly because of inconsistent calibration procedures and lack of measurements for CO2fluids having densities between 0.21 and 0.75 g/cm3, where liquid and vapor phases coexist near room temperature.In this study, a high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsules were used to prepare pure CO2 samples with densities between 0.0472 and 1.0060 g/cm3. The measured CO2 Fermi diad splits were calibrated with two well established Raman bands of benzonitrile at 1192.6 and 1598.9 cm−1. The relationship between the CO2 Fermi diad split and density can be represented by: ρ = 47513.64243 − 1374.824414 × Δ + 13.25586152 × Δ2 − 0.04258891551 × Δ3(r2 = 0.99835, σ = 0.0253 g/cm3), and this relationship was tested by synthetic fluid inclusions and natural CO2-rich fluid inclusions. The effects of temperature and the presence of H2O and CH4 on this relationship were also examined.

  9. Two-Phase Quality/Flow Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Werlink, Rudy J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A quality and/or flow meter employs a capacitance probe assembly for measuring the dielectric constant of flow stream, particularly a two-phase flow stream including liquid and gas components.ne dielectric constant of the flow stream varies depending upon the volume ratios of its liquid and gas components, and capacitance measurements can therefore be employed to calculate the quality of the flow, which is defined as the volume ratio of liquid in the flow to the total volume ratio of gas and liquid in the flow. By using two spaced capacitance sensors, and cross-correlating the time varying capacitance values of each, the velocity of the flow stream can also be determined. A microcontroller-based processing circuit is employed to measure the capacitance of the probe sensors.The circuit employs high speed timer and counter circuits to provide a high resolution measurement of the time interval required to charge each capacitor in the probe assembly. In this manner, a high resolution, noise resistant, digital representation of each of capacitance value is obtained without the need for a high resolution A/D converter, or a high frequency oscillator circuit. One embodiment of the probe assembly employs a capacitor with two ground plates which provide symmetry to insure that accurate measurements are made thereby.

  10. Numerical calculation of two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.; Harlow, F.H.; Amsden, A.A.

    1975-06-01

    The theoretical study of time-varying two-phase flow problems in several space dimensions introduces such a complicated set of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations that numerical solution procedures for high-speed computers are required in almost all but the simplest examples. Efficient attainment of realistic solutions for practical problems requires a finite- difference formulation that is simultaneously implicit in the treatment of mass convection, equations of state, and the momentum coupling between phases. Such a method is described, the equations on which it is based are discussed, and its properties are illustrated by means of examples. In particular, the capability for calculating physical instabilities and other time-varying dynamics, at the same time avoiding numerical instability is emphasized. The computer code is applicable to problems in reactor safety analysis, the dynamics of fluidized dust beds, raindrops or aerosol transport, and a variety of similar circumstances, including the effects of phase transitions and the release of latent heat or chemical energy. (U.S.)

  11. Condensation in a two-phase pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    We consider the case of vapor condensation in a liquid pool, when the heat transfer is controlled by heat losses through the walls. The analysis is based on drift flux theory for phase separation in the pool, and determines the two-phase mixture height for the pool. To our knowledge this is the first analytical treatment of this classic problem that gives an explicit result, previous work having established the result for the evaporative case. From conservation of mass and energy in a one-dimensional steady flow, together with a void relation between the liquid and vapor fluxes, we determine the increase in the mixture level from the base level of the pool. It can be seen that the thermal and hydrodynamic influences are separable. Thus, the thermal influence of the wall heat transfer appears through its effect on the condensing length L*, so that at high condensation rates the pool is all liquid, and at low rates overflows (the level swell or foaming effect). Similarly, the phase separation effect hydrodynamically determines the height via the relative velocity of the mixture to the entering flux. We examine some practical applications of this result to level swell in condensing flows, and also examine some limits in ideal cases

  12. Two phase flow arising in hydraulics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straškraba, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 1 (2015), s. 21-33 ISSN 0862-7940 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/08/0012 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compressible fluid * Navier-Stokes equations * hydraulic systems Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.507, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10492-015-0083-9

  13. Origin of the Okrouhlá Radouň episyenite-hosted uranium deposit, Bohemian Massif, Czech Republic: fluid inclusion and stable isotope constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolníček, Zdeněk; René, Miloš; Hermannová, Sylvie; Prochaska, Walter

    2014-04-01

    The Okrouhlá Radouň shear zone hosted uranium deposit is developed along the contact of Variscan granites and high-grade metasedimentary rocks of the Moldanubian Zone of the Bohemian Massif. The pre-ore pervasive alteration of wall rocks is characterized by chloritization of mafic minerals, followed by albitization of feldspars and dissolution of quartz giving rise to episyenites. The subsequent fluid circulation led to precipitation of disseminated uraninite and coffinite, and later on, post-ore quartz and carbonate mineralization containing base metal sulfides. The fluid inclusion and stable isotope data suggest low homogenization temperatures (˜50-140 °C during pre-ore albitization and post-ore carbonatization, up to 230 °C during pre-ore chloritization), variable fluid salinities (0-25 wt.% NaCl eq.), low fluid δ18O values (-10 to +2 ‰ V-SMOW), low fluid δ13C values (-9 to -15 ‰ V-PDB), and highly variable ionic composition of the aqueous fluids (especially Na/Ca, Br/Cl, I/Cl, SO4/Cl, NO3/Cl ratios). The available data suggest participation of three fluid endmembers of primarily surficial origin during alteration and mineralization at the deposit: (1) local meteoric water, (2) Na-Ca-Cl basinal brines or shield brines, (3) SO4-NO3-Cl-(H)CO3 playa-like fluids. Pre-ore albitization was caused by circulation of alkaline, oxidized, and Na-rich playa fluids, whereas basinal/shield brines and meteoric water were more important during the post-ore stage of alteration.

  14. Mineralogy, fluid inclusion petrography, and stable isotope geochemistry of Pb-Zn-Ag veins at the Shizhuyuan deposit, Hunan Province, southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenghua; Mao, Jingwen; Yuan, Shunda; Dai, Pan; Wang, Xudong

    2018-01-01

    The Shizhuyuan polymetallic deposit is located in the central part of the Nanling region, southeastern China, and consists of proximal W-Sn-Mo-Bi skarns and greisens and distal Pb-Zn-Ag veins. The sulfides and sulfosalts in the distal veins formed in three distinct stages: (1) an early stage of pyrite and arsenopyrite, (2) a middle stage of sphalerite and chalcopyrite, and (3) a late stage of galena, Ag-, Sn-, and Bi-bearing sulfides and sulfosalts, and pyrrhotite. Combined sulfide and sulfosalt geothermometry and fluid inclusion analyses indicate that the early stage of mineralization occurred at a temperature of 400 °C and involved boiling under hydrostatic pressure ( 200 bar), with the temperature of the system dropping during the late stage to 200 °C. Laser Raman analysis indicates that the fluid inclusions within the studied minerals are dominated by H2O, although some contain carbonate solids and CH4 gas. Vein-hosted sulfides have δ34S values of 3.8-6.3‰ that are interpreted as indicative of a magmatic source of sulfur. The mineralization process can be summarized as follows: an aqueous fluid exsolved on final crystallization of the Qianlishan pluton, ascended along fracture zones, cooled to <400 °C, and boiled under hydrostatic conditions, and with decreasing temperature and sulfur fugacity, sulfide and sulfosalt minerals precipitated successively from the Ag-Cu-Zn-Fe-Pb-Sb-As-S-bearing fluid system.

  15. Recovery Act. Sub-Soil Gas and Fluid Inclusion Exploration and Slim Well Drilling, Pumpernickel Valley, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbank, Brian D. [Nevada Geothermal Power Company, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-03-27

    Nevada Geothermal Power Company (NGP) was awarded DOE Award DE-EE0002834 in January 2010 to conduct sub-soil gas and fluid inclusion studies and slim well drilling at its Black Warrior Project (now known as North Valley) in Washoe and Churchill Counties, Nevada. The project was designed to apply highly detailed, precise, low-cost subsoil and down-hole gas geochemistry methods from the oil and gas industry to identify upflow zone drilling targets in an undeveloped geothermal prospect. NGP ran into multiple institutional barriers with the Black Warrior project relating to property access and extensive cultural survey requirement. NGP requested that the award be transferred to NGP’s Pumpernickel Valley project, due to the timing delay in obtaining permits, along with additional over-budget costs required. Project planning and permit applications were developed for both the original Black Warrior location and at Pumpernickel. This included obtaining proposals from contractors able to conduct required environmental and cultural surveying, designing the two-meter probe survey methodology and locations, and submitting Notices of Intent and liaising with the Bureau of Land Management to have the two-meter probe work approved. The award had an expiry date of April 30, 2013; however, due to the initial project delays at Black Warrior, and the move of the project from Black Warrior to Pumpernickel, NGP requested that the award deadline be extended. DOE was amenable to this, and worked with NGP to extend the deadline. However, following the loss of the Blue Mountain geothermal power plant in Nevada, NGP’s board of directors changed the company’s mandate to one of cash preservation. NGP was unable to move forward with field work on the Pumpernickel property, or any of its other properties, until additional funding was secured. NGP worked to bring in a project partner to form a joint venture on the property, or to buy the property. This was unsuccessful, and NGP notified

  16. Measurement of off-diagonal transport coefficients in two-phase flow in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, T S; Goode, P A

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent description of low capillary number two-phase flow in porous media relies on the independence of phase transport. An extended Darcy's law with a saturation dependent effective permeability is used for each phase. The driving force for each phase is given by its pressure gradient and the body force. This diagonally dominant form neglects momentum transfer from one phase to the other. Numerical and analytical modeling in regular geometries have however shown that while this approximation is simple and acceptable in some cases, many practical problems require inclusion of momentum transfer across the interface. Its inclusion leads to a generalized form of extended Darcy's law in which both the diagonal relative permeabilities and the off-diagonal terms depend not only on saturation but also on the viscosity ratio. Analogous to application of thermodynamics to dynamical systems, any of the extended forms of Darcy's law assumes quasi-static interfaces of fluids for describing displacement problems. Despite the importance of the permeability coefficients in oil recovery, soil moisture transport, contaminant removal, etc., direct measurements to infer the magnitude of the off-diagonal coefficients have been lacking. The published data based on cocurrent and countercurrent displacement experiments are necessarily indirect. In this paper, we propose a null experiment to measure the off-diagonal term directly. For a given non-wetting phase pressure-gradient, the null method is based on measuring a counter pressure drop in the wetting phase required to maintain a zero flux. The ratio of the off-diagonal coefficient to the wetting phase diagonal coefficient (relative permeability) may then be determined. The apparatus is described in detail, along with the results obtained. We demonstrate the validity of the experimental results and conclude the paper by comparing experimental data to numerical simulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of two-phase flow for cooling of hybrid microchannel PV cells: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeh-e-Sheyda, Peyvand; Rahimi, Masoud; Karimi, Ebrahim; Asadi, Masomeh

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Showing cooling potential of gas–liquid two-phase flow in microchannels for PV cell. ► Introducing the concept of using slug flow in microchannels for cooling of PV cells. ► In single-phase flow, increasing the liquid flow rate enhances the PV power. ► Showing that in two-phase flow the output power related the fluid flow regime. ► By coupling PV and microchannel an increase up to 38% in output power was observed. - Abstract: This paper reports the experimental data from performance of two-phase flows in a small hybrid microchannel solar cell. Using air and water as two-phase fluid, the experiments were conducted at indoor condition in an array of rectangular microchannels with a hydraulic diameter of 0.667 mm. The gas superficial velocity ranges were between 0 and 3.27 m s −1 while liquid flow rate was 0.04 m s −1 . The performance analysis of the PV cell at slug and transitional slug/annular flow regimes are the focus of this study. The influence of two-phase working fluid on PV cell cooling was compared with single-phase. In addition, the great potential of slug flow for heat removal enhancement in PV/T panel was investigated. The obtained data showed the proposed hybrid system could substantially increases the output power of PV solar cells

  18. Two-phase mixed media dielectric with macro dielectric beads for enhancing resistivity and breakdown strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Steven; Meyer, Glenn A; Tang, Vincent; Guethlein, Gary

    2014-06-10

    A two-phase mixed media insulator having a dielectric fluid filling the interstices between macro-sized dielectric beads packed into a confined volume, so that the packed dielectric beads inhibit electro-hydrodynamically driven current flows of the dielectric liquid and thereby increase the resistivity and breakdown strength of the two-phase insulator over the dielectric liquid alone. In addition, an electrical apparatus incorporates the two-phase mixed media insulator to insulate between electrical components of different electrical potentials. And a method of electrically insulating between electrical components of different electrical potentials fills a confined volume between the electrical components with the two-phase dielectric composite, so that the macro dielectric beads are packed in the confined volume and interstices formed between the macro dielectric beads are filled with the dielectric liquid.

  19. Prediction of two-phase choked-flow through safety valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnulfo, G; Bertani, C; De Salve, M

    2014-01-01

    Different models of two-phase choked flow through safety valves are applied in order to evaluate their capabilities of prediction in different thermal-hydraulic conditions. Experimental data available in the literature for two-phase fluid and subcooled liquid upstream the safety valve have been compared with the models predictions. Both flashing flows and non-flashing flows of liquid and incondensable gases have been considered. The present paper shows that for flashing flows good predictions are obtained by using the two-phase valve discharge coefficient defined by Lenzing and multiplying it by the critical flow rate in an ideal nozzle evaluated by either Omega Method or the Homogeneous Non-equilibrium Direct Integration. In case of non-flashing flows of water and air, Leung/Darby formulation of the two-phase valve discharge coefficient together with the Omega Method is more suitable to the prediction of flow rate.

