WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-part classroom inquiry

  1. College science teachers' views of classroom inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick L.; Abell, Sandra K.; Demir, Abdulkadir; Schmidt, Francis J.

    2006-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) gain an understanding of the views of inquiry held by faculty members involved in undergraduate science teaching and (b) describe the challenges, constraints, and opportunities that they perceived in designing and teaching inquiry-based laboratories. Participants included 19 college professors, representing both life and physical science disciplines, from (a) 2-year community college, (b) small, private nonprofit liberal arts college, (c) public master's granting university, and (d) public doctoral/research extensive university. We collected data through semistructured interviews and applied an iterative data analysis process. College science faculty members held a full and open inquiry view, seeing classroom inquiry as time consuming, unstructured, and student directed. They believed that inquiry was more appropriate for upper level science majors than for introductory or nonscience majors. Although faculty members valued inquiry, they perceived limitations of time, class size, student motivation, and student ability. These limitations, coupled with their view of inquiry, constrained them from implementing inquiry-based laboratories. Our proposed inquiry continuum represents a broader view of inquiry that recognizes the interaction between two dimensions of inquiry: (a) the degree of inquiry and (b) the level of student directedness, and provides for a range of inquiry-based classroom activities.

  2. Managing Inquiry-Based Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Christie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Though it may seem that classroom management comes naturally to some teachers, upon closer examination you'll probably discover that preparation and adaptation are more important than any innate ability when it comes to successful classroom management. Any experienced middle school science teacher can tell you that successful classroom management…

  3. Simplifying Inquiry Instruction: Assessing the Inquiry Level of Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Randy L.; Smetana, Lara; Binns, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Inquiry instruction is a hallmark of the current science education reform efforts. Science teachers know that inquiry is important, yet most teachers lack a practical framework of inquiry to inform their instruction. Defining inquiry and assessing how much inquiry is supported by a particular activity or lab can be difficult and confusing. This…

  4. Inquiry-Based Learning and the Flipped Classroom Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Betty; Hodge, Angie; Corritore, Cynthia; Ernst, Dana C.

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom model of teaching can be an ideal venue for turning a traditional classroom into an engaging, inquiry-based learning (IBL) environment. In this paper, we discuss how two instructors at different universities made their classrooms come to life by moving the acquisition of basic course concepts outside the classroom and using…

  5. Promoting Inclusive Practices in Inquiry-Based Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Sarah J.; Therrien, William J.; Kaldenberg, Erica; Taylor, Jonte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of inquiry-based instruction and to outline components of inquiry-based instruction key to ensuring that students with disabilities in inclusive science classrooms acquire core concepts. The use of collaboration, big ideas, knowledge and retention strategies, and formative assessments are…

  6. Technology-rich inquiry science in urban classrooms: What are the barriers to inquiry pedagogy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler Songer, Nancy; Lee, Hee-Sun; Kam, Rosalind

    2002-02-01

    What are the barriers to technology-rich inquiry pedagogy in urban science classrooms, and what kinds of programs and support structures allow these barriers to be overcome? Research on the pedagogical practices within urban classrooms suggests that as a result of many constraints, many urban teachers' practices emphasize directive, controlling teaching, that is, the pedagogy of poverty (Haberman, [1991]), rather than the facilitation of students' ownership and control over their learning, as advocated in inquiry science. On balance, research programs that advocate standards-based or inquiry teaching pedagogies demonstrate strong learning outcomes by urban students. This study tracked classroom research on a technology-rich inquiry weather program with six urban science teachers. The teachers implemented this program in coordination with a district-wide middle school science reform. Results indicated that despite many challenges in the first year of implementation, students in all 19 classrooms of this program demonstrated significant content and inquiry gains. In addition, case study data comprised of twice-weekly classroom observations and interviews with the six teachers suggest support structures that were both conducive and challenging to inquiry pedagogy. Our work has extended previous studies on urban science pedagogy and practices as it has begun to articulate what role the technological component plays either in contributing to the challenges we experienced or in helping urban science classrooms to realize inquiry science and other positive learning values. Although these data outline results after only the first year of systemic reform, we suggest that they begin to build evidence for the role of technology-rich inquiry programs in combating the pedagogy of poverty in urban science classrooms.

  7. Creating Classrooms of Preference: An Exercise in Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews Appreciative Inquiry (AI) as a process used in organizational creation and change and then outlines steps for an in-class exercise titled "The Preferred Classroom," to be used to design and organize a college classroom for the term. The exercise also prepares business students for future exposure to AI. A brief literature…

  8. Computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning and classroom scripts

    OpenAIRE

    Mäkitalo-Siegl, Kati; Kohnle, Carmen; Fischer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the influence of classroom-script structure (high vs. low) during computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning on help-seeking processes and learning gains in 54 student pairs in secondary science education. Screen- and audio-capturing videos were analysed according to a model of the help-seeking process. Results show that the structure of the classroom script substantially affects patterns of student help seeking and learning gain in the classroom. Overall, students ...

  9. Engaging Nature of Science to Preservice Teachers through Inquiry-Based Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart

    2013-01-01

    Inquiry-based classroom is widely distributed in the school science based on its useful and effective instruction. Science teachers are key elements allowing students to have scientific inquiry. If teachers understand and imply inquiry-based learning into science classroom, students will learn science as scientific inquiry and understand nature of…

  10. Understanding Classroom Roles in Inquiry Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl L. Walker

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inquiry-based teaching and learning are rooted in social constructivism and are central to curricular reform. Role theory and social constructivism provided insight into a commonly observed but insufficiently understood phenomenon in inquiry. Within inquiry, role shifts have been described as the switching of roles between students and teachers; however, the process may be better conceptualized as role diversification because students and teachers may undertake multiple roles simultaneously in inquiry. This article expands on existing research and proposes a framework potentially applicable to both learners and teachers, but here focused on learners. Beyond exploration, engagement, and stabilization of roles, diversification was added and described. This framework expanded on current education theory, adding new insight to a minimally explored topic, with implications for students, teachers, consultants, and researchers.

  11. An Integrated Inquiry Activity in an Elementary Teaching Methods Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Tahsin

    2010-01-01

    In this integrated inquiry, students in an elementary teaching methods class investigate a real-world problem outside the classroom. The students use the Cognitive Research Trust (CoRT) thinking strategy to find the causes of, impact of, and possible solutions to the problem. They present their findings and then discuss implementation of this…

  12. Negotiating Authority through Cultivating a Classroom Community of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Nathan D.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines how authority was negotiated in an undergraduate teacher education course. As the teacher of the course, I involved students in on-going processes of collaborative dialogue and deliberation about issues of importance to those involved through cultivating a classroom community of inquiry. The findings suggest that…

  13. Promoting Cognitive and Social Aspects of Inquiry through Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Wei, Xin; Duan, Peiran; Guo, Yuying; Wang, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how Chinese physics teachers structured classroom discourse to support the cognitive and social aspects of inquiry-based science learning. Regarding the cognitive aspect, we examined to what extent the cognitive processes underlying the scientific skills and the disciplinary reasoning behind the content knowledge were taught.…

  14. Mapping Science in Discourse-based Inquiry Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeneayhu, Demeke Gesesse

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate how discourse-based inquiry science lessons provided opportunities for students to develop a network of semantic relations among core ideas and concepts in science. It was a naturalistic inquiry classroom lessons observation study on three science teachers--- a middle school science teacher and two high school physics teachers in an urban school district located in the Western New York region. Discourse and thematic analysis drawn from the theory of Systemic Functional Linguistics were utilized as guiding framework and analysis tools. Analysis of the pre-observation and post-observation interviews of the participant teachers revealed that all of the three teachers participated in at least one inquiry-based science teaching teacher professional development program and they all thought their classroom teaching practice was inquiry-based. Analysis of their classroom lesson videos that each participant teacher taught on a specific science topic revealed that the middle school teacher was found to be a traditional teacher-dominated classroom whereas the two high school physics teachers' classroom teaching approach was found to be discourse-based inquiry. One of the physics teachers who taught on a topic of Magnetic Interaction used relatively structured and guided-inquiry classroom investigations. The other physics teacher who taught on a topic of Color Mixing utilized open-ended classroom investigations where the students planned and executed the series of classroom science investigations with minimal guidance from the teacher. The traditional teacher-based classroom communicative pattern was found to be dominated by Triadic Dialogue and most of the science thematics were jointly developed by the teacher and the students, but the students' role was limited to providing responses to the teacher's series questions. In the guided-inquiry classroom, the common communicative pattern was found to be True Dialogue and most

  15. Inquiry and the Literary Text: Constructing Discussions in the English Classroom. Classroom Practices in Teaching English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, James, Ed.; Schmit, John S., Ed.

    This collection of 14 articles aims to help teachers make the most of student discussion and inquiry in classrooms from middle school to high school to college. Contributors to the collection--secondary and college practitioners--offer theory-grounded, classroom-tested approaches for literature study in which students engage in democratic dialogue…

  16. Shifting more than the goal posts: developing classroom norms of inquiry-based learning in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, Katie; Fielding-Wells, Jill

    2017-06-01

    The 3-year study described in this paper aims to create new knowledge about inquiry norms in primary mathematics classrooms. Mathematical inquiry addresses complex problems that contain ambiguities, yet classroom environments often do not adopt norms that promote curiosity, risk-taking and negotiation needed to productively engage with complex problems. Little is known about how teachers and students initiate, develop and maintain norms of mathematical inquiry in primary classrooms. The research question guiding this study is, "How do classroom norms develop that facilitate student learning in primary classrooms which practice mathematical inquiry?" The project will (1) analyse a video archive of inquiry lessons to identify signature practices that enhance productive classroom norms of mathematical inquiry and facilitate learning, (2) engage expert inquiry teachers to collaborate to identify and design strategies for assisting teachers to develop and sustain norms over time that are conducive to mathematical inquiry and (3) support and study teachers new to mathematical inquiry adopting these practices in their classrooms. Anticipated outcomes include identification and illustration of classroom norms of mathematical inquiry, signature practices linked to these norms and case studies of primary teachers' progressive development of classroom norms of mathematical inquiry and how they facilitate learning.

  17. Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by…

  18. Opportunities for Inquiry Science in Montessori Classrooms: Learning from a Culture of Interest, Communication, and Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Carol R.; Gimbel, Steven J.; Haskell, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Although classroom inquiry is the primary pedagogy of science education, it has often been difficult to implement within conventional classroom cultures. This study turned to the alternatively structured Montessori learning environment to better understand the ways in which it fosters the essential elements of classroom inquiry, as defined by…

  19. Teaching Inquiry Science in the Elementary-school Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Dan; Messina, D. L.; McDermott, L. C.

    2006-12-01

    Bringing reform instruction to the elementary school classroom requires a teacher to have strong content understanding as well as an understanding of what it means to teach and learn through inquiry. For the past two years, I have participated in the NSF-funded Summer Institute and ongoing academic-year Continuation Course offered by the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington. In this talk, I will discuss how working through modules in Physics by Inquiry1, the research-based curriculum developed by the group, has strengthened my understanding of topics I am expected to teach. I will also describe how the additional support provided by the Continuation Course has extended my professional development through its emphasis on reflection on teaching practice and the implementation of inquiry in the K-12 classroom. Sponsored by Lillian C. McDermott. 1. L.C. McDermott and the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington, Physics by Inquiry, New York, NY, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (1996).

  20. Activity systems in the inquiry classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Donald William

    Inquiry science, as called for by reform-minded organizations such as the National Research Council (1996), offers a platform with the potential for introducing all students to the practice of science while maintaining focus on key concepts and theories. This project followed two small groups as they completed an inquiry unit on genetics at a Midwestern high school. I investigated whether levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, student-apparatus, and student-concept connections were approximately equal across all students in each of the two groups. I found differences among students in levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and student-concept connections. From a situated idiopathic perspective, these differences may indicate different levels of opportunity-to-learn. At a more abstract (nomothetic) level, these differences may be due to emergent divisions of labor (roles) within the two groups. From the perspective of Activity Theory (Leont'ev, 1978; Engestrom, 1987), roles serve as important mediators that simultaneously allow the social unit to accomplish its objectives, while shaping the development of participants. I describe three roles that capture modes of participation for students interacting in the small groups, and that may contribute to what Engestrom (2001) calls subject-producing activity systems: networked contributor, social member, and isolate. This paper also describes tools for teachers and researchers to use in identifying levels of mediation and roles as they occur in small groups.

  1. Collaborative CPD and inquiry-based science in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    on the teaching of science and on collaboration. Qualitative data obtained by following the same teacher teaching Science & Technology from 4th to 6th grade are used to discuss changes in her classroom practice; in particular concerning inquiry-based methods shown in earlier QUEST-research to be understood...... between seminars, individual trials in own classroom, and collaborative activities in the science-team at local schools. The QUEST research is aimed at understanding the relation between individual and social changes. In this study, quantitative data are used to compare the perceived effect from QUEST...... as merely hands-on activities. In-depth understanding from the case contributed to further understand the quantitative results. Findings reveal a moderate positive correlation between teachers’ reports about changing classroom practice as a consequence of participating in QUEST, and their reports about...

  2. Collaborative CPD and inquiry-based science in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2015-01-01

    on the teaching of science and on collaboration. Qualitative data obtained by following the same teacher teaching Science & Technology from 4th to 6th grade are used to discuss changes in her classroom practice; in particular concerning inquiry-based methods shown in earlier QUEST-research to be understood...... between seminars, individual trials in own classroom, and collaborative activities in the science-team at local schools. The QUEST research is aimed at understanding the relation between individual and social changes. In this study, quantitative data are used to compare the perceived effect from QUEST...... as merely hands-on activities. In-depth understanding from the case contributed to further understand the quantitative results. Findings reveal a moderate positive correlation between teachers’ reports about changing classroom practice as a consequence of participating in QUEST, and their reports about...

  3. Collaborative CPD and inquiry-based science in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2015-01-01

    on the teaching of science and on collaboration. Qualitative data obtained by following the same teacher teaching Science & Technology from 4th to 6th grade are used to discuss changes in her classroom practice; in particular concerning inquiry-based methods shown in earlier QUEST-research to be understood...... between seminars, individual trials in own classroom, and collaborative activities in the science-team at local schools. The QUEST research is aimed at understanding the relation between individual and social changes. In this study, quantitative data are used to compare the perceived effect from QUEST...... as merely hands-on activities. In-depth understanding from the case contributed to further understand the quantitative results. Findings reveal a moderate positive correlation between teachers’ reports about changing classroom practice as a consequence of participating in QUEST, and their reports about...

  4. Promoting cognitive and social aspects of inquiry through classroom discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Wei, Xin; Duan, Peiran; Guo, Yuying; Wang, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how Chinese physics teachers structured classroom discourse to support the cognitive and social aspects of inquiry-based science learning. Regarding the cognitive aspect, we examined to what extent the cognitive processes underlying the scientific skills and the disciplinary reasoning behind the content knowledge were taught. Regarding the social aspect, we examined how classroom discourse supported student learning in terms of students' opportunities to talk and interaction patterns. Our participants were 17 physics teachers who were actively engaged in teacher education programs in universities and professional development programs in local school districts. We analyzed one lesson video from each participating teacher. The results suggest both promises and challenges. Regarding the cognitive aspect of inquiry, the teachers in general recognized the importance of teaching the cognitive processes and disciplinary reasoning. However, they were less likely to address common intuitive ideas about science concepts and principles. Regarding the social aspect of inquiry, the teachers frequently interacted with students in class. However, it appeared that facilitating conversations among students and prompting students to talk about their own ideas are challenging. We discuss the implications of these findings for teacher education programs and professional development programs in China.

  5. Using Brief Teacher Interviews to Assess the Extent of Inquiry in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong-Nuako, Juliet; Shore, Bruce M.; Saunders-Stewart, Katie S.; Gyles, Petra D. T.

    2015-01-01

    Inquiry-based instruction is common to nearly every model of gifted education. Six teachers of 14 secondary classes were briefly interviewed about their teaching and learning methods, use of inquiry-based strategies, classroom descriptions, a typical day, student expectations, and inquiry-instruction outcomes. A criterion-referenced checklist of…

  6. Teacher's Scaffolding over the Year to Develop Norms of Mathematical Inquiry in a Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makar, Katie; Bakker, Arthur; Ben-Zvi, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Developing mathematical inquiry practices requires that teachers are explicit about classroom norms that support these practices. In this study, we asked: "How can a teacher scaffold the development of norms and practices in mathematical inquiry over time?" Analysis of classroom video over a year showed that the teacher constantly…

  7. Scaffolding norms of argumentation-based inquiry in a primary mathematics classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makar, Katie; Bakker, Arthur; Ben-Zvi, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Developing argumentation-based inquiry practices requires teachers and students to be explicit about classroom norms that support these practices. In this study, we asked: How can a teacher scaffold the development of argumentation-based inquiry norms and practices in a mathematics classroom? A prim

  8. Relationship between Preferred and Actual Opinions about Inquiry-Based Instruction Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart

    2017-01-01

    Based on 10 preservice science teachers in 4 schools, this study presents a detailed analysis of how preservice teacher expectation interacts with school practicum and authentic classroom action of inquiry-based instruction. Classroom observation, lesson plan analysis, and interviews revealed that inquiry-based instruction in the expectation and…

  9. Teacher's scaffolding over the year to develop norms of mathematical inquiry in a primary classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makar, Katie; Bakker, A.; Ben-Zvi, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Developing mathematical inquiry practices requires that teachers are explicit about classroom norms that support these practices. In this study, we asked: How can a teacher scaffold the development of norms and practices in mathematical inquiry over time? Analysis of classroom video over a year show

  10. Intelligent Teaching: Using the Theory of Multiple Intelligences in the Inquiry Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Barry R.; MacDougall, Gregory D.

    2002-01-01

    Explains how to use multiple intelligences in science instruction in inquiry classrooms. Describes using touch and movement, music and rhythm, visualization, interpersonal intelligence, and multiple approaches in science teaching. (YDS)

  11. Songcrafting: A Teacher's Perspective of Collaborative Inquiry and Creation of Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Sari

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the wider meanings of collective inquiries, creative collaboration and learning at work through analyzing a teacher's learning process when plunging into collaborative inquiry and creation with the students in primary classroom context. The incorporation of "songcrafting" into the existing practice of singing…

  12. Using Science Trade Books to Support Inquiry in the Elementary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Judith A.; Young, Terrell A.

    2008-01-01

    Students can imitate scientists at work by conducting inquiry investigations in the classroom, thereby exhibiting a multitude of skills and competencies. As stated by Bransford and Donovan (2005), learning science as a process of inquiry involves students in observation, imagination, and reasoning about the phenomena under investigation. Rather…

  13. Exploring the meaning of practicing classroom inquiry from the perspectives of National Board Certified Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ayhan

    Inquiry has been one of the most prominent terms of the contemporary science education reform movement (Buck, Latta, & Leslie-Pelecky, 2007; Colburn, 2006; Settlage, 2007). Practicing classroom inquiry has maintained its central position in science education for several decades because science education reform documents promote classroom inquiry as the potential savior of science education from its current problems. Likewise, having the capabilities of teaching science through inquiry has been considered by National Board for Professional Teaching Standards [NBPTS] as one of the essential elements of being an accomplished science teacher. Successful completion of National Board Certification [NBC] assessment process involves presenting a clear evidence of enacting inquiry with students. Despite the high-profile of the word inquiry in the reform documents, the same is not true in schools (Crawford, 2007). Most of the science teachers do not embrace this type of approach in their everyday teaching practices of science (Johnson, 2006; Luera, Moyer, & Everett, 2005; Smolleck, Zembal-Saul, & Yoder, 2006; Trumbull, Scarano, & Bonney, 2006). And the specific meanings attributed to inquiry by science teachers do not necessarily match with the original intentions of science education reform documents (Matson & Parsons, 2006; Wheeler, 2000; Windschitl, 2003). Unveiling the various meanings held by science teachers is important in developing better strategies for the future success of science education reform efforts (Jones & Eick, 2007; Keys & Bryan, 2001). Due to the potential influences of National Board Certified Science Teachers [NBCSTs] on inexperienced science teachers as their mentors, examining inquiry conceptions of NBCSTs is called for. How do these accomplished practitioners understand and enact inquiry? The purpose of this dissertation research study was twofold. First, it investigated the role of NBC performance assessment process on the professional development

  14. Understanding Teachers' Conceptions of Classroom Inquiry With a Teaching Scenario Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Hwa; Orgill, Marykay; Crippen, Kent J.

    2008-08-01

    A survey instrument using everyday teaching scenarios was developed to measure teacher conceptions of inquiry. Validity of the instrument was established by comparing responses for a group of secondary teachers to narrative writing and group discussion. Participating teachers used only three of the five essential features of inquiry detailed in the standards documents (NRC 2000) when expressing their ideas of classroom inquiry. The features of ‘evaluating explanations in connection with scientific knowledge’ and ‘communicating explanations’ were rarely mentioned. These missing components indicate a gap between the teachers’ conceptions of inquiry and the ideals of the reform movement.

  15. Do science coaches promote inquiry-based instruction in the elementary science classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Rosemary Knight

    The South Carolina Mathematics and Science Coaching Initiative established a school-based science coaching model that was effective in improving instruction by increasing the level of inquiry-based instruction in elementary science classrooms. Classroom learning environment data from both teacher groups indicated considerable differences in the quality of inquiry instruction for those classrooms of teachers supported by a science coach. All essential features of inquiry were demonstrated more frequently and at a higher level of open-ended inquiry in classrooms with the support of a science coach than were demonstrated in classrooms without a science coach. However, from teacher observations and interviews, it was determined that elementary schoolteacher practice of having students evaluate conclusions and connect them to current scientific knowledge was often neglected. Teachers with support of a science coach reported changes in inquiry-based instruction that were statistically significant. This mixed ethnographic study also suggested that the Mathematics and Science Coaching Initiative Theory of Action for Instructional Improvement was an effective model when examining the work of science coaches. All components of effective school infrastructure were positively impacted by a variety of science coaching strategies intended to promote inquiry. Professional development for competent teachers, implementation of researched-based curriculum, and instructional materials support were areas highly impacted by the work of science coaches.

  16. Discursive Modes and Their Pedagogical Functions in Model-Based Inquiry (MBI) Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok; Neilson, Drew

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated the emergent discursive modes and their pedagogical functions found in model-based inquiry (MBI) science classrooms. A sample of four high school physics classrooms was video-recorded and analysed using a newly established discourse mode analysis framework. Qualitative methods were employed to identify the most salient…

  17. An Inquiry-Based Approach to Critical Literacy: Pedagogical Nuances of a Second Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Pamela; Cleovoulou, Yiola

    2014-01-01

    This case study explores the pedagogy and practices of an elementary school teacher who combines inquiry pedagogy and critical literacy. The authors gathered data for this analysis by conducting two interviews with a classroom teacher and observing classroom practices 12 times over a 6 month period. Through a general inductive approach to…

  18. Sustaining inquiry-based teaching methods in the middle school science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Amy Fowler

    This dissertation used a combination of case study and phenomenological research methods to investigate how individual teachers of middle school science in the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative (AMSTI) program sustain their use of inquiry-based methods of teaching and learning. While the overall context for the cases was the AMSTI program, each of the four teacher participants in this study had a unique, individual context as well. The researcher collected data through a series of interviews, multiple-day observations, and curricular materials. The interview data was analyzed to develop a textural, structural, and composite description of the phenomenon. The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) was used along with the Assesing Inquiry Potential (AIP) questionnaire to determine the level of inquiry-based instruction occuring in the participants classrooms. Analysis of the RTOP data and AIP data indicated all of the participants utilized inquiry-based methods in their classrooms during their observed lessons. The AIP data also indicated the level of inquiry in the AMSTI curricular materials utilized by the participants during the observations was structured inquiry. The findings from the interview data suggested the ability of the participants to sustain their use of structured inquiry was influenced by their experiences with, beliefs about, and understandings of inquiry. This study contributed to the literature by supporting existing studies regarding the influence of teachers' experiences, beliefs, and understandings of inquiry on their classroom practices. The inquiry approach stressed in current reforms in science education targets content knowledge, skills, and processes needed in a future scientifically literate citizenry.

  19. Managing Inquiry-Based Science: Challenges in Enacting Complex Science Instruction in Elementary and Middle School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher J.; Rooks, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    Effectively enacting inquiry-based science instruction entails considerable changes in classroom management practices. In this article, we describe five interconnected management areas that need to be addressed when managing an inquiry-oriented K-8 science classroom. We introduce a pyramid model as a framework for thinking about these management…

  20. Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrø, Helle; Johnsen-Høines, Marit

    2012-01-01

    in inquiring questions, and what other ways of communicating may have an inquiring function in learning conversations? The intention is to develop and frame the concept of ’inquiry’ in learning conversations, and this is the focus of analysis of an authentic classroom situation, where teacher and pupils......This article discusses what inquiry conversations could mean when learning mathematics.3 Referring to Gadamar’s distinction of true and apparent questions it is discussed what it takes to be inquiring and if this attitude necessarily includes posing questions. Which qualities are expressed...... are exploring the concept of ’volume’. Further, this analysis informs a discussion of listening as an important element of an inquiring learning conversation....

  1. Abductive Science Inquiry Using Mobile Devices in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sohaib; Parsons, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in digital technology have attracted the interest of educators and researchers to develop technology-assisted inquiry-based learning environments in the domain of school science education. Traditionally, school science education has followed deductive and inductive forms of inquiry investigation, while the abductive form of…

  2. Teacher Epistemology and Scientific Inquiry in Computerized Classroom Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Dorit; Taylor, Peter Charles

    1995-01-01

    Interactions with a scientific database of 2 classes of grade 11 students were monitored and teachers' epistemologies were examined. Results suggest that the computer itself does not facilitate inquiry learning; the teacher's epistemology is a key mediating influence on students' use of the computer as a tool of scientific inquiry. (Author/MKR)

  3. An investigation into the factors that motivate teachers to implement inquiry in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Beth Schieber

    Inquiry-based science teaching is an inductive approach to science instruction that originated in constructivist learning theory and requires students to be active participants in their own learning process. In an inquiry-based classroom, students actively construct their knowledge of science through hands-on, engaged practices and inquiry-based approaches. Inquiry-based teaching stands in contrast to more traditional forms of teaching that see students as empty vessels to be filled by the teacher with rote facts. Despite calls from the NSF, the NRC, and the AAAS for more inquiry-based approaches to teaching science, research has shown that many teachers still do not use inquiry-based approaches. Teachers have cited difficulties including lack of time, high-stakes testing, a shortage of materials, problems with school-wide logistics, rigid science curricula, student passivity, and lack of prerequisite skills. The objective of this mixed-methods study was to examine to what extent specific, identifiable personality traits contribute to the likelihood that a teacher will use inquiry in the science classroom, and what factors figure predominantly as teachers' reasons for implementing inquiry. The findings of the study showed that the null hypotheses were not rejected. However, reduced conscientiousness and increased openness may be significant in indicating why teachers use inquiry-based teaching methods and avenues for further research. In addition, the qualitative results aligned with previous findings that showed that lack of resources (e.g., time and money) and peer support act as powerful barriers to implementing inquiry-based teaching. Inquiry teachers are flexible, come to teaching as a second or third career, and their classrooms can be characterized as chaotic, fun, and conducive to learning through engagement. The study suggests changes in practice among administrators and teachers. With adjustments in methods and survey instruments, additional research

  4. Classroom Response Systems for Implementing "Interactive Inquiry" in Large Organic Chemistry Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Richard W.; Caughran, Joel A.; Sauers, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    The authors have developed "sequence response applications" for classroom response systems (CRSs) that allow instructors to engage and actively involve students in the learning process, probe for common misconceptions regarding lecture material, and increase interaction between instructors and students. "Guided inquiry" and…

  5. The Distinction between Experimental and Historical Sciences as a Framework for Improving Classroom Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Inquiry experiences in secondary science classrooms are heavily weighted toward experimentation. We know, however, that many fields of science (e.g., evolutionary biology, cosmology, and paleontology), while they may utilize experiments, are not justified by experimental methodologies. With the focus on experimentation in schools, these fields of…

  6. Science Achievement of Students in Co-Taught, Inquiry-Based Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca-Vega, Rita; Brown, Kathleen; Yasutake, David

    2011-01-01

    This case investigation followed the progress of middle students with disabilities, their peers, and teachers in co-taught science classrooms where a hands-on, inquiry-based curriculum was used. Students with disabilities (n=21), including learning disabilities, mild intellectual impairment, and mild autism were placed in co-taught classes with…

  7. The Distinction between Experimental and Historical Sciences as a Framework for Improving Classroom Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Inquiry experiences in secondary science classrooms are heavily weighted toward experimentation. We know, however, that many fields of science (e.g., evolutionary biology, cosmology, and paleontology), while they may utilize experiments, are not justified by experimental methodologies. With the focus on experimentation in schools, these fields of…

  8. How Inquiry Pedagogy Enables Teachers to Facilitate Growth Mindsets in Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Mia; Fielding-Wells, Jill; Makar, Katie; Hillman, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Growth mindsets are vital for effective lifelong learning. Students with growth mindsets are more willing to learn new things, take risks, and embrace challenges. Students with fixed mindsets have limiting beliefs about their abilities, and will attribute success in learning to factors beyond their control. Inquiry in mathematics classrooms may…

  9. Science Achievement of Students in Co-Taught, Inquiry-Based Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca-Vega, Rita; Brown, Kathleen; Yasutake, David

    2011-01-01

    This case investigation followed the progress of middle students with disabilities, their peers, and teachers in co-taught science classrooms where a hands-on, inquiry-based curriculum was used. Students with disabilities (n=21), including learning disabilities, mild intellectual impairment, and mild autism were placed in co-taught classes with…

  10. Empowering Students in the Process of Social Inquiry Learning through Flipping the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Morris Siu-Yung

    2017-01-01

    The "flipped classroom" is an educational strategy about inverting the traditional use of in-class time for conducting lower-level learning activities and out-of-class time for conducting higher-level learning activities. "Guided social inquiry learning" (GSIL), which is a scaffolded constructivist pedagogic approach, has been…

  11. Developing Elementary Teachers' Understandings of Hedges and Personal Pronouns in Inquiry-Based Science Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.

    2010-02-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of introducing elementary teachers to the scholarly literature on personal pronouns and hedges in classroom discourse, a professional development strategy adopted during a summer institute to enhance teachers’ social understanding (i.e., their understanding of the social functions of language in science discussions). Teachers became aware of how hedges can be employed to remain neutral toward students’ oral contributions to classroom discussions, invite students to share their opinions and articulate their own ideas, and motivate students to inquire. Teachers recognized that the combined use of I and you can render their feedback authoritative, you can shift the focus from the investigation to students’ competence, and we can lead to authority loss. It is argued that explicitness, reflectivity, and contextualization are essential features of professional development programs aimed at improving teachers’ understandings of the social dimension of inquiry-based science classrooms and preparing teachers to engage in inquiry-based teacher-student interactions.

  12. Using Inquiry to Break the Language Barrier in Chemistry Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Andrew; Jessup, Weston; Criswell, Brett A.; Weaver-High, Consuelo; Rushton, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    A guided inquiry lesson intended to support the linguistic and conceptual development of English language learners (ELLs) in a small, cotaught, high-needs secondary setting is presented. Collaborative groupings based on language and content ability coupled with an emphasis on student-student discourse and a hands-on investigation appeared to…

  13. Discovering Biofilms: Inquiry-Based Activities for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelman, Carly V.; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    In nature, bacteria exist in and adapt to different environments by forming microbial communities called "biofilms." We propose simple, inquiry-based laboratory exercises utilizing a biofilm formation assay, which allows controlled biofilm growth. Students will be able to qualitatively assess biofilm growth via staining. Recently, we developed a…

  14. The Classroom Sandbox: A Physical Model for Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Allan; Cooke, Michele L.; Ellsworth, Mary S.

    2010-01-01

    For scientists, the sandbox serves as an analog for faulting in Earth's crust. Here, the large, slow processes within the crust can be scaled to the size of a table, and time scales are directly observable. This makes it a useful tool for demonstrating the role of inquiry in science. For this reason, the sandbox is also helpful for learning…

  15. SEAS (Student Experiments At Sea): Helping Teachers Foster Authentic Student Inquiry in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, L.; Kelsey, K.; Carlson, J.

    2005-12-01

    Teacher professional development designed to promote authentic research in the classroom is ultimately aimed at improving student scientific literacy. In addition to providing teachers with opportunities to improve their understanding of science through research experiences, we need to help facilitate similar learning in students. This is the focus of the SEAS (Student Experiments At Sea) program: to help students learn science by doing science. SEAS offers teachers tools and a framework to help foster authentic student inquiry in the classroom. SEAS uses the excitement of deep-sea research, as well as the research facilities and human resources that comprise the deep-sea scientific community, to engage student learners. Through SEAS, students have the opportunity to practice inquiry skills and participate in research projects along side scientists. SEAS is a pilot program funded by NSF and sponsored by the Ridge 2000 research community. The pilot includes inquiry-based curricular materials, facilitated interaction with scientists, opportunities to engage students in research projects, and teacher training. SEAS offers a framework of resources designed to help translate inquiry skills and approaches to the classroom environment, recognizing the need to move students along the continuum of scientific inquiry skills. This framework includes hands-on classroom lessons, Classroom to Sea labs where students compare their investigations with at-sea investigations, and a student experiment competition. The program also uses the Web to create a virtual ``scientific community'' including students. Lessons learned from this two year pilot emphasize the importance of helping teachers feel knowledgeable and experienced in the process of scientific inquiry as well as in the subject. Teachers with experience in scientific research were better able to utilize the program. Providing teachers with access to scientists as a resource was also important, particularly given the

  16. An Inquiry "Warm-Up" Activity: Preparing Students for an Active Classroom Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagroves, S.

    2010-12-01

    An active learning community that engages in inquiry activities will employ strategies and structures that students from traditional classrooms may find unfamiliar or uncomfortable. These include group work, voicing questions, shifting from one part of an activity to another (and sometimes shifting groups at the same time), presenting informally to the group, and many others. In addition, the role of the instructor as facilitator rather than teacher may not be familiar to students. As inquiry activities become incorporated into the regular classroom curriculum at Maui Community College (through collaboration with the Professional Development Program as part of the Akamai Workforce Initiative), a need emerged to give students a "warm-up" early in the semester to help them practice these participation structures. This activity was designed to be used on the very first day of class, to be easy and accessible to students, and to give them practice with these features of inquiry activities that they would see again throughout the semester. In addition, the activity introduces the engineering technology concepts of requirements, trade-offs, and limitations. It is important to note that this activity is not in and of itself an inquiry activity; in fact the content and processes featured in the activity are not particularly challenging nor are they the main focus. Instead, this is a "warm-up" for inquiry, so that students gain some comfort with the unconventional features of inquiry activities. The particular activity presented is for 20-30 students in a ˜90 minute lab period, and highlights different imaging technologies of cameras; however, it is easily adaptable to other requirements, to different technology, or other needs.

  17. Science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations: a novel method to scaffold science learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffer, Melanie E; Beckler, Matthew L; Schunn, Christian; Renken, Maggie; Revak, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Science education is progressively more focused on employing inquiry-based learning methods in the classroom and increasing scientific literacy among students. However, due to time and resource constraints, many classroom science activities and laboratory experiments focus on simple inquiry, with a step-by-step approach to reach predetermined outcomes. The science classroom inquiry (SCI) simulations were designed to give students real life, authentic science experiences within the confines of a typical classroom. The SCI simulations allow students to engage with a science problem in a meaningful, inquiry-based manner. Three discrete SCI simulations were created as website applications for use with middle school and high school students. For each simulation, students were tasked with solving a scientific problem through investigation and hypothesis testing. After completion of the simulation, 67% of students reported a change in how they perceived authentic science practices, specifically related to the complex and dynamic nature of scientific research and how scientists approach problems. Moreover, 80% of the students who did not report a change in how they viewed the practice of science indicated that the simulation confirmed or strengthened their prior understanding. Additionally, we found a statistically significant positive correlation between students' self-reported changes in understanding of authentic science practices and the degree to which each simulation benefitted learning. Since SCI simulations were effective in promoting both student learning and student understanding of authentic science practices with both middle and high school students, we propose that SCI simulations are a valuable and versatile technology that can be used to educate and inspire a wide range of science students on the real-world complexities inherent in scientific study.

  18. Inquiry Process through Literature in the EFL Classroom: A Broad Path to Work on Critical Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Garzón Duarte

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents theoretical considerations about the inclusion of literary texts as a facilitative tool to develop critical thinking skills from inquiry process in a foreign language classroom. The rationale presented here may serve as a foundation for foreign language teachers who face the necessity of reformulating their objectives and instructional procedures to promote the development of language competency while fostering critical processes in students.

  19. Developing Adaptive Expertise with Pasifika Learners in an Inquiry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Zain; Hunter, Jodie

    2015-01-01

    In the current reform of mathematics classrooms teachers are charged with the role of facilitating collaborative groups during problem-solving activity. The challenge is for teachers to engage students in making mathematical meaning during collaborative group discussions. In this paper we draw on the concept of adaptive expertise to report on…

  20. Teaching neuroscience to science teachers: facilitating the translation of inquiry-based teaching instruction to the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, G H; Michlin, M; Schmitt, L; MacNabb, C; Dubinsky, J M

    2012-01-01

    In science education, inquiry-based approaches to teaching and learning provide a framework for students to building critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. Teacher professional development has been an ongoing focus for promoting such educational reforms. However, despite a strong consensus regarding best practices for professional development, relatively little systematic research has documented classroom changes consequent to these experiences. This paper reports on the impact of sustained, multiyear professional development in a program that combined neuroscience content and knowledge of the neurobiology of learning with inquiry-based pedagogy on teachers' inquiry-based practices. Classroom observations demonstrated the value of multiyear professional development in solidifying adoption of inquiry-based practices and cultivating progressive yearly growth in the cognitive environment of impacted classrooms.

  1. Developing students' understanding of evolution in an inquiry-based versus a traditional science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Robert James, Jr.

    Research studies over the past 30 years have found that individuals have a limited understanding of the theory of evolution and the mechanisms involved in species change. One possible avenue of improvement has been the use of alternative instructional methods, such as inquiry-based activities and teaching about nature of science. Using recommendations from research, this study integrated nature of science, evolution, and inquiry-based instruction to discern its impact on student understanding of evolution. An instructional unit was developed with a community college instructor and carried out in two introductory biology classes with a total of 38 participants. One class was taught using inquiry-based methods, with an integrated approach to nature of science and evolution, while the other was not. Data collection included student and instructor interviews, surveys, pre and post assessments, classroom observations, and student work products. The number of students holding accurate conceptions of the nature of science in the inquiry class was higher for all the reported categories on the posttest. Despite less direct exposure to evolution concepts in lecture, the inquiry class had higher means on two separate posttests for evolution. The traditional class performed better on the pretests yet the inquiry class had higher posttest scores on both measures. Students in the inquiry class held a positive view of the inquiry-based methods and they cited them as a reason for their understanding of evolution. Individuals indicated that the integration of nature of science and evolution allowed them to grasp the concepts of evolution better than if evolution was taught alone. A creationist student became more accepting of evolution and also improved her understanding of evolution. Another student interviewed four years after the intervention remembered only the inquiry-based unit and was able to still use examples from class to explain natural selection. The instructor had a

  2. Inquiry in interaction: How local adaptations of curricula shape classroom communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enyedy, Noel; Goldberg, Jennifer

    2004-11-01

    In this study, we seek a better understanding of how individuals and their daily interactions shape and reshape social structures that constitute a classroom community. Moreover, we provide insight into how discourse and classroom interactions shape the nature of a learning community, as well as which aspects of the classroom culture may be consequential for learning. The participants in this study include two teachers who are implementing a new environmental science program, Global Learning through Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), and interacting with 54 children in an urban middle school. Both qualitative and quantitative data are analyzed and presented. To gain a better understanding of the inquiry teaching within classroom communities, we compare and contrast the discourse and interactions of the two teachers during three parallel environmental science lessons. The focus of our analysis includes (1) how the community identifies the object or goal of its activity; and (2) how the rights, rules, and roles for members are established and inhabited in interaction. Quantitative analyses of student pre- and posttests suggest greater learning for students in one classroom over the other, providing support for the influence of the classroom community and interactional choices of the teacher on student learning. Implications of the findings from this study are discussed in the context of curricular design, professional development, and educational reform. ? 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 41: 905-935, 2004.

  3. The Teaching of Inquiry-Based Science in Elementary Classrooms: A Bi-National Comparative Reflection of US and Lithuanian Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bobbi; Buczynski, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers a comparative reflection on how two nations, the U.S. and Lithuania, are implementing inquiry-based science in elementary classrooms. The qualitative study explored how fourth grade teachers in Southern California and in Lithuania employed effective inquiry-based strategies in their classrooms. A teacher's use of questioning…

  4. Middle school students' development of inscriptional practices in inquiry-based science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Kai

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the learning practices demonstrated by seventh graders when they used various scientific inscriptions in an inquiry-based learning environment. Inscriptions are types of transformations, such as graphs, diagrams, data tables, symbols, maps, and models, that materialize or visualize an entity into another format or mode. As suggested by science studies, scientific knowledge and the reality of science are constructed through manipulating a variety of inscriptions. However, little is known about how middle school students make use of inscriptions over time and what resources or features of the learning environment support students in doing so. Drawing on a naturalistic approach, this classroom-based study aims to characterize students' inscriptional practices, trace their learning trajectories, examine potential use of various scientific inscriptions, and analyze the learning supports and resources provided by the teachers and the learning environment. This eight-month study is conducted in two inquiry-based science classes with participation of two teachers and 27 seventh graders. Two student dyads from each class were observed intensively. Multiple sources of data were collected, including fieldnotes, classroom video recordings, process video recordings, computer-based models, webpages, science reports, notebooks, and transcripts from interviews with students and teachers. Several analytical steps were taken to analyze and synthesize these data. Expanding upon early research on students' learning of inscriptions, this study shows that seventh graders could demonstrate competent, purposeful inscriptional practices when they were scaffolded by the teachers and the curriculum in a learning environment where the inscriptional activities were sequenced, iterated, and embedded in scientific inquiry. Additionally, using inscriptions in science classrooms provided students with opportunities to engage in thoughtful discussions

  5. Teacher argumentation in the secondary science classroom: Images of two modes of scientific inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Ron E.

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine scientific arguments constructed by secondary science teachers during instruction. The analysis focused on how arguments constructed by teachers differed based on the mode of inquiry underlying the topic. Specifically, how did the structure and content of arguments differ between experimentally and historically based topics? In addition, what factors mediate these differences? Four highly experienced high school science teachers were observed daily during instructional units for both experimental and historical science topics. Data sources include classroom observations, field notes, reflective memos, classroom artifacts, a nature of science survey, and teacher interviews. The arguments were analyzed for structure and content using Toulmin's argumentation pattern and Walton's schemes for presumptive reasoning revealing specific patterns of use between the two modes of inquiry. Interview data was analyzed to determine possible factors mediating these patterns. The results of this study reveal that highly experienced teachers present arguments to their students that, while simple in structure, reveal authentic images of science based on experimental and historical modes of inquiry. Structural analysis of the data revealed a common trend toward a greater amount of scientific data used to evidence knowledge claims in the historical science units. The presumptive reasoning analysis revealed that, while some presumptive reasoning schemes remained stable across the two units (e.g. 'causal inferences' and 'sign' schemes), others revealed different patterns of use including the 'analogy', 'evidence to hypothesis', 'example', and 'expert opinion' schemes. Finally, examination of the interview and survey data revealed five specific factors mediating the arguments constructed by the teachers: view of the nature of science, nature of the topic, teacher personal factors, view of students, and pedagogical decisions. These

  6. The evolution of science literacy: Examining intertextual connections and inquiry behaviors in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocchi-Verrino, Carol J.

