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Sample records for two-lever operant task

  1. Effects of risperidone, clozapine and the 5-HT6 antagonist GSK-742457 on PCP-induced deficits in reversal learning in the two-lever operant task in male Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, N M W J; van Drimmelen, M; Kops, M; van Elk, J; Wetering, M Middelveld-van de; Schwienbacher, I

    2013-05-01

    Reasoning and problem solving deficits have been reported in schizophrenic patients. In the present study, we have tested rats in a two-lever reversal learning task in a Skinner box to model these deficits. In other studies using the Skinner box, atypical antipsychotics fully reversed phencyclidine (PCP)-induced impairments in reversal learning which is in contrast to clinical observations where antipsychotics lack the ability to fully reverse cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Therefore, it can be argued that the outcome of these tests may lack predictive value. In the present study, after training on a spatial discrimination between two levers, rats were exposed to a reversal of the previously learned stimulus-response contingency during 5 days. We first investigated the effects of sub-chronic treatment with the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists dizocilpine (MK-801) and PCP on reversal learning and extinction in male Sprague Dawley rats. Subsequently, we studied the effects of different PCP treatment regimes. Then, we investigated whether the atypical antipsychotics risperidone and clozapine and the 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) antagonist GSK-742457 could reverse the PCP-induced deficits. All drugs were administered subcutaneously (s.c.). MK-801 did not impair reversal learning, while PCP (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) induced a clear deficit in reversal learning. Both compounds, however, disrupted extinction at all tested doses. Risperidone and clozapine were both ineffective in significantly ameliorating the PCP-induced deficit in reversal learning which fits well with the clinical observations. The lowest dose of clozapine (1.25 mg/kg) had an intermediate effect in ameliorating the deficit in reversal learning induced by PCP (not different from control or PCP-treated rats). The lowest dose of GSK-742457 (0.63 mg/kg) fully reversed the PCP-induced deficits while the higher dose (5.0 mg/kg) had an intermediate effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B

  2. Number & operations task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the number & operations concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are problems involving place value, fractions, addition, subtraction and using money. The combined task & drill sheets offer spac

  3. Decision Making System for Operative Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Shakah, G.; Krasnoproshin, V. V.; Valvachev, A. N.

    2009-01-01

    Actual problems of construction of computer systems for operative tasks of decision making are considered. possibilities of solving the problems on the basis of the theory of active systems (tas) are investigated.

  4. Suez Canal Clearance Operation, Task Force 65

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    and remove the four wrecks from the central region of the canal; DREDGE 23, Tug MONGUED, Dredge KASSER and a Concrete Caisson. All salvage operations...feet BUCKET DREDGE NO. 23 72.00 1600 tons 191 feet TUG MONGUED 81.50 1200 tons 165 feet DIPPER DREDGE KASSER 81.50 1200 tons 125 feet CONCRETE CAISSON...MONGUED, DREDGE KASSER , and DREDGE 23 to wet dump in the Great Bitter Lake. Heavy crane THOR arrived in Port Said after transit from Hamburg, Germany

  5. Mission operations and command assurance - Automating an operations TQM task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welz, Linda; Kazz, Sheri; Potts, Sherrill; Witkowski, Mona; Bruno, Kristin

    1993-01-01

    A long-term program is in progress at JPL to reduce cost and risk of mission operations through defect prevention and error management. A major element of this program, Mission Operations and Command Assurance (MO&CA), provides a system level function on flight projects to instill quality in mission operations. MO&CA embodies the total quality management TQM principle of continuous process improvement (CPI) and uses CPI in applying automation to mission operations to reduce risk and costs. MO&CA has led efforts to apply and has implemented automation in areas that impact the daily flight project work environment including Incident Surprise Anomaly tracking and reporting; command data verification, tracking and reporting; and command support data usage. MO&CA's future work in automation will take into account that future mission operations systems must be designed to avoid increasing error through the introduction of automation, while adapting to the demands of smaller flight teams.

  6. A Validated Task Analysis of the Single Pilot Operations Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Cynthia A.; Gore, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    The current day flight deck operational environment consists of a two-person Captain/First Officer crew. A concept of operations (ConOps) to reduce the commercial cockpit to a single pilot from the current two pilot crew is termed Single Pilot Operations (SPO). This concept has been under study by researchers in the Flight Deck Display Research Laboratory (FDDRL) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ames (Johnson, Comerford, Lachter, Battiste, Feary, and Mogford, 2012) and researchers from Langley Research Centers (Schutte et al., 2007). Transitioning from a two pilot crew to a single pilot crew will undoubtedly require changes in operational procedures, crew coordination, use of automation, and in how the roles and responsibilities of the flight deck and ATC are conceptualized in order to maintain the high levels of safety expected of the US National Airspace System. These modifications will affect the roles and the subsequent tasks that are required of the various operators in the NextGen environment. The current report outlines the process taken to identify and document the tasks required by the crew according to a number of operational scenarios studied by the FDDRL between the years 2012-2014. A baseline task decomposition has been refined to represent the tasks consistent with a new set of entities, tasks, roles, and responsibilities being explored by the FDDRL as the move is made towards SPO. Information from Subject Matter Expert interviews, participation in FDDRL experimental design meetings, and study observation was used to populate and refine task sets that were developed as part of the SPO task analyses. The task analysis is based upon the proposed ConOps for the third FDDRL SPO study. This experiment possessed nine different entities operating in six scenarios using a variety of SPO-related automation and procedural activities required to guide safe and efficient aircraft operations. The task analysis presents the roles and

  7. Space station operations task force. Panel 4 report: Management integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Management Integration Panel of the Space Station Operations Task Force was chartered to provide a structure and ground rules for integrating the efforts of the other three panels and to address a number of cross cutting issues that affect all areas of space station operations. Issues addressed include operations concept implementation, alternatives development and integration process, strategic policy issues and options, and program management emphasis areas.

  8. Biocybernetic system evaluates indices of operator engagement in automated task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A. T.; Bogart, E. H.; Bartolome, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    A biocybernetic system has been developed as a method to evaluate automated flight deck concepts for compatibility with human capabilities. A biocybernetic loop is formed by adjusting the mode of operation of a task set (e.g., manual/automated mix) based on electroencephalographic (EEG) signals reflecting an operator's engagement in the task set. A critical issue for the loop operation is the selection of features of the EEG to provide an index of engagement upon which to base decisions to adjust task mode. Subjects were run in the closed-loop feedback configuration under four candidate and three experimental control definitions of an engagement index. The temporal patterning of system mode switching was observed for both positive and negative feedback of the index. The indices were judged on the basis of their relative strength in exhibiting expected feedback control system phenomena (stable operation under negative feedback and unstable operation under positive feedback). Of the candidate indices evaluated in this study, an index constructed according to the formula, beta power/(alpha power + theta power), reflected task engagement best.

  9. Number & operations task sheets : grades 3-5

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2009-01-01

    For grades 3-5, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the number & operations concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to learn and review the concepts in unique ways. Each task sheet is organized around a central problem taken from real-life experiences of the students.

  10. Covert Operant Reinforcement of Remedial Reading Learning Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickley, Verne G.

    The effects of covert operant reinforcement upon remedial reading learning tasks were investigated. Forty junior high school students were taught to imagine either neutral scenes (control) or positive scenes (treatment) upon cue while reading. It was hypothesized that positive covert reinforcement would enhance performance on several measures of…

  11. The Operator's Diagnosis Task under Abnormal Operating Conditions in Industrial Process Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goodstein, L.P.; Pedersen, O.M.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of serious accidents in connection with the operation of technical installations demonstrate that the diagnosis task which confronts personnel under non-normal plant conditions is a critical one. This report presents a preliminary outline of characteristic traits connected with the task...

  12. Experiments on data presentation to process operators in diagnostic tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Goodstein, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    Safety and reliability considerations in modern power plants have prompted our interest in man as an information receiver - especially in diagnostic tasks where the growing complexity of process plants and hence the amount of data involved make it imperative to give the staff proper support....... The great flexibility and capacity of the process computer for data reduction and presentation and for storing information on plant structure and functions give the system designer great freedom in the layout of information display for the staff, but the problem for the designer is how to make proper use...... of this freedom to support the operators efficiently. This is especially important in connection with unique, high-risk, and generally improbable abnormalities in plant functioning. Operator tasks and mental models and the need for matching the encoded information about the plant to these models are treated...

  13. Number & operations task & drill sheets : grades 3-5

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 3-5, our Common Core State Standards-based combined resource meets the number & operations concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills.

  14. Operation Compatibility: A Neglected Contribution to Dual-Task Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannebakker, Merel M.; Band, Guido P. H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, dual-task interference has been attributed to the consequences of task load exceeding capacity limitations. However, the current study demonstrates that in addition to task load, the mutual compatibility of the concurrent processes modulates whether 2 tasks can be performed in parallel. In 2 psychological refractory period…

  15. Job task characteristics of Australian emergency services volunteers during search and rescue operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Aaron; Lenton, Gavin; Savage, Robbie; Aisbett, Brad

    2017-07-28

    Search and rescue operations are necessary in locating, assisting and recovering individuals lost or in distress. In Australia, land-based search and rescue roles require a range of physically demanding tasks undertaken in dynamic and challenging environments. The aim of the current research was to identify and characterise the physically demanding tasks inherent to search and rescue operation personnel within Australia. These aims were met through a subjective job task analysis approach. In total, 11 criterion tasks were identified by personnel. These tasks were the most physically demanding, frequently occurring and operationally important tasks to these specialist roles. Muscular strength was the dominant fitness component for 7 of the 11 tasks. In addition to the discrete criterion tasks, an operational scenario was established. With the tasks and operational scenario identified, objective task analysis procedures can be undertaken so that practitioners can implement evidence-based strategies, such as physical selection procedures and task-based physical training programs, commensurate with the physical demands of search and rescue job roles. Practitioner Summary: The identification of physically demanding tasks amongst specialist emergency service roles predicates health and safety strategies which can be incorporated into organisations. Knowledge of physical task parameters allows employers to mitigate injury risk through the implementation of strategies modelled on the precise physical demands of the role.

  16. Social Loafing in a Co-operative Classroom Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Adrian C.; Linley, P. Alex; Hargreaves, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether social loafing (the tendency for individuals to reduce their input when performing as part of a group) existed in a collaborative educational task employing groups of three and eight participants. Indicates that individuals working in smaller groups were more productive than those working in larger groups. (CMK)

  17. Multifamily Building Operator Job/Task Analysis and Report: September 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, C. M.

    2013-09-01

    The development of job/task analyses (JTAs) is one of three components of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals project and will allow industry to develop training resources, quality assurance protocols, accredited training programs, and professional certifications. The Multifamily Building Operator JTA identifies and catalogs all of the tasks performed by multifamily building operators, as well as the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) needed to perform the identified tasks.

  18. Expressing Inter-task Dependencies between Parallel Stencil Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per; Karlsson, Sven; Madsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Complex embedded systems are designed under tight constraints on response time, resource usage and cost. Design space exploration tools help designers map and schedule embedded software to complex architectures such as heterogeneous MPSoC's. Task graphs are coarse grained representations of paral...... image processing applications. The coding effort is low - at most one line of code per parallel loop was added. The performance impact is evaluated on a quad-core Linux workstation and we observe no statistically significant slowdown....

  19. Task Force On Contractor Logistics in Support of Contingency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    labor or services, through the use of force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage , or...training and education, and combating trafficking in persons. The intent of the task force was to set the stage for future use of contracted support in...such as support of human rights, moral justice, and humanitarian relief. Military service personnel acting in a corrupt manner undermine the U.S

  20. An Approach to Operational Analysis: Doctrinal Task Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-04

    useful to use Block and Package Diagrams to organize the high level tasks within the model, where the package diagram includes the Level 2 activity...solutions often fall short of their desired utility in the eyes of the warfighter. In a fiscally constrained environment, the product development team...must use all available resources in the most efficient manner to produce the highest quality product in the shortest time possible for the end user

  1. Replanning Using Hierarchical Task Network and Operator-Based Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Chien, S.

    1997-01-01

    In order to scale-up to real-world problems, planning systems must be able to replan in order to deal with changes in problem context. In this paper we describe hierarchical task network and operatorbased re-planning techniques which allow adaptation of a previous plan to account for problems associated with executing plans in real-world domains with uncertainty, concurrency, changing objectives.

  2. Expressing Inter-task Dependencies between Parallel Stencil Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per; Karlsson, Sven; Madsen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Complex embedded systems are designed under tight constraints on response time, resource usage and cost. Design space exploration tools help designers map and schedule embedded software to complex architectures such as heterogeneous MPSoC's. Task graphs are coarse grained representations of paral...... image processing applications. The coding effort is low - at most one line of code per parallel loop was added. The performance impact is evaluated on a quad-core Linux workstation and we observe no statistically significant slowdown....

  3. Quantitative comparison of operative skill using 2- and 3-dimensional monitors during laparoscopic phantom tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Masayasu; Kanaji, Shingo; Otake, Yoshito; Harada, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Oshikiri, Taro; Nakamura, Tetsu; Suzuki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Yuki; Hiasa, Yuta; Sato, Yoshinobu; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2017-05-01

    The recent development of stereoscopic images using 3-dimensional monitors is expected to improve techniques for laparoscopic operation. Several studies have reported technical advantages in using 3-dimensional monitors with regard to operative accuracy and working speed, but there are few reports that analyze forceps motions by 3-dimensional optical tracking systems during standardized laparoscopic phantom tasks. We attempted to develop a 3-dimensional motion analysis system for assessing laparoscopic tasks and to clarify the efficacy of using stereoscopic images from a 3-dimensional monitor to track forceps movement during laparoscopy. Twenty surgeons performed 3 tasks (Task 1: a simple operation by the dominant hand, Task 2: a simple operation using both hands, Task 3: a complicated operation using both hands) under 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional systems. We tracked and recorded the motion of forceps tips with an optical marker captured by a 3-dimensional position tracker. We analyzed factors such as forceps path lengths, operation times, and technical errors for each task and compared the results of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional monitors. Mean operation times and technical errors were improved significantly for all tasks performed under the 3-dimensional system compared with the 2-dimensional system; in addition, mean path lengths for the forceps tips were shorter for all tasks performed under the 3-dimensional system. We found that stereoscopic images using a 3-dimensional monitor improved operative techniques with regard to increased accuracy and shorter path lengths for forceps movement, which resulted in a shorter operation time for basic phantom laparoscopic tasks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined analysis of job and task benzene air exposures among workers at four US refinery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Amanda; Shin, Jennifer Mi; Unice, Ken M; Gaffney, Shannon H; Kreider, Marisa L; Gelatt, Richard H; Panko, Julie M

    2017-03-01

    Workplace air samples analyzed for benzene at four US refineries from 1976 to 2007 were pooled into a single dataset to characterize similarities and differences between job titles, tasks and refineries, and to provide a robust dataset for exposure reconstruction. Approximately 12,000 non-task (>180 min) personal samples associated with 50 job titles and 4000 task (job titles and task codes across all four refineries, and (5) our analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the distribution of benzene air concentrations for select jobs/tasks across all four refineries. The jobs and tasks most frequently sampled included those with highest potential contact with refinery product streams containing benzene, which reflected the targeted sampling approach utilized by the facility industrial hygienists. Task and non-task data were analyzed to identify and account for significant differences within job-area, task-job, and task-area categories. This analysis demonstrated that in general, areas with benzene containing process streams were associated with greater benzene air concentrations compared to areas with process streams containing little to no benzene. For several job titles and tasks analyzed, there was a statistically significant decrease in benzene air concentration after 1990. This study provides a job and task-focused analysis of occupational exposure to benzene during refinery operations, and it should be useful for reconstructing refinery workers' exposures to benzene over the past 30 years.

  5. A Predictive Task Network Model for Estimating the Effectiveness of Decision Aids for Sonar Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    METHOD 2.1 Building the model Using existing task analyses of navy sonar systems (Matthews, Greenley and Webb, 1991) and with the assistance of...Critical Operator Tasks. DRDC Toronto Report # CR-2003-131 Matthews, M.L., Greenley , M. and Webb, R.D.G (1991). Presentation of Information from Towed

  6. Influence of stereoscopic vision on task performance with an operating microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibourg, Lisanne M.; Wanders, Wouter; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Koopmans, Steven A.

    PURPOSE: To determine the extent to which stereoscopic depth perception influences the performance of tasks executed under an operating microscope. SETTING: Laboratory of Experimental Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. DESIGN: Experimental study. METHODS: Medical

  7. Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) Automated Task Order Management System (ATOMS) Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Shawn; Fikes, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    This document describes operational aspects of the ATOMS system. The information provided is limited to the functionality provided by ATOMS and does not include information provided in the contractor's proprietary financial and task management system.

  8. Influence of stereoscopic vision on task performance with an operating microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nibourg, Lisanne M.; Wanders, Wouter; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Koopmans, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the extent to which stereoscopic depth perception influences the performance of tasks executed under an operating microscope. SETTING: Laboratory of Experimental Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. DESIGN: Experimental study. METHODS: Medical st

  9. Task Force Gator: Best Practices in Civil-Military Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    attractions and even build an amusement park . We instead decided that clean drinking water held precedence over Ferris wheels. Furthermore, the use of...on more exact criteria . Conversely, TF 2-6 opted to merge the two processes, planning and executing both operations at the same time. We pursued...question „Are we doing things right?‟”, while “MOE answers the question, „Are we doing the right things?‟” 39 Both criteria were used to determine

  10. Report of the task force on SSC commissioning and operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-07-01

    In 1985 January a Taskforce was organized to study the impact of magnet design on the commissioning and operation of the SSC. The results of the study, in the form of this report, are intended as one of several sources of input for the Magnet Type Selection Committee. Other major input will come from the Magnet Taskforce, the Test String Taskforce, the Cost Estimating Taskforce, and other study groups. All of these efforts will culminate in a magnet type selection, after which concentrated R&D on the selected magnet can commence. The study began with a one-week workshop, held on the UC Berkeley campus in 1985 January 14--18. An interim report of the Taskforce, based on the results of the Workshop, was published on 1985 January 28 (SSC-05). With very few exceptions, the work of the Taskforce was carried out by the participants in the Workshop, both during the workshop and in the subsequent weeks. This report is the collective effort of that group, whose very substantial contribution of time, effort, and thought is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Dual-task motor performance with a tongue-operated assistive technology compared with hand operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Ashley N

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To provide an alternative motor modality for control, navigation, and communication in individuals suffering from impairment or disability in hand functions, a Tongue Drive System (TDS has been developed that allows for real time tracking of tongue motion in an unobtrusive, wireless, and wearable device that utilizes the magnetic field generated by a miniature disk shaped magnetic tracer attached to the tip of the tongue. The purpose of the study was to compare the influence of a concurrent motor or cognitive task on various aspects of simple movement control between hand and tongue using the TDS technology. Methods Thirteen young able-bodied adults performed rapid and slow goal-directed movements of hand and tongue (with TDS with and without a concurrent motor (hand or tongue or cognitive (arithmetic and memory task. Changes in reaction time, completion time, speed, correctness, accuracy, variability of displacement, and variability of time due to the addition of a concurrent task were compared between hand and tongue. Results The influence of an additional concurrent task on motor performance was similar between the hand and tongue for slow movement in controlling their displacement. In rapid movement with a concurrent motor task, most aspects of motor performance were degraded in hand, while tongue speed during rapid continuous task was maintained. With a concurrent cognitive task, most aspects of motor performance were degraded in tongue, while hand accuracy during the rapid discrete task and hand speed during the rapid continuous task were maintained. Conclusion Rapid goal-directed hand and tongue movements were more consistently susceptible to interference from concurrent motor and cognitive tasks, respectively, compared with the other movement.

  12. Collaborative task planning for an internet based multi-operator multi-robot system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Sheng; ZHAO Jie; CAI He-gao

    2005-01-01

    In an Internet based multi-operator and multi-robot system (IMOMR), operators have to work collaboratively to overcome the constraints of space and time. Inherently, the activities among them can be defined as a computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW). As a practical application of CSCW, a collaborative task planning system (CTPS) for IMOMR is proposed in this paper on the basis of Petri nets. Its definition, components design, and concrete implementation are given in detail, respectively. As a result, a clear collaboration mechanism of multiple operators in an IMOMR is obtained to guarantee their task planning.

  13. Space station operations task force. Panel 3 report: User development and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The User Development and Integration Panel of the Space Station Operations Task Force was chartered to develop concepts relating to the operations of the Space Station manned base and the platforms, user accommodation and integration activities. The needs of the user community are addressed in the context with the mature operations phase of the Space Station. Issues addressed include space station pricing options, marketing strategies, payload selection and resource allocation options, and manifesting techniques.

  14. Operator function modeling: Cognitive task analysis, modeling and intelligent aiding in supervisory control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1990-01-01

    The design, implementation, and empirical evaluation of task-analytic models and intelligent aids for operators in the control of complex dynamic systems, specifically aerospace systems, are studied. Three related activities are included: (1) the models of operator decision making in complex and predominantly automated space systems were used and developed; (2) the Operator Function Model (OFM) was used to represent operator activities; and (3) Operator Function Model Expert System (OFMspert), a stand-alone knowledge-based system was developed, that interacts with a human operator in a manner similar to a human assistant in the control of aerospace systems. OFMspert is an architecture for an operator's assistant that uses the OFM as its system and operator knowledge base and a blackboard paradigm of problem solving to dynamically generate expectations about upcoming operator activities and interpreting actual operator actions. An experiment validated the OFMspert's intent inferencing capability and showed that it inferred the intentions of operators in ways comparable to both a human expert and operators themselves. OFMspert was also augmented with control capabilities. An interface allowed the operator to interact with OFMspert, delegating as much or as little control responsibility as the operator chose. With its design based on the OFM, OFMspert's control capabilities were available at multiple levels of abstraction and allowed the operator a great deal of discretion over the amount and level of delegated control. An experiment showed that overall system performance was comparable for teams consisting of two human operators versus a human operator and OFMspert team.

  15. Design considerations for remotely operated welding in space: Task definition and visual weld monitoring experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynerson, Charles M.

    1993-05-01

    This thesis explores the concept of welding in a space environment with the use of automation. Since the amount of time astronauts can work outside a spacecraft is limited, future construction and repair tasks will likely be assisted by automation. It is also likely that remote space welding will be needed for the construction of large-scale space structures in earth orbit as well as for lunar and Martian ground-based structures. Due to the complex nature of the tasks to be accomplished, the equipment will probably not be fully autonomous but instead supervised by a human operator. The welding fabrication problem in space is examined in a broad sense including some of the considerations for designing a human supervisory remote welding system. The history of space welding processes is examined, as well as current research in the field. A task definition and functional analysis is provided to assist future designers in outlining typical operational sequences for such a remote welding system. Such analysis is important when deciding whether the human operator should perform certain tasks or if the operator should supervise the automated system while it performs the tasks.

  16. Indistinguishability Operators Applied to Task Allocation Problems in Multi-Agent Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guerrero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show an application of indistinguishability operators to model response functions. Such functions are used in the mathematical modeling of the task allocation problem in multi-agent systems when the stimulus, perceived by the agent, to perform a task is assessed by means of the response threshold model. In particular, we propose this kind of operators to represent a response function when the stimulus only depends on the distance between the agent and a determined task, since we prove that two celebrated response functions used in the literature can be reproduced by appropriate indistinguishability operators when the stimulus only depends on the distance to each task that must be carried out. Despite the fact there is currently no systematic method to generate response functions, this paper provides, for the first time, a theoretical foundation to generate them and study their properties. To validate the theoretical results, the aforementioned indistinguishability operators have been used to simulate, with MATLAB, the allocation of a set of tasks in a multi-robot system with fuzzy Markov chains.

  17. Choosing Your Poison: Optimizing Simulator Visual System Selection as a Function of Operational Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Barbara T.; Kaiser, Mary K.

    2013-01-01

    Although current technology simulator visual systems can achieve extremely realistic levels they do not completely replicate the experience of a pilot sitting in the cockpit, looking at the outside world. Some differences in experience are due to visual artifacts, or perceptual features that would not be present in a naturally viewed scene. Others are due to features that are missing from the simulated scene. In this paper, these differences will be defined and discussed. The significance of these differences will be examined as a function of several particular operational tasks. A framework to facilitate the choice of visual system characteristics based on operational task requirements will be proposed.

  18. Space station operations task force. Panel 2 report: Ground operations and support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Ground Operations Concept embodied in this report provides for safe multi-user utilization of the Space Station, eases user integration, and gives users autonomy and flexibility. It provides for meaningful multi-national participation while protecting U.S. interests. The concept also supports continued space operations technology development by maintaining NASA expertise and enabling technology evolution. Given attention here are pre/post flight operations, logistics, sustaining engineering/configuration management, transportation services/rescue, and information systems and communication.

  19. The role of rostral Brodmann area 6 in mental-operation tasks: an integrative neuroimaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Honda, Manabu; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Okada, Tomohisa; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Fukuyama, Hidena; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2002-11-01

    Recent evidence indicates that classical 'motor' areas may also have cognitive functions. We performed three neuroimaging experiments to investigate the functional neuroanatomy underlying three types of nonmotor mental-operation tasks: numerical, verbal, and spatial. (i) Positron emission tomography showed that parts of the posterior frontal cortex, which are consistent with the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the rostral part of the dorsolateral premotor cortex (PMdr), were active during all three tasks. We also observed activity in the posterior parietal cortex and cerebellar hemispheres during all three tasks. Electrophysiological monitoring confirmed that there were no skeletomotor, oculomotor or articulatory movements during task performance. (ii) Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed that PMdr activity during the mental-operation tasks was localized in the depths of the superior precentral sulcus, which substantially overlapped the region active during complex finger movements and was located dorsomedial to the presumptive frontal eye fields. (iii) Single-trial fMRI showed a transient increase in activity time-locked to the performance of mental operations in the pre-SMA and PMdr. The results of the present study suggest that the PMdr is important in the rule-based association of symbolic cues and responses in both motor and nonmotor behaviors.

  20. An Operant Intra-/Extra-dimensional Set-shift Task for Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheggia, Diego; Papaleo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in executive control and cognitive flexibility, such as attentional set-shifting abilities, are core features of several neuropsychiatric diseases. The most widely used neuropsychological tests for the evaluation of attentional set-shifting in human subjects are the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the CANTAB Intra-/Extra-dimensional set shift task (ID/ED). These tasks have proven clinical relevance and have been modified and successfully adapted for research in animal models. However, currently available tasks for rodents present several limitations, mainly due to their manual-based testing procedures, which are hampering translational advances in psychiatric medicine. To overcome these limitations and to better mimic the original version in primates, we present the development of a novel operant-based two-chamber ID/ED "Operon" task for rodents. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this novel task to measure different facets of cognitive flexibility in mice including attentional set formation and shifting, and reversal learning. Moreover, we show the high flexibility of this task in which three different perceptual dimensions can be manipulated with a high number of stimuli cues for each dimension. This novel ID/ED Operon task can be an effective preclinical tool for drug testing and/or large genetic screening relevant to the study of executive dysfunction and cognitive symptoms found in psychiatric disorders.