  20. A Rotational Pressure-Correction Scheme for Incompressible Two-Phase Flows with Open Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase outflows refer to situations where the interface formed between two immiscible incompressible fluids passes through open portions of the domain boundary. We present several new forms of open boundary conditions for two-phase outflow simulations within the phase field framework, as well as a rotational pressure correction based algorithm for numerically treating these open boundary conditions. Our algorithm gives rise to linear algebraic systems for the velocity and the pressure that involve only constant and time-independent coefficient matrices after discretization, despite the variable density and variable viscosity of the two-phase mixture. By comparing simulation results with theory and the experimental data, we show that the method produces physically accurate results. We also present numerical experiments to demonstrate the long-term stability of the method in situations where large density contrast, large viscosity contrast, and backflows occur at the two-phase open boundaries. PMID:27163909

  1. Numerical simulation of multi-dimensional two-phase flow based on flux vector splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staedtke, H.; Franchello, G.; Worth, B. [Joint Research Centre - Ispra Establishment (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes a new approach to the numerical simulation of transient, multidimensional two-phase flow. The development is based on a fully hyperbolic two-fluid model of two-phase flow using separated conservation equations for the two phases. Features of the new model include the existence of real eigenvalues, and a complete set of independent eigenvectors which can be expressed algebraically in terms of the major dependent flow parameters. This facilitates the application of numerical techniques specifically developed for high speed single-phase gas flows which combine signal propagation along characteristic lines with the conservation property with respect to mass, momentum and energy. Advantages of the new model for the numerical simulation of one- and two- dimensional two-phase flow are discussed.

  2. Two-phase gas bubble-liquid boundary layer flow along vertical and inclined surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Epstein, M.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of a two-phase gas bubble-liquid boundary layer along vertical and inclined porous surfaces with uniform gas injection is investigated experimentally and analytically. Using argon gas and water as the working fluids, a photographical study of the two-phase boundary layer flow has been performed for various angles of inclination ranging from 45 0 to 135 0 and gas injection rates ranging from 0.01 to 0.1 m/s. An integral method has been employed to solve the system of equations governing the two-phase motion. The effects of the gas injection rate and the angle of inclination on the growth of the boundary layer have been determined. The predicted boundary layer thickness is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The calculated axial liquid velocity and the void fraction in the two-phase region are also presented along with the observed flow behavior

  3. Brine history indicated by argon, krypton, chlorine, bromine, and iodine analyses of fluid inclusions from the Mississippi Valley type lead-fluorite-barite deposits at Hansonburg, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Irwin, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Argon, krypton, chlorine, bromine, and iodine were measured in a homogeneous population of high-salinity hydrothermal fluid inclusions from the Tertiary-age Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-fluorite-barite deposits at Hansonburg, New Mexico to establish new types of evidence for the history of both the fluid and the major dissolved salts. Noble gases and halogens in fluid inclusions containing 10−10–10−9 L of brine (Cl= 3 molal) were analyzed by laser microprobe noble-gas mass spectrometry (lmngms) on neutron-irradiated samples.The concentrations of36Ar (4.7 × 10−8 molal) and84Kr1.8 × 10−9 molal) in the fluid inclusions are equal to those of fresh surface waters in equilibrium with air at approximately20 ± 5°. The mole ratios ofBr/Cl (1.2 × 10−4) andI/Cl (1–2 × 10−6) are among the lowest measured in any natural waters, similar to those of modern brines formed by dissolution of Permian NaCl-bearing evaporites in southeast New Mexico.40Ar/36Ar ratios (600) are twice that of air, and indicate that the fluid inclusions had excess radiogenic40Ar (1.4 × 10−5 molal) when trapped. The amount of excess40Ar appears to be too large to have been acquired with Cl by congruent dissolution of halite-bearing evaporites, and possibly too small to have been acquired with Pb by congruent dissolution of granitic basement rocks with Proterozoic KAr ages.From thelmngms data, combined with published Pb and S isotope data, we infer the following sequence of events in the history of the Hansonburg MVT hydrothermal brine: (1) the brine originated as relatively dilute meteoric water, and it did not gain or lose atmospheric Ar or Kr after recharge; (2) the originally dilute fluid acquired the bulk of its Cl and sulfate in the subsurface after recharge by dissolving halite-bearing Permian? marine evaporites; (3) the high salinity brine then acquired most of its Pb and excess radiogenic40Ar from interactions with aquifer rocks other than evaporites, possibly clastic

  4. Two-phase Heating in Flaring Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chunming; Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.

    2018-03-01

    We analyze and model a C5.7 two-ribbon solar flare observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, Hinode, and GOES on 2011 December 26. The flare is made of many loops formed and heated successively over one and half hours, and their footpoints are brightened in the UV 1600 Å before enhanced soft X-ray and EUV missions are observed in flare loops. Assuming that anchored at each brightened UV pixel is a half flaring loop, we identify more than 6700 half flaring loops, and infer the heating rate of each loop from the UV light curve at the footpoint. In each half loop, the heating rate consists of two phases: intense impulsive heating followed by a low-rate heating that is persistent for more than 20 minutes. Using these heating rates, we simulate the evolution of their coronal temperatures and densities with the model of the “enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops.” In the model, suppression of thermal conduction is also considered. This model successfully reproduces total soft X-ray and EUV light curves observed in 15 passbands by four instruments GOES, AIA, XRT, and EVE. In this flare, a total energy of 4.9 × 1030 erg is required to heat the corona, around 40% of this energy is in the slow-heating phase. About two-fifths of the total energy used to heat the corona is radiated by the coronal plasmas, and the other three fifth transported to the lower atmosphere by thermal conduction.

  5. Ostwald ripening in two-phase mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhees, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the temperature of a rapidly solidified solid-liquid mixture have been made over a range of volume fractions solid 0.23 to 0.95. These experiments demonstrate the viability of measuring the change in interfacial curvature with time via precision thermometry. The experimental measurements also indicate that there is no radical change in interface morphology over a wide range of volume fractions solid. A solution to the multi-particle diffusion problem (MDP) has been constructed through the use of potential theory. The solution to the MDP was used to describe the diffusion field within a coarsening two-phase mixture consisting of dispersed spherical second-phase particles. Since this theory is based upon the MDP, interparticle diffusional interactions are specifically included in the treatment. As a result, the theory yields, for the first time, insights into the influence of the local distribution of curvature on a particle's coarsening rate. The effect of interparticle interactions on the collective behavior of an ensemble of coarsening particles was also investigated. It was found that any arbitrary distribution of particle radii will tend to a specific time independent distribution when the particle radii are scaled by the average particle radius. Furthermore, it was determined that with increasing volume fraction of coarsening phase, these time independent distributions become broader and more symmetric. It was also found that the ripening kinetics, as measured by the growth rate of the average particle size, increases by a factor of five upon increasing the volume fraction of coarsening phase from zero to 0.5

  6. Scientific results from the deepened Lopra-1 borehole, Faroe Islands: A reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions in fracture-filling quartz and calcite from the Lopra-1/1A well, Faroe Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konnerup-Madsen, Jens

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Fracture-filling calcite and quartz from the Lopra-1/1A well (at 2380 m and 3543 m depth contains both aqueous low-salinity fluid inclusions and hydrocarbon-dominated fluid inclusions. Microthermometry indicates that the aqueous fluids contain 0.2 to 1.4 equivalent weight% NaCl and occasionally contain traces of hydrocarbons. Homogenisation to liquid occurred between 90°C and 150°C. Modelling based on these fluid inclusion observations indicates that during burial the basaltic section was subjected to temperatures of 160°C and 170°C, occasional pressures of 600–700 bars and the simultaneous percolation of aqueous and hydrocarbon fluids. These fluid conditions may also be relevant to the formation of zeolite observed in the Lopra-1/1A well.

  7. Entrainment in vertical annular two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, Pravin; Ishii, Mamoru; Mori, Michitsugu

    2009-01-01

    Prediction of amount of entrained droplets or entrainment fraction in annular two-phase flow is essential for the estimation of dryout condition and analysis of post dryout heat transfer in light water nuclear reactors and steam boilers. In this study, air-water and organic fluid (Freon-113) annular flow entrainment experiments have been carried out in 9.4 and 10.2 mm diameter test sections, respectively. Both the experiments covered three distinct pressure conditions and wide range of liquid and gas flow conditions. The organic fluid experiments simulated high pressure steam-water annular flow conditions. In each of the experiments, measurements of entrainment fraction, droplet entrainment rate and droplet deposition rate have been performed by using a liquid film extraction method. A simple, explicit and non-dimensional correlation developed by Sawant et al. (2008a) for the prediction of entrainment fraction is further improved in this study in order to account for the existence of critical gas and liquid flow rates below which no entrainment is possible. Additionally, a new correlation is proposed for the estimation of minimum liquid film flow rate at the maximum entrainment fraction condition. The improved correlation successfully predicted the newly collected air-water and Freon-113 entrainment fraction data. Furthermore, the correlations satisfactorily compared with the air-water, helium-water and air-genklene experimental data measured by Willetts (1987). (author)

  8. A two-phase model of aquifer heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moltyaner, G.L.

    1994-11-01

    A two-phase model of a fluid-saturated geologic medium is developed with groundwater velocity (rather than the hydraulic conductivity) as the primary model parameter. The model describes the groundwater flow, contaminant transport processes, and geologic medium structure at the local-scale of a continuum representation and relates structure to processes quantitatively. In this model, the heterogeneity of a geologic medium is characterized either in terms of the spatial variability in the bulk (local-scale) fluid density and sediment density, or in terms of variability in the local-scale porosity and effective grain diameter. The local-scale continuity equations resulting from these properties are derived for both phases. The effective grain diameter is employed to quantify the geologic structure. Velocity is employed to quantify the transport process. Since structure controls process, a high correlation is observed between the effective grain diameter and velocity. The observed correlation leads to a new formulation of Darcy's law without invoking the concept of a fictitious (Darcy's) velocity. The local-scale groundwater flow equation is developed on the basis of the new formulation. (author). 16 refs., 4 figs

  9. Magnetic liquid metal two-phase flow research. Phase 1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, R.D.

    1983-04-01

    The Phase I research demonstrates the feasibility of the magnetic liquid metal (MLM) two-phase flow concept. A dispersion analysis is presented based on a complete set of two-phase-flow equations augmented to include stresses due to magnetic polarization of the fluid. The analysis shows that the stability of the MLM two-phase flow is determined by the magnetic Mach number, the slip ratio, geometry of the flow relative to the applied magnetic field, and by the voidage dependence of the interfacial forces. Results of a set of experiments concerned with magnetic effects on the dynamics of single bubble motion in an aqueous-based, viscous, conducting magnetic fluid are presented. Predictions in the theoretical literature are qualitatively verified using a bench-top experimental apparatus. In particular, applied magnetic fields are seen to lead to reduced bubble size at fixed generating orifice pressure

  10. The questions of liquid metal two-phase flow modelling in the FBR core channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martsiniouk, D.Ye.; Sorokin, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    The two-fluid model representation for calculations of two-phase flow characteristics in the FBR fuel pin bundles with liquid metal cooling is presented and analysed. Two conservation equations systems of the mass, momentum and energy have been written for each phase. Components accounted the mass-, momentum- and heat transfer throughout the interface occur in the macro-field equations after the averaging procedure realisation. The pattern map and correlations for two-fluid model in vertical liquid metal flows are presented. The description of processes interphase mass- and heat exchange and interphase friction is determined by the two-phase flow regime. The opportunity of the liquid metal two-phase flow regime definition is analysed. (author)

  11. Geology, mineralization, and fluid inclusion study of the Kuru-Tegerek Au-Cu-Mo skarn deposit in the Middle Tien Shan, Kyrgyzstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Serguei G.; Kryazhev, Sergey; Dvurechenskaya, Svetlana

    2018-02-01

    The Kuru-Tegerek Cu-Au-Mo deposit is situated in a system of Late Carboniferous subduction-related magmatic arcs of the Middle Tien Shan, which together constitute a metallogenic belt of Cu-Au-Mo (±W) porphyry, with local skarns, deposits. The deposit is related to magnetite-series gabbro-diorite to tonalite intrusion. It contains prograde magnesian and calcic skarns with abundant magnetite, associated with gabbro-diorite, and retrograde skarn with Cu mineralization, formed after intrusion of tonalite. Subsequent propylitic alteration introduced abundant chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite, and native Au culminating in zones overprinting magnetite and garnet skarn. Later quartz-muscovite-carbonate veins, formed after intrusion of late mafic quartz monzogabbro dikes, contain chalcopyrite, pyrite, arsenopyrite and other sulfides and sulfosalts, tellurides, and native Au. The earliest retrograde skarn garnet contains gaseous low-salinity (1.7-3.4 wt.% NaCl eq.) fluid inclusions homogenizing at 460-500 °C into vapor, indicating that the early fluid released from crystallizing magma was a low-density vapor. It was followed by more saline (4.0-5.0 wt.% NaCl eq.), high-temperature (400-440 °C) aqueous fluid, as fluid release from the magma progressed. Boiling of this fluid at temperatures of 420 to 370 °C and a pressure of 350-300 bar produced a low-salinity (0.6-1.2 wt.% NaCl eq.), essentially gaseous, and high-salinity (from 39 to 31 wt.% NaCl eq.) brine, with possible metal (including Cu) partitioning into both gaseous and aqueous-saline phases. Boiling was coeval with sulfide deposition in the retrograde skarn. The latest episode of the retrograde skarn stage included direct separation of saline ( 40-42 wt.% NaCl eq.) fluid from crystallizing magma. The separation of saline ( 40 to 14 wt.% NaCl eq.) fluids from a crystallizing magmatic melt continued during the propylitic stage, when fluid cooling from 370 to 320 °C, together with decreasing fO2, caused Cu and especially

  12. Effect of nanofluid concentration on two-phase thermosyphon heat exchanger performance

    OpenAIRE

    Cieśliński Janusz T.