    A call for a new perspective of science literacy has been marked as the impetus of change in science education, suggesting that a meaning-making approach to literacy and inquiry are central to learning science. This research study explored how science literacy evolved in a classroom where this reconceptualized view of science literacy guided curriculum design and instruction. The teacher/researcher incorporated Interactive Science Notebooks (ISNs) and Interactive Reading Organizers and Comprehension Strategies (IROCS) into instructional materials. In a class consisting of 20 mainstream and special education students, this 7-week study collected data using Likert scales, stimulated recall interviews, a teacher/researcher journal, and students¡¦ position papers. A systematic design framework was used for the three-phase analysis. Hyperresearch RTM software facilitated the identification of open codes, an axial code, and frequency graphs. In order to develop insight into the relationship between questions, methods, and curriculum design recent recommendations for quality research in science education were considered in the methodology. The hypothesis formulated from the data suggests that science literacy evolves on a continuum, and the degree to which science literacy evolves on the continuum seems to be contingent upon their uses of intertextual connections and inquiry behaviors. Several notable insights emerged from the data which were used to guide curriculum, instruction, and assessment that promotes the development of science literacy in the middle school classroom. The study suggests a possible correlation between the use of intertextual connections and inquiry behaviors, and the use of a continuum in measuring the emergence of science literacy.

  7. Science for all: Experiences and outcomes of students with visual impairment in a guided inquiry-based classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooks, Deborah L.

    The purpose of this study was to examine instructional experiences of students with visual impairment in an guided inquiry-based science classroom. Drawing from social constructive perspectives about teaching and learning, I focused on the initial attempts of students to participate fully in an inquiry-based astronomy unit. The astronomy unit incorporated features of project-based science inquiry and aligned with national standards. This study described the opportunities provided to and challenges faced by students with visual impairment as they participated in the guided inquiry-based learning environment. Additionally, discursive practices of students including student-generated questions, student discussions, and students' science notebook writing were examined. Also, students' alternative conceptions about scientific phenomena and changes in students' thinking during the course of instruction, if any, were described. Methods of data collection included classroom observations, video records, pre- and post-curriculum assessments, attitudes toward science measurement, student interviews, and student artifacts (i.e., science notebook entries, student-constructed models). Findings showed that student learning was enhanced when the instructor-researcher guided students in accomplishing inquiry tasks and in making sense of their inquiry experiences. Additionally, the use of appropriate reflective prompts assisted students with visual impairment to fully participate in the writing tasks of the inquiry-based learning environment. Results suggested that the quantity and quality of student-generated questions increased with extended inquiry instruction. Also, students used questions to not only establish verbal communication, but to elaborate on their own thinking and expand or explain the thinking of others. Findings suggested also that students with visual impairment have similar alternative frameworks about scientific phenomena (i.e., causes of lunar phases, reason for

  8. Literacy Tools in the Classroom: Teaching through Critical Inquiry, Grades 5-12. Language and Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard; Campano, Gerald; Edmiston, Brian; Borgmann, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    This innovative resource describes how teachers can help students employ "literacy tools" across the curriculum to foster learning. The authors demonstrate how literacy tools such as narratives, question-asking, spoken-word poetry, drama, writing, digital communication, images, and video encourage critical inquiry in the 5-12 classroom. The book…

  9. NASA Education: Using Inquiry in the Classroom so that Students See Learning in a Whole New Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loston, Adena Williams; Steffen, Peggy L.; McGee, Steven

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses how NASA uses inquiry in the classroom so that students can see learning in a whole new light. The goal is to increase scientific literacy among Americans and to entice a greater number of students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Although NASA offers a diverse array of programs that…

  10. Practicing What We Teach: A Self-Study in Implementing an Inquiry-Based Curriculum in a Middle Grades Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Michael; Eick, Charles J.; Brantley-Dias, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    A science teacher educator returned to teaching adolescents after more than 10 years in the professoriate. We studied his beliefs, practice and daily use of inquiry pedagogy while implementing a reform-based curriculum. Reflection on practice was evidenced by a weekly journal, classroom observations and debriefings, and extensive interviews. Newly…

  11. Computer-Supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning and Classroom Scripts: Effects on Help-Seeking Processes and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makitalo-Siegl, Kati; Kohnle, Carmen; Fischer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the influence of classroom-script structure (high vs. low) during computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning on help-seeking processes and learning gains in 54 student pairs in secondary science education. Screen- and audio-capturing videos were analysed according to a model of the help-seeking process. The results…

  12. Appreciative Inquiry and Autonomy-Supportive Classes in Business Education: A Semilongitudinal Study of AI in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Thomas A.; Hartman, Nathan S.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe 10 separate classroom experiences where an appreciative inquiry (AI) exercise was used for course creation. Post-exercise surveys of students showed that the AI exercise was perceived to be a successful practice. Students indicated putting effort toward reaching their peak learning experience and were satisfied with…

  13. The impact of technology on the enactment of inquiry in a technology enthusiast's sixth grade science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waight, Noemi; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the use of computer technology on the enactment of inquiry in a sixth grade science classroom. Participants were 42 students (38% female) enrolled in two sections of the classroom and taught by a technology-enthusiast instructor. Data were collected over the course of 4 months during which several inquiry activities were completed, some of which were supported with the use of technology. Non-participant observation, classroom videotaping, and semi-structured and critical-incident interviews were used to collect data. The results indicated that the technology in use worked to restrict rather than promote inquiry in the participant classroom. In the presence of computers, group activities became more structured with a focus on sharing tasks and accounting for individual responsibility, and less time was dedicated to group discourse with a marked decrease in critical, meaning-making discourse. The views and beliefs of teachers and students in relation to their specific contexts moderate the potential of technology in supporting inquiry teaching and learning and should be factored both in teacher training and attempts to integrate technology in science teaching.

  14. Museum behind the Scenes--An Inquiry-Based Learning Unit with Biological Collections in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Pia; Dreesmann, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and evaluate an inquiry- and activity-based learning unit for the classroom that uses biological collections to teach key evolutionary concepts and to support the understanding and appreciation of the work of a museum. The unit consisted of three parts that focused on the most important tasks of museums:…

  15. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-Rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of "Caenorhabditis elegans"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a "learning by inquiry" approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research…

  16. Appreciative Inquiry and Autonomy-Supportive Classes in Business Education: A Semilongitudinal Study of AI in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Thomas A.; Hartman, Nathan S.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe 10 separate classroom experiences where an appreciative inquiry (AI) exercise was used for course creation. Post-exercise surveys of students showed that the AI exercise was perceived to be a successful practice. Students indicated putting effort toward reaching their peak learning experience and were satisfied with…

  17. Supporting Discourse and Classroom Orchestration in a Knowledge Community and Inquiry Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Cresencia G. W.

    This thesis presents a design-based research study of a new technology enhanced learning environment called Common Knowledge (CK), which supports students and teachers as they create socially shared notes, including tags, votes, and other forms of interactive knowledge construction. The research served to advance CK through 3 iterations, examining and extending the specific forms of technology, as well as the designs for activity sequences and teacher-mediated discussions. Two teachers participated, with their grade 5/6 students, in all three iterations. The teachers were actively involved in planning and designing the inquiry sequences, informing the designs of CK features, and giving feedback during and after the enactments. In early iterations, CK was employed as a stand-alone brainstorming and reflection tool, used to complement a broader inquiry activity where students collectively investigate a simulated phenomenon that is embedded within their classroom walls. In the final iteration, CK was employed as a scaffolding environment for a structured inquiry progression that included several phases for brainstorming, proposing topics, and open investigations. Discourse episodes are coded and analyzed to reveal patterns of interaction between teachers, students, and the shared knowledge base. Each iteration of CK is examined in terms of the interplay between technology features, activity sequences, and the forms of teacher-guided discourse that emerge to support effective enactment. Because the inquiry topics, technology features and activity sequences vary from one iteration to the next, the teacher-guided discussions must play different roles and make use of CK note content and other knowledge elements in different ways. An activity systems approach is well suited to the interpretation of such interdependencies, as patterns of discourse can be understood as emerging to meet the system requirements, given the fixed set of technology affordances and well defined

  18. Model Based Inquiry in the High School Physics Classroom: An Exploratory Study of Implementation and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Zhang, Danhui; Neilson, Drew

    2011-06-01

    This study considers whether Model Based Inquiry (MBI) is a suitable mechanism for facilitating science as inquiry to allow students to develop deep understandings of difficult concepts, while also gaining better understandings of science process and the nature of science. This manuscript also considers time devoted to MBI in comparison to more traditional demonstration and lecture (TDL) teaching methods, while also revealing the MBI strategy implemented in the physics classroom. Pre-, post-, and delayed- revised versions of the Physics, Attitudes, Skills, and Knowledge Survey (PASKS) were administered to two groups of students, those taught a unit on buoyancy with a TDL instructional strategy ( n = 26) and those taught the same buoyancy unit, but with the MBI instructional strategy ( n = 28). The PASKS focuses on student achievement in terms of science content, science process/reasoning, nature of science, and student attitude toward science. Through quantitative methods the findings revealed statistical differences when considering the pre-, post-, and delayed- measures with significant differences found overall and on each scale. This indicated improved achievement overall and on each scale with the exception of attitude scale for both groups. Additionally, the findings revealed no statistical differences between groups (i.e., TDL & MBI).

  19. "Kindergarten, can I have your eyes and ears?" politeness and teacher directive choices in inquiry-based science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom Wanderlei

    2009-12-01

    This study explores elementary teachers' social understandings and employment of directives and politeness while facilitating inquiry science lessons prior and subsequent to their participation in a summer institute in which they were introduced to the scholarly literature on regulative discourse (directives used by teachers to regulate student behavior). A grounded theory analysis of the institute professional development activities revealed that teachers developed an increased awareness of the authoritative functions served by impolite or direct directives (i.e., pragmatic awareness). Furthermore, a comparative microethnographic analysis of participants' inquiry-based classroom practices revealed that after the institute teachers demonstrated an increased ability to share authority with students by strategically making directive choices that were more polite, indirect, inclusive, involvement-focused and creative. Such ability led to a reduced emphasis on teacher regulation of student compliance with classroom behavioral norms and an increased focus on the discursive organization of the inquiry-based science learning/teaching process. Despite teachers' increased pragmatic awareness, teacher-student linguistic relationships did not become entirely symmetrical subsequent to their participation in the summer institute (i.e., teacher authority was not completely relinquished or lost). Based on such findings, it is argued that teachers need to develop higher levels of pragmatic awareness to become effectively prepared to engage in language-mediated teacher-student interaction in the context of inquiry-based science classroom discourse.

  20. Making sense of shared sense-making in an inquiry-based science classroom: Toward a sociocultural theory of mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladewski, Barbara G.

    Despite considerable exploration of inquiry and reflection in the literatures of science education and teacher education/teacher professional development over the past century, few theoretical or analytical tools exist to characterize these processes within a naturalistic classroom context. In addition, little is known regarding possible developmental trajectories for inquiry or reflection---for teachers or students---as these processes develop within a classroom context over time. In the dissertation, I use a sociocultural lens to explore these issues with an eye to the ways in which teachers and students develop shared sense-making, rather than from the more traditional perspective of individual teacher activity or student learning. The study includes both theoretical and empirical components. Theoretically, I explore the elaborations of sociocultural theory needed to characterize teacher-student shared sense-making as it develops within a classroom context, and, in particular, the role of inquiry and reflection in that sense-making. I develop a sociocultural model of shared sense-making that attempts to represent the dialectic between the individual and the social, through an elaboration of existing sociocultural and psychological constructs, including Vygotsky's zone of proximal development and theory of mind. Using this model as an interpretive framework, I develop a case study that explores teacher-student shared sense-making within a middle-school science classroom across a year of scaffolded introduction to inquiry-based science instruction. The empirical study serves not only as a test case for the theoretical model, but also informs our understanding regarding possible developmental trajectories and important mechanisms supporting and constraining shared sense-making within inquiry-based science classrooms. Theoretical and empirical findings provide support for the idea that perspectival shifts---that is, shifts of point-of-view that alter relationships

  1. Ethics as a Form of Critical and Rhetorical Inquiry in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    To define ethics as a mode of inquiry, it is first important to consider how ethics relates to critical thinking. Put simply, ethical inquiry is one type of inquiry required to think critically. A connection between critical thinking and ethics is only possible, however, when ethics is defined not as a static list of rules but as a "mode of…

  2. Teachers Learning to Research Climate: Development of hybrid teacher professional development to support climate inquiry and research in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, M. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Kennedy, T.

    2011-12-01

    The GLOBE Program is an international science and education focused on connecting scientists, teachers and students around relevant, local environmental issues. GLOBE's focus during the next two years in on climate, global change and understanding climate from a scientific perspective. The GLOBE Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRFC) will engage youth from around the world in understanding and researching climate through investigations of local climate challenges. GLOBE teachers are trained in implementation of inquiry in the classroom and the use of scientific data collection protocols to develop inquiry and research projects of the Earth System. In preparation for the SCRC, GLOBE teachers will need additional training in climate science, global change and communicating climate science in the classroom. GLOBE's reach to 111 countries around the world requires development of scalable models for training teachers. In June GLOBE held the first teacher professional development workshop (Learning to Research Summer Institute) in a hybrid format with two-thirds of the teachers participating face-to-face and the remaining teachers participating virtually using Adobe Connect. The week long workshop prepared teachers to integrate climate science inquiry and research projects in the classrooms in the 2011-12 academic year. GLOBE scientists and other climate science experts will work with teachers and their students throughout the year in designing and executing a climate science research project. Final projects and research results will be presented in May 2012 through a virtual conference. This presentation will provide the framework for hybrid teacher professional development in climate science research and inquiry projects as well as summarize the findings from this inaugural session. The GLOBE Program office, headquartered in Boulder, is funded through cooperative agreements with NASA and NOAA with additional support from NSF and the U.S. Department of State. GLOBE

  3. Social aspects of classroom learning: Results of a discourse analysis in an inquiry-oriented physical chemistry class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nicole M.

    Engaging students in classroom discourse offers opportunities for students to participate in the construction of joint understandings, to negotiate relationships between different types of evidence, and to practice making evidence-based claims about science content. However, close attention to social aspects of learning is critical to creating inquiry-oriented classroom environments in which students learn with understanding. This study examined the social influences that contribute to classroom learning in an inquiry-oriented undergraduate physical chemistry class using the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) approach. A qualitative approach to analyzing classroom discourse derived from Toulmin's (1968) model of argumentation was used to document patterns in classroom reasoning that reflect normative aspects of social interaction. Adapting the constructs of social and sociomathematical norms from the work of Yackel and Cobb (1996), I describe social aspects of the classroom environment by discussing normative aspects of social interaction (social norms) and discipline-specific criteria related to reasoning and justification in chemistry contexts, referred to here as sociochemical norms. This work discusses four social norms and two sociochemical norms that were documented over a five-week period of observation in Dr. Black's POGIL physical chemistry class. In small group activities, the socially established expectations that students explain reasoning, negotiate understandings of terminology and symbolic representations, and arrive at a consensus on critical thinking questions shaped small group interactions and reasoning. In whole class discussion, there was an expectation that students share reasoning with the class, and that the instructor provide feedback on student reasoning in ways that extended student contributions and elaborated relationships between macroscopic, particulate, and symbolic-level ideas. The ways in which the class constructed

  4. Effects of cooperative learning plus inquiry method on student learning and attitudes: a comparative study for engineering economic classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, M. Reza; Behin-Aein, Noureddin

    2014-03-01

    In the Iranian higher education system, including engineering education, effective implementation of cooperative learning is difficult because classrooms are usually crowded and the students never had a formal group working background in their previous education. In order to achieve the benefits of cooperative learning in this condition, this paper proposes a combination of cooperative learning and inquiry method. The method is implemented by grouping students in a way that the learning procedure is done in non-official class sessions by each group, while the inquiry method is done in the regular programmed class sessions. The study is performed in Islamic Azad University and the methods are implemented in two engineering economic classes with different numbers of students in each working group. The results are compared with a control class in which traditional teaching style is implemented. The results of analysis show simultaneous improvement of learning and behavioural attitudes of the students with cooperative learning plus inquiry method in the classroom with a fewer number of students in each working group.

  5. Designing Summer Research Experiences for Teachers and Students That Promote Classroom Science Inquiry Projects and Produce Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, L. A.; Parra, J.; Rao, M.; Offerman, L.

    2007-12-01

    Research experiences for science teachers are an important mechanism for increasing classroom teachers' science content knowledge and facility with "real world" research processes. We have developed and implemented a summer scientific research and education workshop model for high school teachers and students which promotes classroom science inquiry projects and produces important research results supporting our overarching scientific agenda. The summer training includes development of a scientific research framework, design and implementation of preliminary studies, extensive field research and training in and access to instruments, measurement techniques and statistical tools. The development and writing of scientific papers is used to reinforce the scientific research process. Using these skills, participants collaborate with scientists to produce research quality data and analysis. Following the summer experience, teachers report increased incorporation of research inquiry in their classrooms and student participation in science fair projects. This workshop format was developed for an NSF Biocomplexity Research program focused on the interaction of urban climates, air quality and human response and can be easily adapted for other scientific research projects.

  6. Developing Guided Inquiry On-line Resources for the Middle and High School Science Classroom through the NSF-MSP-funded RITES Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardace, D.; Schifman, L. A.; Caulkins, J.; Kortz, K. M.; Saul, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science (RITES) Project works to build inquiry experiences in Rhode Island science classrooms. RITES enhances teacher comfort and training with numerous guided inquiry projects for their classrooms, through a concentrated summer short course experience (focused on content building and pedagogical modeling) and strong in-year presence to support use of new knowledge and technology in individual classrooms. Each guided inquiry project is bundled as an "On-line Investigation," essentially a website with carefully edited text, evocative images, graphing/plotting/screenshot import tools, open-ended question windows, and an efficient teacher view of student comments and work, with instant updates. Each "Investigation" is the culmination of intensive collaborative design, with one higher education faculty member and one in service teacher sharing conceptual development, drafting of all materials, and also teaming in instruction of the short course. In this work, we profile the start to finish process of developing the Rock Cycle-focused "On-line Investigation," from documenting the design intentions of the collaborative team, observing the short course, following some teacher-participants through the short course to observe the use of the Investigation in their classrooms. We present also a research plan for observing actualization of this "On-line Investigation" in classrooms, and consider (a) its impact on enhancing inquiry and exploring the process of science in the observed classrooms, and (b) its utility beyond the RITES Project for other similar initiatives.

  7. The Martian Goes To College: Open Inquiry with Science Fiction in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, L.; Patterson, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Storytelling is an ancient art; one that can get lost in the reams of data available in a typical geology or astronomy classroom. But storytelling draws us to a magical place. Our students, with prior experience in either a geology or astronomy course, were invited to explore Mars in a special topics course at Johnson County Community College through reading The Martian by Andy Weir. As they traveled with astronaut Mark Watney, the students used Google Mars, Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing (JMARS), and learning modules from the Mars for Earthlings web site to investigate the terrain and the processes at work in the past and present on Mars. Our goal was to apply their understanding of processes on Earth in order to explain and predict what they observed on Mars courtesy of the remote sensing opportunities available from Viking, Pathfinder, the Mars Exploration Rovers, and Maven missions; sort of an inter-planetary uniformitarianism. Astronaut Mark Watney's fictional journey from Acidalia Planitia to Schiaparelli Crater was analyzed using learning modules in Mars for Earthlings and exercises that we developed based on Google Mars, JMARS, Rotating Sky Explorer, and Science Friday podcasts. Each student also completed an individual project that either focused on a particular region that Astronaut Mark Watney traveled through or a problem that he faced. Through this open-inquiry learning style, they determined some processes that shaped Mars such as crater impacts, volcanism, fluid flow, mass movement, and groundwater sapping and also investigated the efficacy of solar energy as a power source based on location and the likelihood of regolith potential as a mineral matter source for soil.

  8. The Intersection of Inquiry-Based Science and Language: Preparing Teachers for ELL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinburgh, Molly; Silva, Cecilia; Smith, Kathy Horak; Groulx, Judy; Nettles, Jenesta

    2014-08-01

    As teacher educators, we are tasked with preparing prospective teachers to enter a field that has undergone significant changes in student population and policy since we were K-12 teachers. With the emphasis placed on connections, mathematics integration, and communication by the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (Achieve in Next generation science standards, 2012), more research is needed on how teachers can accomplish this integration (Bunch in Rev Res Educ 37:298-341, 2013; Lee et al. in Educ Res 42(4):223-233, 2013). Science teacher educators, in response to the NGSS, recognize that it is necessary for pre-service and in-service teachers to know more about how instructional strategies in language and science can complement one another. Our purpose in this study was to explore a model of integration that can be used in classrooms. To do this, we examined the change in science content knowledge and academic vocabulary for English language learners (ELLs) as they engaged in inquiry-based science experience utilizing the 5R Instructional Model. Two units, erosion and wind turbines, were developed using the 5R Instructional Model and taught during two different years in a summer school program for ELLs. We analyzed data from interviews to assess change in conceptual understanding and science academic vocabulary over the 60 h of instruction. The statistics show a clear trend of growth supporting our claim that ELLs did construct more sophisticated understanding of the topics and use more language to communicate their knowledge. As science teacher educators seek ways to prepare elementary teachers to help preK-12 students to learn science and develop the language of science, the 5R Instructional Model is one pathway.

  9. WormClassroom.org: An Inquiry-rich Educational Web Portal for Research Resources of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fong-Mei; Stewart, James; White, John G.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization of biology research resources, coupled with a “learning by inquiry” approach, has great potential to aid students in gaining an understanding of fundamental biological principles. To help realize this potential, we have developed a Web portal for undergraduate biology education, WormClassroom.org, based on current research resources of a model research organism, Caenorhabditis elegans. This portal is intended to serve as a resource gateway for students to learn biological concepts using C. elegans research material. The driving forces behind the WormClassroom website were the strengths of C. elegans as a teaching organism, getting researchers and educators to work together to develop instructional materials, and the 3 P's (problem posing, problem solving, and peer persuasion) approach for inquiry learning. Iterative assessment is an important aspect of the WormClassroom site development because it not only ensures that content is up-to-date and accurate, but also verifies that it does, in fact, aid student learning. A primary assessment was performed to refine the WormClassroom website utilizing undergraduate biology students and nonstudent experts such as C. elegans researchers; results and comments were used for site improvement. We are actively encouraging continued resource contributions from the C. elegans research and education community for the further development of WormClassroom. PMID:17548872

  10. Inquiry-Based Projects in the Spanish Heritage Language Classroom: Connecting Culture and Community through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belpoliti, Flavia; Fairclough, Marta

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the development and implementation of inquiry-based cultural projects in a Spanish Heritage Language (SHL) Program. Four different inquiry-based curricula are described to illustrate how university students in an SHL program advance their knowledge of Spanish while carrying out research to understand Hispanic cultures. First-,…

  11. Chemistry Teachers' Perceived Benefits and Challenges of Inquiry-Based Instruction in Inclusive Chemistry Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumba, F.; Banda, A.; Chabalengula, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on inquiry-based instruction in inclusive science teaching have mainly focused on elementary and middle school levels. Little is known about inquiry-based instruction in high school inclusive science classes. Yet, such classes have become the norm in high schools, fulfilling the instructional needs of students with mild disabilities. This…

  12. Developing a Community of Inquiry in a Face-to-Face Class: How an Online Learning Framework Can Enrich Traditional Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Alfred G.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional classes are typically bound both in the classroom space and scheduled time. In this article, I show how applying an online learning framework called the Community of Inquiry and an organizational architecture of matrixed teams has worked in a face-to-face capstone class and extended those boundaries. These were introduced as an…

  13. The Communication in Science Inquiry Project (CISIP): A Project to Enhance Scientific Literacy through the Creation of Science Classroom Discourse Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dale R.; Lewis, Elizabeth B.; Purzer, Senay; Watts, Nievita Bueno; Perkins, Gita; Uysal, Sibel; Wong, Sissy; Beard, Rachelle; Lang, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on the context and impact of the Communication in Science Inquiry Project (CISIP) professional development to promote teachers' and students' scientific literacy through the creation of science classroom discourse communities. The theoretical underpinnings of the professional development model are presented and key professional…

  14. Exploring Influences of Mathematics Coach-Teacher Interactions on the Development of Teacher Pedagogical Knowledge, Effective Mathematical Teaching Practices, and a Classroom Culture of Mathematical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    This study set out to examine how interactions between a mathematics instructional coach and a teacher influence teacher pedagogical content knowledge, instructional practices, and a classroom culture of mathematical inquiry (CCMI). The research literature on mathematics instructional coaching was limited, but showed promise in supporting…

  15. Developing a Community of Inquiry in a Face-to-Face Class: How an Online Learning Framework Can Enrich Traditional Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Alfred G.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional classes are typically bound both in the classroom space and scheduled time. In this article, I show how applying an online learning framework called the Community of Inquiry and an organizational architecture of matrixed teams has worked in a face-to-face capstone class and extended those boundaries. These were introduced as an…

  16. Graduate student involvement with designing inquiry-based Earth science field projects for the secondary-level classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, J. M.; Scherf, L.; Ward, S.; Cady, P.; Bromley, J.; Varner, R. K.; Froburg, E.

    2008-12-01

    In a secondary-level Earth System Science (ESS) curriculum, the most authentic learning is achieved through the inquiry-based application of real-world research methods in the context of modern understanding of the interconnected components of the Earth System (e.g. lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere). Following the intensive ESST-1 summer institute at UNH, during which teachers enhance their ESS content knowledge via interactions with UNH faculty, staff, and graduate students, each participating teacher is paired with one graduate student fellow for the duration of the school year. This graduate fellow provides a continuing link between the secondary-level school teaching environment and university resources, facilitating the implementation of new content knowledge and current scientific research methodology into the classroom setting. According to the National Science Education Standards (1), scientific inquiry is the central strategy for teaching science. "In successful science classrooms, teachers and students collaborate in the pursuit of ideas... Students formulate questions and devise ways to answer them, they collect data and decide how to represent it, they organize data to generate knowledge, and they test the reliability of the knowledge they have generated. As they proceed, students explain and justify their work to themselves and to one another, learn to cope with problems such as the limitations of equipment, and react to challenges posed by the teacher and by classmates." To speak to these goals, an ongoing local wetland field study has been conceptualized and implemented in three example classrooms (seventh grade general science, ninth grade physical science and tenth grade biology) in two school systems (Oyster River Middle School in Durham, NH and Berlin High School in Berlin, NH). These field studies were conducted using authentic scientific equipment to collect data, including a Li-Cor 840 infrared CO2 analyzer and handmade

  17. Using Biological-Control Research in the Classroom to Promote Scientific Inquiry & Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew L.; Richardson, Scott L.; Hall, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists researching biological control should engage in education because translating research programs into classroom activities is a pathway to increase scientific literacy among students. Classroom activities focused on biological control target all levels of biological organization and can be cross-disciplinary by drawing from subject areas…

  18. The Impact of Teacher Beliefs on Elementary Teachers' Use of Scaffolding in a Technology-rich, Inquiry-focused Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lindsay Kristin

    This mixed-methods study, conducted with five elementary teachers, explored the relationship between teacher beliefs and classroom practice. Three theoretical frameworks---Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK), Teacher Beliefs, and Scaffolding---were used for creating the data collection tools and for analyzing the data. Teachers were interviewed and observed in an effort to relate their beliefs about using technology and writing to teach science to their classroom practice when implementing Electronic Science Notebooks (ESNs) to teach elementary science. The data collected suggested that while teachers with greater technological knowledge also had more positive beliefs concerning self-efficacy when teaching science, a greater degree of technological understanding did not necessarily mean that the scaffolding role was shared equally between the ESN and the teacher. Likewise, a higher pedagogical understanding did not mean that the scaffolding role was shared equally between the ESN and the teacher. Concerning the use of writing to teach science, writing was not scaffolded by teachers with the most content knowledge. Finally, teachers with prior experience with ESNs provided more scaffolding for the writing and inquiry process, and they were more likely to engage students in whole class discussion. Although the results of this work cannot be generalized beyond this sample, understanding these teachers' beliefs and classroom practice provided potential insight into how professional development programs could be designed to better support teachers as they plan to incorporate writing into their science instruction or implement ESNs in their classroom. As an example, when there was discrepancy between a teacher's intended use of technology and the actual use behavior, the teacher discussed the barriers that prevented the best strategies from putting into practice. Strategically planned professional development can provide these teachers with a

  19. Critical Race Theory, Hip Hop, and "Huck Finn": Narrative Inquiry in a High School English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the impact of reading "Huckleberry Finn" through the lens of critical race theory for both teacher and students in a racially diverse urban high school environment. The teacher/researcher used narrative inquiry and creative non-fiction to examine student language usage, white privilege (including her own), and student…

  20. Authority in an Agency-Centered, Inquiry-Based University Calculus Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Hope; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Authority roles among teachers and students have traditionally been hierarchal and centered with the expertise and power of the teacher limiting opportunities for students to act with autonomy to build and justify mathematics. In this paper we discuss authority roles for teachers and students that have been realized in an inquiry-based university,…

  1. Refugee Children's Adaptation to American Early Childhood Classrooms: A Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Megan A.; Niesz, Tricia

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that a paucity of research exists on refugee youth in early childhood education settings. Arguing that children's stories provide educators a valuable resource for understanding the meaning children make of initial cross-cultural experiences, this article presents a narrative inquiry into the stories and artwork of three…

  2. WISE Science: Web-based Inquiry in the Classroom. Technology, Education--Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotta, James D.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2009-01-01

    This book shares the lessons learned by a large community of educational researchers and science teachers as they designed, developed, and investigated a new technology-enhanced learning environment known as WISE: The Web-Based Inquiry Science Environment. WISE offers a collection of free, customizable curriculum projects on topics central to the…

  3. Authority in an Agency-Centered, Inquiry-Based University Calculus Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Hope; Bateman, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Authority roles among teachers and students have traditionally been hierarchal and centered with the expertise and power of the teacher limiting opportunities for students to act with autonomy to build and justify mathematics. In this paper we discuss authority roles for teachers and students that have been realized in an inquiry-based university,…

  4. Singing Songs as a Creative Method for Narrative Inquiry in the English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Narrative inquiry has a long tradition in qualitative educational research, although it remains a relatively untapped method of investigation in English curriculum and pedagogy studies. This paper presents one experimental narrative approach through the use of song lyrics as a musical method for storying interview data. Working with non-linear and…

  5. Practice teaching: An inquiry into the experiences in developing an evaluation tool used in classroom observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Lin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper preparation prior to practice teachers’ actual internship is deemed as an important part of the teacher development program. This presentation depicts the summary and findings of a semester-long action research study with 19 practice teachers (PT undertaken in the fall semester of 2013. After finishing all their required credits, PTs needed to prepare themselves for their upcoming internship. In order to help make their internship fruitful and be able to learn as much as possible from their teacher mentor, an internship preparation course designed as an action research was created to support PTs in being able to determine specific classroom observation skills. Within the course, PTs were separated into 4 groups and tasked with organizing all the previous theories learned from other courses in order to determine the key features of a good classroom teacher. Afterwards, the researchers oriented the PTs with the problem-based learning (PBL approach in creating a list of key features of a good classroom teacher. After a month of preparation, PTs were then assigned to undergo two months of classroom observations in a nearby elementary school. In addition, the PTs needed to do two practice teaching sessions before the end of the observation period. During the classroom observations and practice teaching, the PTs used their list of key features of a good classroom teacher to evaluate each other. Pre-post conferences were accomplished before and after each practice teaching session. Researcher observations, interview, and PTs’ reflection logs were later collected and analyzed. Results indicate that PTs claimed that they are able to learn more within a PBL approach in developing an evaluation tool used in classroom observation as compared to the typical classroom discussion type setup. In sum, the process of classroom lectures presented in tandem with actual classroom observations and practice teaching has led to the enrichment of their

  6. Two-part set systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbner, Dániel; Lemons, Nathan; Mubayi, Dhruv; Palmer, Cory; Patkós, Balázs

    2011-01-01

    The two part Sperner theorem of Katona and Kleitman states that if $X$ is an $n$-element set with partition $X_1 \\cup X_2$, and $\\cF$ is a family of subsets of $X$ such that no two sets $A, B \\in \\cF$ satisfy $A \\subset B$ (or $B \\subset A$) and $A \\cap X_i=B \\cap X_i$ for some $i$, then $|\\cF| \\le {n \\choose \\lfloor n/2 \\rfloor}$. We consider variations of this problem by replacing the Sperner property with the intersection property and considering families that satisfiy various combinations of these properties on one or both parts $X_1$, $X_2$. Along the way, we prove the following new result which may be of independent interest: let $\\cF, \\cG$ be families of subsets of an $n$-element set such that $\\cF$ and $\\cG$ are both intersecting and cross-Sperner, meaning that if $A \\in \\cF$ and $B \\in \\cG$, then $A \

  7. Narrative Inquiry: A Methodology for Studying German Migrant Teachers' Experiences in Australian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bense, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Despite their significant contribution to Australian school life, there has been little research into migrant teachers in Australia. The few studies which are available report difficulties with cultural adaptation for migrant teachers in areas related to pedagogy, language, and classroom management. However, research in Australia has mainly…

  8. Enacting Critical Literacy in English Classrooms: How a Teacher Learning Community Supported Critical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    In a time of increased standardization and top-down reform, teachers with democratic and social justice-oriented perspectives must work to create classroom spaces that value student voice and position them as knowledge holders. This article draws on a critical literacy framework to analyze the case study of one teacher working within a teacher…

  9. Is "Doing Science" in New Zealand Classrooms an Expression of Scientific Inquiry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Mavis; France, Bev; Forret, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In science education contexts there appears to be some consensus regarding the "doing" of science but less on the "what for". In this paper we compare and contrast scientists' view of "doing science" with the practice of "doing science" in New Zealand classrooms. After examining and critiquing these…

  10. Theory of Mind Dynamics in Children's Play: A Qualitative Inquiry in a Preschool Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Soyeon

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore children's understanding of mind shown in children's play in a preschool classroom. Previous research on children's theory of mind has relied on empirical studies utilizing several tasks, such as false belief tasks. Since children's emerging understanding of self and others is a complex process of entering a community of theories of mind (Nelson, Henseler, & Plesa, 2000), it is important to expand our understanding of children's theories of mind through...

  11. The Computational Science Education Reference Desk: A tool for increasing inquiry based learning in the science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, D. A.; Stevenson, D. E.; Panoff, R. M.

    2000-12-01

    The Computational Science Reference Desk is an online tool designed to provide educators in math, physics, astronomy, biology, chemistry, and engineering with information on how to use computational science to enhance inquiry based learning in the undergraduate and pre college classroom. The Reference Desk features a showcase of original content exploration activities, including lesson plans and background materials; a catalog of websites which contain models, lesson plans, software, and instructional resources; and a forum to allow educators to communicate their ideas. Many of the recent advances in astronomy rely on the use of computer simulation, and tools are being developed by CSERD to allow students to experiment with some of the models that have guided scientific discovery. One of these models allows students to study how scientists use spectral information to determine the makeup of the interstellar medium by modeling the interstellar extinction curve using spherical grains of silicate, amorphous carbon, or graphite. Students can directly compare their model to the average interstellar extinction curve, and experiment with how small changes in their model alter the shape of the interstellar extinction curve. A simpler model allows students to visualize spatial relationships between the Earth, Moon, and Sun to understand the cause of the phases of the moon. A report on the usefulness of these models in two classes, the Computational Astrophysics workshop at The Shodor Education Foundation and the Conceptual Astronomy class at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, will be presented.

  12. Inquiry in Limnology Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variano, Evan; Taylor, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Inquiry can be implemented in various ways, ranging from simple classroom discussions to longterm research projects. In this article, the authors developed a project in which high school students were introduced to the nature and process of scientific discovery through a two-week guided inquiry unit on "limnology"--the study of fresh water, which…

  13. Understanding the Development of a Hybrid Practice of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction and Language Development: A Case Study of One Teacher's Journey Through Reflections on Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, Sarah; Hooper, Paula; Rankin, Lynn; Austin, Marilyn; Caven, Gennifer

    2016-04-01

    This qualitative case study looks closely at an elementary teacher who participated in professional development experiences that helped her develop a hybrid practice of using inquiry-based science to teach both science content and English language development (ELD) to her students, many of whom are English language learners (ELLs). This case study examines the teacher's reflections on her teaching and her students' learning as she engaged her students in science learning and supported their developing language skills. It explicates the professional learning experiences that supported the development of this hybrid practice. Closely examining the pedagogical practice and reflections of a teacher who is developing an inquiry-based approach to both science learning and language development can provide insights into how teachers come to integrate their professional development experiences with their classroom expertise in order to create a hybrid inquiry-based science ELD practice. This qualitative case study contributes to the emerging scholarship on the development of teacher practice of inquiry-based science instruction as a vehicle for both science instruction and ELD for ELLs. This study demonstrates how an effective teaching practice that supports both the science and language learning of students can develop from ongoing professional learning experiences that are grounded in current perspectives about language development and that immerse teachers in an inquiry-based approach to learning and instruction. Additionally, this case study also underscores the important role that professional learning opportunities can play in supporting teachers in developing a deeper understanding of the affordances that inquiry-based science can provide for language development.

  14. Using Videoconferencing to Provide Mentorship in Inquiry-Based Urban and Rural Secondary Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this design-based research study is to examine the effects of an inquiry-based learning environment, with the support of videoconferencing, on both rural and urban secondary students’ mathematics and science learning. An important aspect of this learning environment is the use of videoconferencing to connect classes with mathematicians/ scientists (as e-mentors. Specifically, the following two research questions guide this study: (1 In what ways, if any, does the inquiry-based learning environment impact student beliefs and learning outcomes? (2 What challenges emerge in the development of an inquiry-based learning environment with secondary students in both rural and urban schools? Using a mixed methods approach, this study focuses on two grade 9 classes in an urban school and three Grade 8 classes in a rural school. The results suggest positive effects of this learning environment on student learning of math and science. In particular, both urban and rural students showed significant gains in their achievement. In addition, students showed an increased interest and heightened confidence in math and science. As well, the results point to issues arising from the process, suggesting useful guidelines for the development of such environments. Résumé : L’objectif principal de cette étude de recherche axée sur la conception est d’examiner les effets d’un environnement d’apprentissage basé sur le processus d’enquête et utilisant le soutien de la vidéoconférence sur l’apprentissage des mathématiques et des sciences auprès d’élèves du secondaire en milieux ruraux et urbains. L’utilisation de la vidéoconférence pour mettre les classes en lien avec des mathématiciens et des scientifiques (en tant que cybermentors constitue un aspect important de cet environnement d’apprentissage. Plus précisément, les deux questions suivantes orientent la présente étude : (1 De quelle manière, le cas

  15. Assessing the Effectiveness of Inquiry-based Learning Techniques Implemented in Large Classroom Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, D. N.; McConnell, D. A.; Owens, K.

    2001-12-01

    Geoscience and education faculty at The University of Akron jointly developed a series of inquiry-based learning modules aimed at both non-major and major student populations enrolled in introductory geology courses. These courses typically serve 2500 students per year in four to six classes of 40-160 students each per section. Twelve modules were developed that contained common topics and assessments appropriate to Earth Science, Environmental Geology and Physical Geology classes. All modules were designed to meet four primary learning objectives agreed upon by Department of Geology faculty. These major objectives include: 1) Improvement of student understanding of the scientific method; 2) Incorporation of problem solving strategies involving analysis, synthesis, and interpretation; 3) Development of the ability to distinguish between inferences, data and observations; and 4) Obtaining an understanding of basic processes that operate on Earth. Additional objectives that may be addressed by selected modules include: 1) The societal relevance of science; 2) Use and interpretation of quantitative data to better understand the Earth; 3) Development of the students' ability to communicate scientific results; 4) Distinguishing differences between science, religion and pseudo-science; 5) Evaluation of scientific information found in the mass media; and 6) Building interpersonal relationships through in-class group work. Student pre- and post-instruction progress was evaluated by administering a test of logical thinking, an attitude toward science survey, and formative evaluations. Scores from the logical thinking instrument were used to form balanced four-person working groups based on the students' incoming cognitive level. Groups were required to complete a series of activities and/or exercises that targeted different cognitive domains based upon Bloom's taxonomy (knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of information). Daily

  16. Impact of inquiry based distance learning and availability of classroom materials on physical science content knowledge of teachers and students in central Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Timothy John

    Physical science is important for developing scientific literacy yet a majority of teachers responsible for physical science courses do not have an academic degree in physical science. Programs aimed at increasing teacher content knowledge can be time consuming. This dissertation examines the impact of an inquiry based, professional development program offered via distance learning on teacher content knowledge and the role of teacher content knowledge on student understanding and attitudes toward science. Seventy-three teachers participated in the study, including Group I teachers (n = 39) who completed a distance learning course, a control group (Group II) with no intervention (n = 17), and Group III teachers (n = 17) who received classroom materials and no course intervention. A multiple-choice assessment was administered to teachers at the beginning and end of the summer. A similar multiple-choice assessment was administered during the school year to students (n=3,790) of those teachers. A teacher survey assessing the frequency of activity use and teachers' perceptions of the kit was administered to teachers at the end of the school year. A student survey assessing frequency of activities in the classroom, opinions of how to learn science, and attitudes toward science was administered to students during the school year. While Group II (50.6%) and Group III (52.2%) teacher scores were both lower than Group I teacher scores (67.4%), students in Group III (42.9%) outperformed students in Group II (39.4%) following instruction, at a level equal to Group I students (43.6%). Thus, providing materials/activities was as effective at increasing student understanding as providing materials/activities and increasing teacher understanding. However, while teachers in Group I and III report similar use of and satisfaction with the materials/activities, the percentage of Group I students reporting frequent use of inquiry based activities in the classroom, strong belief that

  17. Inquiry, Land Snails, and Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.; Krantz, Patrick D.

    2002-01-01

    Introduces land snails for use in inquiry-based science activities. Describes common characteristics and safety considerations while introducing students to land snails. Explains procedures for inquiry-based use of land snails in classrooms. (YDS)

  18. Inquiry Guided Learning Projects for the Development of Critical Thinking in the College Classroom: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Danielle C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the inaugural success of implementing Inquiry Guided Learning Projects within a college-level human anatomy and physiology course. In this context, scientific inquiry was used as a means of developing skills required for critical thinking among students. The projects were loosely designed using the Information Search Process…

  19. A Large-Scale Inquiry-Based Astronomy Intervention Project: Impact on Students' Content Knowledge Performance and Views of their High School Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Michael; McKinnon, David H.; Danaia, Lena; Deehan, James

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present the results from a study of the impact on students involved in a large-scale inquiry-based astronomical high school education intervention in Australia. Students in this intervention were led through an educational design allowing them to undertake an investigative approach to understanding the lifecycle of stars more aligned with the `ideal' picture of school science. Through the use of two instruments, one focused on content knowledge gains and the other on student views of school science, we explore the impact of this design. Overall, students made moderate content knowledge gains although these gains were heavily dependent on the individual teacher, the number of times a teacher implemented and the depth to which an individual teacher went with the provided materials. In terms of students' views, there were significant global changes in their views of their experience of the science classroom. However, there were some areas where no change or slightly negative changes of which some were expected and some were not. From these results, we comment on the necessity of sustained long-period implementations rather than single interventions, the requirement for similarly sustained professional development and the importance of monitoring the impact of inquiry-based implementations. This is especially important as inquiry-based approaches to science are required by many new curriculum reforms, most notably in this context, the new Australian curriculum currently being rolled out.