  1. Task Analysis of Emergency Operating Procedures for Generating Quantitative HRA Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yochan; Park, Jinkyun; Kim, Seunghwan; Choi, Sun Yeong; Jung, Wondea; Jang, Inseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the analysis results of the emergency task in the procedures (EOPs; emergency operating procedures) that can be observed from the simulator data are introduced. The task type, component type, system type, and additional information related with the performance of the operators were described. In addition, a prospective application of the analyzed information to HEP quantification process was discussed. In the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) field, various human reliability analyses (HRAs) have been performed to produce estimates of human error probabilities (HEPs) for significant tasks in complex socio-technical systems. To this end, Many HRA methods have provided basic or nominal HEPs for typical tasks and the quantitative relations describing how a certain performance context or performance shaping factors (PSFs) affects the HEPs. In the HRA community, however, the necessity of appropriate and sufficient human performance data has been recently indicated. This is because a wide range of quantitative estimates in the previous HRA methods are not supported by solid empirical bases. Hence, there have been attempts to collect HRA supporting data. For example, KAERI has started to collect information on both unsafe acts of operators and the relevant PSFs. A characteristic of the database that is being developed at KAERI is that human errors and related PSF surrogates that can be objectively observable are collected from full-scope simulator experiences. In this environment, to produce concretely grounded bases of the HEPs, the traits or attributes of tasks where significant human errors can be observed should be definitely determined. The determined traits should be applicable to compare the HEPs on the traits with the data in previous HRA methods or databases. In this study, task characteristics in a Westinghouse type of EOPs were analyzed with the defining task, component, and system taxonomies.

  2. Predicting performance and situation awareness of robot operators in complex situations by unit task tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mioch, T.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Human-in-the-loop field tests of human-robot operations in high-demand situations provide serious constraints with respect to costs and control. A set of relatively simple unit tasks might be used to do part of the testing and to establish a benchmark for human-robot performance and situation awaren

  3. Predicting performance and situation awareness of robot operators in complex situations by unit task tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mioch, T.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Human-in-the-loop field tests of human-robot operations in high-demand situations provide serious constraints with respect to costs and control. A set of relatively simple unit tasks might be used to do part of the testing and to establish a benchmark for human-robot performance and situation awaren

  4. Optimisation of battery operating life considering software tasks and their timing behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipskoch, Henrik

    2010-02-19

    Users of mobile embedded systems have an interest in long battery operating life. The longer a system can operate without need for recharge or battery replacement, the more will maintenance cost and the number of faults due to insufficient power supply decrease. Operating life is prolonged by saving energy, which may reduce available processing time. Mobile embedded systems communicating with other participants like other mobiles or radio stations are subject to time guarantees ensuring reliable communication. Thus, methods that save energy by reducing processing time are not only subject to available processing time but subject to the embedded system's time guarantees. To perform parameter optimisations offline, decisions can be taken early at design time, avoiding further computations at run-time. Especially, to compute processor shutdown durations offline, no extra circuitry to monitor system behaviour and to wake up the processor needs to be designed, deployed, or power supplied: only a timer is required. In this work, software tasks are considered sharing one processor. The scheduling algorithm earliest deadline first is assumed, and per-task, a relative deadline is assumed. Tasks may be instantiated arbitrarily as long as this occurrence behaviour is given in the notion of event streams. Scaling of the processor's voltage and processor shutdown are taken into account as methods for saving energy. With given per task worst-case execution times and the tasks' event streams, the real-time feasibility of the energy optimised solutions is proven. The decision which energy saving solution provides longest operating life is made with the help of a battery model. The used real-time feasibility test has the advantage that it can be approximated: this yields an adjustable number of linear optimisation constraints. Reducing the processor's voltage reduces processor frequency, therefore, execution times increase. The resulting slowdown becomes the

  5. User-oriented data acquisition chain task planning algorithm for operationally responsive space satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Chen; Jun Li; Ning Jing

    2016-01-01

    With the development of operational y responsive space (ORS) and on-board processing techniques, the end users can receive the observation data from the ORS satel ite directly. To satisfy the demand for reducing the requirements-tasking-effects cycle from one day to hours, the various resources of the whole data acquisition chain (including satel ites, ground stations, data processing centers, users, etc.) should be taken into an overal consideration, and the traditional batch task planning mode should be transformed into the user-oriented task planning mode. Con-sidering there are many approaches for data acquisition due to the new techniques of ORS satel ite, the data acquisition chain task planning problem for ORS satel ite can be seen as the multi-modal route planning problem. Thereby, a framework is presented using label-constrained shortest path technique with the conflict resolution. To apply this framework to solve the ORS satel ite task planning problem, the preprocessing and the conflict resolution strategies are discussed in detail. Based on the above work, the user-oriented data acquisition chain task planning algorithm for ORS satel ite is proposed. The exact solution can be obtained in polynomial time using the proposed algorithm. The simulation experiments validate the feasibility and the adaptability of the pro-posed approach.

  6. Task Allocation and Path Planning for Collaborative Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Operating through an Underwater Acoustic Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyue Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic and unstructured multiple cooperative autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV missions are highly complex operations, and task allocation and path planning are made significantly more challenging under realistic underwater acoustic communication constraints. This paper presents a solution for the task allocation and path planning for multiple AUVs under marginal acoustic communication conditions: a location-aided task allocation framework (LAAF algorithm for multitarget task assignment and the grid-based multiobjective optimal programming (GMOOP mathematical model for finding an optimal vehicle command decision given a set of objectives and constraints. Both the LAAF and GMOOP algorithms are well suited in poor acoustic network condition and dynamic environment. Our research is based on an existing mobile ad hoc network underwater acoustic simulator and blind flooding routing protocol. Simulation results demonstrate that the location-aided auction strategy performs significantly better than the well-accepted auction algorithm developed by Bertsekas in terms of task-allocation time and network bandwidth consumption. We also demonstrate that the GMOOP path-planning technique provides an efficient method for executing multiobjective tasks by cooperative agents with limited communication capabilities. This is in contrast to existing multiobjective action selection methods that are limited to networks where constant, reliable communication is assumed to be available.

  7. Analysis of Operators Comments on the PSF Questionnaire of the Task Complexity Experiment 2003/2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torralba, B.; Martinez-Arias, R.

    2007-07-01

    Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) methods usually take into account the effect of Performance Shaping Factors (PSF). Therefore, the adequate treatment of PSFs in HRA of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) models has a crucial importance. There is an important need for collecting PSF data based on simulator experiments. During the task complexity experiment 2003-2004, carried out in the BWR simulator of Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLAB), there was a data collection on PSF by means of a PSF Questionnaire. Seven crews (composed of shift supervisor, reactor operator and turbine operator) from Swedish Nuclear Power Plants participated in the experiment. The PSF Questionnaire collected data on the factors: procedures, training and experience, indications, controls, team management, team communication, individual work practice, available time for the tasks, number of tasks or information load, masking and seriousness. The main statistical significant results are presented on Performance Shaping Factors data collection and analysis of the task complexity experiment 2003/2004 (HWR-810). The analysis of the comments about PSFs, which were provided by operators on the PSF Questionnaire, is described. It has been summarised the comments provided for each PSF on the scenarios, using a content analysis technique. (Author)

  8. Optimisation of battery operating life considering software tasks and their timing behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipskoch, Henrik

    2010-02-19

    Users of mobile embedded systems have an interest in long battery operating life. The longer a system can operate without need for recharge or battery replacement, the more will maintenance cost and the number of faults due to insufficient power supply decrease. Operating life is prolonged by saving energy, which may reduce available processing time. Mobile embedded systems communicating with other participants like other mobiles or radio stations are subject to time guarantees ensuring reliable communication. Thus, methods that save energy by reducing processing time are not only subject to available processing time but subject to the embedded system's time guarantees. To perform parameter optimisations offline, decisions can be taken early at design time, avoiding further computations at run-time. Especially, to compute processor shutdown durations offline, no extra circuitry to monitor system behaviour and to wake up the processor needs to be designed, deployed, or power supplied: only a timer is required. In this work, software tasks are considered sharing one processor. The scheduling algorithm earliest deadline first is assumed, and per-task, a relative deadline is assumed. Tasks may be instantiated arbitrarily as long as this occurrence behaviour is given in the notion of event streams. Scaling of the processor's voltage and processor shutdown are taken into account as methods for saving energy. With given per task worst-case execution times and the tasks' event streams, the real-time feasibility of the energy optimised solutions is proven. The decision which energy saving solution provides longest operating life is made with the help of a battery model. The used real-time feasibility test has the advantage that it can be approximated: this yields an adjustable number of linear optimisation constraints. Reducing the processor's voltage reduces processor frequency, therefore, execution times increase. The resulting slowdown becomes the

  9. An ergonomics study of computerized emergency operating procedures: Presentation style, task complexity, and training level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Song; Song Fei [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Zhizhong [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: zzli@tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhao Qianyi; Luo Wei [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); He Xuhong [Scanpower Risk Management China Inc., Towercrest International Plaza, No. 3 Maizidian West Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100016 (China); Salvendy, Gavriel [Department of Industrial Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-10-15

    Emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are widely used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). With the development of information technology, computerized EOPs are taking the place of paper-based ones. Unlike paper-based EOPs, the industrial practice of computerized EOPs is still quite limited. Ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately. This study focuses on the effects of EOP presentation style, task complexity, and training level on the performance of the operators in the execution of computerized EOPs. One simulated computerized EOP system was developed to present two EOPs, each with different task complexity levels, by two presentation styles (Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination). Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. Statistical analysis of the experimental results indicates that: (1) complexity, presentation style, and training level all can significantly influence the error rate. High-complexity tasks and lack of sufficient training may lead to a higher error rate. Style B caused a significantly higher error rate than style A did in the skilled phase. So the designers of computerized procedures should take the presentation styles of EOPs into account. (2) Task complexity and training level can significantly influence operation time. No significant difference was found in operation time between the two presentation styles. (3) Training level can also significantly influence the subjective workload of EOPs operations. This implies that adequate training is very important for the performance of computerized EOPs even if emergency responses with computerized EOPs are much more simple and easy than that with paper-based EOPs.

  10. Operation REDWING Commander Task Group 7.3, Operation Plan Number 1-56.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-01-24

    9 Decoder 1955 indicates for each unit a two digit numbal which is to be appended to the designation SNF in order to identify the ship _ or unit for...Center) XWAJALEIN D-3_ Annex D to OTG 7.3 No -1-56 SEARCH AND RESCUE PLAN b. Comunications . An specified in reference (b) and Annex E of this-Operation...satisfactory comunications should be employed to transmit CONFIDENTIAL traffic when necessary to transmit visually in the clear. a, Vessels having three or

  11. Application of empirical mode decomposition and Teager energy operator to EEG signals for mental task classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleem, M F; Sugavaneswaran, L; Guergachi, A; Krishnan, S

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for mental task classification from EEG signals using Empirical Mode Decomposition and Teager energy operator techniques on EEG data. The efficacy of these techniques for non-stationary and non-linear data has already been demonstrated, which therefore lend themselves well to EEG signals, which are also non-stationary and non-linear in nature. The method described in this paper decomposed the EEG signals (6 EEG signals per task per subject, for a total of 5 tasks over multiple trials) into their constituent oscillatory modes, called intrinsic mode functions, and separated out the trend from the signal. Teager energy operator was used to calculate the average energy of both the detrended signal and the trend. The average energy was used to construct separate feature vectors with a small number of parameters for the detrended signal and the trend. Based on these parameters, one-versus-one classification of mental tasks was performed using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Using both feature vectors, an average correct classification rate of more than 85% was achieved, demonstrating the effectiveness of the method used. Furthermore, this method used all the intrinsic mode functions, as opposed to similar studies, demonstrating that the trend of the EEG signal also contains important discriminatory information.

  12. New target acquisition task for contemporary operating environments: personnel in MWIR, LWIR, and SWIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Evelyn J.; Leonard, Kevin R.; Hodgkin, Van A.; Thompson, Roger; Miller, Brian; Hixson, Jon; Johnson, Sara; Godbolt, Tehran; Acton, David D.

    2010-04-01

    Operating environments that US Soldiers and Marines are in have changed, along with the types of tasks that they are required to perform. In addition, the potential imaging sensor options available have increased. These changes make it necessary to examine how these new tasks are affected by waveband and time of day. US Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, Communications Electronics Research Development and Engineering Center, Night Vision and Electronic Sensor Directorate (NVESD), investigated one such task for several wavebands (MWIR, LWIR, Visible, and SWIR) and during both day and night. This task involved identification of nine different personnel targets: US Soldier, US Marine, Eastern-European/Asian Soldier, Urban Insurgent, Rural Insurgent, Hostile Militia, Indigenous Inhabitant, Contract Laborer, and Reporter. These nine distinct targets were made up from three tactically significant categories: Friendly Force, Combatant and Neutral/Non-Combatant. A ten second video was taken of an actor dressed as one of these targets. The actors walk a square pattern, enabling all aspects to be seen in each video clip. Target characteristics were measured and characteristic dimension, target contrast tabulated. A nine-alternative, forced-choice human perception test was performed at NVESD. This test allowed NVESD to quantify the ability of observers to discriminate between personnel targets for each waveband and time of day. The task difficulty criterion, V50, was also calculated allowing for future modeling using the NVESD sensor performance model.

  13. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Tasks for ANAV NPPs in Support of Plant Operation and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Reventós

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-hydraulic analysis tasks aimed at supporting plant operation and control of nuclear power plants are an important issue for the Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs (ANAV. ANAV is the consortium that runs the Ascó power plants (2 units and the Vandellòs-II power plant. The reactors are Westinghouse-design, 3-loop PWRs with an approximate electrical power of 1000 MW. The Technical University of Catalonia (UPC thermal-hydraulic analysis team has jointly worked together with ANAV engineers at different levels in the analysis and improvement of these reactors. This article is an illustration of the usefulness of computational analysis for operational support. The contents presented were operational between 1985 and 2001 and subsequently changed slightly following various organizational adjustments. The paper has two different parts. In the first part, it describes the specific aspects of thermal-hydraulic analysis tasks related to operation and control and, in the second part, it briefly presents the results of three examples of analyses that were performed. All the presented examples are related to actual situations in which the scenarios were studied by analysts using thermal-hydraulic codes and prepared nodalizations. The paper also includes a qualitative evaluation of the benefits obtained by ANAV through thermal-hydraulic analyses aimed at supporting operation and plant control.

  14. ISS Operations Cost Reductions Through Automation of Real-Time Planning Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy A.; Clancey, William J.; McDonald, Aaron; Toschlog, Jason; Tucker, Tyson; Khan, Ahmed; Madrid, Steven (Eric)

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 the Johnson Space Center s Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) management team challenged their organizations to find ways to reduce the cost of operations for supporting the International Space Station (ISS) in the Mission Control Center (MCC). Each MOD organization was asked to define and execute projects that would help them attain cost reductions by 2012. The MOD Operations Division Flight Planning Branch responded to this challenge by launching several software automation projects that would allow them to greatly improve console operations and reduce ISS console staffing and intern reduce operating costs. These tasks ranged from improving the management and integration mission plan changes, to automating the uploading and downloading of information to and from the ISS and the associated ground complex tasks that required multiple decision points. The software solutions leveraged several different technologies including customized web applications and implementation of industry standard web services architecture; as well as engaging a previously TRL 4-5 technology developed by Ames Research Center (ARC) that utilized an intelligent agent-based system to manage and automate file traffic flow, archive data, and generate console logs. These projects to date have allowed the MOD Operations organization to remove one full time (7 x 24 x 365) ISS console position in 2010; with the goal of eliminating a second full time ISS console support position by 2012. The team will also reduce one long range planning console position by 2014. When complete, these Flight Planning Branch projects will account for the elimination of 3 console positions and a reduction in staffing of 11 engineering personnel (EP) for ISS.

  15. ISS Operations Cost Reductions Through Automation of Real-Time Planning Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 the Johnson Space Center s Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) management team challenged their organization to find ways to reduce the costs of International Space station (ISS) console operations in the Mission Control Center (MCC). Each MOD organization was asked to identify projects that would help them attain a goal of a 30% reduction in operating costs by 2012. The MOD Operations and Planning organization responded to this challenge by launching several software automation projects that would allow them to greatly improve ISS console operations and reduce staffing and operating costs. These projects to date have allowed the MOD Operations organization to remove one full time (7 x 24 x 365) ISS console position in 2010; with the plan of eliminating two full time ISS console support positions by 2012. This will account for an overall 10 EP reduction in staffing for the Operations and Planning organization. These automation projects focused on utilizing software to automate many administrative and often repetitive tasks involved with processing ISS planning and daily operations information. This information was exchanged between the ground flight control teams in Houston and around the globe, as well as with the ISS astronaut crew. These tasks ranged from managing mission plan changes from around the globe, to uploading and downloading information to and from the ISS crew, to even more complex tasks that required multiple decision points to process the data, track approvals and deliver it to the correct recipient across network and security boundaries. The software solutions leveraged several different technologies including customized web applications and implementation of industry standard web services architecture between several planning tools; as well as a engaging a previously research level technology (TRL 2-3) developed by Ames Research Center (ARC) that utilized an intelligent agent based system to manage and automate file traffic flow

  16. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Tasks for ANAV NPPs in Support of Plant Operation and Control

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis tasks aimed at supporting plant operation and control of nuclear power plants are an important issue for the Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs (ANAV). ANAV is the consortium that runs the Ascó power plants (2 units) and the Vandellòs-II power plant. The reactors are Westinghouse-design, 3-loop PWRs with an approximate electrical power of 1000 MW. The Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) thermal-hydraulic analysis team has jointly worked togeth...

  17. Performance impact of mutation operators of a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm for multi-robot task allocation problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Kroll, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Multi-robot task allocation determines the task sequence and distribution for a group of robots in multi-robot systems, which is one of constrained combinatorial optimization problems and more complex in case of cooperative tasks because they introduce additional spatial and temporal constraints. To solve multi-robot task allocation problems with cooperative tasks efficiently, a subpopulation-based genetic algorithm, a crossover-free genetic algorithm employing mutation operators and elitism selection in each subpopulation, is developed in this paper. Moreover, the impact of mutation operators (swap, insertion, inversion, displacement, and their various combinations) is analyzed when solving several industrial plant inspection problems. The experimental results show that: (1) the proposed genetic algorithm can obtain better solutions than the tested binary tournament genetic algorithm with partially mapped crossover; (2) inversion mutation performs better than other tested mutation operators when solving problems without cooperative tasks, and the swap-inversion combination performs better than other tested mutation operators/combinations when solving problems with cooperative tasks. As it is difficult to produce all desired effects with a single mutation operator, using multiple mutation operators (including both inversion and swap) is suggested when solving similar combinatorial optimization problems.

  18. Visual strategies for enhancing user perception of task relationships in emergency operations centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzic, Stephanie; Godwin, Alex; Kilgore, Ryan

    2010-04-01

    In time-sensitive environments, such as DHS emergency operations centers (EOCs), it is imperative for decision makers to rapidly understand and address key logical relationships that exist between tasks, entities, and events, even as conditions fluctuate. These relationships often have important temporal characteristics, such as tasks that must be completed before others can be started (e.g., buses must be transported to an area before an evacuation process can begin). Unfortunately, traditional temporal display methods, such as mission timelines, typically reveal only rudimentary event details and fail to support user understanding of and reasoning about critical temporal constraints and interrelationships across multiple mission components. To address these shortcomings, we developed a visual language to enhance temporal data displays by explicitly and intuitively conveying these constraints and relationships to decision makers. In this paper, we detail these design strategies and describe ongoing evaluation efforts to assess their usability and effectiveness to support decision-making tasks in complex, time-sensitive environments. We present a case study in which we applied our visual enhancements to a timeline display, improving the perception of logical relationships among events in a Master Scenario Event List (MSEL). These methods reduce the cognitive workload of decision makers and improve the efficacy of identification.

  19. Differential gene expression in the rat hippocampus during learning of an operant conditioning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanelli, M; Frick, L R; Zanutto, B S

    2009-11-10

    Changes in transcription levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding (CREB), Synapsin I, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII), activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc), c-jun and c-fos have been associated to several learning paradigms in different brain areas. In this study, we measured mRNA expression in the hippocampus by real time (RT)-PCR mRNA levels of BDNF, CREB, Synapsin I, CamKII, Arc, c-jun and c-fos, during learning and operant conditioning task. Experimental groups were as follows: control (C, the animals never left the bioterium), when the animals reached 50-65% of the expected response (Incompletely Trained, IT), when animals reached 100% of the expected response with a latency time lower than 5 s (Trained, Tr), Box Control of Incompletely Trained (BCIT), animals spent the same time as the IT in the operant conditioning box and Box Control of Trained (BCTr) animals spent the same time as the Tr in the operant conditioning box. All rats were killed at the same time by cervical dislocation 15 min after training and hippocampi were removed and processed. We found increments of mRNA levels of most genes (BDNF, CREB, Synapsin I, Arc, c-jun and c-fos) in IT and Tr groups compared to their box controls, but increments in Tr were smaller compared with IT. These results describe a differential gene expression in the rat hippocampus when the animals are learning and when animals have already learned. Taking together the results presented herein with the known functions of these genes, we propose a link between changes in gene expression in the hippocampus and different degrees of cellular activation and plasticity during learning of an operant conditioning task.

  20. Object-based task-level control: A hierarchical control architecture for remote operation of space robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, H. D.; Miles, E. S.; Rock, S. J.; Cannon, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    Expanding man's presence in space requires capable, dexterous robots capable of being controlled from the Earth. Traditional 'hand-in-glove' control paradigms require the human operator to directly control virtually every aspect of the robot's operation. While the human provides excellent judgment and perception, human interaction is limited by low bandwidth, delayed communications. These delays make 'hand-in-glove' operation from Earth impractical. In order to alleviate many of the problems inherent to remote operation, Stanford University's Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed the Object-Based Task-Level Control architecture. Object-Based Task-Level Control (OBTLC) removes the burden of teleoperation from the human operator and enables execution of tasks not possible with current techniques. OBTLC is a hierarchical approach to control where the human operator is able to specify high-level, object-related tasks through an intuitive graphical user interface. Infrequent task-level command replace constant joystick operations, eliminating communications bandwidth and time delay problems. The details of robot control and task execution are handled entirely by the robot and computer control system. The ARL has implemented the OBTLC architecture on a set of Free-Flying Space Robots. The capability of the OBTLC architecture has been demonstrated by controlling the ARL Free-Flying Space Robots from NASA Ames Research Center.

  1. Information delivery in team communication of MCR operators for an emergency task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwang Sub; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dae

    2005-01-01

    Team performance is a major measure to evaluate the ability of team when a lot of people perform a task of common purpose such as the main control room operators in the nuclear power plant. A team performance is affected the collaboration and communication among operators under dynamic situation as well as by the cognitive process of each team member. Specially, under the emergency situation, more clear and apparent communication in a team is a critical key for the appropriate response to emergency situation. As a general human factor analysis accesses the operator's behavior, it leads to a resulting action of planning, decision, problem-solving. In order to access the internal information and background information of his/her behavior, the verbal protocol analysis is applied. The impact factors on the team performance are derived from the state of the art for team performance, and it is found that the communication is a common key for all impact factors. And, in turn, the impact factors for the communication are accesses and the more detailed analysis is performed. The recorded data for the operator training for emergency situation of nuclear power plant training center are analyzed according to the verbal protocol analysis that are being generally utilized in cognitive psychology, educational psychology, and cognitive science. Two aspects, external (syntax) and internal (symantic) aspects of communication are reviewed. From the syntax analysis, it is found that the task of each step in EOP is separated according to each corresponding operator and the ordinary training is important, and the weak-points for a sentence presentation can be found team-by-team. And, from the symantic analysis for the diagnostic procedure of EOP is performed and the communication errors due to different situation awareness by operators could be found, and it lead to a diagnosis failure. The factors for different symantic cognition for a situation are analyzed and the affecting

  2. A functional approach for research on cognitive control: Analysing cognitive control tasks and their effects in terms of operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liefooghe, Baptist; De Houwer, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive control is an important mental ability that is examined using a multitude of cognitive control tasks and effects. The present paper presents the first steps in the elaboration of a functional approach, which aims to uncover the communalities and differences between different cognitive control tasks and their effects. Based on the idea that responses in cognitive control tasks qualify as operant behaviour, we propose to reinterpret cognitive control tasks in terms of operant contingencies and cognitive control effects as instances of moderated stimulus control. We illustrate how our approach can be used to uncover communalities between topographically different cognitive control tasks and can lead to novel questions about the processes underlying cognitive control.

  3. Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toole, Gasper L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

  4. Effect of donepezil on reversal learning in a touch screen-based operant task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Woei-Shin; Wong, Fong-Kuan; Chapman, Paul F; Pemberton, Darrel J

    2009-10-01

    Impairments in reversal learning, which are commonly observed in patients with psychiatric disorders, remain difficult to treat. There is still a debate over the beneficial effects of cholinergic enhancers on improving behavioural flexibility. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, on the performance of a rodent Probabilistic Reversal Learning task. Lister-Hooded rats were trained to retrieve food rewards by discriminating two computer-generated stimuli in an automated touch screen-based operant task. When a steady performance was achieved, the stimulus-reward rule was reversed. Each rat was given a 30-min training session daily for 24 days and donepezil was administered 30 min before each training session. Systemic treatment with donepezil had no effect on trial accuracy of the two-stimulus discrimination training. However, the donepezil group showed enhanced performance in the reversal learning. Our result showed that treatment with donepezil significantly enhanced Probabilistic Reversal Learning performance in healthy animals. On the basis of this finding, the inhibition of the central acetylcholinesterase would seem to be a potential therapeutic approach to treat behavioural inflexibility.

