WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-moment bulk microphysical

  1. A Stochastic Closure for Two-Moment Bulk Microphysics of Warm Clouds: Part I, Derivations

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, David

    2015-01-01

    We propose a mathematical methodology to derive a stochastic parameterization of bulk warm cloud micro-physics properties. Unlike previous bulk parameterizations, the stochastic parameterization does not assume any particular droplet size distribution, all parameters have physical meanings which are recoverable from data, and the resultant parameterization has the flexibility to utilize a variety of collision kernels. Our strategy is a new two-fold approach to modelling the kinetic collection equation. Partitioning the droplet spectrum into cloud and rain aggregates, we represent droplet densities as the sum of a mean and a random fluctuation. Moreover, we use a Taylor approximation for the collision kernel which allows the resulting parameterization to be independent of the collision kernel. To address the two-moment closure for bulk microphysical equations, we represent the higher (third) order terms as points in an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck-like stochastic process. These higher order terms are aggregate number co...

  2. A Stochastic Closure for Two-Moment Bulk Microphysics of Warm Clouds: Part II, Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, David

    2016-01-01

    The representation of clouds and associated processes of rain and snow formation remains one of the major uncertainties in climate and weather prediction models. In a companion paper (Part I), we systematically derived a two moment bulk cloud microphysics model for collision and coalescence in warm rain based on the kinetic coalescence equation (KCE) and used stochastic approximations to close the higher order moment terms, and do so independently of the collision kernel. Conservation of mass and consistency of droplet number concentration of the evolving cloud properties were combined with numerical simulations to reduce the parametrization problem to three key parameters. Here, we constrain these three parameters based on the physics of collision and coalescence resulting in a "region of validity." Furthermore, we theoretically validate the new bulk model by deriving a subset of the "region of validity" that contains stochastic parameters that skillfully reproduces an existing model based on an a priori dro...

  3. A Two-Moment Bulk Microphysics Coupled with a Mesoscale Model WRF: Model Description and First Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Wenhua; ZHAO Fengsheng; HU Zhijin; FENG Xua

    2011-01-01

    The Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences (CAMS) two-moment bulk microphysics scheme was adopted in this study to investigate the representation of cloud and precipitation processes under different environmental conditions.The scheme predicts the mixing ratio of water vapor as well as the mixing ratios and nnmber concentrations of cloud droplets,rain,ice,snow,and graupel.A new parameterization approach to simulate heterogeneous droplet activation was developed in this scheme.Furthermore,the improved CAMS scheme was coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF v3.1),which made it possible to simulate the microphysics of clouds and precipitation as well as the cloud-aerosol interactions in selected atmospheric condition.The rain event occurring on 27 28 December 2008 in eastern China was simulated using the CAMS scheme and three sophisticated microphysics schemes in the WRF model.Results showed that the simulated 36-h accumulated precipitations were generally agreed with observation data,and the CAMS scheme performed well in the southern area of the nested donain.The radar reflectivity,the averaged precipitation intensity,and the hydrometeor mixing ratios simulated by the CAMS scheme were generally consistent with those from other microphysics schemes.The hydrometeor number concentrations simulated by the CAMS scheme were also close to the experiential values in stratus clouds.The model results suggest that the CAMS scheme performs reasonably well in describing the microphysics of clouds and precipitation in the mesoscale WRF model.

  4. Two-moment Bulk Stratiform Cloud Microphysics in the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiangjun; WANG Bin; Xiaohong LIU; Minghuai WANG

    2013-01-01

    A two-moment bulk stratiform microphysics scheme,including recently developed physically-based droplet activation/ice nucleation parameterizations has been implemented into the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL) as an effort to enhance the model's capability to simulate aerosol indirect effects.Unlike the previous one-moment cloud microphysics scheme,the new scheme produces a reasonable representation of cloud particle size and number concentration.This scheme captures the observed spatial variations in cloud droplet number concentrations.Simulated ice crystal number concentrations in cirrus clouds qualitatively agree with in situ observations.The longwave and shortwave cloud forcings are in better agreement with observations.Sensitivity tests show that the column cloud droplet number concentrations calculated from two different droplet activation parameterizations are similar.However,ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phased clouds is sensitive to different heterogeneous ice nucleation formulations.The simulation with high ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phase clouds has less liquid water path and weaker cloud forcing.Furthermore,ice crystal number concentration in cirrus clouds is sensitive to different ice nucleation parameterizations.Sensitivity tests also suggest that the impact of pre-existing ice crystals on homogeneous freezing in old clouds should be taken into account.

  5. Two-moment bulk stratiform cloud microphysics in the GFDL AM3 GCM: description, evaluation, and sensitivity tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salzmann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A new stratiform cloud scheme including a two-moment bulk microphysics module, a cloud cover parameterization allowing ice supersaturation, and an ice nucleation parameterization has been implemented into the recently developed GFDL AM3 general circulation model (GCM as part of an effort to treat aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions more realistically. Unlike the original scheme, the new scheme facilitates the study of cloud-ice-aerosol interactions via influences of dust and sulfate on ice nucleation. While liquid and cloud ice water path associated with stratiform clouds are similar for the new and the original scheme, column integrated droplet numbers and global frequency distributions (PDFs of droplet effective radii differ significantly. This difference is in part due to a difference in the implementation of the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF mechanism, which leads to a larger contribution from super-cooled droplets in the original scheme. Clouds are more likely to be either completely glaciated or liquid due to the WBF mechanism in the new scheme. Super-saturations over ice simulated with the new scheme are in qualitative agreement with observations, and PDFs of ice numbers and effective radii appear reasonable in the light of observations. Especially, the temperature dependence of ice numbers qualitatively agrees with in-situ observations. The global average long-wave cloud forcing decreases in comparison to the original scheme as expected when super-saturation over ice is allowed. Anthropogenic aerosols lead to a larger decrease in short-wave absorption (SWABS in the new model setup, but outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR decreases as well, so that the net effect of including anthropogenic aerosols on the net radiation at the top of the atmosphere (netradTOA = SWABS-OLR is of similar magnitude for the new and the original scheme.

  6. Modeling cloud microphysics using a two-moments hybrid bulk/bin scheme for use in Titan’s climate models: Application to the annual and diurnal cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgalat, J.; Rannou, P.; Cours, T.; Rivière, E. D.

    2014-03-01

    Microphysical models describe the way aerosols and clouds behave in the atmosphere. Two approaches are generally used to model these processes. While the first approach discretizes processes and aerosols size distributions on a radius grid (bin scheme), the second uses bulk parameters of the size distribution law (its mathematical moments) to represent the evolution of the particle population (moment scheme). However, with the latter approach, one needs to have an a priori knowledge of the size distributions. Moments scheme for Cloud microphysics modeling have been used and enhanced since decades for climate studies of the Earth. Most of the tools are based on Log-Normal law which are suitable for Earth, Mars or Venus. On Titan, due to the fractal structure of the aerosols, the size distributions do not follow a log-normal law. Then using a moment scheme in that case implies to define the description of the size distribution and to review the equations that are widely published in the literature. Our objective is to enable the use of a fully described microphysical model using a moment scheme within a Titan's Global Climate Model. As a first step in this direction, we present here a moment scheme dedicated to clouds microphysics adapted for Titan's atmosphere conditions. We perform comparisons between the two kinds of schemes (bin and moments) using an annual and a diurnal cycle, to check the validity of our moment description. The various forcing produce a time-variable cloud layer in relation with the temperature cycle. We compare the column opacities and the temperature for the two schemes, for each cycles. We also compare more detailed quantities as the opacity distribution of the cloud events at different periods of these cycles. Results show that differences between the two approaches have a small impact on the temperature (less than 1 K) and range between 1% and 10% for haze and clouds opacities. Both models behave in similar way when forced by an annual and

  7. Analytical treatment of ice sublimation and test of sublimation parameterisations in two-moment ice microphysics models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We derive an analytic solution to the spectral growth/sublimation equation for ice crystals and apply it to idealised cases. The results are used to test parameterisations of the ice sublimation process in two-moment bulk microphysics models. Although it turns out that the relation between number loss fraction and mass loss fraction is not a function since it is not unique, it seems that a functional parameterisation is the best that one can do in a bulk model. Testing a more realistic case with humidity oscillations shows that artificial crystal loss can occur in simulations of mature cirrus clouds with relative humidity fluctuating about ice saturation.

  8. Dependency of stratiform precipitation on a two-moment cloud microphysical scheme in mid-latitude squall line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yuya; Takahashi, Keiko

    2014-03-01

    Dependency of stratiform precipitation on a two-moment cloud microphysical scheme in mid-latitude squall line is investigated, using full one-moment, full two-moment and partial two-moment schemes. The results show that the effect of two-moment scheme for rain is consistent with those presented in preceding studies, but the effect is found to be dependent on two-moment scheme for ice water species (ice particles) which enhanced detrainment in convective region and increased rearward buoyancy fluxes. Use of the two-moment scheme for cloud water and cloud ice is found to have less direct impact on the formation of stratiform precipitation, but indirectly affects the precipitation by changing source number concentration of large liquid and ice particles. Two-moment treatment for graupel rather than snow is also found to have great impact on stratiform precipitation through the melting process. The horizontally narrow and vertically gradual graupel melting profile originated from its size distribution change causes suppression to the convective updraft in convective region, and thus increases horizontal rearward buoyancy from the convective to stratiform regions with enhanced growth of ice water species, resulting in an increase in stratiform precipitation. To simulate these features, two-moment treatment for graupel or diagnostic model for graupel intercept parameter considering size distribution change is required.

  9. Recent updates of a GPM Radar Simulator using CRM data with Bulk Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Meneghini, R.; Jones, J.; Liao, L.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is to provide more accurate global precipitation information within ±65° latitude every 2~4 hour. GPM core satellite which carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) operating at Ku- and Ka-band will be launched in February, 2014. A number of radar precipitation retrieval algorithms are being developed for Level-2 radar processing. To support radar algorithm developers who need test data to evaluate the performance of their algorithm, a GPM radar simulator has been developed to generate synthetic Level-1 products which include the most important component, the received echo power, as well as radar parameters required for Level-2 algorithm processing. The GPM radar simulator consists of two modules. One is the DPR scanning geometry module that specifies the characteristics of the DPR sensor and emulates the scan and antenna geometry of the DPR. The other module is the forward calculation module that takes as input the prognostic variables (mixing ratio of hydrometeors) of high resolution cloud-resolving model data, using a one moment bulk microphysics scheme, and computes radar scattering parameters consistent with the microphysical assumptions of the hydrometeors. The forward calculation module also includes a surface scattering model to compute the radar return power from the illuminated surface area by means of a model for the normalized radar cross section (σ0 or NRCS), given as a function of incidence angle and surface type (land/ocean). The simulation of the surface return power plays an important role for one of primary DPR retrieval algorithms, the Surface Reference Technique (SRT), that estimates path-integrated attenuation (PIA) from the surface returns under rain and no-rain condition. Recently, we have completed an update of the surface scattering model for land. Like the NRCS over ocean, the NRCS over land is modeled by taking realizations from a jointly Gaussian random variable

  10. Influence of bulk microphysics schemes upon Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) version 3.6.1 nor'easter simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Decker, Steven G.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Shi, Jainn J.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of five single- or double-moment bulk microphysics schemes (BMPSs) on Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) simulations of seven intense wintertime cyclones impacting the mid-Atlantic United States; 5-day long WRF simulations were initialized roughly 24 h prior to the onset of coastal cyclogenesis off the North Carolina coastline. In all, 35 model simulations (five BMPSs and seven cases) were run and their associated microphysics-related storm properties (hydrometer mixing ratios, precipitation, and radar reflectivity) were evaluated against model analysis and available gridded radar and ground-based precipitation products. Inter-BMPS comparisons of column-integrated mixing ratios and mixing ratio profiles reveal little variability in non-frozen hydrometeor species due to their shared programming heritage, yet their assumptions concerning snow and graupel intercepts, ice supersaturation, snow and graupel density maps, and terminal velocities led to considerable variability in both simulated frozen hydrometeor species and radar reflectivity. WRF-simulated precipitation fields exhibit minor spatiotemporal variability amongst BMPSs, yet their spatial extent is largely conserved. Compared to ground-based precipitation data, WRF simulations demonstrate low-to-moderate (0.217-0.414) threat scores and a rainfall distribution shifted toward higher values. Finally, an analysis of WRF and gridded radar reflectivity data via contoured frequency with altitude diagrams (CFADs) reveals notable variability amongst BMPSs, where better performing schemes favored lower graupel mixing ratios and better underlying aggregation assumptions.

  11. libcloudph++ 0.1: single-moment bulk, double-moment bulk, and particle-based warm-rain microphysics library in C++

    CERN Document Server

    Arabas, Sylwester; Pawlowska, Hanna; Grabowski, Wojciech W

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a library of algorithms for representing cloud microphysics in numerical models written in C++, hence the name libcloudph++. In the initial release, the library covers three warm-rain schemes: the single- and double-moment bulk schemes, and the particle-based scheme with Monte-Carlo coalescence. The three schemes are intended for modelling frameworks of different dimensionality and complexity ranging from parcel models to multi-dimensional cloud-resolving (e.g. large-eddy) simulations. A two-dimensional prescribed-flow framework is used in example simulations presented with the aim of highlighting the library features. Discussion of the example results and of the formulation of the schemes is focused on the particle-based scheme and on comparison of its capabilities and limitations with those of the bulk schemes. The libcloudph++ and all its mandatory dependencies are free and open-source software. The Boost.units library is used for zero-overhead dimensional analysis of the code at comp...

  12. libcloudph++ 0.2: single-moment bulk, double-moment bulk, and particle-based warm-rain microphysics library in C++

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arabas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a library of algorithms for representing cloud microphysics in numerical models. The library is written in C++, hence the name libcloudph++. In the current release, the library covers three warm-rain schemes: the single- and double-moment bulk schemes, and the particle-based scheme with Monte-Carlo coalescence. The three schemes are intended for modelling frameworks of different dimensionality and complexity ranging from parcel models to multi-dimensional cloud-resolving (e.g. large-eddy simulations. A two-dimensional prescribed-flow framework is used in example simulations presented in the paper with the aim of highlighting the library features. The libcloudph++ and all its mandatory dependencies are free and open-source software. The Boost.units library is used for zero-overhead dimensional analysis of the code at compile time. The particle-based scheme is implemented using the Thrust library that allows to leverage the power of graphics processing units (GPU, retaining the possibility to compile the unchanged code for execution on single or multiple standard processors (CPUs. The paper includes complete description of the programming interface (API of the library and a performance analysis including comparison of GPU and CPU setups.

  13. libcloudph++ 1.0: a single-moment bulk, double-moment bulk, and particle-based warm-rain microphysics library in C++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabas, S.; Jaruga, A.; Pawlowska, H.; Grabowski, W. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper introduces a library of algorithms for representing cloud microphysics in numerical models. The library is written in C++, hence the name libcloudph++. In the current release, the library covers three warm-rain schemes: the single- and double-moment bulk schemes, and the particle-based scheme with Monte Carlo coalescence. The three schemes are intended for modelling frameworks of different dimensionalities and complexities ranging from parcel models to multi-dimensional cloud-resolving (e.g. large-eddy) simulations. A two-dimensional (2-D) prescribed-flow framework is used in the paper to illustrate the library features. The libcloudph++ and all its mandatory dependencies are free and open-source software. The Boost.units library is used for zero-overhead dimensional analysis of the code at compile time. The particle-based scheme is implemented using the Thrust library that allows one to leverage the power of graphics processing units (GPU), retaining the possibility of compiling the unchanged code for execution on single or multiple standard processors (CPUs). The paper includes a complete description of the programming interface (API) of the library and a performance analysis including comparison of GPU and CPU set-ups.

  14. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization – Part I: Convection and Cloud Properties Simulated with Spectral Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yi-Chin; Xu, Kuan-Man; North, Kirk; Collis, Scott M.; Dong, Xiquan; Zhang, Guang J.; Chen, Qian; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    The ultimate goal of this study is to improve representation of convective transport by cumulus parameterization for meso-scale and climate models. As Part I of the study, we perform extensive evaluations of cloud-resolving simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complexes in mid-latitude continent and tropical regions using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with spectral-bin microphysics (SBM) and with two double-moment bulk microphysics schemes: a modified Morrison (MOR) and Milbrandt and Yau (MY2). Compared to observations, in general, SBM gives better simulations of precipitation, vertical velocity of convective cores, and the vertically decreasing trend of radar reflectivity than MOR and MY2, and therefore will be used for analysis of scale-dependence of eddy transport in Part II. The common features of the simulations for all convective systems are (1) the model tends to overestimate convection intensity in the middle and upper troposphere, but SBM can alleviate much of the overestimation and reproduce the observed convection intensity well; (2) the model greatly overestimates radar reflectivity in convective cores (SBM predicts smaller radar reflectivity but does not remove the large overestimation); and (3) the model performs better for mid-latitude convective systems than tropical system. The modeled mass fluxes of the mid latitude systems are not sensitive to microphysics schemes, but are very sensitive for the tropical case indicating strong microphysics modification to convection. Cloud microphysical measurements of rain, snow and graupel in convective cores will be critically important to further elucidate issues within cloud microphysics schemes.

  15. Two moment dust and water ice in the MarsWRF GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher; Richardson, Mark I.; Newman, Claire E.; Mischna, Michael A.

    2016-10-01

    A new two moment dust and water ice microphysics scheme has been developed for the MarsWRF General Circulation Model based on the Morrison and Gettelman (2008) scheme, and includes temperature dependent nucleation processes and energetically constrained condensation and evaporation. Dust consumed in the formation of water ice is also tracked by the model.The two moment dust scheme simulates dust particles in the Martian atmosphere using a Gamma distribution with fixed radius for lifted particles. Within the atmosphere the particle distribution is advected and sedimented within the two moment framework, obviating the requirement for lossy conversion between the continuous Gamma distribution and discritized bins found in some Mars microphysics schemes. Water ice is simulated using the same Gamma distribution and advected and sedimented in the same way. Water ice nucleation occurs heterogeneously onto dust particles with temperature dependent contact parameters (e.g. Trainer et al., 2009) and condensation and evaporation follows energetic constraints (e.g. Pruppacher and Klett, 1980; Montmessin et al., 2002) allowing water ice particles to grow in size where necessary. Dust particles are tracked within the ice cores as nucleation occurs, and dust cores advect and sediment along with their parent ice particle distributions. Radiative properties of dust and water particles are calculated as a function of the effective radius of the particles and the distribution width. The new microphysics scheme requires 5 tracers to be tracked as the moments of the dust, water ice, and ice core. All microphysical processes are simulated entirely within the two moment framework without any discretization of particle sizes.The effect of this new microphysics scheme on dust and water ice cloud distribution will be discussed and compared with observations from TES and MCS.

  16. Precipitation Sensitivity to the Mean Radius of Drop Spectra: Comparison of Single- and Double-Moment Bulk Microphysical Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemanja Kovačević

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two bulk microphysical schemes were compared across mean radius values of the entire drop spectra. A cloud-resolving mesoscale model was used to analyze surface precipitation characteristics. The model included the following microphysical categories: water vapour, cloud droplets, raindrops, ice crystals, snow, graupel, frozen raindrops and hail. Two bulk schemes were used: a single-moment scheme in which the mean radius was specified as a parameter and a double-moment scheme in which the mean radius of drops was calculated diagnostically with a fixed value for the cloud droplet number concentration. Experiments were conducted out for three values of the mean radius (in the single-moment scheme and two cloud droplet number concentrations (in the double-moment scheme. There were large differences in the surface precipitation for the two schemes, the simulated precipitation generated by the double-moment scheme had a higher sensitivity. The single-moment scheme generated an unrealistic collection rate of cloud droplets by raindrops and hail as well as unrealistic evaporation of rain and melting of solid hydrometeors; these processes led to inaccurate timing and amounts of surface precipitation.

  17. Validation of Microphysical Schemes in a CRM Using TRMM Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Tao, W.; Matsui, T.; Liu, C.; Masunaga, H.

    2007-12-01

    The microphysical scheme in the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model has been the most heavily developed component in the past decade. The cloud-resolving model now has microphysical schemes ranging from the original Lin type bulk scheme, to improved bulk schemes, to a two-moment scheme, to a detailed bin spectral scheme. Even with the most sophisticated bin scheme, many uncertainties still exist, especially in ice phase microphysics. In this study, we take advantages of the long-term TRMM observations, especially the cloud profiles observed by the precipitation radar (PR), to validate microphysical schemes in the simulations of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). Two contrasting cases, a midlatitude summertime continental MCS with leading convection and trailing stratiform region, and an oceanic MCS in tropical western Pacific are studied. The simulated cloud structures and particle sizes are fed into a forward radiative transfer model to simulate the TRMM satellite sensors, i.e., the PR, the TRMM microwave imager (TMI) and the visible and infrared scanner (VIRS). MCS cases that match the structure and strength of the simulated systems over the 10-year period are used to construct statistics of different sensors. These statistics are then compared with the synthetic satellite data obtained from the forward radiative transfer calculations. It is found that the GCE model simulates the contrasts between the continental and oceanic case reasonably well, with less ice scattering in the oceanic case comparing with the continental case. However, the simulated ice scattering signals for both PR and TMI are generally stronger than the observations, especially for the bulk scheme and at the upper levels in the stratiform region. This indicates larger, denser snow/graupel particles at these levels. Adjusting microphysical schemes in the GCE model according the observations, especially the 3D cloud structure observed by TRMM PR, result in a much better agreement.

  18. A new single-moment microphysics scheme for cloud-resolving models using observed dependence of ice concentration on temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairoutdinov, M.

    2015-12-01

    The representation of microphysics, especially ice microphysics, remains one of the major uncertainties in cloud-resolving models (CRMs). Most of the cloud schemes use the so-called bulk microphysics approach, in which a few moments of such distributions are used as the prognostic variables. The System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) is the CRM that employs two such schemes. The single-moment scheme, which uses only mass for each of the water phases, and the two-moment scheme, which adds the particle concentration for each of the hydrometeor category. Of the two, the single-moment scheme is much more computationally efficient as it uses only two prognostic microphysics variables compared to ten variables used by the two-moment scheme. The efficiency comes from a rather considerable oversimplification of the microphysical processes. For instance, only a sum of the liquid and icy cloud water is predicted with the temperature used to diagnose the mixing ratios of different hydrometeors. The main motivation for using such simplified microphysics has been computational efficiency, especially in the applications of SAM as the super-parameterization in global climate models. Recently, we have extended the single-moment microphysics by adding only one additional prognostic variable, which has, nevertheless, allowed us to separate the cloud ice from liquid water. We made use of some of the recent observations of ice microphysics collected at various parts of the world to parameterize several aspects of ice microphysics that have not been explicitly represented before in our sing-moment scheme. For example, we use the observed broad dependence of ice concentration on temperature to diagnose the ice concentration in addition to prognostic mass. Also, there is no artificial separation between the pristine ice and snow, often used by bulk models. Instead we prescribed the ice size spectrum as the gamma distribution, with the distribution shape parameter controlled by the

  19. Numerical simulation of precipitation formation in the case orographically induced convective cloud: Comparison of the results of bin and bulk microphysical schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, N.; Geresdi, I.; Thompson, G.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, results of bulk and bin microphysical schemes are compared in the case of idealized simulations of pre-frontal orographic clouds with enhanced embedded convection. The description graupel formation by intensive riming of snowflakes was improved compared to prior versions of each scheme. Two methods of graupel melting coincident with collisions with water drops were considered: (1) all simulated melting and collected water drops increase the amount of melted water on the surface of graupel particles with no shedding permitted; (2) also no shedding permitted due to melting, but the collision with the water drops can induce shedding from the surface of the graupel particles. The results of the numerical experiments show: (i) The bin schemes generate graupel particles more efficiently by riming than the bulk scheme does; the intense riming of snowflakes was the most dominant process for the graupel formation. (ii) The collision-induced shedding significantly affects the evolution of the size distribution of graupel particles and water drops below the melting level. (iii) The three microphysical schemes gave similar values for the domain integrated surface precipitation, but the patterns reveal meaningful differences. (iv) Sensitivity tests using the bulk scheme show that the depth of the melting layer is sensitive to the description of the terminal velocity of the melting snow. (v) Comparisons against Convair-580 flight measurements suggest that the bin schemes simulate well the evolution of the pristine ice particles and liquid drops, while some inaccuracy can occur in the description of snowflakes riming. (vi) The bin scheme with collision-induced shedding reproduced well the quantitative characteristics of the observed bright band.

  20. Development of a cloud microphysical model and parameterizations to describe the effect of CCN on warm cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kuba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available First, a hybrid cloud microphysical model was developed that incorporates both Lagrangian and Eulerian frameworks to study quantitatively the effect of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN on the precipitation of warm clouds. A parcel model and a grid model comprise the cloud model. The condensation growth of CCN in each parcel is estimated in a Lagrangian framework. Changes in cloud droplet size distribution arising from condensation and coalescence are calculated on grid points using a two-moment bin method in a semi-Lagrangian framework. Sedimentation and advection are estimated in the Eulerian framework between grid points. Results from the cloud model show that an increase in the number of CCN affects both the amount and the area of precipitation. Additionally, results from the hybrid microphysical model and Kessler's parameterization were compared. Second, new parameterizations were developed that estimate the number and size distribution of cloud droplets given the updraft velocity and the number of CCN. The parameterizations were derived from the results of numerous numerical experiments that used the cloud microphysical parcel model. The input information of CCN for these parameterizations is only several values of CCN spectrum (they are given by CCN counter for example. It is more convenient than conventional parameterizations those need values concerned with CCN spectrum, C and k in the equation of N=CSk, or, breadth, total number and median radius, for example. The new parameterizations' predictions of initial cloud droplet size distribution for the bin method were verified by using the aforesaid hybrid microphysical model. The newly developed parameterizations will save computing time, and can effectively approximate components of cloud microphysics in a non-hydrostatic cloud model. The parameterizations are useful not only in the bin method in the regional cloud-resolving model but also both for a two-moment bulk microphysical model and

  1. Cloud Susceptibilities to Ice Nuclei: Microphysical Effects and Dynamical Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukert, Marco; Hoose, Corinna

    2015-04-01

    due to the adjustment of turbulent transport. Furthermore, simulations of Weisman and Klemp (1982) convective clouds are going to be presented. Results are based on three-dimensional, idealized LES-like simulations with the COSMO-ART model (Vogel et al., 2009) and an extended version of the two-moment bulk microphysics scheme of Seifert and Beheng (2006). Seifert, A., and K. D. Beheng (2006), A two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for mixed-phase clouds. Part 1: Model description, Meteorol. Atmos. Phys., 92, 45-66. Vogel, B., H. Vogel, D. Bäumer, M. Bangert, K. Lundgren, R. Rinke, and T. Stanelle (2009), The comprehensive model system COSMO-ART - Radiative impact of aerosol on the state of the atmosphere on the regional scale, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 8661-8680. Weisman, M. L., and J. B. Klemp (1982), The dependency of numerically simulated convective storms on vertical wind shear and buoyancy, Mon. Wea. Rev., 110, 504-520.

  2. Development of a cloud microphysical model and parameterizations to describe the effect of CCN on warm cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kuba

    2006-02-01

    also both for a two-moment bulk microphysical model and for a global model. The effects of sea salt, sulfate, and organic carbon particles were also studied with these parameterizations and global model.

  3. Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2 ; Precipitation Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridland, Ann M.; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Ten 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3-D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on 23-24 January 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, colocated UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rainwater contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (mu) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes but lower RWCs. Two-moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and, thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision-coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a mu of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing mu to have values greater than 0 may improve excessive size sorting in two-moment schemes. Underpredicted stratiform rain rates are associated with underpredicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. A limited domain size also prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region like the one observed from developing in CRMs, although LAMs also fail to produce such a region.

  4. Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2 ; Precipitation Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridland, Ann M.; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Ten 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3-D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on 23-24 January 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, colocated UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rainwater contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (mu) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes but lower RWCs. Two-moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and, thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision-coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a mu of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing mu to have values greater than 0 may improve excessive size sorting in two-moment schemes. Underpredicted stratiform rain rates are associated with underpredicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. A limited domain size also prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region like the one observed from developing in CRMs, although LAMs also fail to produce such a region.

  5. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (μ) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a μ of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing μ to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  6. Evaluation of cloud-resolving and limited area model intercomparison simulations using TWP-ICE observations: 2. Precipitation microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Ten 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3-D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on 23-24 January 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, colocated UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rainwater contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (μ) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes but lower RWCs. Two-moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and, thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision-coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a μ of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing μ to have values greater than 0 may improve excessive size sorting in two-moment schemes. Underpredicted stratiform rain rates are associated with underpredicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. A limited domain size also prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region like the one observed from developing in CRMs, although LAMs also fail to produce such a region.

  7. Coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics with the MOSAIC aerosol model in WRF-Chem: Methodology and results for marine stratocumulus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenhua; Fan, Jiwen; Easter, R. C.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction processes can be represented more physically with bin cloud microphysics relative to bulk microphysical parameterizations. However, due to computational power limitations in the past, bin cloud microphysics was often run with very simple aerosol treatments. The purpose of this study is to represent better aerosol-cloud interaction processes in the Chemistry version of Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) at convection-permitting scales by coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics (SBM) with the MOSAIC sectional aerosol model. A flexible interface is built that exchanges cloud and aerosol information between them. The interface contains a new bin aerosol activation approach, which replaces the treatments in the original SBM. It also includes the modified aerosol resuspension and in-cloud wet removal processes with the droplet loss tendencies and precipitation fluxes from SBM. The newly coupled system is evaluated for two marine stratocumulus cases over the Southeast Pacific Ocean with either a simplified aerosol setup or full-chemistry. We compare the aerosol activation process in the newly coupled SBM-MOSAIC against the SBM simulation without chemistry using a simplified aerosol setup, and the results show consistent activation rates. A longer time simulation reinforces that aerosol resuspension through cloud drop evaporation plays an important role in replenishing aerosols and impacts cloud and precipitation in marine stratocumulus clouds. Evaluation of the coupled SBM-MOSAIC with full-chemistry using aircraft measurements suggests that the new model works realistically for the marine stratocumulus clouds, and improves the simulation of cloud microphysical properties compared to a simulation using MOSAIC coupled with the Morrison two-moment microphysics.

  8. Coupling Spectral-bin Cloud Microphysics with the MOSAIC Aerosol Model in WRF-Chem: Methodology and Results for Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wenhua; Fan, Jiwen; Easter, Richard C.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-08-23

    Aerosol-cloud interaction processes can be represented more physically with bin cloud microphysics relative to bulk microphysical parameterizations. However, due to computational power limitations in the past, bin cloud microphysics was often run with very simple aerosol treatments. The purpose of this study is to represent better aerosol-cloud interaction processes in the Chemistry version of Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) at convection-permitting scales by coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics (SBM) with the MOSAIC sectional aerosol model. A flexible interface is built that exchanges cloud and aerosol information between them. The interface contains a new bin aerosol activation approach, which replaces the treatments in the original SBM. It also includes the modified aerosol resuspension and in-cloud wet removal processes with the droplet loss tendencies and precipitation fluxes from SBM. The newly coupled system is evaluated for two marine stratocumulus cases over the Southeast Pacific Ocean with either a simplified aerosol setup or full-chemistry. We compare the aerosol activation process in the newly-coupled SBM-MOSAIC against the SBM simulation without chemistry using a simplified aerosol setup, and the results show consistent activation rates. A longer time simulation reinforces that aerosol resuspension through cloud drop evaporation plays an important role in replenishing aerosols and impacts cloud and precipitation in marine stratocumulus clouds. Evaluation of the coupled SBM-MOSAIC with full-chemistry using aircraft measurements suggests that the new model works realistically for the marine stratocumulus clouds, and improves the simulation of cloud microphysical properties compared to a simulation using MOSAIC coupled with the Morrison two-moment microphysics.

  9. AN SENSITIVITY SIMULATION ABOUT CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL PROCESSES OF TYPHOON CHANCHU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Wen-shi; WU Jian-bin; LI Jiang-nan; LIANG Xu-dong; FANG Xing-qin; XU Sui-shan

    2010-01-01

    With the Reisner-2 bulk microphysical parameterization of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University-U.S.National Center for Atmospheric Research(PSU-NCAR)Mesoscale Model(MMS),this paper investigates the microphysical sensitivities of Typhoon Chanchu.Four different microphysical sensitivity experiments were designed with an objective to evaluate their respective impacts in modulating intensity forecasts and microphysics budgets of the typhoon.The set of sensitivity experiments were conducted that comprised(a)a control experiment(CTL),(b)NEVPRW from which evaporation of rain water was suppressed,(c)NGP from which graupel was taken,and(d)NMLT from which melting of snow and graupel was removed.We studied the impacts of different cloud microphysical processes on the track,intensity and precipitation of the typhoon,as well as the kinematics,thermodynamics and vertical structural characteristics of hydrometeors in the inner core of the typhoon.Additionally,the budgets of the cloud microphysical processes in the fine domain were calculated to quantify the importance of each microphysical process for every sensitivity experiment.The primary results are as follows:(1)It is found that varying cloud microphysics parameters produce little sensitivity in typhoon track experiments.(2)The experiment of NGP produces the weakest storm,while the experiment of NMLT produces the strongest storm,and the experiment of NEVPRW also produces stronger storms than CTL.(3)Varying parameters of cloud microphysics have obvious impacts on the precipitation,kinematics,and thermodynamics of the typhoon and the vertical structural characteristics of hydrometeors in the typhoon's inner core.(4)Most budgets of cloud microphysics in NMLT are larger than in CTL,while they are 20%-60% smaller in NEVPRW than in CTL.

  10. Acid rain: Microphysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, A. N.

    1980-01-01

    A microphysical model was used to simulate the case of a ground cloud without dilution by entrainment and without precipitation. The numerical integration techniques of the model are presented. The droplet size spectra versus time and the droplet molalities for each value of time are discussed.

  11. A Cloud-Resolving Modeling Intercomparison Study on Properties of Cloud Microphysics, Convection, and Precipitation for a Squall Line Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Han, B.; Morrison, H.; Varble, A.; Mansell, E.; Milbrandt, J.; Wang, Y.; Lin, Y.; Dong, X.; Giangrande, S. E.; Jensen, M. P.; Collis, S. M.; North, K.; Kollias, P.

    2015-12-01

    The large spread in CRM model simulations of deep convection and aerosol effects on deep convective clouds (DCCs) makes it difficult (1) to further our understanding of deep convection and (2) to define "benchmarks" and recommendations for their use in parameterization developments. Past model intercomparison studies used different models with different complexities of dynamic-microphysics interactions, making it hard to isolate the causes of differences between simulations. In this intercomparison study, we employed a much more constrained approach - with the same model and same experiment setups for simulations with different cloud microphysics schemes (one-moment, two-moment, and bin models). Both the piggybacking and interactive approaches are employed to explore the major microphysical processes that control the model differences and the significance of their feedback to dynamics through latent heating/cooling and cold pool characteristics. Real-case simulations are conducted for the squall line case 20 May 2011 from the MC3E field campaign. Results from the piggybacking approach show substantially different responses of the microphysics schemes to the same dynamical fields. Although the interactive microphysics-dynamics simulations buffer some differences compared with those from the piggyback runs, large differences still exist and are mainly contributed by ice microphysical processes parameterizations. The presentation will include in-depth analyses of the major microphysical processes for the squall line case, the significance of the feedback of the processes to dynamics, and how those results differ in different cloud microphysics schemes.

  12. Sandmo´s Model of the Competitive Firm in a Two-Moment World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sproule

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Sandmo´s (1971 model of the competitive firm under output price uncertainty has been the object of on going research interest since its appearance in 1971. One measure of this interest is the fact that three distinct approaches to signing the marginal effect of risk have been identified. One of these has spawned new research into what is termed the two-moment model. The present paper offers a new bridge between the Sandmo model of the competitive firm and the domain of two-moment models. In particular, the present paper outlines how the Sandmo model might be recast in the context of a two-state world. In doing so, we offer a generalization of an obscure model by Sakai (1977.

  13. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  14. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  15. Separating dynamical and microphysical impacts of aerosols on deep convection applying piggybacking methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Wojciech W.

    2016-04-01

    Formation and growth of cloud and precipitation particles ("cloud microphysics") affect cloud dynamics and such macroscopic cloud field properties as the mean surface rainfall, cloud cover, and liquid/ice water paths. Traditional approaches to investigate the impacts involve parallel simulations with different microphysical schemes or with different scheme parameters (such as the assumed droplet/ice concentration for single-moment bulk schemes or the assumed CCN/IN concentration for double-moment schemes). Such methodologies are not reliable because of the natural variability of a cloud field that is affected by the feedback between cloud microphysics and cloud dynamics. In a nutshell, changing the cloud microphysics leads to a different realization of the cloud-scale flow, and separating dynamical and microphysical impacts is cumbersome. A novel modeling methodology, referred to as the microphysical piggybacking, was recently developed to separate purely microphysical effects from the impact on the dynamics. The main idea is to use two sets of thermodynamic variables driven by two microphysical schemes or by the same scheme with different scheme parameters. One set is coupled to the dynamics and drives the simulation, and the other set piggybacks the simulated flow, that is, it responds to the simulated flow but does not affect it. By switching the sets (i.e., the set driving the simulation becomes the piggybacking one, and vice versa), the impact on the cloud dynamics can be isolated from purely microphysical effects. Application of this methodology to the daytime deep convection development over land based on the observations during the Large-scale Biosphere-Atmosphere (LBA) field project in Amazonia will be discussed applying single-moment and double-moment bulk microphysics schemes. We show that the new methodology documents a small indirect aerosol impact on convective dynamics, and a strong microphysical effect. These results question the postulated strong

  16. Comparison of observed and simulated spatial patterns of ice microphysical processes in tropical oceanic mesoscale convective systems: Ice Microphysics in Midlevel Inflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Hannah C. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle Washington USA; Houze, Robert A. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle Washington USA; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-07-25

    To equitably compare the spatial pattern of ice microphysical processes produced by three microphysical parameterizations with each other, observations, and theory, simulations of tropical oceanic mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were forced to develop the same mesoscale circulations as observations by assimilating radial velocity data from a Doppler radar. The same general layering of microphysical processes was found in observations and simulations with deposition anywhere above the 0°C level, aggregation at and above the 0°C level, melting at and below the 0°C level, and riming near the 0°C level. Thus, this study is consistent with the layered ice microphysical pattern portrayed in previous conceptual models and indicated by dual-polarization radar data. Spatial variability of riming in the simulations suggests that riming in the midlevel inflow is related to convective-scale vertical velocity perturbations. Finally, this study sheds light on limitations of current generally available bulk microphysical parameterizations. In each parameterization, the layers in which aggregation and riming took place were generally too thick and the frequency of riming was generally too high compared to the observations and theory. Additionally, none of the parameterizations produced similar details in every microphysical spatial pattern. Discrepancies in the patterns of microphysical processes between parameterizations likely factor into creating substantial differences in model reflectivity patterns. It is concluded that improved parameterizations of ice-phase microphysics will be essential to obtain reliable, consistent model simulations of tropical oceanic MCSs.

  17. Scaling the Microphysics Equations and Analyzing the Variability of Hydrometeor Production Rates in a Controlled Parameter Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A set of microphysics equations is scaled based on the convective length and velocity scales. Comparisons are made among the dynamical transport and various microphysical processes. From the scaling analysis, it becomes apparent which parameterized microphysical processes present off-scaled influences in the integration of the set of microphysics equations. The variabilities of the parameterized microphysical processes are also studied using the approach of a controlled parameter space. Given macroscopic dynamic and thermodynamic conditions in different regions of convective storms, it is possible to analyze and compare vertical profiles of these processes. Bulk diabatic heating profiles for a cumulus convective updraft and downdraft are also derived from this analysis. From the two different angles, the scale analysis and the controlled-parameter space approach can both provide an insight into and an understanding of microphysics parameterizations.

  18. Two moments in the recent history of biblical reading: the Bible as literature from Erich Auerbach and Robert Alter

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson de Oliveira Lima

    2015-01-01

    This article is dedicated to the understanding of what is read the Bible as literature. We present two moments in the recent history of Bible reading that seem crucial to the definition of this form of reading. The two moments were the publications of two important works that approached the biblical texts from a literary perspective, differing from traditional approaches, religious and exegetical, and influencing the next generations. The first of these two works was Mimesis: The Representati...

  19. A Two-moment Radiation Hydrodynamics Module in Athena Using a Time-explicit Godunov Method

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, M Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We describe a module for the Athena code that solves the gray equations of radiation hydrodynamics (RHD), based on the first two moments of the radiative transfer equation. We use a combination of explicit Godunov methods to advance the gas and radiation variables including the non-stiff source terms, and a local implicit method to integrate the stiff source terms. We adopt the M1 closure relation and include all leading source terms. We employ the reduced speed of light approximation (RSLA) with subcycling of the radiation variables in order to reduce computational costs. Our code is dimensionally unsplit in one, two, and three space dimensions and is parallelized using MPI. The streaming and diffusion limits are well-described by the M1 closure model, and our implementation shows excellent behavior for a problem with a concentrated radiation source containing both regimes simultaneously. Our operator-split method is ideally suited for problems with a slowly varying radiation field and dynamical gas flows, i...

  20. Simulation of cloud microphysical effects on water isotope fractionation in a frontal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. P.; Tsai, I. C.; Chen, W. Y.; Liang, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The stable water isotopic composition changes due to fractionation during phase changes. This information is useful for understanding the water cycle, such as the water vapor source, transport and cloud microphysical processes. In conventional atmospheric models, the isotope exchange between liquid and gas phase is usually assumed to be in an equilibrium state, which is not sufficient to describe the highly kinetic phase transformation processes in clouds. In this study, a two-moment microphysical scheme incorporated into the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is modified to simulate the isotope fractionations. Experimentally determined stable water isotope thermal equilibrium data are converted into isotope saturation vapor pressure, which is then put into the two-stream Maxwellian kinetic equation to calculate the fractionation during vapor condensation/evaporation or deposition/sublimation. Isotope mass transfer between liquid- and ice-phase hydrometeors during freezing/melting are also considered explicitly. The simulation results were compared with rainwater isotope measurements and showed fairly good agreement. Sensitivity tests were also conducted to quantify the contribution of rainwater isotopic due to water vapor source and transport, condensation environment conditions, and cloud microphysical processes. The results show that isotopic water vapor source dominates the stable isotope concentration in rainwater but the cloud microphysical processes including the ice-phase processes are also quite important. The results also showed that the two-stream Maxwellian kinetic method would cause significantly more deuterium to be transported into higher altitudes during convection than the thermal equilibrium method.

  1. Aerosol Microphysics and Radiation Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Aerosol Microphysics and Radiation...Airborne Radiometric Measurements.’ Bucholtz, A. (as member of CRYSTAL-FACE Science Team), NASA 2003 Group Achievement Award to CRYSTAL-FACE

  2. A Two-moment Radiation Hydrodynamics Module in Athena Using a Time-explicit Godunov Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, M. Aaron; Ostriker, Eve C.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a module for the Athena code that solves the gray equations of radiation hydrodynamics (RHD), based on the first two moments of the radiative transfer equation. We use a combination of explicit Godunov methods to advance the gas and radiation variables including the non-stiff source terms, and a local implicit method to integrate the stiff source terms. We adopt the M 1 closure relation and include all leading source terms to {O}(β τ). We employ the reduced speed of light approximation (RSLA) with subcycling of the radiation variables in order to reduce computational costs. Our code is dimensionally unsplit in one, two, and three space dimensions and is parallelized using MPI. The streaming and diffusion limits are well described by the M 1 closure model, and our implementation shows excellent behavior for a problem with a concentrated radiation source containing both regimes simultaneously. Our operator-split method is ideally suited for problems with a slowly varying radiation field and dynamical gas flows, in which the effect of the RSLA is minimal. We present an analysis of the dispersion relation of RHD linear waves highlighting the conditions of applicability for the RSLA. To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we utilize a suite of radiation and RHD tests covering a broad range of regimes, including RHD waves, shocks, and equilibria, which show second-order convergence in most cases. As an application, we investigate radiation-driven ejection of a dusty, optically thick shell in the ISM. Finally, we compare the timing of our method with other well-known iterative schemes for the RHD equations. Our code implementation, Hyperion, is suitable for a wide variety of astrophysical applications and will be made freely available on the Web.

  3. Optical-Microphysical Cirrus Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Lin, R.-F.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Starr, D. O.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that permits the simulation of the optical properties of cirrus clouds as measured with depolarization Raman lidars. It comprises a one-dimensional cirrus model with explicit microphysics and an optical module that transforms the microphysical model output to cloud and particle optical properties. The optical model takes into account scattering by randomly oriented or horizontally aligned planar and columnar monocrystals and polycrystals. Key cloud properties such as the fraction of plate-like particles and the number of basic crystals per polycrystal are parameterized in terms of the ambient temperature, the nucleation temperature, or the mass of the particles. The optical-microphysical model is used to simulate the lidar measurement of a synoptically forced cirrostratus in a first case study. It turns out that a cirrus cloud consisting of only monocrystals in random orientation is too simple a model scenario to explain the observations. However, good agreement between simulation and observation is reached when the formation of polycrystals or the horizontal alignment of monocrystals is permitted. Moreover, the model results show that plate fraction and morphological complexity are best parameterized in terms of particle mass, or ambient temperature which indicates that the ambient conditions affect cirrus optical properties more than those during particle formation. Furthermore, the modeled profiles of particle shape and size are in excellent agreement with in situ and laboratory studies, i.e., (partly oriented) polycrystalline particles with mainly planar basic crystals in the cloud bottom layer, and monocrystals above, with the fraction of columns increasing and the shape and size of the particles changing from large thin plates and long columns to small, more isometric crystals from cloud center to top. The findings of this case study corroborate the microphysical interpretation of cirrus measurements with lidar as suggested previously.

  4. Aerosol Microphysics and Radiation Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    creation of simple thermodynamic and microphysical parameterizations for use in models to the development of complicated error matrices for use in...Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a...speed near glint regions, while for glint angles larger than 80°, the wind speed effect is insignificant. Second , the MODIS cloud screening algorithm

  5. Simulation of Mixed-Phase Convective Clouds: A Comparison of Spectral and Parameterized Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, A.; Khain, A.; Pokrovsky, A.

    2002-12-01

    The simulation of clouds and precipitation is one of the most complex problems in atmospheric modeling. The microphysics of clouds has to deal with a large variety of hydrometeor types and a multitude of complicated physical processes like nukleation, condensation, freezing, melting, collection and breakup of particles. Due to the lack of reliable in-situ observations many of the processes are still not well understood. Nevertheless a cloud resolving model (CRM) has to include these processes in some way. All CRMs can be separated into two groups, according to the microphysical representation used. Cloud models of the first kind utilize the so-called bulk parameterization of cloud microphysics. This concept has been introduced by Kessler (1969) and has been improved and extended in the field of mesoscale modeling. The state-of-the-art bulk schemes include several particle types like cloud droplets, raindrops, ice crystals, snow and graupel which are represented by mass contents and for some of them also by the number concentrations. Within a bulk microphysical model all relevant processes have to be parameterized in terms of these model variables. CRMs of the second kind are based on the spectral formulation of cloud microphysics. For each particle type taken into account the size distribution function is represented by a number of discrete size bins with its corresponding budget equation. To achieve satisfactory numerical results at least 30 bins are necessary for each particle type. This approach has the clear advantage of being a more general representation of the relevant physical processes and the different physical properties of particles of different sizes. A spectral model is able to include detailed descriptions of collisional and condensational growth and activation/nucleation of particles. But this approach suffers from the large computational effort necessary, especially in threedimensional models. We present a comparison between a cloud model with

  6. Two moments in the recent history of biblical reading: the Bible as literature from Erich Auerbach and Robert Alter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson de Oliveira Lima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is dedicated to the understanding of what is read the Bible as literature. We present two moments in the recent history of Bible reading that seem crucial to the definition of this form of reading. The two moments were the publications of two important works that approached the biblical texts from a literary perspective, differing from traditional approaches, religious and exegetical, and influencing the next generations. The first of these two works was Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature by Erich Auerbach, originally published in 1946, the other was The Art of Biblical Narrative by Robert Alter, original 1981. We examine some of the main contributions of these two authors for the Bible studies and try to demonstrate that there is a thematic dependence between their works, then list the main assumptions of this way of reading the Bible today, and defend the hypothesis that religious mediation still dividing the Bible studies.

  7. Modeling the influence of aerosols on cloud microphysical properties in the east Asia region using a mesoscale model coupled with a bin-based cloud microphysics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Takamichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Khain, Alexander P.; Saito, Kazuo; Takemura, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Kentaroh

    2008-07-01

    A bin-based microphysics scheme for cloud is implemented into a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic model and off-line coupled with a global aerosol transport model to reproduce realistic and inhomogeneous condensation nuclei (CN) fields. This coupling makes it possible to calculate cloud microphysical properties over a larger area under more realistic environmental conditions. Using the model, nested grid simulations are performed for two precipitation events associated with transitional synoptic-scale forcing during the spring over an area of the East China Sea. The nested grid simulations reproduce the general features of the horizontal distributions of variables such as effective droplet radius derived from satellite data retrieval. Comparison of the relationships among simulated cloud variables with those among satellite-derived variables reveals that the implementation of an inhomogeneous CN field results in a more accurate simulation of the distribution of cloud microphysical properties. Sensitivity tests with respect to CN concentration show that the simulated area and amount of precipitation are slightly affected by the CN concentration. Comparative simulations using bin-based and bulk microphysical schemes indicate that the difference in cloud microphysics has little effect on precipitation except over the areas of elevated pollution (i.e., elevated CN). Comparison with previous reports indicates that the precipitation response to aerosols is dependent on the environmental conditions and the type of the cloud system.

  8. Climatic implications of ice microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, K.N. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Based on aircraft measurements of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, ice crystal size distribution and ice water content (IWC) are shown to be dependent on temperature. This dependence is also evident from the theoretical consideration of ice crystal growth. Using simple models of the diffusion and accretion growth of ice particles, the computed mean ice crystal size and IWC compare reasonably well with the measured mean values. The temperature dependence of ice crystal size and IWC has important climatic implications in that the temperature field perturbed by external radiative forcings, such as greenhouse warming, can alter the composition of ice crystal clouds. Through radiative transfer, ice microphysics can in turn affect the temperature field. Higher IWC would increase cloud solar albedo and infrared emissivity, while for a given IWC, larger crystals would reduce cloud albedo and emissivity. The competing effects produced by greenhouse temperature perturbations via ice micro-physics and radiation interactions and feedbacks are assessed by a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model that includes an advanced radiation parameterization program. 3 figs.

  9. Representation of nucleation mode microphysics in global aerosol microphysics models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In models, nucleation mode (1 nm Dp J10 and the burdens and lifetimes of ultrafine mode (10 nm Dp J10 and shorter coagulation lifetimes of ultrafine mode particles than the model with explicit dynamics (i.e. 1 nm boundary. The spatial distributions of CN10 (Dp > 10 nm and CCN(0.2% (i.e. CCN concentrations at 0.2% supersaturation are moderately affected, especially CN10 predictions above ~ 700 hPa where nucleation contributes most strongly to CN10 concentrations. The lowermost layer CN10 is substantially improved with the 3 nm boundary (compared to 10 nm in most areas. The overprediction in CN10 with the 3 nm and 10 nm boundaries can be explained by the overprediction of J10 or J3 with the parameterized microphysics possibly due to the instantaneous growth rate assumption in the survival and growth parameterization. The errors in CN10 predictions are sensitive to the choice of the lower size boundary but not to the choice of the time step applied to the microphysical processes. The spatial distribution of CCN(0.2% with the 3 nm boundary is almost identical to that with the 1 nm boundary, but that with the 10 nm boundary can differ more than 10–40% in some areas. We found that the deviation in the 10 nm simulations is partly due to the longer time step (i.e. 1-h time step used in the 10 nm simulations compared to 10-min time step used in the benchmark simulations but, even with the same time step, the 10 nm cutoff showed noticeably higher errors than the 3 nm cutoff. In conclusion, we generally recommend using a lower diameter boundary of 3 nm for studies focused on aerosol indirect effects but down to 1 nm boundary for studies focused on CN10 predictions or nucleation.

  10. 3-D model simulations of dynamical and microphysical interactions in pyro-convective clouds under idealized conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Reutter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pyro-convective clouds, i.e. convective clouds forming over wildland fires due to high sensible heat, play an important role for the transport of aerosol particles and trace gases into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Additionally, due to the emission of a large number of aerosol particles from forest fires, the microphysical structure of a pyro-convective cloud is clearly different from that of ordinary convective clouds. A crucial step in the microphysical evolution of a (pyro- convective cloud is the activation of aerosol particles to form cloud droplets. The activation process affects the initial number and size of cloud droplets and can thus influence the evolution of the convective cloud and the formation of precipitation. Building upon a realistic parameterization of CCN activation, the model ATHAM is used to investigate the dynamical and microphysical processes of idealized three-dimensional pyro-convective clouds in mid-latitudes. A state-of-the-art two-moment microphysical scheme has been implemented in order to study the influence of the aerosol concentration on the cloud development. The results show that the aerosol concentration influences the formation of precipitation. For low aerosol concentrations (NCN=1000 cm−3, rain droplets are rapidly formed by autoconversion of cloud droplets. This also triggers the formation of large graupel and hail particles resulting in an early and strong onset of precipitation. With increasing aerosol concentration (NCN=20 000 cm−3 and NCN=60 000 cm−3 the formation of rain droplets is delayed due to more but smaller cloud droplets. Therefore, the formation of ice crystals and snowflakes becomes more important for the eventual formation of graupel and hail. However, this causes a delay of the onset of precipitation and its intensity for increasing aerosol concentration. This work shows the first detailed investigation of the interaction between cloud microphysics and dynamics of a

  11. Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-29

    A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

  12. Storm Microphysics and Kinematics at the ARM-SGP site using Dual Polarized Radar Observations at Multiple Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Alyssa A.

    This research utilizes observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at the Southern Great Plains location to investigate the kinematic and microphysical processes present in various types of weather systems. The majority of the data used was collected during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E), and utilizes the network of scanning radars to arrive at a multi-Doppler wind retrieval and is compared to vertical wind measurements from a centrally located profiling radar. Microphysical compositions of the storms are analyzed using a multi-wavelength hydrometeor identification algorithm utilizing the strengths of each of the radar wavelengths available (X, C, S). When available, a comparison is done between observational analysis and simulated model output from the Weather Research Forecasting model with Spectral-bin Microphysics (WRF-SBM) using bulk statistics to look at reflectivity, vertical motions, and microphysics.

  13. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysical Parameterizations in Cloud Resolving Model Simulations using the ARM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Muhlbauer, A.; Ackerman, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    Clouds modulate the distribution of energy and water within the atmosphere and regulate the hydrological cycle. Cloud microphysical parameterizations are critical for the representation of cloud microphysical properties in both cloud-resolving and climate models. In this study, we analyze the capabilities of a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with advanced bulk microphysics schemes to simulate the microphysical properties and evolution of convective clouds and anvil cirrus over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in the mid-latitudes and Kwajalein Atoll in the tropics. For evaluating simulated cloud properties, we use observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program 1997 summer Intensive Observations Period at the SGP site and the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) field campaign. The CRM simulations are evaluated with the ARM and KWAJEX observations, in particular using precipitation records, radiative fluxes, and radar reflectivity values observed by the ARM millimeter wavelength cloud radar (MMCR) and the Kwajalein precipitation radar. Preliminary analysis of the ARM SGP case shows that although the precipitation events during this period are well captured by the model, the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) is considerably underestimated and the model generates too much high cloud, which is inconsistent with the MMCR observations. In our study we especially focus on the causes of the overproduction of ice and high clouds in the CRM simulations. Improvements of the ice microphysics scheme and resulting impacts on the simulation are presented.

  14. Evaluating Frontal Precipitation with a Spectral Microphysics Mesoscale Model and a Satellite Simulator as Compared to Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Braun, S. A.; Matsui, T.; Iguchi, T.; Williams, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) onboard NASA Aqua satellite and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar sampled a frontal precipitation event in the US west coast on 30 to 31 December 2005. Simulations with bulk microphysics schemes in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model have been evaluated with those remote sensing data. In the current study, we continue similar work to evaluate a spectral bin microphysics (SBM) scheme, HUCM, in the WRF model. The Goddard-Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU) is used to simulate quantities observed by the radar and radiometer. With advanced representation of cloud and precipitation microphysics processes, the HUCM scheme predicts distributions of 7 hydrometeor species as storms evolve. In this study, the simulation with HUCM well captured the structure of the precipitation and its microphysics characteristics. In addition, it improved total precipitation ice mass simulation and corrected, to a certain extent, the large low bias of ice scattering signature in the bulk scheme simulations. However, the radar reflectivity simulations with the HUCM scheme were not improved as compared to the bulk schemes. We conducted investigations to understand how microphysical processes and properties, such as snow break up parameter and particle fall velocities would influence precipitation size distribution and spectrum of water paths, and further modify radar and/or radiometer simulations. Influence by ice nuclei is going to be examined as well.

  15. Uncertainty of Microphysics Schemes in CRMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W. K.; van den Heever, S. C.; Wu, D.; Saleeby, S. M.; Lang, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Microphysics is the framework through which to understand the links between interactive aerosol, cloud and precipitation processes. These processes play a critical role in the water and energy cycle. CRMs with advanced microphysics schemes have been used to study the interaction between aerosol, cloud and precipitation processes at high resolution. But, there are still many uncertainties associated with these microphysics schemes. This has arisen, in part, from the fact microphysical processes cannot be measured directly; instead, cloud properties, which can be measured, are and have been used to validate model results. The utilization of current and future global high-resolution models is rapidly increasing and are at what has been traditional CRM resolutions and are using microphysics schemes that were developed in traditional CRMs. A potential NASA satellite mission called the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CaPPM) is currently being planned for submission to the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey. This mission could provide the necessary global estimates of cloud and precipitation properties with which to evaluate and improve dynamical and microphysical parameterizations and the feedbacks. In order to facilitate the development of this mission, CRM simulations have been conducted to identify microphysical processes responsible for the greatest uncertainties in CRMs. In this talk, we will present results from numerical simulations conducted using two CRMs (NU-WRF and RAMS) with different dynamics, radiation, land surface and microphysics schemes. Specifically, we will conduct sensitivity tests to examine the uncertainty of the some of the key ice processes (i.e. riming, melting, freezing and shedding) in these two-microphysics schemes. The idea is to quantify how these two different models' respond (surface rainfall and its intensity, strength of cloud drafts, LWP/IWP, convective-stratiform-anvil area distribution) to changes of these key ice

  16. The microphysics of phyllosilicate friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Sabine A. M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts most of the experimentally observed trends in frictional behaviour and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  17. Numerical Simulations of TRMM LBA, TOGA, COARE, GATE, ARM and PRESTORM Convective Systems: Sensitivity tests on Microphysical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W.-K.; Wang, Y.; Lang, S.; Ferrier, B.; Simpson, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The 3D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model was utilized to examine the behavior and response of simulated deep tropical cloud systems that occurred over the west Pacific warm pool region, the Atlantic ocean and the central United States. The periods chosen for simulation were convectively active periods during TOGA-COARE (February 22 1993, December 11-17, 1992; December 19-28, February 9-13, 1993), GATE (September 4, 1974), LBA (January 26 and February 23, 1998), ARM (1997 IOP) and PRESTORM (June 11, 1985). We will examine differences in the microphysics for both warm rain and ice processes (evaporation /sublimation and condensation/ deposition), Q1 (Temperature), Q2 (Water vapor) and Q3 (momentum both U and V) budgets for these three convective events from different large-scale environments. The contribution of stratiform precipitation and its relationship to the vertical shear of the large-scale horizontal wind will also be examined. New improvements to the GCE model (i.e., microphysics: 4ICE two moments and 3ICE one moment; advection schemes) as well as their sensitivity to the model results will be discussed. Preliminary results indicated that various microphysical schemes could have a major impact on stratiform formation as well as the size of convective systems. However, they do not change the major characteristics of the convective systems, such as: arc shape, strong rotational circulation on both ends of system, heavy precipitation along the leading edge of systems.