    2016-01-01

    An approach - relaying on application of nanofluid as a working fluid, to improve performance of the two-phase thermosyphon heat exchanger (TPTHEx) has been proposed. The prototype heat exchanger consists of two horizontal cylindrical vessels connected by two risers and a downcomer. Tube bundles placed in the lower and upper cylinders work as an evaporator and a condenser, respectively. Distilled water and nanofluid water-Al2O3 solution were used as working fluids. Nanoparticles were tested a...

  13. Vapor Compressor Driven Hybrid Two-Phase Loop, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will demonstrate a vapor compressor driven hybrid two-phase loop technology. The hybrid two-phase loop...

  14. Nonequilibrium capillarity effects in two?phase flow through porous media at different scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottero, S.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Kleingeld, P.J.; Heimovaara, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    A series of primary drainage experiments was carried out in order to investigate nonequilibrium capillarity effects in two?phase flow through porous media. Experiments were performed with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and water as immiscible fluids in a sand column 21 cm long. Four drainage experiments

  15. Nonequilibrium capillarity effects in two-phase flow through porous media at different scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottero, S.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Kleingeld, P.J.; Heimovaara, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    A series of primary drainage experiments was carried out in order to investigate nonequilibrium capillarity effects in two-phase flow through porous media. Experiments were performed with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and water as immiscible fluids in a sand column 21 cm long. Four drainage experiments

  16. Thermodynamically consistent modeling and simulation of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    A general diffuse interface model with a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state) is proposed to describe the multi-component two-phase fluid flow based on the principles of the NVT-based framework which is an attractive

  17. A salt diapir-related Mississippi Valley-type deposit: the Bou Jaber Pb-Zn-Ba-F deposit, Tunisia: fluid inclusion and isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Salah; Leach, David L.; Johnson, Craig A.; Marsh, Erin; Salmi-Laouar, Sihem; Banks, David A.

    2016-08-01

    The Bou Jaber Ba-F-Pb-Zn deposit is located at the edge of the Bou Jaber Triassic salt diapir in the Tunisia Salt Diapir Province. The ores are unconformity and fault-controlled and occur as subvertical column-shaped bodies developed in dissolution-collapse breccias and in cavities within the Late Aptian platform carbonate rocks, which are covered unconformably by impermeable shales and marls of the Fahdene Formation (Late Albian-Cenomanian age). The host rock is hydrothermally altered to ankerite proximal to and within the ore bodies. Quartz, as fine-grained bipyramidal crystals, formed during hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks. The ore mineral assemblage is composed of barite, fluorite, sphalerite, and galena in decreasing abundance. The ore zones outline distinct depositional events: sphalerite-galena, barite-ankerite, and fluorite. Fluid inclusions, commonly oil-rich, have distinct fluid salinities and homogenization temperatures for each of these events: sphalerite-galena (17 to 24 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 112 to 136 °C); ankerite-barite (11 to 17 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 100 to 130 °C); fluorite (19 to 21 wt% NaCl eq., Th from 140 to 165 °C). The mean temperature of the ore fluids decreased from sphalerite (125 °C) to barite (115 °C) and increased during fluorite deposition (152 °C); then decreased to ˜110 °C during late calcite precipitation. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of fluid inclusions in fluorite are metal rich (hundreds to thousands ppm Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe) but the inclusions in barite are deficient in Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe. Inclusions in fluorite have Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios of several thousand, consistent with dissolution of halite while the inclusions analysed in barite have values lower than seawater which are indicative of a Br-enriched brine derived from evaporation plus a component of halite dissolution. The salinity of the barite-hosted fluid inclusions is less than obtained simply by the

  18. A salt diapir-related Mississippi Valley-type deposit: The Bou Jaber Pb-Zn-Ba-F deposit, Tunisia: Fluid inclusion and isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Salah; Leach, David; Johnson, Craig A.; Marsh, Erin; Salmi-Laouar, Sihem; Banks, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The Bou Jaber Ba-F-Pb-Zn deposit is located at the edge of the Bou Jaber Triassic salt diapir in the Tunisia Salt Diapir Province. The ores are unconformity and fault-controlled and occur as subvertical column-shaped bodies developed in dissolution-collapse breccias and in cavities within the Late Aptian platform carbonate rocks, which are covered unconformably by impermeable shales and marls of the Fahdene Formation (Late Albian–Cenomanian age). The host rock is hydrothermally altered to ankerite proximal to and within the ore bodies. Quartz, as fine-grained bipyramidal crystals, formed during hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks. The ore mineral assemblage is composed of barite, fluorite, sphalerite, and galena in decreasing abundance. The ore zones outline distinct depositional events: sphalerite-galena, barite-ankerite, and fluorite. Fluid inclusions, commonly oil-rich, have distinct fluid salinities and homogenization temperatures for each of these events: sphalerite-galena (17 to 24 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 112 to 136 °C); ankerite-barite (11 to 17 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 100 to 130 °C); fluorite (19 to 21 wt% NaCl eq., Th from 140 to 165 °C). The mean temperature of the ore fluids decreased from sphalerite (125 °C) to barite (115 °C) and increased during fluorite deposition (152 °C); then decreased to ∼110 °C during late calcite precipitation. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of fluid inclusions in fluorite are metal rich (hundreds to thousands ppm Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe) but the inclusions in barite are deficient in Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe. Inclusions in fluorite have Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios of several thousand, consistent with dissolution of halite while the inclusions analysed in barite have values lower than seawater which are indicative of a Br-enriched brine derived from evaporation plus a component of halite dissolution. The salinity of the barite-hosted fluid inclusions is less than obtained

  19. Numerical methods for two-phase flow with contact lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Clauido

    2012-07-01

    This thesis focuses on numerical methods for two-phase flows, and especially flows with a moving contact line. Moving contact lines occur where the interface between two fluids is in contact with a solid wall. At the location where both fluids and the wall meet, the common continuum descriptions for fluids are not longer valid, since the dynamics around such a contact line are governed by interactions at the molecular level. Therefore the standard numerical continuum models have to be adjusted to handle moving contact lines. In the main part of the thesis a method to manipulate the position and the velocity of a contact line in a two-phase solver, is described. The Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using an explicit finite difference method on a staggered grid. The position of the interface is tracked with the level set method and the discontinuities at the interface are treated in a sharp manner with the ghost fluid method. The contact line is tracked explicitly and its dynamics can be described by an arbitrary function. The key part of the procedure is to enforce a coupling between the contact line and the Navier-Stokes equations as well as the level set method. Results for different contact line models are presented and it is demonstrated that they are in agreement with analytical solutions or results reported in the literature.The presented Navier-Stokes solver is applied as a part in a multiscale method to simulate capillary driven flows. A relation between the contact angle and the contact line velocity is computed by a phase field model resolving the micro scale dynamics in the region around the contact line. The relation of the microscale model is then used to prescribe the dynamics of the contact line in the macro scale solver. This approach allows to exploit the scale separation between the contact line dynamics and the bulk flow. Therefore coarser meshes can be applied for the macro scale flow solver compared to global phase field simulations

  20. Systematic sulfur stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies on veinlet groups in the Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper deposit: based on new data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Maanijou

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mineralization occurred by intrusion of granodioritic stock of middle Miocene in volcano–sedimenrary rocks in Sarcheshmeh of early Tertiary age. This research is based on samples of new drilled boreholes and benches of 2500m elevation. Based on mineralogy and crosscutting relationships, at least four groups of veinlets pertaining to four stages of mineralization were recognized. Sulfur isotope studies in the Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper deposit were conducted on pyrite, chalcopyrite, molybdenite and anhydrites of four groups of veinlets. The δ34S values in the sulfides and sulfates range from -2.2 to 1.27‰ and from 10.2 to 14.5 ‰, respectively. The average δ34S value in the sulfides is 1‰ and that for the sulfates is about 13‰. Considering these results, it can be concluded that the sulfides made up of a fluid that its sulfur has a magmatic origin. Also, fluid inclusions of different veinlet groups were studied, showing high temperature, high salinity and the occurrence of boiling in the mineralizing fluids. Moreover, these studies indicate presence of three types of fluids including magmatic, meteoritic and mixture of these two fluids in alteration and mineralizion processes.

  1. Kinetics of two phase fuel reflected reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzano, M.L.; Corno, S.E.; Mattioda, F.

    2000-01-01

    In the present work a self-consistent mathematical model for the local dynamics of a quite particular class of fission reactors has been developed and solved. These devices consist of an innermost multiplying region, in which a significant fraction of the fissile fuel is diluted into a liquid phase, while the complementary fuel fraction operates as a standing solid matrix. This unconventional active region is surrounded by a standard peripheral reflector. For cooling purposes, the fluid fraction of the fuel needs to be circulated through external heat exchangers. The pump driven circulation causes the delayed neutron precursors, dissolved inside the fluid phase, to be spatially homogenized in the core volume well before decaying, while a continuous removal of precursor nuclei from the core takes place as a consequence of the outside circulation. Furthermore, the fraction of the extracted precursors still surviving after the solenoidal trip through the heat exchangers is continuously reinserted into the core. A new type of dynamical model is required to account for these unusual technological features. The mathematical structure of the evolution model presented in this paper consists of a system of integro-differential-difference equations, whose solution is derived in closed-form, by means of fully analytical techniques. Many dynamics and safety features of reactors of this type can be clarified a priori, upon inspection of the mathematical properties of the solution of the model. The rigorous time-eigenvalue generating equation can be explicitly established in the present theoretical context, together with the evaluation of any kind of transients. A short survey on the possible fields of application of these reactors is also presented

  2. UV-fs-LA-ICP-MS Analysis of CO2-Rich Fluid Inclusions in a Frozen State: Example from the Dahu Au-Mo Deposit, Xiaoqinling Region, Central China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The recently developed technique of ultraviolet femtosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (UV-fs-LA-ICP-MS combined with a freezing cell is expected to improve the analysis of CO2-rich fluid inclusions by decreasing their internal pressure and avoiding the common problem of uncontrolled explosive fluid release on ablation. Here, we report the application of this technique through the case study of CO2-rich fluid inclusions from the quartz vein-style Au-Mo deposit of Dahu in the Xiaoqinling region of central China. The concentrations of Li, B, Na, Al, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Te, Cs, Ba, Au, Pb, and Bi were analyzed in 124 (not all for Al and Ca fluid inclusions, which have low to moderate salinity and multiphase composition (liquid H2O + liquid CO2  ± vapor CO2  ± solids. The Dahu fluids are dominated by Na and K. The concentrations of Mo are always below the detection limit from 0.005 to 2 ppm (excluding values obtained from fluid inclusions with accidentally trapped solids. The Dahu ore fluids differ from metamorphic fluids in compositions and most likely represent two separate pulses of spent fluids evolved from an unexposed and oxidized magmatic system. The UV-fs-LA-ICP-MS analysis of fluid inclusions in a frozen state improves the overpressure problem of CO2-rich fluid inclusions during laser ablation. The transformation of gaseous and liquid CO2 into the solid state leads to a significant decline in the internal pressure of the fluid inclusions, while femtosecond laser pulses generate a minimal heat input in the sample and thus maintain the frozen state during ablation. Transient signals of CO2-rich fluid inclusions obtained in this study typically had one or multiple peaks lasting for more than 15 seconds, without an initial short signal spike as obtained by ns-LA-ICP-MS analysis of CO2-rich fluid inclusions at room temperature.

  3. The genesis of the Hashitu porphyry molybdenum deposit, Inner Mongolia, NE China: constraints from mineralogical, fluid inclusion, and multiple isotope (H, O, S, Mo, Pb) studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Degao; Liu, Jiajun; Tombros, Stylianos; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.

    2018-03-01

    The Hashitu porphyry molybdenum deposit is located in the Great Hinggan Range Cu-Mo-Pb-Zn-Ag polymetallic metallogenic province of NE China, in which the Mo-bearing quartz veins are hosted in approximately coeval granites and porphyries. The deposit contains more than 100 Mt of ore with an average grade of 0.13 wt.% Mo. This well-preserved magmatic-hydrothermal system provides an excellent opportunity to determine the source of the molybdenum, the evolution of the hydrothermal fluids and the controls on molybdenite precipitation in a potentially important but poorly understood metallogenic province. Studies of fluid inclusions hosted in quartz veins demonstrate that the Hashitu hydrothermal system evolved to progressively lower pressure and temperature. Mineralogical and fluid inclusion analyses and physicochemical calculations suggest that molybdenite deposition occurred at a temperature of 285 to 325 °C, a pressure from 80 to 230 bars, a pH from 3.5 to 5.6, and a Δlog fO2 (HM) of -3.0, respectively. Results of multiple isotope (O, H, S, Mo, and Pb) analyses are consistent in indicating a genetic relationship between the ore-forming fluids, metals, and the Mesozoic granitic magmatism (i.e., δ 18OH2O from +1.9 to +9.7‰, δDH2O from -106 to -87‰, δ 34SH2S from +0.3 to +3.9‰, δ 98/95Mo from 0 to +0.37‰, 206Pb/204Pb from 18.2579 to 18.8958, 207Pb/204Pb from 15.5384 to 15.5783, and 208Pb/204Pb from 38.0984 to 42.9744). Molybdenite deposition is interpreted to have occurred from a low-density magmatic-hydrothermal fluid in response to decreases in temperature, pressure, and fO2.