  5. Hippocampal Homer1 levels influence motivational behavior in an operant conditioning task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus V Wagner

    Full Text Available Loss of motivation and learning impairments are commonly accepted core symptoms of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. Reward-motivated learning is dependent on the hippocampal formation but the molecular mechanisms that lead to functional incentive motivation in this brain region are still largely unknown. Recent evidence implicates neurotransmission via metabotropic glutamate receptors and Homer1, their interaction partner in the postsynaptic density, in drug addiction and motivational learning. As previous reports mainly focused on the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens, we now investigated the role of hippocampal Homer1 in operant reward learning in the present study. We therefore tested either Homer1 knockout mice or mice that overexpress Homer1 in the hippocampus in an operant conditioning paradigm. Our results show that deletion of Homer1 leads to a diverging phenotype that either displays an inability to perform the task or outstanding hyperactivity in both learning and motivational sessions. Due to the apparent bimodal distribution of this phenotype, the overall effect of Homer1 deletion in this paradigm is not significantly altered. Overexpression of hippocampal Homer1 did not lead to a significantly altered learning performance in any stage of the testing paradigm, yet may subtly contribute to emerging motivational deficits. Our results indicate an involvement of Homer1-mediated signaling in the hippocampus in motivation-based learning tasks and encourage further investigations regarding the specific molecular underpinnings of the phenotypes observed in this study. We also suggest to cautiously interpret the results of this and other studies regarding the phenotype following Homer1 manipulations in animals, since their behavioral phenotype appears to be highly diverse. Future studies would benefit from larger group sizes that would allow splitting the experimental groups in responders and non-responders.

  6. Increasing Independence in Self-Care Tasks for Children with Autism Using Self-Operated Auditory Prompts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Nicole McGaha; Heflin, L. Juane

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of self-operated auditory prompting systems (SOAPs) on independent self-care task completion of elementary-school-aged children with autism and intellectual disabilities. Prerecorded verbal prompts on a student-operated tape recorder were employed to facilitate independence in washing hands and…

  7. Increasing Independence in Self-Care Tasks for Children with Autism Using Self-Operated Auditory Prompts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Nicole McGaha; Heflin, L. Juane

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of self-operated auditory prompting systems (SOAPs) on independent self-care task completion of elementary-school-aged children with autism and intellectual disabilities. Prerecorded verbal prompts on a student-operated tape recorder were employed to facilitate independence in washing hands and…

  8. Operational Readiness Review Plan for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Materials Production Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. H.; Martin, M. M.; Riggs, C. R.; Beatty, R. L.; Ohriner, E. K.; Escher, R. N.

    1990-04-19

    In October 1989, a US shuttle lifted off from Cape Kennedy carrying the spacecraft Galileo on its mission to Jupiter. In November 1990, a second spacecraft, Ulysses, will be launched from Cape Kennedy with a mission to study the polar regions of the sun. The prime source of power for both spacecraft is a series of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which use plutonium oxide (plutonia) as a heat source. Several of the key components in this power system are required to ensure the safety of both the public and the environment and were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1980 to 1983 period. For these two missions, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), will provide an iridium alloy component used to contain the plutonia heat source and a carbon composite material that serves as a thermal insulator. ORNL alone will continue to fabricate the carbon composite material. Because of the importance to DOE that Energy Systems deliver these high quality components on time, performance of an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) of these manufacturing activities is necessary. Energy Systems Policy GP 24 entitled "Operational Readiness Process" describes the formal and comprehensive process by which appropriate Energy Systems activities are to be reviewed to ensure their readiness. This Energy System policy is aimed at reducing the risks associated with mission success and requires a management approved "readiness plan" to be issued. This document is the readiness plan for the RTG materials production tasks.

  9. Integrated operational control and dynamic task allocation of unattended distributed sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Ashit

    2009-05-01

    Unattended autonomous systems of the future will involve groups of static and mobile sensors functioning in coordination to achieve overall task objectives. Such systems can be viewed as wirelessly networked unmanned heterogeneous sensor networks. We discuss a distributed heterogeneous sensing system with static sensors and mobile robots with novel control optimization algorithms for dynamic adaptation, coordinated control and end to end resource management of all sensors in response to detected events to achieve overall system goals and objectives. Our system is designed for a host of applications, such as unmediated data monitoring and record keeping of the environment, battlefield monitoring using integrated ground, ocean and air sensors, and reactive operation to threats or changing conditions, and homeland security or border/road surveillance systems where unmanned vehicles can be deployed autonomously in response to detected events. Results for large area coastal monitoring are presented. Offline results using actual modeled data from in-situ sensory measurements demonstrate how the sensor parameters can be adapted to maximize observability of a freshwater plume while ensuring that individual system components operate within their physical limitations.1 2

  10. Automation-aided Task Loads Index based on the Automation Rate Reflecting the Effects on Human Operators in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seungmin; Seong, Poonghyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jonghyun [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Many researchers have found that a high automation rate does not guarantee high performance. Therefore, to reflect the effects of automation on human performance, a new estimation method of the automation rate that considers the effects of automation on human operators in nuclear power plants (NPPs) was suggested. These suggested measures express how much automation support human operators but it cannot express the change of human operators' workload, whether the human operators' workload is increased or decreased. Before considering automation rates, whether the adopted automation is good or bad might be estimated in advance. In this study, to estimate the appropriateness of automation according to the change of the human operators' task loads, automation-aided task loads index is suggested based on the concept of the suggested automation rate. To insure plant safety and efficiency on behalf of human operators, various automation systems have been installed in NPPs, and many works which were previously conducted by human operators can now be supported by computer-based operator aids. According to the characteristics of the automation types, the estimation method of the system automation and the cognitive automation rate were suggested. The proposed estimation method concentrates on the effects of introducing automation, so it directly express how much the automated system support human operators. Based on the suggested automation rates, the way to estimate how much the automated system can affect the human operators' cognitive task load is suggested in this study. When there is no automation, the calculated index is 1, and it means there is no change of human operators' task load.

  11. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Volume 4, Task 5, Operation of PFH on beneficiated shale, Task 6, Environmental data and mitigation analyses and Task 7, Sample procurement, preparation, and characterization: Final report, September 1987--May 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The objective of Task 5 (Operation of Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydro-Retorting (PFH) on Beneficiated Shale) was to modify the PFH process to facilitate its use for fine-sized, beneficiated Eastern shales. This task was divided into 3 subtasks: Non-Reactive Testing, Reactive Testing, and Data Analysis and Correlations. The potential environment impacts of PFH processing of oil shale must be assessed throughout the development program to ensure that the appropriate technologies are in place to mitigate any adverse effects. The overall objectives of Task 6 (Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses) were to obtain environmental data relating to PFH and shale beneficiation and to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the integrated PFH process. The task was divided into the following four subtasks. Characterization of Processed Shales (IGT), 6.2. Water Availability and Treatment Studies, 6.3. Heavy Metals Removal and 6.4. PFH Systems Analysis. The objective of Task 7 (Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization) was to procure, prepare, and characterize raw and beneficiated bulk samples of Eastern oil shale for all of the experimental tasks in the program. Accomplishments for these tasks are presented.

  12. Operational readiness review plan for the radioisotope thermoelectric generator materials production tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.H.; Martin, M.M.; Riggs, C.R.; Beatty, R.L.; Ohriner, E.K.; Escher, R.N.

    1990-04-19

    In October 1989, a US shuttle lifted off from Cape Kennedy carrying the spacecraft Galileo on its mission to Jupiter. In November 1990, a second spacecraft, Ulysses, will be launched from Cape Kennedy with a mission to study the polar regions of the sun. The prime source of power for both spacecraft is a series of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which use plutonium oxide (plutonia) as a heat source. Several of the key components in this power system are required to ensure the safety of both the public and the environment and were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1980 to 1983 period. For these two missions, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), will provide an iridium-alloy component used to contain the plutonia heat source and a carbon-composite material that serves as a thermal insulator. ORNL alone will continue to fabricate the carbon-composite material. Because of the importance to DOE that Energy Systems deliver these high-quality components on time, performance of an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) of these manufacturing activities is necessary. Energy Systems Policy GP-24 entitled Operational Readiness Process'' describes the formal and comprehensive process by which appropriate Energy Systems activities are to be reviewed to ensure their readiness. This Energy System policy is aimed at reducing the risks associated with mission success and requires a management-approved readiness plan'' to be issued. This document is the readiness plan for the RTG materials production tasks. 6 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Reinforcing effect for corn oil stimulus was concentration dependent in an operant task in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Takeshi; Taka, Yuichi; Okamura, Maya; Mizushige, Takafumi; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Manabe, Yasuko; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2007-11-30

    Corn oil is reported to elicit a conditioned place preference (CPP) in a CPP test in mice. To further investigate a reinforcing effect of corn oil, we studied whether the corn oil acts as a reinforcer under a progressive ratio (PR) schedule in the operant task. BALB/c mice were trained to lever press for sucrose and corn oil. After reaching a stable break-point for 100% corn oil, the PR test was conducted for various concentrations of corn oil (0%-100%). The reinforcing effect of corn oil was increased in a concentration-dependent manner under the PR schedule. A mineral oil and 0.3% xanthan gum as vehicles did not show any reinforcing effect in the PR test, suggesting that oily and viscous texture was not related to the reinforcing property of corn oil. The break-point for corn oil was attenuated by pretreatment with (-)-sulpiride, a D(2) antagonist, in the PR test. On the other hand, SCH23390, a D(1) antagonist, did not influence the break-point. Furthermore, the pretreatment with (-)-sulpiride or SCH23390 did not influence the intake of corn oil in a one-bottle test for 30 min, suggesting that the dopaminergic system is involved in the reinforcing effect but not the consumption of corn oil in mice. In conclusion, operant response to corn oil is concentration-dependently enhanced under the PR schedule. This reinforcing effect of corn oil is at least partly mediated through the dopaminergic systems via D(2) receptors.

  14. Learning an operant conditioning task differentially induces gliogenesis in the medial prefrontal cortex and neurogenesis in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Rapanelli

    Full Text Available Circuit modification associated with learning and memory involves multiple events, including the addition and remotion of newborn cells trough adulthood. Adult neurogenesis and gliogenesis were mainly described in models of voluntary exercise, enriched environments, spatial learning and memory task; nevertheless, it is unknown whether it is a common mechanism among different learning paradigms, like reward dependent tasks. Therefore, we evaluated cell proliferation, neurogenesis, astrogliogenesis, survival and neuronal maturation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and the hippocampus (HIPP during learning an operant conditioning task. This was performed by using endogenous markers of cell proliferation, and a bromodeoxiuridine (BrdU injection schedule in two different phases of learning. Learning an operant conditioning is divided in two phases: a first phase when animals were considered incompletely trained (IT, animals that were learning the task when they performed between 50% and 65% of the responses, and a second phase when animals were considered trained (Tr, animals that completely learned the task when they reached 100% of the responses with a latency time lower than 5 seconds. We found that learning an operant conditioning task promoted cell proliferation in both phases of learning in the mPFC and HIPP. Additionally, the results presented showed that astrogliogenesis was induced in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC in both phases, however, the first phase promoted survival of these new born astrocytes. On the other hand, an increased number of new born immature neurons was observed in the HIPP only in the first phase of learning, whereas, decreased values were observed in the second phase. Finally, we found that neuronal maturation was induced only during the first phase. This study shows for the first time that learning a reward-dependent task, like the operant conditioning, promotes neurogenesis, astrogliogenesis, survival and

  15. Human Error Probabilites (HEPs) for generic tasks and Performance Shaping Factors (PSFs) selected for railway operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thommesen, Jacob; Andersen, Henning Boje

    at task level, which can be performed with fewer resources than a more detailed analysis of specific errors for each task. The generic tasks are presented with estimated Human Error Probabili-ties (HEPs) based on and extrapolated from the HRA literature, and estimates are compared with samples of measures...... on estimates derived from industries other than rail and the general warning that a task-based analysis is less precise than an error-based one. The authors recommend that estimates be adjusted to actual measures of task failures when feasible....... collaboration with Banedanmark. The estimates provided are based on HRA literature and primarily the HEART method, being recently been adapted for railway tasks by the British Rail Safety and Stan-dards Board (RSSB). The method presented in this report differs from the RSSB tool by supporting an analysis...

  16. Exposure levels of farmers and veterinarians to particulate matter and gases uring operational tasks in pig-fattening houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele Van Ransbeeck

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to assess particulate matter (PM exposure levels for both the farmer and the veterinarian during different operational tasks in pig-fattening houses, and to estimate their exposure levels on a daily working basis (time-weighted average (TWA. The measured PM fractions were: inhalable and respirable PM, PM10, PM2.5 and PM1. The effects of pig age, pen floor type (conventional or low emission surface and cleaning of the pens on the personal PM exposure were also investigated. Indoor concentrations of NH[sub]3[/sub], CH[sub]4[/sub], and CO[sub]2[/sub] were additionally measured during some operational tasks. The results showed that personal exposure levels can become extremely high during some operational tasks performed by the farmer or veterinarian. The highest concentration levels were observed during feed shovelling and blood sampling, the lowest during the weighing of the pigs. For the farmer, the estimated TWA exposure levels of inhalable and respirable PM were 6.0 and 0.29 mg m[sup] -3[/sup] , respectively. These exposure levels for the veterinarian were, respectively, 10.6 and 0.74 mg m[sup] -3[/sup] . The PM concentration levels were mainly determined by the performed operational tasks. There was no significant effect of pig age, pen floor type, nor cleaning of the pens on the personal exposure levels.

  17. Exposure levels of farmers and veterinarians to particulate matter and gases during operational tasks in pig-fattening houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ransbeeck, Nele; Van Langenhove, Herman; Michiels, Annelies; Sonck, Bart; Demeyer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to assess particulate matter (PM) exposure levels for both the farmer and the veterinarian during different operational tasks in pig-fattening houses, and to estimate their exposure levels on a daily working basis (time-weighted average (TWA)). The measured PM fractions were: inhalable and respirable PM, PM10, PM2.5 and PM1. The effects of pig age, pen floor type (conventional or low emission surface) and cleaning of the pens on the personal PM exposure were also investigated. Indoor concentrations of NH3, CH4, and CO2 were additionally measured during some operational tasks. The results showed that personal exposure levels can become extremely high during some operational tasks performed by the farmer or veterinarian. The highest concentration levels were observed during feed shovelling and blood sampling, the lowest during the weighing of the pigs. For the farmer, the estimated TWA exposure levels of inhalable and respirable PM were 6.0 and 0.29 mg m(-3), respectively. These exposure levels for the veterinarian were, respectively, 10.6 and 0.74 mg m(-3). The PM concentration levels were mainly determined by the performed operational tasks. There was no significant effect of pig age, pen floor type, nor cleaning of the pens on the personal exposure levels.

  18. Combining Collision Avoidance and Operator Workload Reduction with Cooperative Task Assignment and Path Planning (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Proceedings of the American Control Conference , 2002. [5] P. Chandler, M. Pachter, S. Rasmussen, and C. Schumacher, “Multiple task assignment for a uav...assign- ing cooperating uavs to multiple tasks,” Proceedings of the American Control Conference , 2006. [7] T. shima, S. Rasmussen, and D. Gross

  19. Expanding a professional dental care system: experiences of Task Force 261 Multifunctional Medical Battalion during Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Frank L; Smith, Gregory M; Cobb, James W; Patterson, Craig G; Smith, Mark A; Pollard, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    During Operation Iraqi Freedom 07-09, Task Force 261 Multifunctional Medical Battalion managed an extensive dental care system stretching throughout the Iraq theater of operations. We illustrate several of the unique challenges faced by Task Force 261's headquarters and its dental and area support companies, and describe the remedies emplaced by the Task Force. Personnel structure, the evacuation chain, supply and facility management, dental civil-military operations, detainee care, information technology applications, and public health initiatives are discussed in detail.

  20. Compliant Task Execution and Learning for Safe Mixed-Initiative Human-Robot Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuonan; Conrad, Patrick R.; Shah, Julie A.; Williams, Brian C.; Mittman, David S.; Ingham, Michel D.; Verma, Vandana

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a novel task execution capability that enhances the ability of in-situ crew members to function independently from Earth by enabling safe and efficient interaction with automated systems. This task execution capability provides the ability to (1) map goal-directed commands from humans into safe, compliant, automated actions, (2) quickly and safely respond to human commands and actions during task execution, and (3) specify complex motions through teaching by demonstration. Our results are applicable to future surface robotic systems, and we have demonstrated these capabilities on JPL's All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) robot.

  1. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa: thinking ahead on programmatic tasks and related operational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachariah Rony

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Until now, we have all been desperately trying to run behind the HIV/AIDS epidemic and catch up with it, but despite all our efforts, the epidemic remains well ahead of us. In 2010, the antiretroviral treatment (ART gap was about 60%, AIDS-related deaths were almost two million a year, and on top of these figures, for every one person started on ART, there were two new HIV infections. What is needed to change this situation is to think ahead of the epidemic in terms of the programmatic tasks we will be faced with and try to act boldly in trying to implement those tasks. From a programmatic perspective, we: a highlight what needs to fundamentally change in our thinking and overall approach to the epidemic; and b outline a number of key task areas for implementation and related operational research.

  2. Westinghouse Hanford Company Conduct of Operations Manual: GOCO cross-cultivation committee. Revision 1, Operational excellence task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    Conduct of Operations is a set of standards which establishes an overall philosophy for achieving excellence in the operation of DOE facilities. These standards have application in many facets of our business and shall be considered by each organization that conducts or supports Operations in their efforts to improve overall organizational performance. The formality and accuracy resulting from the implementation of the elements of this manual will enhance safe operations and result in a higher quality product. The elements of the Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities (DOE 5480.19) are tools to do our work. In like manner the tools and methods given in the Maintenance Management Program (DOE 4330.3A) are complementary and are to be used to the fullest. These DOE documents taken together and integrated into site implementation provide the framework for well operated facilities committed to excellence and not just compliance. The goal of this manual is to promote greater ownership and accountability by each individual worker and supervisor. Evidence of our success will include accountability by workers on the floor and in technical inquisitiveness at all levels. Striving for excellence involves all of us and we should not wait for someone else to find our problems.

  3. Operator function modeling: An approach to cognitive task analysis in supervisory control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    In a study of models of operators in complex, automated space systems, an operator function model (OFM) methodology was extended to represent cognitive as well as manual operator activities. Development continued on a software tool called OFMdraw, which facilitates construction of an OFM by permitting construction of a heterarchic network of nodes and arcs. Emphasis was placed on development of OFMspert, an expert system designed both to model human operation and to assist real human operators. The system uses a blackboard method of problem solving to make an on-line representation of operator intentions, called ACTIN (actions interpreter).

  4. Task Force Fury - 4/82 ABN. Operation Enduring Freedom X, Aug 09-Sep 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    4-82 ABN Mission: Task Force Fury conducts security force assistance with Afghan National Security Forces (ANA, ANP, ABP , ANCOP) in cooperation with...led Combined Action Patrols  Align units with ANA, ANP, ABP organizations • Companies and Battalions mentor and C2 subordinate advising elements...Human Terrain -Intelligence -Governance -Development GIRoA PRT Zabul NDS SFAT (Not Filled) ABP Coy/Troop Requirement ANA TF1F, 2 x ROM

  5. Analyzing the Air Operations Center (AOC) Air Tasking Order (ATO) Process Using Theory of Constraints (TOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-13

    Theory of Constraints (TOC), as espoused by Israeli physicist Dr. Eliyahu Goldratt , defines a process in which throughput-limiting constraints can...the “longest chain of dependent events where the dependency is either task or resource related [17].” In The Goal and Its Not Luck, Dr. Goldratt ...intensive process such as ATO development. It is not possible to use physical evidence such as raw materials or subassemblies, so Goldratt suggests

  6. Torque Production Using Hand Cranks in a Simulated Gear-Operated Valve Opening Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Lawrence J H; Stanton, Edward; Patel, Anupam; Cheli, Maurizio

    1997-01-01

    Hand cranks are used in a variety of industries to actuate valves and in other gear-operated applications. In order to evaluate these types of operations and their compatibility with operator strength capabilities, a rotational dynamometer was used to measure torque production capability of operators using a hand crank at different heights and angles (with respect to the coronal plane). The tests were conducted for both clockwise and counterclockwise rotations using the dominant arm of each test participant. A total of 18 tests were completed by each of five male right-handed test participants. A 0° declination angle, counterclockwise operation, and both 40.65 cm and 60.96 cm heights were found to be associated with the greatest torque production capabilities.

  7. ’Seams’ Of Inefficiency and Joint Interagency Task Force (JIATF) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-31

    9 3. Figure 3: Operation Mayan Jaguar……………………..………… 14 4. Figure 4: Proposed JIATF East JOA …………………………….. 18 5. Figure 5...military forces from engaging in any civil law enforcement activities. By modifying the Act, President Reagan formally directed U.S. intelligence...kicked off operation MAYAN JAGUAR (See Figure 3). Combined CD Operations OP Mayan Jaguar with Guatemala, Feb 2002 92˚ West - JIATF East coordinated

  8. Report of the Task Group on operation Department of Energy tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the operation of DOE Tritium facilities: Environment, Safety, and Health Aspects of Tritium; Management of Operations and Maintenance Functions; Safe Shutdown of Tritium Facilities; Management of the Facility Safety Envelope; Maintenance of Qualified Tritium Handling Personnel; DOE Tritium Management Strategy; Radiological Control Philosophy; Implementation of DOE Requirements; Management of Tritium Residues; Inconsistent Application of Requirements for Measurement of Tritium Effluents; Interdependence of Tritium Facilities; Technical Communication among Facilities; Incorporation of Confinement Technologies into New Facilities; Operation/Management Requirements for New Tritium Facilities; and Safety Management Issues at Department of Energy Tritium Facilities.

  9. Influence of Force and Torque Feedback on Operator Performance in a VR-Based Suturing Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Santos-Carreras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS has revolutionised surgical care, considerably improving the quality of many surgical procedures. Technological advances, particularly in robotic surgery systems, have reduced the complexity of such an approach, paving the way for even less invasive surgical trends. However, the fact that haptic feedback has been progressively lost through this transition is an issue that to date has not been solved. Whereas traditional open surgery provides full haptic feedback, the introduction of MIS has eliminated the possibility of direct palpation and tactile exploration. Nevertheless, these procedures still provide a certain amount of force feedback through the rigid laparoscopic tool. Many of the current telemanipulated robotic surgical systems in return do not provide full haptic feedback, which to a certain extent can be explained by the requirement of force sensors integrated into the tools of the slave robot and actuators in the surgeon’s master console. In view of the increased complexity and cost, the benefit of haptic feedback is open to dispute. Nevertheless, studies have shown the importance of haptic feedback, especially when visual feedback is unreliable or absent. In order to explore the importance of haptic feedback for the surgeon’s master console of a novel teleoperated robotic surgical system, we have identified a typical surgical task where performance could potentially be improved by haptic feedback, and investigate performance with and without this feedback. Two rounds of experiments are performed with 10 subjects, six of them with a medical background. Results show that feedback conditions, including force feedback, significantly improve task performance independently of the operator’s suturing experience. There is, however, no further significant improvement when torque feedback is added. Consequently, it is deduced that force feedback in translations improves subject

  10. Use of the RoboFlag synthetic task environment to investigate workload and stress responses in UAV operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guznov, Svyatoslav; Matthews, Gerald; Funke, Gregory; Dukes, Allen

    2011-09-01

    Use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is an increasingly important element of military missions. However, controlling UAVs may impose high stress and workload on the operator. This study evaluated the use of the RoboFlag simulated environment as a means for profiling multiple dimensions of stress and workload response to a task requiring control of multiple vehicles (robots). It tested the effects of two workload manipulations, environmental uncertainty (i.e., UAV's visual view area) and maneuverability, in 64 participants. The findings confirmed that the task produced substantial workload and elevated distress. Dissociations between the stress and performance effects of the manipulations confirmed the utility of a multivariate approach to assessment. Contrary to expectations, distress and some aspects of workload were highest in the low-uncertainty condition, suggesting that overload of information may be an issue for UAV interface designers. The strengths and limitations of RoboFlag as a methodology for investigating stress and workload responses are discussed.

  11. Defensive Information Operations in Support of the Marine Air Ground Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Report INFOSEC Information Security INFOSYS Information Systems IO Information Operations ISMO Information Systems Management Office...scanning software. “ Much of the success of the Information Systems Management Office ( ISMO ) team comes from educating the Marines on these dangers and

  12. Briefing Number 3 to Space Station Operations Task Force Oversight Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Peter; Shelley, Carl

    1987-01-01

    This document reviews certain issues in relationship to the operation of the Space Station Freedom. The document is in outline format and includes some organizational hierarchy charts, pert charts and decision charts.

  13. Task Force on Energy Systems for Forward/Remote Operating Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    deployable, cost- effective , regulated, and secure small modular reactors with a modest output of electrical power (less than 10 megawatts) to improve... field or as the result of a conducted electric current (which may be natural or man-made). EMP interference is generally disruptive or damaging to...States, nuclear plants generally operate as base-load plants , generating electricity around the clock at low marginal operating costs. This source is

  14. The development of a quantitative measure for the complexity of emergency tasks stipulated in emergency operating procedures of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2006-11-15

    Previous studies have continuously pointed out that human performance is a decisive factor affecting the safety of complicated process systems. Subsequently, as the result of extensive efforts, it has been revealed that the provision of procedures is one of the most effective countermeasures, especially if human operators have to carry out their tasks under a very stressful environment. That is, since good procedures are helpful to not only enhance the performance of human operators but also the reduction of the possibility of a human error through stipulating detailed tasks to be done by human operators. Ironically, it has been emphasized that the performance of human operators could be impaired due to complicated procedures, because procedures directly govern the physical as well as cognitive behavior of human operators by institutionalizing detailed actions. Therefore, it is a prerequisite to develop a systematic framework that properly evaluate the complexity of tasks described in procedures. For this reason, a measure called TACOM (Task Complexity) that can quantify the complexity of emergency tasks described in the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of NPPs has been developed. In this report, a technical background as well as practical steps to quantify the complexity of tasks were presented with a series of studies that were conducted to ensure the validity of the TACOM measure. As a result of validation studies, since it is shown that the TACOM measure seem to properly quantify the complexity of emergency tasks, it is desirable that the TACOM measure plays an important role in improving the performance of human operators.

  15. Analysis of operational comfort in manual tasks using human force manipulability measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Kazuo; Yamada, Naoki; Tsuji, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme for human force manipulability (HFM) based on the use of isometric joint torque properties to simulate the spatial characteristics of human operation forces at an end-point of a limb with feasible magnitudes for a specified limb posture. This is also applied to the evaluation/prediction of operational comfort (OC) when manually operating a human-machine interface. The effectiveness of HFM is investigated through two experiments and computer simulations of humans generating forces by using their upper extremities. Operation force generation with maximum isometric effort can be roughly estimated with an HFM measure computed from information on the arm posture during a maintained posture. The layout of a human-machine interface is then discussed based on the results of operational experiments using an electric gear-shifting system originally developed for robotic devices. The results indicate a strong relationship between the spatial characteristics of the HFM and OC levels when shifting, and the OC is predicted by using a multiple regression model with HFM measures.