  18. Measurement errors in cirrus cloud microphysical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Larsen

    Full Text Available The limited accuracy of current cloud microphysics sensors used in cirrus cloud studies imposes limitations on the use of the data to examine the cloud's broadband radiative behaviour, an important element of the global energy balance. We review the limitations of the instruments, PMS probes, most widely used for measuring the microphysical structure of cirrus clouds and show the effect of these limitations on descriptions of the cloud radiative properties. The analysis is applied to measurements made as part of the European Cloud and Radiation Experiment (EUCREX to determine mid-latitude cirrus microphysical and radiative properties.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (cloud physics and chemistry · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · Radiative processes · Instruments and techniques

  19. The impact of hydrometeors on the microphysical parameterization in the WRF modelling system over southern peninsular India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragi, A. R.; Sharan, Maithili; Haddad, Z. S.

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the influence of Purdue-Lin microphysical parameterization scheme (Lin et al.,1983) on quantitative precipitation for pre-monsoon/monsoon conditions over southern peninsular India in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. An ideal microphysical scheme has to describe the formation, growth of cloud droplets and ice crystals and fall out as precipitation. Microphysics schemes can be broadly categorized into two types: bin and bulk particle size distribution (Morrison, 2010). Bulk schemes predict one or more bulk quantities and assume some functional form for the particle size distribution. For better parameterization, proper interpretation of these hydrometeors (Cloud Droplets, Raindrops, Ice Crystals and Aggregates, Rimed Ice Particles, Graupel, Hail) and non-hydrometeors (Aerosols vs. Condensation Nuclei vs. Cloud Condensation Nuclei vs. Ice Nuclei) is very important. The Purdue-Lin scheme is a commonly used microphysics scheme in WRF model utilizing the "bulk" particle size distribution, meaning that a particle size distribution is assumed. The intercept parameter (N0) is, in fact, turns out to be independent of the density. However, in situ observations suggest (Haddad et al., 1996, 1997) that the mass weighted mean diameter is correlated with water content per unit volume (q), leading to the fact that N0 depends on it. Here, in order to analyze the correlation of droplet size distribution with the convection, we have carried out simulations by implementing a consistent methodology to enforce a correlation between N0 and q in the Purdue-Lin microphysics scheme in WRF model. The effect of particles in Indian Summer Monsoon has been examined using frequency distribution of rainfall at surface, daily rainfall over the domain and convective available potential energy and convective inhibition. The simulations are conducted by analyzing the maximum rainfall days in the pre-monsoon/monsoon seasons using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

  20. Sensitivity of summer ensembles of super-parameterized US mesoscale convective systems to cloud resolving model microphysics and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, E.; Yu, S.; Kooperman, G. J.; Morrison, H.; Wang, M.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Microphysical and resolution sensitivities of explicitly resolved convection within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the central United States are well documented in the context of single case studies simulated by cloud resolving models (CRMs) under tight boundary and initial condition constraints. While such an experimental design allows researchers to causatively isolate the effects of CRM microphysical and resolution parameterizations on modeled MCSs, it is still challenging to produce conclusions generalizable to multiple storms. The uncertainty associated with the results of such experiments comes both from the necessary physical constraints imposed by the limited CRM domain as well as the inability to evaluate or control model internal variability. A computationally practical method to minimize these uncertainties is the use of super-parameterized (SP) global climate models (GCMs), in which CRMs are embedded within GCMs to allow their free interaction with one another as orchestrated by large-scale global dynamics. This study uses NCAR's SP Community Atmosphere Model 5 (SP-CAM5) to evaluate microphysical and horizontal resolution sensitivities in summer ensembles of nocturnal MCSs in the central United States. Storm events within each run were identified using an objective empirical orthogonal function (EOF) algorithm, then further calibrated to harmonize individual storm signals and account for the temporal and spatial heterogeneity between them. Three summers of control data from a baseline simulation are used to assess model internal interannual variability to measure its magnitude relative to sensitivities in a number of distinct experimental runs with varying CRM parameters. Results comparing sensitivities of convective intensity to changes in fall speed assumptions about dense rimed species, one- vs. two-moment microphysics, and CRM horizontal resolution will be discussed.

  1. Evaluation of Model Microphysics Within Precipitation Bands of Extratropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, B.; Molthan, A.; Yu, R.; Stark, D.; Yuter, S. E.; Nesbitt, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies evaluating the bulk microphysical schemes (BMPs) within cloud resolving models (CRMs) have indicated large uncertainties and errors in the amount and size distributions of snow and cloud ice aloft. The snow prediction is sensitive to the snow densities, habits, and degree of riming within the BMPs. Improving these BMPs is a crucial step toward improving both weather forecasting and climate predictions. Several microphysical schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model down to 1.33-km grid spacing are evaluated using aircraft, radar, and ground in situ data from the Global Precipitation Mission Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) experiment, as well as a few years (15 winter storms) of surface measurements of riming, crystal habit, snow density, and radar measurements at Stony Brook, NY (SBNY on north shore of Long Island) during the 2009-2012 winter seasons. Surface microphysical measurements at SBNY were taken every 15 to 30 minutes using a stereo microscope and camera, and snow depth and snow density were also recorded. During these storms, a vertically-pointing Ku-band radar was used to observe the vertical evolution of reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocities. A Particle Size and Velocity (PARSIVEL) disdrometer was also used to measure the surface size distribution and fall speeds of snow at SBNY. For the 15 cases at SBNY, the WSM6, Morrison (MORR), Thompson (THOM2), and Stony Brook (SBU-YLIN) BMPs were validated. A non-spherical snow assumption (THOM2 and SBU-YLIN) simulated a more realistic distribution of reflectivity than spherical snow assumptions in the WSM6 and MORR schemes. The MORR, WSM6, and SBU-YLIN schemes are comparable to the observed velocity distribution in light and moderate riming periods. The THOM2 is ~0.25 m s-1 too slow with its velocity distribution in these periods. In heavier riming, the vertical Doppler velocities in the WSM6, THOM2, and MORR schemes were ~0.25 m s-1 too slow, while the SBU

  2. Evaluating the effects of microphysical complexity in idealised simulations of trade wind cumulus using the Factorial Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dearden

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of microphysical and environmental factors on the development of precipitation in warm idealised cloud is explored using a kinematic modelling framework. A simple one-dimensional column model is used to drive a suite of microphysics schemes including a flexible multi-moment bulk scheme (including both single and dual moment cloud liquid water and a state-of-the-art bin-resolved scheme with explicit treatments of liquid and aerosol. The Factorial Method is employed to quantify and compare the sensitivities of each scheme under a set of controlled conditions, in order to isolate the effect of additional microphysical complexity in terms of the impact on surface precipitation. At relatively low updraught speeds, the sensitivity of the bulk schemes was found to depend on the assumptions made with regards the treatment of droplet activation. It was possible to achieve a much closer agreement between the single and dual moment bulk schemes by tuning the specified droplet number concentration in the single moment scheme, suggesting that a diagnostic representation of droplet number may be an acceptable alternative to the more expensive prognostic option. However the effect of changes in CCN concentration were found to produce a relatively stronger effect on precipitation in the bulk schemes compared to the bin scheme; this is believed to be a consequence of differences in the treatment of drop growth by collision and coalescence. Collectively, these results demonstrate the usefulness of the Factorial Method as a model development tool for quantitatively comparing and contrasting the behaviour of microphysics schemes of differing levels of complexity within a specified parameter space.

  3. The Role of Initial Cloud Condensation Nuclei Concentration in Hail Using the WRF NSSL 2-moment Microphysics Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Zhang, Qinghong; Xue, Huiwen

    2017-04-01

    The effects of the initial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations (100-3000 mg-1) on hail properties were investigated in an idealized hail storm experiment using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, with the National Severe Storms Laboratory two-moment microphysics scheme. The initial CCN concentration had obvious non-monotonic effects on the mixing ratio, number concentrations, and radius of hail, both in clouds and at the surface, with a threshold CCN concentration between 300 and 500 mg-1. An increasing CCN concentration is conducive (suppressive) to the amount of surface hail precipitation below (above) the threshold. The non-monotonic effects were due to both the thermodynamics and microphysics. Below the threshold, the mixing ratios of cloud droplets and ice crystals increased dramatically with the increasing CCN concentration, resulting in more latent heat being released from vapor condensation and intensified updraft volume. The extent of the riming process, which is the primary process for hail production, increased dramatically. Above the threshold, the mixing ratio of cloud droplets and ice crystals increased continuously, but the maximum updraft volume was weakened because of reduced latent heating, which was related to the reduced riming rate in the storm core area. The smaller ice crystals reduced the formation of hail and smaller clouds, with decreased rain water reducing riming efficiency so that graupel and hail also decreased with increasing CCN concentration, which is unfavorable for hail growth.

  4. Methods for characterising microphysical processes in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    de Wit, T Dudok; Furno, I; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Zimbardo, G

    2013-01-01

    Advanced spectral and statistical data analysis techniques have greatly contributed to shaping our understanding of microphysical processes in plasmas. We review some of the main techniques that allow for characterising fluctuation phenomena in geospace and in laboratory plasma observations. Special emphasis is given to the commonalities between different disciplines, which have witnessed the development of similar tools, often with differing terminologies. The review is phrased in terms of few important concepts: self-similarity, deviation from self-similarity (i.e. intermittency and coherent structures), wave-turbulence, and anomalous transport.

  5. A Cloud Microphysics Model for the Gas Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palotai, Csaba J.; Le Beau, Raymond P.; Shankar, Ramanakumar; Flom, Abigail; Lashley, Jacob; McCabe, Tyler

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have significantly increased the quality and the number of observed meteorological features on the jovian planets, revealing banded cloud structures and discrete features. Our current understanding of the formation and decay of those clouds also defines the conceptual modes about the underlying atmospheric dynamics. The full interpretation of the new observational data set and the related theories requires modeling these features in a general circulation model (GCM). Here, we present details of our bulk cloud microphysics model that was designed to simulate clouds in the Explicit Planetary Hybrid-Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) GCM for the jovian planets. The cloud module includes hydrological cycles for each condensable species that consist of interactive vapor, cloud and precipitation phases and it also accounts for latent heating and cooling throughout the transfer processes (Palotai and Dowling, 2008. Icarus, 194, 303–326). Previously, the self-organizing clouds in our simulations successfully reproduced the vertical and horizontal ammonia cloud structure in the vicinity of Jupiter's Great Red Spot and Oval BA (Palotai et al. 2014, Icarus, 232, 141–156). In our recent work, we extended this model to include water clouds on Jupiter and Saturn, ammonia clouds on Saturn, and methane clouds on Uranus and Neptune. Details of our cloud parameterization scheme, our initial results and their comparison with observations will be shown. The latest version of EPIC model is available as open source software from NASA's PDS Atmospheres Node.

  6. Depolarization Lidar Determination of Cloud-Base Microphysical Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donovan, D.P.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J.S.; Roode, S. de; Siebesma, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    The links between multiple-scattering induced depolarization and cloud microphysical properties (e.g. cloud particle number density, effective radius, water content) have long been recognised. Previous efforts to use depolarization information in a quantitative manner to retrieve cloud microphysical

  7. Representation of Nucleation Mode Microphysics in a Global Aerosol Model with Sectional Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. H.; Pierce, J. R.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    In models, nucleation mode (1 nmrepresentation of nucleation mode microphysics impacts aerosol number predictions in the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) aerosol microphysics model running with the GISS GCM II-prime by varying its lowest diameter boundary: 1 nm, 3 nm, and 10 nm. The model with the 1 nm boundary simulates the nucleation mode particles with fully resolved microphysical processes, while the model with the 10 nm and 3 nm boundaries uses a nucleation mode dynamics parameterization to account for the growth of nucleated particles to 10 nm and 3 nm, respectively.We also investigate the impact of the time step for aerosol microphysical processes (a 10 min versus a 1 h time step) to aerosol number predictions in the TOMAS models with explicit dynamics for the nucleation mode particles (i.e., 3 nm and 1 nm boundary). The model with the explicit microphysics (i.e., 1 nm boundary) with the 10 min time step is used as a numerical benchmark simulation to estimate biases caused by varying the lower size cutoff and the time step. Different representations of the nucleation mode have a significant effect on the formation rate of particles larger than 10 nm from nucleated particles (J10) and the burdens and lifetimes of ultrafinemode (10 nm=Dp =70 nm) particles but have less impact on the burdens and lifetimes of CCN-sized particles. The models using parameterized microphysics (i.e., 10 nm and 3 nm boundaries) result in higher J10 and shorter coagulation lifetimes of ultrafine-mode particles than the model with explicit dynamics (i.e., 1 nm boundary). The spatial distributions of CN10 (Dp =10 nm) and CCN(0.2 %) (i.e., CCN concentrations at 0.2%supersaturation) are moderately affected, especially CN10 predictions above 700 hPa where nucleation contributes most strongly to CN10 concentrations. The lowermost-layer CN10 is substantially improved with the 3 nm boundary (compared to 10 nm) in most areas. The overprediction in CN10 with the 3 nm and 10 nm boundaries

  8. Examination of Microphysical Relationships and Corresponding Microphysical Processes in Warm Fogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆春松; 刘延刚; 牛生杰; 赵丽娟; 于华英; 程穆宁

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the microphysical relationships of 8 dense fog events collected from a comprehensive fog observation campaign carried out at Pancheng (32.2◦N, 118.7◦E) in the Nanjing area, China in the winter of 2007 are investigated. Positive correlations are found among key microphysical properties (cloud droplet number concentration, droplet size, spectral standard deviation, and liquid water content) in each case, suggesting that the dominant processes in these fog events are likely droplet nucleation with subsequent condensational growth and/or droplet deactivation via complete evaporation of some droplets. The abrupt broadening of the fog droplet spectra indicates the occurrence of the collision-coalescence processes as well, although not dominating. The combined effects of the dominant processes and collision-coalescence on microphysical relationships are further analyzed by dividing the dataset according to visibility or autocon-version threshold in each case. The result shows that the specific relationships of number concentration to volume-mean radius and spectral standard deviation depend on the competition between the compensation of small droplets due to nucleation-condensation and the loss of small droplets due to collision-coalescence. Generally, positive correlations are found for different visibility or autoconversion threshold ranges in most cases, although negative correlations sometimes appear with lower visibility or larger autoconversion thresh-old. Therefore, the compensation of small droplets is generally stronger than the loss, which is likely related to the sufficient fog condensation nuclei in this polluted area.

  9. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei;

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active...... galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space....... It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments...

  10. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space...... the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights...... in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics....

  11. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marcowith, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O C; Lembege, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebul\\ae, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in-situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasize is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in a...

  12. CAMS云微物理方案的改进及与WRF模式耦合的个例研究%Improved CAMS cloud microphysics scheme and numerical experiment coupled with WRF model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文华; 赵凤生; 胡志晋; 周青

    2012-01-01

    本文在中国气象科学研究院(CAMS)双参数云微物理方案的基础上,增加气溶胶粒子的活化过程,改进原方案中的水汽混合比、云水混合比及云滴数浓度的预报方程,实现对各种水成物(包括云水)的混合比和数浓度的预报.此外,改进后的CAMS云方案被成功耦合到了WRF v3.1中尺度模式,本文利用耦合模式对2009年4月23~24日发生在我国北方地区的一次降水天气过程进行了模拟,将新方案的模拟结果与WRF自带的3个微物理方案进行了比较.结果显示,新方案能够合理地描述地面降水特征,其模拟的雨带分布范围与实测接近,降水中心的强度和位置优于其他3个方案.新方案模拟的云滴数浓度与WDM6方案基本一致,表明加入的气溶胶活化过程是合理的.新方案模拟的其他水成物粒子数浓度与Morrison方案相比有时会有量级的差别,说明粒子数浓度的模拟目前还存在着很大的不确定性,这也是云微物理模式进一步发展的难点.%The Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences (CAMS) two-moment bulk microphysics scheme was employed in this study, and a new parameterization approach to simulate the heterogeneous droplet activation was introduced into the scheme. The proposed scheme predicts both the mixing ratio and the number concentration for five hydrometeor species (cloud water, rain, cloud ice, snow, and graupel). Moreover, the improved CAMS scheme was coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF v3. 1), which makes it possible to investigate the effects of aerosol on clouds and precipitation. The rain event occurring on 23~ 24 April 2009 in north China was simulated using the coupled CAMS scheme and threesophisticated microphysics schemes in the WRF model. Results showed that the new scheme performed reasonably well in describing the characteristic of precipitation and the microphysics structure of cloud. The spatial pattern of precipitation, the

  13. Understanding Discrepancies between Simulated and Measured Upwelling Microwave Brightness Temperatures: A Sensitivity Study on the Impact of Cloud Ice Microphysical and Scattering Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, D.; Hashino, T.; Mugnai, A.; Sanò, P.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G. J.

    2009-09-01

    Most physically-based Bayesian algorithms for precipitation retrieval from satellite-borne microwave (MW) radiometers use cloud-radiation databases (CRD’s) that are composed of numerous detailed microphysical cloud profiles obtained from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, coupled with the simulated upwelling brightness temperatures (TB’s) at several MW frequencies. These TB’s are computed by applying radiative transfer (RT) schemes to the CRM profiles for the same frequencies and polarizations of the satellite MW radiometer measurements in use. Then, the ensemble of simulations is compared with the measurements to estimate the precipitation rate. A good agreement between simulations and measurements is obviously needed. Nevertheless, depending on frequency, there are several sources of discrepancy between simulated and measured TB’s. Here, we show the results of a sensitivity study on the impact of several different parameterizations that are used to compute the radiative properties of ice particles, as well as on the CRM skill in providing realistic descriptions of the microphysical structures of precipitating clouds. To this end, we use 2D-simulations of a case study of the KWAJEX campaign (that took place from 23 July to 14 September 1999), that were performed by the University of Wisconsin - Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS) using both a bulk microphysics scheme, as well as a new microphysical scheme called Advanced Microphysical Prediction System (AMPS) that explicitly predicts ice particle properties (such as size, particle density, and crystal habits).

  14. Condensing Organic Aerosols in a Microphysical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  15. Microphysical imprint of entrainment in warm cumulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Small

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the cloud microphysical response to entrainment mixing in warm cumulus clouds observed from the CIRPAS Twin Otter during the GoMACCS field campaign near Houston, Texas, in summer 2006. Cloud drop size distributions and cloud liquid water contents from the Artium Flight phase-Doppler interferometer in conjunction with meteorological observations are used to investigate the degree to which inhomogeneous versus homogeneous mixing is preferred as a function of height above cloud base, distance from cloud edge and aerosol concentration. Using four complete days of data with 101 cloud penetrations (minimum 300 m in length, we find that inhomogeneous mixing primarily explains liquid water variability in these clouds. Furthermore, we show that there is a tendency for mixing to be more homogeneous towards the cloud top, which we attribute to the combination of increased turbulent kinetic energy and cloud drop size with altitude which together cause the Damköhler number to increase by a factor of between 10 and 30 from cloud base to cloud top. We also find that cloud edges appear to be air from cloud centres that have been diluted solely through inhomogeneous mixing. Theory predicts the potential for aerosol to affect mixing type via changes in drop size over the range of aerosol concentrations experienced (moderately polluted rural sites to highly polluted urban sites. However, the observations, while consistent with this hypothesis, do not show a statistically significant effect of aerosol on mixing type.

  16. The sensitivity to the microphysical schemes on the skill of forecasting the track and intensity of tropical cyclones using WRF-ARW model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devanil Choudhury; Someshwar Das

    2017-06-01

    The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model is used to simulate Very Severe Cyclonic Storms (VSCS) Hudhud (7–13 October, 2014), Phailin (8–14 October, 2013) and Lehar (24–29 November, 2013) to investigate the sensitivity to microphysical schemes on the skill of forecasting track and intensity of the tropical cyclones for high-resolution (9 and 3 km) 120-hr model integration. For cloud resolving grid scale (<5 km) cloud microphysics plays an important role. The performance of the Goddard, Thompson, LIN and NSSL schemes are evaluated and compared with observations and a CONTROL forecast. This study is aimed to investigate the sensitivity to microphysics on the track and intensity with explicitly resolved convection scheme. It shows that the Goddard one-moment bulk liquid-ice microphysical scheme provided the highest skill on the track whereas for intensity both Thompson and Goddard microphysical schemes perform better. The Thompson scheme indicates the highest skill in intensity at 48, 96 and 120 hr, whereas at 24 and 72 hr, the Goddard scheme provides the highest skill in intensity. It is known that higher resolution domain produces better intensity and structure of the cyclones and it is desirable to resolve the convection with sufficiently high resolution and with the use of explicit cloud physics. This study suggests that the Goddard cumulus ensemble microphysical scheme is suitable for high resolution ARW simulation for TC’s track and intensity over the BoB. Although the present study is based on only three cyclones, it could be useful for planning real-time predictions using ARW modelling system.

  17. A Microphysical Model for Phyllosilicate Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hartog, S. A. M.; Faulkner, D.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Phyllosilicate-rich foliations in fault rocks are often thought to reduce overall fault strength and promote fault stability when forming an interconnected network. Indeed, laboratory measurements have shown that the average friction coefficient of dry phyllosilicates of 0.5 is reduced to 0.3 when wet or even 0.1 for smectite. A widely accepted interpretation of these observations is that the strength of phyllosilicates is controlled by breaking of interlayer bonds to form new cleavage surfaces when dry and by the low strength of surface-bound water films when wet. However, the correlation between phyllosilicate shear strength and interlayer bond strength, which formed the basis for this interpretation, was not reproduced in recent experiments (Behnsen and Faulkner, 2012) and is not supported by the latest calculations of the interlayer bond energies (Sakuma and Suehara, 2015). The accepted explanation for phyllosilicate friction also fails to account for the velocity dependence or (a-b) values, which decrease with temperature, reaching a minimum at intermediate temperatures, before increasing again at higher temperatures (Den Hartog et al., 2013, 2014). In this study, we developed a microphysical model for phyllosilicate friction, involving frictional sliding along atomically flat phyllosilicate grain interfaces, with overlapping grain edges forming barriers to sliding. Assuming that the amount of overlap is controlled by crystal plastic bending of grains into pores, together with rate-dependent edge-site cleavage, our model predicts the experimentally observed temperature dependence of (a-b) and provides a basis for extrapolation of laboratory friction data on phyllosilicates to natural conditions.

  18. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcowith, A.; Bret, A.; Bykov, A.; Dieckman, M. E.; O'C Drury, L.; Lembège, B.; Lemoine, M.; Morlino, G.; Murphy, G.; Pelletier, G.; Plotnikov, I.; Reville, B.; Riquelme, M.; Sironi, L.; Stockem Novo, A.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  19. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  20. Bayesian Exploration of Cloud Microphysical Sensitivities in Mesoscale Cloud Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that changes in cloud microphysical processes can have a significant effect on the structure and evolution of cloud systems. In particular, changes in water phase and the associated energy sources and sinks have a direct influence on cloud mass and precipitation, and an indirect effect on cloud system thermodynamic properties and dynamics. The details of cloud particle nucleation and growth, as well as the interactions among vapor, liquid, and ice phases, occur on scales too small to be explicitly simulated in the vast majority of numerical models. These processes are represented by approximations that introduce uncertainty into the simulation of cloud mass and spatial distribution and by extension the simulation of the cloud system itself. This presentation demonstrates how Bayesian methodologies can be used to explore the relationships between cloud microphysics and cloud content, precipitation, dynamics, and radiative transfer. Specifically, a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to compute the probability distribution of cloud microphysical parameters consistent with particular mesoscale environments. Two different physical systems are considered. The first example explores the multivariate functional relationships between precipitation, cloud microphysics, and the environment in a deep convective cloud system. The second examines how changes in cloud microphysical parameters may affect orographic cloud structure, precipitation, and dynamics. In each case, the Bayesian framework can be shown to provide unique information on the inter-dependencies present in the physical system.

  1. Cloud Processed CCN Affect Cloud Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Tabor, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the bimodality/monomodality of CCN spectra (Hudson et al. 2015) exert opposite effects on cloud microphysics in two aircraft field projects. The figure shows two examples, droplet concentration, Nc, and drizzle liquid water content, Ld, against classification of CCN spectral modality. Low ratings go to balanced separated bimodal spectra, high ratings go to single mode spectra, strictly monomodal 8. Intermediate ratings go merged modes, e.g., one mode a shoulder of another. Bimodality is caused by mass or hygroscopicity increases that go only to CCN that made activated cloud droplets. In the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) small cumuli with lower Nc, greater droplet mean diameters, MD, effective radii, re, spectral widths, σ, cloud liquid water contents, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal (lower modal ratings) below cloud CCN spectra whereas clouds with higher Nc, smaller MD, re, σ, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN (higher modal ratings). In polluted stratus clouds of the MArine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) clouds that had greater Nc, and smaller MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal CCN spectra whereas clouds with lower Nc, and greater MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN. These relationships are opposite because the dominant ICE-T cloud processing was coalescence whereas chemical transformations (e.g., SO2 to SO4) were dominant in MASE. Coalescence reduces Nc and thus also CCN concentrations (NCCN) when droplets evaporate. In subsequent clouds the reduced competition increases MD and σ, which further enhance coalescence and drizzle. Chemical transformations do not change Nc but added sulfate enhances droplet and CCN solubility. Thus, lower critical supersaturation (S) CCN can produce more cloud droplets in subsequent cloud cycles, especially for the low W and effective S of stratus. The increased competition reduces MD, re, and σ, which inhibit coalescence and thus reduce drizzle

  2. Monte Carlo-based subgrid parameterization of vertical velocity and stratiform cloud microphysics in ECHAM5.5-HAM2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method for parameterizing the subgrid variations of vertical velocity and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC is presented for general circulation models (GCMs. These parameterizations build on top of existing parameterizations that create stochastic subgrid cloud columns inside the GCM grid cells, which can be employed by the Monte Carlo independent column approximation approach for radiative transfer. The new model version adds a description for vertical velocity in individual subgrid columns, which can be used to compute cloud activation and the subgrid distribution of the number of cloud droplets explicitly. Autoconversion is also treated explicitly in the subcolumn space. This provides a consistent way of simulating the cloud radiative effects with two-moment cloud microphysical properties defined at subgrid scale. The primary impact of the new parameterizations is to decrease the CDNC over polluted continents, while over the oceans the impact is smaller. Moreover, the lower CDNC induces a stronger autoconversion of cloud water to rain. The strongest reduction in CDNC and cloud water content over the continental areas promotes weaker shortwave cloud radiative effects (SW CREs even after retuning the model. However, compared to the reference simulation, a slightly stronger SW CRE is seen e.g. over mid-latitude oceans, where CDNC remains similar to the reference simulation, and the in-cloud liquid water content is slightly increased after retuning the model.

  3. Cirrus microphysics and radiative transfer: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne, Stefan A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    During the Cirrus Intensive Field Operations of FIRE, data collected by the NCAR King Air in the vicinity of Wausau, WI on October 28 were selected to study the influence of cirrus cloud microphysics on radiative transfer and the role of microphysical approximations in radiative transfer models. The instrumentation of the King Air provided, aside from temperature and wind data, up-and downwelling broadband solar and infrared fluxes as well as detailed microphysical data. The aircraft data, supplied every second, are averaged over the 7 legs to represent the properties for that altitude. The resulting vertical profiles, however, suffer from the fact that each leg represents a different cloud column path. Based on the measured microphysical data particle size distributions of equivalent spheres for each cloud level are developed. Accurate radiative transfer calculations are performed, incorporating atmospheric and radiative data from the ground and the stratosphere. Comparing calculated to the measured up- and downwelling fluxes at the seven cloud levels for both the averaged and the three crossover data will help to assess the validity of particle size and shape approximation as they are frequently used to model cirrus clouds. Once agreement is achieved the model results may be applied to determine, in comparison to a cloudfree case, the influence of this particular cirrus on the radiation budget of the earth atmosphere system.

  4. The Influence of the Electric Field on Thunderstorm Microphysical Development Simulated with an Explicit Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, V. T.; Andronache, C.; Sherwood, S.

    2005-05-01

    Electric fields influence the microphysics of aerosol-cloud interactions. Hence, nucleation of ice is sensitive to the charge on nuclei. Furthermore, there is an increase in the collision efficiency when charged aerosol particles collide with droplets ('electroscavenging'), and rates of contact ice nucleation are enhanced by the charge on aerosol particles (Tinsley et al. 2000, Tripathi and Harrison, 2002). In addition, electric fields (EF) affect the collisional growth rate of hydrometeors and their fall velocity. The aim here is to assess how the collection efficiency for the coagulation of hydrometeors may be modified by a typical EF in a thunderstorm. Particular focus is given to effects on the generation of anvil ice particles. This is done by imposing a realistic EF in the control simulation with an Explicit Microphysics Model (EMM) of the storm, observed on 18th July 2002 near Florida during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE), as described by Phillips et al. (2005). An additional aim is to analyze how updraft speed (w) and environmental CCN concentration may affect the charge separation process. The warm rain process is intensified and there is a 30-40% reduction in the anvil ice concentration when an evolving height-dependent EF, typical of continental electrified thunderstorms, is prescribed and applied to the collection efficiencies for coagulation processes in the model. The electric dependence of the collision efficiency for drop-drop collisions is the cause. There is a 150% increase in the broad peak of average mixing ratio of rain near the freezing level (see Figure 1). This boosts the mixing ratio of precipitation-sized ice in the lower half of the mixed phase region, changing the number of charging collisions and depleting the supercooled cloudwater. Primarily because of the high sensitivity of the Hallett-Mossop (H-M) process of ice particle multiplication with respect to

  5. A Multi-Moment Bulkwater Ice Microphysics Scheme with Consideration of the Adaptive Growth Habit and Apparent Density for Pristine Ice in the WRF Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, T. C.; Chen, J. P.; Dearden, C.

    2014-12-01

    The wide variety of ice crystal shapes and growth habits makes it a complicated issue in cloud models. This study developed the bulk ice adaptive habit parameterization based on the theoretical approach of Chen and Lamb (1994) and introduced a 6-class hydrometeors double-moment (mass and number) bulk microphysics scheme with gamma-type size distribution function. Both the proposed schemes have been implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) model forming a new multi-moment bulk microphysics scheme. Two new moments of ice crystal shape and volume are included for tracking pristine ice's adaptive habit and apparent density. A closure technique is developed to solve the time evolution of the bulk moments. For the verification of the bulk ice habit parameterization, some parcel-type (zero-dimension) calculations were conducted and compared with binned numerical calculations. The results showed that: a flexible size spectrum is important in numerical accuracy, the ice shape can significantly enhance the diffusional growth, and it is important to consider the memory of growth habit (adaptive growth) under varying environmental conditions. Also, the derived results with the 3-moment method were much closer to the binned calculations. A field campaign of DIAMET was selected to simulate in the WRF model for real-case studies. The simulations were performed with the traditional spherical ice and the new adaptive shape schemes to evaluate the effect of crystal habits. Some main features of narrow rain band, as well as the embedded precipitation cells, in the cold front case were well captured by the model. Furthermore, the simulations produced a good agreement in the microphysics against the aircraft observations in ice particle number concentration, ice crystal aspect ratio, and deposition heating rate especially within the temperature region of ice secondary multiplication production.

  6. Vertical profile of fog microphysics : a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Frédéric; Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Mazoyer, Marie; Bourrianne, Thierry; Etcheberry, Jean-Michel; Gaillard, Brigitte; Legain, Dominique; Tzanos, Diane; Barrié, Joel; Barrau, Sébastien; Defoy, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and development of fogs result from the non-linear interaction of competing radiative, thermodynamic, microphysical and dynamical processes and the forecasting of their life cycle still remains a challenging issue. Several field campaigns have been carried out at the SIRTA observatory in the Paris suburb area (France). These experiments have shown that fog events exhibit large differences of the microphysical properties and various evolutions during their life cycle. To better understand relationships between the different processes and to validate numerical simulations it is necessary however to document the vertical profile of the fog microphysics. A CDP (Cloud Droplet Spectrometer) from DMT (Droplet Measurement Technology, Boulder, CO) has been modified to allow measurements of the droplet size distribution in fog layers with a tethered balloon. This instrumental set-up has been used during a field campaign during the winter 2013-214 in the Landes area in the South West of France. To validate the vertical profiles provided by the modified CDP, a mast was equipped with microphysical instruments at 2 altitude levels with an another CDP at 24 m and a Fog Monitor FM100 at 42 m. The instrumental set-up deployed during this campaign is presented. Data collected during a fog event that occurred during the night of 5-6 March 2014 are analysed. We show that microphysical properties such as droplet number concentration, LWC and mean droplet size, exhibit different time evolution during the fog life cycle depending on the altitude level. Droplet size distribution measurements are also investigated. They reveal sharp variations along the vertical close to the top of the fog layer. In addition it is shown that the shape of the size distributions at the top follows a time evolution typical of a quasi-adiabatic droplet growth.

  7. The effects of radiative and microphysical processes on simulated warm and transition season arctic stratus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Jerry Y.

    A cloud-resolving model (CRM) version of RAMS, coupled to explicit bin resolving microphysics and a new two-stream radiative transfer code is used to study various aspects of Arctic stratus clouds (ASC). The two-stream radiative transfer model is coupled in a consistent fashion to the bulk microphysical parameterization of Walko et al., (1995), an explicit liquid bin microphysical model (e.g., Feingold et al., 1996a) and a mixed-phase microphysical model (Reisin et al., 1996). These models are used to study both warm (summer) season and transition (fall and spring) season ASC. Equations are developed for the inclusion of the radiative term in the drop growth equation and the effect is studied in a trajectory parcel model (TPM) and the CRM. Arctic stratus simulated with the new CRM framework compared well with the observations of Curry (1986). Along with CCN concentrations, it is shown that drop distribution shape and optical property methods strongly impact cloud evolution through their effect on the radiative properties. Broader cloud top distributions lead to clouds with more shallow depths and circulation strengths as more shortwave radiation is absorbed while the opposite occurs for narrow distribution functions. Radiative-cloud interactions using mean effective radii are shown to be problematic, while conserving re and N of the distribution function (as per Hu and Stamnes, 1993) produces similar cloud evolution as compared to detailed computations. Radiative effects on drop vapor deposition growth can produce drizzle about 30 minutes earlier and is strongly dependent upon cloud top residence time of the parcels. The same set of trajectories assists drizzle production in the radiation and no-radiation cases. Not only is the growth of larger drops enhanced by the radiative effect, but drops with rCRM show a smaller impact of the radiative influence; this is attributed to the spurious production of cloud top supersaturations by Eulerian models (Stevens et al

  8. Low-Level Polarimetric Radar Signatures in EnKF Analyses and Forecasts of the May 8, 2003 Oklahoma City Tornadic Supercell: Impact of Multimoment Microphysics and Comparisons with Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. Dawson II

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of increasing the number of predicted moments in a multimoment bulk microphysics scheme is investigated using ensemble Kalman filter analyses and forecasts of the May 8, 2003 Oklahoma City tornadic supercell storm and the analyses are validated using dual-polarization radar observations. The triple-moment version of the microphysics scheme exhibits the best performance, relative to the single- and double-moment versions, in reproducing the low-ZDR hail core and high-ZDR arc, as well as an improved probabilistic track forecast of the mesocyclone. A comparison of the impact of the improved microphysical scheme on probabilistic forecasts of the mesocyclone track with the observed tornado track is also discussed.

  9. Cloud-microphysical sensors intercomparison at the Puy-de-Dôme Observatory, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Guyot

    2015-06-01

    intercomparison study highlights the necessity to have an instrument which provides a bulk measurement of cloud microphysical or optical properties during cloud ground-based campaigns. Moreover, we show that the orientation of the probes in the main wind flow is essential for an accurate characterization of cloud microphysical properties. In particular, FSSP experiments show strong discrepancies when the wind speed is lower than 3 m s−1 and/or when the angle between the wind direction and the orientation of the instruments is greater than 30°. An inadequate orientation of the FSSP towards the wind direction leads to an underestimation of the measured effective diameter.

  10. Towards More Consistent Retrievals of Ice Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties from Polar Orbiting Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, B. A.; Heymsfield, A.; Yang, P.

    2011-12-01

    Differences exist in the ice cloud optical thickness and effective particle size products provided by teams working with data from AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer), MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of the Earth Reflectance), Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR), and CALIOP (Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization). The issue is in large part due to the assumed ice cloud single-scattering properties that each team uses in their retrievals. To gain insight into this problem, we are developing ice cloud single-scattering properties consistently from solar through far-infrared wavelengths by merging ice cloud microphysical data from in situ measurements with the very latest light scattering calculations for ice habits that include droxtals, solid/hollow columns, plates, solid/hollow bullet rosettes, aggregates of columns, and small/large aggregates of plates. The in-situ measurements are from a variety of field campaigns, including ARM-IOP, CRYSTAL-FACE, ACTIVE, SCOUT, MidCiX, pre-AVE, TC-4, and MACPEX. Among other advances, the light scattering calculations include the full phase matrix (i.e., polarization), incorporate a new treatment of forward scattering, and three levels of surface roughness from smooth to severely roughened. This talk will focus on improvements to our methodology for building both spectral and narrowband bulk scattering optical models appropriate for satellite imagers and hyperspectral infrared sensors. The new models provide a basis for investigating retrieval differences in the products from the sensor teams. We will discuss recent work towards improving the consistency of ice cloud microphysical/optical property retrievals between solar, polarimetric, and infrared retrieval approaches. It will be demonstrated that severely roughened ice particles correspond best in comparisons to polarization measurements. Further discussion will provide insight as to the

  11. Development of the GPU-based Stony-Brook University 5-class microphysics scheme in the weather research and forecasting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.-L.; Goldberg, Mitchell D.

    2011-11-01

    Several bulk water microphysics schemes are available within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, with different numbers of simulated hydrometeor classes and methods for estimating their size fall speeds, distributions and densities. Stony-Brook University (SBU-YLIN) microphysics scheme is a 5-class scheme with riming intensity predicted to account for mixed-phase processes. In this paper, we develop an efficient graphics processing unit (GPU) based SBU-YLIN scheme. The GPU-based SBU-YLIN scheme will be compared to a CPU-based single-threaded counterpart. The implementation achieves 213x speedup with I/O compared to a Fortran implementation running on a CPU. Without I/O the speedup is 896x.

  12. Evaluation of Model Microphysics Within Precipitation Bands of Extratropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Brian A.; Yu, Ruyi; Molthan, Andrew L.; Nesbitt, Steven

    2014-01-01

    It is hypothesized microphysical predictions have greater uncertainties/errors when there are complex interactions that result from mixed phased processes like riming. Use Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission ground validation studies in Ontario, Canada to verify and improve parameterizations. The WRF realistically simulated the warm frontal snowband at relatively short lead times (1014 h). The snowband structire is sensitive to the microphysical parameterization used in WRF. The Goddard and SBUYLin most realistically predicted the band structure, but overpredicted snow content. The double moment Morrison scheme best produced the slope of the snow distribution, but it underpredicted the intercept. All schemes and the radar derived (which used dry snow ZR) underpredicted the surface precipitation amount, likely because there was more cloud water than expected. The Morrison had the most cloud water and the best precipitation prediction of all schemes.

  13. Microphysical effects of Saharan dusts on an orogenic thunderstorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hashino

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the microphysical sensitivity of an orogenic thunderstorm during Genoa 1992 flood event to the concentration and solubility of nucleating aerosols. Idealized 2-D simulations with a new microphysical scheme and a cloud resolving model showed the solubility of CCN can be as important as their concentration. High solubility cases of CCN led to less accumulation of precipitation on the ground and more fraction of the accumulation produced by heavy precipitation than lower solubility cases. The response of vertical motion to the solubility was different for cases with and without dust layer. The preliminary results show that the ice nucleation processes affected by solubility and dust layer may be detected by remote sensing technology.

  14. Effects of cosmic ray decreases on cloud microphysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, J.; Enghoff, M. B.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-01-01

    Using cloud data from MODIS we investigate the response of cloud microphysics to sudden decreases in galactic cosmic radiation – Forbush decreases – and find responses in effective emissivity, cloud fraction, liquid water content, and optical thickness above the 2–3 sigma level 6–9 days after the...... ionization. These results support the suggestion that ions play a significant role in the life-cycle of clouds....

  15. Explanations in Microphysics: a Response to van Fraassen's Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Seno Chibeni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to offer a rejoinder to an argument against scientific realism put forward by van Fraassen, based on theoretical considerations regarding microphysics. At a certain stage of his general attack to scientific realism, van Fraassen argues, in contrast to what realists typically hold, that empirical regularities should sometimes be regarded as “brute facts”, which do not ask for explanation in terms of deeper, unobservable mechanisms. The argument from microphysics formulated by van Fraassen is based on the claim that in microphysics the demand for explanation leads to a demand for the so-called hidden-variable theories, which “runs contrary to at least one major school of thought in twentieth-century physics”. It is shown here that this argument does not represent an insurmountable obstacle to scientific realism, not even when a series of important theoretical and experimental results against hidden-variable theories — and not merely a conflict with a certain school of thought—is taken into account.

  16. Field Observations and Modeling of the Microphysics within Winter Storms over Long Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, David

    Forecasting snowfall accumulation is challenging due to limitations and uncertainties in model bulk microphysical parameterizations (BMPs). The source of these errors is often unknown, since there have been relatively few in situ observations of the microphysics (ice habit, degree of riming, and snow density) during east coast winter storms. This thesis describes the microphysical evolution and model validation within east coast winter storms observed at Stony Brook, NY (SBNY) during the 2009-2010, 2010-2011, and 2011-2012 winter seasons. Surface microphysical measurements were taken every 15 to 30 minutes using a stereo microscope and camera, and snow depth and snow density were also recorded in 15 storms over SBNY. During these storms, a vertically-pointing Ku-band radar was used to observe the vertical evolution of reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocities. A Particle Size and Velocity (PARSIVEL) disdrometer was also used to measure the surface size distribution and fall speeds of snow at SBNY. Changes in the height of the maximum vertical motion relative to the favored growth temperatures led to changes in ice habit throughout the evolution in the comma head of extratropical cyclones and two heavy snow bands. Cold type ice habits with a few plates and dendrites were observed with light riming as the surface low was located along or east of the Mid-Atlantic coast. As the cyclone moved northward towards SBNY, moderately rimed dendrites, plates, and needles were observed. Heavily rimed needles and graupel were observed near the warm front and cyclone center. Mainly needles with light riming and a snow-liquid ratio from 8:1 to 9:1 were observed 2 to 4 hours before two heavy snow bands. With the strongest frontogenetical ascent during snow band maturity, moderately rimed dendrites were observed with snow-liquid ratios from 11:1 to 13:1. Lightly rimed plates and a snow-liquid ratio of 8:1 were observed after the heavy snow bands. The WSM6, MORR, THOM2, and SBU

  17. GPU-Accelerated Stony-Brook University 5-class Microphysics Scheme in WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielikainen, J.; Huang, B.; Huang, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is a next-generation mesoscale numerical weather prediction system. Microphysics plays an important role in weather and climate prediction. Several bulk water microphysics schemes are available within the WRF, with different numbers of simulated hydrometeor classes and methods for estimating their size fall speeds, distributions and densities. Stony-Brook University scheme (SBU-YLIN) is a 5-class scheme with riming intensity predicted to account for mixed-phase processes. In the past few years, co-processing on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) has been a disruptive technology in High Performance Computing (HPC). GPUs use the ever increasing transistor count for adding more processor cores. Therefore, GPUs are well suited for massively data parallel processing with high floating point arithmetic intensity. Thus, it is imperative to update legacy scientific applications to take advantage of this unprecedented increase in computing power. CUDA is an extension to the C programming language offering programming GPU's directly. It is designed so that its constructs allow for natural expression of data-level parallelism. A CUDA program is organized into two parts: a serial program running on the CPU and a CUDA kernel running on the GPU. The CUDA code consists of three computational phases: transmission of data into the global memory of the GPU, execution of the CUDA kernel, and transmission of results from the GPU into the memory of CPU. CUDA takes a bottom-up point of view of parallelism is which thread is an atomic unit of parallelism. Individual threads are part of groups called warps, within which every thread executes exactly the same sequence of instructions. To test SBU-YLIN, we used a CONtinental United States (CONUS) benchmark data set for 12 km resolution domain for October 24, 2001. A WRF domain is a geographic region of interest discretized into a 2-dimensional grid parallel to the ground. Each grid point has

  18. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. English

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA. We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We find equatorial injections increase aerosol optical depth in the Northern Hemisphere more than the Southern Hemisphere, potentially inducing regional climate changes. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions through means other than geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  19. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. English

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA. We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions rather than attempt to cool the planet through geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  20. Micro-Physical characterisation of Convective & Stratiform Rainfall at Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekanth, T. S.

    Large Micro-Physical characterisation of Convective & Stratiform Rainfall at Tropics begin{center} begin{center} Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , and V Sasi Kumar (2) *Centre for Earth Science Studies, Akkulam, Thiruvananthapuram (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) 32. NCC Nagar, Peroorkada, Thiruvananthapuram ABSTRACT Micro-physical parameters of rainfall such as rain drop size & fall speed distribution, mass weighted mean diameter, Total no. of rain drops, Normalisation parameters for rain intensity, maximum & minimum drop diameter from different rain intensity ranges, from both stratiform and convective rain events were analysed. Convective -Stratiform classification was done by the method followed by Testud et al (2001) and as an additional information electrical behaviour of clouds from Atmospheric Electric Field Mill was also used. Events which cannot be included in both types are termed as 'mixed precipitation' and identified separately. For the three years 2011, 2012 & 2013, rain events from both convective & stratiform origin are identified from three seasons viz Pre-Monsoon (March-May), Monsoon (June-September) and Post-Monsoon (October-December). Micro-physical characterisation was done for each rain events and analysed. Ground based and radar observations were made and classification of stratiform and convective rainfall was done by the method followed by Testud et al (2001). Radar bright band and non bright band analysis was done for confimation of stratifom and convective rain respectievely. Atmospheric electric field data from electric field mill is also used for confirmation of convection during convective events. Statistical analyses revealed that the standard deviation of rain drop size in higher rain rates are higher than in lower rain rates. Normalised drop size distribution is ploted for selected events from both forms. Inter relations between various precipitation parameters were analysed in three

  1. Meteorological and Aerosol effects on Marine Cloud Microphysical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Roberts, G.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Wang, Z.; Lee, A.; Abbatt, J.; Lin, J.; Nenes, A.; Wonaschuetz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K.; Jonsson, H.; Albrecht, B. A.; Desiree, T. S.; Macdonald, A. M.; Seinfeld, J.; Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    Both meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation and consequently their droplet distributions and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (EPEACE) and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) studies provide detailed measurements in 6 case studies of both cloud thermodynamic properties and initial particle number distribution and composition, as well as the resulting cloud drop distribution and composition. This study uses simulations of a detailed chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce the observed cloud droplet distribution and composition. Four of the cases examined had a sub-adiabatic lapse rate, which was shown to have fewer droplets due to decreased maximum supersaturation, lower LWC and higher cloud base height, consistent with previous findings. These detailed case studies provided measured thermodynamics and microphysics that constrained the simulated droplet size distribution sufficiently to match the droplet number within 6% and the size within 19% for 4 of the 6 cases, demonstrating "closure" or consistency of the measured composition with the measured CCN spectra and the inferred and modeled supersaturation. The contribution of organic components to droplet formation shows small effects on the droplet number and size in the 4 marine cases that had background aerosol conditions with varying amounts of coastal, ship or other non-biogenic sources. In contrast, the organic fraction and hygroscopicity increased the droplet number and size in the cases with generated smoke and cargo ship plumes that were freshly emitted and not yet internally mixed with the background particles. The simulation results show organic hygroscopicity causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (smoke plume which increased absolute cloud reflectivity fraction by 0.02 and 0.20 respectively. In addition, the ACP model

  2. Modeling Marine Stratocumulus with a Detailed Microphysical Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunsheng(赵春生); Yutaka ISHIZAKA

    2004-01-01

    A one-dimensional 3rd-order turbulence closure model with size-resolved microphysics and radiative transfer has been developed for investigating aerosol and cloud interactions of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer.A new method is presented for coupling between the dynamical model and the microphysical model.This scheme allows the liquid water related correlations to be directly calculated rather than parameterized.On 21 April 2001,a marine stratocumulus was observed by the Caesar aircraft over the west Pacific Rim south of Japan during the 2001 APEX/ACE-Asia field measurements.This cloud is simulated by the model we present here.The model results show that the general features of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer predicted by the model are in agreement with the measurements.A new onboard cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter provides not only total CC Nnumber concentration (as the traditional CCN counters do at a certain supersaturation) but also the CCN size distribution information.Using these CCN data,model responses to different CCN initial concentrations are examined.The model results are consistent with both observations and expectations.The numerical results show that the cloud microphysical properties are changed fundamentally by differentinitial CCN concentrations but the cloud liquid water content does not differ significantly.Different initial CCN loadings have large impacts on the evolution of cloud microstructure and radiation transfer while they have a modest effect on thermodynamics.Increased CCN concentration leads to significant decrease of cloud effective radius.

  3. Latent cooling and microphysics effects in deep convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, S.; Wang, P. K.; Gascón, E.; Valero, F.; Sánchez, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Water phase changes within a storm are responsible for the enhancement of convection and therefore the elongation of its lifespan. Specifically, latent cooling absorbed during evaporation, melting and sublimation is considered the main cause of the intensification of downdrafts. In order to know more accurately the consequences of latent cooling caused by each of these processes (together with microphysical effects that they induce), four simulations were developed with the Wisconsin Dynamical and Microphysical Model (WISCDYMM): one with all the microphysical processes; other without sublimation; melting was suppressed in the third simulation; and evaporation was disabled in the fourth. The results show that sublimation cooling is not essential to maintain the vertical currents of the storm. This is demonstrated by the fact that in the simulation without sublimation, maximum updrafts are in the same range as in the control simulation, and the storm lifespan is similar or even longer. However, melting was of vital importance. The storm in the simulation without melting dissipated prematurely, demonstrating that melting is indispensable to the enhancement of downdrafts below the freezing level and for avoiding the collapse of low level updrafts. Perhaps the most important finding is the crucial influence of evaporative cooling above the freezing level that maintains and enhances mid-level downdrafts in the storm. It is believed that this latent cooling comes from the evaporation of supercooled liquid water connected with the Bergeron-Findeisen process. Therefore, besides its influence at low levels (which was already well known), this evaporative cooling is essential to strengthen mid-level downdrafts and ultimately achieve a quasi-steady state.

  4. Microphysical properties of contrails and natural cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, B.; Wendling, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The radiative properties of a condensation trail (contrail) are determined by its microphysical properties. Therefore an understanding of the concentration, size distribution, and shapes of the particles is necessary for an estimation of the climatic impact of contrails. In-situ particle measurements by use of an ice replicator are presented for several contrail and cirrus events. Contrail particles aged about 2 minutes show shapes which are nearly spherical. Typical sizes are 5 to 10 {mu}m. Concentration values reach up to the order of 1000 cm{sup -3}. Aged contrail size distributions are within the variability of those found in natural cirrus clouds. (author) 2 refs.

  5. Cirrus microphysics and infrared radiative transfer: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Valero, Francisco P. J.; Kinne, Stefan

    1988-01-01

    Coincident measurements of cirrus cloud microphysical properties such as particle size distribution and particle shape and morphology, and measurements of infrared intensity and flux were made. Data was acquired nearly simultaneously in space and time by a KingAir in cloud and by an ER-2 at an altitude of 19 km. Upwelling infrared intensities and fluxes measured from the ER-2 and observations of cloud particle size distributions and particle phase and morphology made from the KingAir are discussed. Broad-band flux measurements were available both in and below the cirrus layer from the KingAir.

  6. Numerical experiment of lake-effect snowstorm in C3VP campaign using the WRF model coupled with spectral bin microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, T.; Matsui, T.; Li, X.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.

    2010-12-01

    The next-generation Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will offer a global view of precipitation systems including over middle and high latitudes and enable accurate measurement of frozen precipitation and light rainfall. The project of a synthetic GPM simulator was proposed to offer a vitual cloud libraty (VCL) to support development of the retrieval algorithm. The VCL is composed of ground validation (GV)-constrained 3D database of cloud resolving model (CRM) output and simulated GPM L1 product. The satellite retrieval algorithm can be cross-checked with a physical-based approach by using the VCL as a priori database. The first experiment for making VCL is planned for a snowfall event during the Canadian CloudSAT/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP) field campaign. This campaign was took place at the site located between the Lakes Huron and Ontario in south central Ontario, Canada. A cold wind passing over the lakes causes a snowstorm specific to areas over the lee side during winter season. Shi et al. [2010] showed a numerical simulation of the lake-effect snowstorm on Jan. 20, 2007 using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model with newly implemented the Goddard microphysics scheme (1-moment bulk for 2-water, 3-ice classes). The simulation reasonably represented the locally intensive frozen precipitation in agreement with King-city C-band radar observation. The structures of ice clouds were generally consistent with those in CloudSat and AMSU-B observations also. This study is aimed at a follow-up study of their research using the WRF in conjunction with the spectral bin microphysics for clouds (WRF-SBM), especially targeted to cloud microphysics of the snowfall event. This SBM (1-moment 33 bins for 1-water, 6-ice classes) is based on the Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM) [e.g., Khain et al., 2000; Iguchi et al., 2008, Appendix A]. We will offer a discussion of ice cloud microphysics on a lake-effect snowstorm with sensitivity tests to

  7. Approximate analytical scattering phase function dependent on microphysical characteristics of dust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2011-06-10

    The approximate bulk-scattering phase function of a polydisperse system of dust particles is derived in an analytical form. In the theoretical solution, the particle size distribution is modeled by a modified gamma function that can satisfy various media differing in modal radii. Unlike the frequently applied power law, the modified gamma distribution shows no singularity when the particle radius approaches zero. The approximate scattering phase function is related to the parameters of the size distribution function. This is an important advantage compared to the empirical Henyey-Greenstein (HG) approximation, which is a simple function of the average cosine. However, any optimized value of average cosine of the HG function cannot provide the information on particle microphysical characteristics, such as the size distribution function. In this paper, the mapping between average cosine and the parameters of size distribution function is given by a semianalytical expression that is applicable in rapid numerical simulations on various dust populations. In particular, the modal radius and half-width can be quickly estimated using the presented formulas.

  8. Analysis of aerosol optical and microphysical properties observed during the DC3 field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; Schuster, G. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Moore, R.; Winstead, E.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) consisted of 18 research flights from Salina, KS. During cloud inflow and outflow surveys, various aged aerosol layers and plumes, including biomass burning, were sampled by the NASA DC-8 aircraft which was equipped with a broad suite of instruments for aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties. As a result, the DC3 dataset includes detailed aerosol number size distribution, bulk aerosol mass concentration, black carbon mass concentration, and mass size distribution for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and organics, together with scattering and absorption coefficients. We use this comprehensive dataset to perform a detailed closure analysis to examine the consistency between the observed aerosol properties and the literature reported aerosol refractive index values. In this context, we report aerosol observations, and comparisons between the aerosol mass and number size distribution for various aerosol layers. Closure tests will also be presented in terms of the impact of the aerosol composition and size distribution on the scattering and absorption.

  9. Effect of cloud microphysics on Indian summer monsoon precipitating clouds: A coupled climate modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Anupam; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Saha, Subodh K.; Pokhrel, Samir

    2017-04-01

    The quest for one of the most dominant processes controlling the large-scale circulations in the tropics is unraveled. The impact of cloud microphysical processes is known to have effects on rainfall and local atmospheric thermodynamics; however, its effect on the prevailing mean circulations is not yet studied. Two sets of coupled global climate model experiments (ICE and NO ICE microphysics) reveal that ice microphysics improves the strength of the Hadley circulation with respect to observation. Results pinpoint that ICE simulation enhances high cloud fraction (global tropics: 59%, India: 51%) and stratiform rain (global tropics: 5%, India: 15%) contribution. ICE and NO ICE cloud microphysics impacts differently on the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), tropospheric temperature, and surface shortwave and longwave radiation. The effect of ice microphysics reduces OLR, which signifies deeper convection in the ICE run. The global annual average of the net radiation flux (shortwave and longwave) at the surface in ICE run (108.1 W/m2) is close to the observation (106 W/m2), which is overestimated in NO ICE run (112 W/m2). The result of apparent heat source term over the land and ocean surface eventually modifies regional Hadley circulation. Thus, the effect of ice microphysics in the global coupled model is important not only because of microphysics but also due to the radiation feedbacks. Therefore, better ice-phase microphysics is required in the new generation of climate forecast model, which may lead to improvements in the simulation of monsoon.

  10. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-09-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  11. Modeling the influence of aerosols on cloud microphysical properties in the east Asia region using a mesoscale model coupled with a bin-based cloud microphysics scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Iguchi, Takamichi; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Khain, Alexander P.; Saito, Kazuo; Takemura, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Kentaroh

    2008-01-01

    A bin-based microphysics scheme for cloud is implemented into a three-dimensional nonhydrostatic model and off-line coupled with a global aerosol transport model to reproduce realistic and inhomogeneous condensation nuclei (CN) fields. This coupling makes it possible to calculate cloud microphysical properties over a larger area under more realistic environmental conditions. Using the model, nested grid simulations are performed for two precipitation events associated with transitional synopt...

  12. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  13. Cirrus Microphysical Properties from Stellar Aureole Measurements, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVore, J. G.; Kristl, J. A.; Rappaport, S. A.

    2012-04-20

    While knowledge of the impact of aerosols on climate change has improved significantly due to the routine, ground-based, sun photometer measurements of aerosols made at AERONET sites world-wide, the impact of cirrus clouds remains much less certain because they occur high in the atmosphere and are more difficult to measure. This report documents work performed on a Phase I SBIR project to retrieve microphysical properties of cirrus ice crystals from stellar aureole imagery. The Phase I work demonstrates that (1) we have clearly measured stellar aureole profiles; (2) we can follow the aureole profiles out to ~1/4 degree from stars (~1/2 degree from Jupiter); (3) the stellar aureoles from cirrus have very distinctive profiles, being flat out to a critical angle, followed by a steep power-law decline with a slope of ~-3; (4) the profiles are well modeled using exponential size distributions; and (5) the critical angle in the profiles is ~0.12 degrees, (6) indicating that the corresponding critical size ranges from ~150 to ~200 microns. The stage has been set for a Phase II project (1) to proceed to validating the use of stellar aureole measurements for retrieving cirrus particle size distributions using comparisons with optical property retrievals from other, ground-based instruments and (2) to develop an instrument for the routine, automatic measurement of thin cirrus microphysical properties.

  14. Microphysical and optical properties of contrails and cirrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayet, J.F.; Febvre, G. [Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferand (France). Lab. de Meteorologie Physique; Brogniez, G. [Universite des Sciences et Techniques de Lille, (France). Lab. d`Optique Atmospherique; Wendling, P. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Larsen, H. [National Inst. for Water and Atmospheric Research, Wellington (New Zealand)

    1997-12-31

    Aircraft contrails have significantly different properties to natural cirrus clouds. Their local and global climate impact cannot be assessed without consideration of these differences. Microphysical data were obtained from the Merlin aircraft equipped with a PMS FSSP-100 for particle spectrum measurements over the 3 {mu}m to 45 {mu}m diameter range; a PMS 2D-C for particle size spectrum and particle shape over the size range from 25 {mu}m to 800 {mu}m and a Johnson-Williams cloud liquid-water probe. Radiative measurements were obtained from a Do228 aircraft which carried the upward looking ALEX-F Lidar operating at a wavelength of 1.06 {mu}m and a Barnes PRT-5 radiometer aligned parallel to the lidar and with a 9 to 11 {mu}m spectral range. The limitation in accuracy of cloud microphysical sensor used in contrail studies are also discussed with subsequent errors on description of cloud radiative properties. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  15. The microphysical properties of small ice particles measured during MACPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, C. G.; Schnaiter, M.; Heymsfield, A.; Bansemer, A.; Hirst, E.

    2012-12-01

    During the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) field campaign, the Small Ice Detector version 3 (SID-3) and the NCAR Video Ice Particle Sampler (VIPS) probes were operated onboard the NASA WB-57 aircraft to measure the microphysical properties of small ice particles in midlatitude cirrus clouds. The VIPS was optimized to measure the particle size distribution and projected area properties of ice particles between 20 and 200 microns and measurements agreed well with other microphysical probes. SID-3 measures the forward light scattering pattern from ice particles in the 1 to 100 micron size range. Forward scattering patterns can be used to characterize ice particle shape as well as surface roughness. Scattering patterns appear to be 'speckled' when particles have surface roughness and/or are polycrystalline. Scattering patterns can be used to identify quasi-spherical ice particles as well as particles which are sublimating. Sublimating crystals, spherical ice particles, and particles with surface roughness were all observed by SID-3 during MACPEX. Observed particle properties will be correlated to concurrent atmospheric observations. Measurements from the controlled environment of the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber will be related to atmospheric particle measurements.

  16. Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the microphysics development and its performance for the multi-scale modeling system will be presented.