  20. Science Inquiry as Knowledge Transformation: Investigating Metacognitive and Self-regulation Strategies to Assist Students in Writing about Scientific Inquiry Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Timothy A.

    2011-12-01

    Science inquiry is central to the science education reform efforts that began in the early 1990's. It is both a topic of instruction and a process to be experienced. Student engagement in the process of scientific inquiry was the focus of this study. The process of scientific inquiry can be conceived as a two-part task. In the initial part of the task, students identify a question or problem to study and then carry out an investigation to address the issue. In the second part of the task, students analyze their data to propose explanations and then report their findings. Knowing that students struggle with science inquiry tasks, this study sought to investigate ways to help students become more successful with the communication demands of science inquiry tasks. The study took place in a high school chemistry class. Students in this study completed a total of three inquiry tasks over the course of one school year. Students were split into four experimental groups in order to determine the effect of goal setting, metacognitive prompts, and sentence stems on student inquiry tasks. The quality of the student written work was assessed using a scoring rubric familiar to the students. In addition, students were asked at four different times in the school year to respond to a self-efficacy survey that measured student self-efficacy for chemistry content and science inquiry processes. Student self-efficacy for the process of scientific inquiry was positive and did not change over the course of the study while student scores on the science inquiry tasks rose significantly. The metacognitive prompts and instruction in goal setting did not have any effect on student inquiry scores. Results related to the effect of the sentence stems were mixed. An analysis of student work indicated that students who received high marks on their initial inquiry task in this study were the ones that adopted the use of the sentence stems. Students who received low marks on their initial inquiry

  1. Should professional development include analyzing and coaching ways of speaking during inquiry-based science instruction in elementary classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zee, Emily H.

    2009-12-01

    In this commentary, I first consider what Oliveira defines inquiry-based science instruction to be. Next I discuss what the discourse practices are that he is advocating. Then I examine what he presents as evidence of changes in two teachers' discourse practices due to a summer institute and how their pragmatic awareness seems to have been enhanced through institute activities. Finally I ponder whether, when, how, and why professional development should include a focus on ways of speaking during inquiry-based science instruction.

  2. Characterizing the changes in teaching practice during first semester implementation of an argument-based inquiry approach in a middle school science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinney, Brian Robert John

    The purpose of this study was to characterize ways in which teaching practice in classroom undergoing first semester implementation of an argument-based inquiry approach changes in whole-class discussion. Being that argument is explicitly called for in the Next Generation Science Standards and is currently a rare practice in teaching, many teachers will have to transform their teaching practice for inclusion of this feature. Most studies on Argument-Based Inquiry (ABI) agree that development of argument does not come easily and is only acquired through practice. Few studies have examined the ways in which teaching practice changes in relation to the big idea or disciplinary core idea (NGSS), the development of dialogue, and/or the development of argument during first semester implementation of an argument-based inquiry approach. To explore these areas, this study posed three primary research questions: (1) How does a teacher in his first semester of Science Writing Heuristic professional development make use of the "big idea"?, (1a) Is the indicated big idea consistent with NGSS core concepts?, (2) How did the dialogue in whole-class discussion change during the first semester of argument-based inquiry professional development?, (3) How did the argument in whole-class discussion change during the first semester of argument-based inquiry professional development? This semester-long study that took place in a middle school in a rural Midwestern city was grounded in interactive constructivism, and utilized a qualitative design to identify the ways in which the teacher utilized big ideas and how dialogue and argumentative dialogue developed over time. The purposefully selected teacher in this study provided a unique situation where he was in his first semester of professional development using the Science Writing Heuristic Approach to argument-based inquiry with 19 students who had two prior years' experience in ABI. Multiple sources of data were collected, including

  3. Shifting from Activitymania To Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Tamara Holmlund; Moscovici, Hedy

    1998-01-01

    Discusses various problems with Activitymania (prepackaged activities for science instruction) in the context of teaching scientific inquiry. Suggests that teachers clearly define conceptual goals and their relationships to students' lives and interests before selecting classroom activities. (PVD)

  4. Shifting from Activitymania To Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Tamara Holmlund; Moscovici, Hedy

    1998-01-01

    Discusses various problems with Activitymania (prepackaged activities for science instruction) in the context of teaching scientific inquiry. Suggests that teachers clearly define conceptual goals and their relationships to students' lives and interests before selecting classroom activities. (PVD)

  5. Collaborative Teacher Inquiry Into iPad Use in Grade 3 Classrooms: Mobilizing Knowledge Through a Long-term School-University Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth McQuirter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on a longitudinal case study exploring Grade 3 teachers’ implementation of iPads in the Language Arts classroom. A school-university partnership was formed based on a collaborative teacher inquiry model. We examined factors that shaped our collaboration. The project resulted in greater teacher sharing of iPad implementation strategies and growth in leadership skills among the teachers. A surprising finding was the degree of reciprocal learning about digital pedagogy that the university researchers experienced during the study and were able to share with their Pre-service Education classes. We emphasize the potential of school-university partnerships for narrowing the current gap between theory and practice in technology-enhanced learning.

  6. The Utility of Inquiry-Based Exercises in Mexican Science Classrooms: Reports from a Professional Development Workshop for Science Teachers in Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racelis, A. E.; Brovold, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The quality of science teaching is of growing importance in Mexico. Mexican students score well below the world mean in math and science. Although the government has recognized these deficiencies and has implemented new policies aimed to improve student achievement in the sciences, teachers are still encountering in-class barriers to effective teaching, especially in public colleges. This paper reports on the utility of inquiry based exercises in Mexican classrooms. In particular, it describes a two-day professional development workshop with science teachers at the Instituto Tecnologico Superior in Felipe Carrillo Puerto in the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. Felipe Carrillo Puerto is an indigenous municipality where a significant majority of the population speak Maya as their first language. This alone presents a unique barrier to teaching science in the municipality, but accompanied with other factors such as student apathy, insufficient prior training of both students and teachers, and pressure to deliver specific science curriculum, science teachers have formidable challenges for effective science teaching. The goals of the workshop were to (1) have a directed discussion regarding science as both content and process, (2) introduce inquiry based learning as one tool of teaching science, and (3) get teachers to think about how they can apply these techniques in their classes.

  7. Using high-resolution satellite imagery to engage students in classroom experiences which meld research, the nature of science, and inquiry-based instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennycook, J.; LaRue, M.; Herried, B.; Morin, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recognizing the need to bridge the gap between scientific research and the classroom, we have developed an exciting activity which engages students in grades 5-12 using high-resolution satellite imagery to observe Weddell seal populations in Antarctica. Going beyond the scope of the textbook, students experience the challenge researchers face in counting and monitoring animal populations in the field. The activity is presented in a non-expert, non-technical exercise enriched for students, with background information, tutorials, and satellite imagery included. Teachers instruct their class in how to use satellite imagery analysis techniques to collect data on seal populations in the McMurdo Sound region of the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Students participate in this inquiry-based, open-ended exercise to evaluate changes in the seal population within and between seasons. The activity meets the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS) through inquiry-based, real-world application and supports seven Performance Expectations (PE) for grade 5-12. In addition, it offers students a glimpse into the work of a field biologist, promoting interest in entering the STEM career pipeline. As every new Antarctica season unfolds, new imagery will be uploaded to the website allowing each year of students to add their counts to a growing long-term dataset for the classroom. The activity files provide 1) a tutorial in how to use the images to count the populations, 2) background information about Weddell seals in the McMurdo Sound region of the Ross Sea for the students and the teachers, and 3) collections of satellite imagery for spatial and temporal analysis of population fluctuations. Teachers can find all activity files to conduct the activity, including student instructions, on the Polar Geospatial Center's website (http://z.umn.edu/seals). Satellite image, Big Razorback Island, Antarctica Weddell seals,Tent Island, Antarctica

  8. "Me? Teach Science?" Exploring EC-4 Pre-Service Teachers' Self Efficacy in an Inquiry-Based Constructivist Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Ratna; Lamp, David

    2010-01-01

    In this qualitative and interpretive study, we investigated factors that influenced elementary preservice teachers' self-efficacy in a constructivist, inquiry-based physics class. Bandura's (1977) theory of social learning was used as a basis to examine preservice teacher's self-efficacy. Participants included 70 female EC-4 preservice teachers…

  9. Students' Attitudes, Self-Efficacy and Experiences in a Modified Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Undergraduate Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnumolakala, Venkat Rao; Southam, Daniel C.; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Qureshi, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    This one-semester, mixed methods study underpinning social cognition and theory of planned behaviour investigated the attitudes, self-efficacy, and experiences of 559 first year undergraduate chemistry students from two cohorts in modified process-oriented guided inquiry learning (POGIL) classes. Versions of attitude toward the study of chemistry…

  10. Does Film Affect Learning Engagement?: Historical Inquiry and the Document-Based Question in a Middle School Social Studies Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paska, Lawrence M.

    2010-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study uses mixed methodologies to examine learning engagement on a social studies unit test based on primary and secondary sources (a "document-based question", or DBQ), to determine whether the use of film in a DBQ changes the nature of historical inquiry. The study was conducted in two Grade 7 classes taught by the same…

  11. Studying Plant-Rhizobium Mutualism in the Biology Classroom: Connecting the Big Ideas in Biology through Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Tomomi; Williamson, Brad

    2014-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry biology lesson, using the plant-rhizobium symbiosis as a model system. This system provides a rich environment for developing connections between the big ideas in biology as outlined in the College Board's new AP Biology Curriculum. Students gain experience with the practice of scientific investigation, from…

  12. Studying Plant-Rhizobium Mutualism in the Biology Classroom: Connecting the Big Ideas in Biology through Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Tomomi; Williamson, Brad

    2014-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry biology lesson, using the plant-rhizobium symbiosis as a model system. This system provides a rich environment for developing connections between the big ideas in biology as outlined in the College Board's new AP Biology Curriculum. Students gain experience with the practice of scientific investigation, from…

  13. Web 2.0 Integration into the Graduate Classroom: An Appreciative Inquiry into Prospective School Administrator Strengths and Leadership Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to advance the preparation of prospective school administrator students by extending the Web 2.0 application of blogging to discover students' strengths and successful leadership experiences. During the blogging process, students reflected on and responded to appreciative inquiry (AI) blog posts that…

  14. Assessing Inquiry in Physical Geology Laboratory Manuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryker, Katherine D.; McConnell, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Many agencies, organizations, and researchers have called for the incorporation of inquiry-based learning in college classrooms. Providing inquiry-based activities in laboratory courses is one way to promote reformed, student-centered teaching in introductory geoscience courses. However, the literature on inquiry has relatively few geoscience…

  15. 将探究式教学引入中学课堂%Introducing Inquiry Teaching into Middle School Classroom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文凯

    2011-01-01

    The basic idea of new curriculum reform is "people-orientation, concern people's development and promote people's development". In order to adaptto the requirements of new curriculum reform, middle school teachers must look far ahead and aim high, change idea, actively lead students to implement inquiry learning, develop scientific inquiry idea and help students develop good learning habits and inquiry awareness.%新课程改革的基本理念是“以人为本,关注人的发展,促进人的发展”。为适应新课改的要求,中学教师必须高瞻远瞩,转变观念,积极引导学生进行探究性学习,发展科学探究的理念,帮助学生养成良好的学习习惯和探究意识。

  16. Designing for Watershed Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec; Shive, Louise

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we describe a collaborative design initiative with three secondary school teachers to promote the use of Web-based inquiry in the context of a watershed investigation. Design interviews that focus on instructional goals and pedagogical beliefs of classroom teachers were conducted. The interview protocol used a curricular framework…

  17. Primary Student-Teachers' Practical Knowledge of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching and Classroom Communication of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratinen, Ilkka; Viiri, Jouni; Lehesvuori, Sami; Kokkonen, Tuukka

    2015-01-01

    A teacher's practical knowledge contains the teacher's beliefs about the goals, values and principles of education that guide his or her actions in the classroom. There is still a lack of knowledge about how teachers' practical knowledge influences their teaching. The present study examines student teachers' practical knowledge in the context of…

  18. "It Makes You Think More when You Watch Things": Scaffolding for Historical Inquiry Using Film in the Middle School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelders, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Students' understanding of history may be shaped less by their social studies teachers than by the powerfully ubiquitous, historically themed media images they passively consume outside of school. In this article, the author describes two strategies conducted during a classroom-based action research study designed to explore how historically…

  19. Effects of Cooperative Learning Plus Inquiry Method on Student Learning and Attitudes: A Comparative Study for Engineering Economic Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, M. Reza; Behin-Aein, Noureddin

    2014-01-01

    In the Iranian higher education system, including engineering education, effective implementation of cooperative learning is difficult because classrooms are usually crowded and the students never had a formal group working background in their previous education. In order to achieve the benefits of cooperative learning in this condition, this…

  20. Social Aspects of Classroom Learning: Results of a Discourse Analysis in an Inquiry-Oriented Physical Chemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nicole M.

    2012-01-01

    Engaging students in classroom discourse offers opportunities for students to participate in the construction of joint understandings, to negotiate relationships between different types of evidence, and to practice making evidence-based claims about science content. However, close attention to social aspects of learning is critical to creating…

  1. The Relationship between Psychological Factors and Inquiry-Based Working by Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uiterwijk-Luijk, Lisette; Krüger, Meta; Zijlstra, Bonne; Volman, Monique

    2017-01-01

    Inquiry-based working by teachers includes working with an inquiry habit of mind, being data literate, contributing to a culture of inquiry at the school level, and creating a culture of inquiry at the classroom level. Inquiry-based working has been found to contribute to educational improvements and the professionalisation of teachers. This study…

  2. The teacher's role in the establishment of whole-class dialogue in a fifth grade science classroom using argument-based inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benus, Matthew J.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the patterns of dialogue that were established and emerged in one experienced fifth-grade science teacher's classroom that used the argument-based inquiry (ABI) and the ways in which these patterns of dialogue and consensus-making were used toward the establishment of a grasp of science practice. Most current studies on ABI agree that it does not come naturally and is only acquired through practice. Additionally, the quality of dialogue is also understood to be an important link in support of student learning. Few studies have examined the ways in which a teacher develops whole-class dialogue over time and the ways in which patterns of dialogue shift over time. The research questions that guided this study were: (1) What were the initial whole-class dialogue patterns established by a fifth-grade science teacher who engaged in ABI? (2) How did the science teacher help to refine whole-class dialogue to support the agreeability of ideas constructed over time? This eighteen week study that took place in a small city of less than 15,000 in Midwestern United States was grounded in interactive constructivism, and utilized a qualitative design method to identify the ways in which an experienced fifth-grade science teacher developed whole-class dialogue and used consensus-making activities to develop the practice of ABI with his students. The teacher in this study used the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach to ABI with twenty-one students who had no previous experience engaging in ABI. This teacher with 10 of years teaching experience was purposefully selected because he was proficient and experienced in practicing ABI. Multiple sources of data were collected, including classroom video with transcriptions, semi-structured interviews, after lesson conversations, and researcher's field notes. Data analysis used a basic qualitative approach. The results showed (1) that the teacher principally engaged in three forms of whole

  3. 中职语文教学自主合作课堂探究%Classroom inquiry of language teaching autonomy cooperation in secondary vocational schools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶锋

    2014-01-01

    在《中职语教学课程标准》中,把倡导"自主合作探究"的学习方式列为中职语文教学课程的基本理念。文章从教学模式探究、兴趣导向、学习习惯养成及培养学生个性发展等四个方面来阐述开展中职语文自主合作式教学的措施,真正实现“以学生为主体”“一切为了学生”,提高学生学习积极主动性及课堂有效性。%In the "vocational language teaching curriculum standards”, put the advocacy of "self-cooperative inquiry" approach to learning as the basic concept of language teaching in vocational courses. Articles from teaching mode, interest-oriented learning habits and cultivate students' personality development in four areas to illustrate how to carry out autonomous cooperation in vocational language teaching, truly"student-centered""All for the students”, positive initiative to improve student learning and classroom effectiveness.

  4. A case study of an experienced teacher's beliefs and practice during implementation of an inquiry-based approach in her elementary science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anita Marie Benna

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between one teacher's beliefs and her practices. This study examined this relationship during the implementation of reform by the teacher in the area of science as recommended by the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996). This study was a single case study of one experienced elementary teacher who was implementing the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach in her science classroom. The study's focus was on the relationship between the teacher's beliefs and her practice during this innovation, as well as the factors that influenced that relationship. Data were collected from multiple sources such as routinely scheduled interviews, classroom observations, researcher's fieldnotes, teacher's written reflections, professional development liaison reflections, student responses, video-tape analysis, think-aloud protocol, audio-tapes of student discourse, metaphor analysis, and Reformed Teacher Observation Protocol (RTOP) scores. Data analysis was conducted using two different approaches: constant comparative method and RTOP scores. Results indicate that a central belief of this teacher was her beliefs about how students learn. This belief was entangled with other more peripheral beliefs such as beliefs about the focus of instruction and beliefs about student voice. As the teacher shifted her central belief from a traditional view of learning to one that is more closely aligned with a constructivist' view, these peripheral beliefs also shifted. This study also shows that the teacher's beliefs and her practice were consistent and entwined throughout the study. As her beliefs shifted, so did her practice and it supports Thompson's (1992) notion of a dialectic relationship between teacher beliefs and practice. Additionally, this study provides implications for teacher education and professional development. As teachers implement reform efforts related to inquiry in their science classrooms, professional

  5. On the role of adult students' subjectivity in inquiry-based classroom teaching%关于成人学生的主体性在探究式课堂教学中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁中宏

    2013-01-01

    Adult education plays an important role in the entire national education system. The inquiry teaching is becoming an important teaching method in classroom teaching. Adult students' subjectivity is the core objective of the inquiry classroom teaching. To understand the problems in inquiry teaching in adult students' subjectivity cultivation, breaking the worship of authority, create an important strategy for autonomous learning space. Let the adult students cooperate in inquiry teaching in the middle school, the exchange and discussion, not only can promote friendship, establish good interpersonal relationships, also conducive to the full play of students’ subjectivity.%成人教育在整个国民教育体系中发挥着重要作用之一。而探究式课堂教学正日益成为课堂教学的重要教学方式。培养成人学生主体性是探究式课堂教学的核心目标。认识目前探究式课堂教学中成人学生主体性培养存在的主要问题,打破对权威的崇拜,创造自主学习空间的重要策略。让成人学生在探究式课堂教学中学会合作,之间的相互交流与讨论,不仅能增进友谊,初步建立良好的人际关系,而且有利于学生群体主体性的充分发挥。

  6. Faunal community use of enhanced and natural oyster reefs in Delaware Bay: A field study and classroom inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Jenny L.

    In addition to its value as a fisheries resource, the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, is a reef building, cornerstone species that provides ecosystem services to the environment. Oysters provide habitat for associated resident and transient species. With widespread declines in oyster populations, restoration efforts have focused on improving oyster stocks and enhancing the ecosystem services they provide. Community-based oyster restoration programs engage the public and local community in planning, construction and/or monitoring of restoration projects. Since 2007, a K-12 student centered community-based restoration venture, Project PORTS, Promoting Oyster Restoration Through Schools, has been working to educate students, promote stewardship values, and enhance oyster habitat in the Delaware Bay. The overarching goals of the present study were to (1) assess fish and macroinvertebrate utilization on the Project PORTS community-created, subtidal, low-relief oyster restoration area in the Delaware Bay, and (2) convert the data collected into a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) activity that can be implemented in the classroom. I examined six subtidal natural oyster reefs of varying oyster densities and one community-based restoration reef as habitat for fishes and invertebrates. Sampling methods on these low-relief reefs consisted of otter trawl tows and benthic habitat tray collections. Results revealed that the enhancement area supported a diverse faunal community consistent with nearby, natural oyster habitats. Data collected during the field study were then transformed into an educational lesson plan, "One Fish, Two Fish-Assessing Habitat Value of Restored Oyster Reefs", that fulfilled national and state (NJ) curriculum standards. The lesson was piloted in a middle school classroom and student learning was evaluated through summative assessments pre and post-participation in the activity. Results of the assessments indicated that

  7. Analyzing the Cognitive Skills and Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Tish

    2011-01-01

    The Common Core Standards (CCS) movement represents a double-edged sword for school librarians. On the one hand, it gives prominence to inquiry skills and interdisciplinary collaboration, reinforcing the profession's efforts to infuse inquiry into the curriculum through collaborative planning and co-instruction between classroom teachers and…

  8. Scaffolding the Inquiry Continuum and the Constitution of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Wayne; Bartley, Anthony; Fazio, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This article considers the impact of scaffolding on pre-service science teachers' constitution of identities as teachers of inquiry. This scaffolding has consisted of 2 major components, a unit on current electricity which encompasses the inquiry continuum and an open inquiry which is situated in context of classroom practice. Our analysis…

  9. Inquiry-Based Examination of Chemical Disruption of Bacterial Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelman, Carly V.; Hawkins, Misty A. W.; Drumwright, Franklin R.; Ransdell, Beverly; Marrs, Kathleen; Anderson, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Inquiry-based instruction in the sciences has been demonstrated as a successful educational strategy to use for both high school and college science classrooms. As participants in the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) Program, we were tasked with creating novel inquiry-based activities for high school classrooms. As a way to…

  10. Building Collaborative Inquiry College English Teaching Mode Based on Flipped Classroom%基于翻转课堂的协作探究型大学英语教学模式的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜洪晴

    2015-01-01

    翻转课堂颠覆了传统的“先教后学”的教学模式,将知识的传授通过微视频形式安排在课前,而课堂时间则用来答疑解惑、讨论互动和个性化指导,无论是教学流程、教学资源还是师生角色都是对传统教学的“翻转”。构建协作探究型大学英语翻转课堂教学模式,为学生提供了自主学习环境,有利于培养学生自主学习和协作探究的能力,从而促进大学英语教学质量的提升。%Flipped classroom subverts the traditional teaching mode by imparting knowledge through micro video before class , while class time is used for answering questions , discussion and interaction , and personalized guidance .It subverts traditional teaching mode in teaching procedures , teaching resources and teacher -student roles .Building collaborative inquiry college English teaching mode based on flipped classroom provides students with autonomous learning environment , which can cultivate students ’ a-bility of autonomous learning and collaborative inquiry , so as to improve the quality of college English teaching .

  11. Injecting Inquiry into Photosynthesis Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Irene; Smith, Rebecca; Nielsen, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    This is the story of how a typical middle school lab was transformed into an open-ended inquiry experience through a few small, but very powerful, changes. By allowing students to follow their own questions, the classroom filled with enthusiasm and students learned much more about photosynthesis, respiration, and the scientific processes. The…

  12. Predictors of Science Inquiry Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.

    This study investigated the influence of student and classroom characteristics on a sample of 17-year-old students' (N=1955) inquiry ability. The sample was obtained from a 1981/1982 national assessment in science carried out by the Minnesota Science Assessment and Research Project. Specific areas addressed included: (1) the effectiveness of the…

  13. History Teachers' Knowledge of Inquiry Methods: An Analysis of Cognitive Processes Used During a Historical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Michiel; De Wever, Bram

    2017-01-01

    The present study explores secondary school history teachers' knowledge of inquiry methods. To do so, a process model, outlining five core cognitive processes of inquiry in the history classroom, was developed based on a review of the literature. This process model was then used to analyze think-aloud protocols of 20 teachers' reasoning during an…

  14. Reconceptualising inquiry in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, Stuart; Price, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Decades of discussion and debate about how science is most effectively taught and learned have resulted in a number of similar but competing inquiry models. These aim to develop students learning of science through approaches which reflect the authenticity of science as practiced by professional scientists while being practical and manageable within the school context. This paper offers a collection of our current reflections and suggestions concerning inquiry and its place in science education. We suggest that many of the current models of inquiry are too limited in their vision concerning themselves, almost exclusively, with producing a scaffold which reduces the complex process of inquiry into an algorithmic approach based around a sequence of relatively simple steps. We argue that this restricts students' experience of authentic inquiry to make classroom management and assessment procedures easier. We then speculate that a more integrated approach is required through an alternative inquiry model that depends on three dimensions (conceptual, procedural and personal) and we propose that it will be more likely to promote effective learning and a willingness to engage in inquiry across all facets of a students' school career and beyond.

  15. Forensic Palynology as Classroom Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Steven L.; Warny, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    This activity introduces the science of "forensic palynology": the use of microscopic pollen and spores (also called "palynomorphs") to solve criminal cases. Plants produce large amounts of pollen or spores during reproductive cycles. Because of their chemical resistance, small size, and morphology, pollen and spores can be…

  16. Forensic Palynology as Classroom Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Steven L.; Warny, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    This activity introduces the science of "forensic palynology": the use of microscopic pollen and spores (also called "palynomorphs") to solve criminal cases. Plants produce large amounts of pollen or spores during reproductive cycles. Because of their chemical resistance, small size, and morphology, pollen and spores can be…

  17. Approximation of the two-part MDL code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaans, P.; Vitányi, P.M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Approximation of the optimal two-part minimum description length (MDL) code for given data, through successive monotonically length-decreasing two-part MDL codes, has the following properties: (i) computation of each step may take arbitrarily long; (ii) we may not know when we reach the optimum, or

  18. Approximation of the two-part MDL code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Adriaans; P.M.B. Vitányi (Paul)

    2009-01-01

    htmlabstractApproximation of the optimal two-part minimum description length (MDL) code for given data, through successive monotonically length-decreasing two-part MDL codes, has the following properties: (i) computation of each step may take arbitrarily long; (ii) we may not know when we reach the

  19. Communication for Inquiry and Access: Teaching Techniques from Discourse Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Susan; Duranczyk, Irene; Moore, Randy; Hatch, Jay; Jensen, Murray; Somdahl, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Adopting inquiry-based science and mathematics pedagogies changes traditional classroom communication patterns. Linguistic research in science and mathematics classrooms has identified communication techniques that help teachers manage classroom discussions to increase student interaction and a sense of student responsibility for learning. These…

  20. SIRA Model of Classroom Observation Pointed to Biology Inquiry Teaching Level%探究式教学实施程度评价的一种探索:SIRA课堂观察模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄鹤; 马云鹏

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, new curriculum reform pays much attention to inquiry teaching. This paper, based on the practical issue, introduces a quantitative curriculum observation SIRA model which comes from biology classroom practice. In addition, this model is independently developed and has highly associated with inquiry teaching implementation at junior level. This paper talks about where this model comes from, sets up four observation dimension based on the inquiry teaching nature analysis, and the observation point according to each dimension. SIRA model is simple, practical and easy to carry out.%探究式教学作为培养学生科学素养和自主精神的有效模式之一受到我国中小学广泛重视,并开展了多方面的实践探索。但是,当前中小学探究式教学课堂教学实施情况评价却处于“无标准”、“无证据化”状态,影响了探究式教学的有效实施。本文立足于实践,以教学主体为核心将探究式课堂教学实践划分为四个维度,即探究主体(Subject)、探究互动(Intemction)、探究资源(Resource)、探究能力(Ability),构建了SIRA课堂观察模式。该模式简单、实用、易操作,可用于不同学校、不同类型的探究式教学实践中。

  1. Assessing Dimensions of Inquiry Practice by Middle School Science Teachers Engaged in a Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Joni M.; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2015-03-01

    Inquiry-based teaching promotes students' engagement in problem-solving and investigation as they learn science concepts. Current practice in science teacher education promotes the use of inquiry in the teaching of science. However, the literature suggests that many science teachers hold incomplete or incorrect conceptions of inquiry. Teachers, therefore, may believe they are providing more inquiry experiences than they are, reducing the positive impact of inquiry on science interest and skills. Given the prominence of inquiry in professional development experiences, educational evaluators need strong tools to detect intended use in the classroom. The current study focuses on the validity of assessments developed for evaluating teachers' use of inquiry strategies and classroom orientations. We explored the relationships between self-reported inquiry strategy use, preferences for inquiry, knowledge of inquiry practices, and related pedagogical content knowledge. Finally, we contrasted students' and teachers' reports of the levels of inquiry-based teaching in the classroom. Self-reports of inquiry use, especially one specific to the 5E instructional model, were useful, but should be interpreted with caution. Teachers tended to self-report higher levels of inquiry strategy use than their students perceived. Further, there were no significant correlations between either knowledge of inquiry practices or PCK and self-reported inquiry strategy use.

  2. Understanding the Development of a Hybrid Practice of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction and Language Development: A Case Study of One Teacher's Journey through Reflections on Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, Sarah; Hooper, Paula; Rankin, Lynn; Austin, Marilyn; Caven, Gennifer

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study looks closely at an elementary teacher who participated in professional development experiences that helped her develop a hybrid practice of using inquiry-based science to teach both science content and English language development (ELD) to her students, many of whom are English language learners (ELLs). This case study…

  3. Understanding the Development of a Hybrid Practice of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction and Language Development: A Case Study of One Teacher's Journey through Reflections on Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, Sarah; Hooper, Paula; Rankin, Lynn; Austin, Marilyn; Caven, Gennifer

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study looks closely at an elementary teacher who participated in professional development experiences that helped her develop a hybrid practice of using inquiry-based science to teach both science content and English language development (ELD) to her students, many of whom are English language learners (ELLs). This case study…

  4. Impact of Inquiry Based Distance Learning and Availability of Classroom Materials on Physical Science Content Knowledge of Teachers and Students in Central Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Timothy John

    2012-01-01

    Physical science is important for developing scientific literacy yet a majority of teachers responsible for physical science courses do not have an academic degree in physical science. Programs aimed at increasing teacher content knowledge can be time consuming. This dissertation examines the impact of an inquiry based, professional development…

  5. Inquiry learning in urban education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Edward D.

    This final project examines one possible way of improving student achievement in the urban classroom in the area of science education by offering two field experiences into the natural environment as catalysts to generate student curiosity and thereby encourage learning through using some basic inquiry skills. All pre tests taken prior and post tests taken after attending one or both trips were analyzed. NYS Regents scores focused on seven ecology questions were also examined. The resulting data all showed a marked improvement in student achievement by both groups who attended either one or both trips. In addition, this project analyzes the research available on the inquiry method and the traditional lecture method. Although both methods had strong support, the research on the traditional and inquiry methods revealed few researchers in the science education field were outspoken and supportive of both methods.

  6. Language, Access, and Power in the Elementary Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoerning, Emily; Hand, Brian; Shelley, Mack; Therrien, William

    2015-01-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards call for the adoption of many aspects of scientific inquiry in the classroom. The ways in which classroom talk and classroom environment change as students and teachers learn to utilize inquiry approaches are underexplored. This study examines the frequency with which linguistic markers related to access and…

  7. Infusing Authentic Inquiry into Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanegan, Nikki L.; Bigler, Amber

    2009-10-01

    Societal benefit depends on the general public's understandings of biotechnology (Betsch in World J Microbiol Biotechnol 12:439-443, 1996; Dawson and Cowan in Int J Sci Educ 25(1):57-69, 2003; Schiller in Business Review: Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia (Fourth Quarter), 2002; Smith and Emmeluth in Am Biol Teach 64(2):93-99, 2002). A National Science Foundation funded survey of high school biology teachers reported that hands-on biotechnology education exists in advanced high school biology in the United States, but is non-existent in mainstream biology coursework (Micklos et al. in Biotechnology labs in American high schools, 1998). The majority of pre-service teacher content preparation courses do not teach students appropriate content knowledge through the process of inquiry. A broad continuum exists when discussing inquiry-oriented student investigations (Hanegan et al. in School Sci Math J 109(2):110-134, 2009). Depending on the amount of structure in teacher lessons, inquiries can often be categorized as guided or open. The lesson can be further categorized as simple or authentic (Chinn and Malhotra in Sci Educ 86(2):175-218, 2002). Although authentic inquiries provide the best opportunities for cognitive development and scientific reasoning, guided and simple inquiries are more often employed in the classroom (Crawford in J Res Sci Teach 37(9):916-937, 2000; NRC in Inquiry and the national science education standards: a guide for teaching and learning, 2000). For the purposes of this study we defined inquiry as "authentic" if original research problems were resolved (Hanegan et al. in School Sci Math J 109(2):110-134, 2009; Chinn and Malhotra in Sci Educ 86(2):175-218, 2002; Roth in Authentic school science: knowing and learning in open-inquiry science laboratories, 1995). The research question to guide this study through naturalistic inquiry research methods was: How will participants express whether or not an authentic inquiry experience enhanced

  8. Inquiry and Living History, Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatney, Sharon; Smalley, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    This article, the first of a two-part series, introduces the living history program. This yearly, weeklong program features living portrayals of famous people, which becomes a catalyst for teaching curricular standards, as well as providing the spark for inquiry. Here, the authors describe how the yearly living history program was implemented and…

  9. Stories of Experience and Narrative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, F. Michael; Clandinin, D. Jean

    1990-01-01

    Surveys forms of narrative inquiry in educational studies. Outlines certain criteria, methods, and writing forms. Describes them in terms of beginning the story, living the story, and selecting stories to construct and reconstruct narrative plots. Describes two-part research agenda for curriculum and studies flowing from stories of experience and…

  10. Poetic inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørlich, Anne

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I argue that poetic inquiry is a valuable method for producing knowledge that complements current research into ‘what works’ in reintegrating young people into secondary education. Researching ‘what works’ and ‘finding effects’ leads to insight into which interventions and tools...

  11. Enzyme Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Dias, Michael; McDurmon, Grant

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a two-phase inquiry lesson in which students explore the catalytic activity of amylase on starch (Rungruangsa and Panijpan 1979). In the first phase, students' prior knowledge about the reaction is assessed through a set of directed prompts and small-group discussion, then challenged or reinforced as students…

  12. Designing for Real-World Scientific Inquiry in Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketelhut, Diane Jass; Nelson, Brian C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most policy doctrines promote the use of scientific inquiry in the K-12 classroom, but good inquiry is hard to implement, particularly for schools with fiscal and safety constraints and for teachers struggling with understanding how to do so. Purpose: In this paper, we present the design of a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE)…

  13. Giving Children Space: A Phenomenological Exploration of Student Experiences in Space Science Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of 4th grade students in an inquiry-based space science classroom. At the heart of the study lies the essential question: What is the lived experience of children engaged in the process of space science inquiry? Through the methodology of phenomenological inquiry, the author investigates the essence of the lived…

  14. Incorporating Practitioner Inquiry into an Online Professional Development Program: The Prime Online Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Nancy Fichtman; Pape, Stephen J.; Griffin, Cynthia C.; Prosser, Sherri Kay

    2017-01-01

    Engagement in practitioner inquiry by classroom teachers is a promising mechanism for teacher professional learning. While much has been learned about the positive role inquiry can play in traditional professional development efforts, we know less about the impact of inquiry in a rapidly advancing technological age that includes the proliferation…

  15. Personal Inquiry and Online Research: Connecting Learners in Ways That Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiro, Julie; Castek, Jill; Quinn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    This piece introduces a framework for how to envision Personal Digital Inquiry (PDI) in K-8 classrooms. To conceptualize what teaching and learning might look like in these classrooms, important practices are situated along a two-dimensional continuum of digital inquiry that varies in terms of levels of support and purposes of technology use. We…

  16. Facilitating Elementary Science Teachers' Implementation of Inquiry-Based Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qablan, Ahmad M.; DeBaz, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Preservice science teachers generally feel that the implementation of inquiry-based science teaching is very difficult to manage. This research project aimed at facilitating the implementation of inquiry-based science teaching through the use of several classroom strategies. The evaluation of 15 classroom strategies from 80 preservice elementary…

  17. Fictional Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Christian; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    At designe i en fortællemæssig ramme giver brugere og designere mulighed for i fællesskab at udforske fremtidens it-anvendelser. Metoden hedder Fictional Inquiry, og den motiverer brugerne til at tænke ud over dagligdagens begrænsninger og sætte ord på ting i hverdagen, som ellers er svære...

  18. A two-part model for censored medical cost data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lu; Huang, Jie

    2007-10-15

    The two-part model is often used to analyse medical cost data which contain a large proportion of zero cost and are highly skewed with some large costs. The total medical costs over a period of time are often censored due to incomplete follow-up, making the analysis difficult as the censoring can be informative. We propose to apply the inverse probability weighting method on a two-part model to analyse right-censored cumulative medical costs with informative censoring. We also introduce a set of simple functionals based on the intermediate cost history to be applied with the efficiency augmentation technique. In addition, we propose a practical model-checking technique based on the cumulative residuals. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate the finite sample performance of the proposed method. We use a data set on the cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related Medicare costs to illustrate our proposed method.

  19. Teaching Inquiry with a Lens toward Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renesse, Christine; Ecke, Volker

    2017-01-01

    This paper links educational psychology research about curiosity to teacher moves that are effective in an inquiry-based mathematics classroom. Three vignettes will show explicit teacher moves (staging disagreement, intriguing anecdotes, and creating a safe space) for different audiences (math majors, mathematics for liberal arts students, and…

  20. Collaborative Inquiry in Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Deborah L.; Schnellert, Leyton

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an in-depth case study of a complex community of inquiry. In this community, teachers worked collaboratively to build from situated assessments of students' "learning through reading" to refine and monitor practices designed to enhance student learning in their subject-area classrooms. In this report, we present evidence to…

  1. Personal Inquiry in the Earth Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, W. Paul

    Designed as a basic workbook using the inquiry process or as a supplementary text in the classroom, this 129 page booklet is divided into five units: Moving in on the Earth From Space, The Earth's Great Bodies of Water, Composition of the Solid Earth, The Earth's Crust is Constantly Changing, and Studying the Earth's History. The exercises are…

  2. Teaching Inquiry with a Lens toward Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renesse, Christine; Ecke, Volker

    2017-01-01

    This paper links educational psychology research about curiosity to teacher moves that are effective in an inquiry-based mathematics classroom. Three vignettes will show explicit teacher moves (staging disagreement, intriguing anecdotes, and creating a safe space) for different audiences (math majors, mathematics for liberal arts students, and…

  3. Internet Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This collection of dialogues is the only textbook of its kind. Internet Inquiry: Conversations About Method takes students into the minds of top internet researchers as they discuss how they have worked through critical challenges as they research online social environments. Editors Annette N....... Markham and Nancy K. Baym illustrate that good research choices are not random but are deliberate, studied, and internally consistent. Rather than providing single "how to" answers, this book presents distinctive and divergent viewpoints on how to think about and conduct qualitative internet studies....

  4. Internet Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This collection of dialogues is the only textbook of its kind. Internet Inquiry: Conversations About Method takes students into the minds of top internet researchers as they discuss how they have worked through critical challenges as they research online social environments. Editors Annette N....... Markham and Nancy K. Baym illustrate that good research choices are not random but are deliberate, studied, and internally consistent. Rather than providing single "how to" answers, this book presents distinctive and divergent viewpoints on how to think about and conduct qualitative internet studies....

  5. Learning to Teach Generative Meaning-Making through Multimodal Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loretto, Adam; Chisholm, James S.

    2012-01-01

    This classroom narrative describes the transformation of one beginning English/language arts (ELA) teacher's perspective and practice as the teacher enacted multimodal inquiry activities that were the focus of both traditional and action research projects. Drawing on field notes, transcripts of classroom discourse, and student-produced artefacts,…

  6. Inquiry Role Approach: A Model for Counselor Involvement in Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingman, Richard M.; And Others

    The Inquiry Role Approach (IRA) is a strategy for classroom learning in which students work as 4-member teams and assume roles as Team Coordinator, Process Advisor, Data Recorder, and Technical Advisor. Cognitive as well as affective objectives are identified which relate to optimum learning and personal growth in the classroom. The counselor's…

  7. Collaborative Inquiry Learning: Models, tools, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thorsten; Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Ploetzner, Rolf

    2010-02-01

    Collaborative inquiry learning is one of the most challenging and exciting ventures for today's schools. It aims at bringing a new and promising culture of teaching and learning into the classroom where students in groups engage in self-regulated learning activities supported by the teacher. It is expected that this way of learning fosters students' motivation and interest in science, that they learn to perform steps of inquiry similar to scientists and that they gain knowledge on scientific processes. Starting from general pedagogical reflections and science standards, the article reviews some prominent models of inquiry learning. This comparison results in a set of inquiry processes being the basis for cooperation in the scientific network NetCoIL. Inquiry learning is conceived in several ways with emphasis on different processes. For an illustration of the spectrum, some main conceptions of inquiry and their focuses are described. In the next step, the article describes exemplary computer tools and environments from within and outside the NetCoIL network that were designed to support processes of collaborative inquiry learning. These tools are analysed by describing their functionalities as well as effects on student learning known from the literature. The article closes with challenges for further developments elaborated by the NetCoIL network.

  8. First-Year Teachers’ Uphill Struggle to Implement Inquiry Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Chichekian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal study of six first-year teachers focused on conceptualizations of inquiry-based pedagogy, self-efficacy for inquiry-based teaching, and its actual enactment. Data included a self-report survey of self-efficacy for inquiry-based instruction, individual interviews at the beginning and end of the year, and five distributed classroom observations. At year’s end, self-efficacy for inquiry teaching declined, as did frequencies of concepts teachers used to describe inquiry enactment. Inquiry descriptions reflected a set of interrelated procedures more than inquiry as conceptual knowledge. Novice teachers were observed least enacting pedagogical actions that required enabling students to communicate findings and the most in student engagement; however, over time frequencies of student engagement declined. Consistent patterns were observed between shifts in self-efficacy and inquiry enactment and shifts between self-efficacy and conceptualizations of inquiry enactment. We found beginning steps toward links between teacher’s conceptualizations and classroom practice.

  9. A narrative inquiry into teaching physics as inquiry: An examination of in-service exemplars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paige K.