  16. Comparison of Operator Aided Optimization with Iterative Manual Optimization in a Simulated Tactical Decision Aiding Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    4 5 ,/, . LEG - - .... .... . ...................... . "S ’= .. 0 fUNCION EVALUAIONS A 52 i TILITY 50 go BLEST UTILITY TO DATE 73.73 The operator...NS S.. 250 - " \\ M..= . BES UTIIT TO U = 37 -122- l .- - ’. ’-,-,,--/-- ’ I / I5 -- S. *1 3 4 FUNCION (3) BES ’ ) I -.B= .0ś FUCINEV/ALL T IONS 1

  17. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator User Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, J.

    1994-06-01

    This program relates to demonstration use of electric-powered vehicles. KSU has two electric cars (conversion vehicles) from Soleq. Corp., and is purchasing 4 Chevy trucks for conversion. This document discusses the participating groups, program plan, events, vehicles and components, operations, and procurement.

  18. Honing the Dagger: The formation of a Standing Joint Special Operations Task Force Headquarters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    even on the ground; while transloading the assault force from the C-130’s, a third 8 Samuel M...College, 2003. Barnett, Frank R., B. Hugh Tovar , and Richard H. Shultz, eds. Special Operations in U.S. Strategy. Washington, D.C.: National Defense...Staff, 2002. 40 Katz, Samuel M. Today’s Green Berets: The U.S. Army’s Special Forces Groups (Airborne). Hong Kong: Concord Publications, 1996

  19. Structural (operational) synchrony of EEG alpha activity during an auditory memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingelkurts, Andrew; Fingelkurts, Alexander; Krause, Christina; Kaplan, Alexander; Borisov, Sergei; Sams, Mikko

    2003-09-01

    Memory paradigms are often used in psycho-physiological experiments in order to understand the neural basis underlying cognitive processes. One of the fundamental problems encountered in memory research is how specific and complementary cortical structures interact with each other during episodic encoding and retrieval. A key aspect of the research described below was estimating the coupling of rapid transition processes (in terms of EEG description) which occur in separate cortical areas rather than estimating the routine phase-frequency synchrony in terms of correlation and coherency. It is assumed that these rapid transition processes in the EEG amplitude correspond to the "switching on/off" of brain elemental operations. By making a quantitative estimate of the EEG structural synchrony of alpha-band power between different EEG channels, it was shown that short-term memory has the emergent property of a multiregional neuronal network, and is not the product of strictly hierarchical processing based on convergence through association regions. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the dynamic temporal structure of alpha activity is strongly correlated to the dynamic structure of working memory.

  20. Headquarters Task Group 8.5 Operation Plan 2-1-62 Operation Order 2-1-62, Effective ____1962 for Operation Dominic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-03-22

    from the ac t iva t ion and operation of ships required by the AEC sole ly a s platforms f o r diagnost ic in- strumentation and fo r which...of buildings, r t ruc tures , and long- Lived equip- mcnts (such a r power, sewerage , water l i n e r and plamta) which occur8 during the...consolidate and coordiaate radio-frequency requirements dth JTF-8 . 3 Crypt0 -Teletype Facilities. The crypto-teletype network being activated to

  1. Distributed Multi-Level Supervision to Effectively Monitor the Operations of a Fleet of Autonomous Vehicles in Agricultural Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa-Muñoz, Jesús; Gonzalez-de-Soto, Mariano; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo; Ribeiro, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a supervisor system for monitoring the operation of automated agricultural vehicles. The system analyses all of the information provided by the sensors and subsystems on the vehicles in real time and notifies the user when a failure or potentially dangerous situation is detected. In some situations, it is even able to execute a neutralising protocol to remedy the failure. The system is based on a distributed and multi-level architecture that divides the supervision into different subsystems, allowing for better management of the detection and repair of failures. The proposed supervision system was developed to perform well in several scenarios, such as spraying canopy treatments against insects and diseases and selective weed treatments, by either spraying herbicide or burning pests with a mechanical-thermal actuator. Results are presented for selective weed treatment by the spraying of herbicide. The system successfully supervised the task; it detected failures such as service disruptions, incorrect working speeds, incorrect implement states, and potential collisions. Moreover, the system was able to prevent collisions between vehicles by taking action to avoid intersecting trajectories. The results show that the proposed system is a highly useful tool for managing fleets of autonomous vehicles. In particular, it can be used to manage agricultural vehicles during treatment operations. PMID:25751079

  2. Distributed Multi-Level Supervision to Effectively Monitor the Operations of a Fleet of Autonomous Vehicles in Agricultural Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Conesa-Muñoz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a supervisor system for monitoring the operation of automated agricultural vehicles. The system analyses all of the information provided by the sensors and subsystems on the vehicles in real time and notifies the user when a failure or potentially dangerous situation is detected. In some situations, it is even able to execute a neutralising protocol to remedy the failure. The system is based on a distributed and multi-level architecture that divides the supervision into different subsystems, allowing for better management of the detection and repair of failures. The proposed supervision system was developed to perform well in several scenarios, such as spraying canopy treatments against insects and diseases and selective weed treatments, by either spraying herbicide or burning pests with a mechanical-thermal actuator. Results are presented for selective weed treatment by the spraying of herbicide. The system successfully supervised the task; it detected failures such as service disruptions, incorrect working speeds, incorrect implement states, and potential collisions. Moreover, the system was able to prevent collisions between vehicles by taking action to avoid intersecting trajectories. The results show that the proposed system is a highly useful tool for managing fleets of autonomous vehicles. In particular, it can be used to manage agricultural vehicles during treatment operations.

  3. Operationally Responsive Tasking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ORS and intelligence communities, with indications that it is a larger DoD issue. Sheehan writes in his paper The Military Missions and Means Framework that...Advanced Air and Space Studies, May 2005. [5] J. H. Sheehan, P. H. Deitz, B. E. Bray, B. A. Harris, and A. B. H. Wong, “The military missions and means framework ,” Interservice

  4. Task Shifting Provision of Contraceptive Implants to Community Health Extension Workers: Results of Operations Research in Northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charyeva, Zulfiya; Oguntunde, Olugbenga; Orobaton, Nosa; Otolorin, Emmanuel; Inuwa, Fatima; Alalade, Olubisi; Abegunde, Dele; Danladi, Saba'atu

    2015-09-01

    Contraceptive use remains low in Nigeria, with only 11% of women reporting use of any modern method. Access to long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is constrained by a severe shortage of human resources. To assess feasibility of task shifting provision of implants, we trained community health extension workers (CHEWs) to insert and remove contraceptive implants in rural communities of Bauchi and Sokoto states in northern Nigeria. We conducted 2- to 3-week training sessions for 166 selected CHEWs from 82 facilities in Sokoto state (September 2013) and 84 health facilities in Bauchi state (December 2013). To assess feasibility of the task shifting approach, we conducted operations research using a pretest-posttest design using multiple sources of information, including surveys with 151 trained CHEWs (9% were lost to follow-up) and with 150 family planning clients; facility observations using supply checklists (N = 149); direct observation of counseling provided by CHEWs (N = 144) and of their clinical (N = 113) skills; as well as a review of service statistics (N = 151 health facilities). The endline assessment was conducted 6 months after the training in each state. CHEWs inserted a total of 3,588 implants in 151 health facilities over a period of 6 months, generating 10,088 couple-years of protection (CYP). After practicing on anatomic arm models, most CHEWs achieved competency in implant insertions after insertions with 4-5 actual clients. Clinical observations revealed that CHEWs performed implant insertion tasks correctly 90% of the time or more for nearly all checklist items. The amount of information that CHEWs provided clients increased between baseline and endline, and over 95% of surveyed clients reported being satisfied with CHEWs' services in both surveys. The study found that supervisors not only observed and corrected insertion skills, as needed, during supervisory visits but also encouraged CHEWs to conduct more community

  5. SIMULATION OF CARS ACCUMULATION PROCESSES FOR SOLVING TASKS OF OPERATIONAL PLANNING IN CONDITIONS OF INITIAL INFORMATION UNCERTAINTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. A. Tereshchenko

    2017-06-01

    simulation the cars accumulation was proposed to optimize the transportation process, depending on the chosen criterion. Findings. The developed methodology of simulation of cars accumulation process was reflected in the dynamic models created with the participation of the author and implemented on the Belarusian Railroad on the basis of IAS SMD CT. They are designed to provide operational planning of the transportation process on the basis of methods that allow assessing technological risks. Originality. The innovative component of the work is due to the expansion of existing models of the accumulation of cars for cases of uncertainty of the initial information. Thus, the earlier deterministic models are particular cases of the proposed model. Also, unlike existing ones, the technique allows to take into account the influence of random processes in a complex manner. Due to this, technological risks can be further assessed and the necessary regulatory measures can be implemented promptly. In general, the results obtained by modeling the proposed method allow to improve the quality of output solutions in the system of shift and daily operational planning, increasing the reliability of operational plans. Practical value. To date, there is a favorable opportunity to use the proposed methodology of modeling in existing in the railway transport systems of automated operational planning for operational work, including the optimization of local railways and the solution of a number of urgent tasks of train formation.

  6. Full Scale Evaluation of How Task-Based Overview Displays Impact Operator Workload and Situation Awareness When in Emergency Procedure Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielman, Zachary; Hill, Racheal; LeBlanc, Katya; Rice, Brandon; Bower, Gordon; Joe, Jeffrey; Powers, David

    2016-07-01

    Control room modernization is critical to extending the life of the 99 operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP) within the United States. However, due to the lack of evidence demonstrating the efficiency and effectiveness of recent candidate technologies, current NPP control rooms operate without the benefit of various newer technologies now available. As nuclear power plants begin to extend their licenses to continue operating for another 20 years, there is increased interest in modernizing the control room and supplementing the existing control boards with advanced technologies. As part of a series of studies investigating the benefits of advanced control room technologies, the researchers conducted an experimental study to observe the effect of Task-Based Overview Displays (TODs) on operator workload and situation awareness (SA) while completing typical operating scenarios. Researchers employed the Situation Awareness Rating Technique (SART) and the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) as construct measures.

  7. Prototype Task Network Model to Simulate the Analysis of Narrow Band Sonar Data and the Effects of Automation on Critical Operator Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    will include the tasks of log data entry and look-up as part of the automation model . Although we refer to the technology solution in this section...for the Environmental Model Values that are different from the default model are shown with a gray background. Variable Acceptable Values Units...analysis Page D-1 Annex D. The Crew Model Trait Variables Acceptable Values Units Value Default Initial Value Agility None, High, Medium, Low

  8. A 1-night operant learning task without food-restriction differentiates among mouse strains in an automated home-cage environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmelink, Esther; Loos, Maarten; Koopmans, Bastijn; Aarts, Emmeke; van der Sluis, Sophie; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs

    2015-04-15

    Individuals are able to change their behavior based on its consequences, a process involving instrumental learning. Studying instrumental learning in mice can provide new insights in this elementary aspect of cognition. Conventional appetitive operant learning tasks that facilitate the study of this form of learning in mice, as well as more complex operant paradigms, require labor-intensive handling and food deprivation to motivate the animals. Here, we describe a 1-night operant learning protocol that exploits the advantages of automated home-cage testing and circumvents the interfering effects of food restriction. The task builds on behavior that is part of the spontaneous exploratory repertoire during the days before the task. We compared the behavior of C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ and DBA/2J mice and found various differences in behavior during this task, but no differences in learning curves. BALB/cJ mice showed the largest instrumental learning response, providing a superior dynamic range and statistical power to study instrumental learning by using this protocol. Insights gained with this home-cage-based learning protocol without food restriction will be valuable for the development of other, more complex, cognitive tasks in automated home-cages.

  9. Effects of nicotine and mecamylamine on choice accuracy in an operant visual signal detection task in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Amir H; Bushnell, Philip J; Levin, Edward D

    2002-12-01

    During the past decade, central nicotinic systems have been shown in both experimental animals and humans to play an important role in cognitive function. However, the way in which specific aspects of cognitive function are affected by nicotinic systems has remained unclear. In humans, the most pronounced action of nicotine is to improve attention, but in rats, memory improvement is more easily seen. This may be due to differences in methods for assessing attention in rats and humans or to species differences in the roles of nicotinic systems in cognitive function. In the current study, we explored the effects of nicotine and mecamylamine using an operant visual signal detection task designed to model sustained attention processes common to rats and humans. Adult female rats ( n=35) were trained to perform the signal detection task to a stable baseline of about 75% accuracy. The rats were then assigned to two subgroups of high and low accuracy based on overall accuracy (hits and correct rejections) at the end of training. All rats were then injected (SC, 10 min before testing) with saline or different doses of nicotine (0.0125, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) or the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg). A low dose range of nicotine (0.0125, 0.025, and 0.05 mg/kg) caused a dose-related increase in percent correct rejection. This dose range did not affect correct detections of the signal (percent hit). Higher doses of nicotine (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) did not affect percent correct rejection, but did have a time-dependent effect on percent hit. Early in the session, the higher doses of nicotine reduced percent hit, whereas during the later part of the session higher doses of nicotine increased percent hit. Effects of nicotine did not differ between the high- and low-accuracy rats. Mecamylamine decreased choice accuracy, reducing both percent hit and percent correct rejection. Mecamylamine reduced percent hit in the low-accuracy rats at a lower

  10. A 1-night operant learning task without food-restriction differentiates among mouse strains in an automated home-cage environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelink, Esther; Loos, Maarten; Koopmans, Bastijn; Aarts, Emmeke; van der Sluis, Sophie; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs; Levelt, C.N.; De Zeeuw, C.I.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals are able to change their behavior based on its consequences, a process involving instrumental learning. Studying instrumental learning in mice can provide new insights in this elementary aspect of cognition. Conventional appetitive operant learning tasks that facilitate the study of this

  11. A 1-night operant learning task without food-restriction differentiates among mouse strains in an automated home-cage environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelink, E.; Loos, M.; Koopmans, B.; Aarts, E.; van der Sluis, S.; Smit, A.B.; Verhage, M.; Brussaard, A.B.; Borst, J.G.; Elgersma, Y; Galjart, N.; van der Horst, G.T.; Levelt, C.N.; Pennartz, C.M.; Spruijt, B.M.; de Zeeuw, C.I.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals are able to change their behavior based on its consequences, a process involving instrumental learning. Studying instrumental learning in mice can provide new insights in this elementary aspect of cognition. Conventional appetitive operant learning tasks that facilitate the study of this

  12. A 1-night operant learning task without food-restriction differentiates among mouse strains in an automated home-cage environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelink, Esther; Loos, Maarten; Koopmans, Bastijn; Aarts, Emmeke; van der Sluis, Sophie; Smit, August B; Verhage, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    Individuals are able to change their behavior based on its consequences, a process involving instrumental learning. Studying instrumental learning in mice can provide new insights in this elementary aspect of cognition. Conventional appetitive operant learning tasks that facilitate the study of this

  13. Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power: Final Summary Report, IEA WIND Task 25, Phase Three 2012-2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, Hannele; Kiviluoma, Juha; Forcione, Alain; Milligan, Michael; Smith, Charles J.; Dillon, Jody; Dobschinski, Jan; van Roon, Serafin; Cutululis, Nicolaos; Orths, Antje; Eriksen, Peter Borre; Carlini, Enrico Maria; Estanqueiro, Ana; Bessa, Ricardo; Soder, Lennart; Farahmand, Hossein; Torres, Jose Rueda; Jianhua, Bai; Kondoh, Junji; Pineda, Ivan; Strbac, Goran

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes recent findings on wind integration from the 16 countries participating in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind collaboration research Task 25 in 2012-2014. Both real experience and studies are reported. The national case studies address several impacts of wind power on electric power systems. In this report, they are grouped under long-term planning issues and short-term operational impacts. Long-term planning issues include grid planning and capacity adequacy. Short-term operational impacts include reliability, stability, reserves, and maximizing the value in operational timescales (balancing related issues). The first section presents variability and uncertainty of power system-wide wind power, and the last section presents recent wind integration studies for higher shares of wind power. Appendix 1 provides a summary of ongoing research in the national projects contributing to Task 25 in 2015-2017.

  14. DOD Task Force for Business and Stability Operations: Actions Needed to Establish Project Management Guidelines and Enhance Information Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Task Force has ongoing activities in banking and finance, energy, software industry development, and information and communication technology ...Afghanistan, including Citibank , IBM, JP Morgan, Sweet Dried Fruit, Case New Holland, and Harrods of London. With respect to facilitating private

  15. Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

  16. Task Analytic Models to Guide Analysis and Design: Use of the Operator Function Model to Represent Pilot-Autoflight System Mode Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Asaf; Mitchell, Christine M.; Chappell, Alan R.; Shafto, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Task-analytic models structure essential information about operator interaction with complex systems, in this case pilot interaction with the autoflight system. Such models serve two purposes: (1) they allow researchers and practitioners to understand pilots' actions; and (2) they provide a compact, computational representation needed to design 'intelligent' aids, e.g., displays, assistants, and training systems. This paper demonstrates the use of the operator function model to trace the process of mode engagements while a pilot is controlling an aircraft via the, autoflight system. The operator function model is a normative and nondeterministic model of how a well-trained, well-motivated operator manages multiple concurrent activities for effective real-time control. For each function, the model links the pilot's actions with the required information. Using the operator function model, this paper describes several mode engagement scenarios. These scenarios were observed and documented during a field study that focused on mode engagements and mode transitions during normal line operations. Data including time, ATC clearances, altitude, system states, and active modes and sub-modes, engagement of modes, were recorded during sixty-six flights. Using these data, seven prototypical mode engagement scenarios were extracted. One scenario details the decision of the crew to disengage a fully automatic mode in favor of a semi-automatic mode, and the consequences of this action. Another describes a mode error involving updating aircraft speed following the engagement of a speed submode. Other scenarios detail mode confusion at various phases of the flight. This analysis uses the operator function model to identify three aspects of mode engagement: (1) the progress of pilot-aircraft-autoflight system interaction; (2) control/display information required to perform mode management activities; and (3) the potential cause(s) of mode confusion. The goal of this paper is twofold

  17. A problem with problem solving: motivational traits, but not cognition, predict success on novel operant foraging tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Horik, Jayden O; Madden, Joah R

    2016-04-01

    Rates of innovative foraging behaviours and success on problem-solving tasks are often used to assay differences in cognition, both within and across species. Yet the cognitive features of some problem-solving tasks can be unclear. As such, explanations that attribute cognitive mechanisms to individual variation in problem-solving performance have revealed conflicting results. We investigated individual consistency in problem-solving performances in captive-reared pheasant chicks, Phasianus colchicus, and addressed whether success depends on cognitive processes, such as trial-and-error associative learning, or whether performances may be driven solely via noncognitive motivational mechanisms, revealed through subjects' willingness to approach, engage with and persist in their interactions with an apparatus, or via physiological traits such as body condition. While subjects' participation and success were consistent within the same problems and across similar tasks, their performances were inconsistent across different types of task. Moreover, subjects' latencies to approach each test apparatus and their attempts to access the reward were not repeatable across trials. Successful individuals did not improve their performances with experience, nor were they consistent in their techniques in repeated presentations of a task. However, individuals that were highly motivated to enter the experimental chamber were more likely to participate. Successful individuals were also faster to approach each test apparatus and more persistent in their attempts to solve the tasks than unsuccessful individuals. Our findings therefore suggest that individual differences in problem-solving success can arise from inherent motivational differences alone and hence be achieved without inferring more complex cognitive processes.

  18. The influence of individual and team cognitive ability on operators' task and safety performance: a multilevel field study in nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Li, Yongjuan; Wu, Changxu

    2013-01-01

    While much research has investigated the predictors of operators' performance such as personality, attitudes and motivation in high-risk industries, its cognitive antecedents and boundary conditions have not been fully investigated. Based on a multilevel investigation of 312 nuclear power plant main control room operators from 50 shift teams, the present study investigated how general mental ability (GMA) at both individual and team level can influence task and safety performance. At the individual level, operators' GMA was predictive of their task and safety performance and this trend became more significant as they accumulated more experience. At the team level, we found team GMA had positive influences on all three performance criteria. However, we also found a "big-fish-little-pond" effect insofar as team GMA had a relatively smaller effect and inhibited the contribution of individual GMA to workers' extra-role behaviors (safety participation) compared to its clear beneficial influence on in-role behaviors (task performance and safety compliance). The possible mechanisms related to learning and social comparison processes are discussed.

  19. Effects of Response Bias and Judgment Framing on Operator Use of an Automated Aid in a Target Detection Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen; McCarley, Jason S.

    2011-01-01

    Automated diagnostic aids prone to false alarms often produce poorer human performance in signal detection tasks than equally reliable miss-prone aids. However, it is not yet clear whether this is attributable to differences in the perceptual salience of the automated aids' misses and false alarms or is the result of inherent differences in…

  20. The Relationship of Selected Aspects of Reading Comprehension and Cognitive Tasks: Classification Abilities at the Concrete Operations Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron Ross, Jr.

    This study attempted to prove a dichotomy between cognitive processes as measured by Piagetian reasoning tasks and those measured by traditional intelligence tests. A battery of tests (Slosson Intelligence Test, Durrell's Silent Reading and Listening Comprehension Test, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, and the Piagetian Measure of Cognitive…

  1. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D. (ed.); Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; Just-in-Time'' precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  2. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D. (ed.); Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; Just-in-Time'' precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  3. 6-Hydroxydopamine and radiofrequency lesions of the lateral entorhinal cortex facilitate an operant appetitive conditioning task in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, M; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1981-07-02

    The entorhinal cortex seems heterogeneous as dopaminergic terminals are present only in the anterior part of the lateral entorhinal cortex. In order to clarify the interaction of this cortex with the hippocampus in memory processes, the effects of either 6-hydroxydopamine or radiofrequency bilateral lesions were compared. Both lesions enhance the retention of a Skinner task with continuous reinforcement schedule. Involvement of dopamine in memory processes is discussed.

  4. Task 9: deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Sources of financing for PV-based rural electrification in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Syngellakis, K. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom); Shanker, A. [Innovation Energie Developpement, IED, Francheville (France)

    2004-05-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at how PV-based rural electrification in developing countries can be financed. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the overall rate of successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries through increased co-operation and information exchange. This document provides an introduction to PV project financing, including funding sources available, strategies and planning needed to secure the necessary financial resources for the deployment of PV technologies in developing and transitional economies. Topics discussed include risk analysis and the barriers to financing, sources of financing, considerations and variables that influence financing decisions and the process for securing financing. Various forms of international and national financing are looked at, as are the factors influencing financing decisions.

  5. Task Force Resettlement Operation, After Action Report, Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, 7 May 1980-19 February 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-09

    Army for Installations and Logistics, Mr. Gibbs , visited Fort Chaffee. 142d FA Bde (Ark NG) released from Task Force mission. 4 June 1980 Soldiers sent...8217. see AR 310.49. t’e p- , n... co,"ncy is ACS1 DETAILED TABLE OF DISTRIBUTION AND ALLOWANCES I , A N SECTION I-ORGANIZATION CIAIr FASE FOR COMPUTATION...of this form. see AR 310.49. the ptoponent ogeeey is ACSFO DETAILED TABLE OF DISTRIBUTION AND ALLOWANCES ŕ,4. SECTION It -ORGANIZATION Dj 4 T [ FASE

  6. DOD Task Force for Business and Stability Operations in Afghanistan: Review of Selected Expenditures Highlights Serious Management and Oversight Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    has several operational drilling rigs as well as an adequate and experienced driller and crew who can operate drilling machines under SIGAR 16-29...significant revenue for the Afghan government. North Aynak Drilling ** $5,126,948.75 2012-2013 This program was designed to conduct capacity building and...exploratory drilling for copper deposits in North Aynak. The drilling program in North Aynak was completed successfully. The contract required the

  7. A study on the effects of human age, type of computer and noise on operators' performance of a data entry task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zahid A; Rizvi, Sayed Aliul H

    2010-01-01

    The effects of human age, type of computer, and noise on computer operators' performance of a data entry task were investigated. Twenty male subjects aged 10-55 were assigned into 4 age groups each consisting of 5 persons. They performed the task for 15 min on desktop and laptop computers in a sitting posture under varying levels of noise. The mean number of characters entered per minute (MNCEPM) was statistically analyzed. Operators in the 16-25 age group achieved the highest rate of data entry at each level of noise investigated. Operators performed better on desktop than on laptop computers. Their performance decreased when noise level increased from 82 to 92 dB(A), but it improved at 102 dB(A). The effects of age and noise were statistically significant. However, the effects of the type of computer, the interactions between age and type of computer, age and noise level, and type of computer and noise were not found to be statistically significant.

  8. Using Goal Setting, Task Clarification, and Feedback to Increase the Use of the Hands-Free Technique by Hospital Operating Room Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas R; Austin, John

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a behavioral treatment on the safe passing of sharp instruments using the hands-free technique among hospital operating room personnel during surgical procedures. Treatment consisted of participative goal setting, task clarification, and feedback. The average percentage of sharp instruments passed safely increased from 32% to 64% and 31% to 70% between baseline and treatment phases in the inpatient and outpatient surgery units, respectively. Five-month follow-up data suggested maintenance of treatment effects. These findings suggest the utility of organizational behavior management strategies in reducing risky behavior in hospital settings. PMID:18189098

  9. Student Perceptions of Social Learning Space: Designing and Implementing a Co-Operative Assessment Task in Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Roger W.; Depaz, Iris; Lluka, Lesley J.

    2008-01-01

    We report findings from a case study of co-operative, group-based assessment in Pharmacology for second-year undergraduates at The University of Queensland, Australia. Students enrolled in the 2005 Bachelor of Science and 2006 Bachelor of Pharmacy degree programs, were early users of the university's new Collaborative Teaching and Learning Centre…

  10. Student Perceptions of Social Learning Space: Designing and Implementing a Co-Operative Assessment Task in Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Roger W.; Depaz, Iris; Lluka, Lesley J.

    2008-01-01

    We report findings from a case study of co-operative, group-based assessment in Pharmacology for second-year undergraduates at The University of Queensland, Australia. Students enrolled in the 2005 Bachelor of Science and 2006 Bachelor of Pharmacy degree programs, were early users of the university's new Collaborative Teaching and Learning Centre…

  11. Effects of cycloheximide on extinction in an appetitively motivated operant conditioning task depend on re-exposure duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewski, Pawel; Olczak, Mieszko; Rogowski, Artur; Kostowski, Wojciech; Samochowiec, Jerzy; Filip, Malgorzata; Przegalinski, Edmund; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2008-08-29

    Little is known about the role of new protein synthesis in extinction of operant responding for natural and chemical reinforcers. In the present study, the authors investigated whether the effects of a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (CHX) on extinction of operant responding for sweet reward depended on the duration of re-exposure sessions. In addition, the authors investigated whether the effects of CHX on extinction could generalize to relapse of saccharin seeking induced by discrete cues. CHX injected after short re-exposure sessions (5min) accelerated extinction of non-reinforced responding. In contrast, the drug injected after long re-exposure sessions (30min) partially inhibited extinction. Reinstatement of saccharin seeking induced by the saccharin-paired discrete cues was not altered by the previous treatment with CHX. Concluding, the results of the present study indicate that: (i) the protein synthesis inhibitor, CHX can alter extinction of operant responding for sweet reward in rats; (ii) the effects of CHX on extinction critically depend on the duration of re-exposure/extinction sessions and do not generalize to relapse of saccharin seeking induced by discrete cues.