  4. Deformation of two-phase aggregates using standard numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duretz, Thibault; Yamato, Philippe; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2013-04-01

    Geodynamic problems often involve the large deformation of material encompassing material boundaries. In geophysical fluids, such boundaries often coincide with a discontinuity in the viscosity (or effective viscosity) field and subsequently in the pressure field. Here, we employ popular implementations of the finite difference and finite element methods for solving viscous flow problems. On one hand, we implemented finite difference method coupled with a Lagrangian marker-in-cell technique to represent the deforming fluid. Thanks to it Eulerian nature, this method has a limited geometric flexibility but is characterized by a light and stable discretization. On the other hand, we employ the Lagrangian finite element method which offers full geometric flexibility at the cost of relatively heavier discretization. In order to test the accuracy of the finite difference scheme, we ran large strain simple shear deformation of aggregates containing either weak of strong circular inclusion (1e6 viscosity ratio). The results, obtained for different grid resolutions, are compared to Lagrangian finite element results which are considered as reference solution. The comparison is then used to establish up to which strain can finite difference simulations be run given the nature of the inclusions (dimensions, viscosity) and the resolution of the Eulerian mesh.

  5. Thermodynamic sensitivity analysis of a novel trigeneration thermodynamic cycle with two-phase expanders and two-phase compressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briola, Stefano; Di Marco, Paolo; Gabbrielli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A novel Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) cycle, operating with two-phase devices for the compression and expansion processes and a single-component wet working fluid, is proposed. A detailed sensitivity analysis of the novel CCHP cycle has been investigated in order to evaluate, in terms of energy performance indicators, its potentiality to serve typical trigenerative tertiary and industrial end-users with different fixed operating temperatures. In general, the novel CCHP cycle is characterized by higher energy performance indicators than a separated energy production system. The comparison between the novel CCHP cycle and several commercialized CCHP systems has been performed in the case studies related to tertiary and industrial end-users. The novel CCHP cycle shows a trigenerative capability in wide ranges of the end-users demands without surplus or deficit of the electric or thermal powers. Furthermore, the maximum allowable capital cost of the whole novel CCHP plant (BEPCC), that will assure the profitability of the investment, is calculated in the tertiary and industrial end-users case studies. For the tertiary end-user, the capital costs of the commercialized CCHP are between the minimum and maximum BEPCC values. On the contrary, for the industrial end-user, they are lower than the minimum and maximum BEPCC values. - Highlights: • Novel CCHP cycle with two-phase expanders and compressors has been conceived. • Novel CCHP cycle has higher performances than a separated energy production system. • Novel CCHP cycle satisfies the user demands in wide ranges without surplus/deficit. • Tertiary user: novel CCHP cycle is competitive against marketed CCHP systems. • Industrial user: novel CCHP cycle is not competitive against marketed CCHP systems.

  6. Analysis of Two-Phase Flow in Damper Seals for Cryogenic Turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz, Grigory L.; SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Cryogenic damper seals operating close to the liquid-vapor region (near the critical point or slightly su-cooled) are likely to present two-phase flow conditions. Under single phase flow conditions the mechanical energy conveyed to the fluid increases its temperature and causes a phase change when the fluid temperature reaches the saturation value. A bulk-flow analysis for the prediction of the dynamic force response of damper seals operating under two-phase conditions is presented as: all-liquid, liquid-vapor, and all-vapor, i.e. a 'continuous vaporization' model. The two phase region is considered as a homogeneous saturated mixture in thermodynamic equilibrium. Th flow in each region is described by continuity, momentum and energy transport equations. The interdependency of fluid temperatures and pressure in the two-phase region (saturated mixture) does not allow the use of an energy equation in terms of fluid temperature. Instead, the energy transport is expressed in terms of fluid enthalpy. Temperature in the single phase regions, or mixture composition in the two phase region are determined based on the fluid enthalpy. The flow is also regarded as adiabatic since the large axial velocities typical of the seal application determine small levels of heat conduction to the walls as compared to the heat carried by fluid advection. Static and dynamic force characteristics for the seal are obtained from a perturbation analysis of the governing equations. The solution expressed in terms of zeroth and first order fields provide the static (leakage, torque, velocity, pressure, temperature, and mixture composition fields) and dynamic (rotordynamic force coefficients) seal parameters. Theoretical predictions show good agreement with experimental leakage pressure profiles, available from a Nitrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Force coefficient predictions for two phase flow conditions show significant fluid compressibility effects, particularly for mixtures with low mass

  7. Mineralogical, stable isotope, and fluid inclusion studies of spatially related porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Te mineralization, Fakos Peninsula, Limnos Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornadel, Andrew P.; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch.; Spry, Paul G.; Melfos, Vasilios

    2012-05-01

    The Fakos porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Te deposit, Limnos Island, Greece, is hosted in a ~20 Ma quartz monzonite and shoshonitic subvolcanic rocks that intruded middle Eocene to lower Miocene sedimentary basement rocks. Metallic mineralization formed in three stages in quartz and quartz-calcite veins. Early porphyry-style (Stage 1) metallic minerals consist of pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, bornite, sphalerite, molybdenite, and iron oxides, which are surrounded by halos of potassic and propylitic alteration. Stage 2 mineralization is composed mostly of quartz-tourmaline veins associated with sericitic alteration and disseminated pyrite and molybdenite, whereas Stage 3, epithermal-style mineralization is characterized by polymetallic veins containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, enargite, bournonite, tetrahedrite-tennantite, hessite, petzite, altaite, an unknown cervelleite-like Ag-telluride, native Au, and Au-Ag alloy. Stage 3 veins are spatially associated with sericitic and argillic alteration. Fluid inclusions in quartz from Stage 1 (porphyry-style) mineralization contain five types of inclusions. Type I, liquid-vapor inclusions, which homogenize at temperatures ranging from 189.5°C to 403.3°C have salinities of 14.8 to 19.9 wt. % NaCl equiv. Type II, liquid-vapor-NaCl, Type III liquid-vapor-NaCl-XCl2 (where XCl is an unknown chloride phase, likely CaCl2), and Type IV, liquid-vapor-hematite ± NaCl homogenize to the liquid phase by liquid-vapor homogenization or by daughter crystal dissolution at temperatures of 209.3 to 740.5 °C, 267.6 to 780.8 °C, and 357.9 to 684.2 °C, respectively, and, Type V, vapor-rich inclusions. Stage 2 veins are devoid of interpretable fluid inclusions. Quartz from Stage 3 (epithermal-style) veins contains two types of fluid inclusions, Type I, liquid-vapor inclusions that homogenize to the liquid phase (191.6 to 310.0 °C) with salinities of 1.40 to 9.73 wt. % NaCl equiv., and Type II, vapor-rich inclusions. Mixing

  8. Preliminary applications of the new Neptune two-phase CFD solver to pressurized thermal shock investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucker, M.; Laviaville, J.; Martin, A.; Bechaud, C.; Bestion, D.; Coste, P.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this communication is to present some preliminary applications to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) investigations of the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) two-phase flow solver of the new NEPTUNE thermal-hydraulics platform. In the framework of plant life extension, the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) integrity is a major concern, and an important part of RPV integrity assessment is related to PTS analysis. In the case where the cold legs are partially filled with steam, it becomes a two-phase problem and new important effects occur, such as condensation due to the Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) injections of sub-cooled water. Thus, an advanced prediction of RPV thermal loading during these transients requires sophisticated two-phase, local scale, 3-dimensional codes. In that purpose, a program has been set up to extend the capabilities of the NEPTUNE two-phase CFD solver. A simple set of turbulence and condensation model for free surface steam-water flow has been tested in simulation of an ECC high pressure injection representing facility, using a full 3-dimensional mesh and the new NEPTUNE solver. Encouraging results have been obtained but it should be noticed that several sources of error can compensate for one another. Nevertheless, the computation presented here allows to be reasonable confident in the use of two-phase CFD in order to carry out refined analysis of two-phase PTS scenarios within the next years

  9. Fluid inclusions in minerals associated to uranium mineralization in Jazida do Engenho (anomaly 09), Lagoa Real uranium province - Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Aurelio da Silva de

    2009-01-01

    The Engenho deposit (anomaly 09) is south-eastern from Cachoeira Mine (anomaly 13), in the northern part of the Province. The uranium mineralization is associated to 'albitites' (over 70% of albite/oligoclase). Epidosites with uranium may also occur. The 'albitite' main minerals are pyroxene, gamet, albite/oligoclase feldspar, amphibole and biotite. Pyroxene, gamet, plagioclase, titanite and epidote are the minerals associated to the uranium mineralization. The fluids related to pyroxene, gamet and epidote are aqueous-saline, primary and with no carbonic phases and are constant, with small variations. They all present medium to high salinity (14 to 18wt% NaCl eq.), the higher values being related to pyroxene and the lower ones related to gamet and epidote. The fluids associated to albite/oligoclase, although aqua-saline and with no carbonic phases, show salinities much lower than in pyroxene, gamet and epidote, suggesting a intense dilution process indicating dilution toward the later minerals phases. The data suggest the pyroxene formation process occurring under a 3,5 kbar pressure condition which corresponds to approximately 10km depth. The dispersion on Th in albites, due probably to the overheating and non elastic increase in volume, precluded a reliable pressure calculation. The IF's microscopy m plagioclase gneiss (albitites host-rocks) suggests the probability of primary carbonic fluids associated to these minerals. The fluids with CO 2 showed in the gneiss maybe also be present in the albitites, probably as late or intergranular fluids. This assumption is based on the fact that signs of carbonic gases were shown during crushing tests. These tendencies suggest the occurrence of two albitization phases in this Lagoa Real area: one associated to a fluid composed by H 2 O + CO 2 + salts (in the gneiss host) and another (in the albitite) formed by an aqueous-saline phase. The data indicate the Brasiliano event as a thermal event without a predominant fluid

  10. Simulation of two-phase flow in horizontal fracture networks with numerical manifold method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, G. W.; Wang, H. D.; Fan, L. F.; Wang, B.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents simulation of two-phase flow in discrete fracture networks with numerical manifold method (NMM). Each phase of fluids is considered to be confined within the assumed discrete interfaces in the present method. The homogeneous model is modified to approach the mixed fluids. A new mathematical cover formation for fracture intersection is proposed to satisfy the mass conservation. NMM simulations of two-phase flow in a single fracture, intersection, and fracture network are illustrated graphically and validated by the analytical method or the finite element method. Results show that the motion status of discrete interface significantly depends on the ratio of mobility of two fluids rather than the value of the mobility. The variation of fluid velocity in each fracture segment and the driven fluid content are also influenced by the ratio of mobility. The advantages of NMM in the simulation of two-phase flow in a fracture network are demonstrated in the present study, which can be further developed for practical engineering applications.

  11. Two-phase flow patterns and their relationship to two-phase heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewitt, G.F.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of this lecture was to discuss the general nature of two phase flows, to define the various regimes of flow and to discuss the influence of these regimes on the heat transfer processes taking place. The methods of regime delineation are briefly described and regime descriptions introduced for both vertical and horizontal flows in tubes. ''Flow regime maps'' have been widely used as an aid to determination of the regime which occurs in a given situation. Some of the more widely used maps are described and the limitations of this approach discussed. There have been many attempts to obtain a better phenomenological description of two phase flow patterns. In this lecture, these attempts will be reviewed in the context of the bubble/plug, plug/churn and churn/annular flow transitions in vertical flow. The latter two transitions are related to the flooding/flow reversal phenomena. For horizontal flows, recent work on the onset of slugging will be reviewed. In flows with evaporation or condensation, the situation is influenced by departures from thermodynamic equilibrium and the types of departure observed are discuss briefly. Flow patterns and their relationships with heat transfer regimes are then reviewed for the case of condensation in horizontal tubes and evaporation in vertical tubes

  12. Experimental petrology for the thermobarometric determination of mineral paragenesis: the fluid inclusions; Petrologia experimental para la determinacion termobarometrica de paragenesis minerales: las inclusiones fluidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Partida, Eduardo; Torres Rodriguez, Vicente; Birkle, Peter [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1994-05-01

    There is a great number of phenomena in nature in which some fluid participates as the main component. Such is the case of oil deposits formation, of metallic minerals, geothermal systems, metamorphic and diagenetic deposits. The common denominator of all of them is that in some part of their stages important physico-chemical processes occurred in the related fluids, leaving evidence of such phenomena in the fluid inclusions. The Geothermal Department has petrologic vanguard tools for reservoir problems resolution, since it has laboratories for the study on fluid inclusions by means of the technique called cryoscopic-microthermometry that permits the definition of physico-chemical conditions of the brine that participated or participates in the hydrothermal systems formation. The method simultaneously permits to know the characteristics of the initial brine that participated in the interaction water-rock phenomenon, observe the boiling phenomena, and determine conditions of initial pressure in the reservoirs. [Espanol] Existe un gran numero de fenomenos en la naturaleza en los que participa algun fluido como componente principal. Tal es el caso de la formacion de yacimientos de petroleo, de minerales metalicos, de sistemas geotermicos, yacimientos metamorficos y diageneticos. El comun denominador de todos ellos es que en alguna de sus etapas ocurrieron procesos fisicoquimicos importantes en los fluidos relacionados, quedando evidencia de tales fenomenos en las inclusiones fluidas. El Departamento de Geotermia cuenta con herramientas petrologicas de vanguardia para la resolucion de problemas en yacimientos, ya que tiene laboratorios para el estudio de las inclusiones fluidas por medio de la tecnica denominada microtermometria-crioscopica que permite definir condiciones fisicoquimicas de la salmuera que participo o participa en la formacion de sistemas hidrotermales. El metodo permite simultaneamente conocer las caracteristicas de la salmuera inicial que participo en

  13. Hydrothermal Evolution of the Giant Cenozoic Kadjaran porphyry Cu-Mo deposit, Tethyan metallogenic belt, Armenia, Lesser Caucasus: mineral paragenetic, cathodoluminescence and fluid inclusion constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakimyan, Samvel; Moritz, Robert; Tayan, Rodrik; Rezeau, Hervé

    2016-04-01

    stockwork. One of them is the east-west-oriented 6th vein zone in the northern part of the deposit, which contains quartz-molybdenite veins and late quartz-galena-sphalerite veins. This is interpreted as a telescoping between porphyry and epithermal environments. It is supported by microscopic studies of mineral paragenesis, which reveal the presence of enargite and tennantite-tetrahedrite, luzonite, sphalerite, and galena, generally in a gangue of quartz, followed by a late carbonate and gypsum stage. On-going fluid inclusion studies are being carried out on quartz samples from the different mineralization stages. Five types of fluid inclusions were distinguished according to their nature, bubble size, and daughter mineral content: vapor-rich, aqueous-carbonic, brine, polyphase brine and liquid-rich inclusions. Cathodoluminescence images from the porphyry veins reveal four generations of quartz. Molybdenite and chalcopyrite are associated with two different dark luminescent quartz generations, which contain typical brine, aqueous-carbonic and vapour-rich H2O fluid inclusions, with some of them coexisting locally as boiling assemblages. Epithermal veins are mainly characterized by liquid-rich H2O fluid inclusions. Microthermometric studies of fluid inclusions reveal a major difference in homogenisation temperatures between the early quartz-molybdenite- chalcopyrite stage (Thtotal between 3600 and 4250C) and the late quartz-galena-sphalerite vein stage (Thtotal 300-2700C), which is attributed to the transition from a porphyry to an epithermal environment in the Kadjaran deposit.