  17. Large area bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  18. Microphysical Ice Crystal Properties in Mid-Latitude Frontal Cirrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Romy; Jurkat, Tina; Voigt, Christiane; Minikin, Andreas; Weigel, Ralf; Molleker, Sergej; Klingebiel, Marcus; Borrmann, Stephan; Luebke, Anna; Krämer, Martina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Schäfler, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds modulate the climate by reflection of shortwave solar radiation and trapping of longwave terrestrial radiation. Their net radiative effect can be positive or negative depending on atmospheric and cloud parameters including ice crystal number density, size and shape. Latter microphysical ice crystal properties have been measured during the mid-latitude cirrus mission ML-CIRRUS with a set of cloud instruments on the new research aircraft HALO. The mission took place in March/April 2014 with 16 flights in cirrus formed above Europe and the Atlantic. The ice clouds were encountered at altitudes from 7 to 14 km in the typical mid-latitude temperature range. A focus of the mission was the detection of frontal cirrus linked to warm conveyor belts (WCBs). Within WCBs, water vapor is transported in the warm sector of an extra-tropical cyclone from the humid boundary layer to the upper troposphere. Cirrus cloud formation can be triggered in the WCB outflow region at moderate updraft velocities and additionally at low updrafts within the high pressure system linked to the WCB. Due to their frequent occurrence, WCBs represent a major source for regions of ice supersaturation and cirrus formation in the mid-latitudes. Here, we use data from the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer with detection for POLarization (CAS-POL) and the Cloud Combination Probe (CCP), combining a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) and a greyscale Cloud Imaging Probe (CIPgs) to investigate the ice crystal distribution in the size range from 0.5 µm to 1 mm. We derive microphysical cirrus properties in mid-latitude warm front cirrus. Further, we investigate their variability and their dependence on temperature and relative humidity. Finally, we compare the microphysical properties of these frontal cirrus to cirrus clouds that formed at low updrafts within high pressure systems or at high updraft velocities in lee waves. We quantify statistically significant differences in cirrus properties formed in these

  19. Effects of cosmic ray decreases on cloud microphysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, J.; Enghoff, M. B.; Svensmark, H.

    2012-01-01

    Using cloud data from MODIS we investigate the response of cloud microphysics to sudden decreases in galactic cosmic radiation – Forbush decreases – and find responses in effective emissivity, cloud fraction, liquid water content, and optical thickness above the 2–3 sigma level 6–9 days after...... the minimum in atmospheric ionization and less significant responses for effective radius and cloud condensation nuclei (... of the signal of 3.1 sigma. We also see a correlation between total solar irradiance and strong Forbush decreases but a clear mechanism connecting this to cloud properties is lacking. There is no signal in the UV radiation. The responses of the parameters correlate linearly with the reduction in the cosmic ray...

  20. From Microphysics to Macrophysics Methods and Applications of Statistical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Balian, Roger

    2007-01-01

    This text not only provides a thorough introduction to statistical physics and thermodynamics but also exhibits the universality of the chain of ideas that leads from the laws of microphysics to the macroscopic behaviour of matter. A wide range of applications teaches students how to make use of the concepts, and many exercises will help to deepen their understanding. Drawing on both quantum mechanics and classical physics, the book follows modern research in statistical physics. Volume I discusses in detail the probabilistic description of quantum or classical systems, the Boltzmann-Gibbs distributions, the conservation laws, and the interpretation of entropy as missing information. Thermodynamics and electromagnetism in matter are dealt with, as well as applications to gases, both dilute and condensed, and to phase transitions. Volume II applies statistical methods to systems governed by quantum effects, in particular to solid state physics, explaining properties due to the crystal structure or to the latti...

  1. Biogenic influence on cloud microphysics over the global ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols have a large potential to influence climate through their effects on the microphysics and optical properties of clouds and, hence, on the Earth's radiation budget. Aerosol-cloud interactions have been intensively studied in polluted air, but the possibility that the marine biosphere plays a role in regulating cloud brightness in the pristine oceanic atmosphere remains largely unexplored. We used 9 yr of global satellite data and ocean climatologies to derive parameterizations of (a production fluxes of sulfur aerosols formed by the oxidation of the biogenic gas dimethylsulfide emitted from the sea surface; (b production fluxes of secondary organic aerosols from biogenic organic volatiles; (c emission fluxes of biogenic primary organic aerosols ejected by wind action on sea surface; and (d emission fluxes of sea salt also lifted by the wind upon bubble bursting. Series of global weekly estimates of these fluxes were correlated to series of cloud droplet effective radius data derived from satellite (MODIS. Similar analyses were conducted in more detail at 6 locations spread among polluted and clean regions of the oceanic atmosphere. The outcome of the statistical analysis was that negative correlation was common at mid and high latitude for sulfur and organic secondary aerosols, indicating both might be important in seeding cloud droplet activation. Conversely, primary aerosols (organic and sea salt showed more variable, non-significant or positive correlations, indicating that, despite contributing to large shares of the marine aerosol mass, they are not major drivers of the variability of cloud microphysics. Uncertainties and synergisms are discussed, and recommendations of research needs are given.

  2. Intel Xeon Phi accelerated Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF Goddard microphysics scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mielikainen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is a numerical weather prediction system designed to serve both atmospheric research and operational forecasting needs. The WRF development is a done in collaboration around the globe. Furthermore, the WRF is used by academic atmospheric scientists, weather forecasters at the operational centers and so on. The WRF contains several physics components. The most time consuming one is the microphysics. One microphysics scheme is the Goddard cloud microphysics scheme. It is a sophisticated cloud microphysics scheme in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The Goddard microphysics scheme is very suitable for massively parallel computation as there are no interactions among horizontal grid points. Compared to the earlier microphysics schemes, the Goddard scheme incorporates a large number of improvements. Thus, we have optimized the Goddard scheme code. In this paper, we present our results of optimizing the Goddard microphysics scheme on Intel Many Integrated Core Architecture (MIC hardware. The Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor is the first product based on Intel MIC architecture, and it consists of up to 61 cores connected by a high performance on-die bidirectional interconnect. The Intel MIC is capable of executing a full operating system and entire programs rather than just kernels as the GPU does. The MIC coprocessor supports all important Intel development tools. Thus, the development environment is one familiar to a vast number of CPU developers. Although, getting a maximum performance out of MICs will require using some novel optimization techniques. Those optimization techniques are discussed in this paper. The results show that the optimizations improved performance of Goddard microphysics scheme on Xeon Phi 7120P by a factor of 4.7×. In addition, the optimizations reduced the Goddard microphysics scheme's share of the total WRF processing time from 20.0 to 7.5%. Furthermore, the same

  3. Aerosol microphysical retrievals from precision filter radiometer direct solar radiation measurements and comparison with AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazadzis, S.; Veselovskii, I.; Amiridis, V.; Gröbner, J.; Suvorina, A.; Nyeki, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Kouremeti, N.; Taylor, M.; Tsekeri, A.; Wehrli, C.

    2014-07-01

    Synchronized sun-photometric measurements from the AERONET-CIMEL (AErosol RObotic NETwork) and GAW-PFR (Global Atmospheric Watch-Precision Filter Radiometer) aerosol networks are used to compare retrievals of the aerosol optical depth (AOD), effective radius, and volume concentration during a high-temporal-resolution measurement campaign at the Athens site in the Mediterranean Basin from 14 to 22 July 2009. During this period, direct-sun AOD retrievals from both instruments exhibited small differences in the range 0.01-0.02. The AODs measured with CIMEL and PFR instruments were inverted to retrieve particle microphysical properties using the linear estimation (LE) technique. For low aerosol loads (AOD CIMEL values for both direct-sun data and inversion data. At higher loads (AOD > 0.4), measurements of the effective radius by the PFR are consistently 20 % lower than CIMEL for both direct-sun and inversion data. Volume concentrations at low aerosol loads from the PFR are up to 80% higher than the CIMEL for direct-sun data but are up to 20% lower when derived from inversion data under these same conditions. At higher loads, the percentage difference in volume concentrations from the PFR and CIMEL is systematically negative, with inversion data predicting differences 30% lower than those obtained from direct-sun data. An assessment of the effect of errors in the AOD retrieval on the estimation of PFR bulk parameters was performed and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the particle volume concentration and effective radius with an uncertainty < 65% when AOD < 0.2 and when input errors are as high as 10%.

  4. The Impact of Microphysics on Intensity and Structure of Hurricanes and Mesoscale Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Shi, Jainn J.; Jou, Ben Jong-Dao; Lee, Wen-Chau; Lin, Pay-Liam; Chang, Mei-Yu

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, both research and operational numerical weather prediction models, e.g. Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model, have started using more complex microphysical schemes originally developed for high-resolution cloud resolving models (CRMs) with a 1-2 km or less horizontal resolutions. WRF is a next-generation mesoscale forecast model and assimilation system that has incorporated modern software framework, advanced dynamics, numeric and data assimilation techniques, a multiple moveable nesting capability, and improved physical packages. WRF model can be used for a wide range of applications, from idealized research to operational forecasting, with an emphasis on horizontal grid sizes in the range of 1-10 km. The current WRF includes several different microphysics options such as Purdue Lin et al. (1983), WSM 6-class and Thompson microphysics schemes. We have recently implemented three sophisticated cloud microphysics schemes into WRF. The cloud microphysics schemes have been extensively tested and applied for different mesoscale systems in different geographical locations. The performances of these schemes have been compared to those from other WRF microphysics options. We are performing sensitivity tests in using WRF to examine the impact of six different cloud microphysical schemes on precipitation processes associated hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems developed at different geographic locations [Oklahoma (IHOP), Louisiana (Hurricane Katrina), Canada (C3VP - snow events), Washington (fire storm), India (Monsoon), Taiwan (TiMREX - terrain)]. We will determine the microphysical schemes for good simulated convective systems in these geographic locations. We are also performing the inline tracer calculation to comprehend the physical processes (i.e., boundary layer and each quadrant in the boundary layer) related to the development and structure of hurricanes and mesoscale convective systems.

  5. A microphysical model explains rate-and-state friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianye; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2015-04-01

    The rate-and-state friction (RSF) laws were originally developed as a phenomenological description of the frictional behavior observed in lab experiments. In previous studies, the empirical RSF laws have been extensively and quite successfully applied to fault mechanisms. However, these laws can not readily be envisioned in terms of the underlying physics. There are several critical discrepancies between seismological constraints on RSF behavior associated with earthquakes and lab-derived RSF parameters, in particular regarding the static stress drop and characteristic slip distance associated with seismic events. Moreover, lab friction studies can address only limited fault topographies, displacements, experimental durations and P-T conditions, which means that scale issues, and especially processes like dilatation and fluid-rock interaction, cannot be fully taken into account. Without a physical basis accounting for such effects, extrapolation of lab-derived RSF data to nature involves significant, often unknown uncertainties. In order to more reliably apply experimental results to natural fault zones, and notably to extrapolate lab data beyond laboratory pressure, temperature and velocity conditions, an understanding of the microphysical mechanisms governing fault frictional behavior is required. Here, following some pioneering efforts (e.g. Niemeijer and Spiers, 2007; Den Hartog and Spiers, 2014), a mechanism-based microphysical model is developed for describing the frictional behavior of carbonate fault gouge, assuming that the frictional behavior seen in lab experiments is controlled by competing processes of intergranular slip versus contact creep by pressure solution. The model basically consists of two governing equations derived from energy/entropy balance considerations and the kinematic relations that apply to a granular fault gouge undergoing shear and dilation/compaction. These two equations can be written as ˙τ/K = Vimp- Lt[λ˙γsbps +(1-

  6. Bulk chemicals from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the current robust forces driving sustainable production, and available biomass conversion technologies, biomass-based routes are expected to make a significant impact on the production of bulk chemicals within 10 years, and a huge impact within 20-30 years. In the Port of Rotterdam there is a

  7. Auctioning Bulk Mobile Messages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Meij (Simon); L-F. Pau (Louis-François); H.W.G.M. van Heck (Eric)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe search for enablers of continued growth of SMS traffic, as well as the take-off of the more diversified MMS message contents, open up for enterprises the potential of bulk use of mobile messaging , instead of essentially one-by-one use. In parallel, such enterprises or value added

  8. Bulk chemicals from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the current robust forces driving sustainable production, and available biomass conversion technologies, biomass-based routes are expected to make a significant impact on the production of bulk chemicals within 10 years, and a huge impact within 20-30 years. In the Port of Rotterdam there is a

  9. Development of a global model of mineral dust aerosol microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A mineral dust module is developed and implemented into the global aerosol microphysics model, GISS-TOMAS. The model is evaluated against long-term measurements of dust surface mass concentrations and deposition fluxes. Predicted mass concentrations and deposition fluxes are in error on average by a factor of 3 and 5, respectively. The comparison shows that the model performs better near the dust source regions but underestimates surface concentrations and deposition fluxes in more remote regions. Including only sites with measured dust concentrations of at least 0.5 μg m−3, the model prediction agrees with observations to within a factor of 2. It was hypothesized that the lifetime of dust, 2.6 days in our base case, is too short and causes the underestimation in remote areas. However, a sensitivity simulation with smaller dust particles and increased lifetime, 3.7 days, does not significantly improve the comparison. These results suggest that the underestimation of mineral dust in remote areas may result from local factors/sources not well described by the global dust source function used here or the GCM meteorology. The effect of dust aerosols on CCN(0.2% concentrations is negligible in most regions of the globe; however, CCN(0.2% concentrations change decrease by 10–20% in dusty regions the impact of dust on CCN(0.2% concentrations in dusty regions is very sensitive to the assumed size distribution of emissions. If emissions are predominantly in the coarse mode, CCN(0.2% decreases in dusty regions up to 10–20% because dust competes for condensable H2SO4, reducing the condensational growth of ultrafine mode particles to CCN sizes. With significant fine mode emissions, however, CCN(0.2% doubles in Saharan source regions because the direct emission of dust particles outweighs any microphysical feedbacks. The impact of dust on CCN concentrations active at various water supersaturations is also investigated

  10. Preliminary microphysical characterization of precipitation at ground over Antarctica coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Montopoli, Mario; Baldini, Luca; Dietrich, Stefano; Porcù, Federico

    2017-04-01

    processing PSD spectra. Software provided by disdrometer manufacturer assumes spherical shape to compute the size and the fall velocity of the particle. In the case of solid precipitation, this assumption can be unrealistic. However, averaging over a long time the influence of irregular shape of the particles can be reduced. Despite this limit, the Parsivel disdrometer has been used in several study to measure falling snow. In this work, some preliminary measurements from OTT Parsivel at MSZ are presented. In particular, the PSD collected during summer season 2016-2017 are analyzed in order to infer microphysical characteristics of snows in Antarctica. A specific methodology to estimate the reflectivity factor and the snow rate from snow size spectra collected by Parsivel is investigated. Microphysical properties of Antarctica precipitating clouds, in particular PSD, are compared to measurements collected by disdrometer during snow events in other regions, such as the data collected during the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) in Ontario, Canada.

  11. Microphysical and macrophysical responses of marine stratocumulus polluted by underlying ships: Evidence of cloud deepening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Matthew W.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2011-02-01

    Ship tracks observed by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) were analyzed to determine the extent to which aerosol plumes from ships passing below marine stratocumulus alter the microphysical and macrophysical properties of the clouds. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery was used to distinguish ship tracks embedded in closed, open, and undefined mesoscale cellular cloud structures. The impact of aerosol on the microphysical cloud properties in both the closed and open cell regimes were consistent with the changes predicted by the Twomey hypothesis. For the macrophysical changes, differences were observed between regimes. In the open cell regime, polluted clouds had significantly higher cloud tops (16%) and more liquid water (39%) than nearby unpolluted clouds. However, in the closed cell regime, polluted clouds exhibited no change in cloud top height and had less liquid water (-6%). Both microphysical (effective radius) and macrophysical (liquid water path) cloud properties contribute to a fractional change in cloud optical depth; in the closed cell regime the microphysical contribution was 3 times larger than the macrophysical contribution. However, the opposite was true in the open cell regime where the macrophysical contribution was nearly 2 times larger than the microphysical contribution because the aerosol probably increased cloud coverage. The results presented here demonstrate key differences aerosols have on the microphysical and macrophysical responses of boundary layer clouds between mesoscale stratocumulus convective regimes.

  12. Microphysical Retrieval from Doppler Radar Reflectivity Using Variational Data Assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongping; ZHU Guofu; XUE Jishan

    2006-01-01

    One of the microphysical variables, the rainwater mixing ratio qr, is retrieved from the observed reflectivity of Doppler radar by a 3D variational data assimilation system. The qr as an analysis variable is obtained by minimizing a cost function defined as the difference between observed radar reflectivity and its retrieval from qr, plus the difference between qr and its background field from a mesoscale model's prediction. Covariance matrix of the background field's error is determined by the so-called NMC method. A method called the second-order auto-regression (SOAR) is used to calculate the coefficients of regressive filtering to fit in with small spatial scale such as cumulus in the process of spatial transformation. An ideal experiment demonstrates the correctness of this system and a sensitivity experiment proves that the random error of observed reflectivity has effect on the analyzed results. At last an experiment with observed data from the Doppler radar at Ma'anshan City in Anhui Province on 19 June 2002 was performed. The retrieved analysis variable qr in this test shows structures in detail, which coincide with the distribution of the echo picture observed by the radar.

  13. Visions of Revolutions: Microphysics and Cosmophysics in the 1930s

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-01-01

    By 1930, at a time when the new physics based on relativity and quantum theory had reached a state of consolidation, problems of a foundational kind began to abound. Physicists began to speak of a new "crisis" and envisage a forthcoming "revolution" of a scale similar to the one in the mid-1920s. The perceived crisis was an issue not only in microphysics but also in cosmology, where it resulted in ambitious cosmophysical theories that transcended the ordinary methods of physics. The uncertain cognitive situation was, in some circles, associated to the uncertain political and moral situation. Did the problems of foundational physics demand a revolution in thinking that somehow paralleled the political revolutions of the time? I argue that although such ideas were indeed discussed in the 1930s, they were more rhetoric than reality. With the benefit of hindsight one can see that the perceived crisis was only temporary and not significantly related to social or ideological developments in the decade.

  14. Aerosol Microphysical and Macrophysical Effects on Deep Convective Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, T.; Li, Z.; Wilcox, E. M.; Oreopoulos, L.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.; Platnick, S. E.; Posselt, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Martins, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    We illustrate a conceptual model of hydrometeor vertical development inside a convective cloud and its utility in studying of aerosol-DCC interactions. Both case studies and ensemble means are used to investigate aerosol-DCC interactions. We identify a few scenarios where possible signal of aerosol effect on DCC may be extracted. The results show a consistent and physically sound picture of aerosols affecting DCC microphysics as well as macrophysical properties. Specifically, pollutions and smokes are shown to consistently decrease ice particle size. On the contrary, dust particles close to source regions are shown to make cloud ice particle size more maritime like. We postulate that dust may achieve this by acting as either heterogeneous ice nuclei or giant cloud condensation nuclei. This contrast between smoke or pollution and dust also exists for their effects on cloud glaciation temperature. Smoke and pollution aerosols are shown to decrease glaciation temperature while dust particles do the opposite. Possible Implications of our results for studying aerosol indirect forcing, cirrus cloud properties, troposphere-stratosphere water vapor exchange and cloud latent heating are discussed.

  15. Microphysics in the Gamma-Ray Burst Central Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the structure and evolution of a gamma-ray burst central engine where an accreting torus has formed around the newly born black hole. We study the general relativistic, MHD models and we self-consistently incorporate the nuclear equation of state. The latter accounts for the degeneracy of relativistic electrons, protons, and neutrons, and is used in the dynamical simulation, instead of a standard polytropic γ-law. The EOS provides the conditions for the nuclear pressure in the function of density and temperature, which evolve with time according to the conservative MHD scheme. We analyze the structure of the torus and outflowing winds, and compute the neutrino flux emitted through the nuclear reaction balance in the dense and hot matter. We also estimate the rate of transfer of the black-hole rotational energy to the bipolar jets. Finally, we elaborate on the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements in the accretion flow and the wind, through computations of the thermonuclear reaction network. We discuss the possible signatures of the radioactive element decay in the accretion flow. We suggest that further detailed modeling of the accretion flow in the GRB engine, together with its microphysics, may be a valuable tool to constrain the black-hole mass and spin. It can be complementary to the gravitational wave analysis if the waves are detected with an electromagnetic counterpart.

  16. Effects of cosmic ray decreases on cloud microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Svensmark

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Using cloud data from MODIS we investigate the response of cloud microphysics to sudden decreases in galactic cosmic radiation – Forbush decreases – and find responses in effective emissivity, cloud fraction, liquid water content, and optical thickness above the 2–3 sigma level 6–9 days after the minimum in atmospheric ionization and less significant responses for effective radius and cloud condensation nuclei (<2 sigma. The magnitude of the signals agree with derived values, based on simple equations for atmospheric parameters. Furthermore principal components analysis gives a total significance of the signal of 3.1 sigma. We also see a correlation between total solar irradiance and strong Forbush decreases but a clear mechanism connecting this to cloud properties is lacking. There is no signal in the UV radiation. The responses of the parameters correlate linearly with the reduction in the cosmic ray ionization. These results support the suggestion that ions play a significant role in the life-cycle of clouds.

  17. Retrievals of ice cloud microphysical properties of deep convective systems using radar measurements: Convective Cloud Microphysical Retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jingjing [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Dong, Xiquan [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Xi, Baike [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Wang, Jingyu [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks North Dakota USA; Homeyer, Cameron R. [School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma USA; McFarquhar, Greg M. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana Illinois USA; Fan, Jiwen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-09-23

    This study presents new algorithms for retrieving ice cloud microphysical properties (ice water content (IWC) and median mass diameter (Dm)) for the stratiform and thick anvil regions of Deep Convective Systems (DCSs) using Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) reflectivity and recently developed empirical relationships from aircraft in situ measurements during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). A classic DCS case on 20 May 2011 is used to compare the retrieved IWC profiles with other retrieval and cloud-resolving model simulations. The mean values of each retrieved and simulated IWC fall within one standard derivation of the other two. The statistical results from six selected cases during MC3E show that the aircraft in situ derived IWC and Dm are 0.47 ± 0.29 g m-3 and 2.02 ± 1.3 mm, while the mean values of retrievals have a positive bias of 0.16 g m-3 (34%) and a negative bias of 0.39 mm (19%). To validate the newly developed retrieval algorithms from this study, IWC and Dm are performed with other DCS cases during Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex Experiment (BAMEX) field campaign using composite gridded NEXRAD reflectivity and compared with in situ IWC and Dm from aircraft. A total of 64 1-min collocated aircraft and radar samples are available for comparisons, and the averages of radar retrieved and aircraft in situ measured IWCs are 1.22 g m-3 and 1.26 g m-3 with a correlation of 0.5, and their averaged Dm values are 2.15 and 1.80 mm. These comparisons have shown that the retrieval algorithms 45 developed during MC3E can retrieve similar ice cloud microphysical properties of DCS to aircraft in situ measurements during BAMEX with median errors of ~40% and ~25% for IWC and Dm retrievals, respectively. This is indicating our retrieval algorithms are suitable for other midlatitude continental DCS ice clouds, especially at stratiform rain and thick anvil regions. In addition, based on the averaged IWC and Dm values during MC3E and

  18. Radiative Bulk Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, X

    2001-01-01

    Viscous resistance to changes in the volume of a gas arises when different degrees of freedom have different relaxation times. Collisions tend to oppose the resulting departures from equilibrium and, in so doing, generate entropy. Even for a classical gas of hard spheres, when the mean free paths or mean flight times of constituent particles are long, we find a nonvanishing bulk viscosity. Here we apply a method recently used to uncover this result for a classical rarefied gas to radiative transfer theory and derive an expression for the radiative stress tensor for a gray medium with absorption and Thomson scattering. We determine the transport coefficients through the calculation of the comoving entropy generation. When scattering dominates absorption, the bulk viscosity becomes much larger than either the shear viscosity or the thermal conductivity.

  19. Numerical framework and performance of the new multiple-phase cloud microphysics scheme in RegCM4.5: precipitation, cloud microphysics, and cloud radiative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogherotto, Rita; Tompkins, Adrian Mark; Giuliani, Graziano; Coppola, Erika; Giorgi, Filippo

    2016-07-01

    We implement and evaluate a new parameterization scheme for stratiform cloud microphysics and precipitation within regional climate model RegCM4. This new parameterization is based on a multiple-phase one-moment cloud microphysics scheme built upon the implicit numerical framework recently developed and implemented in the ECMWF operational forecasting model. The parameterization solves five prognostic equations for water vapour, cloud liquid water, rain, cloud ice, and snow mixing ratios. Compared to the pre-existing scheme, it allows a proper treatment of mixed-phase clouds and a more physically realistic representation of cloud microphysics and precipitation. Various fields from a 10-year long integration of RegCM4 run in tropical band mode with the new scheme are compared with their counterparts using the previous cloud scheme and are evaluated against satellite observations. In addition, an assessment using the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP) Observational Simulator Package (COSP) for a 1-year sub-period provides additional information for evaluating the cloud optical properties against satellite data. The new microphysics parameterization yields an improved simulation of cloud fields, and in particular it removes the overestimation of upper level cloud characteristics of the previous scheme, increasing the agreement with observations and leading to an amelioration of a long-standing problem in the RegCM system. The vertical cloud profile produced by the new scheme leads to a considerably improvement of the representation of the longwave and shortwave components of the cloud radiative forcing.

  20. A study of cloud microphysics and precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau by radar observations and cloud-resolving model simulations: Cloud Microphysics over Tibetan Plateau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wenhua [State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Sui, Chung-Hsiung [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei Taiwan; Fan, Jiwen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Hu, Zhiqun [State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Zhong, Lingzhi [State Key Laboratory of Severe Weather, Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China

    2016-11-27

    Cloud microphysical properties and precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are unique because of the high terrains, clean atmosphere, and sufficient water vapor. With dual-polarization precipitation radar and cloud radar measurements during the Third Tibetan Plateau Atmospheric Scientific Experiment (TIPEX-III), the simulated microphysics and precipitation by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) with the Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences (CAMS) microphysics and other microphysical schemes are investigated through a typical plateau rainfall event on 22 July 2014. Results show that the WRF-CAMS simulation reasonably reproduces the spatial distribution of 24-h accumulated precipitation, but has limitations in simulating time evolution of precipitation rates. The model-calculated polarimetric radar variables have biases as well, suggesting bias in modeled hydrometeor types. The raindrop sizes in convective region are larger than those in stratiform region indicated by the small intercept of raindrop size distribution in the former. The sensitivity experiments show that precipitation processes are sensitive to the changes of warm rain processes in condensation and nucleated droplet size (but less sensitive to evaporation process). Increasing droplet condensation produces the best area-averaged rain rate during weak convection period compared with the observation, suggesting a considerable bias in thermodynamics in the baseline simulation. Increasing the initial cloud droplet size causes the rain rate reduced by half, an opposite effect to that of increasing droplet condensation.

  1. Simulations of Atmospheric River Overland Precipitation with a Spectral Microphysics Mesoscale Model and G-SDSU as Compared to Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Braun, S. A.; Matsui, T.; Iguchi, T.; Williams, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    A spectral microphysics scheme, HUCM, is recently implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit (G-SDSU). With this state-of-the-art numerical representation of cloud and precipitation processes in the WRF model, simulations were conducted for an Atmospheric River (AR) precipitation event in the US west coast on 30 to 31 December 2005. During this period, the intense AR transported abundant moisture, produced intense precipitation, and resulted in large hydrological impacts over California and Nevada. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) onboard NASA Aqua satellite and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar sampled this storm. The G-SDSU is used to simulate the brightness temperature and radar backscatter signals at the instruments' operating frequencies. Analysis shows improvement of ice scattering signature in this simulation with HUCM scheme vs. simulations with several other bulk schemes (done in a previous study). It indicates a better representation of precipitation ice water path in the WRF model with the spectral microphysics scheme. Further analysis of simulated radar signal will be conducted. The structure of the storm will also be examined.

  2. Development of a global model of mineral dust aerosol microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A mineral dust module is developed and implemented into the global aerosol microphysics model, GISS-TOMAS. The model is evaluated against long-term measurements of dust surface mass concentrations and deposition fluxes. Predicted mass concentrations and deposition fluxes are in error on average by a factor of 3 and 5, respectively. The comparison shows that the model performs better near the dust source regions but underestimates surface concentrations and deposition fluxes in more remote regions. For example, including only sites with measured dust concentrations of at least 0.5 μg m−3, the model prediction agrees with observations to within a factor of 2. It was hypothesized that the lifetime of dust, 2.6 days in our base case, is too short and causes the underestimation in remote areas. However, a sensitivity simulation with smaller dust particles and increased lifetime, 3.7 days, does not significantly improve the comparison. We conclude that the underestimation of mineral dust in remote areas results from local factors and sources not well described by the dust source function and/or the GCM meteorology. The effect of dust aerosols on CCN(0.2% concentrations is negligible in most regions of the globe; however, CCN(0.2% concentrations decrease by 10–20% in dusty regions as a result of coagulational scavenging of CCN particles by dust and a decrease in H2SO4 condensation to CCN particles due to the additional surface area of dust.

  3. Arctic stratospheric dehydration – Part 2: Microphysical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Engel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Large areas of synoptic-scale ice PSCs (Polar Stratospheric Clouds distinguished the Arctic winter 2009/2010 from other years and revealed unprecedented evidence of water redistribution in the stratosphere. A unique snapshot of water vapor repartitioning into ice particles was observed under extremely cold Arctic conditions with temperatures around 183 K. Balloon-borne, aircraft and satellite-based measurements suggest that synoptic-scale ice PSCs and concurrent reductions and enhancements in water vapor are tightly linked with the observed de- and rehydration signatures, respectively. In a companion paper (Part 1, water vapor and aerosol backscatter measurements from the RECONCILE (Reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interactions and LAPBIAT-II (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere Facility field campaigns have been analyzed in detail. This paper uses a column version of the Zurich Optical and Microphysical box Model (ZOMM including newly developed NAT (Nitric Acid Trihydrate and ice nucleation parameterizations. Particle sedimentation is calculated in order to simulate the vertical redistribution of chemical species such as water and nitric acid. Accounting for small-scale temperature fluctuations along the trajectory is essential to reach agreement between simulated optical cloud properties and observations. Whereas modeling only homogeneous nucleation causes the formation of ice clouds with particle radii too small to explain the measured vertical redistribution of water, we show that the use of recently developed heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations allows the model to quantitatively reproduce the observed signatures of de- and rehydration.

  4. Cloud microphysical characteristics versus temperature for three Canadian field projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gultepe

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to better understand how cloud microphysical characteristics such as liquid water content (LWC and droplet number concentration (Nd change with temperature (T. The in situ observations were collected during three research projects including: the Radiation, Aerosol, and Cloud Experiment (RACE which took place over the Bay of Fundy and Central Ontario during August 1995, the First International Regional Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE.ACE which took place in the Arctic Ocean during April 1998, and the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS which took place in the Ontario region during the winter of 1999–2000. The RACE, FIRE.ACE, and AIRS projects represent summer mid-latitude clouds, Arctic clouds, and mid-latitude winter clouds, respectively. A LWC threshold of 0.005 g m-3 was used for this study. Similar to other studies, LWC was observed to decrease with decreasing T. The LWC-T relationship was similar for all projects, although the range of T conditions for each project was substantially different, and the variability of LWC within each project was considerable. Nd also decreased with decreasing T, and a parameterization for Nd versus T is suggested that may be useful for modeling studies.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (cloud physics and chemistry – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology; general circulation

  5. Microphysical retrievals from simultaneous polarimetric and profiling radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Morris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The character of precipitation detected at the surface is the final product of many microphysical interactions in the cloud above, the combined effects of which may be characterized by the observed drop size distribution (DSD. This necessitates accurate retrieval of the DSD from remote sensing data, especially radar as it offers large areal coverage, high spatial resolution, and rigorous quality control and testing. Combined instrument observations with a UHF wind profiler, an S-band polarimetric weather radar, and a video disdrometer are analyzed for two squall line events occuring during the calendar year 2007. UHF profiler Doppler velocity spectra are used to estimate the DSD aloft, and are complemented by DSDs retrieved from an exponential model applied to polarimetric data. Ground truth is provided by the disdrometer. A complicating factor in the retrieval from UHF profiler spectra is the presence of ambient air motion, which can be corrected using the method proposed by Teshiba et al. (2009, in which a comparison between idealized Doppler spectra calculated from the DSDs retrieved from KOUN and those retrieved from contaminated wind profiler spectra is performed. It is found that DSDs measured using the distrometer at the surface and estimated using the wind profiler and polarimetric weather radar generally showed good agreement. The DSD retrievals using the wind profiler were improved when the estimates of the vertical wind were included into the analysis, thus supporting the method of Teshiba et al. (2009. Furthermore, the the study presents a method of investigating the time and height structure of DSDs.

  6. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pousse-Nottelmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented in the regional weather forecast and climate model COSMO. The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snow flakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snow flakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. However, the processes not only impact the total aerosol number and mass, but also the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble accumulation mode and generating coarse mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases the cloud droplet number concentration with possible

  7. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pousse-Nottelmann

    2015-08-01

    aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO. The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener–Bergeron–Findeisen (WBF process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases the cloud droplet number concentration with possible implications for the ice crystal number

  8. Influence of Atmospheric Organic Compounds on Cloud Microphysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Michelle Lee

    With the knowledge that polar organic constituents such as difunctional organic oxygenates contribute significantly to particulate matter in the atmosphere, the motivation for this research was to understand the influence of polar organic matter on cloud microphysical processes that affect both the equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleating cloud droplets. To understand the equilibrium condition of polar organics in growing, diluting droplets, solubility and surface tension measurements were made for a group of difunctional organic oxygenates that have been detected consistently in the atmosphere. The organics chosen as models included short chain dicarboxylic acids (C _2-C_6), phthalic acid, cis-pinonic acid. The dicarboxylic acids and phthalic acid are generated from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, and cis-pinonic acid originates from the oxidation of alpha-pinene emitted from coniferous trees. From the solubility information, the dissolution behavior is shown to alter the growth characteristics of a nucleating cloud droplet. From the surface tension studies, the growth characteristics are also shown to be further influenced by the organic. To understand the affect of difunctional organic oxygenates on the transport of water at the air/water interface of single droplets, the evaporation rate of aqueous systems containing the model organics were measured. Light scattering techniques were used to measure the droplet size as a function of time for electrodynamically levitated single microdroplets under conditions of controlled humidity and temperature. The evaporation rates are compared to that of pure water and are found to be reduced by up to an order of magnitude. In addition, the evaporation rates are found to be correlated with the surface tension of the aqueous solution containing the organic. Due to the complex nature of the atmosphere, the arena of observation and experimentation was limited to the laboratory for this thesis work.

  9. Improving the Subgrid-Scale Representation of Hydrometeors and Microphysical Feedback Effects Using a Multivariate PDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brian M.

    The subgrid-scale representation of hydrometeor fields is important for calculating microphysical process rates. In order to represent subgrid-scale variability, the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB) parameterization uses a multivariate Probability Density Function (PDF). In addition to vertical velocity, temperature, and moisture fields, the PDF includes hydrometeor fields. Previously, each hydrometeor field was assumed to follow a multivariate single lognormal distribution. Now, in order to better represent the distribution of hydrometeors, two new multivariate PDFs are formulated and introduced in part one of this two-part project. The new PDFs represent hydrometeors using either a delta-lognormal or a delta-double-lognormal shape. The two new PDF distributions, plus the previous single lognormal shape, are compared to histograms of data taken from Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of a precipitating cumulus case, a drizzling stratocumulus case, and a deep convective case. Finally, the warm microphysical process rates produced by the different hydrometeor PDFs are compared to the same process rates produced by the LES. Microphysics processes have feedback effects on moisture and heat content. Not only do these processes influence mean values, but also variability and fluxes of moisture and heat content. For example, evaporation of rain below cloud base may produce cold pools. This evaporative cooling may increase the variability in temperature in the below-cloud layer. Likewise, rain production in the moistest part of cloud tends to decrease variability in cloud water. These effects are usually not included in most coarse-resolution weather and climate models, or else are crudely parameterized. In part two of this two-part project, the microphysical effects on moisture and heat content are parameterized using the PDF method. This approach is based on predictive, horizontally-averaged equations for the variances, covariances, and fluxes of moisture and heat

  10. A Case Study of a Double-Moment Cloud Microphysics Parameterization in Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Ackerman, T. P.; Morrison, H.

    2010-12-01

    The double-moment microphysics parameterization used in this study predicts both the number concentration and the mixing ratio for five hydrometeor species: cloud water, cloud ice, rain, snow and graupel along with the mass mixing ratio of water vapor. With the explicitly predicted hydrometeor number concentration, we expect the double-moment microphysics scheme to improve the simulation of microphysical processes and the cloud properties. In this study, the double-moment microphysics scheme is utilized in a cloud resolving model (CRM), called the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM), to simulate the cloud evolution during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) 1997 summer Intensive Observations Period. In particular, we performed sensitivity studies of parameters such as the terminal fall velocity of the three ice species and ice-to-snow “autoconversion” threshold. For example, increasing the fall speed of pristine ice particles reduces the cloud amount at higher altitude and agrees better with the ARM ground-based cloud radar observations although the model still overestimates the high cloud amount. Increasing the fall velocity of snow and graupel can decrease the high cloud amount but is less effective. We also considered the impact of the model inherent uncertainty on the interpretation of microphysics sensitivity studies by performing ensemble runs with the same model configuration and large scale forcing but only varying initial soundings.

  11. Mixed-phase altocumulus clouds over Leipzig: Remote sensing measurements and spectral cloud microphysics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Martin; Bühl, Johannes; Ansmann, Albert; Tegen, Ina

    2015-04-01

    The present work combines remote sensing observations and detailed microphysics cloud modeling to investigate two altocumulus cloud cases observed over Leipzig, Germany. A suite of remote sensing instruments was able to detect primary ice at rather warm temperatures of -6°C. For comparison, a second mixed phase case at about -25°C is introduced. To further look into the details of cloud microphysical processes a simple dynamics model of the Asai-Kasahara type is combined with detailed spectral microphysics forming the model system AK-SPECS. Temperature and humidity profiles are taken either from observation (radiosonde) or GDAS reanalysis. Vertical velocities are prescribed to force the dynamics as well as main cloud features to be close to the observations. Subsequently, sensitivity studies with respect to dynamical as well as ice microphysical parameters are carried out with the aim to quantify the most important sensitivities for the cases investigated. For the cases selected, the liquid phase is mainly determined by the model dynamics (location and strength of vertical velocity) whereas the ice phase is much more sensitive to the microphysical parameters (ice nuclei (IN) number, ice particle shape). The choice of ice particle shape may induce large uncertainties which are in the same order as those for the temperature-dependent IN number distribution.

  12. The effect of aerosol representation on cloud microphysical properties in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In-Jin; Iguchi, Takamichi; Kim, Sang-Woo; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Yoon, Soon-Chang

    2014-02-01

    This study performed a three-dimensional regional-scale simulation of aerosol and cloud fields using a meso-scale non-hydrostatic model with a bin-based cloud microphysics. The representation of aerosols in the model has been improved to account for more realistic multi-modal size distribution and multiple chemical compositions. Two case studies for shallow stratocumulus over Northeast Asia in March 2005 were conducted with different aerosol conditions to evaluate model performance. Improved condensation nuclei (CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are attributable to the newly constructed aerosol size distribution. The simulated results of cloud microphysical properties (cloud droplet effective radius, liquid water path, and optical thickness) with improved CN/CCN number are close to the retrievals from satellite-based observation. The effects of aerosol on the microphysical properties of shallow stratocumulus are investigated by model simulation, in terms of columnar aerosol number concentration. Enhanced aerosol number concentration results in increased liquid water path in humid case, but invariant liquid water path in dry case primarily due to precipitation occurrence. The changes of cloud microphysical properties are more predominant for small aerosol burden than for large aerosol burden with the retarded changes in cloud mass and size due to inactive condensation and collision-coalescence processes. Quantitative evaluation of sensitivity factor between aerosol and cloud microphysical properties indicates a strong aerosol-cloud interaction in Northeast Asian region.

  13. Applying super-droplets as a compact representation of warm-rain microphysics for aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabas, S.; Jaruga, A.; Pawlowska, H.; Grabowski, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    Clouds may influence aerosol characteristics of their environment. The relevant processes include wet deposition (rainout or washout) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) recycling through evaporation of cloud droplets and drizzle drops. Recycled CCN physicochemical properties may be altered if the evaporated droplets go through collisional growth or irreversible chemical reactions (e.g. SO2 oxidation). The key challenge of representing these processes in a numerical cloud model stems from the need to track properties of activated CCN throughout the cloud lifecycle. Lack of such "memory" characterises the so-called bulk, multi-moment as well as bin representations of cloud microphysics. In this study we apply the particle-based scheme of Shima et al. 2009. Each modelled particle (aka super-droplet) is a numerical proxy for a multiplicity of real-world CCN, cloud, drizzle or rain particles of the same size, nucleus type,and position. Tracking cloud nucleus properties is an inherent feature of the particle-based frameworks, making them suitable for studying aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions. The super-droplet scheme is furthermore characterized by linear scalability in the number of computational particles, and no numerical diffusion in the condensational and in the Monte-Carlo type collisional growth schemes. The presentation will focus on processing of aerosol by a drizzling stratocumulus deck. The simulations are carried out using a 2D kinematic framework and a VOCALS experiment inspired set-up (see http://www.rap.ucar.edu/~gthompsn/workshop2012/case1/).

  14. Microphysical Properties of Warm Clouds During The Aircraft Take-Off and Landing Over Bucharest, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Sabina; Nicolae Vajaiac, Sorin; Boscornea, Andreea

    2016-06-01

    This paper is focused on airborne measurements of microphysical parameters into warm clouds when the aircraft penetrates the cloud, both during take-off and landing. The experiment was conducted during the aircraft flight between Bucharest and Craiova, in the southern part of Romania. The duration of the experimental flight was 2 hours and 35 minutes in October 7th, 2014, but the present study is dealing solely with the analysis of cloud microphysical properties at the beginning of the experiment (during the aircraft take-off) and at the end, when it got finalized by the aircraft landing procedure. The processing and interpretation of the measurements showed the differences between microphysical parameters, emphasizing that the type of cloud over Bucharest changed, as it was expected. In addition, the results showed that it is important to take into account both the synoptic context and the cloud perturbation due to the velocity of the aircraft, in such cases.

  15. Evaluation of Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Microphysics Using CALIPSO/CloudSat and Earthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We performed several sensitivity studies to evaluate uncertainties in the retrieved ice microphysics due to ice particle orientation and shape. It was found that the implementation of orientation of horizontally oriented ice plate model in the algorithm drastically improved the retrieval results in both for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Differences in the retrieved microphysics between only randomly oriented ice model (3D-ice and mixture of 3D-ice and Q2Dplate model were large especially in off-nadir period, e.g., 100% in effective radius and one order in ice water content, respectively. And differences in the retrieved ice microphysics among different mixture models were smaller than about 50% for effective radius in nadir period.

  16. A review of the theoretical basis for bulk mass flux convective parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Plant

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Most parameterizations for precipitating convection in use today are bulk schemes, in which an ensemble of cumulus elements with different properties is modelled as a single, representative entraining-detraining plume. We review the underpinning mathematical model for such parameterizations, in particular by comparing it with spectral models in which elements are not combined into the representative plume. The chief merit of a bulk model is that the representative plume can be described by an equation set with the same structure as that which describes each element in a spectral model. The equivalence relies on an ansatz for detrained condensate introduced by Yanai et al. (1973 and on a simplified microphysics. There are also conceptual differences in the closure of bulk and spectral parameterizations. In particular, we show that the convective quasi-equilibrium closure of Arakawa and Schubert (1974 for spectral parameterizations cannot be carried over to a bulk parameterization in a straightforward way. Quasi-equilibrium of the cloud work function assumes a timescale separation between a slow forcing process and a rapid convective response. But, for the natural bulk analogue to the cloud-work function, the relevant forcing is characterised by a different timescale, and so its quasi-equilibrium entails a different physical constraint. Closures of bulk parameterizations that use a parcel value of CAPE do not suffer from this timescale issue. However, the Yanai et al. (1973 ansatz must be invoked as a necessary ingredient of those closures.

  17. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  18. Explosive bulk charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  19. The Incredible Bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Keita; Kumar, Jason; Sandick, Pearl; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental results from the LHC have placed strong constraints on the masses of colored superpartners. The MSSM parameter space is also constrained by the measurement of the Higgs boson mass, and the requirement that the relic density of lightest neutralinos be consistent with observations. Although large regions of the MSSM parameter space can be excluded by these combined bounds, leptophilic versions of the MSSM can survive these constraints. In this paper we consider a scenario in which the requirements of minimal flavor violation, vanishing $CP$-violation, and mass universality are relaxed, specifically focusing on scenarios with light sleptons. We find a large region of parameter space, analogous to the original bulk region, for which the lightest neutralino is a thermal relic with an abundance consistent with that of dark matter. We find that these leptophilic models are constrained by measurements of the magnetic and electric dipole moments of the electron and muon, and that these models have ...

  20. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  1. Microphysical Properties of Single Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Grazia; Song, Young-Chul; Pereira, Kelly; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Topping, David; Reid, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) deriving from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can account for a substantial fraction of the overall atmospheric aerosol mass.[1] Therefore, the investigation of SOA microphysical properties is crucial to better comprehend their role in the atmospheric processes they are involved in. This works describes a single particle approach to accurately characterise the hygroscopic response, the optical properties and the gas-particle partitioning kinetics of water and semivolatile components for laboratory generated SOA. SOA was generated from the oxidation of different VOCs precursors (e.g. α-pinene, toluene) in a photo-chemical flow reactor, which consists of a temperature and relative humidity controlled 300 L polyvinyl fluoride bag. Known VOC, NOx and ozone concentrations are introduced in the chamber and UV irradiation is performed by means of a Hg pen-ray. SOA samples were collected with an electrical low pressure impactor, wrapped in aluminium foil and kept refrigerated at -20°C. SOA samples were extracted in a 1:1 water/methanol mixture. Single charged SOA particles were generated from the obtained solution using a microdispenser and confined within an electrodynamic balance (EDB), where they sit in a T (250-320 K) and RH (0-95%) controlled nitrogen flow. Suspended droplets are irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the evolving angularly resolved scattered light is used to keep track of changes in droplet size. One of the key features of this experimental approach is that very little SOA solution is required because of the small volumes needed to load the dispensers (trapping experiments (up to >20000 s) allow the observation of slow SVOCs evaporation kinetics at different T and RH conditions. Water condensation/evaporation kinetics experiments onto/from trapped SOA droplets following fast RH step changes (<0.5 s) were also performed in order to evaluate possible kinetics limitations to water diffusion in the

  2. Alterations of Cloud Microphysics Due to Cloud Processed CCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J. G.; Tabor, S. S.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution CCN spectra have revealed bimodality (Hudson et al. 2015) similar to aerosol size spectra (e.g., Hoppel et al. 1985). Bimodality is caused by chemical and physical cloud processes that increase mass or hygroscopicity of only CCN that produced activated cloud droplets. Bimodality is categorized by relative CCN concentrations (NCCN) within the two modes, Nu-Np; i.e., NCCN within the higher critical supersaturation, Sc, mode that did not undergo cloud processing minus NCCN within the lower Sc mode that was cloud processed. Lower, especially negative, Nu-Np designates greater processing. The table shows regressions between Nu-Np and characteristics of clouds nearest the CCN measurements. ICE-T MASE parameter R SL R SL Nc 0.17 93.24 -0.26 98.65 MD -0.31 99.69 0.33 99.78 σ -0.27 99.04 0.48 100.00 Ld -0.31 99.61 0.38 99.96 Table. Correlation coefficients, R, and one-tailed significance levels in percent, SL, for Nu-Np with microphysics of the clouds closest to each CCN measurement, 75 ICE-T and 74 MASE cases. Nc is cloud droplet concentration, MD is cloud droplet mean diameter, σ is standard deviation of cloud droplet spectra, Ldis drizzle drop LWC. Two aircraft field campaigns, Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) and Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) show opposite R signs because coalescence dominated cloud processing in low altitude ICE-T cumuli whereas chemical transformations predominated in MASE low altitude polluted stratus. Coalescence reduces Nc and NCCN, which thus increases MD, and σ, which promote Ld. Chemical transformations, e.g., SO2 to SO4, increase CCN hygroscopicity, thus reducing Sc, but not affecting Nc or NCCN. Lower Sc CCN are capable of producing greater Nc in subsequent cloud cycles, which leads to lower MD and σ which reduce Ld (figure). These observations are consistent with cloud droplet growth models for the higher vertical wind (W) of cumuli and lower W of stratus. Coalescence thus reduces the indirect

  3. Next generation aerosol-cloud microphysics for advanced high-resolution climate predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennartz, Ralf; Hamilton, Kevin P; Phillips, Vaughan T.J.; Wang, Yuqing; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-14

    The three top-level project goals are: -We proposed to develop, test, and run a new, physically based, scale-independent microphysical scheme for those cloud processes that most strongly affect greenhouse gas scenarios, i.e. warm cloud microphysics. In particular, we propsed to address cloud droplet activation, autoconversion, and accretion. -The new, unified scheme was proposed to be derived and tested using the University of Hawaii's IPRC Regional Atmospheric Model (iRAM). -The impact of the new parameterizations on climate change scenarios will be studied. In particular, the sensitivity of cloud response to climate forcing from increased greenhouse gas concentrations will be assessed.

  4. Modeling afterglow rebrightenings by evolving the microphysics in the termination shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, S. W.; Wong, A. Y. L.; Huang, Y. F.; Cheng, K. S.

    2010-10-01

    Conventionally, long GRBs are thought to be caused by the core collapses of massive stars. During the lifetime of a massive star, a termination shock environment should be produced. Furthermore, the microphysics shock parameters may vary along with the evolution of the fireball. Our numerical simulations indicate that adding the evolution of the microphysics shock parameters in the termination shock can acceptably reproduce the rebrightenings in both the R-band and X-ray afterglow light curves of GRBs, for example GRB 060206, GRB 070311 and GRB 071010A.

  5. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  6. Optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols in Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aculinin, Alexandr; Smicov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Measurements of aerosol properties in Kishinev, Moldova are being carried out within the framework of the international AERONET program managed by NASA/GSFC since 1999. Direct solar and sky diffuse radiances are measured by using of sunphotometer Cimel-318. Aerosol optical properties are retrieved from measured radiances by using of smart computational procedures developed by the AERONET's team. The instrument is situated at the ground-based solar radiation monitoring station giving the opportunity to make simultaneous spectral (win sunphotometer) and broadband (with the set of sensors from radiometric complex) solar radiation. Detailed description of the station and investigations in progress can be found at the http://arg.phys.asm.md. Ground station is placed in an urban environment of Kishinev city (47.00N; 28.56E; 205 m a.s.l). Summary of aerosol optical and microphysical properties retrieved from direct solar and diffuse sky radiance observations at Moldova site from September 1999 to June 2009 are presented below. Number of measurements (total): 1695 Number of measurements (for ?o, n, k): 223 Range of aerosol optical depth (AOD) @440 nm: 0.03 =0.25 Range of Ångström parameter : 0.14 (440/670/870/1020): 0.93/0.92/0.90/0.89 ±0.04 Parameters of volume particle size distribution function: (fine mode) volume median radius r v,f , μm: 0.17 ± 0.06 particle volume concentration Cv,f, μm3/μm2: 0.04 ± 0.03 (coarse mode) volume median radius rv,c , μm: 3.08 ± 0.64 particle volume concentration Cv,c, μm3/μm2: 0.03 ± 0.03 Climatic norms of AOD@500 nm and Ångström parameter at the site of observation are equal to 0.21 ± 0.06 and 1.45 ± 0.14, respectively. The aerosol type in Moldova may be considered as 'urban-industrial and mixed' in accordance with the classification of aerosol type models systematized and developed by AERONET team (O.Dubovik et al., 2002, J. Atmosph. Sci., 59, 590-608) on the basis of datasets acquired from worldwide observations at the

  7. A low-cost digital holographic imager for calibration and validation of cloud microphysics remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Thomas E.; Hamilton, Murray W.; Reid, Iain M.

    2016-10-01

    Clouds cover approximately 70% of the Earth's surface and therefore play a crucial rule in governing both the climate system and the hydrological cycle. The microphysical properties of clouds such as the cloud particle size distribution, shape distribution and spatial homogeneity contribute significantly to the net radiative effect of clouds and these properties must therefore be measured and understood to determine the exact contribution of clouds to the climate system. Significant discrepancies are observed between meteorological models and observations, particularly in polar regions that are most sensitive to changes in climate, suggesting a lack of understanding of these complex microphysical processes. Remote sensing techniques such as polarimetric LIDAR and radar allow microphysical cloud measurements with high temporal and spatial resolution however these instruments must be calibrated and validated by direct in situ measurements. To this end a low cost, light weight holographic imaging device has been developed and experimentally tested that is suitable for deployment on a weather balloon or tower structure to significantly increase the availability of in situ microphysics retrievals.

  8. LACIS-T - A humid wind tunnel for investigating the Interactions between Cloud Microphysics and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtländer, Jens; Niedermeier, Dennis; Siebert, Holger; Shaw, Raymond; Schumacher, Jörg; Stratmann, Frank

    2017-04-01

    To improve the fundamental and quantitative understanding of the interactions between cloud microphysical and turbulent processes, the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) has built up a new humid wind tunnel (LACIS-T). LACIS-T allows for the investigation of cloud microphysical processes, such as cloud droplet activation and freezing, under-well defined thermodynamic and turbulent flow conditions. It therewith allows for the straight forward continuation, extension, and completion of the cloud microphysics related investigations carried out at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) under laminar flow conditions. Characterization of the wind tunnel with respect to flow, thermodynamics, and droplet microphysics is carried out with probes mounted inside (pitot tube and hot-wire anemometer for mean velocity and fluctuations, Pt100 sensor for mean temperature, cold-wire sensor for temperature fluctuations is in progress, as well as a dew-point mirror for mean water vapor concentration, a Lyman-alpha sensor for water vapor fluctuations is in progress) the measurement section, and from outside with optical detection methods (a laser light sheet is available for cloud droplet visualization, a digital holography system for detection of cloud droplet size distributions will be installed for tests in February 2017), respectively. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations have been carried out for defining suitable experimental conditions and assisting the interpretation of the experimental data. In this work, LACIS-T, its fundamental operating principle, and first preliminary results from ongoing characterization efforts will be presented.

  9. Evaluation of Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Microphysics Using CALIPSO/CloudSat and Earthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Hagihara, Yuichiro; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2016-06-01

    We developed lidar-radar algorithms that can be applied to Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar and CloudSat data to retrieve ice microphysics. The algorithms were the extended version of previously reported algorithm [1] and can treat both of nadir pointing of CALIPSO lidar period and 3°-off-nadir pointing one. We used the scattering data bank produced by the physical optics methods [2] and created lidar look-up tables of quasi-horizontally oriented ice plates (Q2D-plate) for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Then LUTs were implemented in the ice retrieval algorithms. We performed several sensitivity studies to evaluate uncertainties in the retrieved ice microphysics due to ice particle orientation and shape. It was found that the implementation of orientation of horizontally oriented ice plate model in the algorithm drastically improved the retrieval results in both for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Differences in the retrieved microphysics between only randomly oriented ice model (3D-ice) and mixture of 3D-ice and Q2Dplate model were large especially in off-nadir period, e.g., 100% in effective radius and one order in ice water content, respectively. And differences in the retrieved ice microphysics among different mixture models were smaller than about 50% for effective radius in nadir period.

  10. Microphysical Properties of Aerosols Encountered During the 2012 TCAP Campaign Using the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamnes, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Liu, X.; Cairns, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign was conducted during the summer of 2012, off the East coast of the United States by Cape Cod. The NASA GISS Research Scanning Polarimeter, a multi-angle, multi-spectral polarimeter measured the upwelling polarized radiances from a B200 aircraft over a period of several weeks and over a distance of several hundred kilometers. A new algorithm based on optimal estimation that can retrieve aerosol microphysical properties using highly accurate radiative transfer and Mie calculations is presented. First, results for synthetic simulated data are discussed. The algorithm is then applied to real data collected during TCAP to retrieve the aerosol microphysical state vector and corresponding uncertainty for the aerosols that were encountered. Simultaneous measurements were also made by the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL2), which provided extinction and backscatter profiles. The RSP-retrieved microphysical properties are compared to the extinction and backscatter products, and to the HSRL2-retrieved microphysical products.

  11. Numerical Study on Microphysical Processes of Two Different Snowfall Cases in Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jing; WANG Pengyun; LI Xiang; LU Ying

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, two snowfall cases under different weather conditions in northern China are simulated by using the meso scale model MM5. Two-way nesting structure of domains is designed for each case. Among the explicit schemes of MM5, the Reisner graupel scheme is selected to describe the microphysical process.The simulated snow-bands of two cases are basically consistent with observations. The simulated results of microphysical processes are mainly discussed. The hydrometeors and their sources and sinks under different weather backgrounds are described. The feedback effects of microphysical processes on the thermal and dynamic processes are also discussed. Method that outputs the accumulative sources and sinks per hour is used to analyze the distribution characteristics of hydrometeors during the strongest snowfall period. Two sensitivity tests (called heat test and drag test) are conducted to examine the effects of microphysical processes on cloud produced by the latent heat and drag force.Results have shown that the distribution of particles has a close relation with temperature. The temperature of Beijing snowfall is under 0℃ and there exist vapor and solid phase particles, while Liaoning snowfall has vapor, liquid, and solid phase particles due to the warm temperature. The distribution of these particles is not the same at different development stages. From the analyses of the characteristics of sources and sinks, it is found that snow is mainly produced by the deposition and accretion with ice. Cloud water is crucial to graupel. The melting of ice-phase particles enhances the rain production. The results of heat tests and drag tests reveal that the microphysical processes have interacted with the dynamic and thermal processes. Latent heat release of hydrometeors feeds back positively on snowfall while the drag force not.At last, comparisons of simulated results have been done between the two different kinds of snowfall cases.The microphysical processes of

  12. The Impact of Microphysical Schemes on Intensity and Track of Hurricane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W. K.; Shi, J. J.; Chen, S. S.; Lang, S.; Lin, P.; Hong, S. Y.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Hou, A.

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, both research and operational numerical weather prediction models [e.g. Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF)] have started using more complex microphysical schemes originally developed for high-resolution cloud resolving models (CRMs) with a 1-2 km or less horizontal resolutions. The WRF is a next-generation meso-scale forecast model and assimilation system that has incorporated a modern software framework, advanced dynamics, numeric and data assimilation techniques, a multiple moveable nesting capability, and improved physical packages. The WRF model can be used for a wide range of applications, from idealized research to operational forecasting, with an emphasis on horizontal grid sizes in the range of 1-10 km. The current WRF includes several different microphysics options. At Goddard, four different cloud microphysics schemes (warm rain only, two-class of ice, two three-class of ice with either graupel or hail) are implemented into the WRF. The performances of these schemes have been compared to those from other WRF microphysics scheme options for an Atlantic hurricane case. In addition, a brief review and comparison on the previous modeling studies on the impact of microphysics schemes and microphysical processes on intensity and track of hurricane will be presented. Generally, almost all modeling studies found that the microphysics schemes did not have major impacts on track forecast, but did have more effect on the intensity. All modeling studies found that the simulated hurricane has rapid deepening and/or intensification for the warm rain-only case. It is because all hydrometeors were very large raindrops, and they fell out quickly at and near the eye-wall region. This would hydrostatically produce the lowest pressure. In addition, these modeling studies suggested that the simulated hurricane becomes unrealistically strong by removing the evaporative cooling of cloud droplets and melting of ice particles. This is due to the

  13. Estimating Large-Scale Convection from a No-Microphysics WRF Simulation over the SGP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segele, Z. T.; Leslie, L. M.; Lamb, P.