  12. Hazard and Operability Study (HAZOP) Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Basin F liquid Incineration, Task IRA 2, Version 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    CONDUb 3-1 1 3.1 HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY ( HAZOP ) - PROGRAM OVERVIEW 3-2 3.2 HAZOP STUDY SOFTWARE 3-5 4.0 HAZOP STUDY RESULTS 4-1. 5.0 RESOLUTION OF...line-by-line basis into the computer database which is used to guide the study. Woodward-Clyde uses the CA- HAZOP software computer program which was...concepts and the other four who had no experience with the HAZOP process. Therefore, some training on guidewords, HAZOP software usage and other

  13. Properties of a genetic algorithm extended by a random self-learning operator and asymmetric mutations: A convergence study for a task of powder-pattern indexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszkowicz, Wojciech [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02-668 Warsaw (Poland)]. E-mail: paszk@ifpan.edu.pl

    2006-04-27

    Genetic algorithms represent a powerful global-optimisation tool applicable in solving tasks of high complexity in science, technology, medicine, communication, etc. The usual genetic-algorithm calculation scheme is extended here by introduction of a quadratic self-learning operator, which performs a partial local search for randomly selected representatives of the population. This operator is aimed as a minor deterministic contribution to the (stochastic) genetic search. The population representing the trial solutions is split into two equal subpopulations allowed to exhibit different mutation rates (so called asymmetric mutation). The convergence is studied in detail exploiting a crystallographic-test example of indexing of powder diffraction data of orthorhombic lithium copper oxide, varying such parameters as mutation rates and the learning rate. It is shown through the averaged (over the subpopulation) fitness behaviour, how the genetic diversity in the population depends on the mutation rate of the given subpopulation. Conditions and algorithm parameter values favourable for convergence in the framework of proposed approach are discussed using the results for the mentioned example. Further data are studied with a somewhat modified algorithm using periodically varying mutation rates and a problem-specific operator. The chance of finding the global optimum and the convergence speed are observed to be strongly influenced by the effective mutation level and on the self-learning level. The optimal values of these two parameters are about 6 and 5%, respectively. The periodic changes of mutation rate are found to improve the explorative abilities of the algorithm. The results of the study confirm that the applied methodology leads to improvement of the classical genetic algorithm and, therefore, it is expected to be helpful in constructing of algorithms permitting to solve similar tasks of higher complexity.

  14. Design and operating parameters for emission control studies: Phelps Dodge, Ajo, copper smelter. Final task report, Apr--Oct 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisenberg, I.J.; Serne, J.C.

    1976-02-01

    The report gives background design data for a specific copper smelter. The data is sufficiently detailed to allow air pollution control system engineering studies to be conducted. These studies will be concerned primarily with lean SO/sup 2/ streams that currently are not being captured. Physical layout of the smelter and the surrounding area is presented, along with existing control equipment. Ductwork that would be considered for future system tie-in is defined. Emissions from operating equipment, gas flow rates, temperatures, sulfur balance, and a process flow sheet are included. Utilities, stack dimensions, footing requirements, and solid waste handling are defined. Available area for new control equipment, gas characteristic variation, and potential new control equipment installation problems are discussed. (GRA)

  15. Task-based language teaching classroom operation mode%任务型语言教学的课堂操作模式解析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨柳

    2015-01-01

    任务型语言教学将真实的语言材料引入学习的环境,把学习者个人的经历作为课堂学习的重要因素.它把"交际性任务"作为最核心的指导单元,整个课堂以任务为驱动,围绕着任务的完成展开各个教学环节,在这一过程中,学生变被动接受知识为主动发现、探究知识,既提高了语言运用能力和交际能力,又获得了全面发展,因此,任务型课堂的实施过程与传统课堂有着很大的差异.教师只有深入理解其教学理念,熟悉其操作模式和流程,明确各个阶段的作用与要求,才能充分发挥其功能以达成课堂教学的有效性.%Task-based language teaching, introduce the real language materials to the study environment, the learners' personal experience as an important factor in classroom learning. "Communicative task" as the core unit, the guidance of the whole class to task for drive, revolves around the completion of the task of each teaching link, in this process, the students accept knowledge passively into active discovery, explore knowledge, can not only improve the language skils and communication skils, and obtained the comprehensive development, therefore, the implementation of task-based classroom process has a big difference with the traditional classroom. Only a deep understanding of the teaching idea, familiar with the operation mode and process, clear and requirements of each phase, can give ful play to its function to achieve the effectiveness of classroom teaching.

  16. Excitotoxic lesions of the medial striatum delay extinction of a reinforcement color discrimination operant task in domestic chicks; a functional role of reward anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Yoko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Matsushima, Toshiya

    2004-12-01

    To reveal the functional roles of the striatum, we examined the effects of excitotoxic lesions to the bilateral medial striatum (mSt) and nucleus accumbens (Ac) in a food reinforcement color discrimination operant task. With a food reward as reinforcement, 1-week-old domestic chicks were trained to peck selectively at red and yellow beads (S+) and not to peck at a blue bead (S-). Those chicks then received either lesions or sham operations and were tested in extinction training sessions, during which yellow turned out to be nonrewarding (S-), whereas red and blue remained unchanged. To further examine the effects on postoperant noninstrumental aspects of behavior, we also measured the "waiting time", during which chicks stayed at the empty feeder after pecking at yellow. Although the lesioned chicks showed significantly higher error rates in the nonrewarding yellow trials, their postoperant waiting time gradually decreased similarly to the sham controls. Furthermore, the lesioned chicks waited significantly longer than the controls, even from the first extinction block. In the blue trials, both lesioned and sham chicks consistently refrained from pecking, indicating that the delayed extinction was not due to a general disinhibition of pecking. Similarly, no effects were found in the novel training sessions, suggesting that the lesions had selective effects on the extinction of a learned operant. These results suggest that a neural representation of memory-based reward anticipation in the mSt/Ac could contribute to the anticipation error required for extinction.

  17. An Analysis and Modeling of Methods of Operational Task Sharing Based on Damage Capability%基于毁伤能力的作战任务分配方法分析与建模

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学文; 王士坤; 武世勇; 刘伶平; 任秉丽

    2014-01-01

    在毁伤任务量及毁伤能力计算的基础上,通过作战任务分配“不合理性相对指标”的分析,提出基于毁伤能力的作战任务分配方法,明确作战任务分配时应遵循的原则,建立使“作战任务分配不合理程度”达到最小的作战任务分配模型。%On the basis of damage task size and calculating damage capability,by means of the analysis of “ irrational relative index”of operational task sharing,the author presents the methods of operational task sharing based on damage capability,clears and defines the principle that should be followed at the time of operational task sharing,and creates the operational task sharing modal which could minimize“the irrational degree of operational task sharing”.

  18. Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Commercial Motor Vehicle Operators: Recommendations of the AASM Sleep and Transportation Safety Awareness Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurubhagavatula, Indira; Sullivan, Shannon; Meoli, Amy; Patil, Susheel; Olson, Ryan; Berneking, Michael; Watson, Nathaniel F

    2017-05-15

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine Sleep and Transportation Safety Awareness Task Force responded to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and Federal Railroad Administration Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and request for public comments regarding the evaluation of safety-sensitive personnel for moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The following document represents this response. The most salient points provided in our comments are that (1) moderate-to-severe OSA is common among commercial motor vehicle operators (CMVOs) and contributes to an increased risk of crashes; (2) objective screening methods are available and preferred for identifying at-risk drivers, with the most commonly used indicator being body mass index; (3) treatment in the form of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is effective and reduces crashes; (4) CPAP is economically viable; (5) guidelines are available to assist medical examiners in determining whether CMVOs with moderate-to-severe OSA should continue to work without restrictions, with conditional certification, or be disqualified from operating commercial motor vehicles.

  19. Dissociation between spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) andWistar–Kyoto (WKY) rats in baseline performance and methylphenidate response on measures of attention, impulsivity and hyperactivity in a Visual Stimulus Position Discrimination Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.

    2009-10-08

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is a widely accepted rodent model of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and methylphenidate (MP) is a central nervous systemstimulant that has been shown to have a dose-related positive effect on attention task performance in humans with ADHD. The current study was undertaken to compare SHR to its typical control strain, Wistar-Kyoto(WKY) rats, on the performance of a Visual Stimulus Position Discrimination Task (VSPDT) as well as of the responsiveness of the two rat strains to MP treatment. The rats were initially trained on the VSPDT, in which a light cue was presented randomly at three different cue-light intervals (1 s, 300 ms and 100 ms) over one of two levers, and presses on the lever corresponding to the light cue were reinforced with a food pellet. Once rats reached stable performance, the treatment phase of the study began, during which they received daily intraperitoneal (IP) injections of saline, 2 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg, and 10 mg/kg of MP in a randomized order immediately prior to being tested on the VSPDT. Baseline performance accuracy on the VSPDT did not differ between the groups. Furthermore, a striking strain dissociation was evident in the response of the two strains to treatment; VSPDT performance was substantially disrupted by the 5 and 10 mg/kg dose in the WKY rats but only mildly in the SHR rats. Response omissions were also increased only in WKY rats. Finally, both strains had increased locomotor activity in the operant chamber following MP treatment. These findings point to an important difference in response tendency toMP in the two strains that supports a view that a critical difference between these strains may suggest neurochemical and neuroadaptive differences associated with the behavioral impairments of ADHD.

  20. Putting mind and body back together: a human-systems approach to the integration of the physical and cognitive dimensions of task design and operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, W S; Hancock, P A

    2014-01-01

    As human factors and ergonomics professionals we should be considering the total context within which the person must operate when performing a task, providing a service, or using a product. We have traditionally thought of the person as having a cognitive system and a physical system and much of our scientific literature has been myopically focused on one or the other of these systems while, in general, totally ignoring the other. However, contemporary efforts have begun to recognize the rich interactions occurring between these systems that can have a profound influence on performance and dictate overall system output. In addition, modern efforts are beginning to appreciate the many interactions between the various elements of the environment that can influence the components of the human systems. The next level of sophistication in the practice of human factors and ergonomics must begin to consider the totality of the human-system behavior and performance and must consider systems design interactions which result from these collective effects. Only then will we be able to truly optimize systems for human use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program. Task, OU 1-03 and OU 4-10 Track 2 investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trippet, W.A. II [IT Corp., (United States); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG&G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  2. Task-based detectability comparison of exponential transformation of free-response operating characteristic (EFROC) curve and channelized Hotelling observer (CHO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khobragade, P.; Fan, Jiahua; Rupcich, Franco; Crotty, Dominic J.; Gilat Schmidt, Taly

    2016-03-01

    This study quantitatively evaluated the performance of the exponential transformation of the free-response operating characteristic curve (EFROC) metric, with the Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO) as a reference. The CHO has been used for image quality assessment of reconstruction algorithms and imaging systems and often it is applied to study the signal-location-known cases. The CHO also requires a large set of images to estimate the covariance matrix. In terms of clinical applications, this assumption and requirement may be unrealistic. The newly developed location-unknown EFROC detectability metric is estimated from the confidence scores reported by a model observer. Unlike the CHO, EFROC does not require a channelization step and is a non-parametric detectability metric. There are few quantitative studies available on application of the EFROC metric, most of which are based on simulation data. This study investigated the EFROC metric using experimental CT data. A phantom with four low contrast objects: 3mm (14 HU), 5mm (7HU), 7mm (5 HU) and 10 mm (3 HU) was scanned at dose levels ranging from 25 mAs to 270 mAs and reconstructed using filtered backprojection. The area under the curve values for CHO (AUC) and EFROC (AFE) were plotted with respect to different dose levels. The number of images required to estimate the non-parametric AFE metric was calculated for varying tasks and found to be less than the number of images required for parametric CHO estimation. The AFE metric was found to be more sensitive to changes in dose than the CHO metric. This increased sensitivity and the assumption of unknown signal location may be useful for investigating and optimizing CT imaging methods. Future work is required to validate the AFE metric against human observers.

  3. Training and qualification of the auxiliaries of operation using the methodology On the Job Training (OJT) and Task Performance Evaluation (TPE); Formacion y culificacion de los auxiliares de operacion mediante la metodologia On the Job Training (OJT) y Task Performance Evaluation (TPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Casado, J.

    2015-07-01

    On the Job Training (OJT) and Task Performance Evaluation (TPE). This plan has been developed and put in practice entirely, by a group of experienced auxiliary operation that have distinguished themselves by their professionalism, knowledge of the work, technical expertise and commitment to nuclear safety. (Author)

  4. Health and Safety Plan for Operations Performed for the Environmental Restoration Program: Task, Characterization of Potential Waste Sources at Auxiliary Reactor Area-1 Operable Unit 5--07 site ARA-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, S.L.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-06-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the ERP. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  5. Health and Safety Plan for Operations Performed for the Environmental Restoration Program: Task, Characterization of Potential Waste Sources at Auxiliary Reactor Area-1 Operable Unit 5--07 site ARA-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickett, S.L.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-06-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG&G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the ERP. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  6. Task 23 - background report on subsurface environmental issues relating to natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Topical report, February 1, 1994--February 28, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    This report describes information pertaining to environmental issues, toxicity, environmental transport, and fate of alkanolamines and glycols associated with natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Waste management associated with the operations is also discussed.

  7. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations. Savannah River Site 200-S Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D. [ed.; Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; ``Just-in-Time`` precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  8. Defense Waste Processing Facility: Report of task force on options to mitigate the effect of nitrite on DWPF operations. Savannah River Site 200-S Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, D. [ed.; Marek, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    The possibility of accumulating ammonium nitrate (an explosive) as well as organic compounds in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell Vent System was recently discovered. A task force was therefore organized to examine ways to avoid this potential hazard. Of thirty-two processing/engineering options screened, the task force recommended five options, deemed to have the highest technical certainty, for detailed development and evaluation: Radiolysis of nitrite in the tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry feed in a new corrosion-resistant facility. Construction of a Late Washing Facility for precipitate washing before transfer to the DWPF; ``Just-in-Time`` precipitation; Startup Workaround by radiolysis of nitrite in the existing corrosion-resistant Pump Pit tanks; Ammonia venting and organics separation in the DWPF; and, Estimated costs and schedules are included in this report.

  9. 应急救援官兵遂行任务中的危机干预%Crisis Intervention in Operation of Tasks of Emergency Rescue Officers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷榕; 宋玉霞

    2014-01-01

    本文主要对应急救援官兵在遂行任务中的心理健康维护进行阐述,并对应急救援官兵遂行任务中心理危机干预常见心理问题进行分析,并提出了具体的实施步骤和注意事项。%This paper elaborates the maintenance of mental health when emergency rescue officers carry out tasks, analyzes the common mental problems in the psychological crisis intervention, and puts forward specific implementation steps and precautions.

  10. Delay discounting task in pigs reveals response strategies related to dopamine metabolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melotti, Luca; Thomsen, Liat Romme; Toscano, Michael J; Mendl, Michael; Held, Suzanne

    2013-08-15

    We developed a novel delay discounting task to investigate outcome impulsivity in pigs. As impulsivity can affect aggression, and might also relate to proactive and reactive coping styles, eight proactive (HR) and eight reactive (LR) pigs identified in a manual restraint test ("Backtest", after Bolhuis et al., 2003) were weaned and mixed in four pens of four unfamiliar pigs, so that each pen had two HR and two LR pigs, and aggression was scored in the 9h after mixing. In the delay discounting task, each pig chose between two levers, one always delivering a small immediate reward, the other a large delayed reward with daily increasing delays, impulsive individuals being the ones discounting the value of the large reward quicker. Two novel strategies emerged: some pigs gradually switched their preference towards the small reward ('Switchers') as predicted, but others persistently preferred the large reward until they stopped making choices ('Omitters'). Outcome impulsivity itself was unrelated to these strategies, to urinary serotonin metabolite (5-HIAA) or dopamine metabolite (HVA) levels, aggression at weaning, or coping style. However, HVA was relatively higher in Omitters than Switchers, and positively correlated with behavioural measures of indecisiveness and frustration during choosing. The delay discounting task thus revealed two response strategies that seemed to be related to the activity of the dopamine system and might indicate a difference in execution, rather than outcome, impulsivity.

  11. Tactical Tasks of Operation P latform Recognition in Situation Assessment for Antiaircraft Defending%对空防御态势分析中敌平台战术任务识别方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崇元; 李加祥

    2015-01-01

    针对传统战术任务推理方法难以处理对抗性意图存在欺骗行为的问题,通过变换态势分析人员视角,以敌方指挥员角度建立了基于作战效能最大化的单平台战术任务推理模型。模型首先根据对空防御战场态势构建了执行各战术任务的效能评价指标及其优势函数;进而将此多平台战术任务推理转化为多目标优化问题,并通过连续Hopfield神经网络优化算法对该问题进行求解。最后通过仿真实验对推理模型的可行性与有效性进行了验证。%To solve the problem of traditional tactical tasks reasoning method is difficult to deal with antagonistic intention exists the problem of cheating, from transforming the perspective of situational analysis personnel, the model of tactical tasks reasoning for operation platform based on maximum operation efficiency was built. Firstly, according to the battlefield of anti⁃aircraft defending built the effectiveness evaluation index and the effectiveness advantage function for each tactical tasks. Then, the multi⁃platform tactical tasks reasoning was translated into the multiple target optimization problem, and the Hopfield neural network algorithm was designed to solve the problem. Finally, the simulation results indicate that the reason⁃ing model is feasible and effective.

  12. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Summary of models for the implementation of solar home systems in developing countries - Part 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    This first part of a two-part report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the implementation of Solar Home systems in developing countries. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries. This summary outlines various models for the implementation of small domestic photovoltaic (PV) systems (Solar Home Systems, SHS) in developing countries. Part 1 of this two-part document discusses three generic models. The second, separate part of the document provides a number of examples demonstrating the models described. This report focuses on the implementation of SHS. However, a considerable amount of the PV market in developing countries is stated as consisting of large systems providing electricity for social services, such as light for schools, mosques, churches, communal centres, refrigeration for health centres and drinking water for communities. It is noted that there are considerable differences between the 'social market' and the 'private market' for SHS. The 'social market' generally consists of large systems but fewer in number. The guide does not cover the detailed technical aspects of a Solar Home System or the issue of recycling old batteries.

  13. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Summary of models for the implementation of solar home systems in developing countries - Part 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    This first part of a two-part report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the implementation of Solar Home systems in developing countries. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries. This summary outlines various models for the implementation of small domestic photovoltaic (PV) systems (Solar Home Systems, SHS) in developing countries. Part 1 of this two-part document discusses three generic models. The second, separate part of the document provides a number of examples demonstrating the models described. This report focuses on the implementation of SHS. However, a considerable amount of the PV market in developing countries is stated as consisting of large systems providing electricity for social services, such as light for schools, mosques, churches, communal centres, refrigeration for health centres and drinking water for communities. It is noted that there are considerable differences between the 'social market' and the 'private market' for SHS. The 'social market' generally consists of large systems but fewer in number. The guide does not cover the detailed technical aspects of a Solar Home System or the issue of recycling old batteries.

  14. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. PV for rural electrification in developing countries - A guide to capacity building requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, J.; Gunning, R. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom); Stapleton, G. [Global Sustainable Energy Solutions Pty Ltd, GSES, Ulladulla 2539 (Australia)

    2003-03-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the topic of 'capacity building' in rural electrification projects. Capacity building is defined here as the development of an organisation's or individual's core knowledge, skills and capabilities in order to build and enhance the organisation's effectiveness and sustainability. This document identifies capacity building measures that should be undertaken as an integral component of a PV-based rural electrification implementation programme. Capacity building is to be facilitated through the provision of technical support activities, training, specific technical assistance and resource networking. The assessment of existing knowledge and the identification of training needs are discussed and training needs and their implementation by governmental and commercial players is discussed. Eleven case studies complete the report.

  15. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. The role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, M. C. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Bates, J. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the role of quality management, hardware certification and accredited training in PV programmes in developing countries. The objective of this document is to provide assistance to those project developers that are interested in implementing or improving support programmes for the deployment of PV systems for rural electrification. It is to enable them to address and implement quality assurance measures, with an emphasis on management, technical and training issues and other factors that should be considered for the sustainable implementation of rural electrification programmes. It is considered important that quality also addresses the socio-economic and the socio-technical aspects of a programme concept. The authors summarise that, for a PV programme, there are three important areas of quality control to be implemented: quality management, technical standards and quality of training.

  16. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. PV for rural electrification in developing countries - Programme design, planning and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W. [Institute for Sustainable Power, Highlands Ranch, CO (United States); Oldach, R.; Wilshaw, A. [IT Power Ltd, The Manor house, Chineham (United Kingdom)

    2003-09-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the design, planning and implementation of PV programmes. The guide contains details on the preparation for PV programmes, including the assessment of needs, stakeholder consultation, social context analysis, supply options and national policy considerations. The establishment of goals, delivery modes, timelines, logistics and quality assurance are discussed. Further, the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of PV programmes is discussed, as are a number of methodologies that have been developed with the aim of improving programme design and implementation. The guide highlights issues pertinent to rural energy programmes in developing countries and leads programme administrators through the process of planning, implementing and evaluating a PV programme.

  17. Kansas State University DOE/KEURP Site Operator User Task Force. Year 3, Fourth quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.

    1994-06-28

    This program relates to demonstration use of electric-powered vehicles. KSU has two electric cars (conversion vehicles) from Soleq. Corp., and is purchasing 4 Chevy trucks for conversion. This document discusses the participating groups, program plan, events, vehicles and components, operations, and procurement.

  18. Task 9. Deployment of photovoltaic technologies: co-operation with developing countries. Summary of models for the implementation of solar home systems in developing countries - Part 2: Practical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-15

    This second part of a report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 9 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at the implementation of Solar Home Systems in developing countries. The objective of Task 9 is to increase the successful deployment of PV systems in developing countries. This summary outlines various models for the implementation of small domestic photovoltaic (PV) systems (Solar Home Systems, SHS) in developing countries. The first part of this two-part document discussed three generic models. Part 2 of the document is based on work prepared for the Renewable Energy Supply Models (RESUM) project. Examples are quoted which describe the operations of a number of companies supplying solar home systems in developing countries. These examples of practical experience provide a description of businesses, highlighting the success and failure factors of the organisations. They are only a sample of the many PV companies operating internationally and are not to be considered as a critical evaluation of the implementation models; they attempt to give the reader an idea of the realities of using the models in practice.

  19. Causal reasoning and models of cognitive tasks for naval nuclear power plant operators; Raisonnement causal et modelisation de l`activite cognitive d`operateurs de chaufferie nucleaire navale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Ferrer, P.

    1995-06-01

    In complex industrial process control, causal reasoning appears as a major component in operators` cognitive tasks. It is tightly linked to diagnosis, prediction of normal and failure states, and explanation. This work provides a detailed review of literature in causal reasoning. A synthesis is proposed as a model of causal reasoning in process control. This model integrates distinct approaches in Cognitive Science: especially qualitative physics, Bayesian networks, knowledge-based systems, and cognitive psychology. Our model defines a framework for the analysis of causal human errors in simulated naval nuclear power plant fault management. Through the methodological framework of critical incident analysis we define a classification of errors and difficulties linked to causal reasoning. This classification is based on shallow characteristics of causal reasoning. As an origin of these errors, more elementary component activities in causal reasoning are identified. The applications cover the field of functional specification for man-machine interfaces, operators support systems design as well as nuclear safety. In addition of this study, we integrate the model of causal reasoning in a model of cognitive task in process control. (authors). 106 refs., 49 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Multi-function Waste Tank Facility path forward engineering analysis -- Technical Task 3.6, Estimate of operational risk in 200 West Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.

    1995-04-28

    Project W-0236A has been proposed to provide additional waste tank storage in the 200 East and 200 West Areas. This project would construct two new waste tanks in the 200 West Area and four new tanks in the 200 East Area, and a related project (Project W-058) would construct a new cross-site line. These projects are intended to ensure sufficient space and flexibility for continued tank farm operations, including tank waste remediation and management of unforeseen contingencies. The objective of this operational risk assessment is to support determination of the adequacy of the free-volume capacity provided by Projects W-036A and W-058 and to determine related impacts. The scope of the assessment is the 200 West Area only and covers the time period from the present to the year 2005. Two different time periods were analyzed because the new cross-site tie line will not be available until 1999. The following are key insights: success of 200 West Area tank farm operations is highly correlated to the success of the cross-site transfer line and the ability of the 200 East Area to receive waste from 200 West; there is a high likelihood of a leak on a complexed single-shell tank in the next 4 years (sampling pending); there is a strong likelihood, in the next 4 years, that some combination of tank leaks, facility upsets, and cross-site line failure will require more free tank space than is currently available in Tank 241-SY-102; in the next 4 to 10 years, there is a strong likelihood that a combination of a cross-site line failure and the need to accommodate some unscheduled waste volume will require more free tank space than is presently available in Tank 241-SY-102; the inherent uncertainty in volume projections is in the range of 3 million gallons; new million-gallon tanks increase the ability to manage contingencies and unplanned events.