  14. Analyses of liquid-gas two-phase flow in fermentation tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, Takashi; Serizawa, Akimi; Takahashi, Osamu; Kawara, Zensaku; Gofuku, Akio; Kataoka, Isao.

    1993-01-01

    The understanding of two-phase flow is one of the important problems for both design and safety analyses of various engineering systems. For example, the flow conditions in beer fermentation tanks have an influence on the quality of production and productivity of tank. In this study, a two-dimensional numerical calculation code based on the one-pressure two-fluid model is developed to understand the circulation structure of low quality liquid-gas two-phase flows induced by bubble plume in a tank. (author)

  15. Local wettability reversal during steady-state two-phase flow in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Santanu; Grøva, Morten; Ødegården, Torgeir Bryge; Skjetne, Erik; Hansen, Alex

    2011-09-01

    We study the effect of local wettability reversal on remobilizing immobile fluid clusters in steady-state two-phase flow in porous media. We consider a two-dimensional network model for a porous medium and introduce a wettability alteration mechanism. A qualitative change in the steady-state flow patterns, destabilizing the percolating and trapped clusters, is observed as the system wettability is varied. When capillary forces are strong, a finite wettability alteration is necessary to move the system from a single-phase to a two-phase flow regime. When both phases are mobile, we find a linear relationship between fractional flow and wettability alteration.

  16. Analysis of two-phase flow induced vibrations in perpendiculary supported U-type piping systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, Tsutomu; Komura, Yoshiaki; Ito, Atsushi.

    1984-01-01

    The perpose of this analysis is to predict the vibration level of a pipe conveying a two-phase flowing fluid. Experiments were carried out with a perpendiculary supported U-type piping system, conveying an air-water two-phase flow in a steady state condition. Fluctuation signals are observed by a void signal sensor, and power spectral densities and probability density functions are obtained from the void signals. Theoretical studies using FEM and an estimation of the exciting forces from the PSD of void signals, provided a good predictional estimation of vibration responses of the piping system. (author)

  17. Numerical simulation analysis of four-stage mutation of solid-liquid two-phase grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junye; Liu, Yang; Hou, Jikun; Hu, Jinglei; Zhang, Hengfu; Wu, Guiling

    2018-03-01

    In order to explore the numerical simulation of solid-liquid two-phase abrasive grain polishing and abrupt change tube, in this paper, the fourth order abrupt change tube was selected as the research object, using the fluid mechanics software to simulate,based on the theory of solid-liquid two-phase flow dynamics, study on the mechanism of AFM micromachining a workpiece during polishing.Analysis at different inlet pressures, the dynamic pressure distribution pipe mutant fourth order abrasive flow field, turbulence intensity, discuss the influence of the inlet pressure of different abrasive flow polishing effect.

  18. Manual for operation of the multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW (Transient Two Phase Flow Test Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, M.; Carl, H.; Schuetz, H.; Pietruske, H.; Lenk, S.

    2004-07-01

    The Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR) e. V. is constructing a new large-scale test facility, TOPFLOW, for thermalhydraulic single effect tests. The acronym stands for transient two phase flow test facility. It will mainly be used for the investigation of generic and applied steady state and transient two phase flow phenomena and the development and validation of models of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. The manual of the test facility must always be available for the staff in the control room and is restricted condition during operation of personnel and also reconstruction of the facility. (orig./GL)

  19. Development of a large-scale general purpose two-phase flow analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasaka, Haruo; Shimizu, Sensuke

    2001-01-01

    A general purpose three-dimensional two-phase flow analysis code has been developed for solving large-scale problems in industrial fields. The code uses a two-fluid model to describe the conservation equations for two-phase flow in order to be applicable to various phenomena. Complicated geometrical conditions are modeled by FAVOR method in structured grid systems, and the discretization equations are solved by a modified SIMPLEST scheme. To reduce computing time a matrix solver for the pressure correction equation is parallelized with OpenMP. Results of numerical examples show that the accurate solutions can be obtained efficiently and stably. (author)

  20. System identification on two-phase flow stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaorong; Zhang Youjie; Wang Dazhong; Bo Jinghai; Wang Fei

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical principle, experimental method and results of interrelation analysis identification for the instability of two-phase flow are described. A completely new concept of test technology and method on two-phase flow stability was developed by using he theory of information science on system stability and system identification for two-phase flow stability in thermo-physics field. Application of this method would make it possible to identify instability boundary of two-phase flow under stable operation conditions of two-phase flow system. The experiment was carried out on the thermohydraulic test system HRTL-5. Using reverse repeated pseudo-random sequences of heating power as input signal sources and flow rate as response function in the test, the two-phase flow stability and stability margin of the natural circulation system are investigated. The effectiveness and feasibility of identifying two-phase flow stability by using this system identification method were experimentally demonstrated. Basic data required for mathematics modeling of two-phase flow and analysis of two-phase flow stability were obtained, which are useful for analyzing, monitoring of the system operation condition, and forecasting of two-phase flow stability in engineering system

  1. Simulation of two-phase flows by domain decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.H.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with numerical simulations of compressible fluid flows by implicit finite volume methods. Firstly, we studied and implemented an implicit version of the Roe scheme for compressible single-phase and two-phase flows. Thanks to Newton method for solving nonlinear systems, our schemes are conservative. Unfortunately, the resolution of nonlinear systems is very expensive. It is therefore essential to use an efficient algorithm to solve these systems. For large size matrices, we often use iterative methods whose convergence depends on the spectrum. We have studied the spectrum of the linear system and proposed a strategy, called Scaling, to improve the condition number of the matrix. Combined with the classical ILU pre-conditioner, our strategy has reduced significantly the GMRES iterations for local systems and the computation time. We also show some satisfactory results for low Mach-number flows using the implicit centered scheme. We then studied and implemented a domain decomposition method for compressible fluid flows. We have proposed a new interface variable which makes the Schur complement method easy to build and allows us to treat diffusion terms. Using GMRES iterative solver rather than Richardson for the interface system also provides a better performance compared to other methods. We can also decompose the computational domain into any number of sub-domains. Moreover, the Scaling strategy for the interface system has improved the condition number of the matrix and reduced the number of GMRES iterations. In comparison with the classical distributed computing, we have shown that our method is more robust and efficient. (author) [fr

  2. Solid-state flurbiprofen and methyl-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes prepared using a single-step, organic solvent-free supercritical fluid process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrangi, Shashi Ravi Suman; Kaialy, Waseem; Ghori, Muhammad U; Trivedi, Vivek; Snowden, Martin J; Alexander, Bruce David

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to enhance the apparent solubility and dissolution properties of flurbiprofen through inclusion complexation with cyclodextrins. Especially, the efficacy of supercritical fluid technology as a preparative technique for the preparation of flurbiprofen-methyl-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes was evaluated. The complexes were prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide processing and were evaluated by solubility, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, practical yield, drug content estimation and in vitro dissolution studies. Computational molecular docking studies were conducted to study the possibility of molecular arrangement of inclusion complexes between flurbiprofen and methyl-β-cyclodextrin. The studies support the formation of stable molecular inclusion complexes between the drug and cyclodextrin in a 1:1 stoichiometry. In vitro dissolution studies showed that the dissolution properties of flurbiprofen were significantly enhanced by the binary mixtures prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide processing. The amount of flurbiprofen dissolved into solution alone was very low with 1.11±0.09% dissolving at the end of 60min, while the binary mixtures processed by supercritical carbon dioxide at 45°C and 200bar released 99.39±2.34% of the drug at the end of 30min. All the binary mixtures processed by supercritical carbon dioxide at 45°C exhibited a drug release of more than 80% within the first 10min irrespective of the pressure employed. The study demonstrated the single step, organic solvent-free supercritical carbon dioxide process as a promising approach for the preparation of inclusion complexes between flurbiprofen and methyl-β-cyclodextrin in solid-state. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic Modeling Strategy for Flow Regime Transition in Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regimes has been widely used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are flow regime dependent. Current nuclear reactor safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5, classify flow regimes using flow regime maps or transition criteria that were developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows. As two-phase flows are dynamic in nature, it is important to model the flow regime transitions dynamically to more accurately predict the two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy to determine flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation of the interfacial area, fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet disintegration, boiling and evaporation, and the destruction of the interfacial area, fluid particle coalescence and condensation. For flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shapes, namely group-1 and group-2 bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identify the flow regimes is discussed, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration. The flow regime predicted with this method shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  4. Two-phase flow field simulation of horizontal steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiee, Ataollah; Kamalinia, Amir Hossein; Hadad, Kamal [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The analysis of steam generators as an interface between primary and secondary circuits in light water nuclear power plants is crucial in terms of safety and design issues. VVER-1000 nuclear power plants use horizontal steam generators which demand a detailed thermal hydraulics investigation in order to predict their behavior during normal and transient operational conditions. Two phase flow field simulation on adjacent tube bundles is important in obtaining logical numerical results. However, the complexity of the tube bundles, due to geometry and arrangement, makes it complicated. Employment of porous media is suggested to simplify numerical modeling. This study presents the use of porous media to simulate the tube bundles within a general-purpose computational fluid dynamics code. Solved governing equations are generalized phase continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Boundary conditions, as one of the main challenges in this numerical analysis, are optimized. The model has been verified and tuned by simple two-dimensional geometry. It is shown that the obtained vapor volume fraction near the cold and hot collectors predict the experimental results more accurately than in previous studies.

  5. Experimental investigation of a two-phase nozzle flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedziur, F.; John, H.; Loeffel, R.; Reimann, J.

    1980-07-01

    Stationary two-phase flow experiments with a convergent nozzle are performed. The experimental results are appropriate to validate advanced computer codes, which are applied to the blowdown-phase of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The steam-water experiments present a broad variety of initial conditions: the pressure varies between 2 and 13 MPa, the void fraction between 0 (subcooled) and about 80%, a great number of critical as well as subcritical experiments with different flow pattern is investigated. Additional air-water experiments serve for the separation of phase transition effects. The transient acceleration of the fluid in the LOCA-case is simulated by a local acceleration in the experiment. The layout of the nozzle and the applied measurement technique allow for a separate testing of blowdown-relevant, physical models and the determination of empirical model parameters, respectively. The measured quantities are essentially the mass flow rate, quality, axial pressure and temperature profiles as well as axial and radial density/void profiles obtained by a γ-ray absorption device. Moreover, impedance probes and a pitot probe are used. Observed phenomena like a flow contraction, radial pressure and void profiles as well as the appearance of two chocking locations are described, because their examination is rather instructive about the refinement of a program. The experimental facilities as well as the data of 36 characteristic experiments are documented. (orig.) [de

  6. Acceleration of a two-phase flow by boiling, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yasuo; Hijikata, Kunio; Iwata, Shoichiro

    1976-01-01

    Acceleration of two-component, two-phase flow has been studied, and a method using the volume expansion by boiling for accelerating fluid has been investigated. In this study, the phenomena of atomizing and boiling were separated, and the liquid with low boiling point was injected into water at lower than the saturation temperature, and was atomized. Then, this was mixed with high temperature liquid and was boiled. The uniform buffle flow was produced, and the phenomena were observed with a high speed camera. The process of acceleration and the acceleration performance were compared with the results of theoretical analysis described in the second report. The experiment was carried out with liquid R113, and at first, the mechanism of atomizing was studied. The atomizing was caused when the relative velocity between R113 and water was more than 4 m/s irrespective of water velocity. The distribution of the diameter of fine liquid drops was almost normal distribution. When the fine drops of R113 were mixed with the high temperature water, bubbles were produced, and the production rate showed definite dependence on the degree of overheating. The flow of bubbles was uniform. However, some of R113 did not become bubbles. The efficiency of acceleration was 1.0 which was independent of the degree of overheating. A further problem is to reduce the quantity of the liquid which does not boil. (Kato, T.)