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluates the ability of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to reproduce the observed cloud and convection characteristics in the vicinity of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF). Eight microphysics simulations were conducted for the warm-season heavy precipitation case of May 27-31, 2001. Cloud observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) were used for validation. For spatial model performance verification, we used the National Weather Service’s (NWS’s) Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) reflectivity data. The results of 3-km-resolution WRF simulations show that although all microphysics experiments reproduced precipitable water vapor in good agreement with the observations, they perform poorly in simulating the intensity and timing of convection. This is evidenced by near zero correlations between EOF1 time coefficients of WSR-88D and simulated reflectivity for all microphysics scheme simulations (Fig. 1). To improve this model weakness, a simulation without any microphysics was conducted. Large-scale convection then was estimated from the 900-400-hPa layer-average of the product of grid-scale ascending velocity and deficit grid-scale water vapor mass. The maximum radar reflectivity was estimated using the WSR-88D radar-precipitation rate empirical formula. Results show that the dynamically estimated reflectivity for the no-microphysics simulation reproduced reasonably well the observed large-scale convection over the SGP. The correlation between EOF1 time series of simulated and WSR-88D reflectivity is increased to +0.54. Fig.1. Characteristics of observed and simulated radar reflectivity over the SGP for May 27-31, 2001. Top panels give EOF1 spatial patterns (nondimensional, arbitrary scale between columns) for (a) WSR-88D composite reflectivity and (b) simulated radar reflectivity estimated from WRF simulation with no microphysics. Lower panel

  14. MAD-VenLA: a microphysical modal representation of clouds for the IPSL Venus GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbon, Sabrina; Määttänen, Anni; Burgalat, Jérémie; Montmessin, Franck; Stolzenbach, Aurélien; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-10-01

    Venus is enshrouded by 20km-thick clouds, which are composed of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets. Clouds play a crucial role on the climate of the planet. Our goal is to study the formation and evolution of Venusian clouds with microphysical models. The goal of this work is to develop the first full 3D microphysical model of Venus coupled with the IPSL Venus GCM and the photochemical model included (Lebonnois et al. 2010, Stolzenbach et al. 2016).Two particle size distribution representations are generally used in cloud modeling: sectional and modal. The term 'sectional' means that the continuous particle size distribution is divided into a discrete set of size intervals called bins. In the modal approach, the particle size distribution is approximated by a continuous parametric function, typically a log-normal, and prognostic variables are distribution or distribution-integrated parameters (Seigneur et al. 1986, Burgalat et al. 2014). These two representations need to be compared to choose the optimal trade-off between precision and computational efficiency. At high radius resolution, sectional models are computationally too demanding to be integrated in GCMs. That is why, in other GCMs, such as the IPSL Titan GCM, the modal scheme is used (Burgalat et al. 2014).The Venus Liquid Aerosol cloud model (VenLA) and the Modal Dynamics of Venusian Liquid Aerosol cloud model (MAD-VenLA) are respectively the sectional and the modal model discussed here and used for defining the microphysical cloud module to be integrated in the IPSL Venus GCM. We will compare the two models with the key microphysical processes in 0D setting: homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, condensation/evaporation and coagulation. Then, MAD-VenLA will be coupled with the IPSL VGCM. The first results of the complete VGCM with microphysics coupled with chemistry will be presented.

  15. Tropospheric aerosol microphysics simulation with assimilated meteorology: model description and intermodel comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Trivitayanurak

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We implement the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS microphysics module into GEOS-CHEM, a CTM driven by assimilated meteorology. TOMAS has 30 size sections covering 0.01–10 μm diameter with conservation equations for both aerosol mass and number. The implementation enables GEOS-CHEM to simulate aerosol microphysics, size distributions, mass and number concentrations. The model system is developed for sulfate and sea-salt aerosols, a year-long simulation has been performed, and results are compared to observations. Additionally model intercomparison was carried out involving global models with sectional microphysics: GISS GCM-II' and GLOMAP. Comparison with marine boundary layer observations of CN and CCN(0.2% shows that all models perform well with average errors of 30–50%. However, all models underpredict CN by up to 42% between 15° S and 45° S while overpredicting CN up to 52% between 45° N and 60° N, which could be due to the sea-salt emission parameterization and the assumed size distribution of primary sulfate emission, in each case respectively. Model intercomparison at the surface shows that GISS GCM-II' and GLOMAP, each compared against GEOS-CHEM, both predict 40% higher CN and predict 20% and 30% higher CCN(0.2% on average, respectively. Major discrepancies are due to different emission inventories and transport. Budget comparison shows GEOS-CHEM predicts the lowest global CCN(0.2% due to microphysical growth being a factor of 2 lower than other models because of lower SO2 availability. These findings stress the need for accurate meteorological inputs and updated emission inventories when evaluating global aerosol microphysics models.

  16. Performance of the Goddard multiscale modeling framework with Goddard ice microphysical schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Li, J.-L. F.; Mohr, Karen I.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2016-03-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount, total cloud fractions, net radiation, and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow and graupel. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with subgrid processes, cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs, and momentum transport remain and will require future improvement.

  17. The hydrometeor partitioning and microphysical processes over the Pacific Warm Pool in numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Chih; Wang, Pao K.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical modeling is conducted to study the hydrometeor partitioning and microphysical source and sink processes during a quasi-steady state of thunderstorms over the Pacific Warm Pool by utilizing the microphysical model WISCDYMM to simulate selected storm cases. The results show that liquid-phase hydrometeors dominate thunderstorm evolution over the Pacific Warm Pool. The ratio of ice-phase mass to liquid-phase mass is about 41%: 59%, indicating that ice-phase water is not as significant over the Pacific Warm Pool as the liquid water compared to the larger than 50% in the subtropics and 80% in the US High Plains in a previous study. Sensitivity tests support the dominance of liquid-phase hydrometeors over the Pacific Warm Pool. The major rain sources are the key hail sinks: melting of hail and shedding from hail; whereas the crucial rain sinks are evaporation and accretion by hail. The major snow sources are Bergeron-Findeisen process, transfer of cloud ice to snow and accretion of cloud water; whereas the foremost sink of snow is accretion by hail. The essential hail sources are accretions of rain, cloud water, and snow; whereas the critical hail sinks are melting of hail and shedding from hail. The contribution and ranking of sources and sinks of these precipitates are compared with the previous study. Hydrometeors have their own special microphysical processes in the development and depletion over the Pacific Warm Pool. Microphysical budgets depend on atmospheric dynamical and thermodynamical conditions which determine the partitioning of hydrometeors. This knowledge would benefit the microphysics parameterization in cloud models and cumulus parameterization in global circulation models.

  18. Evaluating the Performance of the Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling Framework with Different Cloud Microphysical Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, J.; Tao, W.; Lang, S. E.; Matsui, T.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate representation of clouds and cloud processes in atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) with relatively coarse resolution (~100 km) has been a long-standing challenge. With the rapid advancement in computational technology, new breed of GCMs that are capable of explicitly resolving clouds have been developed. Though still computationally very expensive, global cloud-resolving models (GCRMs) with horizontal resolutions of 3.5 to 14 km are already being run in an exploratory manner. Another less computationally demanding approach is the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) that replaces conventional cloud parameterizations with a cloud-resolving model (CRM) in each grid column of a GCM. The Goddard MMF is based on the coupling of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE), a CRM model, and the GEOS global model. In recent years a few new and improved microphysical schemes are developed and implemented to the GCE based on observations from field campaigns. It is important to evaluating these microphysical schemes for global applications such as the MMFs and GCRMs. Two-year (2007-2008) MMF sensitivity experiments have been carried out with different cloud microphysical schemes. The model simulated mean and variability of surface precipitation, cloud types, cloud properties such as cloud amount, hydrometeors vertical profiles, and cloud water contents, etc. in different geographic locations and climate regimes are evaluated against TRMM, CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations. The Goddard MMF has also been coupled with the Goddard Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU), a system with multi-satellite, multi-sensor, and multi-spectrum satellite simulators. The statistics of MMF simulated radiances and backscattering can be directly compared with satellite observations to evaluate the performance of different cloud microphysical schemes. We will assess the strengths and/or deficiencies in of these microphysics schemes and provide guidance on how to improve

  19. Performance of the Goddard Multiscale Modeling Framework with Goddard Ice Microphysical Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Jiun-Dar; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen E.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Li, J.-L.; Mohr, Karen I.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail M.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2016-01-01

    The multiscale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces traditional cloud parameterizations with cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within a host atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), has become a new approach for climate modeling. The embedded CRMs make it possible to apply CRM-based cloud microphysics directly within a GCM. However, most such schemes have never been tested in a global environment for long-term climate simulation. The benefits of using an MMF to evaluate rigorously and improve microphysics schemes are here demonstrated. Four one-moment microphysical schemes are implemented into the Goddard MMF and their results validated against three CloudSat/CALIPSO cloud ice products and other satellite data. The new four-class (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) ice scheme produces a better overall spatial distribution of cloud ice amount, total cloud fractions, net radiation, and total cloud radiative forcing than earlier three-class ice schemes, with biases within the observational uncertainties. Sensitivity experiments are conducted to examine the impact of recently upgraded microphysical processes on global hydrometeor distributions. Five processes dominate the global distributions of cloud ice and snow amount in long-term simulations: (1) allowing for ice supersaturation in the saturation adjustment, (2) three additional correction terms in the depositional growth of cloud ice to snow, (3) accounting for cloud ice fall speeds, (4) limiting cloud ice particle size, and (5) new size-mapping schemes for snow and graupel. Despite the cloud microphysics improvements, systematic errors associated with subgrid processes, cyclic lateral boundaries in the embedded CRMs, and momentum transport remain and will require future improvement.

  20. A double-moment multiple-phase four-class bulk ice scheme, Part 1: Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Brad Shoenberg

    1994-01-01

    A detailed ice-phase bulk microphysical scheme has been developed for simulating the hydrometeor distributions of convective and stratiform precipitation in different large-scale environmental conditions. The proposed scheme involves 90 distinct microphysical processes, which predict the mixing ratios and the number concentrations of small ice crystals, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail, as well as the mixing ratios of liquid water on wet precipitation ice (snow, graupel, frozen drops). The number of adjustable coefficients has been significantly reduced in comparison with other bulk schemes. Additional improvements have been made to the parameterization in the following areas: (1) representing small ice crystals with nonzero terminal fall velocities and dispersive size distributions, (2) accurate and computationally efficient calculations of precipitation collection processes, (3) reformulating the collection equation to prevent unrealistically large accretion rates, (4) more realistic conversion by riming between different classes of precipitation ice, (5) preventing unrealistically large rates of raindrop freezing and freezing of liquid water on ice, (6) detailed treatment of various rime-splintering ice multiplication mechanisms, (7) a simple representation of the Hobbs-Rangno ice enhancement process, (8) aggregation of small ice crystals and snow, and (9) allowing explicit competition between cloud water condensation and ice deposition rates rather than using saturation adjustment techniques. For the purposes of conserving the higher moments of the particle distributions, preserving the spectral widths (or slopes) of the particle spectra is shown to be more important than strict conservation of particle number concentration when parameterizing changes in ice-particle number concentrations due to melting, vapor transfer processes (sublimation of dry ice, evaporation from wet ice), and conversion between different hydrometeor species. The microphysical scheme

  1. Brane Couplings from Bulk Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Georgi, Howard; Grant, Aaron K.; Hailu, Girma

    2000-01-01

    We compute loop corrections to the effective action of a field theory on a five-dimensional $S_1/Z_2$ orbifold. We find that the quantum loop effects of interactions in the bulk produce infinite contributions that require renormalization by four-dimensional couplings on the orbifold fixed planes. Thus bulk couplings give rise to renormalization group running of brane couplings.

  2. Can bulk viscosity drive inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacher, T.; Stein-Schabes, J.A.; Turner, M.S.

    1987-09-15

    Contrary to other claims, we argue that bulk viscosity associated with the interactions of non- relativistic particles with relativistic particles around the time of the grand unified theory (GUT) phase transition cannot lead to inflation. Simply put, the key ingredient for inflation, negative pressure, cannot arise due to the bulk-viscosity effects of a weakly interacting mixture of relativistic and nonrelativistic particles.

  3. Factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate, and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashino, T.; Casella, D.; Mugnai, A.; Sano, P.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G.

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds. Tropical convective and stratiform clouds are important in radiative forcing of climates and distribution of precipitation over the ocean. The possible effects of climate change on these clouds are still not well understood. Recent studies show that the higher CCN concentration in a convective cloud can lead to more vigorous updrafts and a higher evaporation/precipitation ratio. The stronger updraft often means stronger downdraft and gust fronts, which can trigger convection nearby. This implies that increases in CCN concentration can result in an increase in area coverage and persistence of tropical cirrus and stratiform clouds. The increased cloudiness would then be expected to lower sensible and latent heat flux from the ocean by lowering sea surface temperature, affecting the future development of convective clouds. The sea surface temperature may also change in a local area due to change of ocean circulation in climate change scenarios. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful tool to study tropical and global precipitation distribution. Many physically-based passive-microwave (MW) satellite precipitation algorithms make use of cloud radiation databases (CRDs), which typically consist of microphysical profiles from cloud resolving model (CRMs) and simulated MW brightness temperature (Tb). Thus, it is important to validate Tb simulated by a CRM against the observed Tb. Also, it is important to study how any changes in the tropical clouds due to aerosols and sea surface temperature translate into the precipitation and brightness temperature. The case study chosen is KWAJEX campaign that took place from 23 July to 14 September 1999. Authors have developed microphysical physical framework (Advanced Microphysics Prediction System) to predict ice particle properties explicitly in a CRM (University of Wisconsin

  4. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M.; Neely, Ryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size‐resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1‐CARMA is approximately ∼2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three‐mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1‐MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven‐mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1‐MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial‐temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground‐based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ∼32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data. PMID:27668039

  5. Can bulk viscosity drive inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacher, T.; Stein-Schabes, J.A.; Turner, M.S.

    1987-04-01

    Contrary to other claims, we argue that, bulk viscosity associated with the interactions of nonrelativistic particles with relativistic particles around the time of the grand unified theory (GUT) phase transition cannot lead to inflation. Simply put, the key ingredient for inflation, negative pressure, cannot arise due to the bulk viscosity effects of a weakly-interacting mixture of relativistic and nonrelativistic particles. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Gradient Correlation Method for the Stabilization of Inversion Results of Aerosol Microphysical Properties Retrieved from Profiles of Optical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolgotin Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlation relationships between aerosol microphysical parameters and optical data are investigated. The results show that surface-area concentrations and extinction coefficients are linearly correlated with a correlation coefficient above 0.99 for arbitrary particle size distribution. The correlation relationships that we obtained can be used as constraints in our inversion of optical lidar data. Simulation studies demonstrate a significant stabilization of aerosol microphysical data products if we apply the gradient correlation method in our traditional regularization technique.

  7. Microphysical structure of simulated marine stratocumulus: Effects of physical and numerical approximations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, B.; Cotton, W.R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Feingold, G. [Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmospheric (CIRA), Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Over the past decade or so the evolution and equilibria of persistent decks of stratocumulus climatologically clinging to the edge of summertime subtropical highs have been an issue of increased scientific inquiry. The particular interest in the microphysical structure of these clouds stems from a variety of hypotheses which suggest that anthropogenic influences or biogenic feedbacks may alter the structure of these clouds in a climatically significant manner. Most of these hypotheses are quite tentative, based as they are on simple formulations of boundary layer structures and interactions between drops and aerosols. This work is concerned with an assessment of the microphysical structure of marine stratocumulus as simulated by an LES-EM model.

  8. The Microbase Value-Added Product: A Baseline Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, M; Johnson, K; Jensen, M

    2011-05-31

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility baseline cloud microphysical properties (MICROBASE) value-added product (VAP). MICROBASE uses a combination of millimeter-wavelength cloud radar, microwave radiometer, and radiosonde observations to estimate the vertical profiles of the primary microphysical parameters of clouds including the liquid/ice water content and liquid/ice cloud particle effective radius. MICROBASE is a baseline algorithm designed to apply to most conditions and locations using a single set of parameterizations and a simple determination of water phase based on temperature. This document provides the user of this product with guidelines to assist in determining the accuracy of the product under certain conditions. Quality control flags are designed to identify outliers and indicate instances where the retrieval assumptions may not be met. The overall methodology is described in this report through a detailed description of the input variables, algorithms, and output products.

  9. Microphysical characterization of winter cloud systems during a research flight campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Sergio; Sánchez, José Luis; Valero, Francisco; Gascón, Estíbaliz; Merino, Andrés; Hermida, Lucía; López, Laura; Marcos, José Luis; García-Ortega, Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The lack of accuracy in the knowledge of cloud microphysics leads to aviation risks, which have caused numerous crashes, mainly owing to aircraft icing (e.g., an EMB-120 crashed in Detroit, Michigan in 1997, and an ATR-72 crashed near Roselawn, Indiana in 1994). Further, this lack is a source of uncertainty in numerical weather forecasting models, since commonly used parameterizations often overestimate ice water content and underestimate supercooled liquid water. This makes the collection of data on cloud microphysical characteristics very useful toward improving the forecasting of icing conditions. Ten research flights were conducted during the winters of 2011/12 and 2012/13. Their goal was to determine dominant microphysical conditions of winter cloud systems traversing the Guadarrama Mountains in the central Iberian Peninsula. The aircraft was a C-212-200, equipped with a Cloud, Aerosol, and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS) under the left wing. Data of temperature and Liquid Water Content (LWC), registered by the CAPS probe, were used in the study. Furthermore, we thoroughly analyzed images taken by a Cloud Imaging Probe Grayscale (CIP-GS), capable of measuring hydrometeors between 25 and 1,550 µm in size, and representing them in a 2D image. The various types of hydrometeors observed during these flights are described, along with microphysical processes inferred from the CIP-GS images. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS S. Fernández-González acknowledges grant support from the FPU program (AP 2010-2093). This study was also supported by grants from GRANIMETRO (CGL2010-15930) and MICROMETEO (IPT-310000-2010-22). The authors thank INTA for the research flights.

  10. Intercomparison of microphysical datasets collected from CAIPEEX observations and WRF simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, S.; Goswami, B.; Kulkarni, J.

    2009-12-01

    In the first phase of ongoing Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) program of Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), intensive cloud microphysical datasets are collected over India during the May through September, 2009. This study is designed to evaluate the forecast skills of existing cloud microphysical parameterization schemes (i.e. single moment/double moments) within the WRF-ARW model (Version 3.1.1) during different intensive observation periods (IOP) over the targeted regions spreading all across India. Basic meteorological and cloud microphysical parameters obtained from the model simulations are validated against the observed data set collected during CAIPEEX program. For this study, we have considered three IOP phases (i.e. May 23-27, June 11-15, July 3-7) carried out over northern, central and western India respectively. This study emphasizes the thrust to understand the mechanism of evolution, intensification and distribution of simulated precipitation forecast upto day four (i.e. 96 hour forecast). Efforts have also been made to carryout few important microphysics sensitivity experiments within the explicit schemes to investigate their respective impact on the formation and distribution of vital cloud parameters (e.g. cloud liquid water, frozen hydrometeors) and model rainfall forecast over the IOP regions. The characteristic features of liquid and frozen hydrometers in the pre-monsoon and monsoon regimes are examined from model forecast as well as from CAIPEEX observation data set for different IOPs. The model is integrated in a triply nested fashion with an innermost nest explicitly resolved at a horizontal resolution of 4km.In this presentation preliminary results from aforementioned research initiatives will be introduced.

  11. Insights on TTL Dehydration Mechanisms from Microphysical Modelling of Aircraft Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, R.; Pfister, L.; Jensen, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL), a transition layer between the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the tropics, serves as the entryway of various trace gases into the stratosphere. Of particular interest is the transport of water vapor through the TTL, as WV is an important greenhouse gas and also plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry by affecting polar stratospheric cloud formation and the ozone budget. While the dominant control of stratospheric water vapor by tropical cold point temperatures via the "freeze-drying" process is generally well understood, the details of the TTL dehydration mechanisms, including the relative roles of deep convection, atmospheric waves and cloud microphysical processes, remain an active area of research. The dynamical and microphysical processes that influence TTL water vapor concentrations are investigated in simulations of cloud formation and dehydration along air parcel trajectories. We first confirm the validity of our Lagrangian models in a case study involving measurements from the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) flights over the central and eastern tropical Pacific in Oct-Nov 2011 and Jan-Feb 2013. ERA-Interim winds and seasonal mean heating rates from Yang et al. (2010) are used to advance parcels back in time from the flight tracks, and time-varying vertical profiles of water vapor along the diabatic trajectories are calculated in a one-dimensional cloud model as in Jensen and Pfister (2004) but with more reliable temperature field, wave and convection schemes. The simulated water vapor profiles demonstrate a significant improvement over estimates based on the Lagrangian Dry Point, agreeing well with aircraft observations when the effects of cloud microphysics, subgrid-scale gravity waves and convection are included. Following this approach, we examine the dynamical and microphysical control of TTL water vapor in the 30ºS-30ºN latitudinal belt and elucidate the dominant processes

  12. How do changes in warm-phase microphysics affect deep convective clouds?

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qian; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital

    2016-01-01

    Understanding aerosol effects on deep convective clouds and the derived effects on the radiation budget and rain patterns can largely contribute to estimations of climate uncertainties. The challenge is difficult in part because key microphysical processes in the mixed and cold phases are still not well understood. For deep convective clouds with a warm base, understanding aerosol effects on the warm processes is extremely important as they set the initial and boundary conditions for the cold...

  13. Micro-physics of aircraft-generated aerosols and their potential impact on heterogeneous plume chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Luo, B.P. [Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung

    1997-12-31

    Answers are attempted to give to open questions concerning physico-chemical processes in near-field aircraft plumes, with emphasis on their potential impact on subsequent heterogeneous chemistry. Research issues concerning the nucleation of aerosols and their interactions among themselves and with exhaust gases are summarized. Microphysical properties of contrail ice particles, formation of liquid ternary mixtures, and nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in contrails are examined and possible implications for heterogeneous plume chemistry are discussed. (author) 19 refs.

  14. MATRIX-VBS: implementing an evolving organic aerosol volatility in an aerosol microphysics model

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2016-01-01

    We have implemented an existing aerosol microphysics scheme into a box model framework and extended it to represent gas-particle partitioning and chemical ageing of semi-volatile organic aerosols. We then applied this new research tool to investigate the effects of semi-volatile organic species on the growth, composition and mixing state of aerosol particles in case studies representing several different environments. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol mi...

  15. Investigation of Microphysical Parameters within Winter and Summer Type Precipitation Events over Mountainous [Complex] Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalker, James R.; Bossert, James E.

    1997-12-31

    In this study we investigate complex terrain effects on precipitation with RAMS for both in winter and summer cases from a microphysical perspective. We consider a two dimensional east-west topographic cross section in New Mexico representative of the Jemez mountains on the west and the Sangre de Cristo mountains on the east. Located between these two ranges is the Rio Grande Valley. In these two dimensional experiments, variations in DSDs are considered to simulate total precipitation that closely duplicate observed precipitation.

  16. MODIS Cloud Microphysics Product (MOD_PR06OD) Data Collection 6 Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Gala; Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The MODIS Cloud Optical and Microphysical Product (MOD_PR060D) for Data Collection 6 has entered full scale production. Aqua reprocessing is almost completed and Terra reprocessing will begin shortly. Unlike previous collections, the CHIMAERA code base allows for simultaneous processing for multiple sensors and the operational CHIMAERA 6.0.76 stream is also available for VIIRS and SEVIRI sensors and for our E-MAS airborne platform.

  17. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Characteristics of Rifts and Gradients in Maritime Stratocumulus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Tarah M.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Minnis, Patrick; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Van Reken, Timothy; Seinfeld, John; Flagan, Rick

    2008-01-01

    A cloud rift is characterized as a large-scale, persistent area of broken, low reflectivity stratocumulus clouds usually surrounded by a solid deck of stratocumulus. A rift observed off the coast of Monterey Bay, California on 16 July 1999 was studied to compare the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in the rift with those of the surrounding solid stratus deck. Variables measured from an instrumented aircraft included temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid water. These measurements characterized the thermodynamic properties of the solid deck and rift areas. Microphysical measurements made included aerosol, cloud drop and drizzle drop concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The microphysical characteristics in a solid stratus deck differ substantially from those of a broken, cellular rift where cloud droplet concentrations are a factor of 2 lower than those in the solid cloud. Further, CCN concentrations were found to be about 3 times greater in the solid cloud area compared with those in the rift and aerosol concentrations showed a similar difference as well. Although drizzle was observed near cloud top in parts of the solid stratus cloud, the largest drizzle rates were associated with the broken clouds within the rift area. In addition to marked differences in particle concentrations, evidence of a mesoscale circulation near the solid cloud rift boundary is presented. This mesoscale circulation provides a mechanism for maintaining a rift, but further study is required to understand the initiation of a rift and the conditions that may cause it to fill.

  18. The retrieval of cloud microphysical properties using satellite measurements and an in situ database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Poix

    Full Text Available By combining AVHRR data from the NOAA satellites with information from a database of in situ measurements, large-scale maps can be generated of the microphysical parameters most immediately significant for the modelling of global circulation and climate. From the satellite data, the clouds can be classified into cumuliform, stratiform and cirrus classes and then into further sub-classes by cloud top temperature. At the same time a database of in situ measurements made by research aircraft is classified into the same sub-classes and a statistical analysis is used to derive relationships between the sub-classes and the cloud microphysical properties. These two analyses are then linked to give estimates of the microphysical properties of the satellite observed clouds. Examples are given of the application of this technique to derive maps of the probability of occurrence of precipitating clouds and of precipitating water content derived from a case study within the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE held in 1989 over the North Sea.

  19. Retrieve Optically Thick Ice Cloud Microphysical Properties by Using Airborne Dual-Wavelength Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm to retrieve optically thick ice cloud microphysical property profiles is developed by using the GSFC 9.6 GHz ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) and the 94 GHz Cloud Radar System (CRS) measurements aboard the high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. In situ size distribution and total water content data from the CRYSTAL-FACE field campaign are used for the algorithm development. To reduce uncertainty in calculated radar reflectivity factors (Ze) at these wavelengths, coincident radar measurements and size distribution data are used to guide the selection of mass-length relationships and to deal with the density and non-spherical effects of ice crystals on the Ze calculations. The algorithm is able to retrieve microphysical property profiles of optically thick ice clouds, such as, deep convective and anvil clouds, which are very challenging for single frequency radar and lidar. Examples of retrieved microphysical properties for a deep convective clouds are presented, which show that EDOP and CRS measurements provide rich information to study cloud structure and evolution. Good agreement between IWPs derived from an independent submillimeter-wave radiometer, CoSSIR, and dual-wavelength radar measurements indicates accuracy of the IWC retrieved from the two-frequency radar algorithm.

  20. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol's thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ~27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3-5 W m(-2)) and a surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m(-2)). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments.

  1. Sensitivity Study of Cloud Cover and Ozone Modeling to Microphysics Parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wałaszek, Kinga; Kryza, Maciej; Szymanowski, Mariusz; Werner, Małgorzata; Ojrzyńska, Hanna

    2017-02-01

    Cloud cover is a significant meteorological parameter influencing the amount of solar radiation reaching the ground surface, and therefore affecting the formation of photochemical pollutants, most of all tropospheric ozone (O3). Because cloud amount and type in meteorological models are resolved by microphysics schemes, adjusting this parameterization is a major factor determining the accuracy of the results. However, verification of cloud cover simulations based on surface data is difficult and yields significant errors. Current meteorological satellite programs provide many high-resolution cloud products, which can be used to verify numerical models. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) has been applied for the area of Poland for an episode of June 17th-July 4th, 2008, when high ground-level ozone concentrations were observed. Four simulations were performed, each with a different microphysics parameterization: Purdue Lin, Eta Ferrier, WRF Single-Moment 6-class, and Morrison Double-Moment scheme. The results were then evaluated based on cloud mask satellite images derived from SEVIRI data. Meteorological variables and O3 concentrations were also evaluated. The results show that the simulation using Morrison Double-Moment microphysics provides the most and Purdue Lin the least accurate information on cloud cover and surface meteorological variables for the selected high ozone episode. Those two configurations were used for WRF-Chem runs, which showed significantly higher O3 concentrations and better model-measurements agreement of the latter.

  2. Aerosol optical and microphysical retrievals from a hybrid multiwavelength lidar dataset – DISCOVER-AQ 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sawamura

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties (e.g. effective radius, volume and surface-area concentrations and aerosol optical properties (e.g. complex index of refraction and single scattering albedo were obtained from a hybrid multiwavelength lidar dataset for the first time. In July of 2011, in the Baltimore-Washington DC region, synergistic profiling of optical and microphysical properties of aerosols with both airborne in-situ and ground-based remote sensing systems was performed during the first deployment of DISCOVER-AQ. The hybrid multiwavelength lidar dataset combines elastic ground-based measurements at 355 nm with airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL measurements at 532 nm and elastic measurements at 1064 nm that were obtained less than 5 km apart of each other. This was the first study in which optical and microphysical retrievals from lidar were obtained during the day and directly compared to AERONET and in-situ measurements for 11 cases. Good agreement was observed between lidar and AERONET retrievals. Larger discrepancies were observed between lidar retrievals and in-situ measurements obtained by the aircraft and aerosol hygroscopic effects are believed to be the main factor of such discrepancies.

  3. Microphysical processes observed by X band polarimetric radars during the evolution of storm systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Troemel, Silke; Simmer, Clemens

    2014-05-01

    Polarimetric radars are now widely used for characterizing storm systems since they offer significant information for the improvement for atmospheric models and numerical weather prediction. Their observations allow a detailed insight into macro- and micro-physical processes during the spatial and temporal evolution of storm systems. In the frame of the initiative for High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2), which focuses on improving the accuracy of climate models in relation to cloud and precipitation processes, the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) was designed to provide a critical model evaluation at scales covered by Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, which in turn will be used to better understand sub-grid variability and microphysical properties and processes parameterized by larger scale models. Three X-band polarimetric radars deployed in Bonn (BoXPol) and in the vicinity of Juelich (JuXPol and KiXPol), Germany, were operated together with other instruments during the HOPE campaign, in order to obtain a holistic view of precipitation systems covering both macro- and microscopic processes. Given the variability of polarimetric moments observed by polarimetric radars, the corresponding microphysical processes occurring during the development of storm cells thus can be inferred accordingly. This study focuses on the microscopic processes of storm systems which were observed by RHI (range-height indicator) scans of the three X band radars. The two frequently observed microphysical processes during the HOPE campaign, coalescence and differential sedimentation, will be shown, and the evolution of droplet size distributions (DSDs) will be also analyzed. The associated DSDs which are retrieved using radar measured polarimetric moments are further verified by the polarimetric forward operator where the assumptions of non-spherical hydrometeors have been embedded. The results indicate that the estimated

  4. Multi-year analysis of ice microphysics derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Hagihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted multi-year analys of ice microphysics using CloudSat and CALIPSO data. Inter-annual variability, land-ocean differences and seasonal changes of ice microphysical properties were reported for the observation periods from 2006 to 2009. CALIPSO changed the laser tilt angle from 0.3 degrees to 3 degrees off nadir direction on November 2007 and the zonal mean properties of backscattering coefficient and depolarization ratio were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, for low altitude after November 2007. This could be explained by the different backscattering behavior of horizontally oriented ice crystals for the different laser tilt angles. On the other hand, inter-annual variability of zonal mean properties of reflectivity factor observed by CloudSat showed the very similar characteristics during the four years. In addition, the lidar observables were similar when the monthly mean properties were compared for different years before November 2007 and also the same was true for the comparisons after November 2007. These analyses of observables suggested that the inter-annual variability of zonal mean properties of ice microphysics could be considered to be similar. Application of the radar-lidar algorithm showed that the change of the laser tilt angle introduced the large gap between the ice microphysical properties before and after November 2007, if the proper treatment of the oriented ice crystals were not conducted in the retrievals. Global analysis of cloud particle types showed that the frequent occurrence of oriented ice crystals were identified in the temperature range between -10 to -20 degrees C. It is also noted that the significant overestimation of ice water content and significant underestimation of ice effective radius were found if the scattering properties of the horizontally oriented ice particles were not considered. Therefore it is highly demanded that the realistic ice orientation model is implemented in the look up tables

  5. Looking for a bulk point

    CERN Document Server

    Maldacena, Juan; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We consider Lorentzian correlators of local operators. In perturbation theory, singularities occur when we can draw a position-space Landau diagram with null lines. In theories with gravity duals, we can also draw Landau diagrams in the bulk. We argue that certain singularities can arise only from bulk diagrams, not from boundary diagrams. As has been previously observed, these singularities are a clear diagnostic of bulk locality. We analyze some properties of these perturbative singularities and discuss their relation to the OPE and the dimensions of double-trace operators. In the exact nonperturbative theory, we expect no singularity at these locations. We prove this statement in 1+1 dimensions by CFT methods.

  6. Bulk nano-crystalline alloys

    OpenAIRE

    T.-S. Chin; Lin, C. Y.; Lee, M.C.; R.T. Huang; S. M. Huang

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Fe–B–Y–Nb–Cu, 2 mm in diameter, were successfully annealed to become bulk nano-crystalline alloys (BNCAs) with α-Fe crystallite 11–13 nm in size. A ‘crystallization-and-stop’ model was proposed to explain this behavior. Following this model, alloy-design criteria were elucidated and confirmed successful on another Fe-based BMG Fe–B–Si–Nb–Cu, 1 mm in diameter, with crystallite sizes 10–40 nm. It was concluded that BNCAs can be designed in general by the proposed cr...

  7. Tree-based genetic programming approach to infer microphysical parameters of the DSDs from the polarization diversity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tanvir; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; Han, Dawei

    2012-11-01

    The use of polarization diversity measurements to infer the microphysical parametrization has remained an active goal in the radar remote sensing community. In view of this, the tree-based genetic programming (GP) as a novel approach has been presented for retrieving the governing microphysical parameters of a normalized gamma drop size distribution model D0 (median drop diameter), Nw (concentration parameter), and μ (shape parameter) from the polarization diversity measurements. A large number of raindrop spectra acquired from a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer has been utilized to develop the GP models, relating the microphysical parameters to the T-matrix scattering simulated polarization measurements. Several functional formulations retrieving the microphysical parameters-D0 [f(ZDR), f(ZH, ZDR)], log10Nw [f(ZH, D0), f(ZH, ZDR, D0), and μ[f(ZDR, D0), f(ZH, ZDR, D0)], where ZH represents reflectivity and ZDR represents differential reflectivity, have been investigated, and applied to a S-band polarimetric radar (CAMRA) for evaluation. It has been shown that the GP model retrieved microphysical parameters from the polarization measurements are in a reasonable agreement with disdrometer observations. The calculated root mean squared errors (RMSE) are noted as 0.23-0.25 mm for D0, 0.74-0.85 for log10Nw (Nw in mm-1 mm-3), and 3.30-3.36 for μ. The GP model based microphysical retrieval procedure is further compared with a physically based constrained gamma model for D0 and log10Nw estimates. The close agreement of the retrieval results between the GP and the constrained gamma models supports the suitability of the proposed genetic programming approach to infer microphysical parameterization.

  8. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise...

  9. Bulk viscosity and deflationary universes

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S; Waga, I

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the conditions that make possible the description of entropy generation in the new inflationary model by means of a nearequilibrium process. We show that there are situations in which the bulk viscosity cannot describe particle production during the coherent field oscillations phase.

  10. The Universe With Bulk Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Exact solutions for a model with variable G, A and bulk viscosity areobtained. Inflationary solutions with constant (de Sitter-type) and variable energydensity are found. An expanding anisotropic universe is found to isotropize duringits expansion but a static universe cannot isotropize. The gravitational constant isfound to increase with time and the cosmological constant decreases with time asAo∝t-2.

  11. Effect of microphysics scheme in cloud resolving models in passive microwave remote sensing of precipitation over ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hye; Shin, Dong-Bin; Kummerow, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Physically-based rainfall retrievals from passive microwave sensors often make use of cloud resolving models (CRMs) to build a-priori databases of potential rain structures. Each CRM, however, has its own assumptions on the cloud microphysics. Hence, approximated microphysics may cause uncertainties in the a-priori information resulting in inaccurate rainfall estimates. This study first builds a-priori databases by combining the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) observations and simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with six different cloud microphysics schemes. The microphysics schemes include the Purdue Lin (LIN), WRF-Single-Moment 6 (WSM6), Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE), Thompson (THOM), WRF-Double-Moment 6 (WDM6), and Morrison (MORR) schemes. As expected, the characteristics of the a-priori databases are inherited from the individual cloud microphysics schemes. There are several distinct differences in the databases. Particularly, excessive graupel and snow exist with the LIN and THOM schemes, while more rainwater is incorporated into the a-priori information with WDM6 than with any of the other schemes. Major results show that convective rainfall regions are not well captured by the LIN and THOM schemes-based retrievals with correlations of 0.56 and 0.73. Rainfall distributions and their quantities retrieved from the WSM6 and WDM6 schemes-based estimations, however, show relatively better agreement with the PR observations with correlations of 0.79 and 0.81, respectively. Based on the comparisons of the various microphysics schemes in the retrievals, it appears that differences in the a-priori databases considerably affect the properties of rainfall estimations. This study also includes the discrepancy of estimated rain rate from passive radiometer and active radar for two rainfall systems of different cloud microphysics near the Yellow Sea. The first case have high cloud top (HCT) with large ice

  12. An Automated System for Measuring Microphysical and Radiative Cloud Characteristics from a Tethered Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Paul Lawson

    2004-03-15

    OAK-B135 The rate of climate change in polar regions is now felt to be a harbinger of possible global warming. Long-lived, relatively thin stratus clouds play a predominant role in transmitting solar radiation and trapping long wave radiation emitted from open water and melt ponds. In situ measurements of microphysical and radiative properties of Arctic and Antarctic stratus clouds are needed to validate retrievals from remote measurements and simulations using numerical models. While research aircraft can collect comprehensive microphysical and radiative data in clouds, the duration of these aircraft is relatively short (up to about 12 hours). During the course of the Phase II research, a tethered balloon system was developed that supports miniaturized meteorological, microphysical and radiation sensors that can collect data in stratus clouds for days at a time. The tethered balloon system uses a 43 cubic meter balloon to loft a 17 kg sensor package to altitudes u p to 2 km. Power is supplied to the instrument package via two copper conductors in the custom tether. Meteorological, microphysical and radiation data are recorded by the sensor package. Meteorological measurements include pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Radiation measurements are made using a 4-pi radiometer that measures actinic flux at 500 and 800 nm. Position is recorded using a GPS receiver. Microphysical data are obtained using a miniaturized version of an airborne cloud particle imager (CPI). The miniaturized CPI measures the size distribution of water drops and ice crystals from 9 microns to 1.4 mm. Data are recorded onboard the sensor package and also telemetered via a 802.11b wireless communications link. Command signals can also be sent to the computer in the sensor package via the wireless link. In the event of a broken tether, a GMRS radio link to the balloon package is used to heat a wire that burns 15 cm opening in the top of the balloon. The balloon and

  13. Impact of large-scale dynamics on the microphysical properties of midlatitude cirrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhlbauer, Andreas; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Diskin, G. S.; Evans, Stuart; Lawson, Paul; Marchand, Roger

    2014-04-16

    In situ microphysical observations 3 of mid-latitude cirrus collected during the Department of Energy Small Particles in Cirrus (SPAR-TICUS) field campaign are combined with an atmospheric state classification for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site to understand statistical relationships between cirrus microphysics and the large-scale meteorology. The atmospheric state classification is informed about the large-scale meteorology and state of cloudiness at the ARM SGP site by combining ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis data with 14 years of continuous observations from the millimeter-wavelength cloud radar. Almost half of the cirrus cloud occurrences in the vicinity of the ARM SGP site during SPARTICUS can be explained by three distinct synoptic condi- tions, namely upper-level ridges, mid-latitude cyclones with frontal systems and subtropical flows. Probability density functions (PDFs) of cirrus micro- physical properties such as particle size distributions (PSDs), ice number con- centrations and ice water content (IWC) are examined and exhibit striking differences among the different synoptic regimes. Generally, narrower PSDs with lower IWC but higher ice number concentrations are found in cirrus sam- pled in upper-level ridges whereas cirrus sampled in subtropical flows, fronts and aged anvils show broader PSDs with considerably lower ice number con- centrations but higher IWC. Despite striking contrasts in the cirrus micro- physics for different large-scale environments, the PDFs of vertical velocity are not different, suggesting that vertical velocity PDFs are a poor predic-tor for explaining the microphysical variability in cirrus. Instead, cirrus mi- crophysical contrasts may be driven by differences in ice supersaturations or aerosols.

  14. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters from INSAT-3D: a feasibility study using radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinya, John; Bipasha, Paul S.

    2016-05-01

    Clouds strongly modulate the Earths energy balance and its atmosphere through their interaction with the solar and terrestrial radiation. They interact with radiation in various ways like scattering, emission and absorption. By observing these changes in radiation at different wavelength, cloud properties can be estimated. Cloud properties are of utmost importance in studying different weather and climate phenomena. At present, no satellite provides cloud microphysical parameters over the Indian region with high temporal resolution. INSAT-3D imager observations in 6 spectral channels from geostationary platform offer opportunity to study continuous cloud properties over Indian region. Visible (0.65 μm) and shortwave-infrared (1.67 μm) channel radiances can be used to retrieve cloud microphysical parameters such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and cloud effective radius (CER). In this paper, we have carried out a feasibility study with the objective of cloud microphysics retrieval. For this, an inter-comparison of 15 globally available radiative transfer models (RTM) were carried out with the aim of generating a Look-up- Table (LUT). SBDART model was chosen for the simulations. The sensitivity of each spectral channel to different cloud properties was investigated. The inputs to the RT model were configured over our study region (50°S - 50°N and 20°E - 130°E) and a large number of simulations were carried out using random input vectors to generate the LUT. The determination of cloud optical thickness and cloud effective radius from spectral reflectance measurements constitutes the inverse problem and is typically solved by comparing the measured reflectances with entries in LUT and searching for the combination of COT and CER that gives the best fit. The products are available on the website www.mosdac.gov.in

  15. Black carbon mixing state impacts on cloud microphysical properties: effects of aerosol plume and environmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Ping Pui; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2016-05-27

    Black carbon (BC) is usually mixed with other aerosol species within individual aerosol particles. This mixture, along with the particles' size and morphology, determines the particles' optical and cloud condensation nuclei properties, and hence black carbon's climate impacts. In this study the particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to quantify the importance of black carbon mixing state for predicting cloud microphysical quantities. Based on a set of about 100 cloud parcel simulations a process level analysis framework was developed to attribute the response in cloud microphysical properties to changes in the underlying aerosol population ("plume effect") and the cloud parcel cooling rate ("parcel effect"). It shows that the response of cloud droplet number concentration to changes in BC emissions depends on the BC mixing state. When the aerosol population contains mainly aged BC particles an increase in BC emission results in increasing cloud droplet number concentrations ("additive effect"). In contrast, when the aerosol population contains mainly fresh BC particles they act as sinks for condensable gaseous species, resulting in a decrease in cloud droplet number concentration as BC emissions are increased ("competition effect"). Additionally, we quantified the error in cloud microphysical quantities when neglecting the information on BC mixing state, which is often done in aerosol models. The errors ranged from -12% to +45% for the cloud droplet number fraction, from 0% to +1022% for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon (BC) mass fraction, from -12% to +4% for the effective radius, and from -30% to +60% for the relative dispersion.

  16. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Lightning Rate, Extent and NOX Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Lawrence; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Matthee, Retha; Bain, A. Lamont

    2014-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to quantify the relationship between storm physics, lightning characteristics and the production of nitrogen oxides via lightning (LNOx). The focus of this study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern LNOx production, such as flash rate, type and extent across Alabama during DC3. Prior studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate and type is correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume and graupel mass. More study is required to generalize these relationships in a wide variety of storm modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between storm physics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for LNOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection Network(TM) (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to multicell thunderstorms over Northern Alabama on two days during DC3 (21 May and 11 June 2012) in which aircraft observations of NOx are available for comparison. The LNOM lightning characteristics and LNOX production estimates are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar analyses applied to observations from a nearby radar network, including the UAH Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR). Given complex multicell evolution, particular attention is paid to storm morphology, cell

  17. The DYMECS project: The Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thorwald; Hogan, Robin; Hanley, Kirsty; Nicol, John; Plant, Robert; Lean, Humphrey; Clark, Peter; Halliwell, Carol

    2014-05-01

    A new frontier in weather forecasting is emerging by operational forecast models now being run at convection-permitting resolutions at many national weather services. However, this is not a panacea; significant systematic errors remain in the character of convective clouds and rainfall distributions. The DYMECS project (Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms) is taking a fundamentally new approach to evaluate and improve such models: rather than relying on a limited number of cases, which may not be representative, we have gathered a large database of 3D storm structures on 40 convective days using an automated storm-tracking and scan-scheduling algorithm for the high resolution Chilbolton radar in southern England. These structures have been related to storm life-cycles derived by tracking features in the rainfall from the UK radar network, and compared statistically to simulated reflectivity fields from multiple versions of the Met Office model, varying horizontal grid length between 1.5 km and 100 m, and changing the sub-grid mixing and microphysics schemes. We also evaluated the scale and intensity of convective updrafts using a new radar technique. We find that the horizontal size of simulated convective clouds and the updrafts within them decreases with decreasing grid lengths down to 200 m, below which no further decrease is found. Comparison with observations reveals that at these resolutions, updrafts are about the right size (around 2 km across), but the clouds are typically too narrow and rain too intense (in both cases by around a factor of two), while progressing through their lifecycle too slowly. The scale error may be remedied by artificially increasing mixing length, but the microphysics scheme has little effect on either scale or intensity.

  18. Synergetic radar and lidar algorithm for the retrieval of radiative and microphysical properties in ice clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinel, Claire; Testud, Jacques; Protat, Alain; Pelon, Jacques R.

    2003-04-01

    To appreciate the radiative impact of clouds in the dynamics of the global atmosphere, it is important to deploy from space, from aircraft, or from ground, instruments able to describe the cloud layering and to document the cloud characteristics (namely liquid and/or ice water content, and the effective particle radius). In the framework of EarthCARE (ESA), that plans to associate a cloud radar and a lidar on the same spatial platform, RALI (RAdar-LIdar) airborne system is an interesting demonstrator. RALI combines the 95 GHz radar of the CETP and the 0.5 μm wavelength backscattering lidar of the SA. In order to derive the radiative and microphysical properties of clouds, a synergetic algorithm has been developed. It combines the apparent backscatter coefficient, βa, from the lidar and the apparent reflectivity, Za, from the radar to infer properties of the particle size distribution. The principle of this algorithm is to apply in parallel the Hitschfeld-Bordan algorithm to the radar and the Klett algorithm to the lidar. Taken separately, these two algorithms are unstable, but by considering a mutual constraint, it is shown that a stable solution can be established. This solution formulates the retrieval of the true reflectivity and backscattering coefficient, to access microphysical and radiative parameters of clouds. This algorithm allows also to retrieve the variable N0* parameter, which is a normalization parameter of the particle size distribution. This synergetic algorithm has been tested with simulated cases, and results of the algorithm applied on real data are validated by microphysical in-situ measurements.

  19. Torrential Rainfall Responses to Ice Microphysical Processes during Pre-Summer Heavy Rainfall over Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Xinyong; LIU Jia; Xiaofan LI

    2012-01-01

    In this study,the effects of key ice microphysical processes on the pre-summer heavy rainfall over southern China during 3-8 June 2008 were investigated.A series of two-dimensional sensitivity cloud-resolving model simulations were forced with zonally uniform vertical velocity,zonal wind,horizontal temperature,and water vapor advection data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS).The effects of key ice microphysical processes on the responses of rainfall to large-scale forcing were analyzed by comparing two sensitivity experiments with a control experiment.In one sensitivity experiment,ice crystal radius,associated with depositional growth of snow from cloud ice,was reduced from 100 μm in the control experiment to 50 μm,and in the other sensitivity experiment the efficiency of the growth of graupel from the accretion of snow was reduced to 50% from 100% in the control experiment.The results show that the domain-mean rainfall responses to these ice microphysical processes are stronger during the decay phase than during the onset and mature phases.During the decay phase,the increased mean rain rate resulting from the decrease in ice crystal radius is associated with the enhanced mean local atmospheric drying,the increased mean local hydrometeor loss,and the suppressed mean water vapor divergence.The increased mean rain rate caused by the reduction in accretion efficiency is related to the reduced mean water vapor divergence and the enhanced mean local hydrometeor loss.

  20. Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Koch

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on liquid clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon, including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is −0.11 Wm−2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five of the models <±0.06 Wm−2 from clouds. The results are subject to the caveats that variability among models, and regional and interrannual variability for each model, are large. This comparison together with previously published results stresses the need to further constrain aerosol microphysical schemes. The non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experiments to likely impacts of realistic potential emission changes.

  1. A Simulation Study on the Characteristics of Cloud Microphysics of Heavy Rainfall in the Meiyu Front

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Yongmao; WANG Hanjie; ZHONG Zhong; SONG Shuai

    2009-01-01

    A heavy rainfall in the Meiyu front during 4-5 July 2003 is simulated by use of the non-hydrostatic mesoscale model MM5 (V3-6) with different explicit cloud mierophysical parameterization schemes. The characteristics of microphysical process of convective cloud are studied by the model outputs. The simulation study reveals that: (1) The mesoscale model MM5 with explicit cloud microphysical process is capable of simulating the instant heavy rainfall in the Meiyu front, the rainfall simulation could be improved signifi-cantly as the model resolution is increased, and the Goddard scheme is better than the Reisner or Schultz scheme. (2) The convective cloud in the Meiyu front has a comprehensive structure composed of solid, liquid and vapor phases of water, the mass density of water vapor is the largest one in the cloud; the next one is graupel, while those of ice, snow, rain water and the cloud water are almost same. The height at which mass density peaks for different hydrometeors is almost unchangeable during the heavy rainfall period. The mass density variation of rain water, ice, and graupel are consistent with that of ground precipitation, while that of water vapor in the low levels is 1-2 h earlier than the precipitation. (3) The main contribution to the water vapor budget in the atmosphere is the convergence of vapor flux through advection and convection, which provides the main vapor source of the rainfall. Besides the basic process of the auto-conversion of cloud water to rain water, there is an additional cloud microphysical process that is essential to the formation of instant heavy rainfall, the ice-phase crystals are transformed into graupels first and then the increased graupels mix with cloud water and accelerates the conversion of cloud water to rain water. The positive feedback mechanism between latent heat release and convection is the main cause to maintain and develop the heavy precipitation.

  2. Effect of cloud microphysics on particle growth under mixed phase conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfitzenmaier, Lukas; Dufournet, Yann; Unal, Christine; Russchenberg, Herman; Myagkov, Alexander; Seifert, Patric

    2015-04-01

    Mixed phase clouds contain both ice particles and super-cooled cloud water droplets in the same volume of air. Currently, one of the main challenges is to observe and understand how ice particles grow by interacting with liquid water within the mixed-phase clouds. In the mid latitudes this process is one of the most efficient processes for precipitation formation. It is particularly important to understand under which conditions growth processes are most efficient within such clouds. The observation of microphysical cloud properties from the ground is one possible approach to study the liquid-ice interaction that play a role on the ice crystal growth processes. The study presented here is based on a ground-based multi-sensor technique. Dataset of this study was taken during the ACCEPT campaign (Analysis of the Composition of mixed-phase Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques) at Cabauw The Netherlands, autumn 2014. Measurements with the Transportable Atmospheric RAdar (TARA), S-band precipitation radar profiler, from the Delft Technical University, and Ka-band cloud radar systems were performed in cooperation with the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS), Leipzig, Germany. All the radar systems had full Doppler capabilities. In addition , TARA and one of the Ka-band radar systems had full polarimetric capabilities as well, in order to get information of the ice phase within mixed-phase cloud systems. Lidar, microwave radiometer and radiosonde measurements were combined to describe the liquid phase within such clouds. So a whole characterisation of microphysical processes within mixed-phase cloud systems could be done. This study shows how such a combination of instruments is used to: - Detect the liquid layer within the ice clouds - Describe the microphysical conditions for ice particle growth within mixed phase clouds based on cloud hydrometeor shape, size, number concentration obtained from measurements The project aims to observe

  3. Remote measurement of cloud microphysics and its influence in predicting high impact weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipasha, Paul S.; Jinya, John

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the cloud microphysical processes and precise retrieval of parameters governing the same are crucial for weather and climate prediction. Advanced remote sensing sensors and techniques offer an opportunity for monitoring micro-level developments in cloud structure. . Using the observations from a visible and near-infrared lidar onboard CALIPSO satellite (part of A-train) , the spatial variation of cloud structure has been studied over the Tropical monsoon region . It is found that there is large variability in the cloud microphysical parameters manifesting in distinct precipitation regimes. In particular, the severe storms over this region are driven by processes which range from the synoptic to the microphysical scale. Using INSAT-3D data, retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters like effective radius (CER) and optical depth (COD) were carried out for tropical cyclone Phailine. It was observed that there is a general increase of CER in a top-down direction, characterizing the progressively increasing number and size of precipitation hydrometeors while approaching the cloud base. The distribution of CER relative to cloud top temperature for growing convective clouds has been investigated to reveal the evolution of the particles composing the clouds. It is seen that the relatively high concentration of large particles in the downdraft zone is closely related to the precipitation efficiency of the system. Similar study was also carried using MODIS observations for cyclones over Indian Ocean (2010-2013), in which we find that that the mean effective radius is 24 microns with standard deviation 4.56, mean optical depth is 21 with standard deviation 13.98, mean cloud fraction is 0.92 with standard deviation 0.13 and mainly ice phase is dominant. Thus the remote observations of microstructure of convective storms provide very crucial information about the maintenance and potential devastation likely to be associated with it. With the synergistic

  4. Dynamical and Microphysical Retrieval from Simulated Doppler Radar Observations Using the 4DVAR Assimilation Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaoyong; LIU Liping; ZHENG Guoguang

    2005-01-01

    Based on a cloud model and the four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation method developed by Sun and Crook (1997), simulated experiments of dynamical and microphysical retrieval from Doppler radar data were performed. The 4DVAR data assimilation technique was applied to a cloud scale model with a warm rain parameterization scheme. The 3D wind, thermodynamical, and microphysical fields were determined by minimizing a cost function, defined by the difference between both radar observed radial velocities and reflectivities and their model predictions. The adjoint of the numerical model was used to provide the gradient of the cost function with respect to the control variables. Experiments have demonstrated that the 4DVAR assimilation method is able to retrieve the detailed structure of wind, thermodynamics, and microphysics by using either dual-Doppler or single-Doppler information. The quality of retrieval depends strongly on the magnitude of constraint with respect to the variables. Retrieving the temperature field,cloud water and water vapor is more difficult than the recovery of the wind field and rainwater. Accurate thermodynamic retrieval requires a longer assimilation period. The inclusion of a background term, even mean fields from a single sounding, helped reduce the retrieval errors. Less accurate velocity fields were obtained when single-Doppler data were used. It was found that the retrieved velocity is sensitive to the location of the retrieval domain relative to the radars while the other fields have very little changes. Two radar volumetric scans are generally adequate for providing the evolution, although the use of additional volumes improves the retrieval. As the amount of the observations decreases, the performance of the retrieval is degraded. However, the missing observations can be compensated by adding a background term to the cost function. The technique is robust to random errors in radial velocity and calibration errors in

  5. A tandem approach for collocated measurements of microphysical and radiative cirrus properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingebiel, Marcus; Ehrlich, André; Finger, Fanny; Röschenthaler, Timo; Jakirlić, Suad; Voigt, Matthias; Müller, Stefan; Maser, Rolf; Wendisch, Manfred; Hoor, Peter; Spichtinger, Peter; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Microphysical and radiation measurements were collected with the novel AIRcraft TOwed Sensor Shuttle (AIRTOSS) - Learjet tandem platform. The platform is a combination of an instrumented Learjet 35A research aircraft and an aerodynamic bird, which is detached from and retracted back to the aircraft during flight via a steel wire with a length of 4000 m. Both platforms are equipped with radiative, cloud microphysical, trace gas, and meteorological instruments. The purpose of the development of this tandem set-up is to study the inhomogeneity of cirrus as well as other stratiform clouds. Sophisticated numerical flow simulations were conducted in order to optimally integrate an axially asymmetric Cloud Combination Probe (CCP) inside AIRTOSS. The tandem platform was applied during measurements at altitudes up to 36 000 ft (10 970 m) in the framework of the AIRTOSS - Inhomogeneous Cirrus Experiment (AIRTOSS-ICE). Ten flights were performed above the North Sea and Baltic Sea to probe frontal and in situ formed cirrus, as well as anvil outflow cirrus. For one flight, cirrus microphysical and radiative properties displayed significant inhomogeneities resolved by both measurement platforms. The CCP data show that the maximum of the observed particle number size distributions shifts with decreasing altitude from 30 to 300 µm, which is typical for frontal, midlatitude cirrus. Theoretical considerations imply that cloud particle aggregation inside the studied cirrus is very unlikely. Consequently, diffusional growth was identified to be the dominant microphysical growth process. Measurements of solar downward and upward irradiances at 670 nm wavelength were conducted above, below, and in the cirrus on both the Learjet and AIRTOSS. The observed variability of the downward irradiance below the cirrus reflects the horizontal heterogeneity of the observed thin cirrus. Vertically resolved solar heating rates were derived by either using single-platform measurements at different

  6. Variation of microphysics in wind bubbles: an alternative mechanism for explaining the rebrightenings in Gamma-ray burst afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, S. W.; Wong, A. Y. L.; Huang, Y. F.; Cheng, K. S.

    2010-02-01

    Conventionally, long Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to be caused by the core collapses of massive stars. During the lifetime of a massive star, a stellar wind bubble environment should be produced. Furthermore, the microphysics shock parameters may vary along with the evolution of the fireball. Here, we investigate the variation of the microphysics shock parameters under the condition of wind bubble environment, and allow the microphysics shock parameters to be discontinuous at shocks in the ambient medium. It is found that our model can acceptably reproduce the rebrightenings observed in GRB afterglows, at least in some cases. The effects of various model parameters on rebrightenings are investigated. The rebrightenings observed in both the R-band and X-ray afterglow light curves of GRB 060206, GRB 070311 and GRB 071010A are reproduced in this model.

  7. Cosmic bulk viscosity through backreaction

    CERN Document Server

    Barbosa, Rodrigo M; Zimdahl, Winfried; Piattella, Oliver F

    2015-01-01

    We consider an effective viscous pressure as the result of a backreaction of inhomogeneities within Buchert's formalism. The use of an effective metric with a time-dependent curvature radius allows us to calculate the luminosity distance of the backreaction model. This quantity is different from its counterpart for a "conventional" spatially flat bulk viscous fluid universe. Both expressions are tested against the SNIa data of the Union2.1 sample with only marginally different results.

  8. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  9. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hamburger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm−3 stp. Nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  10. Simulation of hailstorm event using Mesoscale Model MM5 with modified cloud microphysics scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chatterjee

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale model MM5 (Version 3.5 with some modifications in the cloud microphysics scheme of Schultz (1995, has been used to simulate two hailstorm events over Gangetic Plain of West Bengal, India. While the first event occurred on 12 March 2003 and the hails covered four districts of the state of West Bengal, India, the second hailstorm event struck Srinikatan (22.65° N, 87.7° E on 10 April 2006 at 11:32 UT and it lasted for 2–3 min. Both these events can be simulated, if the same modifications are introduced in the cloud microphysics scheme of Schultz. However, the original scheme of Schultz cannot simulate any hail.

    The results of simulation were compared with the necessary products of Doppler Weather Radar (DWR located at Kolkata (22.57° N, 88.35° E. Model products like reflectivity, graupel and horizontal wind are compared with the corresponding products of DWR. The pattern of hail development bears good similarity between model output and observation from DWR, if necessary modifications are introduced in the model. The model output of 24 h accumulated rain from 03:00 UT to next day 03:00 UT has also been compared with the corresponding product of the satellite TRMM.

  11. Microphysical characteristics of convective clouds over ocean and land from aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmakumari, B.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Anand, Vrinda; Axisa, Duncan

    2017-10-01

    The Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement EXperiment (CAIPEEX) is a field campaign conducted in India with an instrumented research aircraft. On 29 October 2010, a cyclonic circulation over the Bay of Bengal persisted throughout the day. A special mission was conducted over the Bay of Bengal on this day with the objective of characterizing marine and continental clouds on the same day and finding contrasting/similar signatures of their microphysical properties. The research aircraft sampled growing convective clouds over the ocean and over land. High concentrations of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) were observed over land compared to ocean. Over ocean, higher liquid water content (LWC) and lower cloud droplet number concentrations (Nc) were observed, and droplets reached the threshold of precipitation initiation at lower cloud depths. Over land, clouds contained lower LWC and higher Nc, hence droplets did not reach the threshold of precipitation initiation at a warm temperature as in ocean clouds. Over the ocean larger droplets or drizzle were observed at lower cloud depth than over land. The maximum LWC was found to be very similar at higher altitudes. The convective clouds over land were modified by pollution aerosol with contrasting microphysical properties to those over the ocean.