  1. Phase II Fort Ord Landfill Demonstration Task 8 - Refinement of In-line Instrumental Analytical Tools to Evaluate their Operational Utility and Regulatory Acceptance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, P F

    2006-04-03

    The overall objective of this project is the continued development, installation, and testing of continuous water sampling and analysis technologies for application to on-site monitoring of groundwater treatment systems and remediation sites. In a previous project, an on-line analytical system (OLAS) for multistream water sampling was installed at the Fort Ord Operable Unit 2 Groundwater Treatment System, with the objective of developing a simplified analytical method for detection of Compounds of Concern at that plant, and continuous sampling of up to twelve locations in the treatment system, from raw influent waters to treated effluent. Earlier implementations of the water sampling and processing system (Analytical Sampling and Analysis Platform, A A+RT, Milpitas, CA) depended on off-line integrators that produced paper plots of chromatograms, and sent summary tables to a host computer for archiving. We developed a basic LabVIEW (National Instruments, Inc., Austin, TX) based gas chromatography control and data acquisition system that was the foundation for further development and integration with the ASAP system. Advantages of this integration include electronic archiving of all raw chromatographic data, and a flexible programming environment to support development of improved ASAP operation and automated reporting. The initial goals of integrating the preexisting LabVIEW chromatography control system with the ASAP, and demonstration of a simplified, site-specific analytical method were successfully achieved. However, although the principal objective of this system was assembly of an analytical system that would allow plant operators an up-to-the-minute view of the plant's performance, several obstacles remained. Data reduction with the base LabVIEW system was limited to peak detection and simple tabular output, patterned after commercial chromatography integrators, with compound retention times and peak areas. Preparation of calibration curves, method

  2. Operator programs and operator processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Walters, P.

    2003-01-01

    We define a notion of program which is not a computer program but an operator program: a detailed description of actions performed and decisions taken by a human operator (computer user) performing a task to achieve a goal in a simple setting consisting of that user, one or more computers and a

  3. Operator programs and operator processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Walters, P.

    2003-01-01

    We define a notion of program which is not a computer program but an operator program: a detailed description of actions performed and decisions taken by a human operator (computer user) performing a task to achieve a goal in a simple setting consisting of that user, one or more computers and a work

  4. Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

    2002-10-31

    The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The

  5. Who multi-tasks and why? Multi-tasking ability, perceived multi-tasking ability, impulsivity, and sensation seeking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Sanbonmatsu

    Full Text Available The present study examined the relationship between personality and individual differences in multi-tasking ability. Participants enrolled at the University of Utah completed measures of multi-tasking activity, perceived multi-tasking ability, impulsivity, and sensation seeking. In addition, they performed the Operation Span in order to assess their executive control and actual multi-tasking ability. The findings indicate that the persons who are most capable of multi-tasking effectively are not the persons who are most likely to engage in multiple tasks simultaneously. To the contrary, multi-tasking activity as measured by the Media Multitasking Inventory and self-reported cell phone usage while driving were negatively correlated with actual multi-tasking ability. Multi-tasking was positively correlated with participants' perceived ability to multi-task ability which was found to be significantly inflated. Participants with a strong approach orientation and a weak avoidance orientation--high levels of impulsivity and sensation seeking--reported greater multi-tasking behavior. Finally, the findings suggest that people often engage in multi-tasking because they are less able to block out distractions and focus on a singular task. Participants with less executive control--low scorers on the Operation Span task and persons high in impulsivity--tended to report higher levels of multi-tasking activity.

  6. Analyzing opportunities for energy conservation in municipal fleet management: service delivery patterns, equipment, supply, operations, and maintenance. Information bulletin of the energy task force of the urban consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    Vehicle fleet management as a five-step process is portrayed and the multiple energy conservation opportunities within each step are examined. The five steps described are, configuration of service area and service delivery patterns, equipping the fleet, operating the fleet, maintaining the fleet, and supplying the fleet with fuel. A systems approach to decision making about municipal fleets is outlined. Management options, control techniques, and devices are suggested for each of the five steps. Reference is made to analytic tools which will assist in deliberating options at each of these steps. These tools are presented in a list. Four concise case studies of jurisdictions which are taking deliberate steps to reduce fuel use are presented. Key opportunities for fuel conservation are then summarized, followed by a selected bibliography, and listing of reference materials and additional resources.

  7. Design and operation of power systems with large amounts of wind power. Final summary report, IEA WIND Task 25, Phase two 2009 - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Robitaille, A. [Hydro Quebec, Montreal QC (Canada)] [and others

    2013-01-15

    This report provides a summary of the results from recent wind integration studies. The studies address concerns about the impact of wind power's variability and uncertainty on power system reliability and costs as well as grid reinforcement needs. Quantifiable results are presented as summary graphs: results as a MW-increase in reserve requirements, or euro/MWh increase in balancing costs, or results for capacity value of wind power. Other results are briefly summarised, together with existing experience on the issues. There is already significant experience in integrating wind power in power systems. The mitigation of wind power impacts include more flexible operational methods, incentivising flexibility in other generating plants, increasing interconnection to neighbouring regions, and application of demand-side flexibility. Electricity storage is still not as cost effective in larger power systems as other means of flexibility, but is already seeing initial applications in places with limited transmission. Electricity markets, with cross-border trade of intra-day and balancing resources and emerging ancillary services markets, are seen as promising for future large penetration levels for wind power. (orig.)

  8. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace-vehicle Design (IPAD) system. Volume 6: Implementation schedule, development costs, operational costs, benefit assessment, impact on company organization, spin-off assessment, phase 1, tasks 3 to 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrocq, C. A.; Hurley, M. J.; Dublin, M.

    1973-01-01

    A baseline implementation plan, including alternative implementation approaches for critical software elements and variants to the plan, was developed. The basic philosophy was aimed at: (1) a progressive release of capability for three major computing systems, (2) an end product that was a working tool, (3) giving participation to industry, government agencies, and universities, and (4) emphasizing the development of critical elements of the IPAD framework software. The results of these tasks indicate an IPAD first release capability 45 months after go-ahead, a five year total implementation schedule, and a total developmental cost of 2027 man-months and 1074 computer hours. Several areas of operational cost increases were identified mainly due to the impact of additional equipment needed and additional computer overhead. The benefits of an IPAD system were related mainly to potential savings in engineering man-hours, reduction of design-cycle calendar time, and indirect upgrading of product quality and performance.

  9. Assessment of Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD) Risk for 3 Different Tasks Constructing and Repairing Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) Blankets, Preparing the Dough for a Pizza, and Operating the Becton-Dickinson FACSAria Flow Cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentzler, Marc; Kline, Martin; Palmer, Andrew; Terrone, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD) risks for three different tasks using McCauley-Bell and Badiru's (1993) formula based on task, personal, and organizational factors were examined. For the Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) blanket task, the results showed that the task, personal, and organizational risks were at about the same level. The personal risk factors for this task were evaluated using a hypothetical female employee age 52. For the pizza dough task, it was shown that the organizational risk was particularly high, with task related factors also at quite dangerous levels. On the other hand, there was a very low level of personal risk factors, based on a female age 17. The flow cytometer task was assessed with three different participants, a11 of whom had quite disparate levels of personal risk, which slightly affected the overall CTD risk. This reveals how individual difference variables certainly need to be considered. The task and organizational risks for this task were rated at about the same moderate level. The overall CTD risk averaged across the three participants was .335, indicating some risk. Compruing across the tasks revealed that the pizza dough task created the greatest overall CTD risk by far (.568), with the MLI (.325) and flow cytometer task (.335) having some risk associated with them. Future research should look into different tasks for more of a comparison

  10. Cognitive Modeling for Closed-Loop Task Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As flightdeck equipment becomes more sophisticated and complex, operations become significantly more cognitively demanding. When tasks demands exceed the operator's...

  11. Functionality and operation of fluoroscopic automatic brightness control/automatic dose rate control logic in modern cardiovascular and interventional angiography systems: a report of Task Group 125 Radiography/Fluoroscopy Subcommittee, Imaging Physics Committee, Science Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Phillip; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Balter, Stephen; Fukuda, Atsushi; Goode, Allen; Hartwell, Gary; LaFrance, Terry; Nickoloff, Edward; Shepard, Jeff; Strauss, Keith

    2012-05-01

    Task Group 125 (TG 125) was charged with investigating the functionality of fluoroscopic automatic dose rate and image quality control logic in modern angiographic systems, paying specific attention to the spectral shaping filters and variations in the selected radiologic imaging parameters. The task group was also charged with describing the operational aspects of the imaging equipment for the purpose of assisting the clinical medical physicist with clinical set-up and performance evaluation. Although there are clear distinctions between the fluoroscopic operation of an angiographic system and its acquisition modes (digital cine, digital angiography, digital subtraction angiography, etc.), the scope of this work was limited to the fluoroscopic operation of the systems studied. The use of spectral shaping filters in cardiovascular and interventional angiography equipment has been shown to reduce patient dose. If the imaging control algorithm were programmed to work in conjunction with the selected spectral filter, and if the generator parameters were optimized for the selected filter, then image quality could also be improved. Although assessment of image quality was not included as part of this report, it was recognized that for fluoroscopic imaging the parameters that influence radiation output, differential absorption, and patient dose are also the same parameters that influence image quality. Therefore, this report will utilize the terminology "automatic dose rate and image quality" (ADRIQ) when describing the control logic in modern interventional angiographic systems and, where relevant, will describe the influence of controlled parameters on the subsequent image quality. A total of 22 angiography units were investigated by the task group and of these one each was chosen as representative of the equipment manufactured by GE Healthcare, Philips Medical Systems, Shimadzu Medical USA, and Siemens Medical Systems. All equipment, for which measurement data were

  12. Operation IVY. Joint Task Force 132, 1952

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    atomic bombs. b. !’e.thod (1)1 * eutrons of energy in the range from. thermal (on the order of .025 ev) to .25 ev are essentially all captured by the...reimants PAGE 11 PROGRAM 7 - Long Range Detection PAGE 12 PROGRAM 8 - Thermal Rad1ation MIeasurements PAGE 13 PROCZ 9 - Electrnoagnetic Phenomana PAGE 13... thermal , blast and radiation effects of nigh yield fission weapons. -UM=ER.;TAL P-OZGRA=S 7. Introduction. The following paragraphs present an outl Ane

  13. "Task" as Research Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhouse, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The article examines "task" as research construct as predominantly conceived in terms of task-as-workplan in the task-based learning/second language acquisition literature. It is suggested that "task" has weak construct validity and ontology in an overwhelmingly quantitative paradigm because the construct has a "split personality."…

  14. IEA Wind Task 36 Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Gregor; Cline, Joel; Frank, Helmut; Shaw, Will; Pinson, Pierre; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Kariniotakis, Georges; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Draxl, Caroline

    2017-04-01

    Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from the weather prediction side and from the usage of the forecasts. The new International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on Wind Power Forecasting tries to organise international collaboration, among national weather centres with an interest and/or large projects on wind forecast improvements (NOAA, DWD, UK MetOffice, …) and operational forecaster and forecast users. The Task is divided in three work packages: Firstly, a collaboration on the improvement of the scientific basis for the wind predictions themselves. This includes numerical weather prediction model physics, but also widely distributed information on accessible datasets for verification. Secondly, we will be aiming at an international pre-standard (an IEA Recommended Practice) on benchmarking and comparing wind power forecasts, including probabilistic forecasts aiming at industry and forecasters alike. This WP will also organise benchmarks, in cooperation with the IEA Task WakeBench. Thirdly, we will be engaging end users aiming at dissemination of the best practice in the usage of wind power predictions, especially probabilistic ones. The Operating Agent is Gregor Giebel of DTU, Co-Operating Agent is Joel Cline of the US Department of Energy. Collaboration in the task is solicited from everyone interested in the forecasting business. We will collaborate with IEA Task 31 Wakebench, which developed the Windbench benchmarking platform, which this task will use for forecasting benchmarks. The task runs for three years, 2016-2018. Main deliverables are an up-to-date list of current projects and main project results, including datasets which can be used by researchers around the world to improve their own models, an IEA Recommended Practice on performance evaluation of probabilistic forecasts, a position paper regarding the use of probabilistic forecasts

  15. Machine Tool Series. Duty Task List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This task list is intended for use in planning and/or evaluating a competency-based course to prepare machine tool, drill press, grinding machine, lathe, mill, and/or power saw operators. The listing is divided into six sections, with each one outlining the tasks required to perform the duties that have been identified for the given occupation.…

  16. Joint Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-17

    Unified Task Force (UNITAF) Somalia was formed with forces from France, Italy, Canada, Belgium, Egypt , Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and the United States...military presence, open-source intelligence ( OSINT ) may be the best immediately available information to prepare US forces to operate in a foreign...country. OSINT from radio broadcasts, newspapers, and periodicals often provide tip-offs for HUMINT and other intelligence and information collection

  17. Recalling academic tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Franklin Gno

    This study was focused on what students remembered about five middle school science tasks when they were juniors and seniors in high school. Descriptions of the five tasks were reconstructed from available artifacts and teachers' records, notes and recollections. Three of the five tasks were "authentic" in the sense that students were asked to duplicate the decisions practitioners make in the adult world. The other two tasks were more typical school tasks involving note taking and preparation for a quiz. All five tasks, however, involved use of computers. Students were interviewed to examine what and how well they recalled the tasks and what forms or patterns of recall existed. Analysis of their responses indicated that different kinds of tasks produced different levels of recall. Authentically situated tasks were remembered much better than routine school tasks. Further, authentic tasks centered on design elements were recalled better than those for which design was not as pivotal. Patterns of recall indicated that participants most often recalled the decisions they made, the scenarios of the authentically situated tasks, the consequences of their tasks and the social contexts of the classroom. Task events, in other words, appeared to form a framework upon which students constructed stories of the tasks. The more salient the events, the richer the story, the deeper and more detailed the recall of the task. Thus, authentic tasks appeared to lend themselves to creating stories better than regular school tasks and therefore such tasks were recalled better. Implications of these patterns of recall are discussed with respect to issues of school learning and assessment.

  18. Pupil responses to task requirement in goal-directed movements

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xianta

    2014-01-01

    Objectively measuring the operators’ task workload in goal-directed motor tasks such as surgical operations, is important for performance and safety. This thesis presents an approach for objectively measuring task workload in goal-directed movements using an important eye response: the pupil diameter. We demonstrate how to capture movement-related pupil size changes during motor tasks, investigate how the pupil responds to task requirement, and show that the pupil diameter can be employed a...

  19. Kokkos? Task DAG Capabilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Harold C.; Ibanez, Daniel Alejandro

    2017-09-01

    This report documents the ASC/ATDM Kokkos deliverable "Production Portable Dy- namic Task DAG Capability." This capability enables applications to create and execute a dynamic task DAG ; a collection of heterogeneous computational tasks with a directed acyclic graph (DAG) of "execute after" dependencies where tasks and their dependencies are dynamically created and destroyed as tasks execute. The Kokkos task scheduler executes the dynamic task DAG on the target execution resource; e.g. a multicore CPU, a manycore CPU such as Intel's Knights Landing (KNL), or an NVIDIA GPU. Several major technical challenges had to be addressed during development of Kokkos' Task DAG capability: (1) portability to a GPU with it's simplified hardware and micro- runtime, (2) thread-scalable memory allocation and deallocation from a bounded pool of memory, (3) thread-scalable scheduler for dynamic task DAG, (4) usability by applications.

  20. Components of competitor priming in task switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teskey, Morgan L; Masson, Michael E J

    2017-07-17

    Executing an action in response to a stimulus is thought to result in the creation of an event code that integrates stimulus and action features (Allport, 1987; Hommel in Visual Cognition 5: 183-216, 1998). When switching between tasks, competitor priming occurs if a distractor stimulus cues the retrieval of a previously established event code in which that distractor is bound to a competing task, creating a source of interference with the current task whereby the observer is encouraged to apply the competing task to the distractor. We propose a second aspect of competitor priming: the misapplication of the retrieved competing task to the target stimulus. We report two task-switching experiments in which tasks applied to picture-word compound stimuli were manipulated to create conditions in which this second aspect of competitor priming could be revealed and distinguished from other sources of task- and stimulus-based priming. A substantial increase in competitor priming was observed when subjects switched between tasks that required very different processing operations and the competing task was highly relevant to the target stimulus. These results are consistent with our claim that competitor priming can result from applying the competing task either to the distractor that cued it or to the target stimulus.

  1. Task-oriented maximally entangled states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, Pankaj; Pradhan, B, E-mail: agrawal@iopb.res.i, E-mail: bpradhan@iopb.res.i [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar, Orissa 751 005 (India)

    2010-06-11

    We introduce the notion of a task-oriented maximally entangled state (TMES). This notion depends on the task for which a quantum state is used as the resource. TMESs are the states that can be used to carry out the task maximally. This concept may be more useful than that of a general maximally entangled state in the case of a multipartite system. We illustrate this idea by giving an operational definition of maximally entangled states on the basis of communication tasks of teleportation and superdense coding. We also give examples and a procedure to obtain such TMESs for n-qubit systems.

  2. The functional neuroanatomy of multitasking: combining dual tasking with a short term memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Sabine; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Peeters, Ron; Emsell, Louise; Amant, Frederic; Sunaert, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Insight into the neural architecture of multitasking is crucial when investigating the pathophysiology of multitasking deficits in clinical populations. Presently, little is known about how the brain combines dual-tasking with a concurrent short-term memory task, despite the relevance of this mental operation in daily life and the frequency of complaints related to this process, in disease. In this study we aimed to examine how the brain responds when a memory task is added to dual-tasking. Thirty-three right-handed healthy volunteers (20 females, mean age 39.9 ± 5.8) were examined with functional brain imaging (fMRI). The paradigm consisted of two cross-modal single tasks (a visual and auditory temporal same-different task with short delay), a dual-task combining both single tasks simultaneously and a multi-task condition, combining the dual-task with an additional short-term memory task (temporal same-different visual task with long delay). Dual-tasking compared to both individual visual and auditory single tasks activated a predominantly right-sided fronto-parietal network and the cerebellum. When adding the additional short-term memory task, a larger and more bilateral frontoparietal network was recruited. We found enhanced activity during multitasking in components of the network that were already involved in dual-tasking, suggesting increased working memory demands, as well as recruitment of multitask-specific components including areas that are likely to be involved in online holding of visual stimuli in short-term memory such as occipito-temporal cortex. These results confirm concurrent neural processing of a visual short-term memory task during dual-tasking and provide evidence for an effective fMRI multitasking paradigm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An approach to elemental task learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmans, P

    1990-01-01

    In this article we deal with the automated learning of tasks by a robotic system through observation of a human operator. Particularly, we explain what is meant by a learning ability in autonomous robots and in teleoperation systems, where several operators and several machines may work in cooperation to perform tasks. We discuss different approaches to learning in these systems and outline the features of the models they are based upon. This leads us to choose an analytical model suited for tasks analysis. We then present the software architecture for our proposed approach and show the first results obtained on sample tests. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Dynamics of the central bottleneck: dual-task and task uncertainty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Sigman

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Why is the human brain fundamentally limited when attempting to execute two tasks at the same time or in close succession? Two classical paradigms, psychological refractory period (PRP and task switching, have independently approached this issue, making significant advances in our understanding of the architecture of cognition. Yet, there is an apparent contradiction between the conclusions derived from these two paradigms. The PRP paradigm, on the one hand, suggests that the simultaneous execution of two tasks is limited solely by a passive structural bottleneck in which the tasks are executed on a first-come, first-served basis. The task-switching paradigm, on the other hand, argues that switching back and forth between task configurations must be actively controlled by a central executive system (the system controlling voluntary, planned, and flexible action. Here we have explicitly designed an experiment mixing the essential ingredients of both paradigms: task uncertainty and task simultaneity. In addition to a central bottleneck, we obtain evidence for active processes of task setting (planning of the appropriate sequence of actions and task disengaging (suppression of the plan set for the first task in order to proceed with the next one. Our results clarify the chronometric relations between these central components of dual-task processing, and in particular whether they operate serially or in parallel. On this basis, we propose a hierarchical model of cognitive architecture that provides a synthesis of task-switching and PRP paradigms.

  5. Project Tasks in Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben; Hansen, Poul Erik

    1998-01-01

    Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics......Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics...

  6. Launching Complex Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kara J.; Shahan, Emily C.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Cobb, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics lessons can take a variety of formats. In this article, the authors discuss lessons organized around complex mathematical tasks. These lessons usually unfold in three phases. First, the task is introduced to students. Second, students work on solving the task. Third, the teacher "orchestrates" a concluding whole-class discussion in…

  7. Task assignment and coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching fr

  8. Predictability of Operant Behavior of Rats by Prefrontal Multiple Unit Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Sei-Etsu; Akema, Tatsuo; Izaki, Yoshinori

    To investigate the possibility of a brain computer interface (BCI) constructed using activities of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), we analyzed PFC multiple unit activities (MUAs) during a delayed reinforcement (DRF) lever press task in rats. In the DRF task, each trial consisted of two lever press responses (R1, R2): R1 as the trial initiation, R2 as a pre-conditioned response to a stimulus (buzzer) for a reward. Between R1 and the buzzer, rats were required to inhibit the lever press (waiting phase). The trial was evaluated as incorrect if rats pressed the lever during the waiting phase. Results show that the mean firing rate (MFR) was significantly lower around the time of R1 compared with the pre-trial time in correct trials, although no significant changes were found in incorrect trials. From a neuroengineering perspective, the MFR of each single trial was calculated. Most correct trials showed decreasing MFR around the time of R1. The PFC MUA might be useful for BCI.

  9. Development of flight experiment task requirements. Volume 2: Technical Report. Part 2: Appendix H: Tasks-skills data series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatterick, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The data sheets presented contain the results of the task analysis portion of the study to identify skill requirements of space shuttle crew personnel. A comprehensive data base is provided of crew functions, operating environments, task dependencies, and task-skills applicable to a representative cross section of earth orbital research experiments.

  10. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte Process Development Unit: Modification, operation, and support studies. Task 2.2: Process variable Scan Run E-8 and in-situ activation with syngas Run E-9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-28

    The LPMEOH process was conceived and patented by Chem Systems Inc. in 1975. Initial research and studies on the process focused on two distinct modes of operation. The first was a liquid fluidized mode with relatively large catalyst pellets suspended in a fluidizing liquid, and the second was an entrained (slurry) mode with fine catalyst particles slurried in an inert liquid. The development of both operating modes progressed in parallel from bench scale reactors, through an intermediate scale lab PDU, and then to the LaPorte PDU in 1984. The slurry mode of operation was ultimately chosen as the operating mode of choice due to its superior performance.

  11. Malware Task Identification: A Data Driven Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Eric; Buto, Casey; Shakarian, Paulo; Lebiere, Christian; Bennati, Stefano; THOMSON, ROBERT; Jaenisch, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the tasks a given piece of malware was designed to perform (e.g. logging keystrokes, recording video, establishing remote access, etc.) is a difficult and time-consuming operation that is largely human-driven in practice. In this paper, we present an automated method to identify malware tasks. Using two different malware collections, we explore various circumstances for each - including cases where the training data differs significantly from test; where the malware being evaluate...

  12. A Framework for the Cognitive Task Analysis in Systems Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    he present rapid development of advanced information technology and its use for support of operators of complex technical systems are changing the content of task analysis towards the analysis of mental activities in decision making. Automation removes the humans from routine tasks, and operators...

  13. Speaking Tasks Be Designed to Improve Different Aspects of Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于莹

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate how can speaking tasks be designed to improve different aspects of speaking.The author will first analyze three different aspects and introduce four criteria which can use to define the meaning of task.The result about whether the learner achieves the goal of the task is very important since evaluation of the outcome is the vital way to judge a task is successful or not.After getting to know the definition of task,communicative effectiveness will be analyzed from the angle of its two dimensions.The level of communicative effectiveness can decide the outcome of learner production in the speaking task.Task implementation cannot be ignored in the research of task designing since the feedback from it would enlighten the operation of task design.

  14. What Task Designers Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Describes a research project that is concerned with the design procedures followed by those engaged in designing pedagogic tasks for use in classrooms. Focuses on the part of the project that involves actual observation of designers in the process of developing one specific task for class use. Findings are presented under three headers: control…

  15. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks, is fragme......There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, and recommendations, and supporting exploratory search to sensemaking and analytics, UI and UX design pose an overconstrained challenge. How do we know that our approach is any good? Supporting complex search task requires new collaborations across the whole field of IR, and the proposed workshop will bring together...

  16. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo;

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus in the field of IR that search is complex in many use cases and applications, both on the Web and in domain specific collections, and both professionally and in our daily life. Yet our understanding of complex search tasks, in comparison to simple look up tasks......, is fragmented at best. The workshop addressed the many open research questions: What are the obvious use cases and applications of complex search? What are essential features of work tasks and search tasks to take into account? And how do these evolve over time? With a multitude of information, varying from...... introductory to specialized, and from authoritative to speculative or opinionated, when to show what sources of information? How does the information seeking process evolve and what are relevant differences between different stages? With complex task and search process management, blending searching, browsing...

  17. Hierarchical Task Planning for Multiarm Robot with Multiconstraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiarm systems become the trends of space robots, for the on-orbit servicing missions are becoming more complex and various. A hierarchical task planning method with multiconstraint for multiarm space robot is presented in this paper. The process of task planning is separated into two hierarchies: mission profile analysis and task node planning. In mission profile analysis, several kinds of primitive tasks and operators are defined. Then, a complex task can be decomposed into a sequence of primitive tasks by using hierarchical task network (HTN with those primitive tasks and operators. In task node planning, A⁎ algorithm is improved to adapt the continuous motion of manipulator. Then, some of the primitive tasks which cannot be executed directly because of constraints are further decomposed into several task nodes by using improved A⁎ algorithm. Finally, manipulators execute the task by moving from one node to another with a simple path plan algorithm. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed task planning method are verified by simulation.

  18. Task-baseret kommunikativ sprogundervisning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Svendsen

    2015-01-01

    Definition af task-baseret sprogundervisning, kriterier for task. Forskning i Second Language Acquisition med brug af task, tilrettelæggelse af task-baseret kommunikativ undervisning. Begrænsninger i og perspektiver for videreudvikling af task-baseret sprogundervising-......Definition af task-baseret sprogundervisning, kriterier for task. Forskning i Second Language Acquisition med brug af task, tilrettelæggelse af task-baseret kommunikativ undervisning. Begrænsninger i og perspektiver for videreudvikling af task-baseret sprogundervising-...

  19. Tractor Operation and Daily Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fore, J. M.; And Others

    Written for the tractor operator, the manual describes, with the aid of colored illustrations and diagrams, the tasks involved in the proper operation and daily maintenance of tractors. It offers explanations for the desirability of the various servicing and adjustment operations, as well as guidelines for tractor operation and safety. The…

  20. Learning redundant motor tasks with and without overlapping dimensions: facilitation and interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Rajiv; Wieser, Jon; Mosier, Kristine M; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Scheidt, Robert A

    2014-06-11

    Prior learning of a motor skill creates motor memories that can facilitate or interfere with learning of new, but related, motor skills. One hypothesis of motor learning posits that for a sensorimotor task with redundant degrees of freedom, the nervous system learns the geometric structure of the task and improves performance by selectively operating within that task space. We tested this hypothesis by examining if transfer of learning between two tasks depends on shared dimensionality between their respective task spaces. Human participants wore a data glove and learned to manipulate a computer cursor by moving their fingers. Separate groups of participants learned two tasks: a prior task that was unique to each group and a criterion task that was common to all groups. We manipulated the mapping between finger motions and cursor positions in the prior task to define task spaces that either shared or did not share the task space dimensions (x-y axes) of the criterion task. We found that if the prior task shared task dimensions with the criterion task, there was an initial facilitation in criterion task performance. However, if the prior task did not share task dimensions with the criterion task, there was prolonged interference in learning the criterion task due to participants finding inefficient task solutions. These results show that the nervous system learns the task space through practice, and that the degree of shared task space dimensionality influences the extent to which prior experience transfers to subsequent learning of related motor skills.