    Studies show that teachers who have experienced inquiry are more likely to practice the inquiry method in their own classrooms (McDermott, 2007; Olson, 1995; Pereira, 2005; Windschitl, 2002). This study explores changes in science teachers' personal practical knowledge (Clandinin, 1986) after participating in a graduate level physics inquiry course and subsequent professional development throughout the school year. In addition, teacher participants were studied to determine the roadblocks they encountered when altering curriculum mandates in ways that would enable them to work with the inquiry method. The results of this course and subsequent professional development sessions were analyzed for the benefits of using the inquiry method to teacher learning and to ascertain whether the teacher participants would be more apt to employ the inquiry method in their own classrooms. Moreover, the results of this study were analyzed to inform my personal practice as a leader preparing undergraduate science teachers in the teachHOUSTON program as well as in my continuing work with in-service teachers. An inquiry course may be added to the teachHOUSTON course sequence, based on the discoveries unearthed by this thesis study. This research study is conducted as a narrative inquiry (Clandinin & Connelly, 1992, 2000; Craig, 2011; Polkinghorne, 1995) where story works as both a research method and a form of representation (Connelly & Clandinin, 1990). Narrative inquiry is strongly influenced by John Dewey (1938) who believed that one must rely on past experiences and knowledge to solve current and future problems and that life experience is in fact education. This study inquires into the narratives of two teachers who are teaching secondary science in public schools. These stories illuminate the teachers' lived experiences as they co-constructed curriculum with their students. The images of teacher as a curriculum maker vs. teacher as a curriculum implementer (Craig & Ross, 2008

  10. The Flipped Classroom: A Twist on Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Stacy M. P.; Ralph, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional classroom has utilized the "I Do", "We Do", "You Do" as a strategy for teaching for years. The flipped classroom truly flips that strategy. The teacher uses "You Do", "We Do", "I Do" instead. Homework, inquiry, and investigation happen in the classroom. At home students…

  11. Teachers and Technology Use in Secondary Science Classrooms: Investigating the Experiences of Middle School Science Teachers Implementing the Web-based Inquiry Science Environment (WISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Rachel Corinne

    This study investigated the intended teacher use of a technology-enhanced learning tool, Web-based Inquiry Science Environment (WISE), and the first experiences of teachers new to using it and untrained in its use. The purpose of the study was to learn more about the factors embedded into the design of the technology that enabled it or hindered it from being used as intended. The qualitative research design applied grounded theory methods. Using theoretical sampling and a constant comparative analysis, a document review of WISE website led to a model of intended teacher use. The experiences of four middle school science teachers as they enacted WISE for the first time were investigated through ethnographic field observations, surveys and interviews using thematic analysis to construct narratives of each teachers use. These narratives were compared to the model of intended teacher use of WISE. This study found two levels of intended teacher uses for WISE. A basic intended use involved having student running the project to completion while the teacher provides feedback and assesses student learning. A more optimal description of intended use involved the supplementing the core curriculum with WISE as well as enhancing the core scope and sequence of instruction and aligning assessment with the goals of instruction through WISE. Moreover, WISE projects were optimally intended to be facilitated through student-centered teaching practices and inquiry-based instruction in a collaborative learning environment. It is also optimally intended for these projects to be shared with other colleagues for feedback and iterative development towards improving the Knowledge Integration of students. Of the four teachers who participated in this study, only one demonstrated the use of WISE as intended in the most basic way. This teacher also demonstrated the use of WISE in a number of optimal ways. Teacher confusion with certain tools available within WISE suggests that there may be a

  12. Getting the picture: A mixed-methods inquiry into how visual representations are interpreted by students, incorporated within textbooks, and integrated into middle-school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victor Raymond

    Modern-day middle school science textbooks are heavily populated with colorful images, technical diagrams, and other forms of visual representations. These representations are commonly perceived by educators to be useful aids to support student learning of unfamiliar scientific ideas. However, as the number of representations in science textbooks has seemingly increased in recent decades, concerns have been voiced that many current of these representations are actually undermining instructional goals; they may be introducing substantial conceptual and interpretive difficulties for students. To date, very little empirical work has been done to examine how the representations used in instructional materials have changed, and what influences these changes exert on student understanding. Furthermore, there has also been limited attention given to the extent to which current representational-use routines in science classrooms may mitigate or limit interpretive difficulties. This dissertation seeks to do three things: First, it examines the nature of the relationship between published representations and students' reasoning about the natural world. Second, it considers the ways in which representations are used in textbooks and how that has changed over a span of five decades. Third, this dissertation provides an in-depth look into how middle school science classrooms naturally use these visual representations and what kinds of support are being provided. With respect to the three goals of this dissertation, three pools of data were collected and analyzed for this study. First, interview data was collected in which 32 middle school students interpreted and reasoned with a set of more and less problematic published textbook representations. Quantitative analyses of the interview data suggest that, counter to what has been anticipated in the literature, there were no significant differences in the conceptualizations of students in the different groups. An accompanying

  13. Cockroaches in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagler, Ron; Moseley, Christine

    2005-01-01

    The Madagascar hissing cockroach (MHC) provides an excellent avenue to introduce students to the joys of inquiry-centered learning. MHC's are relatively tame, produce little odor, do not bite, and are easy to handle and breed. Because of these characteristics, they are ideal for classroom activities, science projects, and as pets. They also help…

  14. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  15. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  16. TSA Public Inquiry Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — All non-media public inquiries and complaints and responses to inquiries received by telephone, e-mail and fax, and handles contacts in English and Spanish. The data...

  17. Personal Inquiry Manager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suarez, Angel; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The Personal Inquiry Manager (PIM) is an integration approach based on a mobile application, based on Android, to support the IBL process and gives users mobile access to their inquiries. Moreover it facilitates a more self-directed approach as it enables to set up their own personal inquiries. The

  18. Teaching Science through Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Jesse; Kruse, Jerrid W.; Clough, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Science education efforts have long emphasized inquiry, and inquiry and scientific practices are prominent in contemporary science education reform documents (NRC 1996; NGSS Lead States 2013). However, inquiry has not become commonplace in science teaching, in part because of misunderstandings regarding what it means and entails (Demir and Abell…

  19. Improving science inquiry with elementary students of diverse backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Peggy; Lee, Okhee; Hart, Juliet; Deaktor, Rachael

    2005-03-01

    This study examined the impact of an inquiry-based instructional intervention on (a) children's ability to conduct science inquiry overall and to use specific skills in inquiry, and (b) narrowing the gaps in children's ability among demographic subgroups of students. The intervention consisted of instructional units, teacher workshops, and classroom practices. The study involved 25 third- and fourth-grade students from six elementary schools representing diverse linguistic and cultural groups. Quantitative results demonstrated that the intervention enhanced the inquiry ability of all students regardless of grade, achievement, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), home language, and English proficiency. Particularly, low-achieving, low-SES, and English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) exited students made impressive gains. The study adds to the existing literature on designing learning environments that foster science inquiry of all elementary students.

  20. Implementing e-network-supported inquiry learning in science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, John; Cowie, Bronwen; Khoo, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The successful implementation of electronically networked (e-networked) tools to support an inquiry-learning approach in secondary science classrooms is dependent on a range of factors spread between teachers, schools, and students. The teacher must have a clear understanding of the nature...... of inquiry, the school must provide effective technological infrastructure and sympathetic curriculum parameters, and the students need to be carefully scaffolded to the point of engaging with the inquiry process. Within this study, e-networks supported students to exercise agency, collaborate, and co...

  1. Middle school science inquiry: Connecting experiences and beliefs to practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen Elizabeth

    A major education reform effort today involves the teaching and learning of inquiry science. This case study research examined connections between background experiences and teacher beliefs and the role they played in the implementation of scientific inquiry within four middle school classrooms. The research questions guiding this study included: (a) identifying how teachers' background and experiences related to the use of scientific inquiry-based practice, (b) identification of teacher self-reported characteristics of scientific inquiry, (c) identification of the ways in which teachers' self-reported beliefs related to the use of scientific inquiry-based practice, (d) determine the extent that self-reported teaching scientific inquiry behaviors were consistent with observed behaviors in practice and (e) identify how teachers implemented a scientific inquiry-based approach into their instructional practice. Across the cases, the findings revealed four major experiences that influenced teacher beliefs regarding inquiry-based teaching: (a) opportunities for doing science, (b) influences of the teacher education program primarily with respect to positive science role models, (c) teaching experiences and school expectations and (d) the personality of the individuals. Major themes regarding teaching beliefs regarding characteristics of inquiry-based practice, reported by the participants, included: (a) student-centered instruction, (b) learning by doing, (c) real world applications, (d) integration, (e) collaboration and (f) communicating scientific ideas. Findings also revealed that teacher beliefs and practice aligned except in the area of communicating scientific ideas. Participants did not identify communication as a belief regarding inquirybased practice, but observed practice found communicating scientific ideas played a minor role. Implications from the findings are significant as science educators continue to understand the influence of background experiences

  2. Mobile inquiry-based learning with sensor-data in the school: Effects on student motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firssova, Olga; Kalz, Marco; Börner, Dirk; Prinsen, Fleur; Rusman, Ellen; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses the design, implementation and evaluation of a pilot project that integrated inquiry-based learning with mobile game design and introduced mobile devices and sensors into classroom learning

  3. A “laboratory of knowledge-making” for personal inquiry learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sharples, Mike; Collins, Trevor; Feißt, Markus; Gaved, Mark; Mulholland, Paul; Paxton, Mark; Wright, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We describe nQuire, a constraint-based learning toolkit to support a continuity of inquiry based learning between classroom and non-formal settings. The paper proposes design requirements for personal inquiry learning environments that support learning of personally meaningful science topics with development of metacognitive understanding and self-regulation of the scientific process through situated practice. It introduces a generic implementable model of the inquiry process, and describes a...

  4. Kuwaiti Science Teachers' Beliefs and Intentions Regarding the Use of Inquiry-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhendal, Dalal; Marshman, Margaret; Grootenboer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of education, the Kuwaiti Ministry of Education has encouraged schools to implement inquiry-based instruction. This study identifies psychosocial factors that predict teachers' intention to use inquiry-based instruction in their science classrooms. An adapted model of Ajzen's (1985) theory of planned behaviour--the Science…

  5. A Methodological Framework for Studying Policy-Oriented Teacher Inquiry in Qualitative Research Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka

    2014-01-01

    System-based and collaborative teacher inquiry has unexplored potential that can impact educational policy in numerous ways. This impact can be increased when teacher inquiry builds momentum from classrooms and teaching practices and simultaneously addresses district, state, and national discourses and networks. In this conceptual paper, I…

  6. On Narrative Inquiry: Approaches to Language and Literacy (An NCRLL Volume). Language & Literacy Series. NCRLL Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, David; Vinz, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Can stories about students and classrooms be the basis for meaningful research? In this book, the authors describe and tell illustrative stories about the potential and limits of narrative for the purpose of inquiry in English education. They argue that narrative inquiry is uniquely suited to the questions educators are asking in the field today.…

  7. Challenges and Support When Teaching Science through an Integrated Inquiry and Literacy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødegaard, Marianne; Haug, Berit; Mork, Sonja M.; Sørvik, Gard Ove

    2014-01-01

    In the Budding Science and Literacy project, we explored how working with an integrated inquiry-based science and literacy approach may challenge and support the teaching and learning of science at the classroom level. By studying the inter-relationship between multiple learning modalities and phases of inquiry, we wished to illuminate possible…

  8. It Is All about Inquiry: A Cross-Disciplinary Conversation about the Shared Foundations for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkins Nordstrom, Jennifer A.; Sumner, David Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper brings together general principles for teaching inquiry across disciplines with those generally employed in mathematics classrooms. It describes some broad principles of teaching inquiry to first-year writing students and shows how these can be employed in the context of a course on game theory in popular culture. Although undergraduate…

  9. It Is All about Inquiry: A Cross-Disciplinary Conversation about the Shared Foundations for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkins Nordstrom, Jennifer A.; Sumner, David Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This paper brings together general principles for teaching inquiry across disciplines with those generally employed in mathematics classrooms. It describes some broad principles of teaching inquiry to first-year writing students and shows how these can be employed in the context of a course on game theory in popular culture. Although undergraduate…

  10. A Methodological Framework for Studying Policy-Oriented Teacher Inquiry in Qualitative Research Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka

    2014-01-01

    System-based and collaborative teacher inquiry has unexplored potential that can impact educational policy in numerous ways. This impact can be increased when teacher inquiry builds momentum from classrooms and teaching practices and simultaneously addresses district, state, and national discourses and networks. In this conceptual paper, I…

  11. Steps to Opening Scientific Inquiry: Pre-Service Teachers' Practicum Experiences with a New Support Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Carol; Pardo, Richard; Parker, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative multiple-comparative case study investigates (1) The reported experiences and impressions of four pre-service teachers (PTs) on practicum placement in four different classrooms (grades 1-9) where a new Steps to Inquiry (SI) framework was being utilized to support students conducting open inquiry; (2) The relative dispositions of…

  12. Kuwaiti Science Teachers' Beliefs and Intentions Regarding the Use of Inquiry-Based Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhendal, Dalal; Marshman, Margaret; Grootenboer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To improve the quality of education, the Kuwaiti Ministry of Education has encouraged schools to implement inquiry-based instruction. This study identifies psychosocial factors that predict teachers' intention to use inquiry-based instruction in their science classrooms. An adapted model of Ajzen's (1985) theory of planned behaviour--the Science…

  13. Incorporating Active Learning and Student Inquiry into an Introductory Merchandising Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Hines, Jean D.

    2012-01-01

    Many educators believe that student learning is enhanced when they are actively involved in classroom activities that require student inquiry. The purpose of this paper is to report on three student inquiry projects that were incorporated into a merchandising class with the focus on making students responsible for their learning, rather than the…

  14. A Theory of Planned Behaviour-Based Analysis of TIMSS 2011 to Determine Factors Influencing Inquiry Teaching Practices in High-Performing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongsophon, Pongprapan; Herman, Benjamin C.

    2017-01-01

    Given the abundance of literature describing the strong relationship between inquiry-based teaching and student achievement, more should be known about the factors impacting science teachers' classroom inquiry implementation. This study utilises the theory of planned behaviour to propose and validate a causal model of inquiry-based teaching…

  15. Epistemology of scientific inquiry and computer-supported collaborative learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai Pekka Juhani

    1998-12-01

    The problem addressed in the study was whether 10- and 11-year-old children, collaborating within a computer-supported classroom, could learn a process of inquiry that represented certain principal features of scientific inquiry, namely (1) engagement in increasingly deep levels of explanation, (2) progressive generation of subordinate questions, and (3) collaborative effort to advance explanations. Technical infrastructure for the study was provided by the Computer-Supported Intentional Learning Environments, CSILE. The study was entirely based on qualitative content analysis of students' written productions posted to CSILE's database. Five studies were carried out to analyze CSILE students' process of inquiry. The first two studies aimed at analyzing changes in CSILE students' culture of inquiry in two CSILE classrooms across a three-year period. The results of the studies indicate that the classroom culture changed over three years following the introduction of CSILE. The explanatory level of knowledge produced by the students became increasingly deeper in tracking from the first to third year representing the first principal feature of scientific inquiry. Moreover, between-student communication increasingly focused on facilitating advancement of explanation (the third principal feature). These effects were substantial only in one classroom; the teacher of this class provided strong pedagogical support and epistemological guidance for the students. Detailed analysis of this classroom's inquiry, carried out in the last three studies, indicated that with teacher's guidance the students were able to produce meaningful intuitive explanations as well as go beyond the functional and empirical nature of their intuitive explanations and appropriate theoretical scientific explanations (the first principal feature). Advancement of the students' inquiry appeared to be closely associated with generation of new subordinate questions (the second principal feature) and peer

  16. Over reported and misunderstood? A study of teachers' reported enactment and knowledge of inquiry-based science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Daniel K.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.; Young, Ashley M.

    2016-04-01

    Science education reforms worldwide call on teachers to engage students in investigative approaches to instruction, like inquiry. Studies of teacher self-reported enactment indicate that inquiry is used frequently in the classroom, suggesting a high level of proficiency with inquiry that would be amenable to inquiry reform. However, it is unclear whether the high frequency of self-report is based on sound knowledge inquiry. In the absence of sound knowledge, high rates of self-reported enactment would be suspect. We conducted a study to measure teachers' knowledge of inquiry as it related to the known, high frequency of reported enactment. We developed a multidimensional survey instrument using US reform documents and administered it to 149 K-12 teachers at a national science teachers' conference. The majority of the teachers surveyed did not report inquiry enactment based on well-structured knowledge of inquiry. Interviews with participants showed how teachers could readily map non-inquiry activities onto inquiry statements taken directly from reform documents. From these results we argue that teachers often believed they were enacting inquiry, when likely they were not. We further reason that teachers may struggle to interpret and enact inquiry-related requirements of science education reform and will need support distinguishing inquiry from non-inquiry practices.

  17. Implementing e-network-supported inquiry learning in science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, John; Cowie, Bronwen; Khoo, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The successful implementation of electronically networked (e-networked) tools to support an inquiry-learning approach in secondary science classrooms is dependent on a range of factors spread between teachers, schools, and students. The teacher must have a clear understanding of the nature of inq...

  18. A Simple Inquiry-Based Lab for Teaching Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John R.

    2014-01-01

    This simple inquiry-based lab was designed to teach the principle of osmosis while also providing an experience for students to use the skills and practices commonly found in science. Students first design their own experiment using very basic equipment and supplies, which generally results in mixed, but mostly poor, outcomes. Classroom "talk…

  19. Composing Storied Ground: Four Generations of Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, David; Pagnucci, Gian; Wallace, Rob; Stock, Patricia Lambert

    2007-01-01

    Narrative inquiry in English education comes in many shapes and forms--tales of classrooms and communities, didactic argu-stories, postmodern pastiches, open tales with O. Henry endings--but the heart of the enterprise is research in the form of story or, in other words, exploring the world by telling a story about it. In many such tales, all of…

  20. Preservice Teachers Developing Coherent Inquiry Investigations in Elementary Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Julia D.; Tanis Ozcelik, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    For students to attain deep understanding of scientific practices, they will need to have opportunities to participate in sustained engagement in doing science. Such opportunities begin with elementary teachers implementing coherent and well-sequenced inquiry-based investigations in their classrooms. This study explored how preservice teachers (N…

  1. Preservice Teachers Developing Coherent Inquiry Investigations in Elementary Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Julia D.; Tanis Ozcelik, Arzu

    2015-01-01

    For students to attain deep understanding of scientific practices, they will need to have opportunities to participate in sustained engagement in doing science. Such opportunities begin with elementary teachers implementing coherent and well-sequenced inquiry-based investigations in their classrooms. This study explored how preservice teachers (N…

  2. Using Technology to Engage Preservice Elementary Teachers in Learning about Scientific Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. MacArthur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elementary teachers are often required to teach inquiry in their classrooms despite having had little exposure to inquiry learning themselves. In a capstone undergraduate science course preservice elementary teachers experience scientific inquiry through the completion of group projects, activities, readings and discussion, in order to develop a sense of how inquiry learning takes place. At the same time, they learn science content necessary for teacher licensure. The course exposes students to different pathways of scientific discovery and to the use of the computer both as a tool for conducting inquiry-based investigations and as a means of collecting and sharing student opinions. The students involved have many misconceptions about science and it is often difficult for them to distinguish science from pseudoscience. Computer simulations are used to help students understand that difference. In addition, a classroom response system using “clickers” is used to poll studentopinions on controversial issues and to stimulate discussion.

  3. Using Peer Feedback to Improve Students' Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Tammy Q.; Herrenkohl, Leslie Rupert

    2016-02-01

    This article examines a 7th grade teacher's pedagogical practices to support her students to provide peer feedback to one another using technology during scientific inquiry. This research is part of a larger study in which teachers in California and Washington and their classes engaged in inquiry projects using a Web-based system called Web of Inquiry. Videotapes of classroom lessons and artifacts such as student work were collected as part of the corpus of data. In the case examined, Ms. E supports her students to collectively define "meaningful feedback," thereby improving the quality of feedback that was provided in the future. This is especially timely, given the attention in Next Generation Science Standards to cross-cutting concepts and practices that require students discuss and debate ideas with each other in order to improve their understanding and their written inquiry reports (NGSS, 2013).

  4. Transformative communication as a cultural tool for guiding inquiry science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Joseph L.; Pea, Roy D.

    2001-05-01

    Inquiry-based science instruction offers great promise as a means of actively engaging students in authentic scientific problem solving, including consideration of research design issues. At the same time, inquiry introduces some difficulties. In particular, familiar cultural tools for classroom discourse, such as Initiation-Reply-Evaluation sequences, are no longer appropriate because they are premised on known answers and teacher-driven activity. To help support productive open-ended science inquiry, coaching strategies that allow for strong student voice and teacher influence are necessary. We describe the sociocultural theory motivating one such strategy, transformative communication, as well as a specific dialogue sequence that can be used as a cultural tool for accomplishing such interaction. We then illustrate the utility of the dialogue sequence in four key episodes within an inquiry-based high school Earth Science class.

  5. Is Inquiry the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    Conducts an action research investigation to determine which type of student benefits more from inquiry-based science laboratories. Designs two labs on diffusion and osmosis using both traditional and inquiry-based approaches and assesses student learning in these settings. (YDS)

  6. Testing History As Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James R.; Hart, James

    1973-01-01

    Some obvious difficulties of teaching and testing history as inquiry are reviewed. Examples of test items that require students to utilize thought processes developed through inquiry teaching are presented together with a rationale for their use. Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives is proposed as a useful tool in test construction. (SM)

  7. Inquiry and groups: student interactions in cooperative inquiry-based science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Sturrock, Keryn L.

    2016-03-01

    Science education research has recommended cooperative inquiry based science in the primary science context for more than two decades but after more than 20 years, student achievement in science has not substantially improved. This study, through direct observation and analysis, investigated content-related student interactions in an authentic inquiry based primary science class setting. Thirty-one upper primary students were videotaped working in cooperative inquiry based science activities. Cooperative talk and negotiation of the science content was analysed to identify any high-level group interactions. The data show that while all groups have incidences of high-level content-related group interactions, the frequency and duration of these interactions were limited. No specific pattern of preceding events was identified and no episodes of high-level content-related group interactions were immediately preceded by the teacher's interactions with the groups. This in situ study demonstrated that even without any kind of scaffolding, specific skills in knowing how to implement cooperative inquiry based science, high-level content-related group interactions did occur very briefly. Support for teachers to develop their knowledge and skills in facilitating cooperative inquiry based science learning is warranted to ensure that high-level content-related group interactions and the associated conceptual learning are not left to chance in science classrooms.

  8. Investigating the Use of a Digital Library in an Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Geology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apedoe, Xornam S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a qualitative research study designed to investigate the opportunities and obstacles presented by a digital library for supporting teaching and learning in an inquiry-based undergraduate geology course. Data for this study included classroom observations and field-notes of classroom practices, questionnaires, and…

  9. “主体活动探究式”在“企业财务会计”课堂教学中的运用%On the Application of "Subject Activity Inquiry" in the Classroom Teaching of "Enterprise Financial Account-ing"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢敏

    2015-01-01

    Exemplified by the teaching content of"compilation of bank reconciliation" in "Enterprise Financial Accounting"course, this paper elaborates the implementation process of"sub-ject activity inquiry" teaching which can give full play to stu-dents' subjective role, improve their enthusiasm and initiative in learning, and construct a scientific and effective accounting classroom teaching.%本文以“企业财务会计”课程中“编制银行存款余额调节表”教学内容为例,阐述了“主体活动探究式”教学的实施过程,充分发挥了学生的主体作用,提高了学生学习的积极性和主动性,构建了科学有效的会计教学课堂。

  10. The influence of a Classroom Model of Scientific Scholarship on Four Girls' Trajectories of Identification with Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Melissa Sunshine

    This study examines the teacher's role in shaping the identity construction resources available in a classroom and the ways in which individual students take up, modify, and appropriate those resources to construct themselves as scientists through interaction with their teacher and peers. Drawing on frameworks of identity construction and social positioning, I propose that the locally-negotiated classroom-level cultural model of what it means to be a "good" science student forms the arena in which students construct a sense of their own competence at, affiliation with, and interest in science. The setting for this study was a 6th grade science class at a progressive urban elementary school whose population roughly represents the ethnic and socioeconomic diversity of the state of California. The teacher was an experienced science and math teacher interested in social justice and inquiry teaching. Drawing from naturalistic observations, video and artifact analysis, survey data, and repeated interviews with students and the teacher, I demonstrated what it meant to be a "good" science student in this particular cultural community by analyzing what was required, reinforced, and rewarded in this classroom. Next, I traced the influence of this particular classroom's conception of what it meant to be good at science on the trajectories of identification with science of four 6th grade girls selected to represent a variety of stances towards science, levels of classroom participation, and personal backgrounds. Scientific scholarship in this class had two parts: values related to science as a discipline, and a more generic set of school-related values one might see in any classroom. Different meanings of and values for science were indexed in the everyday activities of the classroom: science as a language for describing the natural world, science as a set of rhetorical values, science as an adult social community, and science as a place for mess and explosions. Among school

  11. Alternative certification science teachers' understanding and implementation of inquiry-based instruction in their beginning years of teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Abdulkadir

    The purpose of this phenomenographic study was to: (a) understand how beginning science teachers recruited from various science disciplines and prepared in an Alternative Teacher Certification Program (ATCP) implemented inquiry during their initial years of teaching; (b) describe constraints and needs that these beginning science teachers perceived in implementing inquiry-based science instruction; and (c) understand the relation between what they learned in their ATCP and their practice of teaching science through inquiry. The participants of this study consisted of four ATCP teachers who are in their beginning years of teaching. Semi-structured interviews, classroom observation, field notes, and artifacts used as source of data collection. The beginning science teachers in this study held incomplete views of inquiry. These views of inquiry did not reflect inquiry as described in NRC (2000)---essential features of inquiry,---nor did they reflect views of faculty members involved in teaching science methods courses. Although the participants described themselves as reform-oriented, there were inconsistencies between their views and practices. Their practice of inquiry did not reflect inquiry either as outlined by essential features of inquiry (NRC, 2000) or inquiry as modeled in activities used in their ATCP. The research participants' perceived constraints and needs in their implementation of inquiry-based activities. Their perceived constraints included logistical and student constraints and school culture. The perceived needs included classroom management, pedagogical skills, practical knowledge, discipline, successful grade-specific models of inquiry, and access to a strong support system. Prior professional work experience, models and activities used in the ATCP, and benefits of inquiry to student learning were the declared factors that facilitated the research participants' practice of inquiry-based teaching.

  12. Science by design: How teachers support scientific inquiry through design projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Eric James

    This dissertation explores the viability of engineering design contexts as venues for engaging students in scientific inquiry. Successful scientific inquiry is defined as generating productive research questions, planning comparative investigations, using evidence to reason about claims, and pursuing scientific explanations. I argue that design contexts offer several affordances for supporting student inquiry, but must be structured in certain ways to support inquiry successfully. I describe a particular instructional approach called inquiry through design (ITD) that is intended to support student inquiry within design contexts. This approach guided the development of several curricular modules and was iteratively refined over the course of several curricular trials. It uses introductory staging activities to provide background information and a motivating design challenge to encourage students to build and test their own design ideas. Design investigations are structured as scientific experiments, where students build and test a series of design variants in order to isolate the effect of particular variables. Finally, iterative redesign allows students to apply what they have learned to improve their designs and provides additional opportunities for students to engage in inquiry practices. To examine the impact and nature of ITD in classroom settings, I conducted three classroom studies. These studies, which detail student engagement in design and inquiry, provide evidence to show that students were able to engage successfully in challenging aspects of inquiry. The success of the inquiry through design approach is portrayed as a collaboration among the students, the teacher, and the instructional materials in specific classroom settings. I describe how the teacher shapes the classroom context and supports student inquiry during project work. I document and contextualize teachers' strategic decisions in terms of their experience, goals, and expectations for the

  13. 探究式教学在初中化学课堂教学中的应用研究%Research on the Application of Inquiry Teaching in Chemistry Classroom Teaching in Junior High School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁礼琴

    2016-01-01

    In the promotion of the new curriculum reform, teaching ideas will have a direct effect on the teaching behavior, and teaching methods will be improved. In the practice of teaching subjects, inquiry teaching has been widely used. According to the characteristics of chemistry discipline, the inquiry teaching method can promote students' autonomous learning ability. The current foreign inquiry teaching started early, the development is also fast, the implementation is also relatively perfect. But in our country, although the research starts very late, but this aspect related work study also many. Inquiry teaching can change the traditional teaching method and break the original model of teachers and students. This paper discusses the inquiry based teaching strategies, according to the actual research, explores the significance of the inquiry based teaching.%在新课改的推进中,教学思想将会对教学行为产生直接的作用,教学方式也随之改进。在各科的教学实践中,探究式教学广泛应用。根据化学的学科特点而言,探究式教学方法可以促进学生的自主学习能力。当前国外的探究教学起步早,发展也快,落实也是相对完善的。而在我国,虽然研究起步很晚,但是该方面相关的著作研究也很多。探究式教学能够改变传统的教师教学法,打破师生原有的模式。本文浅谈了探究式教学的几点策略,根据实际考证,探讨了探究式教学的意义所在。

  14. The influence of a graduate teaching fellows collaboration on science teachers' inquiry practices and perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen Ludwig

    For more than a decade, there has been a call for reform in science education. This effort stresses the creation of a scientifically literate population. Required in this effort to create a more scientifically literate populace is an understanding of the Nature of Science (NOS) on the part of the average citizen. This, in turn requires an understanding of scientific inquiry. This call for reform recognizes the classroom teacher as the main vehicle through which images of the NOS and scientific inquiry are portrayed for students. In order to improve both science teachers' and students' understanding of the NOS and inquiry, the National Science Foundation has implemented the Graduate Teaching Fellows in GK--12 Education (GK--12) initiative. This initiative, which is consistent with reform efforts that call for scientist involvement in K--12 science classrooms, supports programs that place graduate level scientists (GTFs) with K--12 science teachers (PTs) to act as classroom resources. One such program focuses on sustained collaborations between GTFs and PTs with a hands-on, inquiry-based planning and teaching emphasis. This naturalistic study used mixed methods of surveys, observation, interviews and artifact collection to examine how this program influenced PTs' inquiry practices and perceptions. Results from the case studies indicate that collaboration with GTFs had little influence on PTs' inquiry practices and perceptions. PTs displayed little change in beliefs as indicated through survey responses and interview data. They also displayed little change in their observed teaching practices. During data analysis classroom features of inquiry emerged. These features led to the creation of five components of two types of inquiry, Technical and Substantive. These types of inquiry, the components, and their features, make-up an Inquiry Framework that represents a continuum of understandings related to inquiry and is grounded in the practice of teaching. This framework

  15. Enactment of Scientific Inquiry: Observation of Two Cases at Different Grade Levels in China Mainland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Ronghui; Clarke, David; Wang, Weizhen

    2014-04-01

    Enactment of scientific inquiry in classroom has attracted a great attention of science educators around the world. In this study, we examined two competent teachers' (one Grade 9 chemistry teacher and one Grade 4 science teacher) enactment of scientific inquiry in selected teaching units to reveal the characteristics of enacted inquiry at different grade levels by analyzing lesson sequence videos. The coding schemes for enacted inquiry consist of ontological properties and instructional practices. Pre-topic and post-topic teacher interviews and the two teachers' responses to a questionnaire were adopted to identify the factors influencing teacher's enactment. The results indicate that the two case teachers' enactment involved a range of inquiry activities. The enacted inquiry at fourth-grade level covered all the inquiry elements, tending to engage students in the whole procedure of inquiry. The ninth-grade chemistry class placed emphasis on the elements "making plans" to solve problems in authentic context. Important factors influencing the enactment include teacher's understanding about scientific inquiry, textbooks, assessment, students and resource. Implications for inquiry enactment and instruction improvement have been provided.

  16. Wondering + Online Inquiry = Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekeres, Diane Carver; Coiro, Julie; Castek, Jill; Guzniczak, Lizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital information sources can form the basis of effective inquiry-based learning if teachers construct the information and exercises in ways that will promote collaboration, communication, and problem solving.

  17. Challenges and Support When Teaching Science Through an Integrated Inquiry and Literacy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ødegaard, Marianne; Haug, Berit; Mork, Sonja M.; Ove Sørvik, Gard

    2014-12-01

    In the Budding Science and Literacy project, we explored how working with an integrated inquiry-based science and literacy approach may challenge and support the teaching and learning of science at the classroom level. By studying the inter-relationship between multiple learning modalities and phases of inquiry, we wished to illuminate possible dynamics between science inquiry and literacy in an integrated science approach. Six teachers and their students were recruited from a professional development course for the current classroom study. The teachers were to try out the Budding Science teaching model. This paper presents an overall video analysis of our material demonstrating variations and patterns of inquiry-based science and literacy activities. Our analysis revealed that multiple learning modalities (read it, write it, do it, and talk it) are used in the integrated approach; oral activities dominate. The inquiry phases shifted throughout the students' investigations, but the consolidating phases of discussion and communication were given less space. The data phase of inquiry seems essential as a driving force for engaging in science learning in consolidating situations. The multiple learning modalities were integrated in all inquiry phases, but to a greater extent in preparation and data. Our results indicate that literacy activities embedded in science inquiry provide support for teaching and learning science; however, the greatest challenge for teachers is to find the time and courage to exploit the discussion and communication phases to consolidate the students' conceptual learning.

  18. Refining Inquiry with Multi-Form Assessment: Formative and summative assessment functions for flexible inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiker, Steven; Reid Whitaker, J.

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes the 5E+I/A inquiry model and reports a case study of one curricular enactment by a US fifth-grade classroom. A literature review establishes the model's conceptual adequacy with respect to longstanding research related to both the 5E inquiry model and multiple, incremental innovations of it. As a collective line of research, the review highlights a common emphasis on formative assessment, at times coupled either with differentiated instruction strategies or with activities that target the generalization of learning. The 5E+I/A model contributes a multi-level assessment strategy that balances formative and summative functions of multiple forms of assessment in order to support classroom participation while still attending to individual achievement. The case report documents the enactment of a weeklong 5E+I/A curricular design as a preliminary account of the model's empirical adequacy. A descriptive and analytical narrative illustrates variable ways that multi-level assessment makes student thinking visible and pedagogical decision-making more powerful. In light of both, it also documents productive adaptations to a flexible curricular design and considers future research to advance this collective line of inquiry.

  19. Elementary Teacher's Conceptions of Inquiry Teaching: Messages for Teacher Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Joseph E.; Watters, James J.; Brownlee, Jo; Lupton, Mandy

    2011-09-01

    This study explored practicing elementary school teacher's conceptions of teaching in ways that foster inquiry-based learning in the science curriculum (inquiry teaching). The advocacy for inquiry-based learning in contemporary curricula assumes the principle that students learn in their own way by drawing on direct experience fostered by the teacher. That students should be able to discover answers themselves through active engagement with new experiences was central to the thinking of eminent educators such as Pestalozzi, Dewey and Montessori. However, even after many years of research and practice, inquiry learning as a referent for teaching still struggles to find expression in the average teachers' pedagogy. This study drew on interview data from 20 elementary teachers. A phenomenographic analysis revealed three conceptions of teaching for inquiry learning in science in the elementary years of schooling: (a) The Experience-centered conception where teachers focused on providing interesting sensory experiences to students; (b) The Problem-centered conception where teachers focused on engaging students with challenging problems; and (c) The Question-centered conception where teachers focused on helping students to ask and answer their own questions. Understanding teachers' conceptions has implications for both the enactment of inquiry teaching in the classroom as well as the uptake of new teaching behaviors during professional development, with enhanced outcomes for engaging students in Science.

  20. Inquiry-Based Science: Turning Teachable Moments into Learnable Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Berit S.

    2014-02-01

    This study examines how an inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning creates teachable moments that can foster conceptual understanding in students, and how teachers capitalize upon these moments. Six elementary school teachers were videotaped as they implemented an integrated inquiry-based science and literacy curriculum in their classrooms. In this curriculum, science inquiry implies that students search for evidence in order to make and revise explanations based on the evidence found and through critical and logical thinking. Furthermore, the curriculum material is designed to address science key concepts multiple times through multiple modalities (do it, say it, read it, write it). Two types of teachable moments were identified: planned and spontaneous. Results suggest that the consolidation phases of inquiry, when students reinforce new knowledge and connect their empirical findings to theory, can be considered as planned teachable moments. These are phases of inquiry during which the teacher should expect, and be prepared for, student utterances that create opportunities to further student learning. Spontaneous teachable moments are instances when the teacher must choose to either follow the pace of the curriculum or adapt to the students' need. One implication of the study is that more teacher support is required in terms of how to plan for and effectively utilize the consolidation phases of inquiry.

  1. Comparing the perceptions of scientific inquiry between experts and practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Julia Terese Chembars

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in the perception of scientific inquiry between experts and practitioners, and, if a difference was shown to exist, to analyze those perceptions in order to better understand the extent of that difference or gap. A disconnect was found between how experts and practitioners perceived scientific inquiry. The practitioners differed from both the experts and the literature in three key areas. First, although the teachers indicated that students would be manipulating materials, there was no direct reference to this manipulation actually being performed for the purpose of investigating. Second, the practitioners implied active physical engagement with materials, but they did not tie this to active mental engagement or direct involvement in their own learning. Third, teachers omitted their role in laying the foundation for inquiry. Though classroom teachers lacked a complete understanding of true inquiry and its place in the K-12 classroom, most of them actually believed they were practicing the art of teaching via inquiry. Additionally, two other points of interest arose. First, an examination of the national standards for a number of curricular areas established that the process skills of scientific inquiry are mirrored in those standards, implying that inquiry is not limited to the sciences. Second, a definition of inquiry was formulated based upon interviews with experts in the field. Although the literature and the experts were in unison in their definition, there was a disparity between the accepted definition and that provided by the teachers. The struggle for a comprehensive understanding of inquiry continues to this day. It might very well be that the concept still remains elusive partly because the teacher behaviors associated with it run counter to more traditional methods of instruction...methods that most teachers have experienced throughout their own educational careers. The most pervasive

  2. Peningkatan Keterlibatan Dalam Perkuliahan Scientific Writing Menggunakan Model Pengajaran Social Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwartono Suwartono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to solve student low involvement in Scientific Writing classes.The method used in this research was Classroom Action Research (CAR. The planned action was Social Inquiry teaching model, i.e. an autonomous instruction in which students do inquiries for facts (new knowledge on scientific writings along with the linguistic aspects of writings and exercises in communicating the inquiry results within the classroom society are prioritized. The CAR employed Lewin's cyclic model. The model procedures are: (1 identification, evaluation and formulation of the problem; (2 fact finding; (3 review of literature; (4 information gathering to test hypothesis; (5 selection of the planned action procedures; (6 implementation; and (7 interpretation of the data and overall evaluation. The CAR's result has shown that teaching Scientific Writing using Social Inquiry can promote student involvement in scientific writing class activities.

  3. Determinants of Benin elementary school science teachers' orientation toward inquiry-based instructional practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gado, Issaou

    The Republic of Benin (West Africa) undertook a nationwide curriculum reform that put an emphasis on inquiry-based instructional practices. Little, if any, research has been conducted to explore factors that could be related to teachers' orientation toward inquiry instructional practices. The purpose of this research study was to investigate factors and concerns that determine Benin elementary school teachers' orientation toward the use of inquiry-based instruction in the teaching of science. The study followed a naturalistic inquiry methodology combining a correlational ex post facto design and an observational case-study design. The theory of Planned Behavior was the conceptual framework used to design the study. Two hundred (N = 200) elementary school teachers and three (n = 3) case study participants were purposively selected. Data was gathered via the Revised Science Attitude Scale (Thompson & Shrigley, 1986), the Science Teachers' Ideological Preference Scale (Jones & Harty, 1978), open-ended questions, interviews, and classroom observations using audiorecorders, videorecorders, and the researcher-contextualized version of the Observational System for the Analysis of Classroom Instruction (Hough, 1966). Qualitative and quantitative data provided a deeper understanding of participants' responses. Quantitative measures indicated that Benin elementary school teachers have positive attitudes toward school science, significant positive orientation toward both inquiry-based instruction and traditional non inquiry-based instruction, and higher orientation toward inquiry-based instruction than traditional non inquiry-based instruction. Attitude toward handling materials for investigations was found to significantly contribute to the prediction of participants' inquiry orientation. Qualitative analyses of participants' responses indicated that the expectations of educational leaders, individual motivation to comply with the program, a perceived control of the

  4. Pragmatic inquiry and creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    ’Don’t block the road of inquiry” was the motto of Peirce and also Dewey situated inquiry in its ideal version in a democratic and cooperative community. Abduction became the key concept for the pragmatic and creative research process where the lonely engineer is substituted with intelligent...... collaborations of the many. Thus, inquiry is from a pragmatic understanding rather a social than a purely cognitive task. The paper will firstly give a sketch of this understanding of inquiry and creativity on the background of the theories of Peirce and Dewey and will draw some parallels to recent...... of Thevenot’s critical pragmatism this understanding might be naïve – not because this is an idealistic rather than a real-life scenario but because the idea of collaborative creativity and self-realization has actually become the driving force in a marked dominated organization of science and production...

  5. Primary Sources and Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses inquiry learning and primary sources. Inquiry learning puts students in the active role of investigators. Questioning, authentic and active learning, and interactivity are a few of the characteristics of inquiry learning that put the teacher and library media specialist in the role of coaches while students…

  6. Appreciative inquiry research review & notes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandee, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    This short article renews the emphasis on 'inquiry' in the appreciative/ inquiry equation, through a connection with the action research literature. Appreciative Inquiry was initially introduced as action research with the generative capacity to create knowledge for social innovation. If we look at

  7. Effective Evaluation through Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Cheryl A.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluators in the HPI field can improve their performance program results with effective evaluation through appreciative inquiry. Appreciative inquiry and evaluation have many similarities, and when combined they add value and effectiveness to the measurement of intervention results. Appreciative inquiry is beneficial in many evaluation contexts:…

  8. Co-constructing inquiry-based science with teachers: Essential research for lasting reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Carolyn W.; Bryan, Lynn A.

    2001-08-01

    In this article we assert a potential research agenda for the teaching and learning of science as inquiry as part of the JRST series on reform in science education. Drawing on the theoretical frameworks of cognitive and sociocultural constructivism, cultural models of meaning, the dialogic function of language, and transformational models of teacher education, we propose that more research is needed in the areas of teachers' beliefs, knowledge, and practices of inquiry-based science, as well as, student learning. Because the efficacy of reform efforts rest largely with teachers, their voices need to be included in the design and implementation of inquiry-based curriculum. As we review the literature and pose future research questions, we propose that particular attention be paid to research on inquiry in diverse classrooms, and to modes of inquiry-based instruction that are designed by teachers.