  7. Numerical approach of multi-field two-phase flow models in the OVAP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anela Kumbaro

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A significant progress has been made in modeling the complexity of vapor-liquid two-phase flow. Different three-dimensional models exist in order to simulate the evolution of parameters which characterize a two-phase model. These models can be classified into various groups depending on the inter-field coupling. A hierarchy of increasing physical complexity can be defined. The simplest group corresponds to the homogeneous mixture models where no interactions are taken into account. Another group is constituted by the two-fluid models employing physically important interfacial forces between two-phases, liquid, and water. The last group is multi-field modeling where inter-field couplings can be taken into account at different degrees, such as the MUltiple Size Group modeling [2], the consideration of separate equations for the transport and generation of mass and momentum for each field under the assumption of the same energy for all the fields of the same phase, and a full multi-field two-phase model [1]. The numerical approach of the general three-dimensional two-phase flow is by complexity of the phenomena a very challenging task; the ideal numerical method should be at the same time simple in order to apply to any model, from equilibrium to multi-field model and conservative in order to respect the fundamental conservation physical laws. The approximate Riemann solvers have the good properties of conservation of mass, momentum and energy balance and have been extended successfully to two-fluid models [3]- [5]. But, the up-winding of the flux is based on the Eigen-decomposition of the two-phase flow model and the computation of the Eigen-structure of a multi-field model can be a high cost procedure. Our contribution will present a short review of the above two-phase models, and show numerical results obtained for some of them with an approximate Riemann solver and with lower-complexity alternative numerical methods that do not

  8. Forced two phase helium cooling of large superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Taylor, J.D.

    1979-08-01

    A major problem shared by all large superconducting magnets is the cryogenic cooling system. Most large magnets are cooled by some variation of the helium bath. Helium bath cooling becomes more and more troublesome as the size of the magnet grows and as geometric constraints come into play. An alternative approach to cooling large magnet systems is the forced flow, two phase helium system. The advantages of two phase cooling in many magnet systems are shown. The design of a two phase helium system, with its control dewar, is presented. The paper discusses pressure drop of a two phase system, stability of a two phase system and the method of cool down of a two phase system. The results of experimental measurements at LBL are discussed. Included are the results of cool down and operation of superconducting solenoids

  9. Evolution of the magmatic-hydrothermal acid-sulfate system at Summitville, Colorado: Integration of geological, stable-isotope, and fluid-inclusion evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, P.M.; Rye, R.O.; Stoffregen, R.E.; Vikre, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    The Summitville Au-Ag-Cu deposit is a classic volcanic dome-hosted high-sulfidation deposit. It occurs in the Quartz Latite of South Mountain, a composite volcanic dome that was emplaced along the coincident margins of the Platoro and Summitville calderas at 22.5??0.5 Ma, penecontemporaneous with alteration and mineralization. A penecontemporaneous quartz monzonite porphyry intrusion underlies the district and is cut and overlain by pyrite-quartz stockwork veins with traces of chalcopyrite and molybdenite. Alteration and mineralization proceeded through three hypogene stages and a supergene stage, punctuated by at least three periods of hydrothermal brecciation. Intense acid leaching along fractures in the quartz latite produced irregular pipes and lenticular pods of vuggy silica enclosed sequentially by alteration zones of quartz-alunite, quartz-kaolinite, and clay. The acid-sulfate-altered rocks host subsequent covellite+enargite/luzonite+chalcopyrite mineralization accompanied by kaolinite, and later barite-base-metal veins, some containing high Au values and kaolinite. The presence of both liquid- and vapor-rich fluid inclusions indicates the episodic presence of a low-density fluid at all levels of the system. In the mineralized zone, liquid-rich fluid inclusions in healed fractures in quartz phenocrysts and in quartz associated with mineralization homogenize to temperatures between 160 and 390 ??C (90% between 190 and 310 ??C), consistent with the range (200-250 ??C) estimated from the fractionation of sulfur isotopes between coexisting alunite and pyrite. A deep alunite-pyrite pair yielded a sulfur-isotope temperature of 390 ??C, marking a transition from hydrostatic to lithostatic pressure at a depth of about 1.5 km. Two salinity populations dominate the liquid-rich fluid inclusions. One has salinities between 0 and 5 wt.% NaCl equivalent; the other has salinities of up to 43 wt.% NaCl equivalent. The occurrence of high-salinity fluid inclusions in vein

  10. On the Shape Sensitivity of the First Dirichlet Eigenvalue for Two-Phase Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dambrine, M.; Kateb, D.

    2011-01-01

    We consider a two-phase problem in thermal conductivity: inclusions filled with a material of conductivity σ 1 are layered in a body of conductivity σ 2 . We address the shape sensitivity of the first eigenvalue associated with Dirichlet boundary conditions when both the boundaries of the inclusions and the body can be modified. We prove a differentiability result and provide the expressions of the first and second order derivatives. We apply the results to the optimal design of an insulated body. We prove the stability of the optimal design thanks to a second order analysis. We also continue the study of an extremal eigenvalue problem for a two-phase conductor in a ball initiated by Conca et al. (Appl. Math. Optim. 60(2):173-184, 2009) and pursued in Conca et al. (CANUM 2008, ESAIM Proc., vol. 27, pp. 311-321, EDP Sci., Les Ulis, 2009).

  11. Numerical method for two-phase flow discontinuity propagation calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toumi, I.; Raymond, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we present a class of numerical shock-capturing schemes for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws modelling two-phase flow. First, we solve the Riemann problem for a two-phase flow with unequal velocities. Then, we construct two approximate Riemann solvers: an one intermediate-state Riemann solver and a generalized Roe's approximate Riemann solver. We give some numerical results for one-dimensional shock-tube problems and for a standard two-phase flow heat addition problem involving two-phase flow instabilities

  12. Analytical solution of laminar-laminar stratified two-phase flows with curved interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, N.; Rovinsky, J.; Maron, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The present study represents a complete analytical solution for laminar two-phase flows with curved interfaces. The solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the two-phases in bipolar coordinates provides the 'flow monograms' describe the relation between the interface curvature and the insitu flow geometry when given the phases flow rates and viscosity ratios. Energy considerations are employed to construct the 'interface monograms', whereby the characteristic interfacial curvature is determined in terms of the phases insitu holdup, pipe diameter, surface tension, fluids/wall adhesion and gravitation. The two monograms are then combined to construct the system 'operational monogram'. The 'operational monogram' enables the determination of the interface configuration, the local flow characteristics, such as velocity profiles, wall and interfacial shear stresses distribution as well as the integral characteristics of the two-phase flow: phases insitu holdup and pressure drop

  13. Entropy analysis on non-equilibrium two-phase flow models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwat, H.; Ruan, Y.Q.

    1995-01-01

    A method of entropy analysis according to the second law of thermodynamics is proposed for the assessment of a class of practical non-equilibrium two-phase flow models. Entropy conditions are derived directly from a local instantaneous formulation for an arbitrary control volume of a structural two-phase fluid, which are finally expressed in terms of the averaged thermodynamic independent variables and their time derivatives as well as the boundary conditions for the volume. On the basis of a widely used thermal-hydraulic system code it is demonstrated with practical examples that entropy production rates in control volumes can be numerically quantified by using the data from the output data files. Entropy analysis using the proposed method is useful in identifying some potential problems in two-phase flow models and predictions as well as in studying the effects of some free parameters in closure relationships

  14. Visualization of two-phase flow in metallic pipes using neutron radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luiz, L.C.; Crispim, V.R.

    2007-01-01

    The study of two-phase flow is a matter of great interest both for the engineering and oil industries. The production of oil and natural gas involves the transportation of fluids in their liquid and gaseous states, respectively, to the processing plant for refinement. The forecasting of two-phase flow in oil pipes is of the utmost important yet an extremely difficult task. With the development of the electronic imaging system, installed in J-9 irradiation channel of the IEN/CNEN Argonauta Reactor, it is possible to visualize the different types of two phase air-water flows in small-diameter metallic pipes. After developing the captured image the liquid-gas drift flux correlation as well as the void fraction in relation to the injected air outflow for a fixed water outflow can be obtained. (author)

  15. Numerical analysis of critical two-phase flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romstedt, P.; Werner, W.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical calculation of critical two-phase flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle is complicated by a singularity of the fluid flow equations at the unknown critical point. This paper describes a method which is able to calculate critical state and its location without any additional assumptions. The critical state is identified by its mathematical properties: characteristics and solvability of linear systems with singular matrix. Because the numerically evaluable mathematical properties are only necessary conditions for the existence of critical flow, some physical ''compatibility-criteria'' (flow velocity equals two-phase sonic velocity, critical flow is independent of downstream flow state variations) are used as a substitute for mathematically sufficient conditions. Numerical results are shown for the critical flow in a LOBI nozzle; the two-phase flow is described by a model with equal phase velocities and thermodynamic non-equilibrium

  16. Measurement of pressure fluctuation in gas-liquid two-phase vortex street

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhiqiang; Sang Wenhui; Zhang Hongjian

    2009-01-01

    The pressure fluctuation in the wake is an important parameter to characterize the shedding process of gas-liquid two-phase Karman vortex street. This paper investigated such pressure fluctuations in a horizontal pipe using air and water as the tested fluid media. The dynamic signal representing the pressure fluctuation was acquired by the duct-wall differential pressure method. Results show that in the wake of the gas-liquid two-phase Karman vortex street, the frequency of the pressure fluctuation is linear with the Reynolds number when the volume void fraction is within the range of 18%. Moreover, the mean amplitude of the pressure fluctuation decreases with the volume void fraction, and the mean amplitude is larger at higher water flowrates under the same volume void fraction. These findings contribute to an in-depth understanding of the gas-liquid two-phase Karman vortex street.

  17. Phase separation and pressure drop of two-phase flow in vertical manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zetzmann, K.

    1982-01-01

    The splitting of a two-phase mass flow in a tube manifold results in a separation between liquid and gas phase. A study is presented of the phase distribution and the related two-phase pressure drop for vertical manifolds in the technically relevant geometry and flow parameter region of an air-water-flow. At the outlet changes in the gas/fluid-radio are observed which are proportional to this ratio at the inlet. The separation characteristic strongly depends on the massflow through the junction. Empirical equations are given to calculate the separation. Measuring the pressure drop at main- and secondary tube of the manifold the additional pressure drop can be obtained. If these results are related with the dynamic pressure at the inlet, two-phase resistance coefficients can be deduced, which may be tested by empirical relations. (orig.) [de

  18. Two-phase gas bubble-liquid boundary layer flow along vertical and inclined surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Epstein, M.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of a two-phase gas bubble liquid boundary layer along vertical and inclined porous surfaces with uniform gas injection is investigated experimentally and analytically. Using argon gas and water as the working fluids, a photographical study of the two-phase boundary layer flow has been performed for various angles of inclination ranging from 45 0 to 135 0 and gas injection rates ranging from 0.01 to 0.1 m/s. An integral method has been employed to solve the system of equations governing the two-phase motion. The effects of the gas injection rate and the angle of inclination on the growth of the boundary layer have been determined

  19. Analytical solution of laminar-laminar stratified two-phase flows with curved interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauner, N.; Rovinsky, J.; Maron, D.M. [Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel)

    1995-09-01

    The present study represents a complete analytical solution for laminar two-phase flows with curved interfaces. The solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the two-phases in bipolar coordinates provides the `flow monograms` describe the relation between the interface curvature and the insitu flow geometry when given the phases flow rates and viscosity ratios. Energy considerations are employed to construct the `interface monograms`, whereby the characteristic interfacial curvature is determined in terms of the phases insitu holdup, pipe diameter, surface tension, fluids/wall adhesion and gravitation. The two monograms are then combined to construct the system `operational monogram`. The `operational monogram` enables the determination of the interface configuration, the local flow characteristics, such as velocity profiles, wall and interfacial shear stresses distribution as well as the integral characteristics of the two-phase flow: phases insitu holdup and pressure drop.

  20. Entropy analysis on non-equilibrium two-phase flow models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karwat, H.; Ruan, Y.Q. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    A method of entropy analysis according to the second law of thermodynamics is proposed for the assessment of a class of practical non-equilibrium two-phase flow models. Entropy conditions are derived directly from a local instantaneous formulation for an arbitrary control volume of a structural two-phase fluid, which are finally expressed in terms of the averaged thermodynamic independent variables and their time derivatives as well as the boundary conditions for the volume. On the basis of a widely used thermal-hydraulic system code it is demonstrated with practical examples that entropy production rates in control volumes can be numerically quantified by using the data from the output data files. Entropy analysis using the proposed method is useful in identifying some potential problems in two-phase flow models and predictions as well as in studying the effects of some free parameters in closure relationships.

  1. Statistical descriptions of polydisperse turbulent two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jean-pierre.minier@edf.fr

    2016-12-15

    Disperse two-phase flows are flows containing two non-miscible phases where one phase is present as a set of discrete elements dispersed in the second one. These discrete elements, or ‘particles’, can be droplets, bubbles or solid particles having different sizes. This situation encompasses a wide range of phenomena, from nano-particles and colloids sensitive to the molecular fluctuations of the carrier fluid to inertia particles transported by the large-scale motions of turbulent flows and, depending on the phenomenon studied, a broad spectrum of approaches have been developed. The aim of the present article is to analyze statistical models of particles in turbulent flows by addressing this issue as the extension of the classical formulations operating at a molecular or meso-molecular level of description. It has a three-fold purpose: (1) to bring out the thread of continuity between models for discrete particles in turbulent flows (above the hydrodynamical level of description) and classical mesoscopic formulations of statistical physics (below the hydrodynamical level); (2) to reveal the specific challenges met by statistical models in turbulence; (3) to establish a methodology for modeling particle dynamics in random media with non-zero space and time correlations. The presentation is therefore centered on organizing the different approaches, establishing links and clarifying physical foundations. The analysis of disperse two-phase flow models is developed by discussing: first, approaches of classical statistical physics; then, by considering models for single-phase turbulent flows; and, finally, by addressing current formulations for discrete particles in turbulent flows. This brings out that particle-based models do not cease to exist above the hydrodynamical level and offer great interest when combined with proper stochastic formulations to account for the lack of equilibrium distributions and scale separation. In the course of this study, general

  2. A two-phase theory for non-Newtonian suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsakelis, Christos

    In this talk, a continuum and thermodynamically consistent theory for macroscopic particles immersed in a non-Newtonian fluid is presented. According to the employed methodology, each phase of the mixture is treated as a thermodynamic system, endowed with its own set of thermodynamic and kinetic variables, and is required to separately satisfy the equations for the balance of mass, momentum and energy. As both constituents of the mixture are not simple fluids, additional degrees of freedom are introduced for the proper description of their thermodynamic state. A subsequent exploitation of the entropy inequality asserts that the accommodation of the complicated rheological characteristics of both phases requires a departure from a linear current-force relationship. For this reason, a subtle nonlinear representation of the stress tensors is employed. Importantly, the inclusion of additional degrees of freedom allows us to obtain a rate equation for the evolution of the volume fraction of the particulate phase. Following a delineation of the fundamentals of the proposed theory, the talk concludes with the presentation of some limiting cases that also serve as preliminary, sanity tests.