  12. Arrange and Average Algorithm for Microphysical Retrievals with A "3β+3α" Lidar Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemyakin, Eduard; Müller, Detlef; Burton, Sharon; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a comparison study in which a simple, automated, and unsupervised algorithm, which we call the arrange and average algorithm, was used to infer microphysical parameters (complex refractive index (CRI), effective radius, total number, surface area, and volume concentrations) of atmospheric aerosol particles. The algorithm normally uses backscatter coefficients (β) at 355, 532, and 1064 nm and extinction coefficients (α) at 355 and 532 nm as input information. We compared the performance of the algorithm for the existing "3β+α" and potential "3β+3α" configurations of a multiwavelength aerosol Raman lidar or highspectral-resolution lidar (HSRL). The "3β+3α" configuration uses an extra extinction coefficient at 1064 nm. Testing of the algorithm is based on synthetic optical data that are computed from prescribed CRIs and monomodal logarithmically normal particle size distributions that represent spherical, primarily fine mode aerosols. We investigated the degree to which the microphysical results retrieved by this algorithm benefits from the increased number of input extinction coefficients.

  13. Evaluation of Warm-Rain Microphysical Parameterizations in Cloudy Boundary Layer Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, K.; Mechem, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Common warm-rain microphysical parameterizations used for marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds are either tuned for specific cloud types (e.g., the Khairoutdinov and Kogan 2000 parameterization, "KK2000") or are altogether ill-posed (Kessler 1969). An ideal microphysical parameterization should be "unified" in the sense of being suitable across MBL cloud regimes that include stratocumulus, cumulus rising into stratocumulus, and shallow trade cumulus. The recent parameterization of Kogan (2013, "K2013") was formulated for shallow cumulus but has been shown in a large-eddy simulation environment to work quite well for stratocumulus as well. We report on our efforts to implement and test this parameterization into a regional forecast model (NRL COAMPS). Results from K2013 and KK2000 are compared with the operational Kessler parameterization for a 5-day period of the VOCALS-REx field campaign, which took place over the southeast Pacific. We focus on both the relative performance of the three parameterizations and also on how they compare to the VOCALS-REx observations from the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown, in particular estimates of boundary-layer depth, liquid water path (LWP), cloud base, and area-mean precipitation rate obtained from C-band radar.

  14. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hamburger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm−3 stp. Ultra-fine particles as indicators for nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  15. Investigation of Aerosol Effects on Cumulus Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation in Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Zhang, R.; Tao, W.

    2006-05-01

    The effect of aerosols on clouds is of significant uncertainty. Aerosols in polluted air may influence the cloud microphysical processes and precipitation by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), potentially forming smaller cloud droplets and higher concentrations. The aerosol concentration and properties (composition, solubility, etc) have an important effect on cloud droplet activation, which determine the number-size distribution of cloud droplets, the precipitation rate, and the lifetime of a cloud. We investigate the effect of aerosol concentrations and properties on a convective cloud case in Houston, Texas, using a cloud resolving model (CRM) developed at the NASA-GSFC, which incorporates a spectral-bin microphysics Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM). The CRM simulations are compared to measurements of radar reflectivity and accumulated precipitation. Sensitivity studies are performed to examine the effects of aerosol number concentration, chemical compositions, and other environmental parameters such relative humidity on cloud droplet number concentration, droplet size, precipitation rate, convective intensity, etc. The implications of the present results on assessment of aerosol indirect effect are discussed.

  16. Improving estimates of aerosol radiative forcing through a particle-based aerosol microphysical scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierce, L.; McGraw, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Forcing by atmospheric aerosols remains a large source of uncertainty in assessing human influences on the climate. Although global models have moved toward including more detailed representations of aerosol populations, aerosol microphysical schemes have been evaluated against benchmark models in only limited cases. Here we introduce a new framework for simulating atmospheric aerosols based on the Quadrature Method of Moments. This new aerosol model has been designed to reproduce key features of benchmark populations simulated by the particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC, while tracking as little information about aerosol distributions as is necessary. The quadrature-based model simulates the aerosol evolution using a small number of weighted particles and is, therefore, decided as a reduced particle-based model. By applying principles of maximum entropy, the quadrature-based model efficiently reproduces distributions with respect to key aerosol properties, such as critical supersaturation for cloud condensation nuclei activation and optical cross sections, with high accuracy. In addition to providing an optimized aerosol model, the present study also describes how multi-scale modeling can be used as a tool for development of advanced aerosol microphysical schemes.

  17. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, T.; McMeeking, G.; Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Coe, H.; Krejci, R.

    2012-12-01

    In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm-3 stp. Ultra-fine particles as indicators for nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C) to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  18. On Depolarization Lidar-Based Method for The Determination of Liquid-Cloud Microphysical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Under single scattering conditions, water droplets clouds do not depolarize the backscattered light. However, backscattered light from multiple scattering will be depolarized. The level of depolarization is a function of the droplets size, the cloud extinction coefficient value and profile; it has also an important dependency on the lidar field-of-view (FOV. The use of depolarization information to retrieve cloud microphysical properties, using Multiple-FOV has been the object of studies, [1], [2]. Recently the use of the depolarization, at a single FOV, has been studied for cloud with linear liquid water content profiles, [3], [4]. In this paper we present the mechanism leading to depolarization and identify the FOV values for which the information on particle size is high. Also Monte Carlo simulations for cloud with constant and ramp up profiles are presented. The degree of linear depolarization as a function of cloud penetration is significantly different for both cloud profiles. This suggests that the use of the degree of linear depolarization at a single FOV should be used with caution to determine clouds micro-physical parameters.

  19. Exploring the Effects of Cloud Vertical Structure on Cloud Microphysical Retrievals based on Polarized Reflectances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Ackerman, A. S.; Cornet, C.; Baum, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    A polarized cloud reflectance simulator was developed by coupling an LES cloud model with a polarized radiative transfer model to assess the capabilities of polarimetric cloud retrievals. With future remote sensing campaigns like NASA's Aerosols/Clouds/Ecosystems (ACE) planning to feature advanced polarimetric instruments it is important for the cloud remote sensing community to understand the retrievable information available and the related systematic/methodical limitations. The cloud retrieval simulator we have developed allows us to probe these important questions in a realistically relevant test bed. Our simulator utilizes a polarized adding-doubling radiative transfer model and an LES cloud field from a DHARMA simulation (Ackerman et al. 2004) with cloud properties based on the stratocumulus clouds observed during the DYCOMS-II field campaign. In this study we will focus on how the vertical structure of cloud microphysics can influence polarized cloud effective radius retrievals. Numerous previous studies have explored how retrievals based on total reflectance are affected by cloud vertical structure (Platnick 2000, Chang and Li 2002) but no such studies about the effects of vertical structure on polarized retrievals exist. Unlike the total cloud reflectance, which is predominantly multiply scattered light, the polarized reflectance is primarily the result of singly scattered photons. Thus the polarized reflectance is sensitive to only the uppermost region of the cloud (tau~influencer on the microphysical development of cloud droplets, can be potentially studied with polarimetric retrievals.

  20. Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, D.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Easter, R. C.; Ferrachat, S.; Ghan, S. J.; Hoose, C.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, X.; Lohmann, U.; Menon, S.; Quaas, J.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Takemura, T.; Yan, N.

    2011-02-01

    We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on liquid clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.11 Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five of the models effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experiments to likely impacts of realistic potential emission changes.

  1. A two-habit model for the microphysical and optical properties of ice clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To provide a better representation of natural ice clouds, a novel ice cloud model containing two particle habits is developed. The microphysical and optical properties of the two-habit model (THM are compared with both laboratory and in situ measurements, and its performance in downstream satellite remote sensing applications is tested. The THM assumes an ice cloud to be an ensemble of hexagonal columns and twenty-element aggregates, and to have specific habit fractions at each particle size. The ice water contents and median mass diameters calculated based on the THM closely agree with in situ measurements made during 11 field campaigns. In this study, the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of ice crystals are calculated with a combination of the invariant imbedding T-matrix, pseudo-spectral time domain, and improved geometric-optics methods over an entire range of particle sizes. The phase functions, calculated based on the THM, show excellent agreement with counterparts from laboratory and in situ measurements and from satellite retrievals. For downstream applications in the retrieval of cloud microphysical and optical properties from MODIS observations, the THM presents excellent spectral consistency; specifically, the retrieved cloud optical thicknesses based on the visible/near infrared bands and the thermal infrared bands agree quite well. Furthermore, a comparison between the polarized reflectivities observed by the PARASOL satellite and from theoretical simulations illustrates that the THM can be used to represent ice cloud polarization properties.

  2. A Model for Particle Microphysics,Turbulent Mixing, and Radiative Transfer in the Stratocumulus-Topped Marine Boundary Layer and Comparisons with Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Andrew S.; Toon, Owen B.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed 1D model of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer is described. The model has three coupled components: a microphysics module that resolves the size distributions of aerosols and cloud droplets, a turbulence module that treats vertical mixing between layers, and a multiple wavelength radiative transfer module that calculates radiative heating rates and cloud optical properties. The results of a 12-h model simulation reproduce reasonably well the bulk thermodynamics, microphysical properties, and radiative fluxes measured in an approx. 500-m thick, summertime marine stratocumulus cloud layer by Nicholls. However, in this case, the model predictions of turbulent fluxes between the cloud and subcloud layers exceed the measurements. Results of model simulations are also compared to measurements of a marine stratus layer made under gate conditions and with measurements of a high, thin marine stratocumulus layer. The variations in cloud properties are generally reproduced by the model, although it underpredicts the entrainment of overlying air at cloud top under gale conditions. Sensitivities of the model results are explored. The vertical profile of cloud droplet concentration is sensitive to the lower size cutoff of the droplet size distribution due to the presence of unactivated haze particles in the lower region of the modeled cloud. Increases in total droplet concentrations do not always produce less drizzle and more cloud water in the model. The radius of the mean droplet volume does not correlate consistently with drizzle, but the effective droplet radius does. The greatest impacts on cloud properties predicted by the model are produced by halving the width of the size distribution of input condensation nuclei and by omitting the effect of cloud-top radiative cooling on the condensational growth of cloud droplets. The omission of infrared scattering produces noticeable changes in cloud properties. The collection efficiencies for droplets less

  3. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  4. Toughness of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu V. Madge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs have desirable properties like high strength and low modulus, but their toughness can show much variation, depending on the kind of test as well as alloy chemistry. This article reviews the type of toughness tests commonly performed and the factors influencing the data obtained. It appears that even the less-tough metallic glasses are tougher than oxide glasses. The current theories describing the links between toughness and material parameters, including elastic constants and alloy chemistry (ordering in the glass, are discussed. Based on the current literature, a few important issues for further work are identified.

  5. Governance in Córdoba’s Mixed Tribunal: A Study on Microphysics of Power Governance in Córdoba’s Mixed Tribunal: A Study on Microphysics of Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Abel Amietta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Córdoba is the first province of Argentina to adopt lay participation for the decision of criminal cases. Since 2005, a mixed tribunal of 8 lays and 3 judges decide some criminal cases by the rule of majority. Drawing on in-depth interviews with judges, other officials and jurors, this thesis explores this unique encounter of legal professionals and lays from the perspective of “microphysics of power” as put forward by Michel Foucault. The analysis first focuses on legal professionals’ perceptions of jurors and unveils how these perceptions construct jurors as a problem that needs to be governed. Secondly I discuss the tools of governance put into practice by legal professionals and the Judiciary to direct jurors’ conduct and argue that the interaction between lays and professionals is largely demarked by the mutual operation of power relations and knowledge. Next I look to jurors’ narratives to unravel their practices of self-governance and finally I trace the possibility of the emergence of resistant discourses by focusing on the narrative of a single juror. All in all this thesis constitutes an important departure from the previous body of work about lay participation in criminal justice by its theoretical approach and methodological advantages. It aims to make, by the theoretically informed analysis of relevant qualitative data, fruitful contributions both to the field of inquiries on jury trials and to more general discussions on how power in its myriad forms shapes subjectivities and governs conducts whilst circulates and is resisted against.

  6. Results of the meteorological model WRF-ARW over Catalonia, using different parameterizations of convection and cloud microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mercader

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The meteorological model WRF-ARW (Weather Research and Forecasting - Advanced Research WRF is a new generation model that has a worldwide growing community of users. In the framework of a project that studies the feasibility of implementing it operationally at the Meteorological Service of Catalonia, a verification of the forecasts produced by the model in several cases of precipitation observed over Catalonia has been carried out. Indeed, given the importance of precipitation forecasts in this area, one of the main objectives was to study the sensitivity of the model in different configurations of its parameterizations of convection and cloud microphysics. In this paper, we present the results of this verification for two domains, a 36-km grid size and one of 12 km grid size, unidirectionally nested to the previous one. In the external domain, the evaluation was based on the analysis of the main statistical parameters (ME and RMSE for temperature, relative humidity, geopotential and wind, and it has been determined that the combination using the Kain-Fritsch convective scheme with the WSM5 microphysical scheme has provided the best results. Then, with this configuration set for the external domain, some forecasts at the nested domain have been done, by combining different convection and cloud microphysics schemes, leading to the conclusion that the most accurate configuration is the one combining the convective parameterization of Kain-Fritsch and the Thompson microphysics scheme.

  7. Assessment of WRF microphysics schemes to simulate extreme precipitation events from the perspective of GMI radiative signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Shin, D. B.; Joh, M.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations of precipitation depend to a large degree on the assumed cloud microphysics schemes representing the formation, growth and fallout of cloud droplets and ice crystals. Recent studies show that assumed cloud microphysics play a major role not only in forecasting precipitation, especially in cases of extreme precipitation events, but also in the quality of the passive microwave rainfall estimation. Evaluations of the various Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model microphysics schemes in this study are based on a method that was originally developed to construct the a-priori databases of precipitation profiles and associated brightness temperatures (TBs) for precipitation retrievals. This methodology generates three-dimensional (3D) precipitation fields by matching the GPM dual frequency radar (DPR) reflectivity profiles with those calculated from cloud resolving model (CRM)-derived hydrometeor profiles. The method eventually provides 3D simulated precipitation fields over the DPR scan swaths. That is, atmospheric and hydrometeor profiles can be generated at each DPR pixel based on CRM and DPR reflectivity profiles. The generated raining systems over DPR observation fields can be applied to any radiometers that are unaccompanied with a radar for microwave radiative calculation with consideration of each sensor's channel and field of view. Assessment of the WRF model microphysics schemes for several typhoon cases in terms of emission and scattering signals of GMI will be discussed.

  8. Comparing lightning polarity and cloud microphysical properties over regions of high ground flash density in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Simpson, LA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find a correlation between lightning polarity and microphysical properties of a storm cloud, for events where large amounts of lightning damage have occured and/or there has been a reported lightning-related fatality....

  9. The global atmospheric electric circuit and its effects on cloud microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    2008-06-01

    This review is an overview of progress in understanding the theory and observation of the global atmospheric electric circuit, with the focus on its dc aspects, and its short and long term variability. The effects of the downward ionosphere-earth current density, Jz, on cloud microphysics, with its variability as an explanation for small observed changes in weather and climate, will also be reviewed. The global circuit shows responses to external as well as internal forcing. External forcing arises from changes in the distribution of conductivity due to changes in the cosmic ray flux and other energetic space particle fluxes, and at high magnetic latitudes from solar wind electric fields. Internal forcing arises from changes in the generators and changes in volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols in the troposphere and stratosphere. All these result in spatial and temporal variation in Jz. Variations in Jz affect the production of space charge in layer clouds, with the charges being transferred to droplets and aerosol particles. New observations and new analyses are consistent with non-negligible effects of the charges on the microphysics of such clouds. Observed effects are small, but of high statistical significance for cloud cover and precipitation changes, with resulting atmospheric temperature, pressure and dynamics changes. These effects are detectable on the day-to-day timescale for repeated Jz changes of order 10%, and are thus second order electrical effects. The implicit first order effects have not, as yet, been incorporated into basic cloud and aerosol physics. Long term (multidecadal through millennial) global circuit changes, due to solar activity modulating the galactic cosmic ray flux, are an order of magnitude greater at high latitudes and in the stratosphere, as can be inferred from geological cosmogenic isotope records. Proxies for climate change in the same stratified depositories show strong correlations of climate with the inferred global circuit

  10. Sensitivity of WRF cloud microphysics to simulations of a severe thunderstorm event over Southeast India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeevan, M.; Kesarkar, A.; Rao, T.N.; Radhakrishna, B. [National Atmospheric Research Lab., Gadanki (India); Thampi, S.B. [India Meteorological Dept., Chennai (India). Doppler Weather Radar Div.; Rajasekhar, M. [ISRO, Sriharikota (India). SHAR Center

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, we have used the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate the features associated with a severe thunderstorm observed over Gadanki (13.5 N,79.2 E), over southeast India, on 21 May 2008 and examined its sensitivity to four different microphysical (MP) schemes (Thompson, Lin, WSM6 and Morrison). We have used the WRF model with three nested domains with the innermost domain of 2 km grid spacing with explicit convection. The model was integrated for 36 h with the GFS initial conditions of 00:00 UTC, 21 May 2008. For validating simulated features of the thunderstorm, we have considered the vertical wind measurements made by the Indian MST radar installed at Gadanki, reflectivity profiles by the Doppler Weather Radar at Chennai, and automatic weather station data at Gadanki. There are major differences in the simulations of the thunderstorm among the MP schemes, in spite of using the same initial and boundary conditions and model configuration. First of all, all the four schemes simulated severe convection over Gadanki almost an hour before the observed storm. The DWR data suggested passage of two convective cores over Gadanki on 21 May, which was simulated by the model in all the four MP schemes. Comparatively, the Thompson scheme simulated the observed features of the updraft/downdraft cores reasonably well. However, all the four schemes underestimated strength and vertical extend of the updraft cores. The MP schemes also showed problems in simulating the downdrafts associated with the storm. While the Thompson scheme simulated surface rainfall distribution closer to observations, the other three schemes overestimated observed rainfall. However, all the four MP schemes simulated the surface wind variations associated with the thunderstorm reasonably well. The model simulated reflectivity profiles were consistent with the observed reflectivity profile, showing two convective cores. These features are consistent with the simulated

  11. Handling of bulk solids theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Shamlou, P A

    1990-01-01

    Handling of Bulk Solids provides a comprehensive discussion of the field of solids flow and handling in the process industries. Presentation of the subject follows classical lines of separate discussions for each topic, so each chapter is self-contained and can be read on its own. Topics discussed include bulk solids flow and handling properties; pressure profiles in bulk solids storage vessels; the design of storage silos for reliable discharge of bulk materials; gravity flow of particulate materials from storage vessels; pneumatic transportation of bulk solids; and the hazards of solid-mater

  12. In-Situ Measurements of Cloud-Precipitation Microphysics in the East Asian Monsoon Region Since 1960

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东海; 尹金方; 翟国庆

    2015-01-01

    A large number of in-situ measurements of cloud-precipitation microphysical properties have been made since 1960, including measurements of particle size distribution, particle concentration, and liquid water content of clouds and rain. These measurements have contributed to considerable progress in understanding microphysical processes in clouds and precipitation and signifi cant improvements in parameterizations of cloud microphysics in numerical models. This work reviews key fi ndings regarding cloud-precipitation mi-crophysics over China. The total number concentrations of various particles vary signifi cantly, with certain characteristic spatial scales. The size distributions of cloud droplets in stratiform clouds can generally be fi t with gamma distributions, but the fi t parameters cover a wide range. Raindrop size distributions (RSDs) associated with stratiform clouds can be fi t with either exponential or gamma distributions, while RSDs associated with convective or mixed stratiform-cumuliform clouds are best fi t with gamma distributions. Concentrations of ice nuclei (IN) over China are higher than those observed over other regions, and increase exponentially as temperature decreases. The particle size distributions of ice crystals, snow crystals, and hailstones sampled at a variety of locations can be reliably approximated by using exponential distributions, while aerosol particle size distributions are best described as the sum of a modifi ed gamma distribution and a Junge power-law distribution. These results are helpful for evaluating and improving the fi delity of physical processes and hydrometeor fi elds simulated by microphysical parameterizations. The comprehensive summary and analysis of previous work presented here also provide useful guidelines for the design of future observational programs.

  13. Studyng the Influence of Aerosols in the Evolution of Cloud Microphysics Procesess Associated with Tropical Cyclone Earl Using Airborne Measurements from the NASA Grip Field Campaing 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Cruz, Y.; Heymsfield, A.; Jenkins, G. S.; Bansemer, A.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud microphysics processes are strongly related to tropical cyclones evolution. Although there have been three decades of research dedicated to understand the role of cloud microphysics in tropical cyclogenesis, there are still questions unanswered. With the intention of fulfill the gaps and to better understand the processes involves in tropical storms formation the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign was conducted during the months of August and September of 2010. In-situ microphysical measurements, including particle size distributions, shapes, liquid/ice water content and supercooled liquid water were obtained from the DC-8 aircraft. A total of 139 hrs of flying science modules were performed including sampling of four named storms (Earl, Gaston, Karl and Matthew). One tropical cyclone, Earl, was one of the major hurricanes of the season reaching a category 4 in the Saffir-Simpson scale. Earl emerged from the West Africa on August 22 as an easterly wave, moved westward and became a tropical storm on August 25 before undergoing rapid intensification. This project seeks to explore the lifecycle of hurricane Earl including the genesis and rapid intensification from a microphysics perspective; to develop a better understanding of the relationship between dust from the Saharan Air Layer and cloud microphysics evolution and to develop a better understanding of how cloud microphysics processes interacts and serve as precursor for thermodynamics processes. An overview of the microphysics measurements as well as preliminary results will be presented.

  14. parameterrization of microphysical and dynamical processes of rainfall in thunderstorm cloud model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available   In this research parameterization of the precipitation process in Ogura & Takahashi (O-T thunderstorm model was improved in microphysical processes, specially in the autoconversion process to form raindrops, in the glaciation process and in the terminal velocities of rain and hail. The rainfall intensity became much heavier with Kesslers parameterization, the second peak of the rainfall intensity disappeared with Biggs freezing probability, and the rainfall intensity became much heavier and sharper with Lin et als terminal velocities of rain and hail than in the O-T original model. Finally, the derived rainfall pattern based on the improved model has much similarities to the observation data. This paper expresses the basic research for studying the physical treatment in clouds. The modified O-T model has different applications in analyzing radar observation data, estimate the potential of soil erosion, parameteriztion of shower in mesoscale numerical weather prediction and eta.

  15. Data driven analysis of rain events: feature extraction, clustering, microphysical /macro physical relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djallel Dilmi, Mohamed; Mallet, Cécile; Barthes, Laurent; Chazottes, Aymeric

    2017-04-01

    The study of rain time series records is mainly carried out using rainfall rate or rain accumulation parameters estimated on a fixed integration time (typically 1 min, 1 hour or 1 day). In this study we used the concept of rain event. In fact, the discrete and intermittent natures of rain processes make the definition of some features inadequate when defined on a fixed duration. Long integration times (hour, day) lead to mix rainy and clear air periods in the same sample. Small integration time (seconds, minutes) will lead to noisy data with a great sensibility to detector characteristics. The analysis on the whole rain event instead of individual short duration samples of a fixed duration allows to clarify relationships between features, in particular between macro physical and microphysical ones. This approach allows suppressing the intra-event variability partly due to measurement uncertainties and allows focusing on physical processes. An algorithm based on Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Self Organising Maps (SOM) is developed to obtain a parsimonious characterisation of rain events using a minimal set of variables. The use of self-organizing map (SOM) is justified by the fact that it allows to map a high dimensional data space in a two-dimensional space while preserving as much as possible the initial space topology in an unsupervised way. The obtained SOM allows providing the dependencies between variables and consequently removing redundant variables leading to a minimal subset of only five features (the event duration, the rain rate peak, the rain event depth, the event rain rate standard deviation and the absolute rain rate variation of order 0.5). To confirm relevance of the five selected features the corresponding SOM is analyzed. This analysis shows clearly the existence of relationships between features. It also shows the independence of the inter-event time (IETp) feature or the weak dependence of the Dry percentage in event (Dd%e) feature. This confirms

  16. In situ observations of contrail micro-physics and implications for their radiative impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poellot, M.R. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States); Arnott, W.P.; Hallett, J. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst.

    1997-12-31

    Increasing levels of air traffic have raised concerns about the potential effects of aircraft exhaust on the climate. Current knowledge is expanded by examining in situ data from 21 contrails sampled at altitudes of 9.3 - 12.5 km and temperatures of -47 deg C to -66 deg C. The airborne equipment allowed measurements of particles as small as 2 {mu}m in diameter, which have not previously been reported. The microphysical characteristics of the contrails, which occurred in both clear and cloudy air, are presented and compared with natural cirrus properties. Computations of the wavelength-dependent radiative properties of the sampled particle distributions are also presented and compared with laboratory measurements. Finally, implications of these findings for climatic assessment are discussed. (R.P.) 9 refs.

  17. Microphysical particle properties derived from inversion algorithms developed in the framework of EARLINET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Detlef; Böckmann, Christine; Kolgotin, Alexei; Schneidenbach, Lars; Chemyakin, Eduard; Rosemann, Julia; Znak, Pavel; Romanov, Anton

    2016-10-01

    We present a summary on the current status of two inversion algorithms that are used in EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) for the inversion of data collected with EARLINET multiwavelength Raman lidars. These instruments measure backscatter coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, and extinction coefficients at 355 and 532 nm. Development of these two algorithms started in 2000 when EARLINET was founded. The algorithms are based on a manually controlled inversion of optical data which allows for detailed sensitivity studies. The algorithms allow us to derive particle effective radius as well as volume and surface area concentration with comparably high confidence. The retrieval of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index still is a challenge in view of the accuracy required for these parameters in climate change studies in which light absorption needs to be known with high accuracy. It is an extreme challenge to retrieve the real part with an accuracy better than 0.05 and the imaginary part with accuracy better than 0.005-0.1 or ±50 %. Single-scattering albedo can be computed from the retrieved microphysical parameters and allows us to categorize aerosols into high- and low-absorbing aerosols. On the basis of a few exemplary simulations with synthetic optical data we discuss the current status of these manually operated algorithms, the potentially achievable accuracy of data products, and the goals for future work. One algorithm was used with the purpose of testing how well microphysical parameters can be derived if the real part of the complex refractive index is known to at least 0.05 or 0.1. The other algorithm was used to find out how well microphysical parameters can be derived if this constraint for the real part is not applied. The optical data used in our study cover a range of Ångström exponents and extinction-to-backscatter (lidar) ratios that are found from lidar measurements of various aerosol types. We also tested

  18. Observations of Stratiform Lightning Flashes and Their Microphysical and Kinematic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Williams, Earle

    2017-01-01

    During the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), combined observations of clouds and precipitation were made from airborne and ground-based in situ and remote sensing platforms. These observations were coordinated for multiple mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that passed over the MC3E domain in northern Oklahoma. Notably, during a storm on 20 May 2011 in situ and remote sensing airborne observations were made near the times and locations of stratiform positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning flashes. These +CGs resulted from extremely large stratiform lightning flashes that were hundreds of km in length and lasted several seconds. This dataset provides an unprecedented look at kinematic and microphysical environments in the vicinity of large, powerful, and long-lived stratiform lightning flashes. We will use this dataset to understand the influence of low liquid water contents (LWCs) in the electrical charging of MCS stratiform regions.

  19. Cirrus microphysics and radiative transfer: Cloud field study on October 28, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne, Stefan; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Valero, Francisco P. J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Spinhirne, James D.

    1990-01-01

    The radiative properties of cirrus clouds present one of the unresolved problems in weather and climate research. Uncertainties in ice particle amount and size and, also, the general inability to model the single scattering properties of their usually complex particle shapes, prevent accurate model predictions. For an improved understanding of cirrus radiative effects, field experiments, as those of the Cirrus IFO of FIRE, are necessary. Simultaneous measurements of radiative fluxes and cirrus microphysics at multiple cirrus cloud altitudes allows the pitting of calculated versus measured vertical flux profiles; with the potential to judge current cirrus cloud modeling. Most of the problems in this study are linked to the inhomogeneity of the cloud field. Thus, only studies on more homogeneous cirrus cloud cases promises a possibility to improve current cirrus parameterizations. Still, the current inability to detect small ice particles will remain as a considerable handicap.

  20. Airborne observations of the microphysical structure of two contrasting cirrus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, S. J.; Choularton, T. W.; Lloyd, G.; Crosier, J.; Bower, K. N.; Gallagher, M.; Abel, S. J.; Cotton, R. J.; Brown, P. R. A.; Fugal, J. P.; Schlenczek, O.; Borrmann, S.; Pickering, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We present detailed airborne in situ measurements of cloud microphysics in two midlatitude cirrus clouds, collected as part of the Cirrus Coupled Cloud-Radiation Experiment. A new habit recognition algorithm for sorting cloud particle images using a neural network is introduced. Both flights observed clouds that were related to frontal systems, but one was actively developing while the other dissipated as it was sampled. The two clouds showed distinct differences in particle number, habit, and size. However, a number of common features were observed in the 2-D stereo data set, including a distinct bimodal size distribution within the higher-temperature regions of the clouds. This may result from a combination of local heterogeneous nucleation and large particles sedimenting from aloft. Both clouds had small ice crystals (developing case the ice concentrations at the lowest temperatures are best explained by homogenous nucleation.

  1. Microphysics of Neutron Star Outer Envelopes in the Periodized, Magnetic Thomas-Fermi Model

    CERN Document Server

    Engstrom, Tyler A; Owen, Benjamin J; Brannick, James; Hu, Xiaozhe

    2014-01-01

    Observations of several types of neutron stars indicate surface temperature inhomogeneities. In recent years magneto-thermal simulations have supported the idea that the magnetic field and anisotropic heat conduction play important roles in generating these inhomogeneities. Simulations rely on crustal microphysics input heretofore calculated at the level of a plasma model -- neglecting lattice structure and electron polarizability. We focus on the low density outer envelope, treating both of these elements by a proper periodization of the magnetic Thomas-Fermi model. Our solution method involves a novel domain decomposition and we describe a scalable implementation using \\textit{Hypre}. The method may be seen as a prototype for the general class of problems involving nonlinear charge screening of periodic, quasi-low-dimensionality structures, e.g. liquid crystals. Findings include low density $c'<0$ elastic instabilities for both bcc and fcc lattices, reminiscent of the situation in some light actinides, a...

  2. The Impact of Microphysics and Model Resolution on Precipitation Associated with Typhoon Morakot 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pay-Liam; Chen, D.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Shi, Jainn J.; Chang, Mei-Yu

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the heavy rainfall that was associated with severe weather events (e.g., typhoons, local heavy precipitation events) has caused significant damages in the economy and loss of human life throughout Taiwan. Especially, the extreme heavy rainfall (over 2500 mm over 24 hours) associated with Typhoon Morakot 2009 caused more than 600 human beings lost and more than $100 million US dollar damage. In this paper, we are using WRF to simulate the precipitation processes associated Typhoon Morakot 2009. The preliminary results indicated that the wrf model with using 2 km grid size and with utilizing the 310E scheme (cloud ice, snow and hail) can simulate more than 2500 mm rainfall over 24 hour integration. In this talk, we will evaluate the performance of the microphysical schemes for the Typhoon Morakot case. In addition, we will examine the impact of model resolution (in both horizontal and vertical) on the Typhoon Morakot case.

  3. New fermions in the bulk

    CERN Document Server

    de Brito, K P S

    2016-01-01

    Spinor fields on 5-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds are classified, according to the geometric Fierz identities that involve their bilinear covariants. Based upon this classification that generalises the celebrated 4-dimensional Lounesto classification of spinor fields, new non-trivial classes of 5-dimensional spinor fields are, hence, found, with important potential applications regarding bulk fermions and their subsequent localisation on brane-worlds. In addition, quaternionic bilinear covariants are used to derive the quaternionic spin density, through the truncated exterior bundle. In order to accomplish a realisation of these new spinors, a Killing vector field is constructed on the horizon of 5-dimensional Kerr black holes. This Killing vector field is shown to reach the time-like Killing vector field at the spatial infinity, through a current 1-form density, constructed with the derived new spinor fields. The current density is, moreover, expressed as the f\\"unfbein components, assuming a condensed for...

  4. New fermions in the bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, K. P. S.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2016-10-01

    The spinor fields on 5-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds are classified according to the geometric Fierz identities, which involve their bilinear covariants. Based upon this classification, which generalises the celebrated 4-dimensional Lounesto classification of spinor fields, new non-trivial classes of 5-dimensional spinor fields are hence found, with important potential applications regarding bulk fermions and their subsequent localisation on brane-worlds. In addition, quaternionic bilinear covariants are used to derive the quaternionic spin density through the truncated exterior bundle. In order to accomplish the realisation of these new spinors, a Killing vector field is constructed on the horizon of a 5-dimensional Kerr black hole. This Killing vector field is shown to reach the time-like Killing vector field at spatial infinity through a current 1-form density, constructed with the new derived spinor fields. The current density is, moreover, expressed as the fünfbein component, assuming a condensed form.

  5. Nanofluidics, from bulk to interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, Lydéric; Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2010-03-01

    Nanofluidics has emerged recently in the footsteps of microfluidics, following the quest for scale reduction inherent to nanotechnologies. By definition, nanofluidics explores transport phenomena of fluids at nanometer scales. Why is the nanometer scale specific? What fluid properties are probed at nanometric scales? In other words, why does 'nanofluidics' deserve its own brand name? In this critical review, we will explore the vast manifold of length scales emerging for fluid behavior at the nanoscale, as well as the associated mechanisms and corresponding applications. We will in particular explore the interplay between bulk and interface phenomena. The limit of validity of the continuum approaches will be discussed, as well as the numerous surface induced effects occurring at these scales, from hydrodynamic slippage to the various electro-kinetic phenomena originating from the couplings between hydrodynamics and electrostatics. An enlightening analogy between ion transport in nanochannels and transport in doped semi-conductors will be discussed (156 references).

  6. Parametric studies of contrail ice particle formation in jet regime using microphysical parcel modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Condensation trails (contrails formed from water vapor emissions behind aircraft engines are the most uncertain components of the aviation impacts on climate change. To gain improved knowledge of contrail and contrail-induced cirrus cloud formation, understanding of contrail ice particle formation immediately after aircraft engines is needed. Despite many efforts spent in modeling the microphysics of ice crystal formation in jet regime (with a plume age <5 s, systematic understanding of parametric effects of variables affecting contrail ice particle formation is still limited. In this work, we apply a microphysical parcel modeling approach to study contrail ice particle formation in near-field aircraft plumes up to 1000 m downstream of an aircraft engine in the soot-rich regime (soot number emission index >1×1015 (kg-fuel−1 at cruise. The effects of dilution history, ion-mediated nucleation, ambient relative humidity, fuel sulfur contents, and initial soot emissions were investigated. Our simulation results suggest that ice particles are mainly formed by water condensation on emitted soot particles. The growth of ice coated soot particles is driven by water vapor emissions in the first 1000 m and by ambient relative humidity afterwards. The presence of chemi-ions does not significantly contribute to the formation of ice particles in the soot-rich regime, and the effect of fuel sulfur contents is small over the range typical of standard jet fuels. The initial properties of soot emissions play the most critical role, and our calculations suggest that higher number concentration and smaller size of contrail particle nuclei may be able to effectively suppress the formation of contrail ice particles. Further modeling and experimental studies are needed to verify if our findings can provide a possible approach for contrail mitigation.

  7. Microphysics of KCl and ZnS Clouds on GJ 1214 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peter; Benneke, Björn

    2016-10-01

    Clouds are ubiquitous in the atmospheres of exoplanets. However, as most of these planets have temperatures between 600 and 2000 K, their clouds are likely composed of exotic condensates such as salts, sulfides, silicates, and metals. Treatment of these clouds in current exoplanet atmosphere models do not consider the microphysical processes that govern their formation, evolution, and distribution, such as nucleation and condensation/evaporation, thus creating a gulf between the cloud properties retrieved from observations and the cloud composition predictions from condensation equilibrium models. In this work, we apply a 1D microphysical cloud model to GJ 1214 b and investigate the properties of potassium chloride (KCl) and zinc sulfide (ZnS) clouds as a function of atmospheric metallicity, the intensity of vertical mixing, and the mode of nucleation. Our cloud model has been widely applied to planets in our own Solar System, and as such our work bridges a gap between planetary science and exoplanets. Using model background atmospheres calculated by the SCARLET code, we find that (1) the cloud distribution is not significantly affected by metallicity unless [Fe/H] > 2, (2) higher intensities of vertical mixing leads to more extended cloud decks, more cloud particles at all altitudes, and smaller mean particle radii, (3) the high surface energy of solid ZnS prevents the homogeneous nucleation of pure ZnS cloud particles, such that KCl clouds dominate; solid ZnS can only manifest by nucleating onto pre-existing surfaces (heterogeneous nucleation), such as KCl cloud particles, resulting in mixed clouds, and (4) formation of KCl clouds results in a KCl vapor abundance above the cloud deck ~5 orders of magnitude less than that calculated from equilibrium chemistry. We also examine the transmission spectra that would result from these different cases. Extension of this model to other planets and condensates will shed light on the observed continuum in the "cloudiness

  8. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2010-04-09

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

  9. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects.

    Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is −0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between −0.32 to −0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  10. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing.

    Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing between 1750 and 2000 is −0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing can vary between −0.32 to −0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particle, changes the overall net aerosol radiative forcing from negative to positive. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Black carbon absorption is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings, but even more strongly by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative forcing when sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to climate benefits.

  11. Mountain wave PSC dynamics and microphysics from ground-based lidar measurements and meteorological modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reichardt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The day-long observation of a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC by two co-located ground-based lidars at the Swedish research facility Esrange (67.9° N, 21.1° E on 16 January 1997 is analyzed in terms of PSC dynamics and microphysics. Mesoscale modeling is utilized to simulate the meteorological setting of the lidar measurements. Microphysical properties of the PSC particles are retrieved by comparing the measured particle depolarization ratio and the PSC-averaged lidar ratio with theoretical optical data derived for different particle shapes. In the morning, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT particles and then increasingly coexisting liquid ternary aerosol (LTA were detected as outflow from a mountain wave-induced ice PSC upwind Esrange. The NAT PSC is in good agreement with simulations for irregular-shaped particles with length-to-diameter ratios between 0.75 and 1.25, maximum dimensions from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, and a number density from 8 to 12 cm-3 and the coexisting LTA droplets had diameters from 0.7 to 0.9 µm, a refractive index of 1.39 and a number density from 7 to 11 cm-3. The total amount of condensed HNO3 was in the range of 8–12 ppbv. The data provide further observational evidence that NAT forms via deposition nucleation on ice particles as a number of recently published papers suggest. By early afternoon the mountain-wave ice PSC expanded above the lidar site. Its optical data indicate a decrease in minimum particle size from 3 to 1.9 µm with time. Later on, following the weakening of the mountain wave, wave-induced LTA was observed only. Our study demonstrates that ground-based lidar measurements of PSCs can be comprehensively interpreted if combined with mesoscale meteorological data.

  12. Using a multiwavelength suite of microwave instruments to investigate the microphysical structure of deep convective cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, A.; Mroz, K.; Lang, Tim; Tridon, F.; Tanelli, S.; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Gerald M.

    2016-08-01

    Due to the large natural variability of its microphysical properties, the characterization of solid precipitation is a longstanding problem. Since in situ observations are unavailable in severe convective systems, innovative remote sensing retrievals are needed to extend our understanding of such systems. This study presents a novel technique able to retrieve the density, mass, and effective diameter of graupel and hail in severe convection through the combination of airborne microwave remote sensing instruments. The retrieval is applied to measure solid precipitation properties within two convective cells observed on 23-24 May 2014 over North Carolina during the IPHEx campaign by the NASA ER-2 instrument suite. Between 30 and 40 degrees of freedom of signal are associated with the measurements, which is insufficient to provide full microphysics profiling. The measurements have the largest impact on the retrieval of ice particle sizes, followed by ice water contents. Ice densities are mainly driven by a priori assumptions, though low relative errors in ice densities suggest that in extensive regions of the convective system, only particles with densities larger than 0.4 g/cm3 are compatible with the observations. This is in agreement with reports of large hail on the ground and with hydrometeor classification derived from ground-based polarimetric radars observations. This work confirms that multiple scattering generated by large ice hydrometeors in deep convection is relevant for airborne radar systems already at Ku band. A fortiori, multiple scattering will play a pivotal role in such conditions also for Ku band spaceborne radars (e.g., the GPM Dual Precipitation Radar).

  13. The Sensitivity of Diagnostic Radiative Properties to Cloud Microphysics among Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man

    2005-04-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of diagnosed radiative fluxes and heating rates to different treatments of cloud microphysics among cloud-resolving models (CRMs). The domain-averaged CRM outputs are used in this calculation. The impacts of the cloud overlap and uniform hydrometeor assumptions are examined using outputs having spatially varying cloud fields from a single CRM. It is found that the cloud overlap assumption impacts the diagnosis more significantly than the uniform hydrometeor assumption for all radiative fluxes. This is also the case for the longwave radiative cooling rate except for a layer above 7 km where it is more significantly impacted by the uniform hydrometeor assumption. The radiative cooling above upper-tropospheric anvils and the warming below these clouds are overestimated by about 0.5 K day-1 using the domain-averaged outputs. These results are used to further quantify intermodel differences in radiative properties due to different treatments of cloud microphysics among 10 CRMs. The magnitudes of the intermodel differences, as measured by the deviations from the consensus of 10 CRMs, are found to be smaller than those due to the cloud overlap assumption and comparable to those due to the uniform hydrometeor assumption for most shortwave radiative fluxes and the net radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. For all longwave radiative fluxes, they are smaller than those due to cloud overlap and uniform hydrometeor assumptions. The consensus of all diagnosed radiative fluxes except for the surface downward shortwave flux agrees with observations to a degree that is close to the uncertainties of satellite- and ground-based measurements.

  14. Microphysical Characteristics of Sea Fog over the East Coast of Leizhou Peninsula, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lijuan; NIU Shengjie; ZHANG Yu; XU Feng

    2013-01-01

    Microphysical properties of sea fog and correlations of these properties were analyzed based on the measurements from a comprehensive field campaign carried out from 15 March to 18 April 2010 on Donghai Island (21°35″N,110°32′5″E) in Zhanjiang,Guangdong Province,China.There were four types of circulation pattern in favor of sea fog events in this area identified,and the synoptic weather pattern was found to influence the microphysical properties of the sea fogs.Those influenced by a warm sector in front of a cold front or the anterior part of low pressure were found to usually have a much longer duration,lower visibility,greater liquid water content,and bigger fog droplet sizes.A fog droplet number concentration of N> 1 cm-3 and liquid water content of L≥0.001 g m-3 can be used to define sea fogs in this area.The type of fog droplet size distribution of the sea fog events was mostly monotonically-decreasing,with the spectrum width always being >20 μ.m.The significant temporal variation of N was due in large part to the number concentration variation of fog droplets with radius <3 μm.A strong collection process appeared when droplet spectrum width was >10 μm,which subsequently led to the sudden increase of droplet spectrum width.The dominant physical process during the sea fog events was activation with subsequent condensational growth or reversible evaporation processes,but turbulent mixing also played an important role.The collection process occurred,but was not vital.

  15. Radiative and Microphysical Characteristics of Deep Convective Systems in the Tropical Western Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Michael P.; del Genio, Anthony D.

    2003-09-01

    The radiative and microphysical characteristics of 17 precipitating systems observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite over Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Nauru Island are modeled. These cases represent both deep and midlevel convection. Reflectivity data from the TRMM precipitation radar and Geostationary Meteorological Satellite infrared radiometer measurements are used to parameterize the three-dimensional cloud microphysics of each precipitating cloud system. These parameterized cloud properties are used as input for a two-stream radiative transfer model. Comparisons with measurements of broadband radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere and the surface show agreement to within 20%. In cases in which the convective available potential energy (CAPE) is large, deep convective clouds with extended anvil decks form, containing layers of ice crystals that are too small to be detected by the TRMM radar but have a large optical thickness. This results in maximum shortwave heating and longwave cooling near cloud top at heights of 12-14 km. When CAPE is small, convective clouds extend only to midlevels (4-7 km), and there are no cloud layers below the detectability limit of the TRMM radar. Radiative heating and cooling in these cases are maximum near the freezing level. A sensitivity analysis suggests that the small ice crystals near the cloud top and larger precipitation-sized particles play equally significant roles in producing the high albedos of tropical anvil clouds. A comparison of the radiative heating profiles calculated in this study with latent heating profiles from previous studies shows that for cases of mature deep convection near local solar noon, the maximum radiative heating is 10%-30% of the magnitude of the maximum latent heating.

  16. Microphysical aerosol parameters of spheroidal particles via regularized inversion of lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, Stefanos; Böckmann, Christine

    2015-04-01

    One of the main topics in understanding the aerosol impact on climate requires the investigation of the spatial and temporal variability of microphysical properties of particles, e.g., the complex refractive index, the effective radius, the volume and surface-area concentration, and the single-scattering albedo. Remote sensing is a technique used to monitor aerosols in global coverage and fill in the observational gap. This research topic involves using multi-wavelength Raman lidar systems to extract the microphysical properties of aerosol particles, along with depolarization signals to account for the non-sphericity of the latter. Given, the optical parameters (measured by a lidar), the kernel functions, which summarize the size, shape and composition of particles, we solve for the size distribution of the particles modeled by a Fredholm integral system and further calculate the refractive index. This model works well for spherical particles (e.g. smoke); the kernel functions are derived from relatively simplified formulas (Mie scattering theory) and research has led to successful retrievals for particles which at least resemble a spherical geometry (small depolarization ratio). Obviously, more complicated atmospheric structures (e.g dust) require employment of non-spherical kernels and/or more complicated models which are investigated in this paper. The new model is now a two-dimensional one including the aspect ratio of spheroidal particles. The spheroidal kernel functions are able to be calculated via T-Matrix; a technique used for computing electromagnetic scattering by single, homogeneous, arbitrarily shaped particles. In order to speed up the process and massively perform simulation tests, we created a software interface using different regularization methods and parameter choice rules. The following methods have been used: Truncated singular value decomposition and Pade iteration with the discrepancy principle, and Tikhonov regularization with the L

  17. Retrieval of radiative and microphysical properties of clouds from multispectral infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Saito, Masanori; Tokoro, Yuka; Putri, Nurfiena Sagita; Sekiguchi, Miho

    2016-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of the macroscopic, microphysical, and optical properties of clouds are useful for studying spatial and temporal variations of clouds at various scales and constraining cloud physical processes in climate and weather prediction models. Instead of using separate independent algorithms for different cloud properties, a unified, optimal estimation-based cloud retrieval algorithm is developed and applied to moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations using ten thermal infrared bands. The model considers sensor configurations, background surface and atmospheric profile, and microphysical and optical models of ice and liquid cloud particles and radiative transfer in a plane-parallel, multilayered atmosphere. Measurement and model errors are thoroughly quantified from direct comparisons of clear-sky observations over the ocean with model calculations. Performance tests by retrieval simulations show that ice cloud properties are retrieved with high accuracy when cloud optical thickness (COT) is between 0.1 and 10. Cloud-top pressure is inferred with uncertainty lower than 10 % when COT is larger than 0.3. Applying the method to a tropical cloud system and comparing the results with the MODIS Collection 6 cloud product shows good agreement for ice cloud optical thickness when COT is less than about 5. Cloud-top height agrees well with estimates obtained by the CO2 slicing method used in the MODIS product. The present algorithm can detect optically thin parts at the edges of high clouds well in comparison with the MODIS product, in which these parts are recognized as low clouds by the infrared window method. The cloud thermodynamic phase in the present algorithm is constrained by cloud-top temperature, which tends not to produce results with an ice cloud that is too warm and liquid cloud that is too cold.

  18. The relevance of individual microphysical processes for potential vorticity anomalies in extratropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crezee, Bas; Joos, Hanna; Wernli, Heini

    2016-04-01

    Extratropical cyclones have a large impact on daily weather through their accompanying strong winds and precipitation. The latent heating and cooling associated with microphysical processes like condensation, freezing and melting, sublimation and evaporation leads to the formation of distinct cloud diabatic potential vorticity (CDPV) anomalies. Positive low-level CDPV anomalies - which typically are formed along the fronts and close to the cyclone center - have been shown to interact with upper-level PV anomalies thereby potentially enhancing storm intensification. Here a novel method is applied, which calculates backward trajectories from the mature storm stage, integrates cloud diabatic PV changes due to microphysical processes, and constructs a CDPV budget for each individual anomaly. Thereby we quantify the contributions of, e.g., cloud condensation, depositional growth of snow and melting of snow to the individual anomalies and in turn to the near-surface circulation. First, we apply this method to an idealized mid-latitude cyclone. The formation of the relatively small low-level negative CDPV anomalies is dominated each by one specific process, depending on their location relative to the front. For the large positive PV anomaly we find that the strongest contributions are from in-cloud condensation and below-cloud snow melting and rain evaporation. Although contributions of in-cloud depositional growth of ice are rather small, they cover a very large area and are therefore dynamically significant, i.e., they produce a fairly large-scale but low-amplitude anomaly. In addition the results from the idealized simulations are compared to a wintertime cyclone. It will be discussed how well the method works for real cyclones and how closely the results agree with those from the idealized channel model experiment.

  19. Interactions Between Microphysics and Dynamics in Persistent Arctic Mixed Phase Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komurcu, M.; Harrington, J. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Mixed-phase clouds are commonly observed in the Arctic atmosphere, particularly during the transition and winter seasons. Inter-comparison of the results of the model simulations of cold season mixed-phase clouds show that the biggest spreads in model results occur in the simulated water contents which lead to negative radiation errors. Partitioning of the liquid water and ice is crucial in understanding the radiative influences of these clouds, and in turn their influences on the Arctic surface energy budget. Because ice growth occurs at the expense of liquid water droplets at cold temperatures of the Arctic during the cold season, the phase partitioning of water is partly controlled by the ice formation and growth processes. Therefore, in this study, we investigate and intercompare different ice formation mechanisms, ice crystal shapes and the number of available ice nuclei to understand the microphysical and dynamical interactions that allow for the formation and persistence of both liquid water and ice in long-lived mixed-phase clouds. We present results that attempt to separate the influences of microphysics and dynamics, with a view to understanding how dynamic processes affect the production and maintenance of supercooled liquid within Arctic cloud systems. We investigate how certain conditions that influence cloud circulations, such as changing the magnitudes of surface fluxes, or radiative forcing, can lead to the decoupling of the cloud and subcloud layers, and in turn possibly to the cessation of the cloud. To identify the conditions of decoupling, we develop a new ratio based on cloud circulations that is different from previous assessments of decoupling in the literature, which did not seem to work for Arctic clouds.

  20. What are the Microphysical Properties of Clouds in an Atmosphere without Human-Induced Pollution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichter, J.; O'Donnell, D.

    2009-04-01

    The composition of the atmosphere without any man-made emissions is controlled by biogenic and volcanic emissions and wind-driven particle emissions from the pedosphere and the ocean. Biogenic sources include phytoplankton, emission of volatile organic carbon (VOC) compounds by plants and reduced sulfur emissions from vegetation and soils. Besides mineral dust and biomass burning emissions, organics formed from biogenic VOC was likely the dominating aerosol over continents. The different chemical composition of present-day and past climate aerosol loading might affect the subset of aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei and subsequently the microphysical properties of clouds. We will present some exploratory model simulations contrasting the climate system in the absence of human-induced aerosol and VOC emissions with that in the presence of such emissions. In particular, cloud properties will be simulated for present-day emissions and contrasted to a scenario where anthropogenic emissions are switched off. The atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 used for this study includes the aerosol model HAM and has been extended by an emission model and a module for secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The updated model treats SOA formed from the anthropogenic precursors toluene, xylene and benzene and from the biogenic precursors isoprene and monoterpenes. SOA-specific modelled processes are precursor emissions, gas-phase formation of SOA and gas-aerosol phase partitioning of SOA. Aerosol microphysical and sink processes (dry and wet removal) are treated with minor modifications to the existing model. The VOC emissions from plants are calculated dependent on surface temperature and photosynthetically active radiation flux.

  1. Microphysics in the Multi-Scale Modeling Systems with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, J.; Lamg, S.; Matsui, T.; Shen, B.; Zeng, X.; Shi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (l) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, the microphysics developments of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling system to study the heavy precipitation processes will be presented.

  2. A global off-line model of size-resolved aerosol microphysics: II. Identification of key uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We use the new GLOMAP model of global aerosol microphysics to investigate the sensitivity of modelled sulfate and sea salt aerosol properties to uncertainties in the driving microphysical processes and compare these uncertainties with those associated with aerosol and precursor gas emissions. Overall, we conclude that uncertainties in microphysical processes have a larger effect on global sulfate and sea salt derived condensation nuclei (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations than uncertainties in present-day sulfur emissions. Our simulations suggest that uncertainties in predicted sulfate and sea salt CCN abundances due to poorly constrained microphysical processes are likely to be of a similar magnitude to long-term changes in sulfate and sea salt CCN due to changes in anthropogenic emissions. A microphysical treatment of the global sulfate aerosol allows the uncertainty in climate-relevant aerosol properties to be attributed to specific processes in a way that has not been possible with simpler aerosol schemes. In particular we conclude that: (1 changes in the binary H2SO4-H2O nucleation rate and condensation rate of gaseous H2SO4 cause a shift in the vertical location of the upper tropospheric CN layer by as much as 3 km, while the shape of the CN profile is essentially pre-served (2 uncertainties in the binary H2SO4-H2O nucleation rate have a relatively insignificant effect on marine boundary layer (MBL aerosol properties; (3 emitting a fraction of anthropogenic SO2 as particulates (to represent production of sulfate particles in power plant plumes below the scale of the model grid (which is of the order of 300 km has the potential to change the global mean MBL sulfate-derived CN concentrations by up to 72%, and changes of up to a factor 20 can occur in polluted continental regions; (4 predicted global mean MBL sulfate and sea salt CCN concentrations change by 10 to 60% when several microphysical processes are changed within

  3. Carrier Bulk-Lifetime Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Solcansky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the measurement of the minority carrier bulk-lifetime the characterization method MW-PCD is used, where the result of measurement is the effective carrier lifetime, which is very dependent on the surface recombination velocity and therefore on the quality of a silicon surface passivation. This work deals with an examination of a different solution types for the chemical passivation of a silicon surface. Various solutions are tested on silicon wafers for their consequent comparison. The main purpose is to find optimal solution, which suits the requirements of a time stability and start-up velocity of passivation, reproducibility of the measurements and a possibility of a perfect cleaning of a passivating solution remains from a silicon surface, so that the parameters of a measured silicon wafer will not worsen and there will not be any contamination of the other wafers series in the production after a repetitive return of the measured wafer into the production process. The cleaning process itself is also a subject of a development.

  4. Coupling brane fields to bulk supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parameswaran, Susha L. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Theoretical Physics; Schmidt, Jonas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    In this note we present a simple, general prescription for coupling brane localized fields to bulk supergravity. We illustrate the procedure by considering 6D N=2 bulk supergravity on a 2D orbifold, with brane fields localized at the fixed points. The resulting action enjoys the full 6D N=2 symmetries in the bulk, and those of 4D N=1 supergravity at the brane positions. (orig.)

  5. Relative entropy equals bulk relative entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Jafferis, Daniel L; Maldacena, Juan; Suh, S Josephine

    2015-01-01

    We consider the gravity dual of the modular Hamiltonian associated to a general subregion of a boundary theory. We use it to argue that the relative entropy of nearby states is given by the relative entropy in the bulk, to leading order in the bulk gravitational coupling. We also argue that the boundary modular flow is dual to the bulk modular flow in the entanglement wedge, with implications for entanglement wedge reconstruction.

  6. Anvil Glaciation in a Deep Cumulus Updraught over Florida Simulated with the Explicit Microphysics Model. I: Impact of Various Nucleation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Vaughan T. J.; Andronache, Constantin; Sherwood, Steven C.; Bansemer, Aaron; Conant, William C.; Demott, Paul J.; Flagan, Richard C.; Heymsfield, Andy; Jonsson, Haflidi; Poellot, Micheal; Rissman, Tracey A.; Seinfeld, John H.; Vanreken, Tim; Varutbangkul, Varuntida; Wilson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Simulations of a cumulonimbus cloud observed in the Cirrus regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) with an advanced version of the Explicit Microphysics Model (EMM) are presented. The EMM has size-resolved aerosols and predicts the time evolution of sizes, bulk densities and axial ratios of ice particles. Observations by multiple aircraft in the troposphere provide inputs to the model, including observations of the ice nuclei and of the entire size distribution of condensation nuclei. Homogeneous droplet freezing is found to be the source of almost all of the ice crystals in the anvil updraught of this particular model cloud. Most of the simulated droplets that freeze to form anvil crystals appear to be nucleated by activation of aerosols far above cloud base in the interior of the cloud ("secondary" or "in cloud" droplet nucleation). This is partly because primary droplets formed at cloud base are invariably depleted by accretion before they can reach the anvil base in the updraught, which promotes an increase with height of the average supersaturation in the updraught aloft. More than half of these aerosols, activated far above cloud base, are entrained into the updraught of this model cloud from the lateral environment above about 5 km above mean sea level. This confirms the importance of remote sources of atmospheric aerosol for anvil glaciation. Other nucleation processes impinge indirectly upon the anvil glaciation by modifying the concentration of supercooled droplets in the upper levels of the mixed-phase region. For instance, the warm-rain process produces a massive indirect impact on the anvil crystal concentration, because it determines the mass of precipitation forming in the updraught. It competes with homogeneous freezing as a sink for cloud droplets. The effects from turbulent enhancement of the warm-rain process and from the nucleation processes on the anvil ice properties are assessed.

  7. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The...

  8. Applications of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J. R.

    The development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) can be broadly generalized into thin-film electronics, wire applications, and bulk applications. We consider bulk HTS's to include sintered or crystallized forms that do not take the geometry of filaments or tapes, and we discuss major applications for these materials. For the most part applications may be realized with the HTS's cooled to 77 K, and the properties of the bulk HTS's are often already sufficient for commercial use. A non-exhaustive list of applications for bulk HTS's includes trapped field magnets, hysteresis motors, magnetic shielding, current leads, and magnetic bearings. These applications are briefly discussed in this paper.

  9. Hyperon bulk viscosity in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Monika

    2008-01-01

    We study bulk viscosity in neutron star matter including $\\Lambda$ hyperons in the presence of quantizing magnetic fields. Relaxation time and bulk viscosity due to both the non-leptonic weak process involving $\\Lambda$ hyperons and the direct Urca (dUrca) process are calculated here. In the presence of a strong magnetic field, bulk viscosity coefficients are enhanced when protons, electrons and muons are populated in their respective zeroth Landau levels compared with the field free cases. The enhancement of bulk viscosity coefficient is larger for the dUrca case.