  1. Energy Efficient Task Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadottir, Asta; Ardkapan, Siamak Rahimi; Johnsen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this work is to develop a task light for office lighting that fulfils the minimum requirements of the European standard EN12464 - 1 : Light and lighting – Lighting of work places, Part 1: Indoor workplaces and the Danish standard DS 700 : Lys og belysning I arbejdsrum , or more...... specifically the requirements that apply to the work area and the immediate surrounding area. By providing a task light that fulfils the requirements for task lighting and the immediate surrounding area, the general lighting only needs to provide the illuminance levels required for background lighting...... and thereby a reduction in installed power for general lighting of about 40 % compared to the way illuminance levels are designed in an office environment in Denmark today. This lighting strategy is useful when the placement of the task area is not defined in the space before the lighting is design ed...

  2. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    Civil servants conduct the work which makes welfare states functions on an everyday bases: Police men police, school teachers teach, and tax inspectors inspect. Focus in this paper is on the core tasks of tax inspectors. The paper argues that their core task of securing the collection of revenue...... has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...

  3. The neurodynamics underlying attentional control in set shifting tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemme, Anja; Deco, Gustavo; Busch, Astrid

    2007-09-01

    In this work we address key phenomena observed with classical set shifting tasks as the "Wisconsin Card Sorting Test" or the "Stroop" task: Different types of errors and increased response times reflecting decreased attention. A component of major importance in these tasks is referred to as the "attentional control" thought to be implemented by the prefrontal cortex which acts primarily by an amplification of task relevant information. This mode of operation is illustrated by a neurodynamical model developed for a new kind of set shifting experiment: The Wisconsin-Delayed-Match-to-Sample task combines uninstructed shifts as investigated in Wisconsin-like tasks with a Delayed-Match-to-Sample paradigm. These newly developed WDMS experiments in conjunction with the neurodynamical simulations are able to explain the reason for decreased attention in set shifting experiments as well the different consequences of decreased attention in tasks requiring bivalent yes/no responses compared to tasks requiring multivalent responses.

  4. 4-D COMMON OPERATIONAL PICTURE (COP) FOR MISSION ASSURANCE (4D COP) Task Order 0001: Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Autonomy Collaboration in Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR), Electronic Warfare (EW)/Cyber and Combat Identification (CID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-27

    distribution is unlimited. Action Plan Triggering Question 85 3. Structured Dialogic Design 2 Workshop Plan 86 Solution Domains, Portfolios ...and provided the opportunity for feedback and alignment within the AFRL organization. This developmental pilot workshop covered: • SDD2 workshop...technology (S&T) program guided by feedback from operational experience and evolving mission requirements. • The Undersecretary of Defense for

  5. Task Switching in a Hierarchical Task Structure: Evidence for the Fragility of the Task Repetition Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Mei-Ching; Ruthruff, Eric

    2004-01-01

    This study examined how task switching is affected by hierarchical task organization. Traditional task-switching studies, which use a constant temporal and spatial distance between each task element (defined as a stimulus requiring a response), promote a flat task structure. Using this approach, Experiment 1 revealed a large switch cost of 238 ms.…

  6. 78 FR 16757 - First Meeting: RTCA Tactical Operations Committee (TOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration First Meeting: RTCA Tactical Operations Committee (TOC) AGENCY: Federal... Discussion Committee Operations FAA Taskings Discussion FAA Task Groups Discussion Anticipated Issues for...

  7. The development of a task analysis method applicable to the tasks of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wan Chul; Park, Ji Soo; Baek, Dong Hyeon; Ham, Dong Han; Kim, Huhn [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    While task analysis is one of the essential processes for human factors studies, traditional methods reveal weaknesses in dealing with the cognitive aspects, which become more critical in modern complex system. This report proposes a cognitive task analysis (CTA) method for identifying cognitive requirements of operators' tasks in nuclear power plants. The proposed CTA method is characterized by the information-oriented concept and procedure-based approach. The task prescription identifies the information requirements and trace the information flow to reveal the cognitive organization of task procedure with emphasis to the relations among the information requirements. The cognitive requirements are then analyzed in terms of cognitive span of task information, cognitive envelope and working memory relief point of t procedures, and working memory load. The proposed method is relatively simple and, possibly being incorporated in a full task analysis scheme, directly applicable to the design/evaluation of human-machine interfaces and operating procedures. A prototype of a computerized support system is developed for supporting the practicality of the proposed method. (Author) 104 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs.

  8. The development of a task analysis method applicable to the tasks of nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wan Chul; Park, Ji Soo; Baek, Dong Hyeon; Ham, Dong Han; Kim, Huhn [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    While task analysis is one of the essential processes for human factors studies, traditional methods reveal weaknesses in dealing with the cognitive aspects, which become more critical in modern complex system. This report proposes a cognitive task analysis (CTA) method for identifying cognitive requirements of operators' tasks in nuclear power plants. The proposed CTA method is characterized by the information-oriented concept and procedure-based approach. The task prescription identifies the information requirements and trace the information flow to reveal the cognitive organization of task procedure with emphasis to the relations among the information requirements. The cognitive requirements are then analyzed in terms of cognitive span of task information, cognitive envelope and working memory relief point of t procedures, and working memory load. The proposed method is relatively simple and, possibly being incorporated in a full task analysis scheme, directly applicable to the design/evaluation of human-machine interfaces and operating procedures. A prototype of a computerized support system is developed for supporting the practicality of the proposed method. (Author) 104 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs.

  9. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer

  10. Board Task Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minichilli, Alessandro; Zattoni, Alessandro; Nielsen, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses recent calls to narrow the micro–macro gap in management research (Bamberger, 2008), by incorporating a macro-level context variable (country) in exploring micro-level determinants of board effectiveness. Following the integrated model proposed by Forbes and Milliken (1999), we...... identify three board processes as micro-level determinants of board effectiveness. Specifically, we focus on effort norms, cognitive conflicts and the use of knowledge and skills as determinants of board control and advisory task performance. Further, we consider how two different institutional settings...... influence board tasks, and how the context moderates the relationship between processes and tasks. Our hypotheses are tested on a survey-based dataset of 535 medium-sized and large industrial firms in Italy and Norway, which are considered to substantially differ along legal and cultural dimensions...

  11. Goal orientation, perceived task outcome and task demands in mathematics tasks: effects on students' attitude in actual task settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegers, Gerard; van Putten, Cornelis M; de Brabander, Cornelis J

    2002-09-01

    In earlier studies, it has been found that students' domain-specific cognitions and personal learning goals (goal orientation) influence task-specific appraisals of actual learning tasks. The relations between domain-specific and task-specific variables have been specified in the model of adaptive learning. In this study, additional influences, i.e., perceived task outcome on a former occasion and variations in task demands, were investigated. The purpose of this study was to identify personality and situational variables that mediate students' attitude when confronted with a mathematics task. Students worked on a mathematics task in two subsequent sessions. Effects of perceived task outcome at the first session on students' attitude at the second session were investigated. In addition, we investigated how differences in task demands influenced students' attitude. Variations in task demands were provoked by different conditions in task-instruction. In one condition, students were told that the result on the test would add to their mark on mathematics. This outcome orienting condition was contrasted with a task-orienting condition where students were told that the results on the test would not be used to give individual grades. Participants were sixth grade students (N = 345; aged 11-12 years) from 14 primary schools. Multivariate and univariate analyses of (co)variance were applied to the data. Independent variables were goal orientation, task demands, and perceived task outcome, with task-specific variables (estimated competence for the task, task attraction, task relevance, and willingness to invest effort) as the dependent variables. The results showed that previous perceived task outcome had a substantial impact on students' attitude. Additional but smaller effects were found for variation in task demands. Furthermore, effects of previous perceived task outcome and task demands were related to goal orientation. The resulting pattern confirmed that, in general

  12. Algebra task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are opportunities for problem-solving, patterning, algebraic graphing, equations and determining averages. The combined task & drill sheets

  13. Algebra task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 3-5, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are opportunities for problem-solving, patterning, algebraic graphing, equations and determining averages. The combined task & drill sheets

  14. Task-Based Learning: The Interaction between Tasks and Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jacky

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between tasks and learners in task-based learning. Findings suggest that manipulation of task characteristics and conditions may not achieve the intended pedagogic outcomes, and that new ways are needed to focus learners' attention of form without sacrificing the meaning-driven principles of task-based learning.…

  15. Bypassing the central bottleneck after single-task practice in the psychological refractory period paradigm: evidence for task automatization and greedy resource recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquestiaux, François; Laguë-Beauvais, Maude; Ruthruff, Eric; Bherer, Louis

    2008-10-01

    In this research, the controversial issue of whether the central bottleneck can be bypassed through task automatization was investigated. To examine this issue, participants received six single-task practice sessions with an auditory-vocal task (low vs. high pitch). We then assessed dual-task performance using the analytically tractable psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm, in which the highly practiced auditory-vocal task was presented as Task 2, along with an unpracticed visual-manual Task 1. The results provide evidence of bottleneck bypass for virtually all the participants (17 out of 20). Several converging tests suggest that the bottleneck reemerged, however, in a follow-up experiment with tasks presented in the opposite order (auditory-vocal Task 1 and visual-manual Task 2). One possible explanation is that tasks greedily recruit central resources when available, even though they can operate without central resources when unavailable.

  16. Community hoarding task forces: a comparative case study of five task forces in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratiotis, Christiana

    2013-05-01

    During the past decade, many community task forces have formed to address hoarding problems that come to public attention. Such task forces provide a societal-level intervention to assist people with the most severe cases of hoarding, who do not voluntarily seek or want help for their hoarding behaviour. This qualitative study of five U.S. hoarding task forces included sites selected for their diversity of purpose, approaches to hoarding intervention and community geography, composition and resources. Data were collected during the period of September 2007-March 2008. The case study methodology used multiple forms of data, including semi-structured interviews, analysis of documents, small group interviews and investigator observation. This study captured the perspectives of public and private sector service providers such as mental health, housing, social service, public health agencies and community enforcement organisations (fire, police, legal, animal control) to examine how task forces organise and operate and the emerging practice and policy changes. Study findings suggest that structural factors (e.g. leadership, purpose, funding and membership) impact hoarding task force viability, that participation on a task force influences practice and policy decisions about hoarding, and that social work can expand its role in task force leadership. Task forces may be a mechanism for improving community policies about hoarding and mechanisms for addressing other social problems across multiple sectors.

  17. A Daunting Task Still

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHIPING

    2010-01-01

    @@ Despite steady economic growth for three decades, China is still a developing country facing daunting poverty alleviation tasks. According to the poverty line of 1,196 yuan ($176) per capita net income in a year set in March 2009, the country still has a poverty population of more than 40 million, mainly living in rural areas.

  18. Task 1 quarternary tectonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    Activities on the task of quarternary tectonics for the Yucca Mountain Site investigations are described. Technical topics include: A preliminary reveiw of Bare Mountain Trench; A preliminary detailed lineament map of the Southwestern part of the proposed repository; A discussion on the 1994 Double Spring Flat, Nevada earthquake; and evidence for temporal clustering.

  19. Reverse control for humanoid robot task recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hak, Sovannara; Mansard, Nicolas; Stasse, Olivier; Laumond, Jean Paul

    2012-12-01

    Efficient methods to perform motion recognition have been developed using statistical tools. Those methods rely on primitive learning in a suitable space, for example, the latent space of the joint angle and/or adequate task spaces. Learned primitives are often sequential: A motion is segmented according to the time axis. When working with a humanoid robot, a motion can be decomposed into parallel subtasks. For example, in a waiter scenario, the robot has to keep some plates horizontal with one of its arms while placing a plate on the table with its free hand. Recognition can thus not be limited to one task per consecutive segment of time. The method presented in this paper takes advantage of the knowledge of what tasks the robot is able to do and how the motion is generated from this set of known controllers, to perform a reverse engineering of an observed motion. This analysis is intended to recognize parallel tasks that have been used to generate a motion. The method relies on the task-function formalism and the projection operation into the null space of a task to decouple the controllers. The approach is successfully applied on a real robot to disambiguate motion in different scenarios where two motions look similar but have different purposes.

  20. WLCG Operations portal demo tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This is a navigation through http://wlcg-ops.web.cern.ch/ the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) Operations' portal. In this portal you will find documentation and information about WLCG Operation activities for: System Administrators at the WLCG sites LHC Experiments Operation coordination people, including Task Forces and Working Groups

  1. Can tasks be inherently boring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, Evan

    2013-12-01

    Kurzban et al. argue that the experiences of "effort," "boredom," and "fatigue" are indications that the costs of a task outweigh its benefits. Reducing the costs of tasks to "opportunity costs" has the effect of rendering tasks costless and of denying that they can be inherently boring or tedious, something that "vigilance tasks" were intentionally designed to be.

  2. Engineering task plan for rotary mode core sample truck calibration procedure support engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-06-04

    This Engineering Task Plan defines the tasks associated with providing an overview, with respect to the Authorization Basis and PHMC procedures, as applicable, of the calibration documentation for operational equipment for which Characterization Engineering has calibration responsibility.

  3. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Acquire Express-A3 SPT 100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 deg E and 11 deg W, respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  4. Performing Task Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjaer, Bente; Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    . Here cross-professional coordination of work was done by scheduled communication twice a day. When we proposed a way for further integration of tasks through an all-inclusive team organization, we were met with resistance. We use the study to discuss whether relational coordination theory is able to do......In the paper, we deal with how to organize work for cross-professional knowledge sharing. We do so inspired by relational coordination theory, which is affiliated with positive organizational scholarship. Relational coordination theory is constituted by a combination of relationships marked...... away with differences regarding task definitions and working conditions as well as professional knowledge hierarchies and responsibilities for parts and wholes....

  5. Features or tasks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon

    In this paper for the Workshop on Human-computer interaction and e-learning, NordiCHI 2002, the author argues that in developing innovative E-learning systems, especially if constructivist pedagogy is to be applied, it will be useful to model the user interface on the often complex tasks...... that the user has to perform rather than just focusing on technical features (and adapting system use to them)....

  6. Gap Task Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  7. Mobile Thread Task Manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Estlin, Tara A.; Bornstein, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    The Mobile Thread Task Manager (MTTM) is being applied to parallelizing existing flight software to understand the benefits and to develop new techniques and architectural concepts for adapting software to multicore architectures. It allocates and load-balances tasks for a group of threads that migrate across processors to improve cache performance. In order to balance-load across threads, the MTTM augments a basic map-reduce strategy to draw jobs from a global queue. In a multicore processor, memory may be "homed" to the cache of a specific processor and must be accessed from that processor. The MTTB architecture wraps access to data with thread management to move threads to the home processor for that data so that the computation follows the data in an attempt to avoid L2 cache misses. Cache homing is also handled by a memory manager that translates identifiers to processor IDs where the data will be homed (according to rules defined by the user). The user can also specify the number of threads and processors separately, which is important for tuning performance for different patterns of computation and memory access. MTTM efficiently processes tasks in parallel on a multiprocessor computer. It also provides an interface to make it easier to adapt existing software to a multiprocessor environment.

  8. Task analysis of laparoscopic camera control schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R Darin; Munaco, Anthony J; Reisner, Luke A; Klein, Michael D; Composto, Anthony M; Pandya, Abhilash K; King, Brady W

    2016-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgeries rely on laparoscopic camera views to guide the procedure. Traditionally, an expert surgical assistant operates the camera. In some cases, a robotic system is used to help position the camera, but the surgeon is required to direct all movements of the system. Some prior research has focused on developing automated robotic camera control systems, but that work has been limited to rudimentary control schemes due to a lack of understanding of how the camera should be moved for different surgical tasks. This research used task analysis with a sample of eight expert surgeons to discover and document several salient methods of camera control and their related task contexts. Desired camera placements and behaviours were established for two common surgical subtasks (suturing and knot tying). The results can be used to develop better robotic control algorithms that will be more responsive to surgeons' needs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Towards a new metamodel for the Task Flow Model of the Discovery Method

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-y-Fernandez, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents our proposal for the evolution of the metamodel for the Task Algebra in the Task Flow model for the Discovery Method. The original Task Algebra is based on simple and compound tasks structured using operators such as sequence, selection, and parallel composition. Recursion and encapsulation were also considered. We propose additional characteristics to improve the capabilities of the metamodel to represent accurately the Task Flow Model.

  10. Multi-task connectivity reveals flexible hubs for adaptive task control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael W.; Reynolds, Jeremy R.; Power, Jonathan D.; Repovs, Grega; Anticevic, Alan; Braver, Todd S.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive evidence suggests the human ability to adaptively implement a wide variety of tasks is preferentially due to the operation of a fronto-parietal brain network. We hypothesized that this network’s adaptability is made possible by ‘flexible hubs’ – brain regions that rapidly update their pattern of global functional connectivity according to task demands. We utilized recent advances in characterizing brain network organization and dynamics to identify mechanisms consistent with the flexible hub theory. We found that the fronto-parietal network’s brain-wide functional connectivity pattern shifted more than other networks’ across a variety of task states, and that these connectivity patterns could be used to identify the current task. Further, these patterns were consistent across practiced and novel tasks, suggesting reuse of flexible hub connectivity patterns facilitates adaptive (novel) task performance. Together, these findings support a central role for fronto-parietal flexible hubs in cognitive control and adaptive implementation of task demands generally. PMID:23892552

  11. Hysteresis in Mental Workload and Task Performance: The Influence of Demand Transitions and Task Prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Reinier J; Sawyer, Ben D; van Egmond, René; de Ridder, Huib; Hancock, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    We examine how transitions in task demand are manifested in mental workload and performance in a dual-task setting. Hysteresis has been defined as the ongoing influence of demand levels prior to a demand transition. Authors of previous studies predominantly examined hysteretic effects in terms of performance. However, little is known about the temporal development of hysteresis in mental workload. A simulated driving task was combined with an auditory memory task. Participants were instructed to prioritize driving or to prioritize both tasks equally. Three experimental conditions with low, high, and low task demands were constructed by manipulating the frequency of lane changing. Multiple measures of subjective mental workload were taken during experimental conditions. Contrary to our prediction, no hysteretic effects were found after the high- to low-demand transition. However, a hysteretic effect in mental workload was found within the high-demand condition, which degraded toward the end of the high condition. Priority instructions were not reflected in performance. Online assessment of both performance and mental workload demonstrates the transient nature of hysteretic effects. An explanation for the observed hysteretic effect in mental workload is offered in terms of effort regulation. An informed arrival at the scene is important in safety operations, but peaks in mental workload should be avoided to prevent buildup of fatigue. Therefore, communication technologies should incorporate the historical profile of task demand. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  12. Improving efficiency of a global barrier operation in a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-10-04

    Performing a global barrier operation in a parallel computer that includes compute nodes coupled for data communications, where each compute node executes tasks, with one task on each compute node designated as a master task, including: for each task on each compute node until all master tasks have joined a global barrier: determining whether the task is a master task; if the task is not a master task, joining a single local barrier; if the task is a master task, joining the global barrier and the single local barrier only after all other tasks on the compute node have joined the single local barrier.

  13. Likelihood alarm displays. [for human operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Robert D.; Kantowitz, Barry H.; Kantowitz, Susan C.

    1988-01-01

    In a likelihood alarm display (LAD) information about event likelihood is computed by an automated monitoring system and encoded into an alerting signal for the human operator. Operator performance within a dual-task paradigm was evaluated with two LADs: a color-coded visual alarm and a linguistically coded synthetic speech alarm. The operator's primary task was one of tracking; the secondary task was to monitor a four-element numerical display and determine whether the data arose from a 'signal' or 'no-signal' condition. A simulated 'intelligent' monitoring system alerted the operator to the likelihood of a signal. The results indicated that (1) automated monitoring systems can improve performance on primary and secondary tasks; (2) LADs can improve the allocation of attention among tasks and provide information integrated into operator decisions; and (3) LADs do not necessarily add to the operator's attentional load.

  14. Heimdall System for MSSS Sensor Tasking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, A.; Jones, B.; Herz, E.; George, D.; Axelrad, P.; Gehly, S.

    In Norse Mythology, Heimdall uses his foreknowledge and keen eyesight to keep watch for disaster from his home near the Rainbow Bridge. Orbit Logic and the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research (CCAR) at the University of Colorado (CU) have developed the Heimdall System to schedule observations of known and uncharacterized objects and search for new objects from the Maui Space Surveillance Site. Heimdall addresses the current need for automated and optimized SSA sensor tasking driven by factors associated with improved space object catalog maintenance. Orbit Logic and CU developed an initial baseline prototype SSA sensor tasking capability for select sensors at the Maui Space Surveillance Site (MSSS) using STK and STK Scheduler, and then added a new Track Prioritization Component for FiSST-inspired computations for predicted Information Gain and Probability of Detection, and a new SSA-specific Figure-of-Merit (FOM) for optimized SSA sensor tasking. While the baseline prototype addresses automation and some of the multi-sensor tasking optimization, the SSA-improved prototype addresses all of the key elements required for improved tasking leading to enhanced object catalog maintenance. The Heimdall proof-of-concept was demonstrated for MSSS SSA sensor tasking for a 24 hour period to attempt observations of all operational satellites in the unclassified NORAD catalog, observe a small set of high priority GEO targets every 30 minutes, make a sky survey of the GEO belt region accessible to MSSS sensors, and observe particular GEO regions that have a high probability of finding new objects with any excess sensor time. This Heimdall prototype software paves the way for further R&D that will integrate this technology into the MSSS systems for operational scheduling, improve the software's scalability, and further tune and enhance schedule optimization. The Heimdall software for SSA sensor tasking provides greatly improved performance over manual tasking, improved

  15. Task Dominance Determines Backward Inhibition in Task Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Jost

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Switching between tasks is assumed to be accompanied by inhibiting currently irrelevant, but competing tasks. A dominant task that strongly interferes with performing a weaker task may receive especially strong inhibition. We tested this prediction by letting participants switch among three tasks that differ in dominance: a location discrimination task with strong stimulus–response bindings (responding with left-hand and right-hand button presses to stimuli presented left or right to the fixation cross was combined with a color/pattern and a shape discrimination task, for which stimulus–response mappings were arbitrary (e.g., left-hand button press mapped to a red stimulus. Across three experiments, the dominance of the location task was documented by faster and more accurate responses than in the other tasks. This even held for incompatible stimulus–response mappings (i.e., right-hand response to a left-presented stimulus and vice versa, indicating that set-level compatibility (i.e., “dimension overlap” was sufficient for making this location task dominant. As a behavioral marker for backward inhibition, we utilized n-2 repetition costs that are defined by higher reaction times for a switch back to a just abandoned and thus just inhibited task (ABA sequence than for a switch to a less recently inhibited task (CBA, n-2 non-repetition. Reliable n-2 task repetition costs were obtained for all three tasks. Importantly, these costs were largest for the location task, suggesting that inhibition indeed was stronger for the dominant task. This finding adds to other evidence that the amount of inhibition is adjusted in a context-sensitive way.

  16. Cohering power of quantum operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Kaifeng, E-mail: bkf@zju.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Kumar, Asutosh, E-mail: asukumar@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Zhang, Lin, E-mail: linyz@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Mathematics, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wu, Junde, E-mail: wjd@zju.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2017-05-18

    Highlights: • Quantum coherence. • Cohering power: production of quantum coherence by quantum operations. • Study of cohering power and generalized cohering power, and their comparison for differentmeasures of quantum coherence. • Operational interpretation of cohering power. • Bound on cohering power of a generic quantum operation. - Abstract: Quantum coherence and entanglement, which play a crucial role in quantum information processing tasks, are usually fragile under decoherence. Therefore, the production of quantum coherence by quantum operations is important to preserve quantum correlations including entanglement. In this paper, we study cohering power–the ability of quantum operations to produce coherence. First, we provide an operational interpretation of cohering power. Then, we decompose a generic quantum operation into three basic operations, namely, unitary, appending and dismissal operations, and show that the cohering power of any quantum operation is upper bounded by the corresponding unitary operation. Furthermore, we compare cohering power and generalized cohering power of quantum operations for different measures of coherence.

  17. Calorimetry Task Force Report

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullin, Salavat; Banerjee, Sunanda; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Bhatti, Anwar; Chlebana, Frank; Cossutti, Fabio; Hirschauer, James; Ivanchenko, V; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Kunori, Shuichi; Kroeger, Rob; Liu, Yanwen; Moeller, Anthony; Paulini, Manfred; Piperov, Stefan; Rahmat, Rahmat; Rovelli, Chiara; Safronov, Grigory; Sharma, Seema; Spiropulu, Maria; Yetkin, Taylan

    2010-01-01

    In this note we summarize the progress made by the calorimeter simulation task force (CaloTF) over the past year. The CaloTF was established in February 2008 in order to understand and reconcile the discrepancies observed between the CMS calorimetry simulation and test beam data recorded during 2004 and 2006. The simulation has been significantly improved by using a newer version of Geant4 and an improved physics list for the full CMS detector simulation. Simulation times have been reduced by introducing flexible parameterizations to describe showering in the calorimeter (using a Gflash-like approach) which have been tuned to the test beam data.

  18. Quarternary tectonics, Task 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J.W.

    1993-09-30

    Activities conducted for the evaluation of the geology and seismotectonics stability of Yucca Mountain as a potential site for the underground disposal of high-level radioactive wastes continued. Tasks concerned with quaternary tectonics include: scheduling of photography of Little Skull Mountain area; the collection and dating of rock varnish samples from the 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake area for carbon 14 AMS and cation-ratio analysis; collection of samples for thermoluminescence dating from the 1932 Cedar Mountain earthquake area; mapping of the northern area of Crater Flat; and surveying of the May 17, 1993 Eureka the Valley earthquake area.

  19. Cask fleet operations study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Waste Management the responsibility for disposing of high-level waste and spent fuel. A significant part of that responsibility involves transporting nuclear waste materials within the federal waste management system; that is, from the waste generator to the repository. The lead responsibility for transportation operations has been assigned to Oak Ridge Operations, with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing technical support through the Transportation Operations Support Task Group. One of the ORNL support activities involves assessing what facilities, equipment and services are required to assure that an acceptable, cost-effective and safe transportation operations system can be designed, operated and maintained. This study reviews, surveys and assesses the experience of Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) in operating a fleet of spent-fuel shipping casks to aid in developing the spent-fuel transportation system.

  20. Operations management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandli, A. E.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Kelly, C. M.; Mccandless, W.; Rue, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of an operations management system is to provide an orderly and efficient method to operate and maintain aerospace vehicles. Concepts are described for an operations management system and the key technologies are highlighted which will be required if this capability is brought to fruition. Without this automation and decision aiding capability, the growing complexity of avionics will result in an unmanageable workload for the operator, ultimately threatening mission success or survivability of the aircraft or space system. The key technologies include expert system application to operational tasks such as replanning, equipment diagnostics and checkout, global system management, and advanced man machine interfaces. The economical development of operations management systems, which are largely software, will require advancements in other technological areas such as software engineering and computer hardware.