  3. Numerical simulation of two-phase flow with front-capturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Weber, D.P.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the complexity of two-phase flow phenomena, two-phase flow codes rely heavily on empirical correlations. This approach has a number of serious shortcomings. Advances in parallel computing and continuing improvements in computer speed and memory have stimulated the development of numerical simulation tools that rely less on empirical correlations and more on fundamental physics. The objective of this work is to take advantage of developments in massively parallel computing, single-phase computational fluid dynamics of complex systems, and numerical methods for front capturing in two-phase flows to develop a computer code for direct numerical simulation of two-phase flow. This includes bubble/droplet transport, interface deformation and topology change, bubble-droplet interactions, interface mass, momentum, and energy transfer. In this work, the Navier-Stokes and energy equations are solved by treating both phases as a single fluid with interfaces between the two phases, and a discontinuity in material properties across the moving interfaces. The evolution of the interfaces is simulated by using the front capturing technique of the level-set methods. In these methods, the boundary of a two-fluid interface is modeled as the zero level set of a smooth function φ. The level-set function φ is defined as the signed distance from the interface (φ is negative inside a droplet/bubble and positive outside). Compared to other front-capturing or front-tracking methods, the level-set approach is relatively easy to implement even in three-dimensional flows, and it has been shown to simulate well the coalescence and breakup of droplets/bubbles

  4. Comparison of Experimental and Numerical Two-Phase Flows in a Porous Micro-Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Crandall

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing two-phase flow in porous media is important to provide estimates of sweep efficiency in enhanced oil recovery and storage estimates in potential geological CO2 sequestration repositories. To further the current understanding of two-phase flow in porous media a micro-model of interconnected channels was designed and fabricated using stereolithography to experimentally study gas-liquid flows. This flowcell was created with a wide variability of throat dimensions to represent naturally occurring porous media. Low flow rate experiments of immiscible two-phase drainage were performed within this cell. Additionally, a computational model for analyzing two-phase flows in the same flowcell was developed and used to simulate conditions not possible with our laboratory settings. The computational model was first tested for the identical conditions used in the experimental studies, and was shown to be in good agreement with the experimentally determined fractal dimension of the invading gas structure, time until breakthrough, and fluid saturation. The numerical model was then used to study two-phase air-water flows in flowcells with the same geometry and different gas-liquid-solid contact angles. The percent saturation of air and the motion of the fluids through the cell were found to vary with changes in these parameters. Finally, to simulate flows expected during geologic carbon sequestration, the fluid properties and interface conditions were set to model the flow of CO2 into a brine-saturated porous medium at representative subsurface conditions. The CO2 flows were shown to have larger gas saturations than the previous air into water studies. Thus the accuracy of the computational model was supported by the flowcell experiments, and the computational model extended the laboratory results to conditions not possible with the apparatus used in the experiments.

  5. The status of research on CFD-PBM simulation of liquid-liquid two-phase flow in extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shaowei; Jing Shan; Wu Qiulin; Zhang Qi

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has gained more and more interest in the chemical engineering researchers and is becoming a useful tool for the chemical engineering research. The research on liquid-liquid two-phase flow CFD simulation in extraction columns is now in its initial stage. There is much work to do for the developing of this research field. The purpose of this article is to review the CFD simulation methods for two-phase flow in extraction column. The population balance model (PBM) is detailedly described in this article because it is the main method used in the two-phase flow CFD simulation currently. Then some examples for the two-phase flow simulation in extraction columns are briefly introduced. The strategy for the research on CFD simulation of two-phase flow in extraction columns is suggested at last. (authors)

  6. Interaction between local parameters of two-phase flow and random forces on a cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylviane Pascal-Ribot; Yves Blanchet; Franck Baj; Phillippe Piteau

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the frame of assessments of steam generator tube bundle vibrations, a study was conducted in order to investigate the effects of an air/water flow on turbulent buffeting forces induced on a cylinder. The main purpose is to relate the physical parameters characterizing an air/water two-phase crossflow with the structural loading of a fixed cylindrical tube. In this first approach, the experiments are carried out in a rectangular acrylic test section supplied with a vertical upward bubbly flow. This flow is transversally impeded by a fixed rigid 12,15 mm diameter cylinder. Different turbulence grids are used in order to modify two-phase characteristics such as bubble diameter, void fraction profile, fluctuation parameters. Preliminarily, a dimensional analysis of fluid-structure interaction under two-phase turbulent solicitations has enabled to identify a list of physically relevant variables which must be measured to evaluate the random forces. The meaning of these relevant parameters as well as the effect of flow patterns are discussed. Direct measurements of two-phase flow parameters are performed simultaneously with measurements of forces exerted on the cylinder. The main descriptive parameters of a two-phase flow are measured using a bi-optical probe, in particular void fraction profiles, interfacial velocities, bubble diameters, void fraction fluctuations. In the same time, the magnitude of random forces caused by two-phase flow is measured with a force transducer. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is then undertaken in order to correlate physical two-phase mechanisms with the random forces exerted on the cylinder. The hypotheses made while applying the dimensional analysis are verified and their pertinence is discussed. Finally, physical parameters involved in random buffeting forces applied on a transverse tube are proposed to scale the spectral magnitude of these forces and comparisons with other authors

  7. Complex network analysis in inclined oil–water two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong-Ke, Gao; Ning-De, Jin

    2009-01-01

    Complex networks have established themselves in recent years as being particularly suitable and flexible for representing and modelling many complex natural and artificial systems. Oil–water two-phase flow is one of the most complex systems. In this paper, we use complex networks to study the inclined oil–water two-phase flow. Two different complex network construction methods are proposed to build two types of networks, i.e. the flow pattern complex network (FPCN) and fluid dynamic complex network (FDCN). Through detecting the community structure of FPCN by the community-detection algorithm based on K-means clustering, useful and interesting results are found which can be used for identifying three inclined oil–water flow patterns. To investigate the dynamic characteristics of the inclined oil–water two-phase flow, we construct 48 FDCNs under different flow conditions, and find that the power-law exponent and the network information entropy, which are sensitive to the flow pattern transition, can both characterize the nonlinear dynamics of the inclined oil–water two-phase flow. In this paper, from a new perspective, we not only introduce a complex network theory into the study of the oil–water two-phase flow but also indicate that the complex network may be a powerful tool for exploring nonlinear time series in practice. (general)

  8. Zero-G two phase flow regime modeling in adiabatic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinarts, T.R.; Best, F.R.; Wheeler, M.; Miller, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Two-phase flow, thermal management systems are currently being considered as an alternative to conventional, single phase systems for future space missions because of their potential to reduce overall system mass, size, and pumping power requirements. Knowledge of flow regime transitions, heat transfer characteristics, and pressure drop correlations is necessary to design and develop two-phase systems. This work is concerned with microgravity, two-phase flow regime analysis. The data come from a recent sets of experiments. The experiments were funded by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and conducted by NASA JSC with Texas A ampersand M University. The experiment was on loan to NASA JSC from Foster-Miller, Inc., who constructed it with funding from the Air Force Phillips Laboratory. The experiment used R12 as the working fluid. A Foster-Miller two phase pump was used to circulate the two phase mixture and allow separate measurements of the vapor and liquid flow streams. The experimental package was flown 19 times for 577 parabolas aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which simulates zero-G conditions by its parabolic flight trajectory. Test conditions included bubbly, slug and annular flow regimes in 0-G. The superficial velocities of liquid and vapor have been obtained from the measured flow rates and are presented along with the observed flow regimes and several flow regime transition predictions. None of the predictions completely describe the transitions as indicated by the data

  9. Constructing a unique two-phase compressibility factor model for lean gas condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moayyedi, Mahmood; Gharesheikhlou, Aliashghar [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azamifard, Arash; Mosaferi, Emadoddin [Amirkabir University of Technology (AUT), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Generating a reliable experimental model for two-phase compressibility factor in lean gas condensate reservoirs has always been demanding, but it was neglected due to lack of required experimental data. This study presents the main results of constructing the first two-phase compressibility factor model that is completely valid for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs. Based on a wide range of experimental data bank for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs, a unique two-phase compressibility factor model was generated using design of experiments (DOE) method and neural network technique (ANN). Using DOE, a swift cubic response surface model was generated for two-phase compressibility factor as a function of some selected fluid parameters for lean gas condensate fluids. The proposed DOE and ANN models were finally validated using four new independent data series. The results showed that there is a good agreement between experimental data and the proposed models. In the end, a detailed comparison was made between the results of proposed models.

  10. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuard, Adrian M; Mahmud, Hisham B; King, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ω turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model. (paper)

  11. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuard, Adrian M.; Mahmud, Hisham B.; King, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ɷ turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model.

  12. Constructing a unique two-phase compressibility factor model for lean gas condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moayyedi, Mahmood; Gharesheikhlou, Aliashghar; Azamifard, Arash; Mosaferi, Emadoddin

    2015-01-01

    Generating a reliable experimental model for two-phase compressibility factor in lean gas condensate reservoirs has always been demanding, but it was neglected due to lack of required experimental data. This study presents the main results of constructing the first two-phase compressibility factor model that is completely valid for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs. Based on a wide range of experimental data bank for Iranian lean gas condensate reservoirs, a unique two-phase compressibility factor model was generated using design of experiments (DOE) method and neural network technique (ANN). Using DOE, a swift cubic response surface model was generated for two-phase compressibility factor as a function of some selected fluid parameters for lean gas condensate fluids. The proposed DOE and ANN models were finally validated using four new independent data series. The results showed that there is a good agreement between experimental data and the proposed models. In the end, a detailed comparison was made between the results of proposed models

  13. Void fraction prediction in two-phase flows independent of the liquid phase density changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazemi, E.; Feghhi, S.A.H.; Roshani, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray densitometry is a frequently used non-invasive method to determine void fraction in two-phase gas liquid pipe flows. Performance of flow meters using gamma-ray attenuation depends strongly on the fluid properties. Variations of the fluid properties such as density in situations where temperature and pressure fluctuate would cause significant errors in determination of the void fraction in two-phase flows. A conventional solution overcoming such an obstacle is periodical recalibration which is a difficult task. This paper presents a method based on dual modality densitometry using Artificial Neural Network (ANN), which offers the advantage of measuring the void fraction independent of the liquid phase changes. An experimental setup was implemented to generate the required input data for training the network. ANNs were trained on the registered counts of the transmission and scattering detectors in different liquid phase densities and void fractions. Void fractions were predicted by ANNs with mean relative error of less than 0.45% in density variations range of 0.735 up to 0.98 gcm −3 . Applying this method would improve the performance of two-phase flow meters and eliminates the necessity of periodical recalibration. - Highlights: • Void fraction was predicted independent of density changes. • Recorded counts of detectors/void fraction were used as inputs/output of ANN. • ANN eliminated necessity of recalibration in changeable density of two-phase flows

  14. Two-phase-flow cooling concept for fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, D.J.; Hoffman, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The new two-phase heat transfer medium proposed is a mixture of potassium droplets and helium which permits blanket operation at hih temperature and low pressure, while maintaining acceptable pumping power requirements, coolant ducting size, and blanket structure fractions. A two-phase flow model is described. The helium pumping power and the primary heat transfer loop are discussed

  15. Two-phase flow characterisation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblond, J.; Javelot, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebon, L.

    1998-01-01

    The results presented in this paper demonstrate the performance of the PFGSE-NMR to obtain a complete characterisation of two-phase flows. Different methods are proposed to characterise air-water flows in different regimes: stationary two-phase flows and flows in transient condition. Finally a modified PFGSE is proposed to analyse the turbulence of air-water bubbly flow. (author)

  16. Unsteady State Two Phase Flow Pressure Drop Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Ayatollahi, Shahaboddin

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate unsteady state two phase flow in a gas-liquid line based on a quasi-steady state approach. A computer program for numerical solution of this method was prepared. Results of calculations using the computer program are presented for several unsteady state two phase flow systems

  17. The sources and evolution of mineralising fluids in iron oxide-copper-gold systems, Norrbotten, Sweden: Constraints from Br/Cl ratios and stable Cl isotopes of fluid inclusion leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, S. A.; Smith, M. P.

    2009-10-01

    We have analysed the halogen concentrations and chlorine stable isotope composition of fluid inclusion leachates from three spatially associated Fe-oxide ± Cu ± Au mineralising systems in Norrbotten, Sweden. Fluid inclusions in late-stage veins in Fe-oxide-apatite deposits contain saline brines and have a wide range of Br/Cl molar ratios, from 0.2 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values from -3.1‰ to -1.0‰. Leachates from saline fluid inclusions from the Greenstone and Porphyry hosted Cu-Au prospects have Br/Cl ratios that range from 0.2 to 0.5 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values from -5.6‰ to -1.3‰. Finally, the Cu-Au deposits hosted by the Nautanen Deformation Zone (NDZ) have Br/Cl molar ratios from 0.4 to 1.1 × 10 -3 and δ 37Cl values that range from -2.4‰ to +0.5‰, although the bulk of the data fall within 0‰ ± 0.5‰. The Br/Cl ratios of leachates are consistent with the derivation of salinity from magmatic sources or from the dissolution of halite. Most of the isotopic data from the Fe-oxide-apatite and Greenstone deposits are consistent with a mantle derived source of the chlorine, with the exception of the four samples with the most negative values. The origin of the low δ 37Cl values in these samples is unknown but we suggest that there may have been some modification of the Cl-isotope signature due to fractionation between the mineralising fluids and Cl-rich silicate assemblages found in the alteration haloes around the deposits. If such a process has occurred then a modified crustal source of the chlorine for all the samples cannot be ruled out although the amount of fractionation necessary to generate the low δ 37Cl values would be significantly larger. The source of Cl in the NDZ deposits has a crustal signature, which suggests the Cl in this system may be derived from (meta-) evaporites or from input from crustal melts such as granitic pegmatites of the Lina Suite.