  10. The microphysics of clouds over the Antarctic Peninsula - Part 2: modelling aspects within Polar WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listowski, Constantino; Lachlan-Cope, Tom

    2017-08-01

    The first intercomparisons of cloud microphysics schemes implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale atmospheric model (version 3.5.1) are performed on the Antarctic Peninsula using the polar version of WRF (Polar WRF) at 5 km resolution, along with comparisons to the British Antarctic Survey's aircraft measurements (presented in part 1 of this work; Lachlan-Cope et al., 2016). This study follows previous works suggesting the misrepresentation of the cloud thermodynamic phase in order to explain large radiative biases derived at the surface in Polar WRF continent-wide (at 15 km or coarser horizontal resolution) and in the Polar WRF-based operational forecast model Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) over the Larsen C Ice Shelf at 5 km horizontal resolution. Five cloud microphysics schemes are investigated: the WRF single-moment five-class scheme (WSM5), the WRF double-moment six-class scheme (WDM6), the Morrison double-moment scheme, the Thompson scheme, and the Milbrandt-Yau double-moment seven-class scheme. WSM5 (used in AMPS) and WDM6 (an upgrade version of WSM5) lead to the largest biases in observed supercooled liquid phase and surface radiative biases. The schemes simulating clouds in closest agreement to the observations are the Morrison, Thompson, and Milbrandt schemes for their better average prediction of occurrences of clouds and cloud phase. Interestingly, those three schemes are also the ones allowing for significant reduction of the longwave surface radiative bias over the Larsen C Ice Shelf (eastern side of the peninsula). This is important for surface energy budget consideration with Polar WRF since the cloud radiative effect is more pronounced in the infrared over icy surfaces. Overall, the Morrison scheme compares better to the cloud observation and radiation measurements. The fact that WSM5 and WDM6 are single-moment parameterizations for the ice crystals is responsible for their lesser ability to model the

  11. Microphysical and macrophysical responses of marine stratocumulus polluted by underlying ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Matthew Wells

    Multiple sensors flying in the A-train constellation of satellites were used to determine the extent to which aerosol plumes from ships passing below marine stratocumulus alter the microphysical and macrophysical properties of the clouds. Aerosol plumes generated by ships sometimes influence cloud microphysical properties (effective radius) and, to a largely undetermined extent, cloud macrophysical properties (liquid water path, coverage, depth, precipitation, and longevity). Aerosol indirect effects were brought into focus, using observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and the 94-GHZ radar onboard CloudSat. To assess local cloud scale responses to aerosol, the locations of over one thousand ship tracks coinciding with the radar were meticulously logged by hand from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery. MODIS imagery was used to distinguish ship tracks that were embedded in closed, open, and unclassifiable mesoscale cellular cloud structures. The impact of aerosol on the microphysical cloud properties in both the closed and open cell regimes were consistent with the changes predicted by the Twomey hypothesis. For the macrophysical changes, differences in the sign and magnitude of these properties were observed between cloud regimes. The results demonstrate that the spatial extent of rainfall (rain cover fraction) and intensity decrease in the clouds contaminated by the ship plume compared to the ambient pristine clouds. Although reductions of precipitation were common amongst the clouds with detectable rainfall (72% of cases), a substantial fraction of ship tracks (28% of cases) exhibited the opposite response. The sign and strength of the response was tied to the type of stratocumulus (e.g., closed vs open cells), depth of the boundary layer, and humidity in the free-troposphere. When closed cellular clouds were identified, liquid water path, drizzle rate, and rain cover fraction (an average

  12. On the Influence of a Simple Microphysics Parametrization on Radiation Fog Modelling: A Case Study During ParisFog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojing; Musson-Genon, Luc; Dupont, Eric; Milliez, Maya; Carissimo, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of a radiation fog event with a single column model is presented, which takes into account recent developments in microphysical parametrizations. One-dimensional simulations are performed using the computational fluid dynamics model Code_Saturne and the results are compared to a very detailed in situ dataset collected during the ParisFog campaign, which took place near Paris, France, during the winter 2006-2007. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete diurnal simulations and to the role of microphysics in the fog life cycle. The comparison between the simulated and the observed visibility, in the single-column model case study, shows that the evolution of radiation fog is correctly simulated. Sensitivity simulations show that fog development and dissipation are sensitive to the droplet-size distribution through sedimentation/deposition processes but the aerosol number concentration in the coarse mode has a low impact on the time of fog formation.

  13. Optical and microphysical properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol observed over Warsaw on 10th July 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Lucja; Stachlewska, Iwona; Veselovskii, Igor; Baars, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Biomass burning aerosol originating from Canadian forest fires was widely observed over Europe in July 2013. Favorable weather conditions caused long-term westward flow of smoke from Canada to Western and Central Europe. During this period, PollyXT lidar of the University of Warsaw took wavelength dependent measurements in Warsaw. On July 10th short event of simultaneous advection of Canadian smoke and Saharan dust was observed at different altitudes over Warsaw. Different origination of both air masses was indicated by backward trajectories from HYSPLIT model. Lidar measurements performed with various wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm), using also Raman and depolarization channels for VIS and UV allowed for distinguishing physical differences of this two types of aerosols. Optical properties acted as input for retrieval of microphysical properties. Comparisons of microphysical and optical properties of biomass burning aerosols and mineral dust observed will be presented.

  14. On the relative importance of different microphysics on the D-type expansion of galactic HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Haworth, Thomas J; Acreman, David M; Bisbas, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    Radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations are used to study many astrophysical phenomena, however they require the use of simplified radiation transport and thermal prescriptions to reduce computational cost. In this paper we present a systematic study of the importance of microphysical processes in RHD simulations using the example of D-type HII region expansion. We compare the simplest hydrogen-only models with those that include: ionisation of H, He, C, N, O, S and Ne, different gas metallicity, non-LTE metal line blanketed stellar spectral models of varying metallicity, radiation pressure, dust and treatment of photodissociation regions. Each of these processes are explicitly treated using modern numerical methods rather than parameterisation. In line with expectations, changes due to microphysics in either the effective number of ionising photons or the thermal structure of the gas lead to differences in D-type expansion. In general we find that more realistic calculations lead to the onset of D-type exp...

  15. New microphysical volcanic forcing datasets for the Agung, El Chichon and Pinatubo eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Marshall, Lauren; Carslaw, Kenneth; Chipperfield, Martyn; Bellouin, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Olaf; Johnson, Colin; O'Connor, Fiona

    2017-04-01

    Major tropical volcanic eruptions inject huge amounts of SO2 directly into the stratosphere, and create a long-lasting perturbation to the stratospheric aerosol. The abruptly elevated aerosol has strong climate impacts, principally surface cooling via scattering incoming solar radiation. The enhanced tropical stratospheric aerosol can also absorb outgoing long wave radiation causing a warming of the stratosphere and subsequent complex composition-dynamics responses (e.g. Dhomse et al., 2015). In this presentation we apply the composition-climate model UM-UKCA with interactive stratospheric chemistry and aerosol microphysics (Dhomse et al., 2014) to assess the enhancement to the stratospheric aerosol and associated radiative forcings from the three largest tropical eruptions in the last 60 years: Mt Agung (February 1963), El Chichon (April 1982) and Mt. Pinatubo (June 1991). Accurately characterising the forcing signature from these major eruptions is important for attribution of recent climate change and volcanic effects have been identified as a key requirement for robust attribution of multi-decadal surface temperature trends (e.g. Marotzke and Forster, 2015). Aligning with the design of the ISA-MIP co-ordinated multi-model "Historical Eruption SO2 Emissions Assessment" (HErSEA), we have carried out 3-member ensemble of simulations with each of upper, low and mid-point best estimates for SO2 and injection height for each eruption. We evaluate simulated aerosol properties (e.g. extinction, AOD, effective radius, particle size distribution) against a range of satellite and in-situ observational datasets and assess stratospheric heating against temperature anomalies are compared against reanalysis and other datasets. References: Dhomse SS, Chipperfield MP, Feng W, Hossaini R, Mann GW, Santee ML (2015) Revisiting the hemispheric asymmetry in midlatitude ozone changes following the Mount Pinatubo eruption: A 3-D model study, Geophysical Research Letters, 42, pp.3038

  16. Interactions of radiation, microphysics, and turbulence in the evolution of cirrus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu

    2000-12-01

    A two-dimensional cirrus cloud model has been developed to investigate the interaction and feedback of radiation, ice microphysics, and turbulence-scale turbulence, and their influence on the evolution of cirrus clouds. The new features of the model include a detailed ice microphysical module for the prediction of ice crystal size distributions, a radiation scheme which interacts with the ice crystal size distribution via ice water content (IWC) and a mean effective ice crystal size, the effects of radiation on the diffusional growth of ice crystals, and a second-order closure for turbulence. Simulation results show that initial cloud formation occurs through ice nucleation associated with dynamic and thermodynamic forcings. Radiative processes enhance both the growth of ice crystals at the cloud top by radiative cooling and the sublimation of ice crystals in the lower region by radiative heating. In addition, the radiation effect on individual ice crystals through diffusional growth is shown to be significant. Turbulence begins to play a substantial role in cloud evolution during the maintenance and dissipation period of the cirrus cloud life cycle. The inclusion of turbulence tends to generate more intermediate-to-large ice crystals, especially in the middle and lower parts of the cloud. A three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model has also been developed to simulate the transfer of solar and thermal infrared radiation in inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The model utilizes a diffusion approximation approach for application to inhomogeneous media employing Cartesian coordinates. The extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor are parameterized in terms of the ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size. We employ the correlated k- distribution method for incorporation of gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres. Delta- function adjustment is used to account for the strong forward diffraction nature of the phase

  17. Dislocation Motion and the Microphysics of Flash Heating and Weakening of Faults during Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Spagnuolo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes are the result of slip along faults and are due to the decrease of rock frictional strength (dynamic weakening with increasing slip and slip rate. Friction experiments simulating the abrupt accelerations (>>10 m/s2, slip rates (~1 m/s, and normal stresses (>>10 MPa expected at the passage of the earthquake rupture along the front of fault patches, measured large fault dynamic weakening for slip rates larger than a critical velocity of 0.01–0.1 m/s. The dynamic weakening corresponds to a decrease of the friction coefficient (defined as the ratio of shear stress vs. normal stress up to 40%–50% after few millimetres of slip (flash weakening, almost independently of rock type. The microstructural evolution of the sliding interfaces with slip may yield hints on the microphysical processes responsible for flash weakening. At the microscopic scale, the frictional strength results from the interaction of micro- to nano-scale surface irregularities (asperities which deform during fault sliding. During flash weakening, the visco-plastic and brittle work on the asperities results in abrupt frictional heating (flash heating and grain size reduction associated with mechano-chemical reactions (e.g., decarbonation in CO2-bearing minerals such as calcite and dolomite; dehydration in water-bearing minerals such as clays, serpentine, etc. and phase transitions (e.g., flash melting in silicate-bearing rocks. However, flash weakening is also associated with grain size reduction down to the nanoscale. Using focused ion beam scanning and transmission electron microscopy, we studied the micro-physical mechanisms associated with flash heating and nanograin formation in carbonate-bearing fault rocks. Experiments were conducted on pre-cut Carrara marble (99.9% calcite cylinders using a rotary shear apparatus at conditions relevant to seismic rupture propagation. Flash heating and weakening in calcite-bearing rocks is associated with a shock-like stress

  18. Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Microphysics Within Winter Storms Using Field Data and In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, B.; Molthan, A.; Yu, R.; Nesbitt, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Snow prediction within models is sensitive to the snow densities, habits, and degree of riming within the BMPs. Several microphysical schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model down to 1.33-km grid spacing are evaluated using aircraft, radar, and ground in situ data from the Global Precipitation Mission Cold-­season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) experiment over southern Ontario, as well as a few years (12 winter storms) of surface measurements of riming, crystal habit, snow density, and radar measurements at Stony Brook, NY (SBNY on north shore of Long Island) during the 2009-­2012 winter seasons. Surface microphysical measurements at SBNY were taken every 15 to 30 minutes using a stereo microscope and camera, and snow depth and snow density were also recorded. During these storms, a vertically­pointing Ku band radar was used to observe the vertical evolution of reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocities. The GCPEx presentation will focus on verification using aircraft spirals through warm frontal snow band event on 18 February 2012. All the BMPs realistically simulated the structure of the band and the vertical distribution of snow/ice aloft, except the SBU-YLIN overpredicted slightly and Thompson (THOM) underpredicted somewhat. The Morrison (MORR) scheme produced the best slope size distribution for snow, while the Stony Brook (SBU) underpredicted and the THOM slightly overpredicted. Those schemes that have the slope intercept a function of temperature (SBU and WSM6) tended to perform better for that parameter than others. There was a large amount of super-cooled water near the center of the band, which was underpredicted by all schemes. Meanwhile, for the 15 cases at SBNY, which include moderate and heavy riming events, the non-spherical snow assumption (THOM and SBU-YLIN) simulated a more realistic distribution of reflectivity than spherical snow assumptions in the WSM6 and MORR schemes. The MORR, WSM6, and SBU schemes are comparable to

  19. Titan's Detached Haze as a Test of Circulation and Microphysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    In 1981 Voyager ISS images showed a thin, high haze layer above Titan's main haze. Rages and Pollack (Icarus 55, 50-62, 1983) measured the altitude of this so-called detached haze to be at 357 km at the equator and about 27 km lower in the high southern latitudes. In the Voyager images and later in the Cassini ISS images starting in 2004 the detached haze was observed to be present and continuous over all latitudes south of the northern polar vortex boundary, but in the Cassini images beginning in 2004 the altitude of the haze was significantly higher (just over 500 km ) and more circular. West et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L06204, doi:10.1029/2011GL046843, 2011) tracked the altitude of the haze from 2004 to August of 2010, and found that the altitude dropped dramatically and most rapidly near equinox in 2009. More recent images taken in 2011 show the altitude to be the same, within a few km, as the altitude measured by Rages and Pollack almost 30 earth years and one Titan year earlier. Two very different models to explain the existence and properties of the detached were put forward prior to the observation of the altitude shift. One by Rannou et al. (Nature 418, 853-856, 2002) produces the detached haze via a global meridional cell and includes seasonal variations. Another by Lavvas et al. (Icarus, 201, 626-633, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.01.004, 2009), produces the haze by a purely steady-state microphysical mechanism and must be coupled with a dynamical process to produce the evolution. The collapse of Titan's detached haze is most likely a feature of the breakdown of a global meridional cell in the high stratosphere at equinox as solar heating becomes symmetric, although the haze does not disappear with the change in altitude as predicted by the model of Rannou et al.. The detached haze, a scientific curiosity for almost 30 years, has become an incisive test for Titan circulation and haze microphysical models. Part of this work was performed by the Jet

  20. Earthquake and slow-slip nucleation investigated with a micro-physics based seismic cycle simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ende, Martijn; Chen, Jianye; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Niemeijer, André

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory experiments grant essential insights into the frictional behaviour of faults over a wide range of conditions. However, these experiments are limited in the size of the test subject (the rock sample) and in their duration, which hinders the extrapolation of lab results to the scales of natural faults. Seismic cycle numerical modelling provides the means to bridge this spatial and temporal gap between laboratory experiments and nature. Modelling of the evolution of fault rock friction, leading to earthquake nucleation, and rupture propagation is commonly performed based on rate-and-state friction (RSF). While the governing equations are convenient for implementation into numerical codes, they are empirical in nature, and the absence of a physical basis for extrapolation of laboratory-derived parameters complicates the interpretation of results that are derived from such models. By contrast, analytical models based on micro-physical principles allow for an interpretation of their predictions in terms of well-defined material properties and thermodynamic quantities, but are often restricted to highly simplified geometries and boundary conditions. In this work, we present a numerical implementation of the micro-physical model proposed by Chen & Spiers (2016), which describes the interplay between granular flow and ductile creep of fault gouges, into an earthquake cycle simulator, QDYN (Luo & Ampuero, 2011). This physics-based approach offers an alternative to the rate-and-state friction laws for more detailed investigation of earthquake source mechanics. With this implementation, characteristic features typically ascribed to rate-and-state friction laws emerge spontaneously from the model, and can be related to physical properties of the material of study under the appropriate pressure and temperature conditions. We investigate the nucleation behaviour of frictional instabilities, with focus on the transition from stable creep to slow-slip and to dynamic

  1. Validation of MODIS cloud microphysical properties with in situ measurements over the Southeast Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Min

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing the unique characteristics of the cloud over the Southeast Pacific (SEP off the coast of Chile during the VOCALS field campaign, we validated satellite remote sensing of cloud microphysical properties against in situ data from multi-aircraft observations, and studied the extent to which these retrieved properties are sufficiently constrained and consistent to reliably quantify the influence of aerosol loading on cloud droplet sizes. After constraining the spatial-temporal coincidence between satellite retrievals and in situ measurements, we selected 17 non-drizzle comparison pairs. For these cases the mean aircraft profiling times were within one hour of Terra overpass at both projected and un-projected (actual aircraft positions for two different averaging domains of 5 km and 25 km. Retrieved quantities that were averaged over a larger domain of 25 km compared better statistically with in situ observations than averages over a smaller domain of 5 km. Validation at projected aircraft positions was slightly better than un-projected aircraft positions for some parameters. Overall, both MODIS-retrieved effective radius and LWP were larger but highly correlated with the in situ measured effective radius and LWP. The observed effective radius difference between the two decreased with increasing cloud drop number concentration, and increased with increasing cloud geometrical thickness. Also, MODIS retrievals for adiabatic clouds agreed better with the in situ measurements than for sub-adiabatic clouds. Our validation and sensitivity analysis of simulated retrievals demonstrate that both cloud geometrical thickness and cloud adiabaticity are important factors in satellite retrievals of effective radius and cloud drop number concentration. The large variabilities in cloud geometric thickness and adiabaticity, the dependencies of cloud microphysical properties on both quantities (as demonstrated in our sensitivity study of simulated retrievals

  2. Influence of heterogeneous freezing on the microphysical and radiative properties of orographic cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Joos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of heterogeneous freezing on the microphysical and optical properties of orographic cirrus clouds has been simulated with the cloud resolving model EULAG. Idealized simulations with different concentrations of ice nuclei (IN in a dynamically dominated regime with high vertical velocities have been performed. Furthermore the temperature under which the cloud forms as well as the critical supersaturation which is needed for the initiation of heterogenoues freezing have been varied. The short wave, long wave and net cloud forcing has been calculated under the assumption that the clouds form between 06:00 and 12:00 LT or between 12:00 and 18:00 LT, respectively. In general it can be seen that the onset of homogeneous freezing is shifted in time depending on the IN concentration as part of the available water vapor is depleted before the critical threshold for homogeneous freezing is reached. Although the high vertical velocities in an orographic gravity wave lead to a strong adiabatic cooling followed by high ice supersaturations, a small number concentration of IN in the order of 5 L−1 is already able to strongly decrease the simulated ice crystal number burden (ICNB, ice water path (IWP and optical depth of the cloud. In general, the ICNB, IWP and optical depth strongly decrease when the IN concentrations are increased from 0 to 50 L−1. The absolute values of the short wave, long wave and net cloud forcing are also reduced with increasing IN concentrations. If a cloud produces a net warming or cooling depends on the IN concentration, the temperature and the time of day at which the cloud forms. The clouds that form between 06:00 and 12:00 LT are mainly cooling whereas the clouds with the same microphysical properties can lead to a warming when they form between 12:00 and 18:00 LT. In order to predict the radiative forcing of cirrus clouds it is therefore necessary to take the correct dynamical and thermodynamical processes as

  3. Evaluation of Mixed-Phase Microphysics Within Winter Storms Using Field Data and In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Brian A.; Molthan, Andrew; Yu, Ruyi; Nesbitt, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Snow prediction within models is sensitive to the snow densities, habits, and degree of riming within the BMPs. Improving these BMPs is a crucial step toward improving both weather forecasting and climate predictions. Several microphysical schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model down to 1.33-km grid spacing are evaluated using aircraft, radar, and ground in situ data from the Global Precipitation Mission Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) experiment over southern Ontario, as well as a few years (12 winter storms) of surface measurements of riming, crystal habit, snow density, and radar measurements at Stony Brook, NY (SBNY on north shore of Long Island) during the 2009-2012 winter seasons. Surface microphysical measurements at SBNY were taken every 15 to 30 minutes using a stereo microscope and camera, and snow depth and snow density were also recorded. During these storms, a vertically-pointing Ku band radar was used to observe the vertical evolution of reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocities. The GCPex presentation will focus on verification using aircraft spirals through warm frontal snow band event on 18 February 2012. All the BMPs realistically simulated the structure of the band and the vertical distribution of snow/ice aloft, except the SBU-YLIN overpredicted slightly and Thompson (THOM) underpredicted somewhat. The Morrison (MORR) scheme produced the best slope size distribution for snow, while the Stony Brook (SBU) underpredicted and the THOM slightly overpredicted. Those schemes that have the slope intercept a function of temperature (SBU and WSM6) tended to perform better for that parameter than others, especially the fixed intercept in Goddard. Overall, the spread among BMPs was smaller than in other studies, likely because there was limited riming with the band. For the 15 cases at SBNY, which include moderate and heavy riming events, the non-spherical snow assumption (THOM and SBU-YLIN) simulated a more realistic

  4. How do changes in warm-phase microphysics affect deep convective clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital

    2017-08-01

    Understanding aerosol effects on deep convective clouds and the derived effects on the radiation budget and rain patterns can largely contribute to estimations of climate uncertainties. The challenge is difficult in part because key microphysical processes in the mixed and cold phases are still not well understood. For deep convective clouds with a warm base, understanding aerosol effects on the warm processes is extremely important as they set the initial and boundary conditions for the cold processes. Therefore, the focus of this study is the warm phase, which can be better resolved. The main question is: How do aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase affect the properties of deep convective cloud systems? To explore this question, we used a weather research and forecasting (WRF) model with spectral bin microphysics to simulate a deep convective cloud system over the Marshall Islands during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX). The model results were validated against observations, showing similarities in the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and the surface rain rate. Simulations with larger aerosol loading resulted in a larger total cloud mass, a larger cloud fraction in the upper levels, and a larger frequency of strong updrafts and rain rates. Enlarged mass both below and above the zero temperature level (ZTL) contributed to the increase in cloud total mass (water and ice) in the polluted runs. Increased condensation efficiency of cloud droplets governed the gain in mass below the ZTL, while both enhanced condensational and depositional growth led to increased mass above it. The enhanced mass loading above the ZTL acted to reduce the cloud buoyancy, while the thermal buoyancy (driven by the enhanced latent heat release) increased in the polluted runs. The overall effect showed an increased upward transport (across the ZTL) of liquid water driven by both larger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. These aerosol effects were reflected in the larger ratio

  5. Microphysical Effects of Cloud Seeding in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Observed from NOAA Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the satellite retrieval methodology, the spectral characteristics and cloud microphysical properties were analyzed that included brightness temperatures of Channels 4 and 5, and their brightness temperature difference (BTD), the particle effective radius of seeded cloud track caused by an operational cloud seeding and the microphysical effects of cloud seeding were revealed by the comparisons of their differences inside and outside the seeded track. The cloud track was actually a cloud channel reaching 1.5-km deep and 14-km wide lasting for more than 80 min. The effective radius of ambient clouds was 10-15μm, while that within the cloud track ranged from 15 to 26 μm. The ambient clouds were composed of supercooled droplets, and the composition of the cloud within the seeding track was ice. With respect to the rather stable reflectance of two ambient sides around the track, the visible spectral reflectance in the cloud track varied at least 10%, and reached a maximum of 35%, the reflectance of 3.7 μm in the seeded track relatively decreased at least 10%. As cloud seeding advanced, the width and depth were gradually increased. Simultaneously the cloud top temperature within the track became progressively warmer with respect to the ambient clouds,and the maximum temperature differences reached 4.2 and 3.9℃ at the first seeding position for Channels 4 and 5. In addition, the BTD in the track also increased steadily to a maximum of 1.4℃, compared with 0.2-0.4℃ of the ambient clouds. The evidence that the seeded cloud became thinner comes from the visible image showing a channel, the warming of the cloud tops, and the increase of BTD in the seeded track.The seeded cloud became thinner mainly because the cloud top descended and it lost water to precipitation throughout its depth. For this cloud seeding case, the glaciation became apparent at cloud tops about 22min after seeding. The formation of a cloud track in the supercooled stratiform clouds was

  6. How do changes in warm-phase microphysics affect deep convective clouds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding aerosol effects on deep convective clouds and the derived effects on the radiation budget and rain patterns can largely contribute to estimations of climate uncertainties. The challenge is difficult in part because key microphysical processes in the mixed and cold phases are still not well understood. For deep convective clouds with a warm base, understanding aerosol effects on the warm processes is extremely important as they set the initial and boundary conditions for the cold processes. Therefore, the focus of this study is the warm phase, which can be better resolved. The main question is: How do aerosol-derived changes in the warm phase affect the properties of deep convective cloud systems? To explore this question, we used a weather research and forecasting (WRF model with spectral bin microphysics to simulate a deep convective cloud system over the Marshall Islands during the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX. The model results were validated against observations, showing similarities in the vertical profile of radar reflectivity and the surface rain rate. Simulations with larger aerosol loading resulted in a larger total cloud mass, a larger cloud fraction in the upper levels, and a larger frequency of strong updrafts and rain rates. Enlarged mass both below and above the zero temperature level (ZTL contributed to the increase in cloud total mass (water and ice in the polluted runs. Increased condensation efficiency of cloud droplets governed the gain in mass below the ZTL, while both enhanced condensational and depositional growth led to increased mass above it. The enhanced mass loading above the ZTL acted to reduce the cloud buoyancy, while the thermal buoyancy (driven by the enhanced latent heat release increased in the polluted runs. The overall effect showed an increased upward transport (across the ZTL of liquid water driven by both larger updrafts and larger droplet mobility. These aerosol effects were reflected in the

  7. Parameterizing microphysical effects on variances and covariances of moisture and heat content using a multivariate probability density function: a study with CLUBB (tag MVCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brian M.; Larson, Vincent E.

    2016-11-01

    Microphysical processes, such as the formation, growth, and evaporation of precipitation, interact with variability and covariances (e.g., fluxes) in moisture and heat content. For instance, evaporation of rain may produce cold pools, which in turn may trigger fresh convection and precipitation. These effects are usually omitted or else crudely parameterized at subgrid scales in weather and climate models.A more formal approach is pursued here, based on predictive, horizontally averaged equations for the variances, covariances, and fluxes of moisture and heat content. These higher-order moment equations contain microphysical source terms. The microphysics terms can be integrated analytically, given a suitably simple warm-rain microphysics scheme and an approximate assumption about the multivariate distribution of cloud-related and precipitation-related variables. Performing the integrations provides exact expressions within an idealized context.A large-eddy simulation (LES) of a shallow precipitating cumulus case is performed here, and it indicates that the microphysical effects on (co)variances and fluxes can be large. In some budgets and altitude ranges, they are dominant terms. The analytic expressions for the integrals are implemented in a single-column, higher-order closure model. Interactive single-column simulations agree qualitatively with the LES. The analytic integrations form a parameterization of microphysical effects in their own right, and they also serve as benchmark solutions that can be compared to non-analytic integration methods.

  8. A Fast and Efficient Version of the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) Global Aerosol Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunha; Adams, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops more computationally efficient versions of the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithms, collectively called Fast TOMAS. Several methods for speeding up the algorithm were attempted, but only reducing the number of size sections was adopted. Fast TOMAS models, coupled to the GISS GCM II-prime, require a new coagulation algorithm with less restrictive size resolution assumptions but only minor changes in other processes. Fast TOMAS models have been evaluated in a box model against analytical solutions of coagulation and condensation and in a 3-D model against the original TOMAS (TOMAS-30) model. Condensation and coagulation in the Fast TOMAS models agree well with the analytical solution but show slightly more bias than the TOMAS-30 box model. In the 3-D model, errors resulting from decreased size resolution in each process (i.e., emissions, cloud processing wet deposition, microphysics) are quantified in a series of model sensitivity simulations. Errors resulting from lower size resolution in condensation and coagulation, defined as the microphysics error, affect number and mass concentrations by only a few percent. The microphysics error in CN70CN100 (number concentrations of particles larger than 70100 nm diameter), proxies for cloud condensation nuclei, range from 5 to 5 in most regions. The largest errors are associated with decreasing the size resolution in the cloud processing wet deposition calculations, defined as cloud-processing error, and range from 20 to 15 in most regions for CN70CN100 concentrations. Overall, the Fast TOMAS models increase the computational speed by 2 to 3 times with only small numerical errors stemming from condensation and coagulation calculations when compared to TOMAS-30. The faster versions of the TOMAS model allow for the longer, multi-year simulations required to assess aerosol effects on cloud lifetime and precipitation.

  9. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol...

  10. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of...

  11. Bulk equations of motion from CFT correlators

    CERN Document Server

    Kabat, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    To O(1/N) we derive, purely from CFT data, the bulk equations of motion for interacting scalar fields and for scalars coupled to gauge fields and gravity. We first uplift CFT operators to mimic local AdS fields by imposing bulk microcausality. This requires adding an infinite tower of smeared higher-dimension double-trace operators to the CFT definition of a bulk field, with coefficients that we explicitly compute. By summing the contribution of the higher-dimension operators we derive the equations of motion satisfied by these uplifted CFT operators and show that we precisely recover the expected bulk equations of motion. We exhibit the freedom in the CFT construction which corresponds to bulk field redefinitions.

  12. Bulk equations of motion from CFT correlators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabat, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy,Lehman College, City University of New York, Bronx NY 10468 (United States); Lifschytz, Gilad [Department of Physics and Astronomy,Lehman College, City University of New York, Bronx NY 10468 (United States); Physics Department,City College, City University of New York, New York NY 10031 (United States); Department of Mathematics and Physics,University of Haifa at Oranim, Kiryat Tivon 36006 (Israel)

    2015-09-10

    To O(1/N) we derive, purely from CFT data, the bulk equations of motion for interacting scalar fields and for scalars coupled to gauge fields and gravity. We first uplift CFT operators to mimic local AdS fields by imposing bulk microcausality. This requires adding an infinite tower of smeared higher-dimension double-trace operators to the CFT definition of a bulk field, with coefficients that we explicitly compute. By summing the contribution of the higher-dimension operators we derive the equations of motion satisfied by these uplifted CFT operators and show that we precisely recover the expected bulk equations of motion. We exhibit the freedom in the CFT construction which corresponds to bulk field redefinitions.

  13. Microphysical Modelling of the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter. 2; Chlorine Activation and Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drdla, K.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a range of assumptions about polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) on ozone depletion has been assessed using at couple microphysical/photochemical model. The composition of the PSCs was varied (ternary solutions, nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dehydrate, or ice), as were parameters that affected the levels of denitrification and dehydration. Ozone depletion was affected by assumptions about PSC freezing because of the variability in resultant nitrification chlorine activation in all scenarios was similar despite the range of assumed PSC compositions. Vortex-average ozone loss exceeded 40% in the lower stratosphere for simulations without nitrification an additional ozone loss of 15-20% was possible in scenarios where vortex-average nitrification reached 60%. Ozone loss intensifies non-linearly with enhanced nitrification in air parcels with 90% nitrification 40% ozone loss in mid-April can be attributed to nitrification alone. However, these effects are sensitive to the stability of the vortex in springtime: nitrification only began to influence ozone depletion in mid-March.

  14. Microphysical characterization of free space optical link due to hydrometeor and fog effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Saverio; Marzano, Frank S

    2015-08-01

    Free space optics (FSO) channel availability is affected by atmospheric water particles, which may introduce severe path attenuation. A unified microphysically oriented atmospheric particle scattering (MAPS) model is proposed and described to simulate particle scattering effects on FSO links. Atmospheric particles, such as raindrops, graupel particles, and snowflakes, together with fog droplets, are considered. Input data to characterize liquid and frozen water particle size distribution, density, and refractivity are derived from available literature data and measurements. Scattering, absorption, and extinction coefficients as well as the asymmetry factor are numerically simulated for each particle class and then parametrized with respect to particle water content, fall rate, and visibility, spanning from visible to infrared wavelengths. Both single- and multiple-scattering effects are discussed and quantified by using a radiative transfer model for small-angle approximation. MAPS simulations confirm that fog layers are those causing the largest power extinction on FSO links, but also several decibels of attenuation can be attributed to snow and rain conditions. Multiple-scattering effects, especially due to fog droplets, heavy rain, and dry snowflakes, typically tend to reduce the total attenuation by increasing the received power. An estimate of these effects, parameterized to single-scattering extinction, is proposed for near-infrared FSO link design.

  15. MATRIX-VBS Condensing Organic Aerosols in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Konstas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  16. Imaginary refractive index and other microphysical properties of volcanic ash, Sarahan dust, and other mineral aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Lima, A.; Martins, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Artaxo, P.; Todd, M.; Ben Ami, Y.; Dolgos, G.; Espinosa, R.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol properties are essential to support remote sensing measurements, atmospheric circulation and climate models. This research aims to improve the understanding of the optical and microphysical properties of different types of aerosols particles. Samples of volcanic ash, Saharan dust and other mineral aerosols particles were analyzed by different techniques. Ground samples were sieved down to 45um, de-agglomerated and resuspended in the laboratory using a Fluidized Bed Aerosol Generator (FBAG). Particles were collected on Nuclepore filters into PM10, PM2.5, or PM1.0. and analyzed by different techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for determination of size distribution and shape, spectral reflectance for determination of the optical absorption properties as a function of the wavelength, material density, and X-Ray fluorescence for the elemental composition. The spectral imaginary part of refractive index from the UV to the short wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength was derived empirically from the measurements of the spectral mass absorption coefficient, size distribution and density of the material. Some selected samples were also analyzed with the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) instrument for the characterization of the aerosol polarized phase function. This work compares results of the spectral refractive index of different materials obtained by our methodology with those available in the literature. In some cases there are significant differences both in magnitude and spectral dependence of the imaginary refractive index. These differences are evaluated and discussed in this work.

  17. What is Quantum? Unifying Its Micro-Physical and Structural Appearance

    CERN Document Server

    Aerts, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We can recognize two modes in which 'quantum appears' in macro domains: (i) a 'micro-physical appearance', where quantum laws are assumed to be universal and they are transferred from the micro to the macro level if suitable 'quantum coherence' conditions (e.g., very low temperatures) are realized, (ii) a 'structural appearance', where no hypothesis is made on the validity of quantum laws at a micro level, while genuine quantum aspects are detected at a structural-modeling level. In this paper, we inquire into the connections between the two appearances. We put forward the explanatory hypothesis that, 'the appearance of quantum in both cases' is due to 'the existence of a specific form of organisation, which has the capacity to cope with random perturbations that would destroy this organisation when not coped with'. We analyse how 'organisation of matter', 'organisation of life', and 'organisation of culture', play this role each in their specific domain of application, point out the importance of evolution i...

  18. Optical, microphysical and compositional properties of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rocha-Lima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Microphysical, optical, and compositional properties of the volcanic ash from the April–May (2010 Eyjafjallajökull volcanic eruption are presented. Samples of the volcanic ash were taken on the ground in the vicinity of the volcano. The material was sieved, re-suspended, and collected on filters, separating particle sizes into coarse and fine modes. The spectral mass absorption efficiency αabs [m2 g−1] was determined for coarse and fine particles in the wavelength range from 300 to 2500 nm. Size distribution of particles on filters was obtained using a semi-automatic software to analyze images obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The grain density of the volcanic ash was determined as 2.16(13 g cm−3 by measuring the variation of air volume in a system with volcanic ash and air under compression. Using Mie–Lorenz and T-matrix theories, the imaginary part of the refractive index was derived. Results show the spectral imaginary refractive index ranging from 0.001 to 0.005. Fine and coarse particles were analyzed by X-Ray fluorescence for elemental composition. Fine and coarse mode particles exhibit distinct compositional and optical differences.

  19. The kinematic and microphysical control of lightning rate, extent, and NOX production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Mecikalski, Retha M.

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOX = NO + NO2) via lightning (LNOX), such as flash rate, type, and extent. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to lightning observations following multicell thunderstorms through their lifecycle in a Lagrangian sense over Northern Alabama on 21 May 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, type, channel length distributions, channel segment altitude distributions (SADs), and LNOX production profiles. The LNOM-derived lightning characteristics and LNOX production are compared to the evolution of radar-inferred updraft and precipitation properties. Intercloud, intracloud (IC) flash SAD comprises a significant fraction of the total (IC + cloud-to-ground [CG]) SAD, while increased CG flash SAD at altitudes >6 km occurs after the simultaneous peaks in several thunderstorm properties (i.e., total [IC + CG] and IC flash rate, graupel volume/mass, convective updraft volume, and maximum updraft speed). At heights 6 km. Graupel volume/mass, updraft volume, and maximum updraft speed are all well correlated to the total flash rate (correlation coefficient, ρ ≥ 0.8) but are less correlated to total flash extent (ρ ≥ 0.6) and total LNOX production (ρ ≥ 0.5). Although LNOM transforms lightning observations into LNOX production values, these values are estimates and are subject to further independent validation.

  20. Ice nucleation and cloud microphysical properties in tropical tropopause layer cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Jensen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In past modeling studies, it has generally been assumed that the predominant mechanism for nucleation of ice in the uppermost troposphere is homogeneous freezing of aqueous aerosols. However, recent in situ and remote-sensing measurements of the properties of cirrus clouds at very low temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL are broadly inconsistent with theoretial predictions based on the homogeneous freezing assumption. The nearly ubiquitous occurence of gravity waves in the TTL makes the predictions from homogeneous nucleation theory particularly difficult to reconcile with measurements. These measured properties include ice number concentrations, which are much lower than theory predicts; ice crystal size distributions, which are much broader than theory predicts; and cloud extinctions, which are much lower than theory predicts. Although other explanations are possible, one way to limit ice concentrations is to have on the order of 50 L−1 effective ice nuclei (IN that could nucleate ice at relatively low supersaturations. We suggest that ammonium sulfate particles, which would be dry much of the time in the cold TTL, are a potential IN candidate for TTL cirrus. Possible implications of the observed cloud microphysical properties for ice sedimentation, dehydration, and cloud persistence are also discussed.

  1. Ice nucleation and cloud microphysical properties in tropical tropopause layer cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Jensen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In past modeling studies, it has generally been assumed that the predominant mechanism for nucleation of ice in the uppermost troposphere is homogeneous freezing of aqueous aerosols. However, recent in situ and remote-sensing measurements of the properties of cirrus clouds at very low temperatures in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL are broadly inconsistent with theoretial predictions based on the homogeneous freezing assumption. The nearly ubiquitous occurence of gravity waves in the TTL makes the predictions from homogeneous nucleation theory particularly difficult to reconcile with measurements. These measured properties include ice number concentrations, which are much lower than theory predicts; ice crystal size distributions, which are much broader than theory predicts; and cloud extinctions, which are much lower than theory predicts. Although other explanations are possible, one way to limit ice concentrations is to have on the order of 50 L−1 effective ice nuclei (IN that could nucleate ice at relatively low supersaturations. We suggest that ammonium sulfate particles, which would be dry much of the time in the cold TTL, are a potential IN candidate for TTL cirrus. However, this mechanism remains to be fully quantified for the size distribution of ammonium sulfate (possibly internally mixed with organics actually present in the upper troposphere. Possible implications of the observed cloud microphysical properties for ice sedimentation, dehydration, and cloud persistence are also discussed.

  2. Microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds: the EUCREX mission 206 case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowska, Hanna; Brenguier, Jean-Louis; Fouquart, Yves; Armbruster, Wolfgang; Bakan, Stephan; Descloitres, Jacques; Fischer, Jürgen; Flamant, Cyril; Fouilloux, Anne; Gayet, Jean-François; Gosh, Sat; Jonas, Peter; Parol, Frederic; Pelon, Jacques; Schüller, Lothar

    In this conclusion paper, remote sensing retrievals of cloud optical thickness performed during the EUCREX mission 206 are analyzed. The comparison with estimates derived from in situ measurements demonstrates that the adiabatic model of cloud microphysics is more realistic than the vertically uniform plane parallel model (VUPPM) for parameterization of optical thickness. The analysis of the frequency distributions of optical thickness in the cloud layer then shows that the adiabatic model provides a good prediction when the cloud layer is thick and homogeneous, while it overestimates significantly the optical thickness when the layer is thin and broken. Finally, it is shown that the effective optical thickness over the whole sampled cloud is smaller than the adiabatic prediction based on the mean geometrical thickness of the cloud layer. The high sensitivity of the optical thickness on cloud geometrical thickness suggests that the effect of aerosol and droplet concentration on precipitation efficiency, and therefore on cloud extent and lifetime, is likely to be more significant than the Twomey effect.

  3. Aerosol microphysical processes and properties in Canadian boreal forest fire plumes measured during BORTAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kimiko; Allen, James; Coe, Hugh; Taylor, Jonathan; Duck, Thomas; Pierce, Jeffrey

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning emissions contribute significantly to aerosol concentrations and clound condensation nuclei in many regions of the atmosphere. Plume-aerosol characteristics vary according to age, fuel type, and region. These differences are poorly represented in regional and global aerosol models, and they contribute to large uncertainties in predicted size distributions in biomass-burning-dominated regions. The Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS) measurement campaign was designed to invesigate boreal biomass burning emissions over Atlantic Canada during July-August of 2011. Aged (2-3 days) biomass burning aerosols originating from western Ontario were measured by an SMPS and AMS on board the British Atmospheric Research Aircraft. We identify the presence of plumes using CO concentrations and acetonitrile enhancement ratios. In-plume aerosol size distributions were collected for six aged plume profiles. The size distributions show an accumulation-mode median diameter of ~240 nm. However, there are persistant nucleation and Aitken modes present in the profiles, even 2-3 days from the source. Without continuous nucleation and condensation (likely SOA production), these small modes would be lost by coagulation in less than 1 day. We use an aerosol microphysics plume model to estimate the mean nucleation and condensation rates necessary to maintain the small aerosols, and calculate how these processes enhance the total number of particles and cloud condensation nuclei in the aged plume.

  4. Observed microphysical changes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds when transitioning from sea ice to open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gillian; Jones, Hazel M.; Choularton, Thomas W.; Crosier, Jonathan; Bower, Keith N.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Davies, Rhiannon S.; Renfrew, Ian A.; Elvidge, Andrew D.; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Marenco, Franco; Brown, Philip R. A.; Ricketts, Hugo M. A.; Connolly, Paul J.; Lloyd, Gary; Williams, Paul I.; Allan, James D.; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Liu, Dantong; Flynn, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    In situ airborne observations of cloud microphysics, aerosol properties, and thermodynamic structure over the transition from sea ice to ocean are presented from the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign. A case study from 23 March 2013 provides a unique view of the cloud microphysical changes over this transition under cold-air outbreak conditions. Cloud base lifted and cloud depth increased over the transition from sea ice to ocean. Mean droplet number concentrations, Ndrop, also increased from 110 ± 36 cm-3 over the sea ice to 145 ± 54 cm-3 over the marginal ice zone (MIZ). Downstream over the ocean, Ndrop decreased to 63 ± 30 cm-3. This reduction was attributed to enhanced collision-coalescence of droplets within the deep ocean cloud layer. The liquid water content increased almost four fold over the transition and this, in conjunction with the deeper cloud layer, allowed rimed snowflakes to develop and precipitate out of cloud base downstream over the ocean. The ice properties of the cloud remained approximately constant over the transition. Observed ice crystal number concentrations averaged approximately 0.5-1.5 L-1, suggesting only primary ice nucleation was active; however, there was evidence of crystal fragmentation at cloud base over the ocean. Little variation in aerosol particle number concentrations was observed between the different surface conditions; however, some variability with altitude was observed, with notably greater concentrations measured at higher altitudes ( > 800 m) over the sea ice. Near-surface boundary layer temperatures increased by 13 °C from sea ice to ocean, with corresponding increases in surface heat fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy. These significant thermodynamic changes were concluded to be the primary driver of the microphysical evolution of the cloud. This study represents the first investigation, using in situ airborne observations, of cloud microphysical changes with

  5. Numerical Simulation of the Dynamics, Cloud Microphysics and Radar Echo Structures of Tropical and Mid-Latitude Convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chee Pong

    Tropical convective cells have radar echo patterns that are distinctly different from many mid-latitude convective cells. Also, tropical convection develops associated regions of rain falling from thick anvil clouds. This anvil rain is stratiform and its radar reflectivity pattern contrasts sharply with the radar echoes of the cells. The goal of this study is to use numerical modeling to achieve a better understanding of the dynamical-microphysical interactions that result in the radar echo patterns of tropical and mid-latitude convective cells and of tropical anvil precipitation. A parameterized cloud microphysical scheme with ice-phase processes is coupled first with a one-dimensional time-dependent convective cloud model to simulate tropical and mid-latitude convective cells. Then the microphysical scheme is coupled with a set of prescribed mesoscale anvil cloud vertical motions to simulate the radar reflectivity in anvil precipitation. The simulated tropical convective cells are generally consistent with vertical velocities, and water contents observed by aircraft, although the model vertical velocities may be somewhat higher than those observed. Inclusion of the ice-phase microphysics and in-cloud perturbation pressure are both important in obtaining reasonable cloud dynamics. Tropical clouds of various maximum heights can be produced by varying the cell radius (which is prescribed parameter), cloud base conditions and the environment sounding. With a few exceptions, it was necessary to destabilize the input sounding (by lifting it on an adiabatic chart) prior to using it as input to the model, in order to generate tropical cells greater than 9 km in maximum height. This result indicates the importance of mesoscale forcing prior to the outbreak of deep convection. Warm-rain microphysics are found to account for 40-100% of the rain that falls from the simulated tropical cells. A portion of the rain in deep cells, however, is accounted for by graupel, which

  6. An intercomparison and evaluation of aerosol microphysical properties among AeroCom global aerosol models of a range of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Reddington, Carly; Pringle, Kirsty; Schulz, Michael; Asmi, Ari

    2013-04-01

    Many of the next generation of climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. Such aerosol microphysics schemes ensure that aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations are determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study, as part of the second phase of the international AeroCom initiative, examines how the particle size distribution is simulated in the current generation of global aerosol microphysics models. We use 12 models to quantify the mean and diversity of size-resolved particle concentrations on a global scale and map areas of particular model uncertainty (based on their central diversity) and identify biases through evaluation against observations. In regions of strong anthropogenic emissions, the diversity of simulated concentrations of particles larger than 30nm (N30) is large (factor 2 to 6), while the diversity of sulphate mass (factor 1.2 to 3) and N100 (factor 1.5 to 2) are lower. We attribute the higher N30 diversity in emissions regions to inter-model differences in nucleation and growth processes, and also to different size assumptions for primary emitted particles. In clean marine regions, the pattern of size-resolved diversity is opposite to polluted regions, with N30 diversity (factor 1.5 to 2) much lower than N100. At high latitudes, N30 has relatively low diversity (factor 2 to 7), compared to much higher diversity in simulated sulphate, black carbon and N100 (factor 5 to 30). The higher N30 diversity in polluted continental regions indicates that simulated CCN concentrations are more diverse among models than the >100nm sizes, which mainly determine aerosol optical properties. However, the relatively low N30 diversity in marine and remote regions gives confidence that current global aerosol microphysics

  7. Holographic representation of local bulk operators

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, A; Lifschytz, G; Lowe, D A; Hamilton, Alex; Kabat, Daniel; Lifschytz, Gilad; Lowe, David A.

    2006-01-01

    The Lorentzian AdS/CFT correspondence implies a map between local operators in supergravity and non-local operators in the CFT. By explicit computation we construct CFT operators which are dual to local bulk fields in the semiclassical limit. The computation is done for general dimension in global, Poincare and Rindler coordinates. We find that the CFT operators can be taken to have compact support in a region of the complexified boundary whose size is set by the bulk radial position. We show that at finite N the number of independent commuting operators localized within a bulk volume saturates the holographic bound.

  8. Superconducting bulk magnets for magnetic levitation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, H.; Kamijo, H.

    2000-06-01

    The major applications of high-temperature superconductors have mostly been confined to products in the form of wires and thin films. However, recent developments show that rare-earth REBa 2Cu 3O 7- x and light rare-earth LREBa 2Cu 3O 7- x superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical-current density at 77 K and high magnetic fields. These superconductors will promote the application of bulk high-temperature superconductors in high magnetic fields; the superconducting bulk magnet for the Maglev train is one possible application. We investigated the possibility of using bulk magnets in the Maglev system, and examined flux-trapping characteristics of multi-superconducting bulks arranged in array.

  9. Measuring Bulk Flows in Large Scale Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, H A; Feldman, Hume A.; Watkins, Richard

    1993-01-01

    We follow a formalism presented by Kaiser to calculate the variance of bulk flows in large scale surveys. We apply the formalism to a mock survey of Abell clusters \\'a la Lauer \\& Postman and find the variance in the expected bulk velocities in a universe with CDM, MDM and IRAS--QDOT power spectra. We calculate the velocity variance as a function of the 1--D velocity dispersion of the clusters and the size of the survey.

  10. The Bulk Multicore Architecture for Improved Programmability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    algorithm, forcing the same order of chunk commits as in the recording step. This design, which we call PicoLog , typically incurs a performance cost... PicoLog . Data-race detection at production- run speed. The Bulk Multicore can support an efficient data-race detec- tor based on the “happens-before...Bulk Multicore (a), with a possible OrderOnly execution log (b) and PicoLog execution log (c). contributed articles DECEMBER 2009 | VOL. 52

  11. Assessment of microphysical and chemical factors of aerosols over seas of the Russian Artic Eastern Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golobokova, Liudmila; Polkin, Victor

    2014-05-01

    The newly observed kickoff of the Northern Route development drew serious attention to state of the Arctic Resource environment. Occurring climatic and environmental changes are more sensitively seen in polar areas in particular. Air environment control allows for making prognostic assessments which are required for planning hazardous environmental impacts preventive actions. In August - September 2013, RV «Professor Khlustin» Northern Sea Route expeditionary voyage took place. En-route aerosol sampling was done over the surface of the Beringov, Chukotka and Eastern-Siberia seas (till the town of Pevek). The purpose of sampling was to assess spatio-temporal variability of optic, microphysical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles of the surface layer within different areas adjacent to the Northern Sea Route. Aerosol test made use of automated mobile unit consisting of photoelectric particles counter AZ-10, aetalometr MDA-02, aspirator on NBM-1.2 pump chassis, and the impactor. This set of equipment allows for doing measurements of number concentration, dispersed composition of aerosols within sizes d=0.3-10 mkm, mass concentration of submicron sized aerosol, and filter-conveyed aerosols sampling. Filter-conveyed aerosols sampling was done using method accepted by EMEP and EANET monitoring networks. The impactor channel was upgraded to separate particles bigger than 1 mkm in size, and the fine grain fraction settled down on it. Reverse 5-day and 10-day trajectories of air mass transfer executed at heights of 10, 1500 and 3500 m were analyzed. The heights were selected by considerations that 3000 m is the height which characterizes air mass trend in the lower troposphere. 1500 m is the upper border of the atmospheric boundary layer, and the sampling was done in the Earth's surface layer at less than 10 m. Minimum values of the bespoken microphysical characteristics are better characteristic of higher latitudes where there are no man induced sources of

  12. Retrieval of aerosol microphysical and optical properties above liquid clouds from POLDER/PARASOL polarization measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Waquet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the current aerosol retrievals from passive sensors are restricted to cloud-free scenes, which strongly reduces our ability to monitor the aerosol properties at a global scale and to estimate their radiative forcing. The presence of aerosol above clouds (AAC affects the polarized light reflected by the cloud layer, as shown by the spaceborne measurements provided by the POlarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances (POLDER instrument on the PARASOL satellite. In a previous work, a first retrieval method was developed for AAC scenes and evaluated for biomass-burning aerosols transported over stratocumulus clouds. The method was restricted to the use of observations acquired at forward scattering angles (90–120° where polarized measurements are highly sensitive to fine-mode particle scattering. Non-spherical particles in the coarse mode, such as mineral dust particles, do not much polarize light and cannot be handled with this method. In this paper, we present new developments that allow retrieving also the properties of mineral dust particles above clouds. These particles do not much polarize light but strongly reduce the polarized cloud bow generated by the liquid cloud layer beneath and observed for scattering angles around 140°. The spectral attenuation can be used to qualitatively identify the nature of the particles (i.e. accumulation mode versus coarse mode, i.e. mineral dust particles versus biomass-burning aerosols, whereas the magnitude of the attenuation is related to the optical thickness of the aerosol layer. We also use the polarized measurements acquired in the cloud bow to improve the retrieval of both the biomass-burning aerosol properties and the cloud microphysical properties. We provide accurate polarized radiance calculations for AAC scenes and evaluate the contribution of the POLDER polarization measurements for the simultaneous retrieval of the aerosol and cloud properties. We investigate various scenes

  13. The microphysical information content of polarimetric radar measurements in the melting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troemel, Silke; Ryzhkov, Alexander V.; Zhang, Pengfei; Simmer, Clemens

    2014-05-01

    The practical utilization of the backscatter differential phase δ, measured by polarimetric weather radars, is not well explored yet. δ is defined as the difference between the phases of horizontally and vertically polarized components of the wave caused by backscattering from objects within the radar resolution volume. δ bears important information about the dominant size of raindrops and wet snowflakes in the melting layer. The backscatter differential phase, which is immune to attenuation, partial beam blockage, and radar miscalibration, would complement the information routinely available from reflectivity ZH, differential reflectivity ZDR, and cross-correlation coefficient ρhv which are traditionally used for characterizing microphysical properties of the melting layer. Actual measurements of δ have been performed with a number of polarimetric WSR-88D radars operated at S band in US. Similar observations of δ were made in Germany using research X band radars in Bonn (BoXPol) and Jülich (JüXPol). Contrary to our expectations δgbservations at S band showed much higher magnitudes than the δ observations at X band. Maximal observed δ at X band is 8.5° , whereas maximal observed δ at S band is 40° . Model simulations which assume spheroidal shapes for melting snowflakes in the absence of aggregation within the melting layer yield much lower values of δ than observed, especially at S band. According to simulations of δ the simulated values of δ are relatively small and barely exceed 4° at X, C, and S bands. Indeed, the simulations assume that mixed-phase particles do not interact with each other and wet snowflakes do not aggregate. Taking aggregation into account in the model the magnitude of δ can be significantly higher. The huge observed δ magnitudes at S band ranging from 18 to 40° , however, are impressive and unexpected at first. Since all X band observations are from Germany and all S band observations taken into account are from the U

  14. Prospects for Detecting a Cosmic Bulk Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Benjamin; Garnavich, Peter M.; Mathews, Grant James

    2015-01-01

    The ΛCDM model is based upon a homogeneous, isotropic space-time leading to uniform expansion with random peculiar velocities caused by local gravitation perturbations. The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation evidences a significant dipole moment in the frame of the Local Group. This motion is usually explained with the Local Group's motion relative to the background Hubble expansion. An alternative explanation, however, is that the dipole moment is the result of horizon-scale curvature remaining from the birth of space-time, possibly a result of quantum entanglement with another universe. This would appear as a single velocity (a bulk flow) added to all points in space. These two explanations differ observationally on cosmic distance scales (z > 0.1). There have been many differing attempts to detect a bulk flow, many with no detectable bulk flow but some with a bulk flow velocity as large as 1000 km/s. Here we report on a technique based upon minimizing the scatter around the expected cosine distribution of the Hubble redshift residuals with respect to angular distance on the sky. That is, the algorithm searches for a directional dependence of Hubble residuals. We find results consistent with most other bulk flow detections at z Type Ia Supernovae to be ~0.01, whereas the current error (~0.2.) is more than an order of magnitude too large for the detection of bulk flow beyond z~0.05.

  15. Parametric studies of contrail ice particle formation in jet regime using one-dimensional microphysical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Condensation trails (contrails formed from water vapor emissions behind aircraft engines are the most uncertain components of the aviation impacts on climate change. To gain improved knowledge of contrail and contrail-induced cirrus cloud formation, understanding of contrail ice particle formation immediately after aircraft engines is needed. Despite many efforts spent in modeling the microphysics of ice crystal formation in jet regime (with a plume age <5 s, systematic understanding of parametric effects of variables affecting contrail ice particle formation is still limited. In this work, we apply a one-dimensional modeling approach to study contrail ice particle formation in near-field aircraft plumes up to 1000 m downstream of an aircraft engine in the soot-rich regime (soot number emission index >1×1015 (kg-fuel−1 at cruise. The effects of ion-mediated nucleation, ambient relative humidity, fuel sulfur content, and initial soot emissions were investigated. Our simulation results suggest that ice particles are mainly formed by water condensation on emitted soot particles. The growth of ice coated soot particles is driven by water vapor emissions in the first 1000 m and by ambient relative humidity afterwards. The presence of chemi-ions does not significantly contribute to the formation of ice particles, and the effect of fuel sulfur content is small over the range typical of standard jet fuels. The initial properties of soot emissions play the most critical role, and our calculations suggest that higher number concentration and smaller size of contrail particle nuclei may be able to effectively suppress the formation of contrail ice particles, providing a possible approach for contrail mitigation.

  16. Microphysical Properties of Single and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Derived from AERI Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2003-06-01

    A novel new approach to retrieve cloud microphysical properties from mixed-phase clouds is presented. This algorithm retrieves cloud optical depth, ice fraction, and the effective size of the water and ice particles from ground-based, high-resolution infrared radiance observations. The theoretical basis is that the absorption coefficient of ice is stronger than that of liquid water from 10-13 mm, whereas liquid water is more absorbing than ice from 16-25 um. However, due to strong absorption in the rotational water vapor absorption band, the 16-25 um spectral region becomes opaque for significant water vapor burdens (i.e., for precipitable water vapor amounts over approximately 1 cm). The Arctic is characterized by its dry and cold atmosphere, as well as a preponderance of mixed-phase clouds, and thus this approach is applicable to Arctic clouds. Since this approach uses infrared observations, cloud properties are retrieved at night and during the long polar wintertime period. The analysis of the cloud properties retrieved during a 7 month period during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment demonstrates many interesting features. These results show a dependence of the optical depth on cloud phase, differences in the mode radius of the water droplets in liquid-only and mid-phase clouds, a lack of temperature dependence in the ice fraction for temperatures above 240 K, seasonal trends in the optical depth with the clouds being thinner in winter and becoming more optically thick in the late spring, and a seasonal trend in the effective size of the water droplets in liquid-only and mixed-phase clouds that is most likely related to aerosol concentration.

  17. Dominant cloud microphysical processes of a torrential rainfall event in Sichuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yongjie; Cui, Xiaopeng

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution numerical simulation data of a rainstorm triggering debris flow in Sichuan Province of China simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model were used to study the dominant cloud microphysical processes of the torrential rainfall. The results showed that: (1) In the strong precipitation period, particle sizes of all hydrometeors increased, and mean-mass diameters of graupel increased the most significantly, as compared with those in the weak precipitation period; (2) The terminal velocity of raindrops was the strongest among all hydrometeors, followed by graupel's, which was much smaller than that of raindrops. Differences between various hydrometeors' terminal velocities in the strong precipitation period were larger than those in the weak precipitation period, which favored relative motion, collection interaction and transformation between the particles. Absolute terminal velocity values of raindrops and graupel were significantly greater than those of air upward velocity, and the stronger the precipitation was, the greater the differences between them were; (3) The orders of magnitudes of the various hydrometeors' sources and sinks in the strong precipitation period were larger than those in the weak precipitation period, causing a difference in the intensity of precipitation. Water vapor, cloud water, raindrops, graupel and their exchange processes played a major role in the production of the torrential rainfall, and there were two main processes via which raindrops were generated: abundant water vapor condensed into cloud water and, on the one hand, accretion of cloud water by rain water formed rain water, while on the other hand, accretion of cloud water by graupel formed graupel, and then the melting of graupel formed rain water.

  18. Cloudy - simulating the non-equilibrium microphysics of gas and dust, and its observed spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Cloudy is an open-source plasma/spectral simulation code, last described in the open-access journal Revista Mexicana (Ferland et al. 2013, 2013RMxAA..49..137F). The project goal is a complete simulation of the microphysics of gas and dust over the full range of density, temperature, and ionization that we encounter in astrophysics, together with a prediction of the observed spectrum. Cloudy is one of the more widely used theory codes in astrophysics with roughly 200 papers citing its documentation each year. It is developed by graduate students, postdocs, and an international network of collaborators. Cloudy is freely available on the web at trac.nublado.org, the user community can post questions on http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/cloudy_simulations/info, and summer schools are organized to learn more about Cloudy and its use (http://cloud9.pa.uky.edu gary/cloudy/CloudySummerSchool/). The code’s widespread use is possible because of extensive automatic testing. It is exercised over its full range of applicability whenever the source is changed. Changes in predicted quantities are automatically detected along with any newly introduced problems. The code is designed to be autonomous and self-aware. It generates a report at the end of a calculation that summarizes any problems encountered along with suggestions of potentially incorrect boundary conditions. This self-monitoring is a core feature since the code is now often used to generate large MPI grids of simulations, making it impossible for a user to verify each calculation by hand. I will describe some challenges in developing a large physics code, with its many interconnected physical processes, many at the frontier of research in atomic or molecular physics, all in an open environment.