  9. Inquiry of the Trouble in Combining Second Classroom Activity with Professional Education%高校第二课堂活动与专业教育结合的困境探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申明远; 魏建生

    2016-01-01

    In colleges,first class education with the combination of the second classroom activity is the important condition of development and innovation. In the second classroom activity,how to combine them with professional education has become the management personnel thinking problem. Though the second classroom in colleges and universities has been gradually combined with professional education,but in the early stage,the students enthusiasm is not high and widely covered;the investment in the second classroom activities is not enough;professional teacher’s assignments are large with low participation;the second classroom activity of incentive mechanism is not perfect;management functions were fused,responsibilities are in chaos,etc. So content innovation were carried out;standardize community management to provide independent practice platform;strengthen the project management of the second classroom activities such as to promote the organic combination of the second classroom education and professional education.%第一课堂教育与第二课堂活动的有机结合是高校发展和创新的重要条件。第二课堂活动如何与专业教育有机结合成为了高校学生工作管理人员必须思考的问题。目前高校第二课堂虽然已经逐步与专业教育相结合,但处于初期磨合阶段,仍然存在学生积极性不高,专业教师参与度不高,激励机制不完善,权责混乱等问题。因此需要做到以学生为本,创新第二课堂活动内容和形式,促进第二课堂教育与专业教育有机结合。

  10. An investigation of the practice of scientific inquiry in secondary science and agriculture courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Julie R.

    The purpose of this exploratory qualitative study was to investigate the practice of scientific inquiry in two secondary biology classes and one agriculture class from different schools in different communities. The focus was on teachers' interests and intentions for the students' participation in inquiry, the voices contributing to the inquiry, and students' opportunities to confront their conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The Partnership for Research and Education in Plants (PREP) served as the context by providing students with opportunities to design and conduct original experiments to help elucidate the function(s) of a disabled gene in Arabidopsis thaliana . Transcripts of teacher and student semi-structured interviews, field notes of classroom observations and classroom conversations, and documents (e.g., student work, teacher handouts, school websites, PREP materials) were analyzed for evidence of the practice of scientific inquiry. Teachers were interested in implementing inquiry because of potential student learning about scientific research and because PREP supports course content and is connected to a larger scientific project outside of the school. Teachers' intentions regarding the implementation of inquiry reflected the complexity of their courses and the students' previous experiences. All inquiries were student-directed. The biology students' participation more closely mirrored the practice of scientists, while the agriculture students were more involved with the procedural display of scientific inquiry. All experiences could have been enhanced from additional knowledge-centered activities regarding scientific reasoning. No activities brought explicit attention to NOS. Biology activities tended to implicitly support NOS while the agriculture class activities tended to implicitly contradict NOS. Scientists' interactions contributed to implied support of the NOS. There were missed opportunities for explicit attention to NOS in all classes

  11. An analysis of elementary teachers' perceptions of teaching science as inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domjan, Heather Nicole

    The purpose of this study is to describe elementary school teachers' perceptions of science as inquiry in science instruction. A descriptive survey research design was used to collect data regarding elementary science teachers' knowledge and beliefs related to inquiry and its role in science education. The written section of the survey was analyzed and interpreted descriptively through phenomenological data and the constant comparative method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967; Lincoln & Guba, 1985). The researcher used the constant comparative method to identify statements, perceptions, and impressions that occurred over time during the study (Janesick, 1994). Ninety-two elementary school teachers who teach science in a large suburban district southwest of Houston, Texas were administered a three part Understanding Science as Inquiry Survey (USAI) developed by the researcher. Participants communicated in writing personal definitions of inquiry in elementary science as well as determined to what extent inquiry was used in four elementary science classroom scenarios. The survey items were based on the following four components of inquiry described by Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (2000): (1) conceptual knowledge, (2) process skills, (3) nature of science, and (4) affect. The study describes elementary school teachers' perceptions about science as inquiry. Conclusions for Part A of the USAI Survey indicate that participants define inquiry as: mostly process skills, some conceptual knowledge, and very little affect with no perception of the nature of science. The Likert scale ratings for the scenarios in Part B of the USAI Survey reveal that participants have varied perceptions regarding teaching science as inquiry. The written section of Part B reveals participants' perceptions to be similar to that of their Likert scale ratings except in scenario one. The researcher concludes that the participants in this study appear to have an incomplete understanding

  12. Complexity and deliberation in collaborative socioscientific issues (SSI) inquiry discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Byhring, Anne Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Argumentation in science classrooms may be modeled on the practices of ‘science proper’, as in experimental work and inquiry learning. Consequentially, argumentation is oriented around matters of truth, or at least on matters of probability. Regarding less clear cut matters of opinion and of priorities of action, as is often the case when deliberating on socioscientific issues (SSI), neither science knowledge alone nor empirical evidence are able to provide sufficient grounds f...

  13. Inquiry and Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Ted; Shepardson, Daniel; Harbor, Jon; Bell, Cheryl; Meyer, Jason; Klagges, Hope; Burgess, Willie

    2001-01-01

    Presents inquiry-oriented activities that acquaint students with groundwater sources, movement of water through aquifers, and contamination of groundwater by pollution. In one activity, students use well log data from web-based resources to explore groundwater systems. Provides sample well log data for those not having access to local information.…

  14. Narrative as Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Petra Munro

    2010-01-01

    The author suggests that all research is narrative. Resituating all research as narrative, as opposed to characterizing narrative as one particular form of inquiry, provides a critical space for rethinking "research" beyond current dualisms and bifurcations that create boundaries that limit the capacity for dialogue across diverse epistemologies.…

  15. Extending Paper Chromatography Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finson, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    One of the "good old" standard activities middle school students seem to enjoy is paper chromatography. The procedures and materials needed are relatively simple and the results can be colorful. All too often, the activity ends just after these colorful results are obtained, cutting short the potential it holds for some further inquiry. With some…

  16. Small Group Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Martin M.

    Learning in small groups is a practical way to bring about behavior change. The inquiry learning process is perceived to be the most natural and scientific way of learning. Skills developed include those of problem-solving task analysis, decision-making, value formation and adaptability. The art of small group interaction is developed. Factual…

  17. Unitary appreciative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, W R

    2001-06-01

    Unitary appreciative inquiry is described as an orientation, process, and approach for illuminating the wholeness, uniqueness, and essence that are the pattern of human life. It was designed to bring the concepts, assumptions, and perspectives of the science of unitary human beings into reality as a mode of inquiry. Unitary appreciative inquiry provides a way of giving fullest attention to important facets of human life that often are not fully accounted for in current methods that have a heavier emphasis on diagnostic representations. The participatory, synoptic, and transformative qualities of the unitary appreciative process are explicated. The critical dimensions of nursing knowledge development expressed in dialectics of the general and the particular, action and theory, stories and numbers, sense and soul, aesthetics and empirics, and interpretation and emancipation are considered in the context of the unitary appreciative stance. Issues of legitimacy of knowledge and credibility of research are posed and examined in the context of four quality standards that are deemed important to evaluate the worthiness of unitary appreciative inquiry for the advancement of nursing science and practice.

  18. Inquiry and Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Ted; Shepardson, Daniel; Harbor, Jon; Bell, Cheryl; Meyer, Jason; Klagges, Hope; Burgess, Willie

    2001-01-01

    Presents inquiry-oriented activities that acquaint students with groundwater sources, movement of water through aquifers, and contamination of groundwater by pollution. In one activity, students use well log data from web-based resources to explore groundwater systems. Provides sample well log data for those not having access to local information.…

  19. Science Teachers' Views and Stereotypes of Religion, Scientists and Scientific Research: A Call for Scientist-Science Teacher Partnerships to Promote Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing consensus regarding the value of inquiry-based learning (IBL) for students' learning and engagement in the science classroom, the implementation of such practices continues to be a challenge. If science teachers are to use IBL to develop students' inquiry practices and encourage them to think and act as scientists, a better…

  20. Science Teachers' Views and Stereotypes of Religion, Scientists and Scientific Research: A Call for Scientist-Science Teacher Partnerships to Promote Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Despite a growing consensus regarding the value of inquiry-based learning (IBL) for students' learning and engagement in the science classroom, the implementation of such practices continues to be a challenge. If science teachers are to use IBL to develop students' inquiry practices and encourage them to think and act as scientists, a better…

  1. Effects of gender and role selection in cooperative learning groups on science inquiry achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affhalter, Maria Geralyn

    An action research project using science inquiry labs and cooperative learning groups examined the effects of same-gender and co-educational classrooms on science achievement and teacher-assigned or self-selected group roles on students' role preferences. Fifty-nine seventh grade students from a small rural school district participated in two inquiry labs in co-educational classrooms or in an all-female classroom, as determined by parents at the beginning of the academic year. Students were assigned to the same cooperative groups for the duration of the study. Pretests and posttests were administered for each inquiry-based science lab. Posttest assessments included questions for student reflection on role assignment and role preference. Instruction did not vary and a female science teacher taught all class sections. The same-gender classroom and co-ed classrooms produced similar science achievement scores on posttests. Students' cooperative group roles, whether teacher-assigned or self-selected, produced similar science achievement scores on posttests. Male and female students shared equally in favorable and unfavorable reactions to their group roles during the science inquiry labs. Reflections on the selection of the leader role revealed a need for females in co-ed groups to be "in charge". When reflecting on her favorite role of leader, one female student in a co-ed group stated, "I like to have people actually listen to me".

  2. Inquiry-based learning, the nature of science, and computer technology: New possibilities in science education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Kubieck

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of science in the K-12 classroom has been less than successful. Students typically do not develop science literacy and do not understand the role and relevance of science in society. Inquiry-based learning is an approach which promises to improve science teaching by engaging students in authentic investigations, thereby achieving a more realistic conception of scientific endeavour as well as providing a more learner-centred and motivating environment. It can also be used to support teaching the nature of science. The inquiry approach, while lauded by educators, is still not prevalent in the classroom, and is often misused. This may be the result of multiple factors, such as amount of classroom time, lack of effective means for students to conduct independent investigations, the difficulty of incorporating abstract concepts with inquiry, and lack of teacher expertise and experience. Computer technology has evolved now to the point where it can greatly facilitate the use of inquiry learning on many levels, and provide new tools for representing the nature of science in the classroom. This use of technology to support new teaching approaches and objectives holds great promise for improving science education in the classroom, as long as the inherent limitations are recognized and technology is used as a tool rather than as a foundation.

  3. Resident Teachers Take an Inquiry Stance: The Impact of Guided Collaborative Inquiry Groups on the Development of Guided Reading Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain de Galarce, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Urban schools are struggling to hire and retain effective literacy teachers. Alternative certification programs throughout the country seek to bridge the achievement gap and to bring qualified teachers to underserved classrooms. This dissertation explores the transformative inquiry of developing "resident" teachers in their journey as…

  4. Sample selection versus two-part models revisited: the case of female smoking and drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, David

    2008-03-01

    There is a well-established debate between Heckman sample selection and two-part models in health econometrics, particularly when no obvious exclusion restrictions are available. Most of this debate has focussed on the application of these models to health care expenditure. This paper revisits the debate in the context of female smoking and drinking, and evaluates the two approaches on three grounds: theoretical, practical and statistical. The two-part model is generally favoured but it is stressed that this comparison should be carried out on a case-by-case basis.

  5. A Study on Digital Analysis of Bach’s “Two-Part Inventions”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yi Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of music composition, creating polyphony is relatively one of the most difficult parts. Among them, the basis of multivoice polyphonic composition is two-part counterpoint. The main purpose of this paper is, through the computer technology, conducting a series of studies on “Two-Part Inventions” of Bach, a Baroque polyphony master. Based on digitalization, visualization and mathematical methods, data mining algorithm has been applied to identify bipartite characteristics and rules of counterpoint polyphony. We hope that the conclusions drawn from the article could be applied to the digital creation of polyphony.

  6. Supporting Collective Inquiry: A Technology Framework for Distributed Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissenbaum, Michael

    This design-based study describes the implementation and evaluation of a technology framework to support smart classrooms and Distributed Technology Enhanced Learning (DTEL) called SAIL Smart Space (S3). S3 is an open-source technology framework designed to support students engaged in inquiry investigations as a knowledge community. To evaluate the effectiveness of S3 as a generalizable technology framework, a curriculum named PLACE (Physics Learning Across Contexts and Environments) was developed to support two grade-11 physics classes (n = 22; n = 23) engaged in a multi-context inquiry curriculum based on the Knowledge Community and Inquiry (KCI) pedagogical model. This dissertation outlines three initial design studies that established a set of design principles for DTEL curricula, and related technology infrastructures. These principles guided the development of PLACE, a twelve-week inquiry curriculum in which students drew upon their community-generated knowledge base as a source of evidence for solving ill-structured physics problems based on the physics of Hollywood movies. During the culminating smart classroom activity, the S3 framework played a central role in orchestrating student activities, including managing the flow of materials and students using real-time data mining and intelligent agents that responded to emergent class patterns. S3 supported students' construction of knowledge through the use individual, collective and collaborative scripts and technologies, including tablets and interactive large-format displays. Aggregate and real-time ambient visualizations helped the teacher act as a wondering facilitator, supporting students in their inquiry where needed. A teacher orchestration tablet gave the teacher some control over the flow of the scripted activities, and alerted him to critical moments for intervention. Analysis focuses on S3's effectiveness in supporting students' inquiry across multiple learning contexts and scales of time, and in

  7. Hidden in Plain Sight: Pre-Service Teachers’ Orientations Toward Inquiry-Based Learning in History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Michael Pellegrino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to implement models of reform-based history education in the classroom there is a fundamental need to address preservice and practicing teachers’ understanding of learning and teaching history, mindful of the role inquiry must play in the process. The project described in this paper employed a comparative case design to explore how prospective social studies educators perceived inquiry-based instruction and the extent to which it aligned with relevant history education for middle and secondary students. Results suggest that the process undertaken by the independent inquiry group may have an implicit impact on shaping how preservice teachers understand inquiry. Yet these preservice teachers included more inquiry-based activities in lesson plan products analyzed as part of this project. After the implementation of both means of learning about historical inquiry, many remained conflicted about what the ideal model of inquiry represents for student learning and at what ability level students are capable of engaging in inquiry in social studies.

  8. Developing the critical thinking skills of astrobiology students through creative and scientific inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jamie S; Lemus, Judith D

    2015-01-01

    Scientific inquiry represents a multifaceted approach to explore and understand the natural world. Training students in the principles of scientific inquiry can help promote the scientific learning process as well as help students enhance their understanding of scientific research. Here, we report on the development and implementation of a learning module that introduces astrobiology students to the concepts of creative and scientific inquiry, as well as provide practical exercises to build critical thinking skills. The module contained three distinct components: (1) a creative inquiry activity designed to introduce concepts regarding the role of creativity in scientific inquiry; (2) guidelines to help astrobiology students formulate and self-assess questions regarding various scientific content and imagery; and (3) a practical exercise where students were allowed to watch a scientific presentation and practice their analytical skills. Pre- and post-course surveys were used to assess the students' perceptions regarding creative and scientific inquiry and whether this activity impacted their understanding of the scientific process. Survey results indicate that the exercise helped improve students' science skills by promoting awareness regarding the role of creativity in scientific inquiry and building their confidence in formulating and assessing scientific questions. Together, the module and survey results confirm the need to include such inquiry-based activities into the higher education classroom, thereby helping students hone their critical thinking and question asking skill set and facilitating their professional development in astrobiology.

  9. A Cost-Effective Two-Part Experiment for Teaching Introductory Organic Chemistry Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Christopher M.; Brown, Brenna A.; Wan, Hayley

    2011-01-01

    This two-part laboratory experiment is designed to be a cost-effective method for teaching basic organic laboratory techniques (recrystallization, thin-layer chromatography, column chromatography, vacuum filtration, and melting point determination) to large classes of introductory organic chemistry students. Students are exposed to different…

  10. Role of the Teacher in Computer-supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Bell, Thorsten; Mansfield, Amie; Holmes, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of practices in teaching with computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning environments. We describe the role of the teacher in computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning by five principles that span the whole instructional process, from the preparation of the lesson up to the assessment of learning achievement. For successful implementation of computer-supported projects, the teacher has to (1) envision the lesson, (2) enable collaboration, (3) encourage students, (4) ensure learning, and (5) evaluate achievement. We analyse classroom scenarios provided by eight teachers or mentors who implemented one of four different approaches developed by multimedia researchers: Web-based Inquiry Science Environment, Modeling Across the Curriculum, Collaborative Laboratories across Europe, or Resources for Collaborative Inquiry Learning. Teachers or mentors responded to a semi-structured questionnaire about their experiences in implementing the inquiry lesson. A comparison of different classroom scenarios according to the mentioned five principles informed our analysis of teacher activities that contribute to the success of student inquiry while using such technology-enhanced approaches. We conclude with a discussion of the often neglected role of the teacher in computer-supported learning.

  11. Secondary students' views about scientific inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galano, Silvia; Zappia, Alessandro; Smaldone, Luigi; Testa, Italo

    2016-05-01

    In this study we investigated the views about Scientific Inquiry (SI) of about 300 students at the beginning of the secondary school course (14-15years old). An adapted version of the Views On Scientific Inquiry (VOSI) questionnaire was used as research instrument. The questionnaire, focused on six specific aspects of SI, was submitted before and after a six-hours in-classroom delivery of a teaching-learning sequence (TLS) that targeted explicitly the six SI aspects. We first analyzed responses using a five-level categorization: a) informed view; b) mixed or partially correct view; c) naıve view; d) unclear; e) not given. Two independent researchers iteratively analyzed the data with a final inter-rater reliability of about 90%. Then, we collapsed the initial categories into three macro-categories: C1) informed/partial view; C2) naıve view; C3) unclear or not given; and calculated the shift in the macro-categorization between pre- and post-test. Finally, we investigated a possible relationship between how the TLSs were enacted and the students' achievements. Data show that the percentage of students' informed responses only slightly increased between pre- and post-test in the majority of the targeted aspects. Moreover, students' achievements seem to depend on how the teachers enacted the TLSs. Our results suggest that short inquiry-based teaching interventions are not sufficient to effectively teach SI aspects. Moreover, our results suggest to develop specific training courses aimed at improving teachers' own beliefs and practices about SI.

  12. Development of the two-part pattern during regeneration of the head in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bode, Matthias; Awad, T A; Koizumi, O;

    1988-01-01

    The head of a hydra is composed of two parts, a domed hypostome with a mouth at the top and a ring of tentacles below. When animals are decapitated a new head regenerates. During the process of regeneration the apical tip passes through a transient stage in which it exhibits tentacle...... began evaginating in a ring, both the TS-19 antigen and RLI+ ganglion cells gradually disappeared from the presumptive hypostome area and RLI+ sensory cells appeared at the apex. By tracking tissue movements during morphogenesis it became clear that the apical cap, in which these changes took place, did...... not undergo tissue turnover. The implications of this tentacle-like stage for patterning the two-part head are discussed....

  13. Scaffolding Information Problem Solving in Web-Based Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Annelies; Schellens, Tammy; De Wever, Bram; Vanderhoven, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of different modes of scaffolding on students who are learning science through a web-based collaborative inquiry project in authentic classroom settings and explored the interaction effects with students' characteristics. The intervention study aimed to improve "domain-specific knowledge" and "metacognitive…

  14. Fostering Creativity through Inquiry and Adventure in Informal Learning Environment Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Aaron; Henrickson, Jeni

    2015-01-01

    Self-directed, inquiry-based learning opportunities focused on transdisciplinary real-world problem solving have been shown to foster creativity in learners. What tools might we provide classroom teachers to scaffold them and their students through this creative process? This study examines an online informal learning environment and the role the…

  15. A Formative Study: Inquiry and Informational Text with Fifth-Grade Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Lindsey

    2014-01-01

    This article includes the findings from a formative experiment implementing inquiry with informational texts in a fifth-grade bilingual classroom after the completion of state assessments. The pedagogical goals were focused on facilitating engaged reading and writing for native Spanish-speakers and building content knowledge and related academic…

  16. Towards Online Delivery of Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Techniques in Information Technology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevathan, Jarrod; Myers, Trina

    2013-01-01

    Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is a technique used to teach in large lectures and tutorials. It invokes interaction, team building, learning and interest through highly structured group work. Currently, POGIL has only been implemented in traditional classroom settings where all participants are physically present. However,…

  17. Encouraging Greater Student Inquiry Engagement in Science through Motivational Support by Online Scientist-Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.; Stuessy, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for integrating knowledge and practice in learning experiences in K-12 science education. "PlantingScience" (PS), an ideal curriculum for use as an NGSS model, is a computer-mediated collaborative learning environment intertwining scientific inquiry, classroom instruction, and online…

  18. Investigating the Use of Inquiry & Web-Based Activities with Inclusive Biology Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Waller, Patricia L.; Edwards, Lana; Darlene Kale, Santoro

    2007-01-01

    A Web-integrated biology program is used to explore how to best assist inclusive high school students to learn biology with inquiry-based activities. Classroom adaptations and instructional strategies teachers may use to assist in promoting biology learning with inclusive learners are discussed.

  19. Inquiry-Based Environmental Science Investigations with the Fantastic Fruit Fly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Ashlie M.; Krall, Rebecca M.

    2010-01-01

    The use of inquiry in life science can be particularly daunting because of the additional management and care living systems require. However, there are some low-maintenance organisms that work well in the classroom. One of these is the common fruit fly, "Drosophila melanogaster." Its small size, low cost, easy availability and maintenance, and…

  20. Designing and Implementing Web-Based Scaffolding Tools for Technology-Enhanced Socioscientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Suhkyung; Brush, Thomas A.; Glazewski, Krista D.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores how web-based scaffolding tools provide instructional support while implementing a socio-scientific inquiry (SSI) unit in a science classroom. This case study focused on how students used web-based scaffolding tools during SSI activities, and how students perceived the SSI unit and the scaffolding tools embedded in the SSI…

  1. Mathematics for What? High School Students Reflect on Mathematics as a Tool for Social Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelias, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    This study examines high school students' views of mathematics as a tool for social inquiry in light of their classroom experiences using mathematics to explore social issues. A critical theoretical perspective on mathematics literacy is used to ascertain the ways in which their views challenge or affirm the dominant image of mathematics in…

  2. Using Stems and Supported Inquiry to Help an Elementary Teacher Move toward Dialogic Reading Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhone, Dot

    2015-01-01

    Classroom talk patterns are notoriously resistant to change. This article examines changes in one fifth-grade teacher's discourse practices and beliefs as she and the author engaged in inquiry-driven professional development. Discourse analysis of class discussions and qualitative analysis of transcripts of professional development sessions…

  3. Embedded Librarianship and Teacher Education: A Neuroeducational Paradigm Using Guided Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Signia; Templeton, Lolly

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on a course-embedded guided inquiry project initiated by a senior librarian and an education professor to promote an understanding of how the brain functions and to experiment with brain-targeted teaching techniques. Information literacy instruction (ILI) takes place in the electronic classroom in the Educational Resources…

  4. Empowering Educators through Teacher Research: Promoting Qualitative Inquiry among K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, E. Jason

    2012-01-01

    The desire to find pedagogically effective uses of technology in K-12 education has exposed the need for reliable professional development programs that empower teachers to identify the problems and needs they have in their classrooms, apply a process of systematic inquiry in order to discover solutions to those problems, and to share those…

  5. Examining Preservice Teacher Inquiry through Video-Based, Formative Assessment e-Portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Craig E.; Hannafin, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    A capstone electronic portfolio, usually focused on summative assessment, was altered for preservice social studies teachers to include video-based formative e-portfolio assessment. Using a case-study design with three participants, we found that use of video artifacts facilitated reflection, supported inquiry into classroom success and failure,…

  6. Using Scaffold Supports to Improve Student Practice and Understanding of an Authentic Inquiry Process in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Sandrine; Hamel, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study addressed computer-supported collaborative scientific inquiries in remote networked schools (Quebec, Canada). Three dyads of Grade 5-6 classrooms from remote locations across the province collaborated using the knowledge-building tool Knowledge Forum. Customized scaffold supports embedded in the online tool were used to support student…

  7. An Inquiry-Based Exercise for Demonstrating Prey Preference in Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Aaron J.; Abramson, Charles I.

    2006-01-01

    The recent promotion of inquiry-based learning techniques (Uno, 1990) is well suited to the use of animals in the classroom. Working with living organisms directly engages students and stimulates them to actively participate in the learning process. Students develop a greater appreciation for living things, the natural world, and their impact on…

  8. Mathematics for What? High School Students Reflect on Mathematics as a Tool for Social Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelias, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    This study examines high school students' views of mathematics as a tool for social inquiry in light of their classroom experiences using mathematics to explore social issues. A critical theoretical perspective on mathematics literacy is used to ascertain the ways in which their views challenge or affirm the dominant image of mathematics in…

  9. Animated Pedagogical Agents Effects on Enhancing Student Motivation and Learning in a Science Inquiry Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students' perceptions of task relevance and self-efficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science classrooms, special attention was given to…

  10. An Example of Inquiry in Linear Algebra: The Roles of Symbolizing and Brokering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Michelle; Wawro, Megan; Rasmussen, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address practical questions such as: How do symbols appear and evolve in an inquiry-oriented classroom? How can an instructor connect students with traditional notation and vocabulary without undermining their sense of ownership of the material? We tender an example from linear algebra that highlights the roles of the instructor…

  11. The Departmental Script as an Ongoing Conversation into the Phronesis of Teaching Science as Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Wayne; Campbell, Todd; Fazio, Xavier; Bartley, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the extent to which a science department script supports the teaching and learning of science as inquiry and how this script is translated into individual teachers' classrooms. This study was completed at one school in Canada which, since 2000, has developed a departmental script supportive of teaching and learning of…

  12. Encouraging Greater Student Inquiry Engagement in Science through Motivational Support by Online Scientist-Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Stephen C.; Stuessy, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) call for integrating knowledge and practice in learning experiences in K-12 science education. "PlantingScience" (PS), an ideal curriculum for use as an NGSS model, is a computer-mediated collaborative learning environment intertwining scientific inquiry, classroom instruction, and online…

  13. A Self-Study Investigation of Using Inquiry Groups in a Professional Development School Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Eva; Harper, Mya

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry Group participation for PDS teachers and teacher candidates is one of the signature programs of the Bowie State University PDS Network and provides PDS teachers and teacher candidates the opportunity to collaborate on teaching strategies and methodologies to use in their classrooms. This article uses self-study methodology to explore the…

  14. Scaffolding Information Problem Solving in Web-Based Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Annelies; Schellens, Tammy; De Wever, Bram; Vanderhoven, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of different modes of scaffolding on students who are learning science through a web-based collaborative inquiry project in authentic classroom settings and explored the interaction effects with students' characteristics. The intervention study aimed to improve "domain-specific knowledge" and "metacognitive…

  15. Optimizing Inquiry Skills: A View of Teacher Behavior Using Flanders' Categories and Blooms' Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Jack

    1976-01-01

    Discusses optimal teacher actions in developing inquiry skills through Flanders Category System, (created to describe and classify classroom interactions), and Blooms Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, (created to identify levels of intellectual operations). Identifies different purposes served by different level questions. (Author/DB)

  16. 独立学院英语视听说课堂教学模式探索%An Inquiry into the Model of English Audio-Visual Classroom Teaching in Independent College

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳明; 张新坤

    2011-01-01

    本文基于独立学院英语专业学生的特点和英语视听说课程的教学现状,在人本主义和建构主义指导下,构建了一个多元化、个性化、协作化的英语视听说课堂教学模式,并通过具体的教案设计分析了其在教学中的实际应用。%Based on English majors' characteristics and the present situation of English audio-visual lesson in Independent college,this paper puts forward a diversified,personalized and collaborative classroom teaching model and applies it to actual teaching design with the guide of Humanism and Constructivism.

  17. Two Parts Reflection, One Part Selfie: A Visual Alternative to the Minute Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehlhause, Kellie

    2016-01-01

    For almost 40 years, the Minute Paper has been a quick and easy means of learning assessment, both in the college classroom and in library instruction. More recently, the use of social media, particularly selfies, has gained popularity by connecting with students through the technology with which they are most familiar. This article makes the case…

  18. Teacher Perceptions of Inquiry and STEM Education in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, Kazi K.

    This dissertation reports lower secondary science teachers perceptions of current practice in Dhaka, Bangladesh concerning inquiry and STEM Education in order to establish a baseline of data for reform of science education in Bangladesh. Bangladesh has been trying to incorporate inquiry-based science curricula since the 1970s. Over time, the science curricula also aligned with different international science education movements such as Science for All, Scientific Literacy, Science, Technology, and Society. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) is the most recent science education movement in international science education. This study explored current practices and perceptions of lower secondary science teachers in order to establish a baseline of current practice so that future reform recommendations may be pursued and recommendations made for Bangladesh to overcome the inquiry-based challenges and to incorporate new STEM-based science education trends happening in the US and throughout the world. The study explored science teachers perceptions and readiness to transform their science classrooms based on self-reported survey. The survey utilized Likert-type scale with range 1 (very strongly disagree) to 6 (very strongly agree) among four hundred lower secondary science teachers, teacher training college faculty, and university faculty. The data is presented in four different categories: curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development. Results indicated that the participants understand and practice a certain level of inquiry in their science classrooms, though they do not have adequate professional development. Participants also stated that they do not have sufficient instructional materials and the curriculum is not articulated enough to support inquiry. On the other hand, the participants reported that they understand and practice a certain degree of inquiry and STEM-based science education, but they also state that the

  19. Social competence and collaborative guided inquiry science activities: Experiences of students with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer Anne

    This thesis presents a qualitative investigation of the effects of social competence on the participation of students with learning disabilities (LD) in the science learning processes associated with collaborative, guided inquiry learning. An inclusive Grade 2 classroom provided the setting for the study. Detailed classroom observations were the primary source of data. In addition, the researcher conducted two interviews with the teacher, and collected samples of students' written work. The purpose of the research was to investigate: (a) How do teachers and peers mediate the participation of students with LD in collaborative, guided inquiry science activities, (b) What learning processes do students with LD participate in during collaborative, guided inquiry science activities, and (c) What components of social competence support and constrain the participation of students with LD during collaborative, guided inquiry science activities? The findings of the study suggest five key ideas for research and teaching in collaborative, guided inquiry science in inclusive classrooms. First, using a variety of collaborative learning formats (whole-class, small-group, and pairs) creates more opportunities for the successful participation of diverse students with LD. Second, creating an inclusive community where students feel accepted and valued may enhance the academic and social success of students with LD. Third, careful selection of partners for students with LD is important for a positive learning experience. Students with LD should be partnered with academically successful, socially competent peers; also, this study suggested that students with LD experience more success working collaboratively in pairs rather than in small groups. Fourth, a variety of strategies are needed to promote active participation and positive social interactions for students with and without LD during collaborative, guided inquiry learning. Fifth, adopting a general approach to teaching

  20. Lecture to inquiry: The transformation of a tech prep biology teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Deborah Harris

    As teachers implement the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996) many have to reform the instructional methods they have used throughout their careers. This case study examines the transformation of Laurie, a 20-year teacher, during her first year of change from a "traditional" textbook/lecture style of teaching to a facilitator of an inquiry-based classroom. Implementing change requires not only pedagogical expertise, but also the belief that the modifications can be made and that the outcomes are significant. Using Bandura's social cognitive theory as a framework, changes in Laurie's self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and motivation are followed throughout the transition. During her first year of change, Laurie used worksheets, small group activities, and guided inquiry activities, all strategies in which she had high self-efficacy and experienced positive student outcomes. She rarely used class forums, authentic assessment, and formative assessment. Factors that influenced her change were experiential professional development opportunities that allowed her to practice inquiry-based techniques, a change in her teaching environment from college prep chemistry to tech prep biology, autonomy regarding classroom decisions, and reflective decision making as she learned through experience. Using a standards-based biology textbook increased her self-efficacy toward using inquiry-based practices. The textbook format of embedding text in activities rather than adding activities to the text resulted in an increase of the number and frequency of activities done. Facilitating the textbook's Guided Inquiries and Extended Inquiries helped Laurie gain experience with inquiry-based methods. She also realized that when building from the students' concrete experiences, her students were able to attain higher-level thinking skills. The study revealed six factors contributing to Laurie's change process: (a) experiential professional development, (b) motivation for change

  1. Inquiry guided learning in a chemical engineering core curriculum: General instructional approach and specific application to the fluid mechanics case

    OpenAIRE

    Atilhan, Mert; Eljack, Fadwa; Alfadala, Hassan; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; El-Halwagi, Mahmoud; Mahalec, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results from a preliminary study of the effectiveness of using inquiry-guided learning instructional strategies both in chemical engineering classrooms and laboratories. For readers unfamiliar with the instructional strategy, the paper describes the general approach and then reports on results of its application for the fluid mechanics course taken by undergraduate students in the Chemical Engineering Department at Qatar University. Inquiry-guided activities were developed...

  2. Science inquiry learning environments created by National Board Certified Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderholm, Jon

    participants to treatment and control groups and dependent pre- and post-tests (Shadish, Cook, & Campbell, 2002). Teacher and student NOS understanding was measured using the Student Understanding of Science and Science Inquiry (SUSSI) instrument (Liang, et. al, 2006). Science inquiry environment was measured with the Elementary Science Inquiry Survey (ESIS) (Dunbar, 2002) which was given both to teachers and their students. Science inquiry environment measurements were triangulated with observations of a stratified random sub-sample of participating teachers. Observations were structured using the low-inference Collaboratives for Excellence in Teaching Practice (CETP) Classroom Observation Protocol (COP) (Lawrenz, Huffman, & Appleldoorn 2002), and the high-inference Reform Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) (Piburn & Sawada, 2000). NBCTs possessed more informed view of NOS than did non-NBCTs. Additionally, high school science teachers possessed more informed views regarding NOS than did middle school science teachers, with the most informed views belonging to high school science NBCTs. High school science NBCTs created learning environments in which students engaged in science inquiry behaviors significantly more frequently than did high school science non-NBCTs. Middle school science NBCTs, on the other hand, did not create learning environments that differed in significant ways from those of middle school science non-NBCTs. Students of high school science NBCTs possessed significantly higher science reasoning than did students of high school science non-NBCTs. Middle school students of science NBCTs possessed no more science reasoning ability than did middle school students of science non-NBCTs. NOS understanding displayed by students of both middle school and high school science NBCTs was not distinguished from students of non-NBCTs. Classroom science inquiry environment created by non-NBCTs were correlated with science teachers' perceptions of factors determining the

  3. Middle school science teachers' perspectives and practices of teaching through inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Harry Alton

    This research examined middle school teachers' perspectives and practices of teaching through inquiry and the effect of a professional development institute on effecting change in those teachers' perspectives and practices. The professional development institute consisted of 16 days of content and pedagogical instruction, practice teaching, and reflection. Teachers' perspectives of inquiry were established through semi-structured interviews, journals, and written reflections. Teacher practices were assessed through analysis of videotaped lessons using a rubric designed to measure reformed teaching. Teachers' perspectives of inquiry were compared to their practices and to the National Science Education Standards. Through qualitative and quantitative analysis of data it has been found that teacher change is very complex. Professional development must address teacher beliefs, practices, and curriculum. Teachers can adopt the language of reform and imitate reform practices through the use of reform-based curriculum; however, for substantial change in classroom practice to occur, teachers must believe that all students are capable of learning through inquiry.

  4. Inquiry learning for gifted children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eysink, Tessa; Gersen, Loes; Gijlers, Hannie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of support on knowledge acquisition of gifted learners and their flow and mood during inquiry learning. Sixty-four gifted primary school children were randomly assigned to one of three conditions differing in support given in an inquiry task. Resul

  5. Eight Ways to Do Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel Z.; Kubarek-Sandor, Joy; Kedvesh, James; Heitzman, Cheryl; Pan, Yaozhen; Faik, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Creating inquiry activities is inherently difficult. Asking meaningful questions requires both background knowledge on the part of the students and complexity on the part of the phenomena. Yet numerous strategies can help teachers conduct inquiry activities. In this article, the authors share a taxonomy of teaching strategies used to create…

  6. Navigating Sites for Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clandinin, D. Jean; Pushor, Debbie; Orr, Anne Murray

    2007-01-01

    Narrative inquiry is a methodology that frequently appeals to teachers and teacher educators. However, this appeal and sense of comfort has advantages and disadvantages. Some assume narrative inquiries will be easy to design, live out, and represent in storied formats in journals, dissertations, or books. For the authors, though, narrative inquiry…

  7. Narrative Inquiry: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Baden, Maggi; Van Niekerk, Lana

    2007-01-01

    This article offers an overview of the method of narrative inquiry and explores competing trends in the use of the approach. It not only examines the theories relating to the method but also offers practical guidance on using narrative inquiry, including an exploration of what might count as a narrative and ways of analysing narrative data. The…

  8. Inquiry learning for gifted children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eysink, Tessa H.S.; Gersen, Loes; Gijlers, Aaltje H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of support on knowledge acquisition of gifted learners and their flow and mood during inquiry learning. Sixty-four gifted primary school children were randomly assigned to one of three conditions differing in support given in an inquiry task.

  9. The process of generative inquiry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandee, D.P.

    2013-01-01

    Appreciative inquiry is an approach to action research that intends to create knowledge for social innovation. Such knowledge has the generative capacity to interrupt habitual practice and to create an inspiring sense of possibility that energizes novel action. How can appreciative inquiry live up t

  10. Writing as collaborative inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Christina Hee; Novak, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In our presentation we strive to disturb and unravel the romantic discourses of collaboration, dialogue and empowerment in relation to qualitative inquiry. For more than two years we (five Danish and Czech researchers) have been exploring the complex obstructions, difficulties and potentials...... involved in collaborative knowledge production across difference (including age, professional position, life situation, nation). We tell about our experiences with how collaboration can lead toward re-invention of our research practices and methods, as well as our own subjectivities, through involvement...

  11. The science experience: The relationship between an inquiry-based science program and student outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poderoso, Charie

    Science education reforms in U.S. schools emphasize the importance of students' construction of knowledge through inquiry. Organizations such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Research Council (NRC), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) have demonstrated a commitment to searching for solutions and renewed efforts to improve science education. One suggestion for science education reform in U.S. schools was a transition from traditional didactic, textbook-based to inquiry-based instructional programs. While inquiry has shown evidence for improved student learning in science, what is needed is empirical evidence of those inquiry-based practices that affect student outcomes in a local context. This study explores the relationship between instructional programs and curricular changes affecting student outcomes in the Santa Ana Unified District (SAUSD): It provides evidence related to achievement and attitudes. SAUSD employs two approaches to teaching in the middle school science classrooms: traditional and inquiry-based approaches. The Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform (LASER) program is an inquiry-based science program that utilizes resources for implementation of the University of California Berkeley's Lawrence Hall of Science Education for Public Understanding Program (SEPUP) to support inquiry-based teaching and learning. Findings in this study provide empirical support related to outcomes of seventh-grade students, N = 328, in the LASER and traditional science programs in SAUSD.

  12. GeoInquiries: Addressing a Grand Challenge for Teaching with GIS in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, D.; Baker, T.

    2016-12-01

    According to the National Research Council (2006), geographic information systems (GIS) is a powerful tool for expanding students' abilities to think spatially, a critical skill for future STEM professionals. However, educators in mainstream subjects in U.S. education have struggled for decades to use GIS effectively in classrooms. GeoInquiries are no cost, standards-based (NGSS or AP), Creative Commons-licensed instructional activities that guide inquiry around map-based concepts found in key subjects like Earth and environmental science. Web maps developed for GeoInquiries expand upon printed maps in leading textbooks by taking advantage of 21st GIS capabilities. GeoInquiry collections consist of 15 activities, each chosen to offer a map-based activity every few weeks throughout the school year. GeoInquiries use a common inquiry instructional framework, learned by many educators during their teacher preparation coursework. GeoInquiries are instructionally flexible - acting as much like building blocks for crafting custom activities as finished instructional materials. Over a half million geoinquiries will be accessed in the next twelve months - serving an anticipated 15 million students. After a generation of outreach to the educators, GIS is finally finding its way the mainstream.

  13. Overview of Obstacles in the Implementation of the Argumentation Based Science Inquiry Approach and Pedagogical Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda YESILDAG-HASANCEBI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the possible problems confronted in implementing Argumentation Based Science Inquiry (ABI approach. In addition, the ways that teacher used to deal with those problems were further investigated in this study. For this purpose, this study utilized a case study methodology. The participant was a teacher at a primary school located in the eastern part of Turkey. The teacher took part in a project1 related to ABI. Data were collected through classroom videotape recordings and semistructured interviews. The results indicated problems in grasping the ABI by the teacher, questioning (teacher and student questioning, classroom interaction, classroom management, and accessing resources and equipment.

  14. Science Teachers' Perceptions of the Relationship Between Game Play and Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezei, Jessica M.

    The implementation of inquiry learning in American science classrooms remains a challenge. Teachers' perceptions of inquiry learning are predicated on their past educational experiences, which means outdated methods of learning may influence teachers' instructional approaches. In order to enhance their understanding and ultimately their implementation of inquiry learning, teachers need new and more relevant models. This study takes a preliminary step exploring the potential of game play as a valuable experience for science teachers. It has been proposed that game play and inquiry experiences can embody constructivist processes of learning, however there has been little work done with science teachers to systematically explore the relationship between the two. Game play may be an effective new model for teacher education and it is important to understand if and how teachers relate game playing experience and knowledge to inquiry. This study examined science teachers' game playing experiences and their perceptions of inquiry experiences and evaluated teacher's recognition of learning in both contexts. Data was collected through an online survey (N=246) and a series of follow-up interviews (N=29). Research questions guiding the study were: (1) What is the nature of the relationship between science teachers' game experience and their perceptions of inquiry? (2) How do teachers describe learning in and from game playing as compared with inquiry science learning? and (3) What is the range of similarities and differences teachers articulate between game play and inquiry experiences?. Results showed weak quantitative links between science teachers' game experiences and their perceptions of inquiry, but identified promising game variables such as belief in games as learning tools, game experiences, and playing a diverse set of games for future study. The qualitative data suggests that teachers made broad linkages in terms of parallels of both teaching and learning. Teachers

  15. Inquiry Roles in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Marion E.

    1973-01-01

    Describes use of sociograms in the classroom to cause students to work with others who are generally isolated. Such attempts resulted in more participation in activities by shy students and increased cooperation among students, and overall higher scores by students on tests. (PS)

  16. Much ado about two: reconsidering retransformation and the two-part model in health econometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullahy, J

    1998-06-01

    In health economics applications involving outcomes (y) and covariates (x), it is often the case that the central inferential problems of interest involve E[y/x] and its associated partial effects or elasticities. Many such outcomes have two fundamental statistical properties: y > or = 0; and the outcome y = 0 is observed with sufficient frequency that the zeros cannot be ignored econometrically. This paper (1) describes circumstances where the standard two-part model with homoskedastic retransformation will fail to provide consistent inferences about important policy parameters; and (2) demonstrates some alternative approaches that are likely to prove helpful in applications.

  17. Physical activity versus cardiorespiratory fitness: two (partly) distinct components of cardiovascular health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFina, Laura F; Haskell, William L; Willis, Benjamin L; Barlow, Carolyn E; Finley, Carrie E; Levine, Benjamin D; Cooper, Kenneth H

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) both have inverse relationships to cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Recent position papers and guidelines have identified the important role of both of these factors in CV health. The benefits of PA and CRF in the prevention of CV disease and risk factors are reviewed. In addition, assessment methodology and utilization in the research and clinical arenas are discussed. Finally, the benefits, methodology, and utilization are compared and contrasted to better understand the two (partly) distinct components and their impact on CV health.