  18. A Complex Solar Coronal Jet with Two Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jie; Su, Jiangtao; Deng, Yuanyong [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Priest, E. R., E-mail: chenjie@bao.ac.cn [Mathematical Institute, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Jets often occur repeatedly from almost the same location. In this paper, a complex solar jet was observed with two phases to the west of NOAA AR 11513 on 2012 July 2. If it had been observed at only moderate resolution, the two phases and their points of origin would have been regarded as identical. However, at high resolution we find that the two phases merge into one another and the accompanying footpoint brightenings occur at different locations. The phases originate from different magnetic patches rather than being one phase originating from the same patch. Photospheric line of sight (LOS) magnetograms show that the bases of the two phases lie in two different patches of magnetic flux that decrease in size during the occurrence of the two phases. Based on these observations, we suggest that the driving mechanism of the two successive phases is magnetic cancellation of two separate magnetic fragments with an opposite-polarity fragment between them.

  19. Void fraction and interfacial velocity in gas-liquid upward two-phase flow across tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, T.; Tomomatsu, K.; Takamatsu, H.; Nishikawa, H.

    1997-01-01

    Tube failures due to flow-induced vibration are a major problem in heat exchangers and many studies on the problem of such vibration have been carried out so far. Most studies however, have not focused on two-phase flow behavior in tube bundles, but have concentrated mainly on tube vibration behavior like fluid damping, fluid elastic instability and so on. Such studies are not satisfactory for understanding the design of heat exchangers. Tube vibration behavior is very complicated, especially in the case of gas-liquid two-phase flow, so it is necessary to investigate two-phase flow behavior as well as vibration behavior before designing heat exchangers. This paper outlines the main parameters that characterize two-phase behavior, such as void fraction and interfacial velocity. The two-phase flow analyzed here is gas-liquid upward flow across a horizontal tube bundle. The fluids tested were HCFC-123 and steam-water. HCFC-123 stands for Hydrochlorofluorocarbon. Its chemical formula is CHCl 2 CF 3 , which has liquid and gas densities of 1335 and 23.9 kg/m 3 at a pressure of 0.40 MPa and 1252 and 45.7 kg/m 3 at a pressure of 0.76 MPa. The same model tube bundle was used in the two tests covered in this paper, to examine the similarity law of two-phase flow behavior in tube bundles using HCFC-123 and steam-water two-phase flow. We also show numerical simulation results for the two fluid models in this paper. We do not deal with vibration behavior and the relationship between vibration behavior and two-phase flow behavior. (author)

  20. Theoretical investigation of flow regime for boiling water two-phase flow in horizontal rectangular narrow channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunwei; Qiu Suizheng; Yan Mingyu; Wang Bulei; Nie Changhua

    2005-01-01

    The flow regime transition criteria for the boiling water two-phase flow in horizontal rectangular narrow channels (1 x 20 mm, 2 x 20 mm) were theoretically explored. The discernible flow patterns were bubble, intermittent slug, churn, annular and steam-water separation flow. By using two-fluid model, equations of conservation of momentum were established for the two-phase flow. New flow-regime criteria were obtained and agreed well with the experiment data. (authors)

  1. Study of REE behaviors, fluid inclusions, and O, S stable Isotopes in Zafar-abad iron skarn deposit, NW Divandarreh, Kordestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Barati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Zafar-abad iron ore deposit, situated in the NW part of Divandarreh (lat. 36°01'14" and long. 46°58'22". The ore body is located on the northern margin of the Sanandaj-Sirjan igneous metamorphic zone. The Zafar-abad Fe-skarn deposit is one of the important, medium- size mineral deposits in western Iran. REE patterns of skarn magnetite were among others studied in Skarn deposit by (Taylor, 1979 Hydrothermal alteration and fluid-rock interaction significantly affect total contents of REE and their patterns in fluids. Moreover, fractionation of REE by chemical complication, adsorption effects and redox reactions are characteristic processes determining REE behavior during crystallization. Stable isotope data for oxygen and sulfur have been widely used with great success to trace the origin and evolution history of paleo-hydrothermal fluids of meteoric, magmatic, and metamorphic. Materials and methods The present study investigates REE and stable Isotope geochemistry of magnetite and pyrite in Zafar-abad deposit and temperature of trapped fluid inclusions based on geothermometry analysis. In order to study the major, trace and REE compositions of Zafar-abad magnetite, twelve samples were collected from surface of ore exposures. The emphasis during sampling was on ores with primary textures. Discussion The Zafar-abad district is situated in Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary, meta-sedimentary and meta-igneous rocks in Sanandaj-Sirjan igneous metamorphic zone. Sedimentary sequences dominantly composed of calcareous and conglomerate rocks. Various meta-sedimentary rocks are intercalated with the sedimentary rocks, and comprise biotite and muscovite-rich schist, calc-schist, calc-silicate rock. Several distinct ductile tectonic fabrics have been identified around the Zafar-abad deposit. The main ore body at Zafar-abad is in the form of a roughly horizontal, discordant, lens to tabular-shaped body plunging 10° NW, where it appears to

  2. Void fraction measurement in two-phase flow with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufschmidt, W.; Clercq, E. de.

    1984-01-01

    The exact knowledge of the void fraction in two-phase flow systems with water and vapour is of great importance for water-reactors. A mesurement method not disturbing the fluid flow is the absorption technique X-rays. This method has been tested for the present case of small absorption lengths (about 16mm). In collaboration with the 'Lehrstuhl fuer elektronische Schaltungen' of the Ruhruniversitaet, Bochum (FRG), a rapid measurement device has been developed using ionization chambers. At present steady-state fluid in vertical tubes with homogeneous distribution of the two-phases water-vapour are tested at pressures in the range from 70 to 150 bars and rather good agreements with calculated values are found

  3. First-order system least squares and the energetic variational approach for two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, J. H.; Brannick, J.; Liu, C.; Manteuffel, T.; Zikatanov, L.

    2011-07-01

    This paper develops a first-order system least-squares (FOSLS) formulation for equations of two-phase flow. The main goal is to show that this discretization, along with numerical techniques such as nested iteration, algebraic multigrid, and adaptive local refinement, can be used to solve these types of complex fluid flow problems. In addition, from an energetic variational approach, it can be shown that an important quantity to preserve in a given simulation is the energy law. We discuss the energy law and inherent structure for two-phase flow using the Allen-Cahn interface model and indicate how it is related to other complex fluid models, such as magnetohydrodynamics. Finally, we show that, using the FOSLS framework, one can still satisfy the appropriate energy law globally while using well-known numerical techniques.

  4. Synchrotron 4-dimensional imaging of two-phase flow through porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, F H; Penumadu, D; Patel, P; Xiao, X; Garboczi, E J; Moylan, S P; Donmez, M A

    2016-01-01

    Near real-time visualization of complex two-phase flow in a porous medium was demonstrated with dynamic 4-dimensional (4D) (3D + time) imaging at the 2-BM beam line of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Advancing fluid fronts through tortuous flow paths and their interactions with sand grains were clearly captured, and formations of air bubbles and capillary bridges were visualized. The intense X-ray photon flux of the synchrotron facility made 4D imaging possible, capturing the dynamic evolution of both solid and fluid phases. Computed Tomography (CT) scans were collected every 12 s with a pixel size of 3.25 µm. The experiment was carried out to improve understanding of the physics associated with two-phase flow. The results provide a source of validation data for numerical simulation codes such as Lattice-Boltzmann, which are used to model multi-phase flow through porous media.

  5. Two-phase flow patterns in adiabatic and diabatic corrugated plate gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, A.-E.; Kabelac, S.; de Vries, B.

    2016-09-01

    Correlations for two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop can be improved considerably, when they are adapted to specific flow patterns. As plate heat exchangers find increasing application as evaporators and condensers, there is a need for flow pattern maps for corrugated plate gaps. This contribution presents experimental results on flow pattern investigations for such a plate heat exchanger background, using an adiabatic visualisation setup as well as a diabatic setup. Three characteristic flow patterns were observed in the considered range of two-phase flow: bubbly flow, film flow and slug flow. The occurrence of these flow patterns is a function of mass flux, void fraction, fluid properties and plate geometry. Two different plate geometries having a corrugation angle of 27° and 63°, respectively and two different fluids (water/air and R365mfc liquid/vapor) have been analysed. A flow pattern map using the momentum flux is presented.

  6. Three-dimensional investigation of the two-phase flow structure in a bubbly pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidl, W.; Hassan, Y.A.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1996-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a nonintrusive measurement technique that can be used to study the structure of various fluid flows. PIV is used to measure the time-varying, full-field velocity data of a particle-seeded flow field within either a two-dimensional plane or three-dimensional volume. PIV is a very efficient measurement technique since it can obtain both qualitative and quantitative spatial information about the flow field being studied. The quantitative spatial velocity information can be further processed into information of flow parameters such as vorticity and turbulence over extended areas. The objective of this study was to apply recent advances and improvements in the PIV flow measurement technique to the full-field, nonintrusive analysis of a three-dimensional, two-phase fluid flow system in such a manner that both components of the two-phase system could be experimentally quantified

  7. Measurement and modeling of two-phase flow parameters in scaled 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 BWR rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X.; Schlegel, J.P.; Liu, Y.; Paranjape, S.; Hibiki, T. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States); Ishii, M., E-mail: ishii@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, 400 Central Dr., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2017 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grid spacers have a significant but not well understood effect on flow behavior and development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two different length scales are present in rod bundles, which must be accounted for in modeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An easy-to-implement empirical model has been developed for the two-phase friction multiplier. - Abstract: The behavior of reactor systems is predicted using advanced computational codes in order to determine the safety characteristics of the system during various accidents and to determine the performance characteristics of the reactor. These codes generally utilize the two-fluid model for predictions of two-phase flows, as this model is the most accurate and detailed model which is currently practical for predicting large-scale systems. One of the weaknesses of this approach however is the need to develop constitutive models for various quantities. Of specific interest are the models used in the prediction of void fraction and pressure drop across the rod bundle due to their importance in new Natural Circulation Boiling Water Reactor (NCBWR) designs, where these quantities determine the coolant flow rate through the core. To verify the performance of these models and expand the existing experimental database, data has been collected in an 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 rod bundle which is carefully scaled from actual BWR geometry and includes grid spacers to maintain rod spacing. While these spacer grids are 'generic', their inclusion does provide valuable data for analysis of the effect of grid spacers on the flow. In addition to pressure drop measurements the area-averaged void fraction has been measured by impedance void meters and local conductivity probes have been used to measure the local void fraction and interfacial area concentration in the bundle subchannels. Experimental conditions covered a wide range of flow rates and void fractions up to 80%.

  8. A Variational Model for Two-Phase Immiscible Electroosmotic Flow at Solid Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Shao, Sihong

    2012-01-01

    We develop a continuum hydrodynamic model for two-phase immiscible flows that involve electroosmotic effect in an electrolyte and moving contact line at solid surfaces. The model is derived through a variational approach based on the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation. This approach was first presented in the derivation of a continuum hydrodynamic model for moving contact line in neutral two-phase immiscible flows (Qian, Wang, and Sheng, J. Fluid Mech. 564, 333-360 (2006)). Physically, the electroosmotic effect can be formulated by the Onsager principle as well in the linear response regime. Therefore, the same variational approach is applied here to the derivation of the continuum hydrodynamic model for charged two-phase immiscible flows where one fluid component is an electrolyte exhibiting electroosmotic effect on a charged surface. A phase field is employed to model the diffuse interface between two immiscible fluid components, one being the electrolyte and the other a nonconductive fluid, both allowed to slip at solid surfaces. Our model consists of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for momentum transport, the Nernst-Planck equation for ion transport, the Cahn-Hilliard phase-field equation for interface motion, and the Poisson equation for electric potential, along with all the necessary boundary conditions. In particular, all the dynamic boundary conditions at solid surfaces, including the generalized Navier boundary condition for slip, are derived together with the equations of motion in the bulk region. Numerical examples in two-dimensional space, which involve overlapped electric double layer fields, have been presented to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the model, and a few salient features of the two-phase immiscible electroosmotic flows at solid surface. The wall slip in the vicinity of moving contact line and the Smoluchowski slip in the electric double layer are both investigated. © 2012 Global-Science Press.

  9. Modeling and simulation of nanoparticles transport in a two-phase flow in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu

    2012-01-01

    In the current paper, a mathematical model to describe the nanoparticles transport carried by a two-phase flow in a porous medium is presented. Both capillary forces as well as Brownian diffusion are considered in the model. A numerical example of countercurrent water-oil imbibition is considered. We monitor the changing of the fluid and solid properties due to the addition of the nanoparticles using numerical experiments. Variation of water saturation, nanoparticles concentration and porosity ratio are investigated.

  10. Modeling and numerical analysis of non-equilibrium two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rascle, P.; El Amine, K.

    1997-01-01

    We are interested in the numerical approximation of two-fluid models of nonequilibrium two-phase flows described by six balance equations. We introduce an original splitting technique of the system of equations. This technique is derived in a way such that single phase Riemann solvers may be used: moreover, it allows a straightforward extension to various and detailed exchange source terms. The properties of the fluids are first approached by state equations of ideal gas type and then extended to real fluids. For the construction of numerical schemes , the hyperbolicity of the full system is not necess