  19. Microphysical properties and distribution retrieval with a variable base point algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterloh, Lukas; Böckmann, Christine

    2009-09-01

    We present a new algorithm for the retrieval of the volume distribution - and thus, other relevant microphysical properties such as the effective radius - of stratospheric and tropospheric aerosols from multiwavelength lidar data. We consider the basic equation as a linear ill-posed problem and solve the linear system derived from spline collocation. Starting from here, algorithmical improvements for the inversion process are proposed. While a standard approach consisting of spline collocation and a regularization method such as truncated singular value decomposition or Tikhonov-Philips regularization proves sufficient in some cases, that kind of algorithm is not suitable for a more general case; the base points of the spline collocation take a key role here. Indeed, there is a direct connection between the number and position of the base points on the solution, as the problem of the correct regularization parameter - which is represented here by both location and number of base points - and its implications on over- or underregularization of the solution have to be investigated. Here, we present an algorithm that makes use of the fact that smoother areas of the solution require less base points in the vicinity for a proper reconstruction, combined with a Padé-type iterative regularization method. The algorithm starts with equidistant base points, then moves these base points during the calculation away from the smoother areas of the solution. This algorithm proved to work very well in many different simulation cases. Different weight functions for the base point shift are investigated, leading to slightly different results. Also, an improvement on this algoritm is proposed which, in addition to the position of the base points, also actively controls the actual number of base points, as solutions that more smooth in a global sense require less base points. Finally, we also take a look at how this new algorithm can also help us in simultaneously retrieving the

  20. MADE-IN: a new aerosol microphysics submodel for global simulation of potential atmospheric ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Aquila

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC and mineral dust are among the dominant atmospheric ice nuclei, i.e. aerosol particles that can initiate heterogeneous nucleation of ice crystals. When released, most BC and dust particles are externally mixed with other aerosol compounds. Through coagulation with particles containing soluble material and condensation of gases, externally mixed particles may obtain a coating and be transferred into an internal mixture. The mixing state of BC and dust aerosol particles influences their radiative and hygroscopic properties, as well as their ability of building ice crystals.

    We introduce the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE-IN, implemented within the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry global model (EMAC. MADE-IN is able to track separately mass and number concentrations of BC and dust particles in their different mixing states, as well as particles free of BC and dust. MADE-IN describes these three classes of particles through a superposition of seven log-normally distributed modes, and predicts the evolution of their size distribution and chemical composition. Six out of the seven modes are mutually interacting, allowing for the transfer of mass and number among them. Separate modes for the different mixing states of BC and dust particles in EMAC/MADE-IN allow for explicit simulations of the relevant aging processes, i.e. condensation, coagulation and cloud processing. EMAC/MADE-IN has been evaluated with surface and airborne measurements and performs well both in the planetary boundary layer and in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere. Such a model represents a highly appropriate tool for the study of the concentration and composition of potential atmospheric ice nuclei.

  1. Constraints on the microphysics of Pluto's photochemical haze from New Horizons observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peter; Fan, Siteng; Wong, Michael L.; Liang, Mao-Chang; Shia, Run-Lie; Kammer, Joshua A.; Yung, Yuk L.; Summers, Michael E.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Young, Leslie A.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Weaver, Harold A.; Stern, S. Alan

    2017-05-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto confirmed the existence of hazes in its atmosphere. Observations of a large high- to low- phase brightness ratio, combined with the blue color of the haze (indicative of Rayleigh scattering), suggest that the haze particles are fractal aggregates, perhaps analogous to the photochemical hazes on Titan. Therefore, studying the Pluto hazes can shed light on the similarities and differences between the Pluto and Titan atmospheres. We model the haze distribution using the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres assuming that the distribution is shaped by downward transport and coagulation of particles originating from photochemistry. Hazes composed of both purely spherical and purely fractal aggregate particles are considered. General agreement between model results and solar occultation observations is obtained with aggregate particles when the downward mass flux of photochemical products is equal to the column-integrated methane destruction rate ∼1.2 × 10-14 g cm-2 s-1, while for spherical particles the mass flux must be 2-3 times greater. This flux is nearly identical to the haze production flux of Titan previously obtained by comparing microphysical model results to Cassini observations. The aggregate particle radius is sensitive to particle charging effects, and a particle charge to radius ratio of 30 e-/μm is necessary to produce ∼0.1-0.2 μm aggregates near Pluto's surface, in accordance with forward scattering measurements. Such a particle charge to radius ratio is 2-4 times higher than those previously obtained for Titan. Hazes composed of spheres with the same particle charge to radius ratio have particles that are 4 times smaller at Pluto's surface. These results further suggest that the haze particles are fractal aggregates. We also consider the effect of condensation of HCN, C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6 on the haze particles, which may play an important role in shaping their altitude and size distributions.

  2. Microphysical Responses to Catalysis During a Stratocumulus Aircraft Seeding Experiment over the Sanjiangyuan Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王黎俊; 银燕; 姚展予; 孙安平

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the microphysical responses to a cloud seeding operation in the Sanjiangyuan re-gion, China. The cloud seeding was performed using a zigzag flight pattern, while the detection phase was accomplished using a back-and-forth flight pattern through the top of a stratocumulus layer. Global Position System (GPS) and Particle Measuring System (PMS) data obtained during the operation are used to determine the effective cloud area before and after the operation, differentiate the phase states of cloud particles, and analyze changes in the concentrations of liquid cloud particles and ice crystals, the evolution of the cloud particle spectrum, and the content of supercooled water. The median diameter of liquid cloud particles in the area of the cloud-seeding operation was 3.5-18.5 µm, most cloud particles observed in the 21.5-45.5-µm size regime were ice crystals, while all particles of size 50 µm and above were in the ice phase. Changes in the concentration and typical diameter of cloud particles within 36 km downwind of the cloud-seeding operation did not exceed natural fluctuations in the cloud area before the operation; however, the concentration of liquid cloud particles decreased substantially in areas with high concentrations of super-cooled water (concentrations of supercooled water exceeding 0.01 g m-3). The concentration of ice crystals within the measuring range of the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) increased substantially, the water content of ice-phase particles increased, and the average supercooled water content in the cloud decreased from (68.3±23.1)%before the operation to (34.2±12.4)%. The effects of cloud seeding were more pronounced in parts of the cloud where the content of supercooled water was higher. Little to no effects were observed in parts of the cloud with low concentrations of supercooled water.

  3. Minimalist model of ice microphysics in mixed-phase stratiform clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, M.; Shaw, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from supercooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power-law relationship with ice number concentration (ni). wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation confirm the 2.5 power-law relationship, and initial indications of the scaling law are observed in data from the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties. Ice water content (wi) and ice number concentration (ni) relationship from LES. a and c: Accumulation zone region; b and d: Selective accumulation zone region. Black lines in c and d are best fitted 2.5 slope lines. Colors in Figures a and b represent updraft velocity, while colors in c and d represent altitude. The cloud base and top are at about 600 m and 800 m, respectively. Ice water content (wi) and ice number concentration (ni) relationship for two ice nucleation rates. Blue points are from LES with low ice nucleation rate and red points with high ice nucleation rate. Solid and dashed lines are best fitted 2.5 slope lines.

  4. The evolution of microphysical and optical properties of an A380 contrail in the vortex phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Gayet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The contrail from a large-body A380 aircraft has extensively been probed in the vortex and early dispersion regime with in situ instruments to measure microphysical and optical properties of contrail ice particles on the DLR research aircraft Falcon. Concentrations up to 340 cm−3 of ice particles with diameters d >0.9 μm and extinction coefficients up to 7.0 km−1 were measured inside the plume. Initially the primary vortices were sampled about 270 m below the A380 flight altitude at contrail ages of 70 to 120 s in ice subsaturated conditions, followed by measurements in the secondary wake with contrail ages of 120 to 220 s at conditions near ice saturation. In the primary vortices the mean effective diameter was 3.5 μm and the maximum ice water content (IWC was 7.0 mg m−3 increasing with altitude and ice saturation in the secondary wake to 4.8 μm and 10.0 mg m−3. The asymmetry parameter was found to decrease systematically with contrail age (and altitude from 0.87 to 0.80 indicating that ice crystals become more and more aspherical during ice crystal growth. In addition, an inversion approach was used to retrieve the ice particle size distribution and the partitioning between spherical and aspherical particles. In the young primary vortex 100% of the ice particles were of spherical shape, whereas partitioning coefficients of 68% and 44% were found in the more aged secondary wake. The extrapolation of our results to older contrails under similar meteorological conditions suggests that contrails with ages over 5 min may be dominated by aspherically-shaped ice particles typical for natural mid latitude cirrus.

  5. Optical and microphysical properties of smoke over Cape Verde inferred from multiwavelength lidar measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tesche, Matthias (Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Leipzig (Germany); Dept. of Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)), e-mail: matthias.tesche@itm.su.se; Muller, Detlef (Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Leipzig (Germany); Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory, Gwangju Inst. of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)); Gross, Silke (Meteorological Inst., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Inst. of Atmospheric Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany)); Ansmann, Albert; Althausen, Dietrich (Leibniz Inst. for Tropospheric Research (IfT), Leipzig (Germany)); Freudenthaler, Volker (Meteorological Inst., Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany)); Weinzierl, Bernadett; Veira, Andreas; Petzold, Andreas (Inst. for Atmospheric Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Wessling (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    Lidar measurements of mixed dust/smoke plumes over the tropical Atlantic ocean were carried out during the winter campaign of SAMUM-2 at Cape Verde. Profiles of backscatter and extinction coefficients, lidar ratios, and Aangstroem exponents related to pure biomass-burning aerosol from southern West Africa were extracted from these observations. Furthermore, these findings were used as input for an inversion algorithm to retrieve microphysical properties of pure smoke. Seven measurement days were found suitable for the procedure of aerosol-type separation and successive inversion of optical data that describe biomass-burning smoke. We inferred high smoke lidar ratios of 87 +-17 sr at 355 nm and 79 +- 17 sr at 532 nm. Smoke lidar ratios and Aangstroem exponents are higher compared to the ones for the dust/smoke mixture. These numbers indicate higher absorption and smaller sizes for pure smoke particles compared to the dust/smoke mixture. Inversion of the smoke data set results in mean effective radii of 0.22 +- 0.08 mum with individual results varying between 0.10 and 0.36 mum. The single-scattering albedo for pure biomass-burning smoke was found to vary between 0.63 and 0.89 with a very low mean value of 0.75 +- 0.07. This is in good agreement with findings of airborne in situ measurements which showed values of 0.77 +- 0.03. Effective radii from the inversion were similar to the ones found for the fine mode of the in situ size distributions

  6. Aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties at regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michaël; Barragan, Rubén; Dulac, François; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Mallet, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of the ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) program, the seasonal variability of the aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties derived from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network; http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is examined in two regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean Basin: Ersa (Corsica Island, France) and Palma de Mallorca (Mallorca Island, Spain). A third site, Alborán (Alborán Island, Spain), with only a few months of data is considered for examining possible northeast-southwest (NE-SW) gradients of the aforementioned aerosol properties. The AERONET dataset is exclusively composed of level 2.0 inversion products available during the 5-year period 2011-2015. AERONET solar radiative fluxes are compared with ground- and satellite-based flux measurements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that AERONET fluxes are compared with measurements at the top of the atmosphere. Strong events (with an aerosol optical depth at 440 nm greater than 0.4) of long-range transport aerosols, one of the main drivers of the observed annual cycles and NE-SW gradients, are (1) mineral dust outbreaks predominant in spring and summer in the north and in summer in the south and (2) European pollution episodes predominant in autumn. A NE-SW gradient exists in the western Mediterranean Basin for the aerosol optical depth and especially its coarse-mode fraction, which all together produces a similar gradient for the aerosol direct radiative forcing. The aerosol fine mode is rather homogeneously distributed. Absorption properties are quite variable because of the many and different sources of anthropogenic particles in and around the western Mediterranean Basin: North African and European urban areas, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas, most forest fires and ship emissions. As a result, the aerosol direct forcing efficiency, more dependent to absorption than the absolute

  7. Microphysical characterization of long-range transported biomass burning particles from North America at three EARLINET stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Benavent-Oltra, José Antonio; Böckmann, Christine; Samaras, Stefanos; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Janicka, Łucja; Baars, Holger; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2017-05-01

    Strong events of long-range transported biomass burning aerosol were detected during July 2013 at three EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) stations, namely Granada (Spain), Leipzig (Germany) and Warsaw (Poland). Satellite observations from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) instruments, as well as modeling tools such as HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System), have been used to estimate the sources and transport paths of those North American forest fire smoke particles. A multiwavelength Raman lidar technique was applied to obtain vertically resolved particle optical properties, and further inversion of those properties with a regularization algorithm allowed for retrieving microphysical information on the studied particles. The results highlight the presence of smoke layers of 1-2 km thickness, located at about 5 km a.s.l. altitude over Granada and Leipzig and around 2.5 km a.s.l. at Warsaw. These layers were intense, as they accounted for more than 30 % of the total AOD (aerosol optical depth) in all cases, and presented optical and microphysical features typical for different aging degrees: color ratio of lidar ratios (LR532 / LR355) around 2, α-related ångström exponents of less than 1, effective radii of 0.3 µm and large values of single scattering albedos (SSA), nearly spectrally independent. The intensive microphysical properties were compared with columnar retrievals form co-located AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) stations. The intensity of the layers was also characterized in terms of particle volume concentration, and then an experimental relationship between this magnitude and the particle extinction coefficient was established.

  8. 75 FR 64585 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... nonsubstantive changes, however, to correct grammar, internal paragraph references, and a temperature conversion... means the English version of the ``International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes Code'' published by...

  9. Development of superconductor bulk for superconductor bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Joong; Jun, Byung Hyuk; Park, Soon Dong (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Current carrying capacity is one of the most important issues in the consideration of superconductor bulk materials for engineering applications. There are numerous applications of Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors e.g. magnetic levitation train, flywheel energy storage system, levitation transportation, lunar telescope, centrifugal device, magnetic shielding materials, bulk magnets etc. Accordingly, to obtain YBCO materials in the form of large, single crystals without weak-link problem is necessary. A top seeded melt growth (TSMG) process was used to fabricate single crystal YBCO bulk superconductors. The seeded and infiltration growth (IG) technique was also very promising method for the synthesis of large, single-grain YBCO bulk superconductors with good superconducting properties. 5 wt.% Ag doped Y211 green compacts were sintered at 900 .deg. C {approx} 1200 .deg.C and then a single crystal YBCO was fabricated by an infiltration method. A refinement and uniform distribution of the Y211 particles in the Y123 matrix were achieved by sintering the Ag-doped samples. This enhancement of the critical current density was ascribable to a fine dispersion of the Y211 particles, a low porosity and the presence of Ag particles. In addition, we have designed and manufactured large YBCO single domain with levitation force of 10-13 kg/cm{sup 2} using TSMG processing technique.

  10. Into the Bulk: A Covariant Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhardt, Netta

    2016-01-01

    I propose a general, covariant way of defining when one region is "deeper in the bulk" than another. This definition is formulated outside of an event horizon (or in the absence thereof) in generic geometries; it may be applied to both points and surfaces, and may be used to compare the depth of bulk points or surfaces relative to a particular boundary subregion or relative to the entire boundary. Using the recently proposed "lightcone cut" formalism, the comparative depth between two bulk points can be determined from the singularity structure of Lorentzian correlators in the dual field theory. I prove that, by this definition, causal wedges of progressively larger regions probe monotonically deeper in the bulk. The definition furthermore matches expectations in pure AdS and in static AdS black holes with isotropic spatial slices, where a well-defined holographic coordinate exists. In terms of holographic RG flow, this new definition of bulk depth makes contact with coarse-graining over both large distances ...

  11. A diphoton resonance from bulk RS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáki, Csaba; Randall, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Recent LHC data hinted at a 750 GeV mass resonance that decays into two photons. A significant feature of this resonance is that its decays to any other Standard Model particles would be too low to be detected so far. Such a state has a compelling explanation in terms of a scalar or a pseudoscalar that is strongly coupled to vector states charged under the Standard Model gauge groups. Such a scenario is readily accommodated in bulk RS with a scalar localized in the bulk away from but close to the Higgs. Turning this around, we argue that a good way to find the elusive bulk RS model might be the search for a resonance with prominent couplings to gauge bosons.

  12. A stereoscopic look into the bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Mosk, Benjamin; Sully, James

    2016-07-01

    We present the foundation for a holographic dictionary with depth perception. The dictionary consists of natural CFT operators whose duals are simple, diffeomorphisminvariant bulk operators. The CFT operators of interest are the "OPE blocks," contributions to the OPE from a single conformal family. In holographic theories, we show that the OPE blocks are dual at leading order in 1 /N to integrals of effective bulk fields along geodesics or homogeneous minimal surfaces in anti-de Sitter space. One widely studied example of an OPE block is the modular Hamiltonian, which is dual to the fluctuation in the area of a minimal surface. Thus, our operators pave the way for generalizing the Ryu-Takayanagi relation to other bulk fields.

  13. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation and properties of bulk amorphous quarternary Mg-based alloys and the influence of additional elements on the ability of the alloy to form bulk amorphous. The main goal is to find a Mg-based alloy system which shows both high strength to weight ratio...... and a low glass transition temperature. The alloys were prepared by using a relatively simple technique, i.e. rapid cooling of the melt in a copper wedge mould. The essential structural changes that are achieved by going from the amorphous to the crystalline state through the supercooled liquid state...... are discussed in this paper. On the basis of these measurements phase diagrams of the different systems were constructed. Finally, it is demonstrated that when pressing the bulk amorphous alloy onto a metallic dies at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region, the alloy faithfully replicates the surface...

  14. Orchestrating Bulk Data Movement in Grid Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazhkudai, SS

    2005-01-25

    Data Grids provide a convenient environment for researchers to manage and access massively distributed bulk data by addressing several system and transfer challenges inherent to these environments. This work addresses issues involved in the efficient selection and access of replicated data in Grid environments in the context of the Globus Toolkit{trademark}, building middleware that (1) selects datasets in highly replicated environments, enabling efficient scheduling of data transfer requests; (2) predicts transfer times of bulk wide-area data transfers using extensive statistical analysis; and (3) co-allocates bulk data transfer requests, enabling parallel downloads from mirrored sites. These efforts have demonstrated a decentralized data scheduling architecture, a set of forecasting tools that predict bandwidth availability within 15% error and co-allocation architecture, and heuristics that expedites data downloads by up to 2 times.

  15. Bulk fields from the boundary OPE

    CERN Document Server

    Guica, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established an equality between the geodesic integral of a free bulk field in AdS and the contribution of the conformal descendants of its dual CFT primary operator to the OPE of two other operators inserted at the endpoints of the geodesic. Working in the context of AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$, we extend this relation to include all $1/N$ corrections to the bulk field obtained by dressing it with i) a $U(1)$ current and ii) the CFT stress tensor, and argue it equals the contribution of the Ka\\v{c}-Moody/the Virasoro block to the respective boundary OPE. This equality holds for a particular framing of the bulk field to the boundary that involves a split Wilson line.

  16. Multiphase composites with extremal bulk modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibiansky, L. V.; Sigmund, Ole

    2000-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analytical and numerical study of isotropic elastic composites made of three or more isotropic phases. The ranges of their effective bulk and shear moduli are restricted by the Hashin-Shtrikman-Walpole (HSW) bounds. For two-phase composites, these bounds are attainable......, that is, there exist composites with extreme bulk and shear moduli. For multiphase composites, they may or may not be attainable depending on phase moduli and volume fractions. Sufficient conditions of attainability of the bounds and various previously known and new types of optimal composites...... are described. Most of our new results are related to the two-dimensional problem. A numerical topology optimization procedure that solves the inverse homogenization problem is adopted and used to look for two-dimensional three-phase composites with a maximal effective bulk modulus. For the combination...

  17. Bulk Comptonization by Turbulence in Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, J

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent "wave" temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, ra...

  18. A Diphoton Resonance from Bulk RS

    CERN Document Server

    Csaki, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Recent LHC data hints at a 750 GeV mass resonance that decays into two photons. A significant feature of this resonance is that its decays to Higges and to any other Standard Model particles are so far too low to be detected. Such a state has a compelling explanation in terms of a scalar or a pseudoscalar that is strongly coupled to vector states charged under the Standard Model gauge groups. We argue that if the state is a scalar, some form of sequestering is likely to be necessary to naturally explain the suppressed scalar-Higgs interactions. Such a scenario is readily accommodated in bulk RS with a scalar localized in the bulk away from the Higgs. Turning this around, we argue that a good way to find the elusive bulk RS model might be the search for a resonance with prominent couplings to gauge bosons.

  19. Spherically symmetric brane spacetime with bulk gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2015-01-01

    Introducing term in the five-dimensional bulk action we derive effective Einstein's equation on the brane using Gauss-Codazzi equation. This effective equation is then solved for different conditions on dark radiation and dark pressure to obtain various spherically symmetric solutions. Some of these static spherically symmetric solutions correspond to black hole solutions, with parameters induced from the bulk. Specially, the dark pressure and dark radiation terms (electric part of Weyl curvature) affect the brane spherically symmetric solutions significantly. We have solved for one parameter group of conformal motions where the dark radiation and dark pressure terms are exactly obtained exploiting the corresponding Lie symmetry. Various thermodynamic features of these spherically symmetric space-times are studied, showing existence of second order phase transition. This phenomenon has its origin in the higher curvature term with gravity in the bulk.

  20. Cloud Microphysics in Hurricane Outflows: Observations in 'Bonnie' (1998) at 12 km Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Hallett, J.; Strawa, A. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Bui, T. P.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The water balance of a hurricane is controlled by boundary layer inflow, near vertical motion in the eyewall causing coalescence precipitation at above and residual ice precipitation at below freezing temperatures, and cirrus outflow at below -40 C aloft. In this paper we address the question of efficiency of water removal by this cirrus outflow which is important for the release of latent heat at high altitudes and its role in the dynamic flow at that level. During NASA's 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment campaign we acquired microphysical outflow data in order to (1) determine the release and redistribution of latent heat near the top of hurricanes, (2) aid in TRMM algorithm development for remote sensing of precipitation, and (3) determine the optical/radiative characteristics of hurricane outflow. The data were acquired with Particle Measuring Systems two dimensional imaging spectrometers. On 23 August and again during the hurricane's landfall on 26 August, 1998, the NASA DC-8 aircraft penetrated hurricane 'Bonnie' four times each near 200 hPa pressure altitude. The eye crossing times were determined by (1) zero counts of cloud particles, (2) approximately 5 C increases in static and potential temperatures, and (3) minima in speeds and changes of direction of horizontal winds. The vertical winds showed shear between -6 m per second and +4 m per second and tangential winds approached 30 m per second in the eyewall. The particle volumes in the eyewall (determined by the pixels the particles shadowed in the direction of flight [x-direction] and normally to it by the number of diodes that they shadowed [y-direction]) ranged between 0.5 and 5.0 cubic centimeters per cubic meter. With a particle density near 0.2 g per cubic centimeter (determined from in situ melting and evaporation on a surface collector), the 1.0 g per meter corresponding mass of cloud ice ranged between 0.27 and 2.7 g per kilograms yielding horizontal fluxes between 8.1 and 81 g per square

  1. An algorithm for retrieving fine and coarse aerosol microphysical properties from AERONET-type photopolarimetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Wang, J.; Zeng, J.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Liu, X.; Dubovik, O.; Li, Z.; Li, L.; Holben, B. N.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    A new retrieval algorithm has been developed to retrieve both fine and coarse modal aerosol properties from multi-spectral and multi-angular solar polarimetric radiation fields such as those measured by the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) but with additional channels of polarization observations (hereafter AEROENT-type measurements). Most AERONET sites lack the capability to measure light polarization, though a few measure polarization only at 870 nm. From both theory and real cases, we show that adding multi-spectral polarization data can allow a mode-resolved inversion of aerosol microphysical parameters. In brief, the retrieval algorithm incorporates AERONET-type measurements in conjunction with advanced vector radiative transfer model specifically designed for studying the inversion problems in aerosol remote sensing. It retrieves aerosol parameters associated to a bi-lognormal particle size distribution (PSD) including aerosol volume concentrations, effective radius and variance, and complex indices of aerosol refraction. Our algorithm differs from the current AERONET inversion algorithm in two major aspects. First, it retrieves effective radius and variance and total volume by assuming a bi-modal lognormal PSD, while AERONET one retrieves aerosol volumes of 22 size bins. Second, our algorithm retrieves spectral refractive indices for both fine and coarse modes. Mode-resolved refractive indices can improve the estimate of single scattering albedo (SSA) for each mode, which also benefits the evaluation for satellite products and chemistry transport models. While bi-lognormal PSD can well represent aerosol size spectrum in most cases, future research efforts will include implementation for tri-modal aerosol mixtures in situations of cloud-formation or volcanic aerosols. Applying the algorithm to a suite of real cases over Beijing_RADI site, we found that our retrievals are overall consistent with AERONET inversion products, but can offer mode

  2. 3-D microphysical model studies of Arctic denitrification: comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Davies

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of Arctic denitrification using a 3-D chemistry-microphysics transport model are compared with observations for the winters 1994/1995, 1996/1997 and 1999/2000. The model of Denitrification by Lagrangian Particle Sedimentation (DLAPSE couples the full chemical scheme of the 3-D chemical transport model, SLIMCAT, with a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT growth and sedimentation scheme. We use observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and Improved Limb Atmospheric Sounder (ILAS satellite instruments, the balloon-borne Michelsen Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B, and the in situ NOy instrument on-board the ER-2. As well as directly comparing model results with observations, we also assess the extent to which these observations are able to validate the modelling approach taken. For instance, in 1999/2000 the model captures the temporal development of denitrification observed by the ER-2 from late January into March. However, in this winter the vortex was already highly denitrified by late January so the observations do not provide a strong constraint on the modelled rate of denitrification. The model also reproduces the MLS observations of denitrification in early February 2000. In 1996/1997 the model captures the timing and magnitude of denitrification as observed by ILAS, although the lack of observations north of ~67° N make it difficult to constrain the actual timing of onset. The comparison for this winter does not support previous conclusions that denitrification must be caused by an ice-mediated process. In 1994/1995 the model notably underestimates the magnitude of denitrification observed during a single balloon flight of the MIPAS-B instrument. Agreement between model and MLS HNO3 at 68 hPa in mid-February 1995 was significantly better. Sensitivity tests show that a 1.5 K overall decrease in vortex temperatures or a factor 4 increase in assumed NAT nucleation rates produce the best

  3. The origin of midlatitude ice clouds and the resulting influence on their microphysical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Luebke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The radiative role of ice clouds in the atmosphere is known to be important, but uncertainties remain concerning the magnitude and net effects. However, through measurements of the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds, we can better characterize them, which can ultimately allow for their radiative properties to be more accurately ascertained. It has recently been proposed that there are two types of cirrus clouds – in situ and liquid origin. In this study, we present observational evidence to show that two distinct types of cirrus do exist. Airborne, in situ measurements of cloud ice water content (IWC, ice crystal concentration (Nice, and ice crystal size from the 2014 ML-CIRRUS campaign provide cloud samples that have been divided according to their origin type. The key features that set liquid origin cirrus apart from the in situ origin cirrus are a higher frequency of high IWC (> 100 ppmv, higher Nice values, and larger ice crystals. A vertical distribution of Nice shows that the in situ origin cirrus clouds exhibit a median value of around 0.1 cm−3, while the liquid origin concentrations are slightly, but notably higher. The median sizes of the crystals contributing the most mass are less than 200 μm for in situ origin cirrus, with some of the largest crystals reaching 550 μm in size. The liquid origin cirrus, on the other hand, were observed to have median diameters greater than 200 μm, and crystals that were up to 750 μm. An examination of these characteristics in relation to each other and their relationship to temperature provides strong evidence that these differences arise from the dynamics and conditions in which the ice crystals formed. Additionally, the existence of these two groups in cirrus cloud populations may explain why a bimodal distribution in the IWC-temperature relationship has been observed. We hypothesize that the low IWC mode is the result of in situ origin cirrus and the high IWC mode is the result of

  4. Numerical studies of microphysical modulations of stratospheric aerosol within ROMIC-ROSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, René; von Savigny, Christian; Rozanov, Alexei; Burrows, John; Zalach, Jakob

    2016-04-01

    The stratospheric aerosol layer (so-called Junge layer) is an inherent part of the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC). Stratospheric aerosols play a large role in the Earth's climate system because they interact with catalytic cycles depleting ozone, directly alter the atmosphere's radiative balance and modulate the strength of polar vortices, in particular when this system is perturbed. In terms of mass the layer is predominantly composed of liquid sulphate-water droplets and is fed from the oxidation of gaseous precursors reaching the stratosphere either by direct volcanic injections (mainly supplying SO2) or troposphere-stratosphere exchange processes. In volcanically quiescent periods, latter processes predominantly maintain the so-called background state of aerosol layer through oxidation of OCS above 22 km, and SO2 below. The Junge layer begins to develop 2-3 km above the tropopause and reaches a height of about 35 km, with a largest vertical extent in the tropics and spring-time polar regions. Above the TTL, the layer's vertical extent varies between 2 km and 8 km (about 35% of its mean vertical expansion), depending on the phase of the QBO. The QBO-induced meridional circulation, overlying the BDC, and accompanied signatures in the stratospheric temperature directly affect the life cycle of stratospheric aerosol. Mainly by modulating the equilibrium between microphysical processes which maintain the layer. Effects caused by QBO modulations of the advective transport in the upwelling region of the BDC are smaller and difficult to quantify, because the overlying sedimentation of aerosol is also being modulated and counteract the aerosol lofting. Here we show results from numerical studies performed within the project ROMIC-ROSA (Role of Stratospheric Aerosol in Climate and Atmospheric Science). We further explored relationships between QBO forcing and aerosol processes in the lower stratosphere. We examined whether similar process interferences can be caused by

  5. Impact of aerosols on marine cloud microphysics over the Indian Ocean using satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sofiya; Dey, Sagnik

    2017-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction is the one of the least understood and largest sources of uncertainty in quantifying climate forcing. Despite progress, the problem remains unresolved because of the buffering effect of meteorology and therefore it is suggested to separate the meteorological forcing from aerosol forcing focusing on different cloud types (Stevens and Feingold 2009). However, most of the previous studies on aerosol-cloud interaction over the Indian Ocean (including INDOEX) are limited to either one particular season or short period. We examine relationships between aerosol and cloud parameters using MODIS data sets for 15 years (2000-2015) period over Indian Ocean. We separated the meteorological forcing from aerosol forcing. In both the Arabian Sea (AS) and Bay of Bengal (BOB), the meteorological forcing is largest in the monsoon. In all the four seasons, cloud microphysical properties are more sensitive to aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the AS compared to BOB. Further analysis reveals presence of semi-direct effect in the winter season. Influence of aerosols on liquid water path (LWP) - cloud effective radius (Reff) relation is quantified. Cloud albedo (Rc) dependency on LWP and Reff is examined in view of changing aerosol load. Cloud drop growth is facilitated in presence of high moisture content. This is evident from the fact that Reff is found to broadly increase with an increase in LWP in every season over Arabian Sea as well as over Bay of Bengal. It is also noted that Reff is larger across a wide range of LWP in 'clean' condition (AOD polluted' condition (0.2 polluted' condition and (AOD > 0.4). This clearly demonstrate that in more polluted conditions, growth of cloud drops are restricted. This is the evidence of classic aerosol indirect effect. However, we notice a saturation in the decrease in Reff with an increase in AOD beyond 0.4. The results provide robust observational evidence of aerosol-cloud interaction in the Indian Ocean region that

  6. Correlations among the Optical Properties of Cirrus-Cloud Particles: Microphysical Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Cirrus measurements obtained with a ground-based polarization Raman lidar at 67.9 deg N in January 1997 reveal a strong positive correlation between the particle optical properties, specifically depolarization ratio delta(sub par) and extinction- to-backscatter (lidar) ratio S, for delta(sub par) less than approximately 40%, and an anti-correlation for delta(sub par) greater than approximately 40%. Over the length of the measurements the particle properties vary systematically. Initially, delta (sub par) approximately equals 60% and S approximately equals 10sr are observed. Then, with decreasing delta(sub par), S first increases to approximately 27sr (delta(sub par) approximately equals 40%) before decreasing to values around 10sr again (delta(sub par) approximately equals 20%). The analysis of lidar humidity and radiosonde temperature data shows that the measured optical properties stem from scattering by dry solid ice particles, while scattering by supercooled droplets, or by wetted or subliming ice particles can be excluded. For the microphysical interpretation of the lidar measurements, ray-tracing computations of particle scattering properties have been used. The comparison with the theoretical data suggests that the observed cirrus data can be interpreted in terms of size, shape, and, under the assumption that the lidar measurements of consecutive cloud segments can be mapped on the temporal development of a single cloud parcel moving along its trajectory, growth of the cirrus particles: Near the cloud top in the early stage of cirrus development, light scattering by nearly isometric particles that have the optical characteristics of hexagonal columns (short, column-like particles) is dominant. Over time the ice particles grow, and as the cloud base height extends to lower altitudes characterized by warmer temperatures they become morphologically diverse. For large S and depolarization values of approximately 40%, the scattering contributions of column- and

  7. Aerosol microphysics simulations of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption with the UKCA composition-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Dhomse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have enhanced the capability of a microphysical aerosol-chemistry module to simulate the atmospheric aerosol and precursor gases for both tropospheric and stratospheric conditions. Using the Mount Pinatubo eruption (June 1991 as a test case, we evaluate simulated aerosol properties in a composition-climate model against a range of satellite and in-situ observations. Simulations are performed assuming an injection of 20 Tg SO2 at 19–27 km in tropical latitudes, without any radiative feedback from the simulated aerosol. In both quiescent and volcanically perturbed conditions, simulated aerosol properties in the lower stratosphere show reasonable agreement with the observations. The model captures the observed timing of the maximum aerosol optical depth (AOD and its decay timescale in both tropics and Northern Hemisphere (NH mid-latitudes. There is also good qualitative agreement with the observations in terms of spatial and temporal variation of the aerosol effective radius (Reff, which peaks 6–8 months after the eruption. However, the model shows significant biases against some observational data sets. Simulated AOD and Surface Area Density (SAD in the tropics are substantially higher than the gap-filled satellite data products during the first 6 months after the eruption. The model shows consistently weaker enhancement in Reff compared to satellite and in-situ measurements. Simulated aerosol particle size distribution is also compared to NH mid-latitude in-situ balloon sounding measurements of size-resolved number concentrations. Before the eruption, the model captures the observed profiles of lower stratospheric particle number concentrations with radii larger than 5, 150 and 250 nm (N5, N150 and N250 very well. However, in the first 6 months after the eruption, the model shows high bias in N5 concentrations in the lower stratosphere, suggesting too strong nucleation. Following particle growth via condensation and coagulation, this bias

  8. Aerosol Impacts on Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2011-12-01

    particle sizes, down to at least 55 nm in size, act as droplet nuclei in these stratocumulus clouds. A detailed LES microphysical model was used to show this can occur without invoking differences in chemical composition. Aerosol number concentration in the >0.05 and >0.1 μm size ranges was correlated with droplet number concentration, and anti-correlated with droplet effective radius, and the effect is statistically significant. The impact of aerosol pollutants was to increase droplet number and decrease droplet size within a region extending about 1000 km offshore. Cloud droplets were more numerous and smaller near shore, and there was less drizzle. However, MODIS satellite measurements were used to show that despite the smaller droplets near shore, cloud albedo is not higher near shore than offshore. This is due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water path near shore.

  9. First comparison of a global microphysical aerosol model with size-resolved observational aerosol statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Mann, G. W.; Manktelow, P.; Heintzenberg, J.

    2006-09-01

    A statistical synthesis of marine aerosol measurements from experiments in four different oceans is used to evaluate a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP). We compare the model against observed size resolved particle concentrations, probability distributions, and the temporal persistence of different size particles. We attempt to explain the observed size distributions in terms of sulfate and sea spray and quantify the possible contributions of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous material to the number and mass distribution. The model predicts a bimodal size distribution that agrees well with observations as a grand average over all regions, but there are large regional differences. Notably, observed Aitken mode number concentrations are more than a factor 10 higher than in the model for the N Atlantic but a factor 7 lower than the model in the NW Pacific. We also find that modelled Aitken mode and accumulation mode geometric mean diameters are generally smaller in the model by 10-30%. Comparison with observed free tropospheric Aitken mode distributions suggests that the model underpredicts growth of these particles during descent to the MBL. Recent observations of a substantial organic component of free tropospheric aerosol could explain this discrepancy. We find that anthropogenic continental material makes a substantial contribution to N Atlantic marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol, with typically 60-90% of sulfate across the particle size range coming from anthropogenic sources, even if we analyse air that has spent an average of >120 h away from land. However, anthropogenic primary black carbon and organic carbon particles do not explain the large discrepancies in Aitken mode number. Several explanations for the discrepancy are suggested. The lack of lower atmospheric particle formation in the model may explain low N Atlantic particle concentrations. However, the observed and modelled particle persistence at Cape Grim in the Southern Ocean, does not

  10. Retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties from AERONET photopolarimetric measurements: 1. Information content analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    This paper is the first part of a two-part study that aims to retrieve aerosol particle size distribution (PSD) and refractive index from the multispectral and multiangular polarimetric measurements taken by the new-generation Sun photometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). It provides theoretical analysis and guidance to the companion study in which we have developed an inversion algorithm for retrieving 22 aerosol microphysical parameters associated with a bimodal PSD function from real AERONET measurements. Our theoretical analysis starts with generating the synthetic measurements at four spectral bands (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm) with a Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model for various types of spherical aerosol particles. Subsequently, the quantitative information content for retrieving aerosol parameters is investigated in four observation scenarios, i.e., I1, I2, P1, and P2. Measurements in the scenario (I1) comprise the solar direct radiances and almucantar radiances that are used in the current AERONET operational inversion algorithm. The other three scenarios include different additional measurements: (I2) the solar principal plane radiances, (P1) the solar principal plane radiances and polarization, and (P2) the solar almucantar polarization. Results indicate that adding polarization measurements can increase the degree of freedom for signal by 2-5 in the scenario P1, while not as much of an increase is found in the scenarios I2 and P2. Correspondingly, smallest retrieval errors are found in the scenario P1: 2.3% (2.9%) for the fine-mode (coarse-mode) aerosol volume concentration, 1.3% (3.5%) for the effective radius, 7.2% (12%) for the effective variance, 0.005 (0.035) for the real-part refractive index, and 0.019 (0.068) for the single-scattering albedo. These errors represent a reduction from their counterparts in scenario I1 of 79% (57%), 76% (49%), 69% (52%), 66% (46%), and 49% (20%), respectively. We further

  11. 3-D microphysical model studies of Arctic denitrification: comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Davies

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of Arctic denitrification using a 3-D chemistry-microphysics transport model are compared with observations for the winters 1994/95, 1996/97 and 1999/2000. The model of Denitrification by Lagrangian Particle Sedimentation (DLAPSE couples the full chemical scheme of the 3-D chemical transport model, SLIMCAT, with a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT growth and sedimentation scheme. We use observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and Improved Limb Atmospheric Sounder (ILAS satellite instruments, the balloon-borne Michelsen Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B, and the in situ NOy instrument on-board the ER-2. As well as directly comparing model results with observations, we also assess the extent to which these observations are able to validate the modelling approach taken. For instance, in 1999/2000 the model captures the temporal development of denitrification observed by the ER-2 from late January into March. However, in this winter the vortex was already highly denitrified by late January so the observations do not provide a strong constraint on the modelled rate of denitrification. The model also reproduces the MLS observations of denitrification in early February 2000. In 1996/97 the model captures the timing and magnitude of denitrification as observed by ILAS, although the lack of observations north of ~67° N in the beginning of February make it difficult to constrain the actual timing of onset. The comparison for this winter does not support previous conclusions that denitrification must be caused by an ice-mediated process. In 1994/95 the model notably underestimates the magnitude of denitrification observed during a single balloon flight of the MIPAS-B instrument. Agreement between model and MLS HNO3 at 68 hPa in mid-February 1995 is significantly better. Sensitivity tests show that a 1.5 K overall decrease in vortex temperatures, or a factor 4 increase in assumed NAT nucleation rates, produce the best

  12. Making bulk-conductive glass microchannel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jay J. L.; Niu, Lihong

    2008-02-01

    The fabrication of microchannel plate (MCP) with bulk-conductive characteristics has been studied. Semiconducting clad glass and leachable core glass were used for drawing fibers and making MCP. Co-axial single fiber was drawn from a platinum double-crucible in an automatic fiberizing system, and the fibers were stacked and redrawn into multifiber by a special gripping mechanism. The multifibers were stacked again and the boule was made and sliced into discs. New MCPs were made after chemically leaching process without the traditional hydrogen firing. It was shown that bulk-conductive glass MCP can operate at higher voltage with lower noise.

  13. "Work-Hardenable" ductile bulk metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jayanta; Tang, Mei Bo; Kim, Ki Buem; Theissmann, Ralf; Baier, Falko; Wang, Wei Hua; Eckert, Jürgen

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (< 1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive "work hardening" and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The "work-hardening" capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  14. Synthesis of Bulk Superconducting Magnesium Diboride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie Olbinado

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Bulk polycrystalline superconducting magnesium diboride, MgB2, samples were successfully prepared via a one-step sintering program at 750°C, in pre Argon with a pressure of 1atm. Both electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the superconductivity of the material at 39K, with a transition width of 5K. The polycrystalline nature, granular morphology, and composition of the sintered bulk material were confirmed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX.

  15. Towards a Reconstruction of General Bulk Metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhardt, Netta

    2016-01-01

    We prove that the metric of a general holographic spacetime can be reconstructed (up to an overall conformal factor) from distinguished spatial slices - "light-cone cuts" - of the conformal boundary. Our prescription is covariant and applies to bulk points in causal contact with the boundary. Furthermore, we describe a procedure for determining the light-cone cuts corresponding to bulk points in the causal wedge of the boundary in terms of the divergences of correlators in the dual field theory. Possible extensions for determining the conformal factor and including the cuts of points outside of the causal wedge are discussed. We also comment on implications for subregion/subregion duality.

  16. What do we need to know to model the microphysical evolution of volcanic clouds and how can we make these measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, J. M.; Toon, O. B.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions can inject millions of tons of ash, sulfate and gaseous precursors into the stratosphere. The magnitude and duration of the volcanic cloud on Earth's temperatures, circulation, clouds, and stratospheric ozone is strongly affected by the microphysical properties of the aerosol size distribution, which can evolve in complex ways. This presentation will cover the impacts and uncertainties associated with microphysical aerosol measurements and modeling of the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption, and valuable future measurements after the next large volcanic eruption. These additional measurements can help improve our understanding of stratospheric processes as well as possible consequences of large volcanic eruptions and hypothetical geoengineering scenarios on radiative forcing and chemistry.

  17. A new airborne Polar Nephelometer for the measurement of optical and microphysical cloud properties. Part II: Preliminary tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Crépel

    Full Text Available A new optical sensor, the airborne Polar Nephelometer, has been tested in an open wind tunnel. The wind tunnel was operated in cloudy conditions including either cloud water droplets or ice crystals, or a mixture of these particles. The sensor is designed to measure the optical and microphysical parameters of cloud particles sized from a few micrometers to about 500 µm diameter. Basically, the probe measures the scattering phase function of an ensemble of cloud particles which intersect a collimated laser beam near the focal point of a paraboloidal mirror. From the measured scattering phase function the retrieval of the droplet-size spectra and subsequent derived quantities such as liquid water content and size parameters can be calculated using an inversion method. The particle phase discrimination (water droplets/ice particles can be derived from the shape of the scattering phase function and the sensitivity of the probe allows the detection of small ice crystals (typically of 5 µm diameter. The paper describes the preliminary results obtained by the prototype version of the Polar Nephelometer in various cloudy conditions. These results are compared with direct microphysical measurements obtained by usual PMS probes also mounted in the wind tunnel. Complementary results obtained in a cold chamber are presented in order to illustrate the reliability of the Polar Nephelometer in the presence of small ice crystals.

  18. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol and KiXPol were continuously observing the central HOPE area near Forschungszentrum Jülich at a close distance, BoXPol observed the area from a distance of about 48.5 km. MRRs were deployed in the central HOPE area and one MRR close to BoXPol in Bonn, Germany. Seven disdrometers and three rain gauges providing point precipitation observations were deployed at five locations within a 5 km × 5 km region, while three other disdrometers were collocated with the MRR in Bonn. The daily rainfall accumulation at each rain gauge/disdrometer location estimated from the three X-band polarimetric radar observations showed very good agreement. Accompanying microphysical processes during the evolution of precipitation systems were well captured by the polarimetric X-band radars and corroborated by independent observations from the other ground-based instruments.

  19. Towards 3D prediction of supercooled liquid water for aircraft icing: Modifications of the microphysics in COSMO-EU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Köhler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Supercooled liquid water (SLW in the atmosphere is responsible for aircraft icing which can cause severe accidents. To date, the microphysics scheme in the model of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD for the European scale (COSMO-EU; due to be replaced by ICON-EU in 2015 has been optimised to forecast precipitation on the ground but not the water phase in the atmosphere. As a consequence, prediction of SLW is rather poor, as was shown in a series of case studies by the Aeronautical Meteorology department at DWD. ADWICE – the tool used by the DWD to predict aircraft icing – therefore does not rely on COSMO model SLW output, but predicts SLW by itself using a simple parcel method. In an effort to improve ADWICE it has been found that this algorithm has its limits and that it should be replaced by SLW prediction from a 3D weather prediction model. To this end it is necessary to improve the SLW prediction in the COSMO model. In this paper we analyse the microphysics scheme of COSMO-EU with respect to SLW production and depletion and present modifications that greatly improve SLW prediction. As reference for two case studies we use radar-lidar-radiometer products from the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg to verify the change in SLW prediction.

  20. The First Observed Cloud Echoes and Microphysical Parameter Retrievals by China’s 94-GHz Cloud Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Juxiu; WEI Ming; HANG Xin; ZHOU Jie; ZHANG Peichang; LI Nan

    2014-01-01

    By using the cloud echoes fi rst successfully observed by China’s indigenous 94-GHz SKY cloud radar, the macrostructure and microphysical properties of drizzling stratocumulus clouds in Anhui Province on 8 June 2013 are analyzed, and the detection capability of this cloud radar is discussed. The results are as follows. (1) The cloud radar is able to observe the time-varying macroscopic and microphysical parameters of clouds, and it can reveal the microscopic structure and small-scale changes of clouds. (2) The velocity spectral width of cloud droplets is small, but the spectral width of the cloud containing both cloud droplets and drizzle is large. When the spectral width is more than 0.4 m s-1, the radar refl ectivity factor is larger (over-10 dBZ). (3) The radar’s sensitivity is comparatively higher because the minimum radar refl ectivity factor is about-35 dBZ in this experiment, which exceeds the threshold for detecting the linear depolarized ratio (LDR) of stratocumulus (commonly -11 to -14 dBZ; decreases with increasing turbulence). (4) After distinguishing of cloud droplets from drizzle, cloud liquid water content and particle eff ective radius are retrieved. The liquid water content of drizzle is lower than that of cloud droplets at the same radar refl ectivity factor.

  1. Derivation of Physical and Optical Properties of Midlatitude Cirrus Ice Crystals for a Size-Resolved Cloud Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by approx. 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from approx. 0:05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  2. Forest fire smoke layers observed in the free troposphere over Portugal with a multiwavelength Raman lidar: optical and microphysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno Pereira, Sérgio; Preißler, Jana; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Silva, Ana Maria; Wagner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Vertically resolved optical and microphysical properties of biomass burning aerosols, measured in 2011 with a multiwavelength Raman lidar, are presented. The transportation time, within 1-2 days (or less), pointed towards the presence of relatively fresh smoke particles over the site. Some strong layers aloft were observed with particle backscatter and extinction coefficients (at 355 nm) greater than 5 Mm(-1)sr(-1) and close to 300 Mm(-1), respectively. The particle intensive optical properties showed features different from the ones reported for aged smoke, but rather consistent with fresh smoke. The Ångström exponents were generally high, mainly above 1.4, indicating a dominating accumulation mode. Weak depolarization values, as shown by the small depolarization ratio of 5% or lower, were measured. Furthermore, the lidar ratio presented no clear wavelength dependency. The inversion of the lidar signals provided a set of microphysical properties including particle effective radius below 0.2 μm, which is less than values previously observed for aged smoke particles. Real and imaginary parts of refractive index of about 1.5-1.6 and 0.02i, respectively, were derived. The single scattering albedo was in the range between 0.85 and 0.93; these last two quantities indicate the nonnegligible absorbing characteristics of the observed particles.

  3. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state: an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguation Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS climate model (ModelE is described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM, represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol mode, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble modes. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various mode configurations are presented. The number concentration of aerosol particles activated to cloud drops depends on the mode configuration. Simulations on the global scale with the GISS climate model are evaluated against aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment.

  4. Optical and microphysical properties of column-integrated aerosols at a SKYNET site downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Park, J. S.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    A skyradiometer (POM-02, Prede Co. Ltd.) has been operated to investigate aerosol properties at a SKYNET (SKYradiometer NETwork) site, YGN (Yongin) for six years starting from November 2008. The site is at the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul (37.34 °N, 127.27 °E and 167 m above sea level). POM-02 measures the diffuse radiation at six minute intervals at 11 wavelengths. Using version 5 of the skyrad.pack, aerosol optical (aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo) and microphysical (volume size distribution) properties were retrieved from the measurements at five wavelengths such as 400, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. In comparison with CIMEL sun photometers used in AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork), another worldwide ground-based network, skyradiometers have an advantage that they can provide larger number of aerosol property data at shorter time intervals. However, standard procedures for instrument operation and data retrieval have not been established. In this study, we first showed how we calibrated the instrument and how we obtained cloud screened and quality assured data. Next, we presented variations in aerosol optical and microphysical properties, depending on air masses and/or meteorological conditions, and examined the characteristic of high aerosol loading episodes including Asian dust storm and smog.

  5. Combined sphere-spheroid particle model for the retrieval of the microphysical aerosol parameters via regularized inversion of lidar data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaras Stefanos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we propose a two-step advancement of the Mie spherical-particle model accounting for particle non-sphericity. First, a naturally two-dimensional (2D generalized model (GM is made, which further triggers analogous 2D re-definitions of microphysical parameters. We consider a spheroidal-particle approach where the size distribution is additionally dependent on aspect ratio. Second, we incorporate the notion of a sphere-spheroid particle mixture (PM weighted by a non-sphericity percentage. The efficiency of these two models is investigated running synthetic data retrievals with two different regularization methods to account for the inherent instability of the inversion procedure. Our preliminary studies show that a retrieval with the PM model improves the fitting errors and the microphysical parameter retrieval and it has at least the same efficiency as the GM. While the general trend of the initial size distributions is captured in our numerical experiments, the reconstructions are subject to artifacts. Finally, our approach is applied to a measurement case yielding acceptable results.

  6. Derivation of Physical and Optical Properties of Midlatitude Cirrus Ice Crystals for a Size-Resolved Cloud Microphysics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by approx. 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from approx. 0:05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  7. Profiling aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties in ambient conditions by combining in situ and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Nenes, Athanasios; Marinou, Eleni; Solomos, Stavros; Rosenberg, Phil; Trembath, Jamie; Nott, Graeme J.; Allan, James; Le Breton, Michael; Bacak, Asan; Coe, Hugh; Percival, Carl; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    We present the In situ/Remote sensing aerosol Retrieval Algorithm (IRRA) that combines airborne in situ and lidar remote sensing data to retrieve vertical profiles of ambient aerosol optical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties, employing the ISORROPIA II model for acquiring the particle hygroscopic growth. Here we apply the algorithm on data collected from the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft during the ACEMED campaign in the Eastern Mediterranean. Vertical profiles of aerosol microphysical properties have been derived successfully for an aged smoke plume near the city of Thessaloniki with aerosol optical depth of ˜ 0.4 at 532 nm, single scattering albedos of ˜ 0.9-0.95 at 550 nm and typical lidar ratios for smoke of ˜ 60-80 sr at 532 nm. IRRA retrieves highly hydrated particles above land, with 55 and 80 % water volume content for ambient relative humidity of 80 and 90 %, respectively. The proposed methodology is highly advantageous for aerosol characterization in humid conditions and can find valuable applications in aerosol-cloud interaction schemes. Moreover, it can be used for the validation of active space-borne sensors, as is demonstrated here for the case of CALIPSO.

  8. Forest Fire Smoke Layers Observed in the Free Troposphere over Portugal with a Multiwavelength Raman Lidar: Optical and Microphysical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Nepomuceno Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertically resolved optical and microphysical properties of biomass burning aerosols, measured in 2011 with a multiwavelength Raman lidar, are presented. The transportation time, within 1-2 days (or less, pointed towards the presence of relatively fresh smoke particles over the site. Some strong layers aloft were observed with particle backscatter and extinction coefficients (at 355 nm greater than 5 Mm−1 sr−1 and close to 300 Mm−1, respectively. The particle intensive optical properties showed features different from the ones reported for aged smoke, but rather consistent with fresh smoke. The Ångström exponents were generally high, mainly above 1.4, indicating a dominating accumulation mode. Weak depolarization values, as shown by the small depolarization ratio of 5% or lower, were measured. Furthermore, the lidar ratio presented no clear wavelength dependency. The inversion of the lidar signals provided a set of microphysical properties including particle effective radius below 0.2 μm, which is less than values previously observed for aged smoke particles. Real and imaginary parts of refractive index of about 1.5-1.6 and 0.02i, respectively, were derived. The single scattering albedo was in the range between 0.85 and 0.93; these last two quantities indicate the nonnegligible absorbing characteristics of the observed particles.

  9. Microphysical and chemical characteristics of near-water aerosol over White and Kara Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpugova, S. A.; Polkin, V. V.; Panchenko, M. V.; Golobokova, L. P.; Kozlov, V. S.; Shmargunov, V. P.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Lisitzin, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    The results are presented of five-year-long (2003-2007) study of the spatial - temporal variability of the near-water aerosol in the water area of White and Kara Seas (55, 64, 71 and 80-th cruises of RV "Professor Shtockman"; 53 and 54-th cruises of RV "Akademik Mstislav Keldysh"). Measurements of aerosol microphysical characteristics were carried out by means of the automated mobile aerosol complex consisting of nephelometer, photoelectric counter and aethalometer. The aerosol disperse composition was studied with photoelectric counter in 256 size intervals from 0.4 to 10 m. About 1500 series of measurements were carried out in White Sea, and about 1400 series in Kara Sea. Chemical characteristics of aerosol were determined from samples collected on aerosol filters (92 samples were collected in White Sea and 48 in Kara Sea). The ion composition was determined under laboratory conditions. The H+, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, HCO3-, SO42- ions were under examination. Comparing aerosol characteristics of two seas, one can note that the mean values of the aerosol content parameters in Kara Sea are less than in White Sea. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration are from 2 (Yamal Peninsula, northern part of Novaya Zemlya) to 9 times (Blagopoluchia Bay, Ob' Gulf). The differences in the concentration of black carbon vary from 3 (Yamal Peninsula) to 17 times (Blagopoluchia Bay). The differences in the aerosol number concentration NA are not so big. The values NA near Kara Gate, Yamal Peninsula and northern part of Novaya Zemlya are practically the same as in White Sea. The concentration NA at Ob' gulf is one order of magnitude less than in White sea. The obtained aerosol volume size distributions were approximated by the sums of two fractions, submicron and coarse, with lognormal size distributions. The mean volume size distribution of submicron fraction in White Sea is approximated by the distribution with the variance of the radius logarithm s=0.6 and modal

  10. Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part III: Sensitivity to Modeling Assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Laura D.; Randall, David A.

    1996-03-01

    The inclusion of cloud microphysical processes in general circulation models makes it possible to study the multiple interactions among clouds, the hydrological cycle, and radiation. The gaps between the temporal and spatial scales at which such cloud microphysical processes work and those at which general circulation models presently function force climate modelers to crudely parameterize and simplify the various interactions among the different water species (namely, water vapor, cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow) and to use adjustable parameters to which large-scale models can be highly sensitive. Accordingly, the authors have investigated the sensitivity of the climate, simulated with the Colorado State University general circulation model, to various aspects of the parameterization of cloud microphysical processes and its interactions with the cumulus convection and radiative transfer parameterizations.The results of 120-day sensitivity experiments corresponding to perpetual January conditions have been compared with those of a control simulation in order to 1 ) determine the importance of advecting cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow at the temporal and spatial scale resolutions presently used in the model; 2) study the importance of the formation of extended stratiform anvils at the tops of cumulus towers, 3) analyze the role of mixed-phase clouds in determining the partitioning among cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow and, hence, their impacts on the simulated cloud optical properties; 4) evaluate the sensitivity of the atmospheric moisture budget and precipitation rates to a change in the fall velocities of rain and snow; 5) determine the model's sensitivity to the prescribed thresholds of autoconversion of cloud water to rain and cloud ice to snow; and 6) study the impact of the collection of supercooled cloud water by snow, as well as accounting for the cloud optical properties of snow.Results are presented in terms of 30-day mean differences

  11. Polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, RAJ; Hummelen, JC; Saricifti, NS

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured phase-separated blends, or bulk heterojunctions, of conjugated Polymers and fullerene derivatives form a very attractive approach to large-area, solid-state organic solar cells.The key feature of these cells is that they combine easy, processing from solution on a variety of substrate

  12. Failure by fracture in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, C.M.A.; Alves, Luis M.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits formability in bulk metal forming in the light of fundamental concepts of plasticity,ductile damage and crack opening modes. It proposes a new test to appraise the accuracy, reliability and validity of fracture loci associated with crack opening by tension and out-of-plane she...

  13. THE OPTIMIZATION OF PLUSH YARNS BULKING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VINEREANU Adam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experiments that were conducted on the installation of continuous bulking and thermofixing “SUPERBA” type TVP-2S for optimization of the plush yarns bulking process. There were considered plush yarns Nm 6.5/2, made of the fibrous blend of 50% indigenous wool sort 41 and 50% PES. In the first stage, it performs a thermal treatment with a turboprevaporizer at a temperature lower than thermofixing temperature, at atmospheric pressure, such that the plush yarns - deposed in a freely state on a belt conveyor - are uniformly bulking and contracting. It was followed the mathematical modeling procedure, working with a factorial program, rotatable central composite type, and two independent variables. After analyzing the parameters that have a direct influence on the bulking degree, there were selected the pre-vaporization temperature (coded x1,oC and the velocity of belt inside pre-vaporizer (coded x 2, m/min. As for the dependent variable, it was chosen the plush yarn diameter (coded y, mm. There were found the coordinates of the optimal point, and then this pair of values was verified in practice. These coordinates are: x1optim= 90oC and x 2optim= 6.5 m/min. The conclusion is that the goal was accomplished: it was obtained a good cover degree f or double-plush carpets by reducing the number of tufts per unit surface.

  14. Forming of bulk metallic glass microcomponents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wert, John A.; Thomsen, Christian; Jensen, Rune Debel

    2009-01-01

    The present article considers forward extrusion, closed-die forging and backward extrusion processes for fabrication of individual microcomponents from two bulk metallic glass (BMG) compositions: Mg60Cu30Y10 and Zr44Cu40Ag8Al8. Two types of tooling were used in the present work: relatively massive...

  15. Bulk viscosity effects on ultrasonic thermoacoustic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jeffrey; Scalo, Carlo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out unstructured fully-compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of a minimal-unit traveling-wave ultrasonic thermoacoustic device in looped configuration. The model comprises a thermoacoustic stack with 85% porosity and a tapered area change to suppress the fundamental standing-wave mode. A bulk viscosity model, which accounts for vibrational and rotational molecular relaxation effects, is derived and implemented via direct modification of the viscous stress tensor, τij ≡ 2 μSij +λ/2 μ ∂uk/∂xk δij , where the bulk viscosity is defined by μb ≡ λ +2/3 μ . The effective bulk viscosity coefficient accurately captures acoustic absorption from low to high ultrasonic frequencies and matches experimental wave attenuation rates across five decades. Using pressure-based similitude, the model was downscaled from total length L = 2 . 58 m to 0 . 0258 m, corresponding to the frequency range f = 242 - 24200 Hz, revealing the effects of bulk viscosity and direct modification of the thermodynamic pressure. Simulations are carried out to limit cycle and exhibit growth rates consistent with linear stability analyses, based on Rott's theory.

  16. Longitudinal bulk a coustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja;

    2009-01-01

    Design, fabrication and characterization, in terms of mass sensitivity, is presented for a polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever. The device is operated in air at 51 MHz, resulting in a mass sensitivity of 100 HZ/fg (1 fg = 10{su−15 g). The initial characterization...

  17. Winterization strategies for bulk storage of pickles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucumbers are commercially fermented and stored in bulk in outdoor open top fiberglass tanks. During winter, snow and ice accumulates around and on top of tanks influencing heat transfer in an unpredictable manner, often compromising the fruit quality. This study evaluates the performance of inexpen...