  18. Teacher and student reflections on ICT-rich science inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, John; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inquiry learning in science provides authentic and relevant contexts in which students can create knowledge to solve problems, make decisions and find solutions to issues in today’s world. The use of electronic networks can facilitate this interaction, dialogue and sharing, and adds...... a new dimension to classroom pedagogy. Purpose: This is a report of teacher and student reflections on some of the tensions, reconciliations and feelings they experienced as they worked together to engage in inquiry learning. The study sought to find out how networked ICT use might offer new...... initially that the teachers were hesitant in letting go some of the control they felt they had over students learning, and the students felt insecure in adopting some responsibility for their own learning. Over time a sense of trust and ease developed and this ‘control of learning’ balance moved from what...

  19. Reconsideration of the Paradox of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kunimasa

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the Meno presents the argument called "the paradox of inquiry." This paper has two purposes. First, I analyze the paradox of inquiry and reformulate the argument as the "renewed paradox of inquiry." Second, I clarify that the problem of inquiry posed by this paradox concerns the necessary conditions for a…

  20. Reconsideration of the Paradox of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kunimasa

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the Meno presents the argument called "the paradox of inquiry." This paper has two purposes. First, I analyze the paradox of inquiry and reformulate the argument as the "renewed paradox of inquiry." Second, I clarify that the problem of inquiry posed by this paradox concerns the necessary conditions for a…

  1. Deweyan Inquiry: From Education Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James Scott

    2009-01-01

    This book presents John Dewey's theory of inquiry and applies it to various areas of the primary, middle, and secondary school curricula. "Deweyan Inquiry" brings Dewey's theory of inquiry together with educational theory and practice. James Scott Johnston uses Dewey's late masterpiece "Logic: The Theory of Inquiry" as a guide…

  2. An interpretative study of elementary school teachers' conceptions of the nature of inquiry and of their roles while participating in an inquiry based science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucke, Ann Hancock

    The problem. Recent reform efforts in science education have culminated in National Science Education Standards (NSES), which include the theme of inquiry across all grade levels. Consideration must be given to teachers' conceptions of inquiry, and their perceived roles, as they implement the processes of inquiry in the science classroom. Because of the change in pedagogy required by the standards, research efforts must address these areas. Research questions. The following research questions guided this study. (1) What are teachers' conceptions of inquiry? (2) What do the teachers consider important aspects of their roles when providing inquiry experiences for their students? (3) What do the teachers consider important aspects of the students' roles as inquirers? Research paradigm and methodology. The research paradigm that grounded this investigation is the constructivist paradigm proposed by Guba and Lincoln (1989). Participants were three elementary school teachers participating in the Elementary School Education Partners project. Qualitative methodology techniques used in the study included focus group discussion, semi-structured interviews, classroom observation with videotaping, teacher reflections, and fieldnotes. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method as provided by Glaser and Strauss (1967). A case study format was used to discuss the results of themes that emerged. Results. Themes that emerged from the data were (a) inquiry is viewed as a teaching strategy; (b) the teachers' perceptions of the nature of inquiry are different from one another's; (c) there are differences in the degree of fit with the NSES description of inquiry; (d) the manner in which they see themselves as facilitators originates in their own educational experiences and varies from that of a guide, to a monitor, to one who models; and (e) teachers see the role of students as active participants in their learning but the teachers' perceptions of students' roles, as

  3. Two-part silicone mold. A new tool for flexible ureteroscopy surgical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Marroig

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and objectives: Flexible ureteroscopy is a common procedure nowadays. Most of the training programs use virtual reality simulators. The aim of this study was to standardize the building of a three-dimensional silicone mold (cavity of the collecting system, on the basis of polyester resin endocasts, which can be used in surgical training programs. Materials and Methods: A yellow polyester resin was injected into the ureter to fill the collecting system of 24 cadaveric fresh human kidneys. After setting off the resin, the kidneys were immersed in hydrochloric acid until total corrosion of the organic matter was achieved and the collecting system endocasts obtained. The endocasts were used to prepare white color two-part silicone molds, which after endocasts withdrawn, enabled a ureteroscope insertion into the collecting system molds (cavities. Also, the minor calices were painted with different colors in order to map the access to the different caliceal groups. The cost of the materials used in the molds is $30.00 and two days are needed to build them. Results: Flexible ureteroscope could be inserted into all molds and the entire collecting system could be examined. Since some anatomical features, as infundular length, acute angle, and perpendicular minor calices may difficult the access to some minor calices, especially in the lower caliceal group, surgical training in models leads to better surgical results. Conclusions: The two-part silicone mold is feasible, cheap and allows its use for flexible ureteroscopy surgical training.

  4. Mentoring and Community: Inquiry as stance and science as inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, Wayne; Bartley, Anthony

    2010-04-01

    In this article, we investigate how mentoring relationships founded on inquiry as stance can work to emphasize the conditions that promote the development of teachers of science as inquiry. Drawing on data collected through semi-structured interviews, we have developed two narrative case studies based on the two mentoring relationships that exist between three teachers: Will, Dan, and Cathy. Will entered the teaching profession in 1966, and has acted as a mentor for Dan since he commenced teaching in 1982. Similarly, Dan has mentored Cathy since she commenced teaching in 1999. By following two generations of mentoring relationships, we have gained insights into the potential for inquiry as stance to assist the promotion of the professional development standards of the National Science Education Standards. Our data and analysis clearly point to the need for mentoring relationships to exist within larger inquiry-based communities if they are to produce rapid and sustained changes to teacher practice.

  5. Meaning-making from CPD - developing practice in own classroom and as a peer in the local science PLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2016-01-01

    network seminars, collaborative inquiries organized by the local professional learning community (PLC), and individual inquiries. Research questions for the case study are about how the teacher’s reflections and new enactments in own classroom and in collaboration with colleagues developed over time...

  6. Orchestrating Learning Scenarios for the Borderless Classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Esther; Rusman, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This part of the symposium focuses on the design of seamless learning experiences in a borderless classroom. There are two parts to this symposium. We start with unpacking various theoretical approaches that inform the instructional design of boundary-crossing learning scenarios, such as social lear

  7. Orchestrating Learning Scenarios for the Borderless Classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Esther; Rusman, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This part of the symposium focuses on the design of seamless learning experiences in a borderless classroom. There are two parts to this symposium. We start with unpacking various theoretical approaches that inform the instructional design of boundary-crossing learning scenarios, such as social

  8. Orchestrating Learning Scenarios for the Borderless Classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Esther; Rusman, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This part of the symposium focuses on the design of seamless learning experiences in a borderless classroom. There are two parts to this symposium. We start with unpacking various theoretical approaches that inform the instructional design of boundary-crossing learning scenarios, such as social lear

  9. Teacher-Student Development in Mathematics Classrooms: Interrelated Zones of Free Movement and Promoted Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mohammed Abdul; Monaghan, John; Threlfall, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies and extends Valsiner's "zone theory" (zones of free movement and promoted actions) through an examination of an intervention to establish inquiry communities in primary mathematics classrooms. Valsiner's zone theory, in a classroom setting, views students' freedom of choice of action and thought as mediated by the teacher. The…

  10. Pragmatic inquiry and creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    conceptualizations of knowledge production within the field of sociology of knowledge (Helga Nowotny). The pragmatic approach to inquiry as part of everyday life practices is committed not only to the acceptance and inclusion of the public but also to the humanistic ideal of meliorism. From the perspective...... of Thevenot’s critical pragmatism this understanding might be naïve – not because this is an idealistic rather than a real-life scenario but because the idea of collaborative creativity and self-realization has actually become the driving force in a marked dominated organization of science and production....... ‘The inspired world’ as Laurent Thévenot calls this creative environment, is liberating and repressive at the same time, thriving upon constant innovation and excitement. The force to be creative leads to a higher form of alienation. How would Dewey react to this diagnosis? The paper will secondly...

  11. Critical Narrative Inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    While organizations have become central for thinking and structuring contemporary social action, existing perspectives on what they are and how to deal with them are still rooted in modern ideas about the foundations of society. The chapters in this volume take critical narrative inquiry — inspired...... by postmodern or post-human approaches to organizations — as a broad range of research and development strategies that challenge the dominant perspectives prevalent in the organizational literature. The purpose of the volume is three-fold. Firstly, a critical reading of organizations foregrounding notions...... of power and ethics is presented. Secondly, a new framework for understanding and analyzing organizational action based on critical notions of storytelling and sustainability is unfolded. Thirdly, the framework is deployed through innovative concepts and learning methodologies for leadership...

  12. Agriscience Student Engagement in Scientific Inquiry: Representations of Scientific Processes and Nature of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Julie R; Dolan, Erin L; Glasson, George E

    2010-01-01

    Students' experiences with science integrated into agriscience courses contribute to their developing epistemologies of science. The purpose of this case study was to gain insight into the implementation of scientific inquiry in an agriscience classroom. Also of interest was how the tenets of the nature of science were reflected in the students' experiments. Participants included an agriscience teacher and her fifteen students who were conducting plant experiments to gain insight into the role of a gene disabled by scientists. Data sources included classroom observations, conversations with students, face-to-face interviews with the teacher, and students' work. Analysis of the data indicated that the teacher viewed scientific inquiry as a mechanical process with little emphasis on the reasoning that typifies scientific inquiry. Students' participation in their experiments also centered on the procedural aspects of inquiry with little attention to scientific reasoning. There was no explicit attention to the nature of science during the experiments, but the practice implied correct, incorrect, and underdeveloped conceptions of the nature of science. Evidence from the study suggests a need for collaboration between agriscience and science teacher educators to design and conduct professional development focused on scientific inquiry and nature of science for preservice and practicing teachers.

  13. Two Parts Reflection, One Part Selfie: A Visual Alternative to the Minute Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellie Meehlhause

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For almost 40 years, the Minute Paper has been a quick and easy means of learning assessment, both in the college classroom and library instruction. More recently, the use of social media, particularly selfies, has gained popularity by connecting with students through the technology they are most familiar with. This column makes the case for combining the Minute Paper and selfies in order to gain an insight into students’ skill development and retention after a library session. Adaptable to a variety of classes and learning outcomes, the activity enables students to actively use what they learned rather than passively reflecting on it.

  14. Design Principles, Implementation And Evaluation For Inquiry-Based Astronomy:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This thesis is situated in the context of an Australian high school level astronomy intervention project which aimed to enable students to undertake real science with professional grade 2-metre class telescopes. The thesis explores the context and background within which the project was situated and the main blocking factors preventing successful implementation culminating in an outline of the education design used in, and the evaluation of, the project. This work has illustrated that with careful design and sufficient teacher training and support, inquiry-based astronomy can feasibly be undertaken in the high-school classroom.

  15. New Classification Methods for Hiding Information into Two Parts: Multimedia Files and Non Multimedia Files

    CERN Document Server

    Alanazi, Hamdan O; Zaidan, B B; Jalab, Hamid A; AL-Ani, Zaidoon Kh

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid development of various multimedia technologies, more and more multimedia data are generated and transmitted in the medical, commercial, and military fields, which may include some sensitive information which should not be accessed by or can only be partially exposed to the general users. Therefore, security and privacy has become an important, Another problem with digital document and video is that undetectable modifications can be made with very simple and widely available equipment, which put the digital material for evidential purposes under question .With the large flood of information and the development of the digital format Information hiding considers one of the techniques which used to protect the important information. The main goals for this paper, provides a general overview of the New Classification Methods for Hiding Information into Two Parts: Multimedia Files and Non Multimedia Files.

  16. Inquiry Teaching in Clinical Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heins, Paul J.; Mackenzie, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    An adaptation of the inquiry method of teaching, which develops skills of information retrieval and reasoning through systematic questioning by the teacher, is proposed for instruction in clinical periodontics. (MSE)

  17. I Want to be the Inquiry Guy! How Research Experiences for Teachers Change Beliefs, Attitudes, and Values About Teaching Science as Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Deborah G.; Bancroft, Senetta F.; Edwards, Molly M.; Schairer, Caroline J.

    2016-03-01

    This qualitative study examined how and why research experiences for teachers (RETs) influenced middle and high school science teachers' beliefs, attitudes, and values about teaching science as inquiry. Changes teachers reported after participating in the RET ranged from modifying a few lessons (belief change) to a comprehensive revision of what and how they taught to better reflect inquiry (attitude change). Some teachers who described comprehensively changing their instruction also described implementing actions meant to change science education within their respective schools, not just their own classrooms (value change). We present how and why teachers went about changes in their practices in relation to the researcher-created teacher inquiry beliefs system spectrum (TIBSS). The TIBSS conceptualizes the range of changes observed in participating teachers. We also describe the features of the RET and external factors, such as personal experiences and school contexts, that teachers cited as influential to these changes.

  18. Classroom Dimensions and Classroom Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Arthur J.; Solomon, Daniel

    Although classroom "openness" has been much discussed in recent years, there has been little effort to investigate to what degree this openness occurs within a general sample of classrooms. The purpose of this study is to identify significant attributes of classroom activity and organization relevant to the concepts of "traditional" and "open" and…

  19. Mapping to know: The effects of representational guidance and reflective assessment on scientific inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdosne Toth, Eva; Suthers, Daniel D.; Lesgold, Alan M.

    2002-03-01

    This study documents an instructional methodology to teach a fundamental reasoning skill during scientific inquiry: the evaluation of empirical evidence against multiple hypotheses. Using the design experiment approach, with iterative cycles we developed an instructional framework that lends itself to authentic scientific inquiry by providing a nontraditional approach to three aspects of learning: the activities students are engaged in during scientific inquiry, the tools students use while constructing knowledge, and the assessment of learning outcomes. The present article focuses on the contribution of two components of this instructional framework: the effect of technology-based knowledge-representation tools and the effect of reflective assessment on learning to act and think scientifically. The technological tools of the framework allowed students to represent their developing knowledge of natural phenomena with either graphical mapping or with word-processed prose. The reflective assessment we used was a form of inquiry rubrics that provided clear expectations for optimal progress throughout the entire process of inquiry by indicating specific assessment criteria for the various components of scientific inquiry. The results indicated that in real-life-like classroom investigations designed to teach students how to evaluate data in relation to theories, the use of evidence mapping is superior to prose writing. Furthermore, this superior effect of evidence mapping was greatly enhanced by the use of reflective assessment throughout the inquiry process. Modes of representational guidance explain both the superior effect of evidence mapping as well as the discrepancy between the effects of explicit reflection on evidence mapping compared to prose writing. These results have fundamental implications for the development of cognitively-based classroom learning environments and for the design of further research on learning.

  20. Changing Identities and Evolving Conceptions of Inquiry through Teacher-Driven Professional Development

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dusen, Ben; Otero, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    This STEM education study investigates the Streamline to Mastery professional development program, in which teachers work in partnership with university researchers to design professional development opportunities for themselves and for fellow teachers. Our research describes the process of teacher professional growth both through changes in agency and through a shared pursuit of an improved understanding of classroom scientific inquiry. Videos, emails, lesson reflections, survey responses, and interviews were analyzed to glean insight into changes in teacher discourse around inquiry and into their shifts in participation within the professional community they established. Implications for professional development in STEM education are discussed.

  1. Teacher-student interaction: The overlooked dimension of inquiry-based professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Alandeom Wanderlei

    This study explores the teacher-student interactional dimension of inquiry-based science instruction. In it, microethnographic and grounded theory analyses are conducted in order to assess the impact of a professional development program designed to enhance in-service elementary teachers' interactional views (i.e., their understandings of inquiry-based social roles and relationships) and discursive practices (i.e., teachers' abilities to interact with student engaged in classroom inquiries) through a combination of expert instruction, immersion in scientific inquiry, and collaborative analysis of video-recorded classroom discourse. A sociolinguistic theoretical perspective on language use is adopted, viewing classroom discourse as comprising multiple linguistic signs (questions, responses, personal pronouns, hedges, backchannels, reactive tokens, directives, figures of speech, parallel repetitions) that convey not only semantic meanings (the literal information being exchanged) but also pragmatic meanings (information about teachers and students' social roles and relationships). A grounded theory analysis of the professional development activities uncovered a gradual shift in teachers' interactional views from a cognitive, monofunctional and decontextualized perspective to a social, multifunctional and contextualized conception of inquiry-based discourse. Furthermore, teachers developed increased levels of pragmatic awareness, being able to recognize the authoritative interactional functions served by discursive moves such as display questions, cued elicitation, convergent questioning, verbal cloze, affirmation, explicit evaluations of students' responses, verbatim repetitions, IRE triplets, IR couplets, second-person pronouns, "I/you" contrastive pairs, and direct or impolite directives. A comparative microethnographic analysis of teachers' classroom practices revealed that after participating in the program teachers demonstrated an improved ability to share

  2. The role of text in supporting and extending first-hand investigations in guided inquiry science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Danielle Joan

    1999-11-01

    Calls for inquiry-based science instruction recommend students engage in knowledge construction through meaningful experiences that are authentic representations of the work of scientific communities. Though recommendations have focused on children's engagement in investigations of natural phenomena as a reaction to textbook-only instruction, completely removing texts from science instruction is not authentic to the scientific enterprise, nor advantageous to students who are learning to read informational texts. The integration of text into inquiry science instruction is a complex endeavor: the nature of the texts, their position within cycles of inquiry, purposes of text, and teachers' mediation of text use must be considered in the context of an inquiry classroom. This study examines the development of children's substantive and syntactic understandings as text-based investigations are incorporated into Guided Inquiry science instruction in two fourth-grade classrooms, and the extent to which the classes develop an inquiry orientation to text use. This study uses microgenetic analyses of children's discourse in whole class discussions about first- and second-hand investigations, and assessments of student's content understandings to trace the development of students' understandings over an entire program of study. Results indicate that students' understandings of the nature of light surpass expectations from previous research for this age group. Students' understandings of the nature of scientific activity show improvement in their ability to represent data, their understandings of the general processes of investigation, and to some extent, their use of evidence to support claims. However, their ability to discuss the phases of their investigations at a metacognitive level is limited. The use of texts in the genre of a scientist's notebook afforded opportunities for students to engage in inquiry processes while conducting text-based investigations. Students

  3. Giving children space: A phenomenological exploration of student experiences in space science inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Christopher R.

    This study explores the experiences of 4th grade students in an inquiry-based space science classroom. At the heart of the study lies the essential question: What is the lived experience of children engaged in the process of space science inquiry? Through the methodology of phenomenological inquiry, the author investigates the essence of the lived experience of twenty 4th grade students as well as the reflections of two high school students looking back on their 4th grade space science experience. To open the phenomenon more deeply, the concept of space is explored as an overarching theme throughout the text. The writings of several philosophers including Martin Heidegger and Hans-Georg Gadamer are opened up to understand the existential aspects of phenomenology and the act of experiencing the classroom as a lived human experience. The methodological structure for the study is based largely on the work of Max van Manen (2003) in his seminal work, Researching Lived Experience, which describes a structure of human science research. A narrative based on classroom experiences, individual conversations, written reflections, and group discussion provides insight into the students' experiences. Their stories and thoughts reveal the themes of activity , interactivity, and "inquiractivity," each emerging as an essential element of the lived experience in the inquiry-based space science classroom. The metaphor of light brings illumination to the themes. Activity in the classroom is associated with light's constant and rapid motion throughout the Milky Way and beyond. Interactivity is seen through students' interactions just as light's reflective nature is seen through the illumination of the planets. Finally, inquiractivity is connected to questioning, the principal aspect of the inquiry-based classroom just as the sun is the essential source of light in our solar system. As the era of No Child Left Behind fades, and the next generation of science standards emerge, the

  4. Guiding students to develop an understanding of scientific inquiry: a science skills approach to instruction and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elisa M

    2014-01-01

    New approaches for teaching and assessing scientific inquiry and practices are essential for guiding students to make the informed decisions required of an increasingly complex and global society. The Science Skills approach described here guides students to develop an understanding of the experimental skills required to perform a scientific investigation. An individual teacher's investigation of the strategies and tools she designed to promote scientific inquiry in her classroom is outlined. This teacher-driven action research in the high school biology classroom presents a simple study design that allowed for reciprocal testing of two simultaneous treatments, one that aimed to guide students to use vocabulary to identify and describe different scientific practices they were using in their investigations-for example, hypothesizing, data analysis, or use of controls-and another that focused on scientific collaboration. A knowledge integration (KI) rubric was designed to measure how students integrated their ideas about the skills and practices necessary for scientific inquiry. KI scores revealed that student understanding of scientific inquiry increased significantly after receiving instruction and using assessment tools aimed at promoting development of specific inquiry skills. General strategies for doing classroom-based action research in a straightforward and practical way are discussed, as are implications for teaching and evaluating introductory life sciences courses at the undergraduate level.

  5. Teaching Nature of Scientific Inquiry in Chemistry: How do German chemistry teachers use labwork to teach NOSI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strippel, C. G.; Sommer, K.

    2015-12-01

    Learning about scientific inquiry (SI) is an important aspect of scientific literacy and there is a solid international consensus of what should be learned about it. Learning about SI comprises both the doing of science (process) and knowledge about the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI). German reform documents promote inquiry generally but do not equally address these two sides of inquiry. This study explores how teachers incorporate learning about SI into laboratory work in the Chemistry classroom. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 secondary school Chemistry teachers (8 of them holding a Ph.D. in Chemistry) from Germany. The results indicate that teaching NOSI is not a primary goal for teachers. Still, some aspects of NOSI seem to be more easily incorporated in the Chemistry classroom, for example, critical testing and hypothesis and prediction. Teachers state 2 main criteria to identify suitable chemical laboratory work for teaching NOSI: adaptable parameters and low level of required content knowledge. Surprisingly, differences can be found between Ph.D. and non-Ph.D. teachers' views on teaching inquiry. The findings of this study can be used to (a) select opportunities for targeted research on teaching NOSI in the Chemistry classroom, (b) inform curriculum material development and (c) give impetus to science teacher education and professional development.

  6. Development and use of an instrument to measure scientific inquiry and related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Terry Frank

    The use of the scientific inquiry method of teaching science was investigated in one district's elementary schools. The study generated data directly from Albuquerque Public Schools fourth- and fifth-grade teachers through a mail-out survey and through observation. Two forms of an inquiry evaluation research instrument (Elementary Science Inquiry Survey - ESIS) were created. The ESIS-A is a classroom observation tool. The ESIS-B is a survey questionnaire designed to collect information from teachers. The study was designed first to establish reliability and validity for both forms of the instrument. The study made use of multiple regression and exploratory factor analysis. Sources used to establish the instruments' reliability and validity included: (1) Input from an international panel (qualitative analysis of comments sent by raters and quantitative analysis of numerical ratings sent by raters); (2) Cronbach's alpha; (3) Results of factor analysis; (4) Survey respondents' comments (qualitative analysis); (5) Teacher observation data. Cronbach's alpha for the data set was .8955. Inquiry practices were reported to occur between twice per week and three times per week. Teachers' comments regarding inquiry were reported. The ESIS was used to collect inquiry self-report data and teacher background data. The teacher background data included teacher science knowledge and information about their standards awareness and implementation. The following teacher knowledge factors were positively correlated with inquiry use: semesters of college science, science workshops taken, conducted scientific research, and SIMSE (NSF institute) participation. The following standards awareness and implementation factors were positively correlated with inquiry use: familiarity with the National Science Education Standards, familiarity with New Mexico science standards, state or national standards as a curriculum selection factor, student interest as a curriculum selection factor, and "no

  7. Plants & Perpetrators: Forensic Investigation in the Botany Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Amy E.

    2006-01-01

    Applying botanical knowledge to a simulated forensic investigation provides inquiry-based and problem-based learning in the botany classroom. This paper details one such forensic investigation in which students use what they have learned about plant morphology and anatomy to analyze evidence and solve a murder mystery. (Contains 1 table.)

  8. Socio-Scientific Decision Making in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siribunnam, Siripun; Nuangchalerm, Prasart; Jansawang, Natchanok

    2014-01-01

    The learning ability of students in science is improved by socio-scientific decision-making, an important activity that improves a student's scientific literacy, conceptual understanding, scientific inquiry, attitudes, and social values. The socio-scientific issues must be discussed during science classroom activities in the current state of 21st…

  9. Student cognition and motivation during the Classroom BirdWatch citizen science project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasek, Terry Morton

    The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the ways various stakeholders (CBW project developer/coordinator, elementary and middle school teachers, and 5th through 8th grade students) envisioned, implemented and engaged in the citizen science project, eBird/Classroom BirdWatch. A multiple case study mixed-methods research design was used to examine student engagement in the cognitive processes associated with scientific inquiry as part of citizen science participation. Student engagement was described based on a sense of autonomy, competence, relatedness and intrinsic motivation. A goal of this study was to expand the taxonomy of differences between authentic scientific inquiry and simple inquiry to include those inquiry tasks associated with participation in citizen science by describing how students engaged in this type of science. This research study built upon the existing framework of cognitive processes associated with scientific inquiry described by Chinn and Malhotra (2002). This research provides a systematic analysis of the scientific processes and related reasoning tasks associated with the citizen science project eBird and the corresponding curriculum Classroom BirdWatch . Data consisted of responses to surveys, focus group interviews, document analysis and individual interviews. I suggest that citizen science could be an additional form of classroom-based science inquiry that can promote more authentic features of scientific inquiry and engage students in meaningful ways.

  10. Classroom Management

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be...

  11. Acquisition and Retention of STEM Concepts through Inquiry Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Candice

    This study explores the integration of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) concepts through inquiry based learning. Students are exposed to a constructivist style learning environment where they create understanding for themselves. This way of learning lets students plan and justify their ideas and beliefs while discussing and examining the ideas of their classmates. Students are engaged in solving a scientific problem in a meaningful, inquiry-based manner through hypothesis testing, experimentation, and investigation. This mode of learning introduces students to real life, authentic science experiences within the confines of a typical classroom. The focus of the unit is for the students to create connections and understanding about geography and the globe in order to ultimately identify the exact latitude and longitude of 10 mystery sites. The students learn about latitude and longitude and apply their knowledge through a set of clues to determine where their Mystery Class is located. Journey North provides an internationally accessed game of hide-and-seek called Mystery Class Seasons Challenge. Throughout this challenge, over the course of eleven weeks, students will record, graph, interpret and analysis data and research to ultimate identify the location of ten mystery locations. Students will track seasonal changes in sunlight while investigating, examining and researching clues to find these ten secret sites around the world. My research was done to prove the success of students' ability to learn new mathematics, science, technology and engineering concepts through inquiry based design.

  12. Sweet Science for ALL! Supporting Inquiry-Based Learning through M&Ms Investigation for English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youngjin; Higgins, Teresa; Harding-DeKam, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a series of inquiry-based lessons that provide English language learners (ELLs) with opportunities to experience science and engineering practices with conceptual understanding as well as to develop their language proficiency in elementary classrooms. The four-lesson sequence models how various types of instructional…

  13. Effectiveness of Inquiry-Based Lessons Using Particulate Level Models to Develop High School Students' Understanding of Conceptual Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberlin, Stephanie; Yezierski, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Students' inaccurate ideas about what is represented by chemical equations and concepts underlying stoichiometry are well documented; however, there are few classroom-ready instructional solutions to help students build scientifically accurate ideas about these topics central to learning chemistry. An intervention (two inquiry-based activities)…

  14. A Shift to Inquiry: The Heart of Effective Teaching and Professional Development for the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, Vicki; Worth, Karen; Jensen LaConte, Judy E.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how an experienced teacher navigates the demands of curriculum to implement her inquiry-centered teaching and learning philosophy, and how administrators along the way supported her during this change. Interviews with this classroom teacher surface suggestions for twenty-first-century professional development and support,…

  15. Building Warmth Sculpture in the Student-Teacher Relationship: Goethean Observation and Contemplative Practice in an Action Research Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresin-Price, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Through an action research approach, this dissertation focuses on the central role of interpersonal warmth in the teacher and student relationship. The heart of its inquiry is based on data gathered by a set of teachers working collaboratively as co-researchers in their own classrooms. These individuals inquired into the potential of the teacher…

  16. Effectiveness of Inquiry-Based Lessons Using Particulate Level Models to Develop High School Students' Understanding of Conceptual Stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberlin, Stephanie; Yezierski, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Students' inaccurate ideas about what is represented by chemical equations and concepts underlying stoichiometry are well documented; however, there are few classroom-ready instructional solutions to help students build scientifically accurate ideas about these topics central to learning chemistry. An intervention (two inquiry-based activities)…

  17. Using Cloud-Computing Applications to Support Collaborative Scientific Inquiry: Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Perceived Barriers to Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donna, Joel D.; Miller, Brant G.

    2013-01-01

    Technology plays a crucial role in facilitating collaboration within the scientific community. Cloud-computing applications, such as Google Drive, can be used to model such collaboration and support inquiry within the secondary science classroom. Little is known about pre-service teachers' beliefs related to the envisioned use of collaborative,…

  18. Theoretical perspectives on narrative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emden, C

    1998-04-01

    Narrative inquiry is gaining momentum in the field of nursing. As a research approach it does not have any single heritage of methodology and its practitioners draw upon diverse sources of influence. Central to all narrative inquiry however, is attention to the potential of stories to give meaning to people's lives, and the treatment of data as stories. This is the first of two papers on the topic and addresses the theoretical influences upon a particular narrative inquiry into nursing scholars and scholarship. The second paper, Conducting a narrative analysis, describes the actual narrative analysis as it was conducted in this same study. Together, the papers provide sufficient detail for others wishing to pursue a similar approach to do so, or to develop the ideas and procedures according to their own way of thinking. Within this first theoretical paper, perspectives from Jerome Bruner (1987) and Wade Roof (1993) are outlined. These relate especially to the notion of stories as 'imaginative constructions' and as 'cultural narratives' and as such, highlight the profound importance of stories as being individually and culturally meaningful. As well, perspectives on narrative inquiry from nursing literature are highlighted. Narrative inquiry in this instance lies within the broader context of phenomenology.

  19. The Role of Aggregate Representations in Scaffolding Collective Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cober, Rebecca Mary

    This study explores how aggregate representations of student-contributed content were used in whole-class discussions to scaffold scientific inquiry in two middle school science classrooms. Working together as a knowledge community, students contribute scaffolded observations concerning HelioRoom and WallCology, room-sized “Embedded Phenomena” simulations, using tablet computers. These observations are collected and represented in aggregate form, and are the focus of teacher-led whole-class discussions. This thesis examines the efficacy of these aggregate designs for advancing students’ and teachers’ engagement in and understanding of the object of scientific inquiry, their usefulness for constructing relational models, and the interaction patterns that arise from their use. Findings suggest that aggregate representations of binary relationships that use tallies are well-suited for learning activities that have directed outcomes, such as constructing a relationship network. Aggregate representations that highlight gaps in data, and areas of agreement and disagreement in the data can be effective tools fostering productive discourse in classrooms.

  20. "Applying anatomy to something i care about": Authentic inquiry learning and student experiences of an inquiry project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Lauren M

    2017-04-04

    Despite advances to move anatomy education away from its didactic history, there is a continued need for students to contextualize their studies to make learning more meaningful. This article investigates authentic learning in the context of an inquiry-based approach to learning human gross anatomy. Utilizing a case-study design with three groups of students (n = 18) and their facilitators (n = 3), methods of classroom observations, interviews, and artifact collection were utilized to investigate students' experiences of learning through an inquiry project. Qualitative data analysis through open and selective coding produced common meaningful themes of group and student experiences. Overall results demonstrate how the project served as a unique learning experience where learners engaged in the opportunity to make sense of anatomy in context of their interests and wider interdisciplinary considerations through collaborative, group-based investigation. Results were further considered in context of theoretical frameworks of inquiry-based and authentic learning. Results from this study demonstrate how students can engage anatomical understandings to inquire and apply disciplinary considerations to their personal lives and the world around them. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  1. Observing, recording, and reviewing: Using mobile phones in support of science inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khoo, Elaine; Williams, John; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Teaching science can be challenging, particularly if it involves the incorporation of inquiry approaches. Collaboration and co-construction of ideas and understandings requires changing teaching and learning practices to allow students to learn how to collaborate ‘inquiry style......’. There is increasing evidence that the use of mobile learning devices can support inquiry learning by increasing the opportunities for student participation and collaboration in the learning process. This paper reports on the preliminary findings from a New Zealand Teaching and Learning Initiative funded project...... questions and investigations, and increased student ownership of their learning. Sharing the mobile phone recordings of their learning with their peers and community further enriched students’ developing science understandings beyond the classroom....

  2. Appreciative inquiry for leading in complex systems: supporting the transformation of academic nursing culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Roseanne C; Horton-Deutsch, Sara; Pesut, Daniel J

    2007-07-01

    Increasingly complex environments in which nurse educators must function create distinct challenges for leaders in nursing education. Complexity is found in the presence of knowledge-driven economies, advancements in technology, and the blurring of campus boundaries created by online learning versus traditional classroom education. A dual bureaucracy of faculty and administration coexists in nursing education. The transformation of bureaucratic culture is a strategic challenge for academic leaders who strive to move dichotomous groups toward a collective vision of a preferred future. This article advocates for the affirmative administrative process of appreciative inquiry for academic nursing leadership, in nudging the dual bureaucracy toward transformational change. The intent and characteristics of appreciative inquiry are discussed, appreciative leadership strategies and actions are explained, methods for leading cultural paradigm shift are outlined, and an exemplar of the actualization of appreciative inquiry is presented.

  3. Introducing Dramatic Inquiry as Visual Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Mindi; Daiello, Vittoria S.

    2016-01-01

    This article defines dramatic inquiry, exploring its possible contributions to discourses on subjectivity, embodied pedagogy, and relational knowing in art education. As a communal, ensemble endeavor emerging from the discipline of drama education, dramatic inquiry offers strategies for enhancing arts education's critical inquiries by facilitating…

  4. Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Norman K., Ed.; Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Third Edition," the second volume in the paperback version of "The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative Research, 3rd Edition," consists of Part III of the handbook ("Strategies of Inquiry"). "Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Third Edition" presents the major tactics--historically, the research methods--that…

  5. Dealing with the Ambiguities of Science Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yuen Sze Michelle; Caleon, Imelda Santos

    2016-01-01

    The current vision of science education in myriad educational contexts encourages students to learn through the process of science inquiry. Science inquiry has been used to promote conceptual learning and engage learners in an active process of meaning-making and investigation to understand the world around them. The science inquiry process…

  6. Questions, Curiosity and the Inquiry Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Leo

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the conceptual relationship between questions, curiosity and learning as inquiry elaborated in the work of Chip Bruce and others as the Inquiry Cycle. The Inquiry Cycle describes learning in terms of a continuous dynamic of ask, investigate, create, discuss and reflect. Of these elements "ask" has a privileged…

  7. Outdoor Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Valynda

    2010-01-01

    An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community in the development and maintenance of your outdoor classroom, the entire community will…

  8. Inquiry-based science education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars Domino; Sillasen, Martin Krabbe; Hagelskjær, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) er en internationalt afprøvet naturfagsdidaktisk metode der har til formål at øge elevernes interesse for og udbytte af naturfag. I artiklen redegøres der for metoden, der kan betegnes som en elevstyret problem- og undersøgelsesbaseret naturfagsundervisnings......Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) er en internationalt afprøvet naturfagsdidaktisk metode der har til formål at øge elevernes interesse for og udbytte af naturfag. I artiklen redegøres der for metoden, der kan betegnes som en elevstyret problem- og undersøgelsesbaseret...

  9. Effects of guided-inquiry on physiology students at a community college

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael Charles

    Current research into the effects of inquiry education in college science classes has resulted in improvements in student classroom performance and critical thinking skills. Much of the data collected for these studies was obtained from students in four-year institutions majoring in science fields. Many community college science instructors are reluctant to adopt inquiry exercises as there is a perception that inquiry activities will shift student attention away from essential course content. Vocational programs and articulation agreements with four-year institutions are dependent upon course curricula. It is necessary to demonstrate that content learning in community college science classes will not be harmed by inquiry activities for the adoption by community college science instructors to succeed. Two sections of Human Anatomy and Physiology students from Kirkwood Community College were used to test the effects of guided inquiry on learning course content. The treatment group (INQ) performed 3 guided-inquiry laboratories whereas the control group performed 3 traditional laboratories (TRD). The activities were identical for both groups and only differed in learning methodology. Analysis by ANCOVA showed no statistical differences between means in summed quiz scores, lecture exam scores, or lecture exam questions specific to laboratory exercises. No statistical difference was found between groups for time needed to complete assignments. No additional statistical differences were determined between student attitudes towards group work, inquiry and investigation activities but both groups stated they enjoyed these elements of inquiry learning. The results indicate the INQ students participating in the study were not harmed by guided-inquiry as INQ formal assessment scores did not differ significantly from TRD scores. No influence on the results can be attributed to students spending additional time on laboratory exercises as time was controlled for both groups. Not

  10. Moving from answer finding to sensemaking: Supporting middle school students' online inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meilan

    Online inquiry, use of the Web as an information source to conduct inquiry for a scientific question, has become increasingly common in middle schools in recent years. However, while valuable Web resources provide unprecedented learning opportunities, easy access to information does not guarantee learning. Previous research has found that middle school students tend to use the Web in a superficial manner. To address the challenges that students face in online inquiry, this study explored several supporting strategies implemented in Digital IdeaKeeper, a scaffolded software tool to help students move from passively finding a ready-made answer to actively making sense of the information they encounter through support for inquiry planning, information search, analysis, and synthesis. This study examined the differences and similarities between regular online inquiry and supported online inquiry performed by several sixth-graders in real classroom settings. Four pairs from a sixth grade class used IdeaKeeper for their online inquiry project, and another four pairs from a different sixth grade class taught by the same teacher used regular online search engines only. Both groups worked on the same science topic-water, and the entire project lasted about four weeks. During that time, students in both groups used computers for about 10-14 days to conduct online research. Multiple sources of data were collected, including video recordings of students' computer activities and conversations, students' artifacts, log files and student final writings. Several themes emerged from the data analysis. First, the findings refer to the importance of providing a structure for students' online inquiry, to promote a more integrated, efficient, continuous, metacognitive and engaging online inquiry. In addition, guidance is important to promote more careful, thorough, and purposeful online reading, Overall, the results suggest that middle school students' online inquiry needs to be

  11. Student experiences in undergraduate anatomy: An exploration of inquiry learning as an authentic experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Lauren M.

    Anatomy education is challenged to develop contemporary approaches to teaching and learning that move beyond factual recall to elicit from students meaningful and deep understandings of the discipline. Inquiry-based learning is one such pedagogy that involves students' active and increasingly independent investigation of questions and problems that are of interest to them. Because inquiry-based learning aims to encourage learners to draw upon wider contexts for learning and emphasizes the development of skills that extend beyond the confines of the classroom, there is a potential that students' experiences are authentic in nature. This study sought to explore undergraduate students' experiences of an Inquiry Project for learning anatomy. The project's aims were twofold. First, to document, describe, and explain the essence of students' experiences of engagement throughout the Inquiry Project, and second, to explore students' experiences as potentially reflective of authentic learning. A hermeneutic phenomenology and case study methodology was used to explore students' experiences of an Inquiry Project within a second-year undergraduate anatomy course at a mid-sized university in Ontario, Canada. Students (18) and facilitators (3) were observed during group work sessions and inquiry presentations, curricular documents and students' work were analyzed, and interviews were conducted. Data analysis sought to describe students' experiences and as a result, common meaningful themes of groups' and students' engagement were characterized. These results were then further analyzed through a theoretical framework of authentic learning, informed mainly by the Theory of Authentic Learning. While confirmatory and novel connections between factors were found to reflect Authentic Learning, five qualities of Authentic Inquiry Learning emerged from analysis of the data to represent how students' learning was neither solely authentic nor inquiry-based, but a hybrid of the two

  12. The Inquiry Flame: Scaffolding for Scientific Inquiry through Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Richard; Parker, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In the lesson presented in this article, students learn to organize their thinking and design their own inquiry experiments through careful observation of an object, situation, or event. They then conduct these experiments and report their findings in a lab report, poster, trifold board, slide, or video that follows the typical format of the…

  13. Influence of subject matter discipline and science content knowledge on National Board Certified science teachers' conceptions, enactment, and goals for inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslyn, Wayne Gene

    The present study investigated differences in the continuing development of National Board Certified Science Teachers' (NBCSTs) conceptions of inquiry across the disciplines of biology, chemistry, earth science, and physics. The central research question of the study was, "How does a NBCST's science discipline (biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics) influence their conceptions, enactment, and goals for inquiry-based teaching and learning?" A mixed methods approach was used that included an analysis of the National Board portfolio entry, Active Scientific Inquiry, for participants (n=48) achieving certification in the 2007 cohort. The portfolio entry provided detailed documentation of teachers' goals and enactment of an inquiry lesson taught in their classroom. Based on the results from portfolio analysis, participant interviews were conducted with science teachers (n=12) from the 2008 NBCST cohort who represented the science disciplines of biology, chemistry, earth science, and physics. The interviews provided a broader range of contexts to explore teachers' conceptions, enactment, and goals of inquiry. Other factors studied were disciplinary differences in NBCSTs' views of the nature of science, the relation between their science content knowledge and use of inquiry, and changes in their conceptions of inquiry as result of the NB certification process. Findings, based on a situated cognitive framework, suggested that differences exist between biology, chemistry, and earth science teachers' conceptions, enactment, and goals for inquiry. Further, individuals teaching in more than one discipline often held different conceptions of inquiry depending on the discipline in which they were teaching. Implications for the research community include being aware of disciplinary differences in studies on inquiry and exercising caution in generalizing findings across disciplines. In addition, teachers who teach in more than one discipline can highlight the contextual

  14. Investigating inquiry beliefs and nature of science (NOS) conceptions of science teachers as revealed through online learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Hakan Yavuz

    Creating a scientifically literate society appears to be the major goal of recent science education reform efforts (Abd-El-Khalick, Boujaoude, Dushl, Lederman, Hofstein, Niaz, Tregust, & Tuan, 2004). Recent national reports in the U.S, such as Shaping the Future, New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (NSF,1996), Inquiry in Science and In Classroom, Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 2001), Pursuing excellence: Comparison of international eight-grade mathematics and science achievement from a U.S. perspective (NCES, 2001), and Standards for Science Teacher Preparation (NSTA 2003) appear to agree on one thing: the vision of creating a scientifically literate society. It appears from science education literature that the two important components of being a scientifically literate individual are developing an understanding of nature of science and ability to conduct scientific inquiries. Unfortunately, even though teaching science through inquiry has been recommended in national reports since the 1950's, it has yet to find its way into many science classrooms (Blanchard, 2006; Yerrick, 2000). Science education literature identfies several factors for this including: (1) lack of content knowledge (Anderson, 2002; Lee, Hart Cuevas, & Enders, 2004; Loucks-Horsely, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1998; Moscovici, 1999; Smith & Naele, 1989; Smith, 1989); (2) high stake tests (Aydeniz, 2006); (3) teachers' conflicting beliefs with inquiry-based science education reform (Blanchard, 2006; Wallace & Kang, 2004); and, (4) lack of collaboration and forums for communication (Anderson, 2002; Davis, 2003; Loucks-Horsely, Hewson, Love, & Stiles, 1998; Wallace & Kang, 2004). In addition to the factors stated above this study suggest that some of the issues and problems that have impeded inquiry instruction to become the primary approach to teaching science in many science classrooms might be related to

  15. Teaching Practices That Provide Cognitive Scaffolding for Classroom Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, Lawrence B.

    Cognitive Scaffolding is what a teacher does when working with a student to solve a problem, carry out a task, or achieve a goal which would be beyond his unassisted efforts. As a psychological construct, it refers to the interaction between the knowledge and skills of teacher and student. A computer, textbook, or laboratory materials may serve as…

  16. Science Inquiry Learning in Classrooms — Montana Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelsford, M. A.; Peters, J.; Grimberg, B. I.

    2010-04-01

    Montana's ABRC is working with rural school teachers in southwestern Montana. Astrobiology is a new and exciting subject for the teachers and its inter-disciplinary nature is very useful and rewarding for the teachers and their students.

  17. Determining Validity in Qualitative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Dana L.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that the choice of validity procedures in qualitative inquiry is governed by two perspectives: the lens researchers choose to validate their studies and the researchers' paradigm assumptions. The article advances a two-dimensional framework to help researchers identify appropriate validity procedures for their studies. Nine validity…

  18. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  19. Determining Validity in Qualitative Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Miller, Dana L.

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that the choice of validity procedures in qualitative inquiry is governed by two perspectives: the lens researchers choose to validate their studies and the researchers' paradigm assumptions. The article advances a two-dimensional framework to help researchers identify appropriate validity procedures for their studies. Nine validity…

  20. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  1. Education and the Lawrence Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Marika

    2000-01-01

    Examines Judge Macpherson's three recommendations regarding nondiscriminatory education 1 year after his inquiry into the murder of a black man and its botched investigation. Discusses what the recommended citizenship curriculum would offer, the impact of anti-bullying policies in schools, the effectiveness of inspection to determine whether…

  2. Reconceptualising Inquiry in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevins, Stuart; Price, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Decades of discussion and debate about how science is most effectively taught and learned have resulted in a number of similar but competing inquiry models. These aim to develop students learning of science through approaches which reflect the authenticity of science as practiced by professional scientists while being practical and manageable…

  3. The Nature of Pre-service Science Teachers' Argumentation in Inquiry-oriented Laboratory Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdem, Yasemin; Ertepinar, Hamide; Cakiroglu, Jale; Erduran, Sibel

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the kinds of argumentation schemes generated by pre-service elementary science teachers (PSTs) as they perform inquiry-oriented laboratory tasks, and to explore how argumentation schemes vary by task as well as by experimentation and discussion sessions. The model of argumentative and scientific inquiry was used as a design framework in the present study. According to the model, the inquiry of scientific topics was employed by groups of participants through experimentation and critical discussion sessions. The participants of the study were 35 PSTs, who teach middle school science to sixth through eighth grade students after graduation. The data were collected through video- and audio-recordings of the discussions made by PSTs in six inquiry-oriented laboratory sessions. For the analysis of data, pre-determined argumentation schemes by Walton were employed. The results illustrated that PSTs applied varied premises rather than only observations or reliable sources to ground their claims or to argue for a case or an action. It is also worthy of notice that the construction and evaluation of scientific knowledge claims resulted in different numbers and kinds of arguments. Results of this study suggest that designing inquiry-oriented laboratory environments, which are enriched with critical discussion, provides discourse opportunities that can support argumentation. Moreover, PSTs can be encouraged to support and promote argumentation in their future science classrooms if they engage in argumentation integrated instructional strategies.

  4. Towards a Knowledge Building Community: From Guided to Self-Organized Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cacciamani

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Over four academic years a design experiment was conducted involving four online university courses with the goal of shifting from Guided to Self-Organized Inquiry to foster Knowledge Building communities in the classroom. Quantitative analyses focused on notes contributed to collective knowledge spaces, as well as reading and building-on notes of others. All team members, including teachers, contributed at high levels. Students tended to produce more notes in the guided-inquiry approach but read more and demonstrated more even distribution of work as part of self-organized inquiry. Qualitative data focused on strategies students reported as new to their school experience. Strategies fell into three categories common to both guided and self-organizing inquiry: elaborating course content for depth of understanding, collaboration in an online environment, and metacognition, with greater reflection on idea development. Distinctive aspects of self-organized inquiry, according to student reports, included going beyond given information, linking new understandings and personal experiences, attention to the collective works of the community, and learning from instructor’s strategies.

  5. Using Science and the Internet as Everyday Classroom Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Eric

    1999-01-01

    The Everyday Classroom Tools project developed a K-6 inquiry-based curriculum to bring the tools of scientific inquiry, together with the Internet, into the elementary school classroom. Our curriculum encourages students and teachers to experience the adventure of science through investigation of the world around us. In this project, experts in computer science and astronomy at SAO worked closely with teachers and students in Massachusetts elementary schools to design and model activities which are developmentally appropriate, fulfill the needs of the curriculum standards of the school district, and provide students with a chance to experience for themselves the joy and excitement of scientific inquiry. The results of our efforts are embodied in the Threads of Inquiry, a series of free-flowing dialogues about inquiry-inspiring investigations that maintain a solid connection with our experience and with one another. These investigations are concerned with topics such as the motion of the Earth, shadows, light, and time. Our work emphasizes a direct hands-on approach through concrete experience, rather than memorization of facts.

  6. Using unfolding case studies in a subject-centered classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    The recently published report of the Carnegie Foundation's National Study of Nursing Education points out significant problems with classroom teaching in schools of nursing. This article suggests Palmer's idea of the subject-centered classroom as a way to transform nursing school classrooms into collaborative learning communities. For Palmer, the subject is the big idea of nursing practice-the nurse-patient/client/family/community relationship-that should take the lead in stimulating inquiry and discussion. The article goes on to describe how teachers can develop and use unfolding case studies to bring the subject to the center of the classroom. By doing so, the classroom becomes a place where students learn a sense of salience, develop their clinical imagination, and begin their formation as professional nurses.

  7. Corrective Feedback in L2 Latvian Classrooms: Teacher Perceptions versus the Observed Actualities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilans, Gatis

    2016-01-01

    This two-part study aims to investigate teacher perceptions about providing oral corrective feedback (CF) to minority students of Latvian as a second language and compare the perceptions to the actual provision of CF in L2 Latvian classrooms. The survey sample represents sixty-six L2 Latvian teachers while the classroom observations involved 13…

  8. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Delceva – Dizdarevik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aiming to discover the paths that enable teachers to manage their work with students in the classroom. To be an efficient teacher means to know with what and how to motivate students to learn. Teacher as an efficient classroom manager needs to have skills to plan and prepare the education process, know how to organize the teaching and how to guide the class. An efficient teacher moreover needs o establish positive classroom climate and working discipline. Also, teacher should be able to evaluate the progress of the students and self-evaluate his own work.In order to examine classroom management skills of teachers in Republic of Macedonia, a research has been made for teachers in primary schools in Republic of Macedonia. Instruments which will be used in order to complete the research and analyses are the following: questionnaire for teachers and educational policy analyses in our country in order to discover whether there is concrete strategy for promotion and implementation of classroom management on local and national level.Analyses of results show that there is a deficit of classroom management skills among teachers, which is due moreover to some lapses in initial education of teachers.

  9. Establishing Dependability and Confirmability in Naturalistic Inquiry Through an Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.; Guba, Egon G.

    The educational audit is suggested for assessing the process of inquiry for reliability and the product of inquiry for absence of bias. The inquiry auditor must review the inquiry processes to determine that they conform to norms of "good professional practice." He must review inquiry products to ensure they can be substantiated from…

  10. Unraveling the development of scientific literacy: Domain-specific inquiry support in a system of cognitive and social interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Iris Ellen

    The goal of this dissertation was to study how to harness technological tools in service of establishing a climate of inquiry in science classrooms. The research is a design experiment drawing on sociocultural and cognitive theory. As part of the BGuILE project, I developed software to support observational research of natural selection, and a complementary high school unit on evolution. Focusing on urban schools, I employed interpretive methods to examine learning as it unfolds in the classroom. I present design principles for realizing a climate of inquiry in technology-infused classrooms. This research contributes to technology design, teaching practice and educational and cognitive research. My pedagogical approach, Domain-Specific Strategic Support (DSSS), helps students analyze and synthesize primary data by making experts' considerations of content knowledge explicit. Students query data by constructing questions from a selection of comparison and variable types that are privileged in the domain. Students organize their data according to evidence categories that comprise a natural selection argument. I compared the inquiry process of contrastive cases: an honor group, a regular group and a lower track group. DSSS enabled students at different achievement levels to set up systematic comparisons, and construct empirically-based explanations. Prior knowledge and inquiry experience influenced spontaneous strategy use. Teacher guidance compensated for lack of experience, and enabled regular level students to employ strategies as frequently as honor students. I extend earlier research by proposing a taxonomy of both general and domain-specific reflective inquiry strategies. I argue that software, teacher and curriculum work in concert to sustain a climate of inquiry. Teachers help realize the potential that technological tools invite. Teachers reinforce software supports by encouraging students utilize technological tools, and by modeling their use. They also

  11. Comparing Two Inquiry Professional Development Interventions in Science on Primary Students' Questioning and Other Inquiry Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kim; Burgh, Gilbert; Kennedy, Callie

    2015-12-01

    Developing students' skills to pose and respond to questions and actively engage in inquiry behaviours enables students to problem solve and critically engage with learning and society. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of providing teachers with an intervention in inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum in comparison to an intervention in non-inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum on student questioning and other inquiry behaviours. Teacher participants in the comparison condition received training in four inquiry-based science units and in collaborative strategic reading. The experimental group, the community of inquiry (COI) condition, received training in facilitating a COI in addition to training in the same four inquiry-based science units. This study involved 227 students and 18 teachers in 9 primary schools across Brisbane, Australia. The teachers were randomly allocated by school to one of the two conditions. The study followed the students across years 6 and 7 and students' discourse during small group activities was recorded, transcribed and coded for verbal inquiry behaviours. In the second year of the study, students in the COI condition demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of procedural and substantive higher-order thinking questions and other inquiry behaviours than those in the comparison condition. Implementing a COI within an inquiry science curriculum develops students' questioning and science inquiry behaviours and allows teachers to foster inquiry skills predicated by the Australian Science Curriculum. Provision of inquiry science curriculum resources alone is not sufficient to promote the questioning and other verbal inquiry behaviours predicated by the Australian Science Curriculum.

  12. Comparing Two Inquiry Professional Development Interventions in Science on Primary Students' Questioning and Other Inquiry Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kim; Burgh, Gilbert; Kennedy, Callie

    2017-02-01

    Developing students' skills to pose and respond to questions and actively engage in inquiry behaviours enables students to problem solve and critically engage with learning and society. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of providing teachers with an intervention in inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum in comparison to an intervention in non-inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum on student questioning and other inquiry behaviours. Teacher participants in the comparison condition received training in four inquiry-based science units and in collaborative strategic reading. The experimental group, the community of inquiry (COI) condition, received training in facilitating a COI in addition to training in the same four inquiry-based science units. This study involved 227 students and 18 teachers in 9 primary schools across Brisbane, Australia. The teachers were randomly allocated by school to one of the two conditions. The study followed the students across years 6 and 7 and students' discourse during small group activities was recorded, transcribed and coded for verbal inquiry behaviours. In the second year of the study, students in the COI condition demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of procedural and substantive higher-order thinking questions and other inquiry behaviours than those in the comparison condition. Implementing a COI within an inquiry science curriculum develops students' questioning and science inquiry behaviours and allows teachers to foster inquiry skills predicated by the Australian Science Curriculum. Provision of inquiry science curriculum resources alone is not sufficient to promote the questioning and other verbal inquiry behaviours predicated by the Australian Science Curriculum.

  13. Using online media to promote scientific discourse and support science inquiry learning and teaching of practicing elementary teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accalogoun, Lea Brigitte

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the use of online media to engage practicing elementary teachers in scientific discourse supports their learning to teach inquiry-based science. Twenty-eight practicing elementary teachers enrolled in 4 weeks of intensive graduate elementary science methods were involved in the study. The teachers were provided with opportunities to experience inquiry-based activities, develop good explanations for their claims, and engage in online discourse for negotiations of ideas concerning the claims. The findings reported a significant improvement (p portfolios showed that most participants, prior to the online use, had difficulty in developing good arguments for discussion. The results of the study supported a correlation between teachers' improvement in beliefs about science inquiry and science inquiry teaching and their planning to carry out inquiry-based science in the classroom. This study provides insights about the challenges of helping elementary teachers to engage in science inquiry beyond the initial stages of question posing, data collection and analysis, and drawing conclusions---they need to also engage in sharing results, peer review, and revision of outcomes. The study describes challenges of using online resources to support the process of scientific argumentation and offers suggestions for the design of online portfolios and teacher development activities using online interactions.

  14. Challenging Transmission Modes of Teaching in Science Classrooms: Enhancing Learner-Centredness through Dialogicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehesvuori, Sami; Ramnarain, Umesh; Viiri, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    There is an ongoing reform towards more inquiry-based teaching in school curriculum policy in South Africa. Reform towards more inquiry-based approaches is already integrated in pre-service teacher education programmes. As inquiry-based approaches have been gaining momentum worldwide, there is an increasing concern that dialogic interaction in classroom communication is being neglected. This is especially within teacher-orchestrated classroom interactions that should foster greater learner centredness and thus authentic scientific inquiry. In learner-centred teaching approaches, student contributions should be explicitly taken into account as part of classroom interactions in science. Learner-centred approaches provide the rationale for improved interaction, especially when student contributions should be considered within teacher-orchestrated communications. The aim of this study is to bring forth indicators that are connected to different forms of interactions and complement the dialogic-authoritative categorization through in-depth analysis of two lesson transcript examples. Even though over-authoritative and even transmission modes of communication seemed to prevail in South African classrooms, it is through finding building blocks for dialogicity this status can be challenged towards more learner-centred interaction. The explicitness of dialogicity and fundamentally contrasting differences between examples of dialogic and authoritative approaches are presented through the in-depth analysis of classroom interactions of two case episodes. Implications for teaching and teacher education are discussed.

  15. Narrative art inquiry and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jennifer

    Narrative art inquiry is a new qualitative research methodology. It is different from the narrative approaches used by some nurse investigators because the study's findings are presented in the form of creative writing. In this article the author describes narrative art inquiry using material from research that used this approach to study anorexia nervosa. The author believes that narrative art inquiry has a wider application and could be used to study other types of psychological illness and physiological distress.

  16. What precisely works in Appreciative Inquiry?

    OpenAIRE

    Aksu, Kübra

    2014-01-01

    In deze masterproef wordt, aan de hand van kwalitatief onderzoek, gepeild naar de werkende elementen van Appreciative Inquiry. De recente wetenschappelijke literatuur omtrent Appreciative Inquiry bekritiseert een te grote focus op het positieve. Een focus op het positieve is nuttig maar het is geen doel op zich. Het doel van Appreciative Inquiry is het genereren van een nieuwe en betere toekomst. Daarnaast is er, in de context van change management, een sterke groei waar te nemen in het aanta...

  17. Learning to Teach Inquiry: A Course in Inquiry-Based Science for Future Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Angelika; Walker, Mark; Schluter, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    We developed a course in inquiry-based science for students training to become primary school teachers. The emphasis of the course was teaching students to do inquiry-based science activities themselves, as this is the best way of learning how to teach using inquiry-based methods. (Contains 1 table.)

  18. Promoting Inquiry-Based Science Instruction: The Validation of the Science Teacher Inquiry Rubric (STIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec M.; Beerer, Karen M.

    2003-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards recognize that inquiry-based instruction holds significant promise for developing scientifically literate students. The Science Teacher Inquiry Rubric (STIR) was developed based upon the National Science Education Standards' essential features of inquiry instruction (NRC, 2000). A pilot study using a…

  19. Primary Teachers Conducting Inquiry Projects: Effects on Attitudes towards Teaching Science and Conducting Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalderen-Smeets, Sandra I.; Walma van der Molen, Juliette H.; van Hest, Erna G. W. C. M.; Poortman, Cindy

    2017-01-01

    This study used an experimental, pretest-posttest control group design to investigate whether participation in a large-scale inquiry project would improve primary teachers' attitudes towards teaching science and towards conducting inquiry. The inquiry project positively affected several elements of teachers' attitudes. Teachers felt less anxious…

  20. Comparing Two Inquiry Professional Development Interventions in Science on Primary Students' Questioning and Other Inquiry Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kim; Burgh, Gilbert; Kennedy, Callie

    2017-01-01

    Developing students' skills to pose and respond to questions and actively engage in inquiry behaviours enables students to problem solve and critically engage with learning and society. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of providing teachers with an intervention in inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum in comparison…

  1. Exercise in Inquiry: Critical Thinking in an Inquiry-Based Exercise Physiology Laboratory Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPasquale, Dana M.; Mason, Cheryl L.; Kolkhorst, Fred W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an inquiry-based teaching method implemented in an undergraduate exercise physiology laboratory course. Indicates students' strong, positive feelings about the inquiry-based teaching method and shows that inquiry-based learning results in a higher order of learning not typically observed in traditional style classes. This teaching method…

  2. Contextual inquiry for medical device design

    CERN Document Server

    Privitera, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Contextual Inquiry for Medical Device Design helps users understand the everyday use of medical devices and the way their usage supports the development of better products and increased market acceptance. The text explains the concept of contextual inquiry using real-life examples to illustrate its application. Case studies provide a frame of reference on how contextual inquiry is successfully used during product design, ultimately producing safer, improved medical devices. Presents the ways contextual inquiry can be used to inform the evaluation and business case of technologyHelps users

  3. Using technology to support science inquiry learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P John Williams

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study of a teacher’s experience in implementing an inquiry approach to his teaching over a period of two years with two different classes. His focus was on using a range of information technologies to support student inquiry learning. The study demonstrates the need to consider the characteristics of students when implementing an inquiry approach, and also the influence of the teachers level of understanding and related confidence in such an approach. The case also indicated that a range of technologies can be effective in supporting student inquiry learning.

  4. Teacher candidates in an online post-baccalaureate science methods course: Implications for teaching science inquiry with technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Erica L.

    Online learning is becoming more prevalent in today's education and is changing the way students learn and instructors teach. This study proposed using an informative case study design within a multilevel conceptual framework as teacher candidates were learning to teach and use science inquiry while in an online post-baccalaureate science methods course. The purposes were to (a) explore whether the teacher candidates had a thorough understanding of scientific inquiry and how to implement higher-order thinking skills, (b) examine whether or not the teacher candidates used a variety of computer-based instructional technologies when choosing instructional objectives, and (c) identify barriers that impede teacher candidates from using science inquiry or technology singly, or the ability to incorporate technology into learning science inquiry. The findings indicate that an online approach in preparing science teachers holds great potential for using innovative technology to teach science inquiry. First, the teacher candidates did incorporate essential features of classroom inquiry, however it was limited and varied in the type of inquiry used. Second, of the 86 lesson plans submitted by the teacher candidates, less than twelve percent of the learning objectives involved higher-order skills that promoted science inquiry. Third, results supported that when using technology in their lesson planning, participants had widely varying backgrounds in reference to their familiarity with technology. However, even though each participant used some form or another, the technology used was fairly low level. Finally, when discussing implementing inquiry-based science in the lesson plans, this study identified time as a reason that participants may not be pushing for more inquiry-based lessons. The researcher also identifies that school placements were a huge factor in the amount of inquiry-based skills coded in the lesson plans. The study concludes that online teacher preparation

  5. Reflections as near-peer facilitators of an inquiry project for undergraduate anatomy: Successes and challenges from a term of trial-and-error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Lauren M; Michels, Alison; Szymus, Julianna; Law, Wyanne; Edwin Ho, Man-Hymn; Qu, Fei; Yeung, Ralph T T; Chow, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Near-peer facilitators (senior students serving as facilitators to their more junior peers) bring a unique student-based perspective to teaching. With fewer years of teaching experience however, students who become involved in a facilitator role typically develop related skills quickly through a process of trial-and-error within the classroom. The aim of this paper is to report on the authors' own experiences and reflections as student near-peer facilitators for an inquiry-based project in an undergraduate anatomy course. Three areas of the facilitator experience are explored: (1) offering adequate guidance as facilitators of inquiry, (2) motivating students to engage in the inquiry process, and (3) fostering creativity in learning. A practical framework for providing guidance to students is discussed which offers facilitators a scaffold for asking questions and assisting students through the inquiry process. Considerations for stimulating intrinsic motivations toward inquiry learning are made, paying attention to ways in which facilitators might influence feelings of motivation towards learning. Also, the role of creativity in inquiry learning is explored by highlighting the actions facilitators can take to foster a creative learning environment. Finally, recommendations are made for the development of formalized training programs that aid near-peer facilitators in the acquisition of facilitation skills before entering into a process of trial-and-error within the classroom. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  6. Authentic Materials and Cultural Content in EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçkaya, Ferit

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to answer the questions of when and how authentic materials should be used in EFL classrooms, and how cultural content may be included in the curriculum. To address these questions, the paper is organized in two parts. In the first part, the definition of authentic materials is given. Then advantages and disadvantages of the use of…

  7. Promoting 21st-Century Skills in the Science Classroom by Adapting Cookbook Lab Activities: The Case of DNA Extraction of Wheat Germ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alozie, Nonye M.; Grueber, David J.; Dereski, Mary O.

    2012-01-01

    How can science instruction engage students in 21st-century skills and inquiry-based learning, even when doing simple labs in the classroom? We collaborated with teachers in professional development workshops to transform "cookbook" activities into engaging laboratory experiences. We show how to change the common classroom activity of DNA…

  8. Promoting 21st-Century Skills in the Science Classroom by Adapting Cookbook Lab Activities: The Case of DNA Extraction of Wheat Germ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alozie, Nonye M.; Grueber, David J.; Dereski, Mary O.

    2012-01-01

    How can science instruction engage students in 21st-century skills and inquiry-based learning, even when doing simple labs in the classroom? We collaborated with teachers in professional development workshops to transform "cookbook" activities into engaging laboratory experiences. We show how to change the common classroom activity of DNA…

  9. Three case studies of three high school teachers' definitions, beliefs, and implementation practices of inquiry-based science method including barriers to and facilitators of successful implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn-Morrison, Kimberly D.

    This study involved three teachers in various stages of implementation of inquiry-based science method. The cases were chosen because one participant was a novice in using inquiry-based science method, one participant was in her second year of implementation, and the third participant was experienced with inquiry-based science method. The cases were set in a rural high school in three different science classrooms. One of the classrooms was a regular biology class. One of the classrooms was an honors oceanography class and another was an advanced placement environmental science classroom. Data sources included interviews, observations, and document collection. Interviews, observations, and document collection were used to triangulate data. Each classroom was observed five times. Interviews were conducted at the beginning of the semester with each participant and at the end of the semester. Follow-up interviews were conducted after each observation. Documents were collected such as each teacher's lesson plans, student work, and assignments. Data was initially organized according to the research areas of teacher's definition, teacher's beliefs, teacher's barriers to implementation, and teacher's enablers to implementation. Then, patterns emerging from each of these cases were organized. Lastly, patterns emerging across cases were compared in a cross-case analysis. Patterns shared between cases were: Participants related inquiry-based science method with hands-on learning activities. Participants saw students as the center of the learning process. Participants had positive beliefs about constructivist learning practices that were strengthened after implementation of inquiry-based teaching. Facilitators of successful implementation of inquiry-based science method were positive student motivation, students' retention of knowledge, and a positive experience for lower level students. Barriers to successful implementation were teachers not having complete control of the

  10. What Do Cells Really Look Like? An Inquiry into Students' Difficulties in Visualising a 3-D Biological Cell and Lessons for Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijapurkar, Jyotsna; Kawalkar, Aisha; Nambiar, Priya

    2014-01-01

    In our explorations of students' concepts in an inquiry science classroom with grade 6 students from urban schools in India, we uncovered a variety of problems in their understanding of biological cells as structural and functional units of living organisms. In particular, we found not only that they visualised the cell as a two-dimensional (2-D)…

  11. What Do Cells Really Look Like? An Inquiry into Students' Difficulties in Visualising a 3-D Biological Cell and Lessons for Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijapurkar, Jyotsna; Kawalkar, Aisha; Nambiar, Priya

    2014-01-01

    In our explorations of students' concepts in an inquiry science classroom with grade 6 students from urban schools in India, we uncovered a variety of problems in their understanding of biological cells as structural and functional units of living organisms. In particular, we found not only that they visualised the cell as a two-dimensional (2-D)…

  12. Creating A Culture Of Scientific Inquiry Through Research Experiences For Teachers And Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjorski, N.; Hall, M.

    2006-12-01

    Creating A Culture Of Scientific Inquiry (CACOSI) is a National Science Foundation funded pilot project designed to help middle and high school teachers and students achieve a scientific understanding of their world through authentic short and long-term classroom and field research experiences. Throughout the past year CACOSI had reached out to several Northern New Mexico minority-serving schools to implement inquiry- based projects in 6th, 7th, and 8th grade classrooms such as weather, earthquake, and schoolyard ecosystem monitoring. Professional scientists were also introduced into the classroom to act as teachers and mentors of the science process and help expose students to scientific career opportunities. Additionally, CACOSI has developed a one-week residential Summer Science Camp to introduce the students and teachers to hands-on Earth and environmental science investigations with the assistance of professional scientists in the field. Development of this camp significantly strengthened and expanded the partnerships that have been created over the past three years and will allow us to expand the CACOSI project to include more field-based exploration during the 2006-2007 school year across two school systems. Throughout this project we have found that consistent teacher support is required to implement authentic research projects in the classroom. The summer science camp was particularly helpful to the teachers in developing their comfort with the inherent unpredictability of hands-on field research projects. This year we are working with the schools to take the students and teachers out of the classroom setting into the field for one day each month with professional scientists' assistance. This will allow us to explore more intensive field investigations and overcome some of the barriers created by the classroom structure and schedule.

  13. Using articulation and inscription as catalysts for reflection: Design principles for reflective inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Ben Tun-Bin

    2003-07-01

    The demand for students to engage in complex student-driven and information-rich inquiry investigations poses challenges to existing learning environments. Students are not familiar with this style of work, and lack the skills, tools, and expectations it demands, often forging blindly forward in the investigation. If students are to be successful, they need to learn to be reflective inquirers, periodically stepping back from an investigation to evaluate their work. The fundamental goal of my dissertation is to understand how to design learning environments to promote and support reflective inquiry. I have three basic research questions: how to define this mode of work, how to help students learn it, and understanding how it facilitates reflection when enacted in a classroom. I take an exploratory approach in which, through iterative cycles of design, development, and reflection, I develop principles of design for reflective inquiry, instantiate those principles in the design of a software environment, and test that software in the context of classroom work. My work contributes to the understanding of reflective inquiry in three ways: First, I define a task model that describes the kinds of operations (cognitive tasks) that students should engage in as reflective inquirers. These operations are defined in terms of two basic tasks: articulation and inscription, which serve as catalysts for externalizing student thinking as objects of and triggers for reflection. Second, I instantiate the task model in the design of software tools (the Progress Portfolio). And, through proof of concept pilot studies, I examine how the task model and tools helped students with their investigative classroom work. Finally, I take a step back from these implementations and articulate general design principles for reflective inquiry with the goal of informing the design of other reflective inquiry learning environments. There are three design principles: (1) Provide a designated work space

  14. Thinking through children's literature in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes-Torres, Agustín; Soler-Pardo, Betlem

    2014-01-01

    This book is the result of understanding literature as a central part of children's education. Fiction and nonfiction literary works constitute a source to open young minds and to help them understand how and why people - themselves included - live as they do, or to question through critical lenses whether they could live otherwise. By integrating philological, cultural, and pedagogical inquiries, Thinking through Children's Literature in the Classroom approaches the use of literature as a crucial factor to motivate students not only to improve their literacy skills, but also to develop their

  15. Virtual Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove

    2013-01-01

    In the Scandinavian countries: Sweden, Norway and Denmark, the project GNU (Grænseoverskridende Nordisk Undervisning, i.e. Transnational Nordic Teaching) is experimenting with ways of conducting teaching across the borders in the elementary schools. The cloud classes are organised with one class ...... and benefits in regard to learning and pedagogy with virtual classroom....

  16. Classroom Tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructor, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article features the latest classroom technologies namely the FLY Pentop, WriteToLearn, and a new iris scan identification system. The FLY Pentop is a computerized pen from Leapster that "magically" understands what kids write and draw on special FLY paper. WriteToLearn is an automatic grading software from Pearson Knowledge Technologies and…

  17. Classroom Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jacqueline; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes five classroom activities or projects used in Canadian social studies classes. Includes discussions of the use of artifacts, a field trip to Spain, a simulation of the Earth Summit meeting, and the application of mahatma Gandhi's philosophy to current problems. (CFR)

  18. Depth and breadth: Bridging the gap between scientific inquiry and high-stakes testing with diverse junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jee Sun Emily

    This study explored how inquiry-based teaching and learning processes occurred in two teachers' diverse 8th grade Physical Science classrooms in a Program Improvement junior high school within the context of high-stakes standardized testing. Instructors for the courses examined included not only the two 8th grade science teachers, but also graduate fellows from a nearby university. Research was drawn from inquiry-based instruction in science education, the achievement gap, and the high stakes testing movement, as well as situated learning theory to understand how opportunities for inquiry were negotiated within the diverse classroom context. Transcripts of taped class sessions; student work samples; interviews of teachers and students; and scores from the California Standards Test in science were collected and analyzed. Findings indicated that the teachers provided structured inquiry in order to support their students in learning about forces and to prepare them for the standardized test. Teachers also supported students in generating evidence-based explanations, connecting inquiry-based investigations with content on forces, proficiently using science vocabulary, and connecting concepts about forces to their daily lives. Findings from classroom data revealed constraints to student learning: students' limited language proficiency, peer counter culture, and limited time. Supports were evidenced as well: graduate fellows' support during investigations, teachers' guided questioning, standardized test preparation, literacy support, and home-school connections. There was no statistical difference in achievement on the Forces Unit test or science standardized test between classes with graduate fellows and without fellows. There was also no statistical difference in student performance between the two teachers' classrooms, even though their teaching styles were very different. However, there was a strong correlation between students' achievement on the chapter test and

  19. Eliciting User Requirements Using Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Carol Kernitzki

    2010-01-01

    Many software development projects fail because they do not meet the needs of users, are over-budget, and abandoned. To address this problem, the user requirements elicitation process was modified based on principles of Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry, commonly used in organizational development, aims to build organizations, processes,…

  20. 4-H Science Inquiry Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jeremy W.; Black, Lynette; Willis, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Studies support science inquiry as a positive method and approach for 4-H professionals and volunteers to use for teaching science-based practices to youth. The development of a science inquiry video series has yielded positive results as it relates to youth development education and science. The video series highlights how to conduct science-rich…

  1. Pursuing Aesthetic Inquiry in Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    . Although aesthetic inquiry to some extent resides in most Participatory Design practice, we see the need for elaborating this perspective and to further build Participatory Design practice, tools and techniques that address this issue. The Fictional Inquiry technique is presented as an illustrating example...... for the Kattegat Marine Centre was developed. ...

  2. An Inquiry-Based Linear Algebra Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haohao; Posey, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Linear algebra is a standard undergraduate mathematics course. This paper presents an overview of the design and implementation of an inquiry-based teaching material for the linear algebra course which emphasizes discovery learning, analytical thinking and individual creativity. The inquiry-based teaching material is designed to fit the needs of a…

  3. Using Technology to Support Science Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. John; Nguyen, Nhung; Mangan, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of a teacher's experience in implementing an inquiry approach to his teaching over a period of two years with two different classes. His focus was on using a range of information technologies to support student inquiry learning. Data was collected over the two year period by observation, interview and student work…

  4. Multimodal Narrative Inquiry: Six Teacher Candidates Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Cynthia M.; Rottmann, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present findings of a study on the implementation of a multimodal teacher narrative inquiry component, theoretically grounded by Rosenblatt's theory of transaction analysis, methodologically supported by action research and practically enacted by narrative inquiry and multimodal learning. In particular, the component offered…

  5. Does Artificial Tutoring Foster Inquiry Based Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoelz, Alexander; Swertz, Christian; Forstner, Alexandra; Barberi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    This contribution looks at the Intelligent Tutoring Interface for Technology Enhanced Learning, which integrates multistage-learning and inquiry-based learning in an adaptive e-learning system. Based on a common pedagogical ontology, adaptive e-learning systems can be enabled to recommend learning objects and activities, which follow inquiry-based…

  6. 4-H Science Inquiry Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jeremy W.; Black, Lynette; Willis, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Studies support science inquiry as a positive method and approach for 4-H professionals and volunteers to use for teaching science-based practices to youth. The development of a science inquiry video series has yielded positive results as it relates to youth development education and science. The video series highlights how to conduct science-rich…

  7. Preservice teachers working with narrative inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Peer

    2016-01-01

    ’-module is a 6 week full-time study including a 2 weeks stay at a youth folk high school, where the teacher students are to focus on a self-determined element of the praxis. The students are to study this focus through narrative inquiry based on the North-American tradition within narrative inquiry (Clandinin...

  8. The Inquiry Approach in Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ruth Lois; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study to assess the impact of an inquiry-oriented curriculum in a dental hygiene program is described. Two instruments, designed to measure student perception of personal and faculty inquiry and disinquiry behavior, were administered. The implications of the findings are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  9. Teaching Science as Inquiry. Fastback 246.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Steven J.

    The use of the inquiry approach in the teaching of elementary science is examined and advocated in this publication. The position that an inquiry approach is the best way to teach and learn science is upheld and its influence on the development of positive attitudes towards science is stressed. Section titles include: (1) "A Tale of Two Teachers"…

  10. Learning Analytics for Communities of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanovic, Vitomir; Gaševic, Dragan; Hatala, Marek

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes doctoral research that focuses on the development of a learning analytics framework for inquiry-based digital learning. Building on the Community of Inquiry model (CoI)--a foundation commonly used in the research and practice of digital learning and teaching--this research builds on the existing body of knowledge in two…

  11. Eliciting User Requirements Using Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Carol Kernitzki

    2010-01-01

    Many software development projects fail because they do not meet the needs of users, are over-budget, and abandoned. To address this problem, the user requirements elicitation process was modified based on principles of Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry, commonly used in organizational development, aims to build organizations, processes,…

  12. "Naturalist Inquiry" and Grounded Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Barney G. Glaser

    2004-01-01

    Das Buch "Naturalist Inquiry" (NI) von LINCOLN und GUBA (1985) spielt eine wichtige Rolle für die Qualitative Datenanalyse (QDA). Dies ist für das Feld der QDA unproblematisch: NI hat hier wesentlich zur Verdeutlichung und weiteren Entfaltung methodologischer Fragen beigetragen. Bezogen auf die originäre Grounded Theory (GT) hat sich NI jedoch als Hindernis erwiesen durch sukzessive Mitnutzung und "Verfälschung" der ersteren: Für LINCOLN und GUBA ist GT ganz offensichtlich ein QDA-Verfahren (...

  13. "Naturalist Inquiry" und Grounded Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Barney G. Glaser

    2004-01-01

    Das Buch "Naturalist Inquiry" (NI) von LINCOLN und GUBA (1985) spielt eine wichtige Rolle für die Qualitative Datenanalyse (QDA). Dies ist für das Feld der QDA unproblematisch: NI hat hier wesentlich zur Verdeutlichung und weiteren Entfaltung methodologischer Fragen beigetragen. Bezogen auf die originäre Grounded Theory (GT) hat sich NI jedoch als Hindernis erwiesen durch sukzessive Mitnutzung und "Verfälschung" der ersteren: Für LINCOLN und GUBA ist GT ganz offensichtlich ein QDA-Verfahren (...

  14. Theory versus practice at implementation of inquiry-based approaches into physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferová, Miriam Spodniaková; Raganová, Janka; Hruška, Martin; Holec, Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    At present a lot of ideas for student inquiry-based activities accompanied with methodical remarks and instructions for teachers exist and can be used at physics lessons at lower and upper secondary levels. A need of the use of the teaching methods that support an independent student work as well as active learning approaches has been reflected also in the Slovak state educational program at various educational levels. Experiences of teachers who have used inquiry-based approaches in the classrooms are often in the contrary with expectations of these didactical trends. The paper aims to compare the theory and the practice of the implementation of inquiry-based activities in physics teaching. Practical experience was gained implementing activities for science education developed within the Chain Reaction project running at Matej Bel University Banska Bystrica. Opinions of teachers were investigated with the help of questionnaires, evaluation meetings and structured interviews. Their analysis identified many problems that the teachers had met during the implementation of the inquiry-based approaches in their teaching, as well as benefits of those activities for development of student competences.

  15. Barriers Inhibiting Inquiry-Based Science Teaching and Potential Solutions: Perceptions of Positively Inclined Early Adopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Michael; Danaia, Lena; McKinnon, David H.

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, calls for the adoption of inquiry-based pedagogies in the science classroom have formed a part of the recommendations for large-scale high school science reforms. However, these pedagogies have been problematic to implement at scale. This research explores the perceptions of 34 positively inclined early-adopter teachers in relation to their implementation of inquiry-based pedagogies. The teachers were part of a large-scale Australian high school intervention project based around astronomy. In a series of semi-structured interviews, the teachers identified a number of common barriers that prevented them from implementing inquiry-based approaches. The most important barriers identified include the extreme time restrictions on all scales, the poverty of their common professional development experiences, their lack of good models and definitions for what inquiry-based teaching actually is, and the lack of good resources enabling the capacity for change. Implications for expectations of teachers and their professional learning during educational reform and curriculum change are discussed.

  16. Conceptualising inquiry based education in mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomhøj, Morten; Artigue, Michéle

    2013-01-01

    The terms inquiry-based learning (IBL) and inquiry-based education (IBE) have appeared with increasing frequency in educational policy and curriculum documents related to mathematics and science education over the past decade, indicating a major educational trend. We go back to the origin...... of inquiry as a pedagogical concept in the work of Dewey (e.g. 1916, 1938) to analyse and discuss its migration to science and mathematics education. For conceptualizing inquiry-based mathematics education (IBME) it is important to analyse how this concept resonates with already well-established theoretical...... frameworks in mathematics education. Six such frameworks are analysed from the perspective of inquiry: the problem-solving tradition, the Theory of Didactical Situations, the Realistic Mathematics Education programme, the mathematical modelling perspective, the Anthropological Theory of Didactics...

  17. Inquiry identity and science teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Nadine; Wilmes, Sara E. D.; Bellino, Marissa

    2016-06-01

    An effective inquiry-oriented science teacher possesses more than the skills of teaching through investigation. They must address philosophies, and ways of interacting as a member of a group of educators who value and practice science through inquiry. Professional development opportunities can support inquiry identity development, but most often they address teaching practices from limited cognitive perspectives, leaving unexplored the shifts in identity that may accompany teachers along their journey in becoming skilled in inquiry-oriented instruction. In this forum article, we envision Victoria Deneroff's argument that "professional development could be designed to facilitate reflexive transformation of identity within professional learning environments" (2013, p. 33). Instructional coaching, cogenerative dialogues, and online professional communities are discussed as ways to promote inquiry identity formation and collaboration in ways that empower and deepen science teachers' conversations related to personal and professional efficacy in the service of improved science teaching and learning.

  18. Naturalistic Inquiry in E-Learning Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Agostinho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author explains how and why one particular qualitative research approach, the naturalistic inquiry paradigm, was implemented in an e-learning research study that investigated the use of the World Wide Web technology in higher education. A framework is presented that situates the research study within the qualitative research literature. The author then justifies how the study was compliant with naturalistic inquiry and concludes by presenting a model for judging the quality of such research. The purpose of this article is to provide an example of how naturalistic inquiry can be implemented in e-learning research that can serve as a guide for researchers undertaking this form of qualitative inquiry. As such, the focus of the article is to illustrate how methodological issues pertaining to naturalistic inquiry were addressed and justified to represent a rigorous research approach rather than presenting the results of the research study.

  19. Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurain, Bradley, Ed.; Ha, Phan Le, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The benefits and advantages of classroom practices incorporating unity-in-diversity and diversity-in-unity are what "Multilevel and Diverse Classrooms" is all about. Multilevel classrooms--also known as mixed-ability or heterogeneous classrooms--are a fact of life in ESOL programs around the world. These classrooms are often not only multilevel…

  20. From direct instruction to inquiry learning in the earth sciences: common challenges and opportunities across cultures in the Singapore context

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, J.; Rubin, C. M.; Eriksson, S. C.; Hill, E.; Phua, A.; Yong Hon Zun, F.

    2013-12-01

    At all educational levels and across cultures, moving from direct instruction to inquiry learning is challenging for both students and instructors. Is knowledge fixed, to be dispensed by an instructor and received by the learner? Or, is knowledge provisional and dynamic, to be sought and constructed actively by a learner under the guidance of her instructor? In a class for beginning PhD students, we initially observed great cultural discomfort with criticizing others' work. We emphasize the importance of critical discourse in science and provide a small, seminar-style environment in which students can openly critique the work of their colleagues and superiors. We have seen progress toward an intellectual environment where open critique is part of mutual respect. At the secondary level, we provide training and support for teachers to make the transition from knowledge dispenser to learning guide. Inquiry learning opens up the classroom discourse, which can move beyond the teacher's own content knowledge. In our teacher workshops, we model the teacher not as all-knowing, but rather as investigator and learning guide. By taking the role of active learners, teachers deepen their own content knowledge and can anticipate the questions that students might ask; this reduces the challenges of implementing inquiry learning in their own classrooms. With sufficient guidance, institutional support, and chance to practice in a supportive environment, both secondary teachers and graduate students move toward inquiry learning.

  1. Negotiating the Way to Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Mason; McDermott, Mark

    2013-01-01

    One challenge of teaching science is getting students to communicate as scientists do. Scientists employ many different forms of communication as they develop and pass on information to others. Unfortunately, in many classrooms, student communication about science concepts is limited to filling in information on worksheets, finishing…

  2. We Look More, Listen More, Notice More: Impact of Sustained Professional Development on Head Start Teachers' Inquiry-Based and Culturally-Relevant Science Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrig, Gillian H.; Dubosarsky, Mia; Mason, Annie; Carlson, Stephan; Murphy, Barbara

    2011-10-01

    Despite many scholars' recommendations, science is often avoided during early childhood education. Among the reasons provided by early childhood teachers for the exclusion of science from their daily routines included science anxiety, low self-efficacy with respect to teaching science, lack of experience participating in science activities as students, or the notion that literacy and language are more important during the early years. In minority populations the problem is even greater due to identification of science with the `culture of. This article presents results from Ah Neen Dush, a sustained and transformative professional development program for Head Start teachers on an American Indian Reservation. The goal of the program is to support early childhood teachers in developing inquiry-based and culturally-relevant teaching practices. Through analysis of teachers' classroom practices, surveys and interviews, we explore changes in teachers' attitudes toward science and inquiry-based practices. Classroom observations were conducted using CLASS (Classroom assessment Scoring System), a tool used to evaluate the quality of classroom interactions. After 1 year of professional development teachers' attitudes were found to improve and after 2 years teachers classroom practices were more inquiry-based with statistically significant increases in CLASS observation scores.