  18. A Stereoscopic Look into the Bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Czech, Bartlomiej; McCandlish, Samuel; Mosk, Benjamin; Sully, James

    2016-01-01

    We present the foundation for a holographic dictionary with depth perception. The dictionary consists of natural CFT operators whose duals are simple, diffeomorphism-invariant bulk operators. The CFT operators of interest are the "OPE blocks," contributions to the OPE from a single conformal family. In holographic theories, we show that the OPE blocks are dual at leading order in 1/N to integrals of effective bulk fields along geodesics or homogeneous minimal surfaces in anti-de Sitter space. One widely studied example of an OPE block is the modular Hamiltonian, which is dual to the fluctuation in the area of a minimal surface. Thus, our operators pave the way for generalizing the Ryu-Takayanagi relation to other bulk fields. Although the OPE blocks are non-local operators in the CFT, they admit a simple geometric description as fields in kinematic space--the space of pairs of CFT points. We develop the tools for constructing local bulk operators in terms of these non-local objects. The OPE blocks also allow ...

  19. Fluctuating brane in a dilatonic bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, P; Rodríguez-Martinez, M; Brax, Philippe; Langlois, David; Rodriguez-Martinez, Maria

    2003-01-01

    We consider a cosmological brane moving in a static five-dimensional bulk spacetime endowed with a scalar field whose potential is exponential. After studying various cosmological behaviours for the homogeneous background, we investigate the fluctuations of the brane that leave spacetime unaffected. A single mode embodies these fluctuations and obeys a wave equation which we study for bouncing and ever-expanding branes.

  20. Meteoroid Bulk Density and Ceplecha Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaauw, R. C.; Moser, D. E.; Moorhead, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The determination of asteroid bulk density is an important aspect of Near Earth Object (NEO) characterization. A fraction of meteoroids originate from asteroids (including some NEOs), thus in lieu of mutual perturbations, satellites, or expensive spacecraft missions, a study of meteoroid bulk densities can potentially provide useful insights into the densities of NEOs and PHOs (Potentially Hazardous Objects). Meteoroid bulk density is still inherently difficult to measure, and is most often determined by modeling the ablation of the meteoroid. One approach towards determining a meteoroid density distribution entails using a more easily measured proxy for the densities, then calibrating the proxy with known densities from meteorite falls, ablation modelling, and other sources. An obvious proxy choice is the Ceplecha type, KB (Ceplecha, 1958), which is thought to indicate the strength of a meteoroid and often correlated to different bulk densities in literature. KB is calculated using the air density at the beginning height of the meteor, the initial velocity, and the zenith angle of the radiant; quantities more readily determined than meteoroid bulk density itself. Numerical values of K(sub B) are sorted into groups (A, B, C, etc.), which have been matched to meteorite falls or meteor showers with known composition such as the porous Draconids. An extensive survey was conducted to establish the strength of the relationship between bulk density and K(sub B), specifically looking at those that additionally determined K(sub B) for the meteors. In examining the modeling of high-resolution meteor data from Kikwaya et al. (2011), the correlation between K(sub B) and bulk density was not as strong as hoped. However, a distinct split by dynamical type was seen with Jovian Tisserand parameter (T(sub J)), with meteoroids from Halley Type comets (T(sub J) densities than those originating from Jupiter Family comets and asteroids (T(sub J) > 2). Therefore, this work indicates

  1. Integration of bulk piezoelectric materials into microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    Bulk piezoelectric ceramics, compared to deposited piezoelectric thin-films, provide greater electromechanical coupling and charge capacity, which are highly desirable in many MEMS applications. In this thesis, a technology platform is developed for wafer-level integration of bulk piezoelectric substrates on silicon, with a final film thickness of 5-100microm. The characterized processes include reliable low-temperature (200°C) AuIn diffusion bonding and parylene bonding of bulk-PZT on silicon, wafer-level lapping of bulk-PZT with high-uniformity (+/-0.5microm), and low-damage micro-machining of PZT films via dicing-saw patterning, laser ablation, and wet-etching. Preservation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties is confirmed with hysteresis and piezo-response measurements. The introduced technology offers higher material quality and unique advantages in fabrication flexibility over existing piezoelectric film deposition methods. In order to confirm the preserved bulk properties in the final film, diaphragm and cantilever beam actuators operating in the transverse-mode are designed, fabricated and tested. The diaphragm structure and electrode shapes/sizes are optimized for maximum deflection through finite-element simulations. During tests of fabricated devices, greater than 12microm PP displacement is obtained by actuation of a 1mm2 diaphragm at 111kHz with management IC, which incorporates a supply-independent bias circuitry, an active diode for low-dropout rectification, a bias-flip system for higher efficiency, and a trickle battery charger. The overall system does not require a pre-charged battery, and has power consumption of sleep-mode (simulated). Under lg vibration at 155Hz, a 70mF ultra-capacitor is charged from OV to 1.85V in 50 minutes.

  2. 46 CFR 148.04-23 - Unslaked lime in bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unslaked lime in bulk. 148.04-23 Section 148.04-23... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN BULK Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-23 Unslaked lime in bulk. (a) Unslaked lime in bulk must be transported in unmanned, all steel, double-hulled...

  3. Description and evaluation of GLOMAP-mode: a modal global aerosol microphysics model for the UKCA composition-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Mann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new version of the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP is described, which uses a two-moment modal aerosol scheme rather than the original two-moment bin scheme. GLOMAP-mode simulates the multi-component global aerosol, resolving sulphate, sea-salt, dust, black carbon (BC and particulate organic matter (POM, the latter including primary and biogenic secondary POM. Aerosol processes are simulated in a size-resolved manner including primary emissions, secondary particle formation by binary homogeneous nucleation of sulphuric acid and water, particle growth by coagulation, condensation and cloud-processing and removal by dry deposition, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging. A series of benchmark observational datasets are assembled against which the skill of the model is assessed in terms of normalised mean bias (b and correlation coefficient (R. Overall, the model performs well against the datasets in simulating concentrations of aerosol precursor gases, chemically speciated particle mass, condensation nuclei (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. Surface sulphate, sea-salt and dust mass concentrations are all captured well, while BC and POM are biased low (but correlate well. Surface CN concentrations compare reasonably well in free troposphere and marine sites, but are underestimated at continental and coastal sites related to underestimation of either primary particle emissions or new particle formation. The model compares well against a compilation of CCN observations covering a range of environments and against vertical profiles of size-resolved particle concentrations over Europe. The simulated global burden, lifetime and wet removal of each of the simulated aerosol components is also examined and each lies close to multi-model medians from the AEROCOM model intercomparison exercise.

  4. Bulk solitary waves in elastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonov, A. M.; Dreiden, G. V.; Semenova, I. V.; Shvartz, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    A short and object oriented conspectus of bulk solitary wave theory, numerical simulations and real experiments in condensed matter is given. Upon a brief description of the soliton history and development we focus on bulk solitary waves of strain, also known as waves of density and, sometimes, as elastic and/or acoustic solitons. We consider the problem of nonlinear bulk wave generation and detection in basic structural elements, rods, plates and shells, that are exhaustively studied and widely used in physics and engineering. However, it is mostly valid for linear elasticity, whereas dynamic nonlinear theory of these elements is still far from being completed. In order to show how the nonlinear waves can be used in various applications, we studied the solitary elastic wave propagation along lengthy wave guides, and remarkably small attenuation of elastic solitons was proven in physical experiments. Both theory and generation for strain soliton in a shell, however, remained unsolved problems until recently, and we consider in more details the nonlinear bulk wave propagation in a shell. We studied an axially symmetric deformation of an infinite nonlinearly elastic cylindrical shell without torsion. The problem for bulk longitudinal waves is shown to be reducible to the one equation, if a relation between transversal displacement and the longitudinal strain is found. It is found that both the 1+1D and even the 1+2D problems for long travelling waves in nonlinear solids can be reduced to the Weierstrass equation for elliptic functions, which provide the solitary wave solutions as appropriate limits. We show that the accuracy in the boundary conditions on free lateral surfaces is of crucial importance for solution, derive the only equation for longitudinal nonlinear strain wave and show, that the equation has, amongst others, a bidirectional solitary wave solution, which lead us to successful physical experiments. We observed first the compression solitary wave in the

  5. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Höpner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX, conducted in February and March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV to perform vertical in-situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption. These measurements were used together with surface-based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL observations and aerosol in-situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles. Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. Mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717±604 cm−3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo–Gangetic Plain (2247±370 cm−3. Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo–Gangetic Plain. Compared to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX conducted in winter 1999, elevated aerosol layers with increased aerosol number concentration were observed more frequently in 2012. However, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm=8.5±4.2 Wm−1 was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999. By combining vertical in-situ measured particle absorption with scattering calculated with Mie-theory, layers with single-scattering albedo (SSA values of specific source regions were derived and utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for dry conditions were found to be 0.94±0.02 and 0.91±0.02 for air masses from

  6. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpner, F.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Praveen, P. S.; Bosch, C.; Ogren, J. A.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Ramanathan, V.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX), conducted from 16 February to 30 March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH) in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV) to perform vertical in situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption coefficients. These measurements were used together with surface- based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL) observations and aerosol in situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles.Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. The mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717 ± 604 cm-3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo-Gangetic Plain (2247 ± 370 cm-3). Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. This feature is different compared to what was observed during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) conducted in winter 1999, where aerosol number concentrations generally decreased with height. In contrast, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm) = 8.5 ± 4.2 Wm-1) was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999.Layers with source region specific single-scattering albedo (SSA) values were derived by combining vertical in situ particle absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients calculated with Mie theory. These SSA layers were utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for 550 nm for dry

  7. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O' Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

    2014-05-13

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution

  8. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bergman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics model SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by keeping the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution to the minimum. The aerosol size distribution is described using 20 size sections with 10 size sections in size space which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm divided to three subranges each having distinct optimised process and compound selection.

    The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparison against (1 measured continental and marine size distributions, (2 observed variability of continental modal number concentrations, (3 measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea salt mass concentrations, (4 observations of AOD and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5 global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6 model results using M7 which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM.

    The evaluation shows that the global aerosol properties can be reproduced reasonably well using the coarse resolution of 10 size sections in size space. The simulated global aerosol budgets are within the range of previous studies. Surface concentrations of sea salt, sulphate and carbonaceous species have an annual mean within a factor of five of the observations, while the simulated sea salt concentrations reproduce the observations less accurately and show high variability. Regionally, AOD is in relatively good agreement with the observations (within a factor of two. At mid-latitudes the observed AOD is captured well, while at high-latitudes as well as in some polluted and

  9. Intercomparison and evaluation of global aerosol microphysical properties among AeroCom models of a range of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Mann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by 12 global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the multi-model-mean data set simulates the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree

  10. Evaluation of Cloud Microphysics Simulated using a Meso-Scale Model Coupled with a Spectral Bin Microphysical Scheme through Comparison with Observation Data by Ship-Borne Doppler and Space-Borne W-Band Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, T.; Nakajima, T.; Khain, A. P.; Saito, K.; Takemura, T.; Okamoto, H.; Nishizawa, T.; Tao, W.-K.

    2012-01-01

    Equivalent radar reflectivity factors (Ze) measured by W-band radars are directly compared with the corresponding values calculated from a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic meso-scale model coupled with a spectral-bin-microphysical (SBM) scheme for cloud. Three case studies are the objects of this research: one targets a part of ship-borne observation using 95 GHz Doppler radar over the Pacific Ocean near Japan in May 2001; other two are aimed at two short segments of space-borne observation by the cloud profiling radar on CloudSat in November 2006. The numerical weather prediction (NWP) simulations reproduce general features of vertical structures of Ze and Doppler velocity. A main problem in the reproducibility is an overestimation of Ze in ice cloud layers. A frequency analysis shows a strong correlation between ice water contents (IWC) and Ze in the simulation; this characteristic is similar to those shown in prior on-site studies. From comparing with the empirical correlations by the prior studies, the simulated Ze is overestimated than the corresponding values in the studies at the same IWC. Whereas the comparison of Doppler velocities suggests that large-size snowflakes are necessary for producing large velocities under the freezing level and hence rules out the possibility that an overestimation of snow size causes the overestimation of Ze. Based on the results of several sensitivity tests, we conclude that the source of the overestimation is a bias in the microphysical calculation of Ze or an overestimation of IWC. To identify the source of the problems needs further validation research with other follow-up observations.

  11. Bulk locality and boundary creating operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yu; Ooguri, Hirosi

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a minimum requirement for CFT operators to be localized in the dual AdS. In any spacetime dimensions, we show that a general solution to the requirement is a linear superposition of operators creating spherical boundaries in CFT, with the dilatation by the imaginary unit from their centers. This generalizes the recent proposal by Miyaji et al. for bulk local operators in the three dimensional AdS. We show that Ishibashi states for the global conformal symmetry in any dimensions and with the imaginary di-latation obey free field equations in AdS and that incorporating bulk interactions require their superpositions. We also comment on the recent proposals by Kabat et al., and by H. Verlinde.

  12. Bulk Locality and Boundary Creating Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a minimum requirement for CFT operators to be localized in the dual AdS. In any spacetime dimensions, we show that a general solution to the requirement is a linear superposition of operators creating spherical boundaries in CFT, with the dilatation by the imaginary unit from their centers. This generalizes the recent proposal by Miyaji et al. for bulk local operators in the three dimensional AdS. We show that Ishibashi states for the global conformal symmetry in any dimensions and with the imaginary dilatation obey free field equations in AdS and that incorporating bulk interactions require their superpositions. We also comment on the recent proposals by Kabat et al., and by H. Verlinde.

  13. Bulk locality and boundary creating operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Yu [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Ooguri, Hirosi [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-10-19

    We formulate a minimum requirement for CFT operators to be localized in the dual AdS. In any spacetime dimensions, we show that a general solution to the requirement is a linear superposition of operators creating spherical boundaries in CFT, with the dilatation by the imaginary unit from their centers. This generalizes the recent proposal by Miyaji et al. for bulk local operators in the three dimensional AdS. We show that Ishibashi states for the global conformal symmetry in any dimensions and with the imaginary dilatation obey free field equations in AdS and that incorporating bulk interactions require their superpositions. We also comment on the recent proposals by Kabat et al., and by H. Verlinde.

  14. Bulk and shear viscosity in Hagedorn fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, A.; Wahba, M. [Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP), MTI University, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo (Egypt)

    2010-11-15

    Assuming that the Hagedorn fluid composed of known particles and resonances with masses m <2 GeV obeys the first-order theory (Eckart) of relativistic fluid, we discuss the transport properties of QCD confined phase. Based on the relativistic kinetic theory formulated under the relaxation time approximation, expressions for bulk and shear viscosity in thermal medium of hadron resonances are derived. The relaxation time in the Hagedorn dynamical fluid exclusively takes into account the decay and eventually van der Waals processes. We comment on the in-medium thermal effects on bulk and shear viscosity and averaged relaxation time with and without the excluded-volume approach. As an application of these results, we suggest the dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and the cosmological models, which require thermo- and hydro-dynamics equations of state. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Bulk and Shear Viscosity in Hagedorn Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that the Hagedorn fluid composed of known particles and resonances with masses $m<2\\,$GeV obeys the {\\it first-order} theory (Eckart) of relativistic fluid, we discuss the transport properties of QCD confined phase. Based on the relativistic kinetic theory formulated under the relaxation time approximation, expressions for bulk and shear viscosity in thermal medium are derived. The relaxation time in the Hagedorn dynamical fluid exclusively takes into account the decay and eventually van der Waals processes. We comment on the {\\it in-medium} thermal effects on bulk and shear viscosities and averaged relaxation time with and without the excluded-volume approach. As an application of these results, we suggest the dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, non-equlibrium thermodynamics and the cosmological models, which require thermo and hydrodynamics equations of state.

  16. Portable design rules for bulk CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that for the past several years, one school of IC designers has used a simplified set of nMOS geometric design rules (GDR) which is 'portable', in that it can be used by many different nMOS manufacturers. The present investigation is concerned with a preliminary set of design rules for bulk CMOS which has been verified for simple test structures. The GDR are defined in terms of Caltech Intermediate Form (CIF), which is a geometry-description language that defines simple geometrical objects in layers. The layers are abstractions of physical mask layers. The design rules do not presume the existence of any particular design methodology. Attention is given to p-well and n-well CMOS processes, bulk CMOS and CMOS-SOS, CMOS geometric rules, and a description of the advantages of CMOS technology.

  17. Fully antisymmetrised dynamics for bulk fermion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Vantournhout, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    The neutron star's crust and mantel are typical examples of non-uniform bulk systems with spacial localisations. When modelling such systems at low temperatures, as is the case in the crust, one has to work with antisymmetrised many-body states to get the correct fermion behaviour. Fermionic molecular dynamics, which works with an antisymmetrised product of localised wave packets, should be an appropriate choice. Implementing periodic boundary conditions into the fermionic molecular dynamics formalism would allow the study of the neutron star's crust as a bulk quantum system. Unfortunately, the antisymmetrisation is a non-local entanglement which reaches far out of the periodically repeated unit cell. In this proceeding, we give a brief overview how periodic boundary conditions and fermionic molecular dynamics can be combined without truncating the long-range many-body correlation induced by the antisymmetry of the many-body state.

  18. Large bulk Micromegas detectors for TPC applications

    CERN Document Server

    Anvar, S; Boyer, M; Beucher, J; Calvet, D; Colas, P; De La Broise, X; Delagnes, E; Delbart, A; Druillole, F; Emery, S; Giganti, C; Giomataris, I; Mazzucato, E; Monmarthe, E; Nizery, F; Pierre, F; Ritou, J L; Sarrat, A; Zito, M; Catanesi, M G; Radicioni, E; De Oliveira, R; Blondel, A; Di Marco, M; Ferrere, D; Perrin, E; Ravonel, M; Jover, G; Lux, T; Rodriguez, A Y; Sanchez, F; Cervera, A; Hansen, C; Monfregola, L

    2009-01-01

    A large volume TPC will be used in the near future in a variety of experiments including T2K. The bulk Micromegas detector for this TPC is built using a novel production technique particularly suited for compact, thin and robust low mass detectors. The capability to pave a large surface with a simple mounting solution and small dead space is of particular interest for these applications. We have built several large bulk Micromegas detectors () and we have tested one in the former HARP field cage with a magnetic field. Prototypes cards of the T2K front end electronics, based on the AFTER ASIC chip, have been used in this TPC test for the first time. Cosmic ray data have been acquired in a variety of experimental conditions. Good detector performances, space point resolution and energy loss measurement have been achieved.

  19. Bulk micromegas detectors for large TPC applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchez, J; Cavata, Ch; Colas, P; De La Broise, X; Delbart, A; Giganon, Arnaud; Giomataris, Ioanis; Graffin, P; Mols, J Ph; Pierre, F; Ritou, J L; Sarrat, A; Virique, E; Zito, M; Radicioni, E; De Oliveira, R; Dumarchez, J; Abgrall, N; Bene, P; Blondel, A; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Ferrère, D; Maschiocchi, F; Perrin, E; Richeux, J P; Schroeter, R; Jover, G; Lux,; Rodriguez, A Y; Sánchez, F

    2007-01-01

    A large volume TPC will be used in the near future in a variety of experiments including T2K. The bulk Micromegas detector for this TPC is built using a novel production technique particularly suited for compact and robust low mass detectors. The capability to pave a large surface with a simple mounting solution and small dead space between modules is of particular interest for these applications. We have built several large bulk Micromegas detectors and we have tested them in the former HARP field cage setup with a magnetic field. Cosmic ray data have been acquired in a variety of experimental conditions. Good detector performances and space point resolution have been achieved.

  20. Effective pure states for bulk quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knill, E.; Chuang, I.; Laflamme, R.

    1997-11-01

    In bulk quantum computation one can manipulate a large number of indistinguishable quantum computers by parallel unitary operations and measure expectation values of certain observables with limited sensitivity. The initial state of each computer in the ensemble is known but not pure. Methods for obtaining effective pure input states by a series of manipulations have been described by Gershenfeld and Chuang (logical labeling) and Corey et al. (spatial averaging) for the case of quantum computation with nuclear magnetic resonance. We give a different technique called temporal averaging. This method is based on classical randomization, requires no ancilla qubits and can be implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance without using gradient fields. We introduce several temporal averaging algorithms suitable for both high temperature and low temperature bulk quantum computing and analyze the signal to noise behavior of each.

  1. Modeling direct interband tunneling. I. Bulk semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Andrew, E-mail: pandrew@ucla.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chui, Chi On [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Interband tunneling is frequently studied using the semiclassical Kane model, despite uncertainty about its validity. Revisiting the physical basis of this formula, we find that it neglects coupling to other bands and underestimates transverse tunneling. As a result, significant errors can arise at low and high fields for small and large gap materials, respectively. We derive a simple multiband tunneling model to correct these defects analytically without arbitrary parameters. Through extensive comparison with band structure and quantum transport calculations for bulk InGaAs, InAs, and InSb, we probe the accuracy of the Kane and multiband formulas and establish the superiority of the latter. We also show that the nonlocal average electric field should be used when applying either of these models to nonuniform potentials. Our findings are important for efficient analysis and simulation of bulk semiconductor devices involving tunneling.

  2. Towards a reconstruction of general bulk metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Horowitz, Gary T.

    2017-01-01

    We prove that the metric of a general holographic spacetime can be reconstructed (up to an overall conformal factor) from distinguished spatial slices—‘light-cone cuts’—of the conformal boundary. Our prescription is covariant and applies to bulk points in causal contact with the boundary. Furthermore, we describe a procedure for determining the light-cone cuts corresponding to bulk points in the causal wedge of the boundary in terms of the divergences of correlators in the dual field theory. Possible extensions for determining the conformal factor and including the cuts of points outside of the causal wedge are discussed. We also comment on implications for subregion/subregion duality.

  3. Metal reduction at bulk chemical filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Toru; Daikoku, Shusaku; Tsuzuki, Shuichi; Murakami, Tetsuya

    2017-03-01

    OK73 thinner and cyclohexanone, both of which were spiked with metals were passed through Nylon 6,6 filter, varying flow rate, which include the conditions of both point-of-use and bulk filtrations. The influent and effluent metal concentrations were measured using ICP-MS for metal removal efficiency of the filtration. As a result, removal efficiency for some metals descended depending on the flow rate, while others maintained. Slower flow rate is recommended to maintain low metal concentration in bulk filtration based on the result. Metals in cyclohexanone were reduced at higher efficiency than in OK73 thinner, agrees with a metal removal model of hydrophilic adsorbent in organic solvent, evidenced in our previous paper. Further, metal reduction on 300 mm φ Si wafer after coating organic solvents with Nylon 6,6 filtration was evidenced with TREX analysis.

  4. Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yafei

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators mainly introduces the theory, design, fabrication technology and application of a recently developed new type of device, multilayer integrated film bulk acoustic resonators, at the micro and nano scale involving microelectronic devices, integrated circuits, optical devices, sensors and actuators, acoustic resonators, micro-nano manufacturing, multilayer integration, device theory and design principles, etc. These devices can work at very high frequencies by using the newly developed theory, design, and fabrication technology of nano and micro devices. Readers in fields of IC, electronic devices, sensors, materials, and films etc. will benefit from this book by learning the detailed fundamentals and potential applications of these advanced devices. Prof. Yafei Zhang is the director of the Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory for Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology, PRC; Dr. Da Chen was a PhD student in Prof. Yafei Zhang’s research group.

  5. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  6. Dissolution of bulk specimens of silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W. F.; Merkle, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    An accurate chemical characterization of silicon nitride has become important in connection with current efforts to incorporate components of this material into advanced heat engines. However, there are problems concerning a chemical analysis of bulk silicon nitride. Current analytical methods require the pulverization of bulk specimens. A pulverization procedure making use of grinding media, on the other hand, will introduce contaminants. A description is given of a dissolution procedure which overcomes these difficulties. It has been found that up to at least 0.6 g solid pieces of various samples of hot pressed and reaction bonded silicon nitride can be decomposed in a mixture of 3 mL hydrofluoric acid and 1 mL nitric acid overnight at 150 C in a Parr bomb. High-purity silicon nitride is completely soluble in nitric acid after treatment in the bomb. Following decomposition, silicon and hydrofluoric acid are volatilized and insoluble fluorides are converted to a soluble form.

  7. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, Helena, E-mail: hpardo@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay); Divine Khan, Ngwashi [Mantfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom); Faccio, Ricardo [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araujo-Moreira, F.M. [Grupo de Materiais e Dispositivos-CMDMC, Departamento de Fisica e Engenharia Fisica, UFSCar, Caixa Postal 676, 13565-905, Sao Carlos SP (Brazil); Fernandez-Werner, Luciana [Centro NanoMat, Polo Tecnologico de Pando, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Cno. Aparicio Saravia s/n, 91000, Pando, Canelones (Uruguay); Crystallography, Solid State and Materials Laboratory (Cryssmat-Lab), DETEMA, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de la Republica, Gral. Flores 2124, P.O. Box 1157, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2012-08-15

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm{sup -1} showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  8. On bulk viscosity and moduli decay

    OpenAIRE

    M. Laine

    2010-01-01

    This pedagogically intended lecture, one of four under the header "Basics of thermal QCD", reviews an interesting relationship, originally pointed out by Bodeker, that exists between the bulk viscosity of Yang-Mills theory (of possible relevance to the hydrodynamics of heavy ion collision experiments) and the decay rate of scalar fields coupled very weakly to a heat bath (appearing in some particle physics inspired cosmological scenarios). This topic serves, furthermore, as a platform on whic...

  9. Depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhouse, D.A.R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY, 10598 (United States); Debnath, Ratan; Kramer, Illan J.; Zhitomirsky, David; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Quantum Solar Power Corporation, 1055 W. Hastings, Ste. 300, Vancouver, BC, V6E 2E9 (Canada); Etgar, Lioz; Graetzel, Michael [Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Effects of bulk viscosity on cosmological evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Pimentel, L O; Pimentel, L O; Diaz-Rivera, L M

    1994-01-01

    Abstract:The effect of bulk viscisity on the evolution of the homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models is considered. Solutions are found, with a barotropic equation of state, and a viscosity coefficient that is proportional to a power of the energy density of the universe. For flat space, power law expansions, related to extended inflation are found as well as exponential solutions, related to old inflation; also a solution with expansion that is an exponential of an exponential of the time is found.

  12. Modeling of Microimprinting of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming CHENG; John A. Wert

    2006-01-01

    A finite element analysis (FEA) model has been developed to analyze microimprinting of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) near the glass transition temperature (Tg). The results reveal an approximately universal imprinting response for BMG, independent of surface feature length scale. The scale-independent nature of BMG imprinting derives from the flow characteristics of BMG in the temperature range above Tg. It also shows that the lubrication condition has a mild influence on BMG imprinting in the temperature range above Tg.

  13. Impact of Cloud Microphysical Processes on the Simulation of Typhoon Rananim near Shore.Part Ⅰ: Cloud Structure and Precipitation Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程锐; 宇如聪; 傅云飞; 徐幼平

    2011-01-01

    By using the Advanced Regional Eta-coordinate Model (AREM),the basic structure and cloud features of Typhoon Rananim are simulated and verified against observations.Five sets of experiments are designed to investigate the effects of the cloud microphysical processes on the model cloud structure and precipitation features.The importance of the ice-phase microphysics,the cooling effect related to microphysical characteristics change,and the influence of terminal velocity of graupel are examined.The results indicate that the cloud microphysical processes impact more on the cloud development and precipitation features of the typhoon than on its intensity and track.Big differences in the distribution pattern and content of hydrometeors,and types and amount of rainfall occur in the five experiments,resulting in different heating and cooling effects.The largest difference of 24-h rain rate reaches 52.5 mm h-1.The results are summarized as follows:1) when the cooling effect due to the evaporation of rain water is excluded,updrafts in the typhoon's inner core are the strongest with the maximum vertical velocity of-19 Pa s-1 and rain water and graupel grow most dominantly with their mixing ratios increased by 1.8 and 2.5 g kg-1,respectively,compared with the control experiment; 2) the melting of snow and graupel affects the growth of rain water mainly in the spiral rainbands,but much less significantly in the eyewall area; 3) the warm cloud microphysical process produces the smallest rainfall area and the largest percentage of convective precipitation (63.19%),while the largest rainfall area and the smallest percentage of convective precipitation (48.85%) are generated when the terminal velocity of graupel is weakened by half.

  14. Implementation of an Aerosol-Cloud Microphysics-Radiation Coupling into the NASA Unified WRF: Simulation Results for the 6-7 August 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J. J.; Matsui, T.; Tao, W.-K.; Tan, Q.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Chin, M.; Pickering, K.; Guy, N.; Lang, S.; Kemp, E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols affect the Earth's radiation balance directly and cloud microphysical processes indirectly via the activation of cloud condensation and ice nuclei. These two effects have often been considered separately and independently, hence the need to assess their combined impact given the differing nature of their effects on convective clouds. To study both effects, an aerosol-microphysics-radiation coupling, including Goddard microphysics and radiation schemes, was implemented into the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting model (NU-WRF). Fully coupled NU-WRF simulations were conducted for a mesoscale convective system (MCS) that passed through the Niamey, Niger area on 6-7 August 2006 during an African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) special observing period. The results suggest that rainfall is reduced when aerosol indirect effects are included, regardless of the aerosol direct effect. Daily mean radiation heating profiles in the area traversed by the MCS showed the aerosol (mainly mineral dust) direct effect had the largest impact near cloud tops just above 200 hectopascals where short-wave heating increased by about 0.8 Kelvin per day; the weakest long-wave cooling was at around 250 hectopascals. It was also found that more condensation and ice nuclei as a result of higher aerosol/dust concentrations led to increased amounts of all cloud hydrometeors because of the microphysical indirect effect, and the radiation direct effect acts to reduce precipitating cloud particles (rain, snow and graupel) in the middle and lower cloud layers while increasing the non-precipitating particles (ice) in the cirrus anvil. However, when the aerosol direct effect was activated, regardless of the indirect effect, the onset of MCS precipitation was delayed about 2 hours, in conjunction with the delay in the activation of cloud condensation and ice nuclei. Overall, for this particular environment, model set-up and physics configuration, the effect of aerosol

  15. Bulk viscous cosmology in early Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C P Singh

    2008-07-01

    The effect of bulk viscosity on the early evolution of Universe for a spatially homogeneous and isotropic Robertson-Walker model is considered. Einstein's field equations are solved by using `gamma-law' equation of state = ( - 1)ρ, where the adiabatic parameter gamma () depends on the scale factor of the model. The `gamma' function is defined in such a way that it describes a unified solution of early evolution of the Universe for inflationary and radiation-dominated phases. The fluid has only bulk viscous term and the coefficient of bulk viscosity is taken to be proportional to some power function of the energy density. The complete general solutions have been given through three cases. For flat space, power-law as well as exponential solutions are found. The problem of how the introduction of viscosity affects the appearance of singularity, is briefly discussed in particular solutions. The deceleration parameter has a freedom to vary with the scale factor of the model, which describes the accelerating expansion of the Universe.

  16. Pseudo-Riemannian Universe from Euclidean bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilić, Milovan

    2015-01-01

    I develop the idea that our world is a brane-like object embedded in Euclidean bulk. In its ground state, the brane constituent matter is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic, and of negligible influence on the bulk geometry. No action functional is initially specified. Instead, the brane dynamics is derived from the universally valid stress-energy conservation equations. The present work studies the cosmology of a $3$-sphere in the $5$-dimensional Euclidean bulk. It is shown that the conventional equation of state $p=\\alpha\\rho$ is universal in the sector of small energy densities, and so is the resulting brane dynamics. The inequality $\\alpha<0$ is found to be a necessary condition for the existence of a stable ground state of the Universe. It is demonstrated that the generic braneworld physics rules out the Big Bang cosmology, and in that matter, any cosmology of finite lifetime. I also demonstrate that stable brane vibrations satisfy Klein-Gordon-like equation with an effective metric of Minkowski s...

  17. Molecular imprinting of bulk, microporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alexander; Davis, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular imprinting aims to create solid materials containing chemical functionalities that are spatially organized by covalent or non-covalent interactions with imprint (or template) molecules during the synthesis process. Subsequent removal of the imprint molecules leaves behind designed sites for the recognition of small molecules, making the material ideally suited for applications such as separations, chemical sensing and catalysis. Until now, the molecular imprinting of bulk polymers and polymer and silica surfaces has been reported, but the extension of these methods to a wider range of materials remains problematic. For example, the formation of substrate-specific cavities within bulk silica, while conceptually straightforward, has been difficult to accomplish experimentally. Here we describe the imprinting of bulk amorphous silicas with single aromatic rings carrying up to three 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane side groups; this generates and occupies microporosity and attaches functional organic groups to the pore walls in a controlled fashion. The triethoxysilane part of the molecules' side groups is incorporated into the silica framework during sol-gel synthesis, and subsequent removal of the aromatic core creates a cavity with spatially organized aminopropyl groups covalently anchored to the pore walls. We find that the imprinted silicas act as shape-selective base catalysts. Our strategy can be extended to imprint other functional groups, which should give access to a wide range of functionalized materials.

  18. Bulk Higgs with a heavy diphoton signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Mariana; Pourtolami, Nima; Toharia, Manuel

    2017-02-01

    We consider scenarios of warped extra dimensions with all matter fields in the bulk and in which both the hierarchy and the flavor puzzles of the Standard Model are addressed. Inspired by the puzzling excess of diphoton events at 750 GeV reported in the early LHC Run II data (since then understood as a statistical excess), we consider here the general question as to whether the simplest extra-dimensional extension of the Standard Model Higgs sector, i.e., a five-dimensional bulk Higgs doublet, can lead to an intermediate mass resonance (between 500 GeV and 1.5 TeV) of which the first signature would be the presence of diphoton events. This surprising phenomenology can happen if the resonance is the lightest C P -odd state coming from the Higgs sector. No new matter content is required, the only new ingredient being the presence of (positive) brane localized kinetic terms associated to the five-dimensional bulk Higgs (which reduce the mass of the C P -odd states). Production and decay of this resonance can naturally give rise to observable diphoton signals, keeping dijet production under control, with very low ZZ and WW signals and with a highly reduced top pair production in an important region of parameter space. We use the 750 GeV excess as an example case scenario.

  19. Bulk Rashba Semiconductors and Related Quantum Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramy, Mohammad Saeed; Ogawa, Naoki

    2017-03-29

    Bithmuth tellurohalides BiTeX (X = Cl, Br and I) are model examples of bulk Rashba semiconductors, exhibiting a giant Rashba-type spin splitting among their both valence and conduction bands. Extensive spectroscopic and transport experiments combined with the state-of-the-art first-principles calculations have revealed many unique quantum phenomena emerging from the bulk Rashba effect in these systems. The novel features such as the exotic inter- and intra-band optical transitions, enhanced magneto-optical response, divergent orbital dia-/para-magnetic susceptibility and helical spin textures with a nontrivial Berry's phase in the momentum space are among the salient discoveries, all arising from this effect. Also, it is theoretically proposed and indications have been experimentally reported that bulk Rashba semiconductors such as BiTeI have the capability of becoming a topological insulator under the application of a hydrostatic pressure. Here, we overview these studies and show that BiTeX are an ideal platform to explore the next aspects of quantum matter, which could ultimately be utilized to create spintronic devices with novel functionalities.

  20. Cosmological Implications of QGP Bulk Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Anand, Sampurn; Bhatt, Jitesh R

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of the hot QCD matter indicate that the bulk viscosity ($\\zeta$) of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) rises sharply near the critical point of the QCD phase transition. In this work, we show that such a sharp rise of the bulk viscosity will lead to an effective negative pressure near the critical temperature, $T_{c}$ which in turn drives the Universe to inflate. This inflation has a natural graceful exist when the viscous effect evanesce. We estimate that, depending upon the peak value of $\\zeta$, universe expands by a factor of $10$ to $80$ times in a very short span ($\\Delta t\\sim 10^{-8}$ seconds). Another important outcome of the bulk viscosity dominated dynamics is the cavitation of QGP around $T \\sim 1.5T_{c}$. This would lead to the phenomenon of formation of cavitation bubbles within the QGP phase. The above scenario is independent of the order of QCD phase transition. We delineate some of the important cosmological consequences of the inflation and the cavitation.

  1. Evidence for Bulk Ripplocations in Layered Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Jacob; Lang, Andrew C.; Griggs, Justin; Taheri, Mitra L.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-09-01

    Plastically anisotropic/layered solids are ubiquitous in nature and understanding how they deform is crucial in geology, nuclear engineering, microelectronics, among other fields. Recently, a new defect termed a ripplocation–best described as an atomic scale ripple–was proposed to explain deformation in two-dimensional solids. Herein, we leverage atomistic simulations of graphite to extend the ripplocation idea to bulk layered solids, and confirm that it is essentially a buckling phenomenon. In contrast to dislocations, bulk ripplocations have no Burgers vector and no polarity. In graphite, ripplocations are attracted to other ripplocations, both within the same, and on adjacent layers, the latter resulting in kink boundaries. Furthermore, we present transmission electron microscopy evidence consistent with the existence of bulk ripplocations in Ti3SiC2. Ripplocations are a topological imperative, as they allow atomic layers to glide relative to each other without breaking the in-plane bonds. A more complete understanding of their mechanics and behavior is critically important, and could profoundly influence our current understanding of how graphite, layered silicates, the MAX phases, and many other plastically anisotropic/layered solids, deform and accommodate strain.

  2. Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, François; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-01-01

    Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

  3. A case study of microphysical structures and hydrometeor phase in convection using radar Doppler spectra at Darwin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimaki, L. D.; Comstock, J. M.; Luke, E.; Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2017-07-01

    To understand the microphysical processes that impact diabatic heating and cloud lifetimes in convection, we need to characterize the spatial distribution of supercooled liquid water. To address this observational challenge, ground-based vertically pointing active sensors at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site are used to classify cloud phase within a deep convective cloud. The cloud cannot be fully observed by a lidar due to signal attenuation. Therefore, we developed an objective method for identifying hydrometeor classes, including mixed-phase conditions, using k-means clustering on parameters that describe the shape of the Doppler spectra from vertically pointing Ka-band cloud radar. This approach shows that multiple, overlapping mixed-phase layers exist within the cloud, rather than a single region of supercooled liquid. Diffusional growth calculations show that the conditions for the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process exist within one of these mixed-phase microstructures.

  4. A case study of microphysical structures and hydrometeor phase in convection using radar Doppler spectra at Darwin, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Luke, Edward; Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang

    2017-07-28

    To understand the microphysical processes that impact diabatic heating and cloud lifetimes in convection, we need to characterize the spatial distribution of supercooled liquid water. To address this observational challenge, vertically pointing active sensors at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site are used to classify cloud phase within a deep convective cloud in a shallow to deep convection transitional case. The cloud cannot be fully observed by a lidar due to signal attenuation. Thus we develop an objective method for identifying hydrometeor classes, including mixed-phase conditions, using k-means clustering on parameters that describe the shape of the Doppler spectra from vertically pointing Ka band cloud radar. This approach shows that multiple, overlapping mixed-phase layers exist within the cloud, rather than a single region of supercooled liquid, indicating complexity to how ice growth and diabatic heating occurs in the vertical structure of the cloud.

  5. Spatial and temporal CCN variations in convection-permitting aerosol microphysics simulations in an idealised marine tropical domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planche, Céline; Mann, Graham W.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Dalvi, Mohit; Marsham, John H.; Field, Paul R.

    2017-03-01

    A convection-permitting limited area model with periodic lateral boundary conditions and prognostic aerosol microphysics is applied to investigate how concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the marine boundary layer are affected by high-resolution dynamical and thermodynamic fields. The high-resolution aerosol microphysics-dynamics model, which resolves differential particle growth and aerosol composition across the particle size range, is applied to a domain designed to match approximately a single grid square of a climate model. We find that, during strongly convective conditions with high wind-speed conditions, CCN concentrations vary by more than a factor of 8 across the domain (5-95th percentile range), and a factor of ˜ 3 at more moderate wind speed. One reason for these large sub-climate-grid-scale variations in CCN is that emissions of sea salt and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) are much higher when spatial and temporal wind-speed fluctuations become resolved at this convection-permitting resolution (making peak wind speeds higher). By analysing how the model evolves during spin-up, we gain new insight into the way primary sea salt and secondary sulfate particles contribute to the overall CCN variance in these realistic conditions, and find a marked difference in the variability of super-micron and sub-micron CCN. Whereas the super-micron CCN are highly variable, dominated by strongly fluctuating sea spray emitted, the sub-micron CCN tend to be steadier, mainly produced on longer timescales following growth after new particle formation in the free troposphere, with fluctuations inherently buffered by the fact that coagulation is faster at higher particle concentrations. We also find that sub-micron CCN are less variable in particle size, the accumulation-mode mean size varying by ˜ 20 % (0.101 to 0.123 µm diameter) compared to ˜ 35 % (0.75 to 1.10 µm diameter) for coarse-mode particles at this resolution. We explore how the CCN variability

  6. Retrieving Microphysical Properties and Air Motion of Cirrus Clouds Based on the Doppler Moments Method Using Cloud Radar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Lingzhi; LIU Liping; DENG Min; ZHOU Xiuji

    2012-01-01

    Radar parameters including radar reflectivity,Doppler velocity,and Doppler spectrum width were obtained from Doppler spectrum moments.The Doppler spectrum moment is the convolution of both the particle spectrum and the mean air vertical motion.Unlike strong precipitation,the motion of particles in cirrus clouds is quite close to the air motion around them.In this study,a method of Doppler moments was developed and used to retrieve cirrus cloud microphysical properties such as the mean air vertical velocity,mass-weighted diameter,effective particle size,and ice content. Ice content values were retrieved using both the Doppler spectrum method and classic Z-IWC (radar reflectivity-ice water content) relationships;however,the former is a more reasonable method.

  7. A new airborne polar Nephelometer for the measurements of optical and microphysical cloud properties. Part I: Theoretical design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Gayet

    Full Text Available A new optical sensor, the airborne Polar Nephelometer, is described. The sensor is designed to measure the optical and microphysical parameters of clouds containing either water droplets or ice crystals or a mixture of these particles ranging in size from a few micrometers to about 500 µm diameter. The probe measures the scattering phase function of an ensemble of cloud particles intersecting a collimated laser beam near the focal point of a paraboloïdal mirror. The light scattered from polar angles from 3.49° to 169° is reflected onto a circular array of 33 photodiodes. The signal processing electronics and computer storage can provide one measurement of the scattering phase function every 100 ms or every 0.2 ms. The first part of the paper describes the theoretical design of a prototype version of the probe.

  8. Effects of the microphysical Equation of State in the mergers of magnetized Neutron Stars With Neutrino Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Palenzuela, C; Neilsen, D; Lehner, L; Caballero, O L; O'Connor, E; Anderson, M

    2015-01-01

    We study the merger of binary neutron stars using different realistic, microphysical nuclear equations of state, as well as incorporating magnetic field and neutrino cooling effects. In particular, we concentrate on the influence of the equation of state on the gravitational wave signature and also on its role, in combination with cooling and electromagnetic effects, in determining the properties of the hypermassive neutron star resulting from the merger, the production of neutrinos, and the characteristics of ejecta from the system. The ejecta we find are consistent with other recent studies that find soft equations of state produce more ejecta than stiffer equations of state. Moreover, the degree of neutron richness increases for softer equations of state. In light of reported kilonova observations (associated to GRB~130603B and GRB~060614) and the discovery of relatively low abundances of heavy, radioactive elements in deep sea deposits (with respect to possible production via supernovae), we speculate tha...

  9. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bergman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by minimising the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution. The aerosol size distribution is described using 10 size classes with parallel sections which can have different chemical compositions. Thus in total, the module tracks 20 size sections which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm and are divided into three subranges, each with an optimised selection of processes and compounds.

    The implementation of SALSA into ECHAM5-HAM includes the main aerosol processes in the atmosphere: emissions, removal, radiative effects, liquid and gas phase sulphate chemistry, and the aerosol microphysics. The aerosol compounds treated in the module are sulphate, organic carbon, sea salt, black carbon, and mineral dust. In its default configuration, ECHAM5-HAM treats aerosol size distribution using the modal method. In this implementation, the aerosol processes were converted to be used in a sectional model framework.

    The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparing against (1 measured continental and marine size distributions, (2 observed variability of continental number concentrations, (3 measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea-salt mass concentrations, (4 observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5 global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6 model results using M7, which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM.

    The evaluation shows that the global aerosol

  10. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state: an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS climate model (ModelE are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM, represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations.

    A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment

  11. Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part I: Parameterization of the microphysics of hydrometeors and ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Textor, C.; Graf, H. F.; Herzog, M.; Oberhuber, J. M.; Rose, William I.; Ernst, G. G. J.

    2006-02-01

    The aggregation of volcanic ash particles within the eruption column of explosive eruptions has been observed at many volcanoes. It influences the residence time of ash in the atmosphere and the radiative properties of the umbrella cloud. However, the information on the processes leading to aggregate formation are still either lacking or very incomplete. We examine the fate of ash particles through numerical experiments with the plume model ATHAM (Active Tracer High resolution Atmospheric Model) in order to determine the conditions that promote ash particle aggregation. In this paper we describe the microphysics and parameterization of ash and hydrometeors. In a companion paper (this issue) we use this information in a series of numerical experiments. The parameterization includes the condensation of water vapor in the rising eruption column. The formation of liquid and solid hydrometeors and the effect of latent heat release on the eruption column dynamics are considered. The interactions of hydrometeors and volcanic ash within the eruption column that lead to aggregate formation are simulated for the first time within a rising eruption column. The microphysical parameterization follows a modal approach. The hydrometeors are described by two size classes, each of which is divided into a liquid and a frozen category. By analogy with the hydrometeor classification, we specify four categories of volcanic ash particles. We imply that volcanic particles are active as condensation nuclei for water and ice formation. Ash can be contained in all categories of hydrometeors, thus forming mixed particles of any composition reaching from mud rain to accretionary lapilli. Collisions are caused by gravitational capture of particles with different fall velocity. Coalescence of hydrometeor-ash aggregates is assumed to be a function of the hydrometeor mass fraction within the mixed particles. The parameterization also includes simplified descriptions of electrostatics and salinity

  12. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer,S.E.; Wright, D.L.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E.R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S.E.; Ruedy, R.

    2008-10-21

    A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 {micro}m, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment. This is more likely due

  13. Microphysical and radiative characterization of a subvisible midlevel Arctic ice cloud by airborne observations – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lampert

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR campaign, which was conducted in March and April 2007, an optically thin ice cloud was observed south of Svalbard at around 3 km altitude. The microphysical and radiative properties of this particular subvisible midlevel cloud were investigated with complementary remote sensing and in situ instruments. Collocated airborne lidar remote sensing and spectral solar radiation measurements were performed at a flight altitude of 2300 m below the cloud base. Under almost stationary atmospheric conditions, the same subvisible midlevel cloud was probed with various in situ sensors roughly 30 min later.

    From individual ice crystal samples detected with the Cloud Particle Imager and the ensemble of particles measured with the Polar Nephelometer, microphysical properties were retrieved with a bi-modal inversion algorithm. The best agreement with the measurements was obtained for small ice spheres and deeply rough hexagonal ice crystals. Furthermore, the single-scattering albedo, the scattering phase function as well as the volume extinction coefficient and the effective diameter of the crystal population were determined. A lidar ratio of 21(±6 sr was deduced by three independent methods. These parameters in conjunction with the cloud optical thickness obtained from the lidar measurements were used to compute spectral and broadband radiances and irradiances with a radiative transfer code. The simulated results agreed with the observed spectral downwelling radiance within the range given by the measurement uncertainty. Furthermore, the broadband radiative simulations estimated a net (solar plus thermal infrared radiative forcing of the subvisible midlevel ice cloud of −0.4 W m−2 (−3.2 W m−2 in the solar and +2.8 W m−2 in the thermal infrared wavelength range.

  14. Tailoring Magnetic Properties in Bulk Nanostructured Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jason Rolando

    Important magnetic properties and behaviors such as coercivity, remanence, susceptibility, energy product, and exchange coupling can be tailored by controlling the grain size, composition, and density of bulk magnetic materials. At nanometric length scales the grain size plays an increasingly important role since magnetic domain behavior and grain boundary concentration determine bulk magnetic behavior. This has spurred a significant amount of work devoted to developing magnetic materials with nanometric features (thickness, grain/crystallite size, inclusions or shells) in 0D (powder), 1D (wires), and 2D (thin films) materials. Large 3D nanocrystalline materials are more suitable for many applications such as permanent magnets, magneto-optical Faraday isolators etc. Yet there are relatively few successful demonstrations of 3D magnetic materials with nanoscale influenced properties available in the literature. Making dense 3D bulk materials with magnetic nanocrystalline microstructures is a challenge because many traditional densification techniques (HIP, pressureless sintering, etc.) move the microstructure out of the "nano" regime during densification. This dissertation shows that the Current Activated Pressure Assisted Densification (CAPAD) method, also known as spark plasma sintering, can be used to create dense, bulk, magnetic, nanocrystalline solids with varied compositions suited to fit many applications. The results of my research will first show important implications for the use of CAPAD for the production of exchange-coupled nanocomposite magnets. Decreases in grain size were shown to have a significant role in increasing the magnitude of exchange bias. Second, preferentially ordered bulk magnetic materials were produced with highly anisotropic material properties. The ordered microstructure resulted in changing magnetic property magnitudes (ex. change in coercivity by almost 10x) depending on the relative orientation (0° vs. 90°) of an externally

  15. Comparisons of cirrus cloud microphysical properties between polluted and pristine air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Minghui; Schumann, Ulrich; Minikin, Andreas; Jensen, Jorgen

    2015-04-01

    Cirrus clouds occur in the upper troposphere at altitudes where atmospheric radiative forcing is most sensitive to perturbations of water vapor concentration and water phase. The formation of cirrus clouds influences the distributions of water in both vapor and ice forms. The radiative properties of cirrus depend strongly on particle sizes. Currently it is still unclear how the formation of cirrus clouds and their microphysical properties are influenced by anthropogenic emissions (e.g., industrial emission and biomass burning). If anthropogenic emissions influence cirrus formation in a significant manner, then one should expect a systematic difference in cirrus properties between pristine (clean) air and polluted air. Because of the pollution contrasts between the Southern (SH) and Northern Hemispheres (NH), cirrus properties could have hemispheric differences as well. Therefore, we study high-resolution (~200 m), in-situ observations from two global flight campaigns: 1) the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) global campaign in 2009-2011 funded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF), and 2) the Interhemispheric Differences In Cirrus Properties from Anthropogenic Emissions (INCA) campaign in 2000 funded by the European Union and participating research institutions. To investigate the changes of cirrus clouds by anthropogenic emissions, we compare ice crystal distributions in polluted and pristine air, in terms of their frequency occurrence, number concentration (Nc) and mean diameter (i.e., effective-mean Deff and volume-mean Dc). Total aerosol concentration is used to represent the combined influence of natural and anthropogenic aerosols. In addition, measured carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratio is used to discriminate between polluted and pristine air masses. All analyses are restricted to temperatures ≤ -40°C to exclude mixed-phased clouds. The HIPPO campaign observations were obtained over the North America continent and the central Pacific Ocean

  16. Materials for Bulk Acoustic Resonators and Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebl, Hans-Peter

    2003-03-01

    Highly selective solidly mounted bulk acoustic wave (BAW) band pass filters are suited for mobile and wireless systems in the GHz frequency range between 0.8 and 10 GHz. Electro-acoustic thin film BAW resonators are the building blocks these BAW filters. Piezoelectric materials used in these resonators include mainly AlN or ZnO which can be deposited by dedicated thin film sputter deposition techniques. Using these piezo-electric materials and using suited materials for the acoustic Bragg reflector, BAW resonators with high quality factors can be fabricated. The achievable filter bandwidth is approximately 4Alternatively, also ferroelectric thin films might be used to achieve higher coupling coefficient and thus filter bandwidth. BAW resonators and filters have been designed and fabricated on 6" Silicon and glass wafers. Results are presented for resonators and filters operating between 1.95 and 8 GHz. The talk will give an overview of the material aspects which are important for BAW devices. It will be shown that modeling of the resonator and filter response using 1D electro-acoustic simulation (1,2) which includes losses is essential to extract acoustic and electrical material parameters. (1) Solidly Mounted Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters for the Ghz Frequency Range, H.P. Loebl, C. Metzmacher , D.N.Peligrad , R. Mauczok , M. Klee , W. Brand , R.F. Milsom , P.Lok , F.van Straten , A. Tuinhout , J.W.Lobeek, IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002. (2) Combined Acoustic-Electromagnetic Simulation Of Thin-Film Bulk Acoustic Wave Filters, R.F. Milsom, H-P. Löbl, D.N. Peligrad, J-W. Lobeek, A. Tuinhout, R. H. ten Dolle IEEE 2002 Ultrasonics Symposium Munich, October 2002.

  17. Hubble Parameter in Bulk Viscous Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A; Wahba, M

    2009-01-01

    We discuss influences of bulk viscosity on the Early Universe, which is modeled by Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric and Einstein field equations. We assume that the matter filling the isotropic and homogeneous background is relativistic viscous characterized by ultra-relativistic equations of state deduced from recent lattice QCD simulations. We obtain a set of complicated differential equations, for which we suggest approximate solutions for Hubble parameter $H$. We find that finite viscosity in Eckart and Israel-Stewart fluids would significantly modify our picture about the Early Universe.

  18. Fabrication of Porous Bulk Metallic Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keqiang QIU; Yinglei REN

    2005-01-01

    An open-cell porous bulk metallic glass (BMG)with a diameter of at least 6 mm was fabricated by using an U-turn quartz tube and infiltration casting aroundsoluble NaCl placeholders. The pore formation and glassy structure were examined by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the pores or cells are connected to each other and the specimenis composed of a mostly glassy phase.This paper provides a suitable method for fabrication of porous BMG and BMG with larger size in diameter.

  19. Bulk metamaterials: Design, fabrication and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Malureanu, Radu; Alabastri, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metamaterials claim a lot of attention worldwide. We report about our activity and advances in design, fabrication and characterization of metal-dielectric composites with three-dimensional lattices. The nomenclature of designs exhibiting negative index behaviour in the near infrared includes...... the generic family of so-called nested structures. Such designs allow keeping the cubic symmetry of the unit cell along with the electric and magnetic responses showed by different parts in separate. For extraction of effective parameters we employ homemade wave propagation retrieving method free from...

  20. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  1. Diffusion and bulk flow in phloem loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dölger, Julia; Rademaker, Hanna; Liesche, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    loading mechanism, active symplasmic loading, also called the polymer trap mechanism, where sucrose is transformed into heavier sugars, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the intermediary-type companion cells bordering the sieve elements in the minor veins of the phloem. Keeping the heavier sugars from......%-20% to the sucrose flux into the intermediary cells, while the main part is transported by diffusion. On the other hand, the subsequent sugar translocation into the sieve elements would very likely be carried predominantly by bulk water flow through the plasmodesmata. Thus, in contrast to apoplasmic loaders, all...

  2. New Class of Plastic Bulk Metallic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. Y.; Fu, Z. D.; Zhang, G. Q.; Hao, X. P.; Jiang, Q. K.; Wang, X. D.; Cao, Q. P.; Franz, H.; Liu, Y. G.; Xie, H. S.; Zhang, S. L.; Wang, B. Y.; Zeng, Y. W.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2008-02-01

    An intrinsic plastic Cu45Zr46Al7Ti2 bulk metallic glass (BMG) with high strength and superior compressive plastic strain of up to 32.5% was successfully fabricated by copper mold casting. The superior compressive plastic strain was attributed to a large amount of randomly distributed free volume induced by Ti minor alloying, which results in extensive shear band formation, branching, interaction and self-healing of minor cracks. The mechanism of plasticity presented here suggests that the creation of a large amount of free volume in BMGs by minor alloying or other methods might be a promising new way to enhance the plasticity of BMGs.

  3. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains t...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  4. Improving the bulk data transfer experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guok, Chin; Guok, Chin; Lee, Jason R.; Berket, Karlo

    2008-05-07

    Scientific computations and collaborations increasingly rely on the network to provide high-speed data transfer, dissemination of results, access to instruments, support for computational steering, etc. The Energy Sciences Network is establishing a science data network to provide user driven bandwidth allocation. In a shared network environment, some reservations may not be granted due to the lack of available bandwidth on any single path. In many cases, the available bandwidth across multiple paths would be sufficient to grant the reservation. In this paper we investigate how to utilize the available bandwidth across multiple paths in the case of bulk data transfer.

  5. Binary Cu-Zr Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Mei-Bo; ZHAO De-Qian; PAN Ming-Xiang; WANG Wei-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report that bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) can be produced up to 2 mm by a copper mould casting in Cux Zr1-x binary alloy with a wide glass forming composition range (45 < x < 60 at.%). We find that the formation mechanism for the binary Cu-Zr binary BMG-forming alloy is obviously different from that of the intensively studied multicomponent BMGs. Our results demonstrate that the criteria for the multicomponent alloys with composition near deep eutectic and strong liquid behaviour are no longer the major concern for designing BMGs.

  6. Production, Properties and Applications of Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Zhang; Akihisa Inoue

    2000-01-01

    A review is given of recent work concerned with the production method, the characteristic properties(1) Bulk amorphous system; (2) Mechanical and magnetic properties of bulkamorphous alloys; (3)application of bulk amorphous alloys.

  7. Constructing local bulk observables in interacting AdS/CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Kabat, Daniel; Lowe, David A

    2011-01-01

    Local operators in the bulk of AdS can be represented as smeared operators in the dual CFT. We show how to construct these bulk observables by requiring that the bulk operators commute at spacelike separation. This extends our previous work by taking interactions into account. Large-N factorization plays a key role in the construction. We show diagrammatically how this procedure is related to bulk Feynman diagrams.

  8. Perovskite oxides: Oxygen electrocatalysis and bulk structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonio, R. E.; Fierro, C.; Tryk, D.; Scherson, D.; Yeager, Ernest

    1987-01-01

    Perovskite type oxides were considered for use as oxygen reduction and generation electrocatalysts in alkaline electrolytes. Perovskite stability and electrocatalytic activity are studied along with possible relationships of the latter with the bulk solid state properties. A series of compounds of the type LaFe(x)Ni1(-x)O3 was used as a model system to gain information on the possible relationships between surface catalytic activity and bulk structure. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate constants were measured for these compounds. Ex situ Mossbauer effect spectroscopy (MES), and magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to study the solid state properties. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to examine the surface. MES has indicated the presence of a paramagnetic to magnetically ordered phase transition for values of x between 0.4 and 0.5. A correlation was found between the values of the MES isomer shift and the catalytic activity for peroxide decomposition. Thus, the catalytic activity can be correlated to the d-electron density for the transition metal cations.

  9. A Batch Feeder for Inhomogeneous Bulk Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vislov, I. S.; Kladiev, S. N.; Slobodyan, S. M.; Bogdan, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The work includes the mechanical analysis of mechanical feeders and batchers that find application in various technological processes and industrial fields. Feeders are usually classified according to their design features into two groups: conveyor-type feeders and non-conveyor feeders. Batchers are used to batch solid bulk materials. Less frequently, they are used for liquids. In terms of a batching method, they are divided into volumetric and weighting batchers. Weighting batchers do not provide for sufficient batching accuracy. Automatic weighting batchers include a mass controlling sensor and systems for automatic material feed and automatic mass discharge control. In terms of operating principle, batchers are divided into gravitational batchers and batchers with forced feed of material using conveyors and pumps. Improved consumption of raw materials, decreased loss of materials, ease of use in automatic control systems of industrial facilities allows increasing the quality of technological processes and improve labor conditions. The batch feeder suggested by the authors is a volumetric batcher that has no comparable counterparts among conveyor-type feeders and allows solving the problem of targeted feeding of bulk material batches increasing reliability and hermeticity of the device.

  10. Boundary-bulk relation in topological orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Kong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the relation between an anomaly-free n+1D topological order, which are often called n+1D topological order in physics literature, and its nD gapped boundary phases. We argue that the n+1D bulk anomaly-free topological order for a given nD gapped boundary phase is unique. This uniqueness defines the notion of the “bulk” for a given gapped boundary phase. In this paper, we show that the n+1D “bulk” phase is given by the “center” of the nD boundary phase. In other words, the geometric notion of the “bulk” corresponds precisely to the algebraic notion of the “center”. We achieve this by first introducing the notion of a morphism between two (potentially anomalous topological orders of the same dimension, then proving that the notion of the “bulk” satisfies the same universal property as that of the “center” of an algebra in mathematics, i.e. “bulk = center”. The entire argument does not require us to know the precise mathematical description of a (potentially anomalous topological order. This result leads to concrete physical predictions.

  11. Enhancing bulk superconductivity by engineering granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoh, James; García García, Antonio

    2014-03-01