  3. Code-Switching: L1-Coded Mediation in a Kindergarten Foreign Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a qualitative inquiry that investigated the role of teachers' mediation in three different modes of coding in a kindergarten foreign language classroom in China (i.e. L2-coded intralinguistic mediation, L1-coded cross-lingual mediation, and L2-and-L1-mixed mediation). Through an exploratory examination of the varying effects…

  4. Turkish Preservice Science Teachers' Socioscientific Issues-Based Teaching Practices in Middle School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genel, Abdulkadir; Topçu, Mustafa Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite a growing body of research and curriculum reforms including socioscientific issues (SSI) across the world, how preservice science teachers (PST) or in-service science teachers can teach SSI in science classrooms needs further inquiry. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the abilities of PSTs to teach SSI in middle…

  5. Your Science Classroom: Becoming an Elementary/Middle School Science Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldston, M. Jenice; Downey, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Designed around a practical "practice-what-you-teach" approach to methods instruction, "Your Science Classroom: Becoming an Elementary/Middle School Science Teacher" is based on current constructivist philosophy, organized around 5E inquiry, and guided by the National Science Education Teaching Standards. Written in a reader-friendly style, the…

  6. Zooming in and Out: Exploring Teacher Competencies in Inclusive Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Joo; Recchia, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored issues of social inclusion for young children with disabilities through a systematic reanalysis of six preschool case studies focusing on strategies that teachers used in daily practice. Our analysis process entailed a reexamination of classroom observations and teacher inquiry data, focusing back and forth between the…

  7. Diversifying Instruction and Shifting Authority: A Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) Analysis of Classroom Participant Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchen, Terri; Smithenry, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent calls asking science teachers to increase student authority by diversifying instruction appear stalled by a lack of empirical evidence supporting the actual implementation of any such shifts. To better support the practical integration of more student-directed inquiry into the science classroom, we consider one teacher's day-to-day…

  8. Evaluating Alignment of Technology and Primary Source Use within a History Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Kathleen; Locascio, David

    2008-01-01

    Many researchers in the social studies have supported the use of primary sources in history classrooms as a support for historical inquiry. Although primary sources have become accessible via the Internet, simply using digital primary sources, does not automatically translate into historical thinking or technology best practice. Consequently, an…

  9. Authentic Research Experience and "Big Data" Analysis in the Classroom: Maize Response to Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarevitch, Irina; Frechette, Cameo; Wiatros, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Integration of inquiry-based approaches into curriculum is transforming the way science is taught and studied in undergraduate classrooms. Incorporating quantitative reasoning and mathematical skills into authentic biology undergraduate research projects has been shown to benefit students in developing various skills necessary for future…

  10. Immersive Simulations for Smart Classrooms: Exploring Evolutionary Concepts in Secondary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Michelle; Slotta, James D.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the design of an immersive simulation and inquiry activity for technology-enhanced classrooms. Using a co-design method, researchers worked with a high school biology teacher to create a rainforest simulation, distributed across several large displays in the room to immerse students in the environment. The authors created and…

  11. Building Concepts through Writing-to-Learn in College Physics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Shawn

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws on an action research inquiry into my teaching practice featuring careful analysis of the experiences of some of the students in my college-level introductory college physics course. Specifically, the research describes and interprets the role of Writing-to-Learn pedagogies in a physics classroom with a view to exploring how such…

  12. Integrating Literacy and Science in the Classroom: From Ecomysteries to Readers Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hindi, Amelia E.

    2003-01-01

    Outlines activities that encourage students' talking, reading, and writing about science in a way that supports both inquiry-based science instruction and a student-centered approach to literacy. Notes that talk is very important to science learning in the elementary classroom. Describes how writing "ecomysteries," dialogue journals, and grant…

  13. Zooming in and Out: Exploring Teacher Competencies in Inclusive Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Joo; Recchia, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored issues of social inclusion for young children with disabilities through a systematic reanalysis of six preschool case studies focusing on strategies that teachers used in daily practice. Our analysis process entailed a reexamination of classroom observations and teacher inquiry data, focusing back and forth between the…

  14. Happy Places, Horrible Times, and Scary Learners: Affective Performances and Sticky Objects in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraian, Srikala; Khoja-Moolji, Shenila

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on data from two studies conducted in US public schools, this paper traces the affective productions and performances of teachers to illustrate the role of affect in delineating (non)normative pedagogical practices in inclusive classrooms. Occupying a borderland space in narrative inquiry that permitted the straddling of differing…

  15. Building Social Inclusion through Critical Arts-Based Pedagogies in University Classroom Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Sharon Verner; Chappell, Drew

    2016-01-01

    In humanities and education university classrooms, the authors facilitated counter-narrative arts-based inquiry projects in order to build critical thought and social inclusion. The first author examines public performance installations created by graduate students in elementary and bilingual education on needs-based and dignity-based rights of…

  16. Ben Johnson and Social Studies Teaching--Classroom Use of Current Social Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Suggests steps for approaching discussion of controversial issues in the classroom, using the scandal of Canadian Olympian sprinter Ben Johnson as an example. Recommends the reflective inquiry approach, which necessitates framing the problem in relationship to student age, and with attention to the information available about the problem. (LS)

  17. Building Social Inclusion through Critical Arts-Based Pedagogies in University Classroom Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Sharon Verner; Chappell, Drew

    2016-01-01

    In humanities and education university classrooms, the authors facilitated counter-narrative arts-based inquiry projects in order to build critical thought and social inclusion. The first author examines public performance installations created by graduate students in elementary and bilingual education on needs-based and dignity-based rights of…

  18. Teaching inquiry in secondary school science: Beliefs and practice, challenges and program support

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlmoyle, Ann-E.

    In spite of a multi-decade mandate to enact inquiry in science, research reports that a large gap continues to exist in Ontario between the vision of science education presented in curriculum documents and what is enacted in the classroom. A three-staged, mixed methods design was chosen to examine teachers. beliefs and practices that contribute to an understanding of this longstanding gap in teaching practice related to inquiry. The participants in this study were secondary school science teachers currently employed by one medium-sized, urban & rural district public school board. Quantitative data was first collected through a self-reporting survey designed to explore teachers. beliefs related to teaching and learning in inquiry. Completed questionnaires were submitted by 80 % (n = 83) of the population of science teachers. Qualitative data, collected through semi-structured interviews (n = 17), were used to confirm and expand the quantitative findings. Quantitative analysis resulted in the development of an empirical framework to illustrate the dimensionality of teachers. beliefs and practices related to inquiry. Four types of science teachers were identified during qualitative analysis, each associated with a preferred type of inquiry and each identifiable by a cluster of beliefs. A stance was determined for each of these types of teachers representing their generalized view of teaching and learning related to inquiry including: utilitarian science, content-based science, authentic contextual science, and citizenship science. Additionally, each group of teachers could be associated with one of the four quadrants in my framework. Lastly, a beliefs profile was produced to represent each quadrant in this framework based on integration of the quantitative and qualitative findings. Challenges to enactment and types of program support to foster enactment of open-ended inquiry were identified by science teachers associated with each stance. A few of these challenges and

  19. Interrogative Model of Inquiry and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai; Sintonen, Matti

    2002-01-01

    Examines how the Interrogative Model of Inquiry (I-Model), developed for the purposes of epistemology and philosophy of science, could be applied to analyze elementary school students' process of inquiry in computer-supported learning. Suggests that the interrogative approach to inquiry can be productively applied for conceptualizing inquiry in…

  20. Addressing scientific literacy through content area reading and processes of scientific inquiry: What teachers report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Susan J.

    The purpose of this study was to interpret the experiences of secondary science teachers in Florida as they address the scientific literacy of their students through teaching content reading strategies and student inquiry skills. Knowledge of the successful integration of content reading and inquiry skills by experienced classroom teachers would be useful to many educators as they plan instruction to achieve challenging state and national standards for reading as well as science. The problem was investigated using grounded theory methodology. Open-ended questions were asked in three focus groups and six individual interviews that included teachers from various Florida school districts. The constant comparative approach was used to analyze the data. Initial codes were collapsed into categories to determine the conceptual relationships among the data. From this, the five core categories were determined to be Influencers, Issues, Perceptions, Class Routines, and Future Needs. These relate to the central phenomenon, Instructional Modifications, because teachers often described pragmatic and philosophical changes in their teaching as they deliberated to meet state standards in both reading and science. Although Florida's secondary science teachers have been asked to incorporate content reading strategies into their science instruction for the past several years, there was limited evidence of using these strategies to further student understanding of scientific processes. Most teachers saw little connection between reading and inquiry, other than the fact that students must know how to read to follow directions in the lab. Scientific literacy, when it was addressed by teachers, was approached mainly through class discussions, not reading. Teachers realized that students cannot learn secondary science content unless they read science text with comprehension; therefore the focus of reading instruction was on learning science content, not scientific literacy or student

  1. A well-started beginning elementary teacher's beliefs and practices in relation to reform recommendations about inquiry-based science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    2017-06-01

    Given reform recommendations emphasizing scientific inquiry and empirical evidence pointing to the difficulties beginning teachers face in enacting inquiry-based science, this study explores a well-started beginning elementary teacher's (Sofia) beliefs about inquiry-based science and related instructional practices. In order to explore Sofia's beliefs and instructional practices, several kinds of data were collected in a period of 9 months: a self-portrait and an accompanying narrative, a personal philosophy assignment, three interviews, three journal entries, ten lesson plans, and ten videotaped classroom observations. The analysis of these data showed that Sofia's beliefs and instructional practices were reform-minded. She articulated contemporary beliefs about scientific inquiry and how children learn science and was able to translate these beliefs into practice. Central to Sofia's beliefs about science teaching were scientific inquiry and engaging students in investigations with authentic data, with a prevalent emphasis on the role of evidence in the construction of scientific claims. These findings are important to research aiming at supporting teachers, especially beginning ones, to embrace reform recommendations.

  2. A well-started beginning elementary teacher's beliefs and practices in relation to reform recommendations about inquiry-based science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamidou, Lucy

    2016-03-01

    Given reform recommendations emphasizing scientific inquiry and empirical evidence pointing to the difficulties beginning teachers face in enacting inquiry-based science, this study explores a well-started beginning elementary teacher's (Sofia) beliefs about inquiry-based science and related instructional practices. In order to explore Sofia's beliefs and instructional practices, several kinds of data were collected in a period of 9 months: a self-portrait and an accompanying narrative, a personal philosophy assignment, three interviews, three journal entries, ten lesson plans, and ten videotaped classroom observations. The analysis of these data showed that Sofia's beliefs and instructional practices were reform-minded. She articulated contemporary beliefs about scientific inquiry and how children learn science and was able to translate these beliefs into practice. Central to Sofia's beliefs about science teaching were scientific inquiry and engaging students in investigations with authentic data, with a prevalent emphasis on the role of evidence in the construction of scientific claims. These findings are important to research aiming at supporting teachers, especially beginning ones, to embrace reform recommendations.

  3. The Influence of an Extensive Inquiry-Based Field Experience on Pre-Service Elementary Student Teachers' Science Teaching Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sumita; Volk, Trudi; Lumpe, Andrew

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the effects of an extensive inquiry-based field experience on pre service elementary teachers’ personal agency beliefs, a composite measure of context beliefs and capability beliefs related to teaching science. The research combined quantitative and qualitative approaches and included an experimental group that utilized the inquiry method and a control group that used traditional teaching methods. Pre- and post-test scores for the experimental and control groups were compared. The context beliefs of both groups showed no significant change as a result of the experience. However, the control group’s capability belief scores, lower than those of the experimental group to start with, declined significantly; the experimental group’s scores remained unchanged. Thus, the inquiry-based field experience led to an increase in personal agency beliefs. The qualitative data suggested a new hypothesis that there is a spiral relationship among teachers’ ability to establish communicative relationships with students, desire for personal growth and improvement, ability to implement multiple instructional strategies, and possession of substantive content knowledge. The study concludes that inquiry-based student teaching should be encouraged in the training of elementary school science teachers. However, the meaning and practice of the inquiry method should be clearly delineated to ensure its correct implementation in the classroom.

  4. PEMAHAMAN NILAI-NILAI DEMOKRASI SISWA MELALUI METODE INQUIRI PADA PEMBELAJARAN PKN DI SMA NEGERI 1 GAMPING SLEMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Christopel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk: meningkatkan pemahaman nilai demokrasi melalui metode inquiri pada pembelajaran PKn di kelas XA SMA Negeri 1 Gamping Sleman.Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian tindakan kelas (PTK. Subjek penelitian adalah 34 siswa SMA Negeri 1 Gamping Sleman. Teknik pengumpulan data yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini terdiri observasi, test skala sikap, dan analisis dokumen. Intrumen penelitian terdiri atas tes sikap, tes hasil belajar, lembar observasi perilaku siswa, catatan lapangan, dan pedoman wawancara. Teknik analisis data kualitatif yang digunakan adalah model Miles & Huberman, sedangkan data yang bersifat kuantitatif dianalisis dengan statistik deskriptif. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukan bahwa penerapan metode inquiri dapat meningkatkan nilai demokrasi siswa. Pada siklus 1 rerata 67,64, siklus 2 rerata 72,64 dan siklus 3 rerata 78,38. Dengan demikian melalui penerapan metode inquiri dapat meningkatkan pemahaman nilai- nilai demokrasi siswa di SMA Negeri 1 Gamping Sleman.   UNDERSTANDING OF DEMOCRATIC VALUES IN STUDENTS THROUGH THE INQUIRY METHOD OF TEAHING CIVIC EDUCATION IN SMA 1 GAMPINGSLEMAN Asbtract This study aim: to improve students’ democratic through value the application of the inquiry method in civic education learning in the Grade XA of SMA NegeriGampingSleman,This was a classroom action research (CAR, The sesearch subjects 34 grade X SMA Negeri 1 Gamping. The data collecting techniques consisted of observations, an attitude scale test and a document analysis. The research instruments consisted of an attitude test, a learning achievement test, student behavior observation sheets, field notes, and interview guides. The technique to analyze the qualitative data was the Miles &Huberman model, while the quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The result shows that the application of the inquiry method can improve students’ democratic value. In the first cycle the mean was 67.64, in the

  5. An educational ethnography of teacher-developed science curriculum implementation: Enacting conceptual change-based science inquiry with Hispanic students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, Eric Steven

    An achievement gap exists between White and Hispanic students in the United States. Research has shown that improving the quality of instruction for minority students is an effective way to narrow this gap. Science education reform movements emphasize that science should be taught using a science inquiry approach. Extensive research in teaching and learning science also shows that a conceptual change model of teaching is effective in helping students learn science. Finally, research into how Hispanic students learn best has provided a number of suggestions for science instruction. The Inquiry for Conceptual Change model merges these three research strands into a comprehensive yet accessible model for instruction. This study investigates two questions. First, what are teachers' perceptions of science inquiry and its implementation in the classroom? Second, how does the use of the Inquiry for Conceptual Change model affect the learning of students in a predominantly Hispanic, urban neighborhood. Five teachers participated in a professional development project where they developed and implemented a science unit based on the Inquiry for Conceptual Change model. Three units were developed and implemented for this study. This is a qualitative study that included data from interviews, participant reflections and journals, student pre- and post-assessments, and researcher observations. This study provides an in-depth description of the role of professional development in helping teachers understand how science inquiry can be used to improve instructional quality for students in a predominantly Hispanic, urban neighborhood. These teachers demonstrated that it is important for professional development to be collaborative and provide opportunities for teachers to enact and reflect on new teaching paradigms. This study also shows promising results for the ability of the Inquiry for Conceptual Change model to improve student learning.

  6. A collaborative narrative inquiry: Two teacher educators learning about narrative inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Penny Hacker; Gary Barkhuizen

    2011-01-01

    With its capacity to unharness the power of narrative to promote meaning-making of lived experience, narrative inquiry is developing as a credible approach to research in several areas in the field of language teaching (Johnson, 2006). This article tells the story of two narrative researchers working in language teacher education who engaged in a collaborative narrative inquiry as both participants and inquirers, in order to learn more about narrative inquiry. The ‘bounded’ nature of their in...

  7. Conveying the vision of science: Meta-lessons on inquiry found in a content analysis of two high school biology textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Patricia Mcmillan

    This descriptive study examined two high school biology textbooks for differences in opportunities for student inquiry as reported by Romey's Index of Student Involvement. The National Research Council's National Science Education Standards emphasizes the importance of students becoming "independent inquirers about the natural world." The systematic examination of student textbooks is an significant aspect in monitoring the state of science education in contemporary classrooms. Over 81% of text sampled in PRENTICE HALL Biology was categorized as fact, definition, or author's conclusion while 7% qualified as engaging students in inquiry. Biology: A Community Context had a more balanced distribution with 42% of sentences being categorized as fact, definition, or author's conclusion and 28% qualifying as engaging students in inquiry. Chi-square (chi2) statistics for the categories of non-inquiry/inquiry were significant, indicating that the two textbooks differ significantly as to their emphases on opportunities for inquiry. The investigation also compared two different sample sizes: the literature-recommended sample of 5% of text and a smaller 250-sentence sample. The frequency distribution across the 10 categories of non-inquiry/inquiry was very similar for the two sample sizes. PRENTICE HALL Biology fell below the recommended Index of Student Involvement range in both sampling techniques, while Biology: A Community Context fell in the recommended range for the Index of Student Involvement in both sampling techniques. This seems to indicate that the smaller sample size could be used appropriately to compare potential student textbooks by textbook adoption committees and curriculum planners. Biology textbooks that are judged to have relatively high amounts of inquiry are recommended for those who want to implement the national standards.

  8. "Naturalist Inquiry" and Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The world of Qualitative Data Analysis (QDA methodology became quite taken with LINCOLN and GUBA's book "Naturalist Inquiry" (1985. I have no issue with it with respect to its application to QDA; it helped clarify and advance so many QDA issues. However, its application to Grounded Theory (GT has been a major block on GT, as originated, by its cooptation and corruption hence remodeling of GT by default. LINCOLN and GUBA have simply assumed GT is just another QDA method, which it is not. In "The Grounded Theory Perspective II" (GLASER 2002a, Chapter 9 on credibility, I have discussed "Naturalist In­quiry" (NI thought regarding how LINCOLN and GUBA's notion of "trustworthy" data (or worrisome data orientation and how their view of constant comparison can and has remodeled and eroded GT. In this paper I will consider other aspects of NI that remodel GT. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs040170

  9. Qualitative Inquiry in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    This book is a 'survival guide' for students and researchers who would like to conduct a qualitative study with limited resources. Brinkmann shows how everyday life materials such as books, television, the internet, the media and everyday conversations and interactions can help us to understand...... larger social issues. As living human beings in cultural worlds, we are constantly surrounded by 'data' that call for analysis, and as we cope with the different situations and episodes of our lives, we are engaged in understanding and interpreting the world as a form of qualitative inquiry. The book...... helps its reader develop a disciplined and analytic awareness informed by theory, and shows how less can be more in qualitative research. Each chapter introduces theoretical tools to think with, and demonstrates how they can be put to use in working concretely with everyday life materials....

  10. Narrative journalism as complementary inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Jeppesen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Narrative journalism is a method to craft stories worth reading about real people. In this article, we explore the ability of that communicative power to produce insights complementary to those obtainable through traditional qualitative and quantitative research methods. With examples from a study of journalistic narrative as patient involvement in professional rehabilitation, interview data transcribed as stories are analyzed for qualities of heterogeneity, sensibility, transparency, and reflexivity. Building on sociological theories of thinking with stories, writing as inquiry, and public journalism as ethnography, we suggest that narrative journalism as a common practice might unfold dimensions of subjective otherness of the self. Aspiring to unite writing in both transparently confrontational and empathetically dialogic ways, the narrative journalistic method holds a potential to expose dynamics of power within the interview.

  11. Narrative journalism as complementary inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Jeppesen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Narrative journalism is a method to craft stories worth reading about real people. In this article, we explore the ability of that communicative power to produce insights complementary to those obtainable through traditional qualitative and quantitative research methods. With examples from a study of journalistic narrative as patient involvement in professional rehabilitation, interview data transcribed as stories are analyzed for qualities of heterogeneity, sensibility, transparency, and reflexivity. Building on sociological theories of thinking with stories, writing as inquiry, and public journalism as ethnography, we suggest that narrative journalism as a common practice might unfold dimensions of subjective otherness of the self. Aspiring to unite writing in both transparently confrontational and empathetically dialogic ways, the narrative journalistic method holds a potential to expose dynamics of power within the interview.

  12. Appreciative inquiry and leadership transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Maureen R; Pesut, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    In times of accelerated change accompanied by leadership transitions, appreciative inquiry (AI) and sensemaking skills are necessary. AI is a philosophy, a model of change, and a set of tools and techniques that support discovery, dreaming, design, and creation of a vision that inspires people in an organization to move toward a collective destiny. Sensemaking involves sizing up a situation to create a framework for decision-making, creating a context for communication, linking with others, and focusing on what is and what could be. Sensemaking can be facilitated by applying appreciative leadership techniques. In this article, the story of the University of Utah College of Nursing's and the faculty's experience with an AI process illustrates the application of the AI leadership strategy to navigating organizational change and a leadership transition.

  13. Using Flipped Classroom Approach to Explore Deep Learning in Large Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Danker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This project used two Flipped Classroom approaches to stimulate deep learning in large classrooms during the teaching of a film module as part of a Diploma in Performing Arts course at Sunway University, Malaysia. The flipped classes utilized either a blended learning approach where students first watched online lectures as homework, and then completed their assignments and practical work in class; or utilized a guided inquiry approach at the beginning of class using this same process. During the class the lecturers were present to help the students, and in addition, the students were advantaged by being able to help one another. The in-class learning activities also included inquiry-based learning, active learning, and peer-learning. This project used an action research approach to improve the in-class instructional design progressively to achieve its impact of deep learning among the students. The in-class learning activities that was included in the later flipped classes merged aspects of blended learning with an inquiry-based learning cycle which focused on the exploration of concepts. Data was gathered from questionnaires filled out by the students and from short interviews with the students, as well as from the teacher’s reflective journals. The findings verified that the flipped classrooms were able to remodel large lecture classes into active-learning classes. The results also support the possibility of individualised learning for the students as being high as a result of the teacher’s ability to provide one-on-one tutoring through technology-infused lessons. It is imperative that the in-class learning activities are purposefully designed as the inclusion of the exploratory learning through guided inquiry-based activities in the flipped classes was a successful way to engage students on a deeper level and increased the students’ curiosity and engaged them to develop higher-order thinking skills. This project also concluded that

  14. Narrative inquiry in a nursing practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Gail M; Smith, Faith

    2003-06-01

    One approach to creating research-based nursing education is to think and write narratively about the daily life of a BScN program student and her teacher in diverse settings and over time. Gail, as a nurse-teacher, and Faith, as a nursing student and now Public Health Nurse, reconstruct their teaching-learning experiences in an integrated practicum in maternal-child health services as a narrative inquiry. After presenting this reconstruction of experience at a conference on maternal scholarship, further inquiry into their experiences shows how narrative inquiry matters to construction of nursing praxis and to life-long learning as a nurse. Teaching-learning relationships are seen as a template for a student's connections to people experiencing nursing care and to other clinicians. Construction of stories to live by that take into account becoming a nurse, constructing knowledge and enacting caring-healing nursing practices is illuminated through narrative inquiry.

  15. Inquiry based learning in physical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars Domino

    2014-01-01

    and disadvantages within the IBL-methodology in relation to students’ motivation. Instructed in guided inquiry, 32 students of physical education in a teacher training college worked with inquiry based learning in physical education over a four week period. During the IBL-unit, qualitative data such as the students......The present project is a case study founded on the decreasing motivation and engagement in physical education. The project suggests inquiry based learning (IBL) as an educational methodology. This may help to turn the trend as IBL has shown to engage and motivate students at different educational...... to the IBL and the motivation theory. The analysis revealed that the students found the method very motivating and engaging, but they also accentuated the difficulties experienced in the beginning of the inquiry work due to the degrees of freedom in the work. Besides, the students emphasised the learning...

  16. Inquiry, New Literacies, and the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    For 21st century learning, students need to be well versed in techniques for inquiry using new literacies. Developing these skills also will meet the rigorous expectations of the Common Core State Standards.

  17. Inquiry, New Literacies, and the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    For 21st century learning, students need to be well versed in techniques for inquiry using new literacies. Developing these skills also will meet the rigorous expectations of the Common Core State Standards.

  18. Drug price regulation under consumer moral hazard. Two-part tariffs, uniform price or third-degree price discrimination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Stefan

    2004-12-01

    Drug price differences across national markets as they exist in the EU are often justified by the concept of Ramsey prices: with fixed costs for R&D, the optimal mark-ups on marginal costs are inversely related to the price elasticity in the individual markets. This well-known result prevails if consumer moral hazard is taken into account. Contrary to the situation without moral hazard, the uniform price does not necessarily dominate discriminatory pricing in welfare terms. The two-part tariff is a better alternative as it allows governments to address moral hazard. A uniform price combined with lump-payments reflecting differences in the willingness to pay and the moral hazard in member states appears to be an attractive option for a common EU drug market.

  19. Implementing inquiry-based kits within a professional development school model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mark Thomas

    2005-07-01

    Implementation of guided inquiry teaching for the first time carries inherent problems for science teachers. Reform efforts on inquiry-based science teaching are often unsustainable and are not sensitive to teachers' needs and abilities as professionals. Professional development schools are meant to provide a research-based partnership between a public school and a university. These collaborations can provide support for the professional development of teachers. This dissertation reports a study focused on the implementation of inquiry-based science kits within the support of one of these collaborations. The researcher describes the difficulties and successful adaptations experienced by science teachers and how a coteaching model provided support. These types of data are needed in order to develop a bottom-up, sustainable process that will allow teachers to implement inquiry-based science. A qualitative methodology with "researcher as participant" was used in this study of two science teachers during 2002--2003. These two teachers were supported by a coteaching model, which included preservice teachers for each teacher as well as a supervising professor. Data were collected from the researcher's direct observations of coteachers' practice. Data were also collected from interviews and reflective pieces from the coteachers. Triangulation of the data on each teacher's case supported the validity of the findings. Case reports were prepared from these data for each classroom teacher. These case reports were used and cross-case analysis was conducted to search for major themes and findings in the study. Major findings described the hurdles teachers encounter, examples of adaptations observed in the teachers' cases and the supportive interactions with their coteachers while implementing the inquiry-based kits. In addition, the data were used to make recommendations for future training and use of the kits and the coteaching model. Results from this study showed that the

  20. Phases of inquiry-based learning: Definitions and the inquiry cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaste, Margus; Mäeots, Mario; Siiman, Leo A.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; van Riesen, Siswa; Kamp, E.T.; Kamp, E.T.; Manoli, Constantinos C.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Tsourlidaki, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning is gaining popularity in science curricula, international research and development projects as well as teaching. One of the underlying reasons is that its success can be significantly improved due to the recent technical developments that allow the inquiry process to be suppor

  1. Personal Inquiry: Innovations in Participatory Design and Models for Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conole, Grainne; Scanlon, Eileen; Littleton, Karen; Kerawalla, Lucinda; Mulholland, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a participatory design approach to the development of inquiry-based learning supported through a technology toolkit. The work is part of an interdisciplinary project--Personal Inquiry (PI). The paper focuses on the approach we adopted, concentrating in particular on the two mediating artefacts we used to guide and frame the…

  2. Teachers Responding to Narrative Inquiry: An Approach to Narrative Inquiry Criticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Using a reader-response approach, the author examines practitioners' interpretations of three narrative inquiry texts to highlight how their responses suggest ways to enhance and more particularly nuance narrative inquiry representations of teaching practice. She asserts that the transactive character of the reader-response relationship across…

  3. Phases of inquiry-based learning: Definitions and the inquiry cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaste, Margus; Mäeots, Mario; Siiman, Leo A.; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.; van Riesen, Siswa; Kamp, E.T.; Kamp, E.T.; Manoli, Constantinos C.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Tsourlidaki, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning is gaining popularity in science curricula, international research and development projects as well as teaching. One of the underlying reasons is that its success can be significantly improved due to the recent technical developments that allow the inquiry process to be

  4. Phases of inquiry-based learning: Definitions and the inquiry cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaste, Margus; Mäeots, Mario; Siiman, Leo A.; Jong, de A.J.M.; Riesen, van S.A.N.; Kamp, E.T.; Manoli, Constantinos C.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Tsourlidaki, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning is gaining popularity in science curricula, international research and development projects as well as teaching. One of the underlying reasons is that its success can be significantly improved due to the recent technical developments that allow the inquiry process to be suppor

  5. Collaboration Modality, Cognitive Load, and Science Inquiry Learning in Virtual Inquiry Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Benjamin E.; Nelson, Brian C.; Savenye, Wilhelmina C.

    2010-01-01

    Educational multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) have been shown to be effective platforms for situated science inquiry curricula. While researchers find MUVEs to be supportive of collaborative scientific inquiry processes, the complex mix of multi-modal messages present in MUVEs can lead to cognitive overload, with learners unable to…

  6. The Wisdom of Sages: Nuclear Physics Education, Knowledge-Inquiry, and Wisdom-Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the difference between knowledge-inquiry and wisdom-inquiry in nuclear physics education. In the spirit of an earlier study of 57 senior-level textbooks for first-degree physics students, this work focuses here on a remarkable use of literary quotations in one such book. "Particles and Nuclei: an introduction to the physical…

  7. A collaborative narrative inquiry: Two teacher educators learning about narrative inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Hacker

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available With its capacity to unharness the power of narrative to promote meaning-making of lived experience, narrative inquiry is developing as a credible approach to research in several areas in the field of language teaching (Johnson, 2006. This article tells the story of two narrative researchers working in language teacher education who engaged in a collaborative narrative inquiry as both participants and inquirers, in order to learn more about narrative inquiry. The ‘bounded’ nature of their inquiry design provided a feasible way for them to explore their focus of research (i.e. their learning about narrative inquiry, and led them, through an iterative and reflexive process of analysing their narrative data, to formulate what they believe are essential ingredients of principled narrative inquiry work. Four narrative inquiry variables became the scaffolding which enabled them to answer their research questions, and are offered here as a heuristic for teaching practitioners, whether they be teachers, teacher educators or researchers, to guide them in narrative inquiries into their own work.

  8. What Makes Inquiry Stick? The Quality of Preservice Teachers’ Understanding of Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Aulls

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This nonexperimental, exploratory, mixed-design study used questionnaires with 167 preservice secondary teachers to identify prior educational experiences associated with student-teachers’ inquiry understanding. Understanding was determined through content analysis then open coding of definitions of inquiry and descriptions of best-experienced inquiry instruction, in terms of 23 potential learner-inquiry outcomes. Only two of seven educational-context variables related to understanding: prior experience doing a thesis or research—especially to definition quality and having taken a research-methods course—especially to description quality. How definitions and descriptions of inquiry are different and similar was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Implications for methodology, theory, and practice were presented, for example, research opportunities and research-methods training during teacher education.

  9. Inquiry based learning with a virtual microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, S. P.; Sharples, M.; Tindle, A.; Villasclaras-Fernández, E.

    2012-12-01

    As part of newly funded initiative, the Wolfson OpenScience Laboratory, we are linking a tool for inquiry based learning, nQuire (http://www.nquire.org.uk) with the virtual microscope for Earth science (http://www.virtualmicroscope.co.uk) to allow students to undertake projects and gain from inquiry based study thin sections of rocks without the need for a laboratory with expensive petrological microscopes. The Virtual Microscope (VM) was developed for undergraduate teaching of petrology and geoscience, allowing students to explore rock hand specimens and thin sections in a browser window. The system is based on HTML5 application and allows students to scan and zoom the rocks in a browser window, view in ppl and xpl conditions, and rotate specific areas to view birefringence and pleochroism. Importantly the VM allows students to gain access to rare specimens such as Moon rocks that might be too precious to suffer loss or damage. Experimentation with such specimens can inspire the learners' interest in science and allows them to investigate relevant science questions. Yet it is challenging for learners to engage in scientific processes, as they may lack scientific investigation skills or have problems in planning their activities; for teachers, managing inquiry activities is a demanding task (Quintana et al., 2004). To facilitate the realization of inquiry activities, the VM is being integrated with the nQuire tool. nQuire is a web tool that guides and supports students through the inquiry process (Mulholland et al., 2011). Learners are encouraged to construct their own personally relevant hypothesis, pose scientific questions, and plan the method to answer them. Then, the system enables users to collect and analyze data, and share their conclusions. Teachers can monitor their students' progress through inquiries, and give them access to new parts of inquiries as they advance. By means of the integration of nQuire and the VM, inquiries that involve collecting data

  10. Exploring the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2017-08-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The financial maths task asked students to decide on the best fundraising option for the school. We used the theory of practice architectures to analyse the interactions in the classroom in order to understand what may have enabled and constrained classroom practices. We found that classroom practices such as engaging with peers through positive and collaborative learning opportunities, making ethical, social and mathematical connections of the task, and considering the impact of financial decisions on others may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education.

  11. Supporting students' knowledge integration with technology-enhanced inquiry curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jennifer Lopseen

    Dynamic visualizations of scientific phenomena have the potential to transform how students learn and understand science. Dynamic visualizations enable interaction and experimentation with unobservable atomic-level phenomena. A series of studies clarify the conditions under which embedding dynamic visualizations in technology-enhanced inquiry instruction can help students develop robust and durable chemistry knowledge. Using the knowledge integration perspective, I designed Chemical Reactions, a technology-enhanced curriculum unit, with a partnership of teachers, educational researchers, and chemists. This unit guides students in an exploration of how energy and chemical reactions relate to climate change. It uses powerful dynamic visualizations to connect atomic level interactions to the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The series of studies were conducted in typical classrooms in eleven high schools across the country. This dissertation describes four studies that contribute to understanding of how visualizations can be used to transform chemistry learning. The efficacy study investigated the impact of the Chemical Reactions unit compared to traditional instruction using pre-, post- and delayed posttest assessments. The self-monitoring study used self-ratings in combination with embedded assessments to explore how explanation prompts help students learn from dynamic visualizations. The self-regulation study used log files of students' interactions with the learning environment to investigate how external feedback and explanation prompts influence students' exploration of dynamic visualizations. The explanation study compared specific and general explanation prompts to explore the processes by which explanations benefit learning with dynamic visualizations. These studies delineate the conditions under which dynamic visualizations embedded in inquiry instruction can enhance student outcomes. The studies reveal that visualizations can be deceptively clear

  12. Reverse Revenue Sharing Contract versus Two-Part Tariff Contract under a Closed-Loop Supply Chain System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunya Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of remanufacturing has been recognized in research and practice. The integrated system, combining the forward and reverse activities of supply chains, is called closed-loop supply chain (CLSC system. By coordination in the CLSC system, players will get economic improvement. This paper studies different coordination performances of two types of contracts, two-part tariff (TTC and reverse revenue sharing contract (RRSC, in a closed-loop system. Through mathematical analysis based on Stackelberg Game Theory, we find that it is easy for manufacturer to improve more profits and retailer’s collection effects by adjusting the ratio of transfer collection price through RRSC, and we also give the function to calculate the best ratio of transfer collection price, which may be a valuable reference for the decision maker in practice. Besides, our results also suggest that although the profits of the coordinated CLSC system are always higher than the contradictory scenario, the RRSC is more favorable to the manufacturer than to the retailer, as results show that the manufacturer will share more profits from the system through RRSC. Therefore, RRSC has attracted the manufacturers more to closing the supply chain for economic consideration.

  13. A Bayesian two part model applied to analyze risk factors of adult mortality with application to data from Namibia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence N Kazembe

    Full Text Available Despite remarkable gains in life expectancy and declining mortality in the 21st century, in many places mostly in developing countries, adult mortality has increased in part due to HIV/AIDS or continued abject poverty levels. Moreover many factors including behavioural, socio-economic and demographic variables work simultaneously to impact on risk of mortality. Understanding risk factors of adult mortality is crucial towards designing appropriate public health interventions. In this paper we proposed a structured additive two-part random effects regression model for adult mortality data. Our proposal assumed two processes: (i whether death occurred in the household (prevalence part, and (ii number of reported deaths, if death did occur (severity part. The proposed model specification therefore consisted of two generalized linear mixed models (GLMM with correlated random effects that permitted structured and unstructured spatial components at regional level. Specifically, the first part assumed a GLMM with a logistic link and the second part explored a count model following either a Poisson or negative binomial distribution. The model was used to analyse adult mortality data of 25,793 individuals from the 2006/2007 Namibian DHS data. Inference is based on the Bayesian framework with appropriate priors discussed.

  14. The experiences of science teachers' particpation in an inquiry-based professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Emily A.

    Once a leader in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, the United States (U.S.) is now far behind many countries. There is growing concern that the U.S. is not preparing a sufficient number of students in the areas of STEM. Despite advancement of inquiry learning in science, the extent to which inquiry learning has been implemented on a classroom level falls short. The purpose of this study was to learn about the experiences of science teachers' participation in an inquiry-based professional development. A mixed method research design was used for this study to collect data from ten Project MISE participants. The qualitative data was collected using semi-structured, in-depth individual interviews, focus group interviews, observations, and document analysis of teacher portfolios and analyzed using constant comparative method. The quantitative data were collected through administration of a pretest and posttest instrument that measures the content knowledge of the science teachers and analyzed using descriptive statistics and paired t-test. The participants of this mixed methods study provided compelling evidence that Project MISE has a profound impact on their instructional practice, networking abilities, opportunities for reflection, and content knowledge.

  15. Examining Science Teachers' Development of Interdisciplinary Science Inquiry Pedagogical Knowledge and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Bhawna; Liu, Xiufeng; Yerrick, Randy; Smith, Erica; Grant, Brooke

    2014-12-01

    The current literature relates to how teachers develop knowledge and practice of science inquiry, but little has been reported on how teachers develop interdisciplinary science inquiry (ISI) knowledge and practice. This study examines the effect of university research experiences, ongoing professional development, and in-school support on teachers' development of ISI pedagogical knowledge and practices. It centers on documenting diverse teachers' journeys of experiencing ISI as well as developing knowledge of ISI. It was found that there was variation in ISI understanding and practice among the teachers as a result of the combination of teachers' experiences, beliefs, and participation. Thus, in order to help teachers develop ISI knowledge and pedagogy, barriers to ISI knowledge development and implementation must also be addressed. Professional developers must articulate clear program goals to all stakeholders including an explicit definition of ISI and the ability to recognize ISI attributes during research experiences as well as during classroom implementation. Teachers must also be held accountable for participation and reflection in all aspects of professional development. Program developers must also take into consideration teachers' needs, attitudes, and beliefs toward their students when expecting changes in teachers' cognition and behavior to teach inquiry-rich challenging science.

  16. When Learner Inquiries Arise: Marking Teacher Cognition as It Unfolds “In-The-Moment”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew S. Fagan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2015v68n1p75 With the understanding that teacher cognition itself is ever-emergent, originating and framed by engagement with social activities (Johnson & Golombek, 2011, the current study examines one expert English as a Second Language (ESL teacher’s micro-analysis of her classroom practices when addressing learner inquiries in-themoment, and how such analysis leads the teacher to alter her conscious awareness of what it means to teach language even at an advanced point in her career. Bridging the methodologies of conversation analysis and ethnographic analysis, two distinct practices were used by the teacher when addressing learner inquiries: doing answering and modeling exploration. Each practice is detailed with a focus on their varied constructions and the speciic verbal and nonverbal communicative cues found to inluence their uses. Numerous and simultaneous factors are shown to afect the teacher’s management of learner inquiries, factors both paralleling and contradicting her perceptions of teaching. he paper concludes with a discussion on how the indings not only connect to the current teacher cognition literature but also advocates for opening up the methodological tools used in SLTE to more fully understand teacher learning.

  17. Investigating elementary education and physical therapy majors' perceptions of an inquiry-based physics content course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, John Martin

    This study investigates why physical therapy assistant majors engage and perform better than elementary education majors in an inquiry-based conceptual physics course at Mid-Atlantic Community College. The students from each major are demographically similar, both courses are similar in depth and structure, and each course supports the students' program. However, there is an observed difference in the levels of engagement with the curriculum and performance on writing-based assessments between the two groups. To explore possible explanations for the difference, I examine students' affinity for science, their beliefs about the nature of science and scientific knowledge in the classroom, and their perception of the usefulness of science to their program. During semi-structured interviews, students from both majors displayed nearly identical weak affinities for science, epistemological beliefs, and uncertainty about the usefulness of the class. However, the physical therapy majors' ability to see the relevance of the physics course experience to their program enhanced their interest and motivation. In contrast, the elementary education students do not see connections between the course and their program, and do not see a purpose for their learning of physics content. To improve the program, I propose a two-pronged approach - designing a faded-scaffolded-inquiry approach for both classes, and developing a field-based/seminar class for the elementary education majors. The scaffolded inquiry will help both groups develop better orientations toward lab activities, and the structured observations and reflection will help the elementary group connect the material to their program.

  18. The opportunities and challenges of guided inquiry science for students with special needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marianne

    Research in science education has been conducted with various goals for instruction. Four outcomes identified include: immediate and delayed recall, literal comprehension, science skills and processes, and conceptual understanding. The promise of developing important thinking skills exists for all students if science instruction is designed to teach students the products of science and the principled process of inquiry. Guided inquiry science seeks to develop conceptual understanding through the pursuit of meaningful questions using scientific problem solving to conduct investigations that are thoughtfully generated and evaluated. Using a social constructivist perspective, this study examines the learning experiences of four students, identified by their teachers as learning disabled or underachieving. Four case studies are presented of the students' participation in a guided inquiry investigation of the behavior of light. Measures of conceptual understanding included pre- and post-instruction assessments, interviews, journal writing, videotapes, and fieldnotes. All four students demonstrated improved conceptual understanding of light. Five patterns of relationships influenced the development of the students' thinking. First, differences in the culture of the two classrooms altered the learning environment, Second, the nature of teacher interaction with the target students affected conceptual understanding. Third, interactions with peers modified the learning experiences for the identified students. Fourth, the conceptual and procedural complexity of the tasks increased the tendency for the students to lose focus. Finally, the literacy requirements of the work were challenging for these students.

  19. Exploring How Korean Teacher's Attitudes and Self-Efficacy for Using Inquiry and Language Based Teaching Practices Impacts Learning for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students: Implications for Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jennifer; Chu, Hye-Eun; Martin, Sonya N.

    2016-01-01

    Demographic trends in Korea indicate that the student population is becoming more diverse with regards to culture, ethnicity and language. These changes have implications for science classrooms where inquiry-based, student-centered activities require culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students to connect with their peers and successfully…

  20. Exploring How Korean Teacher's Attitudes and Self-Efficacy for Using Inquiry and Language Based Teaching Practices Impacts Learning for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students: Implications for Science Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jennifer; Chu, Hye-Eun; Martin, Sonya N.

    2016-01-01

    Demographic trends in Korea indicate that the student population is becoming more diverse with regards to culture, ethnicity and language. These changes have implications for science classrooms where inquiry-based, student-centered activities require culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students to connect with their peers and successfully…