  1. Novice supervisors' tasks and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Mathiesen, Birgit Bork

    2012-01-01

    were confronted with complicated jobs, e.g., group, internal and interdisciplinary supervision, but were not prepared, i.e. trained, prior to these tasks. These findings imply that more training is needed for novice supervisors. Preferably, this training should be introduced before, or at least...... parallel to, the first supervisor tasks, preparing the novice supervisors for the often complicated tasks they are meeting....

  2. Principles of Communicative Task Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    The use of the learning task as a basic planning and instructional tool for communicative second language instruction is discussed, and considerations and procedures for designing such tasks are outlined. A task is defined as a piece of classroom work that involves learners in comprehending, manipulating, producing, or interacting in the target…

  3. TASK: Let's Have a Party!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, James

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a creative way to demystify contemporary art for students. TASK is artist Oliver Herring's creation, where participants actively interpret instructions found on little pieces of paper--what he calls "tasks." An art classroom has all the key ingredients for a TASK event: (1) people; (2) materials; (3) space;…

  4. TASK: Let's Have a Party!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, James

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a creative way to demystify contemporary art for students. TASK is artist Oliver Herring's creation, where participants actively interpret instructions found on little pieces of paper--what he calls "tasks." An art classroom has all the key ingredients for a TASK event: (1) people; (2) materials; (3) space;…

  5. Task-dependent signal variations in EEG error-related potentials for brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrate, I.; Montesano, L.; Minguez, J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. A major difficulty of brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is dealing with the noise of EEG and its signal variations. Previous works studied time-dependent non-stationarities for BCIs in which the user’s mental task was independent of the device operation (e.g., the mental task was motor imagery and the operational task was a speller). However, there are some BCIs, such as those based on error-related potentials, where the mental and operational tasks are dependent (e.g., the mental task is to assess the device action and the operational task is the device action itself). The dependence between the mental task and the device operation could introduce a new source of signal variations when the operational task changes, which has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to analyse task-dependent signal variations and their effect on EEG error-related potentials.Approach. The work analyses the EEG variations on the three design steps of BCIs: an electrophysiology study to characterize the existence of these variations, a feature distribution analysis and a single-trial classification analysis to measure the impact on the final BCI performance.Results and significance. The results demonstrate that a change in the operational task produces variations in the potentials, even when EEG activity exclusively originated in brain areas related to error processing is considered. Consequently, the extracted features from the signals vary, and a classifier trained with one operational task presents a significant loss of performance for other tasks, requiring calibration or adaptation for each new task. In addition, a new calibration for each of the studied tasks rapidly outperforms adaptive techniques designed in the literature to mitigate the EEG time-dependent non-stationarities.

  6. Rate of learning and asymptotic performance in an automatization task and the relation to reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Rozalia; Crewther, David; Crewther, Sheila

    2004-12-01

    In the present study, direct evidence was sought linking cognitive automatic processing with reading in the general adult population. Reading speed on single-task performance and dual-task performance were compared. A total of 18 adults without dyslexia participated (7 men and 11 women, age M=25.3 yr., SD=2.7). Participants initially were trained in single-task mode on two types of tasks. The first was a central alphanumeric equation task (true or false), which comprised 3 subtests of increasing difficulty, ranging from an easily automated task to a varied and unpredictable mathematical operation. The second task was a peripheral pattern subitization task for which stimulus exposure time was related to performance. Finally, participants received dual-task training, which required simultaneous processing of both tasks. Slower reading speed was significantly related to rate of learning and speed of performance on predictable alphanumeric operations in dual-task conditions. There was no effect of reading speed on performance in the varied alphanumeric task. Faster readers were no better than slower readers on the pattern-subitization task. These findings suggest that faster readers automatized the predictable alphanumeric task more rapidly than slower readers and hence were better able to cope with the dual-task condition.

  7. An architecture for task execution in adverse environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miletic, F.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an architecture for distributed computation in mobile environments. Here, the workflow stands for the operational aspect of a work procedure. This notion subsumes the structure of the tasks, who performs them, what their operation structure is, how they are synchronized, how in

  8. Task 8 -- Design and test of critical components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chance, T.F.

    1996-11-01

    This report covers tasks 8.1, 8.1.1, and 8.2. The primary objective of Task 8.1, Particulates Flow Deposition, is to characterize the particulate generated in an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant whose configuration approximates that proposed for an ATS power plant. In addition, the task is to evaluate the use of full-flow filtering to reduce the steam particulate loads. Before the start of this task, GE had already negotiated an agreement with the candidate power plant, piping and a filter unit had already been installed at the power plant site, and major elements of the data acquisition system had been purchased. The objective of Task 8.1.1, Coolant Purity, is to expose typical ATS gas turbine airfoil cooling channel geometries to real steam flow to determine whether there are any unexpected deposit formations. The task is a static analog of the centrifugal deposition rig trials of Task 8.2, in which a bucket channel return bend is exposed to steam flow. Two cooling channel geometries are of primary interest in this static exposure. The primary objective of Task 8.2, Particle Centrifugal Sedimentation, is to determine the settling characteristics of particles in a cooling stream from an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant when that stream is ducted through a passage experiencing the G-loads expected in a simulated bucket channel specimen representative of designs proposed for an ATS gas turbine.

  9. ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Hamel; Steven Everett

    2000-08-01

    Environmental restoration and waste management (ER and WM) challenges in the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and around the world, involve radiation or other hazards which will necessitate the use of remote operations to protect human workers from dangerous exposures. Remote operations carry the implication of greater costs since remote work systems are inherently less productive than contact human work due to the inefficiencies/complexities of teleoperation. To reduce costs and improve quality, much attention has been focused on methods to improve the productivity of combined human operator/remote equipment systems; the achievements to date are modest at best. The most promising avenue in the near term is to supplement conventional remote work systems with robotic planning and control techniques borrowed from manufacturing and other domains where robotic automation has been used. Practical combinations of teleoperation and robotic control will yield telerobotic work systems that outperform currently available remote equipment. It is believed that practical telerobotic systems may increase remote work efficiencies significantly. Increases of 30% to 50% have been conservatively estimated for typical remote operations. It is important to recognize that the basic hardware and software features of most modern remote manipulation systems can readily accommodate the functionality required for telerobotics. Further, several of the additional system ingredients necessary to implement telerobotic control--machine vision, 3D object and workspace modeling, automatic tool path generation and collision-free trajectory planning--are existent.

  10. Essential Civil Support Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    and Loma Prieta Earthquakes, and the Martin Luther King Assassination and Los Angeles Riots make an excellent sample of Army operations to draw......committee members, Dr. Charles Heller, Mr. Larry Noell, and Mr. Bruce Reider. Their personal sacrifice and willingness to educate actually produced a

  11. Mechanical Transformation of Task Heuristics into Operational Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-14

    specified form. Given a mechanism for performing such a search, the ability to solve a particula kind of problem can be dramatically improved just by...oIStRIBUTE by RULE1A2) ---> (OR f, IDE OS) DECK] (. (tOC QS) POT] (, (LOC OS) HOLE] E’ (LOC QS) ( NANO ME)]) (OR (OR (I (LOC OS) DECE] Et (LOC QS

  12. Western Naval Task Force Operation Plan No. 7 - 43

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-08-14

    AOUILA M B( 33 FROSINONE A9-lB 42 ISOLETTA 28 FOGGIA N e 3. MB 0 F ’ , Q 2 AQUINO 25 FOGGIA/GINO LISA i 46 LITTORIA(SEZZE ROMANO) 9 BOVINO 78 SESSA...2 mi. I. of Bovino emergeny L/O. Rectangular strip K/ · SW 1450 yd. NIW/SSI 250 dU. Lraelled agriculturel land. Farm bldg near Alt. 800 ft. 32. FOLIlO

  13. Modeling Operator Performance in Low Task Load Supervisory Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    defined, it is not easy to recognize boredom in real life (Svendsen, 2005). Dostoevsky (1997) referred to boredom as bestial and indefinable affliction...40(6), 1180-1190. Dostoevsky , F. (1997). A Writer’s Diary (Vol. II). Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press. Ebrahim, S. (2010). Rapid

  14. Flight and Operational Medicine Clinic (FOMC) Task Process Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    weight measurement within the past year Complete Snellen eye exam Does further analysis needed? Complete all patient interview and PHA assessment...this risk Is Snellen eye exam required? Refer to optometry Identify and address all CPS IAW local PHA business rules Print out all paperwork and

  15. Tasks Important to Soldier Success in Stability and Reconstruction Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-16

    Map of Iraq ...........................................................................................37 x ACRONYMS ADA Air Defense Artillery AR...Cody, the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, to counter the increasing US casualties from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) ( Lovelace 2005, 31); a...Infantry Armor Field Artillery Aviation ADA Engineer Chemical Signal Transportation Quartermaster

  16. A Task Analytic Process to Define Future Concepts in Aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Brian Francis; Wolter, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    A necessary step when developing next generation systems is to understand the tasks that operators will perform. One NextGen concept under evaluation termed Single Pilot Operations (SPO) is designed to improve the efficiency of airline operations. One SPO concept includes a Pilot on Board (PoB), a Ground Station Operator (GSO), and automation. A number of procedural changes are likely to result when such changes in roles and responsibilities are undertaken. Automation is expected to relieve the PoB and GSO of some tasks (e.g. radio frequency changes, loading expected arrival information). A major difference in the SPO environment is the shift to communication-cued crosschecks (verbal / automated) rather than movement-cued crosschecks that occur in a shared cockpit. The current article highlights a task analytic process of the roles and responsibilities between a PoB, an approach-phase GSO, and automation.

  17. Operation of Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    3.1 Annual Report of SPR Operation Chu Shaochu Having overseen by National Nuclear Safety Administration and specialists, the reactor restarted up successfully after Safety renovation on April 16, 1996. In August 1996 the normal operation of SPR was approved by the authorities of Naitonal Nuclear Safety Administration. 1 Operation status In 1996, the reactor operated safely for 40 d and the energy released was about 137.3 MW·d. The operation status of SPR is shown in table 1. The reactor started up to higher power (power more than 1 MW) and lower power (for physics experiments) 4 times and 14 times respectively. Measurement of control rod efficiency and other measurement tasks were 2 times and 5 times respectively.

  18. Task Prioritization in Dual-Tasking: Instructions versus Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Reinier J.; van Egmond, René; de Ridder, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The role of task prioritization in performance tradeoffs during multi-tasking has received widespread attention. However, little is known on whether people have preferences regarding tasks, and if so, whether these preferences conflict with priority instructions. Three experiments were conducted with a high-speed driving game and an auditory memory task. In Experiment 1, participants did not receive priority instructions. Participants performed different sequences of single-task and dual-task conditions. Task performance was evaluated according to participants’ retrospective accounts on preferences. These preferences were reformulated as priority instructions in Experiments 2 and 3. The results showed that people differ in their preferences regarding task prioritization in an experimental setting, which can be overruled by priority instructions, but only after increased dual-task exposure. Additional measures of mental effort showed that performance tradeoffs had an impact on mental effort. The interpretation of these findings was used to explore an extension of Threaded Cognition Theory with Hockey’s Compensatory Control Model. PMID:27391779

  19. Destruction of central noradrenergic neurones with DSP4 impairs the acquisition of temporal discrimination but does not affect memory for duration in a delayed conditional discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Zahrani, S S; al-Ruwaitea, A S; Ho, M Y; Bradshaw, C M; Szabadi, E

    1997-03-01

    This experiment examined the effect of destroying central noradrenergic neurones using the selective neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-n-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) on the acquisition of a temporal discrimination and on memory for duration, using a delayed conditional discrimination task. In phase I, rats that had received systemic treatment with DSP4 and vehicle-treated control rats were trained in a series of discrete trials to press lever A following a 2-s presentation of a light stimulus, and lever B following an 8-s presentation of the same stimulus. Following stimulus offset, a response on a panel placed midway between the two levers was required to initiate lever presentation; a single response on either lever resulted in withdrawal of both levers and, in the case of a "correct" response, reinforcer delivery. Both groups acquired accurate discrimination, achieving 90% correct choices within 50 sessions; the DSP4-treated group acquired accurate performance more slowly than the control group. In phase II, delays were interposed between stimulus offset and lever presentation in 50% of the trials. In the absence of a delay, discriminative accuracy was lower in the DSP4-treated group than in the control group. Accuracy declined as a function of post-stimulus delay in both groups; both groups showed a delay-dependent bias towards responding on lever A ("choose-short" bias). Neither of these effects differed significantly between the two groups. The concentrations of noradrenaline in the parietal cortex and hippocampus were reduced by 90% and 89% in the DSP4-treated group, compared to the levels in the control group, but the levels of dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid did not differ significantly between the groups. The results confirm the deleterious effect of DSP4 on the acquisition of temporal discrimination, but do not provide evidence for a role of the noradrenergic innervation of the hippocampus and neocortex in temporal working

  20. What are task-sets: a single, integrated representation or a collection of multiple control representations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan eRangelov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Performing two randomly alternating tasks typically results in higher reaction times (RTs following a task switch, relative to a task repetition. These task switch costs (TSC reflect processes of switching between control settings for different tasks. The present study investigated whether task sets operate as a single, integrated representation or as an agglomeration of relatively independent components. In a cued task switch paradigm, target detection (present/absent and discrimination (blue/green/right-/left-tilted tasks alternated randomly across trials. The target was either a color or an orientation singleton among homogeneous distractors. Across two trials, the task and target-defining dimension repeated or changed randomly. For task switch trials, agglomerated task sets predict a difference between dimension changes and repetitions: joint task and dimension switches require full task set reconfiguration, while dimension repetitions permit re-using some control settings from the previous trial. By contrast, integrated task sets always require full switches, predicting dimension repetition effects (DREs to be absent across task switches. RT analyses showed significant DREs across task switches as well as repetitions supporting the notion of agglomerated task sets. Additionally, two event-related potentials (ERP were analyzed: the Posterior-Contralateral-Negativity (PCN indexing spatial selection dynamics, and the Sustained-Posterior-Contralateral-Negativity (SPCN indexing post-selective perceptual/semantic analysis. Significant DREs across task switches were observed for both the PCN and SPCN components. Together, DREs across task switches for RTs and two functionally distinct ERP components suggest that re-using control settings across different tasks is possible. The results thus support the ‘agglomerated-task-set’ hypothesis, and are inconsistent with ‘integrated task sets’.

  1. Task automation in a successful industrial telerobot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spelt, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jones, S.L. [REMOTEC, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss cooperative work by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Remotec{trademark}, Inc., to automate components of the operator`s workload using Remotec`s Andros telerobot, thereby providing an enhanced user interface which can be retroll to existing fielded units as well as being incorporated into now production units. Remotec`s Andros robots are presently used by numerous electric utilities to perform tasks in reactors where substantial exposure to radiation exists, as well as by the armed forces and numerous law enforcement agencies. The automation of task components, as well as the video graphics display of the robot`s position in the environment, will enhance all tasks performed by these users, as well as enabling performance in terrain where the robots cannot presently perform due to lack of knowledge about, for instance, the degree of tilt of the robot. Enhanced performance of a successful industrial mobile robot leads to increased safety and efficiency of performances in hazardous environments. The addition of these capabilities will greatly enhance the utility of the robot, as well as its marketability.

  2. Task Analysis Assessment on Intrastate Bus Traffic Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen Bin, Teo; Azlis-Sani, Jalil; Nur Annuar Mohd Yunos, Muhammad; Ismail, S. M. Sabri S. M.; Tajedi, Noor Aqilah Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Public transportation acts as social mobility and caters the daily needs of the society for passengers to travel from one place to another. This is true for a country like Malaysia where international trade has been growing significantly over the past few decades. Task analysis assessment was conducted with the consideration of cognitive ergonomic view towards problem related to human factors. Conducting research regarding the task analysis on bus traffic controllers had allowed a better understanding regarding the nature of work and the overall monitoring activities of the bus services. This paper served to study the task analysis assessment on intrastate bus traffic controllers and the objectives of this study include to conduct task analysis assessment on the bus traffic controllers. Task analysis assessment for the bus traffic controllers was developed via Hierarchical Task Analysis (HTA). There are a total of five subsidiary tasks on level one and only two were able to be further broken down in level two. Development of HTA allowed a better understanding regarding the work and this could further ease the evaluation of the tasks conducted by the bus traffic controllers. Thus, human error could be reduced for the safety of all passengers and increase the overall efficiency of the system. Besides, it could assist in improving the operation of the bus traffic controllers by modelling or synthesizing the existing tasks if necessary.

  3. Modeling Network Interdiction Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    minimize the operating costs for manufacturing 50 the item. This simple example illustrates the hierarchical structure that can be modeled using...fixed. The resulting model is linearized and the product of the dual variable and the (1−γij) term replaced with βij. This allows certain...the standard network interdiction model based on its tight linear programming relaxation. 2.3.3 Network Disruption. In practice, whenever an object is

  4. Task Management in the New ATLAS Production System

    CERN Document Server

    De, K; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Potekhin, M; Vaniachine, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Production System is the top level workflow manager which translates physicists' needs for production level processing into actual workflows executed across about a hundred processing sites used globally by ATLAS. As the production workload increased in volume and complexity in recent years (the ATLAS production tasks count is above one million, with each task containing hundreds or thousands of jobs) there is a need to upgrade the Production System to meet the challenging requirements of the next LHC run while minimizing the operating costs. Providing a front-end and a management layer for petascale data processing and analysis, the new Production System contains generic subsystems that can be used in a wider range of applications. The main subsystems are the Database Engine for Tasks (DEFT) and the Job Execution and Definition Interface (JEDI). Based on users' requests, the DEFT subsystem manages inter-dependent groups of tasks (Meta-Tasks) and generates corresponding data processing workflows. Th...

  5. Task Management in the New ATLAS Production System

    CERN Document Server

    De, K; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, A; Potekhin, M; Vaniachine, A

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Production System is the top level workflow manager which translates physicists' needs for production level processing into actual workflows executed across about a hundred processing sites used globally by ATLAS. As the production workload increased in volume and complexity in recent years (the ATLAS production tasks count is above one million, with each task containing hundreds or thousands of jobs) there is a need to upgrade the Production System to meet the challenging requirements of the next LHC run while minimizing the operating costs. Providing a front-end and a management layer for petascale data processing and analysis, the new Production System contains generic subsystems that can be used in a wider range of applications. The main subsystems are the Database Engine for Tasks (DEFT) and the Job Execution and Definition Interface (JEDI). Based on users' requests, the DEFT subsystem manages inter-dependent groups of tasks (Meta-Tasks) and generates corresponding data processing workflows. Th...

  6. Knowledge Representations for Planning Manipulation Tasks

    CERN Document Server

    Zacharias, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    In this book, the capability map, a novel general representation of the kinematic capabilities of a robot arm, is introduced. The capability map allows to determine how well regions of the workspace are reachable for the end effector in different orientations. It is a representation that can be machine processed as well as intuitively visualized for the human. The capability map and the derived algorithms are a valuable source of information for high- and low-level planning processes. The versatile applicability of the capability map is shown by examples from several distinct application domains. In human-robot interaction, a bi-manual interface for tele-operation is objectively evaluated. In low-level geometric planning, more human-like motion is planned for a humanoid robot while also reducing the computation time. And in high-level task reasoning, the suitability of a robot for a task is evaluated.    

  7. Task Analyses for Difficult-to-Assess Collective Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence Analysis and Production (34-4-1305) • Conduct Counterintelligence and Human Intelligence Analysis (34-4...Research Product 2014-05 Task Analyses for Difficult-to-Assess Collective Tasks Jonathan J. Bryson Rachel D. Barney...Christina K. Curnow Trevor M. Conrad Arnold L. Leonard Heidi Keller-Glaze ICF International Jennifer S. Tucker Christopher L. Vowels

  8. Measuring Cyber Operations Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    using network scanners and frameworks like the SANS Critical Security Controls. Finally, a network vulnerability penetration test can be performed to...effectiveness in network, defensive, and offensive operations is a difficult task. Measures may be static , automated, some combination of both or...by SANS identifies using port scanners as a way to verify the setup has been performed correctly and only needed ports and protocols are allowed

  9. Efficient task assignment in spatial crowdsourcing with worker and task privacy protection

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, An

    2017-08-01

    Spatial crowdsourcing (SC) outsources tasks to a set of workers who are required to physically move to specified locations and accomplish tasks. Recently, it is emerging as a promising tool for emergency management, as it enables efficient and cost-effective collection of critical information in emergency such as earthquakes, when search and rescue survivors in potential ares are required. However in current SC systems, task locations and worker locations are all exposed in public without any privacy protection. SC systems if attacked thus have penitential risk of privacy leakage. In this paper, we propose a protocol for protecting the privacy for both workers and task requesters while maintaining the functionality of SC systems. The proposed protocol is built on partially homomorphic encryption schemes, and can efficiently realize complex operations required during task assignment over encrypted data through a well-designed computation strategy. We prove that the proposed protocol is privacy-preserving against semi-honest adversaries. Simulation on two real-world datasets shows that the proposed protocol is more effective than existing solutions and can achieve mutual privacy-preserving with acceptable computation and communication cost.

  10. Assessing cognitive load distributions for envisioned task allocations and support functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerincx, M.A.; Dobbelsteen, G.J.H. van den; Grootjen, M.; Veenendaal, J. van

    2003-01-01

    Information technology provides new possibilities to combine and support operator tasks in order to improve the operational effectiveness and efficiency on board of a ship. The general question is how to design a task allocation and support system that lead to an adequate deployment of the human cog

  11. Training Techniques for Visual Search in Complex Task Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guznov, Svyatoslav; Matthews, Gerald; Warm, Joel S; Pfahler, Marc

    2017-06-01

    The goal for this study was to evaluate several visual search training techniques in an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) simulated task environment. Operators controlling remote unmanned vehicles often must perform complex visual search tasks (e.g., target search). These tasks may pose substantial demands on the operator due to various environmental factors. Visual search training may reduce errors and mitigate stress, but the most effective form of training has not been determined. Participants were assigned to one of four training conditions: target, cue, visual scanning, or control. After the training, the effectiveness of the training techniques was tested during a 30-minute simulated UAV flight. A secondary task manipulation was included to further simulate the demands of a realistic UAV control and target search task. Subjective stress and fatigue were also assessed. Target training produced superior target search performances in more hits and fewer false alarms (FAs) when compared to the control condition. The visual scanning and cue trainings were moderately effective. Only target training performance was vulnerable to the secondary task load. The task was stressful, but training did not mitigate stress response. Training participants on the target and the cue appearance as well as active scanning of the visual field is promising for promoting effective target search for this simulated UAV environment. These training techniques could be used in preparation for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions that involve target search, especially where target appearance change is likely.

  12. Caffeine improves anticipatory processes in task switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Wijnen, Jasper G.; Lorist, Monicque M.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    We studied the effects of moderate amounts of caffeine on task switching and task maintenance using mixed-task (AABB) blocks, in which participants alternated predictably between two tasks, and single-task (AAAA, BBBB) blocks. Switch costs refer to longer reaction times (RT) on task switch trials

  13. Caffeine improves anticipatory processes in task switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Wijnen, Jasper G.; Lorist, Monicque M.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effects of moderate amounts of caffeine on task switching and task maintenance using mixed-task (AABB) blocks, in which participants alternated predictably between two tasks, and single-task (AAAA, BBBB) blocks. Switch costs refer to longer reaction times (RT) on task switch trials (e

  14. Decision paths in complex tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanter, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Complex real world action and its prediction and control has escaped analysis by the classical methods of psychological research. The reason is that psychologists have no procedures to parse complex tasks into their constituents. Where such a division can be made, based say on expert judgment, there is no natural scale to measure the positive or negative values of the components. Even if we could assign numbers to task parts, we lack rules i.e., a theory, to combine them into a total task representation. We compare here two plausible theories for the amalgamation of the value of task components. Both of these theories require a numerical representation of motivation, for motivation is the primary variable that guides choice and action in well-learned tasks. We address this problem of motivational quantification and performance prediction by developing psychophysical scales of the desireability or aversiveness of task components based on utility scaling methods (Galanter 1990). We modify methods used originally to scale sensory magnitudes (Stevens and Galanter 1957), and that have been applied recently to the measure of task 'workload' by Gopher and Braune (1984). Our modification uses utility comparison scaling techniques which avoid the unnecessary assumptions made by Gopher and Braune. Formula for the utility of complex tasks based on the theoretical models are used to predict decision and choice of alternate paths to the same goal.

  15. Putting Mathematical Tasks into Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Courtney R.; Styers, Jodie L.

    2015-01-01

    Although many factors affect students' mathematical activity during a lesson, the teacher's selection and implementation of tasks is arguably the most influential in determining the level of student engagement. Mathematical tasks are intended to focus students' attention on a particular mathematical concept and it is the careful developing and…

  16. Human-System task integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraagen, J.M.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Dutch Ministry of Defence research programme Human-System Task Integration aims at acquiring knowledge for the optimal cooperation between human and computer, under the following constraints: freedom of choice in decisions to automate and multiple, dynamic task distributions. This paper describe

  17. Designing for dynamic task allocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, C.J.G. van; Maanen, P.P. van

    2005-01-01

    Future platforms are envisioned in which human-machine teams are able to share and trade tasks as demands in situations change. It seems that human-machine coordination has not received the attention it deserves by past and present approaches to task allocation. In this paper a simple way to make co

  18. Creativity, Overinclusion, and Everyday Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottemiller, Dylan D.; Elliott, Colette Seter; Giovannetti, Tania

    2014-01-01

    This study examined relations between creative thinking and performance on routine, everyday tasks. Results were considered in light of past research on the putative relation between creativity and schizophrenia/psychotic thinking. Thirty healthy undergraduates completed the Alternative Uses Task, a measure of divergent thinking, and the 2 × 3…

  19. Task modeling for collaborative authoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der Gerrit; Kulyk, Olga; Vyas, Dhaval; Kubbe, Onno; Ebert, Achim; Dittmar, A.; Forbrig, P.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation –Task analysis for designing modern collaborative work needs a more fine grained approach. Especially in a complex task domain, like collaborative scientific authoring, when there is a single overall goal that can only be accomplished only by collaboration between multiple roles, each req

  20. DECOVALEX ll PROJECT. Technical Report Task 1C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Knight, L.J. [United Kingdom Nirex Ltd., Harwell (United Kingdom); Kautsky, F. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Tsang, C-F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Science Division

    1999-05-01

    The DECOVALEX II project is an international co-operative research project supported by eleven funding organizations from seven countries. The project studied four tasks: Task 1: numerical simulation of the RCF3 pump test at Sellafield, UK; Task 2: numerical simulation if the in situ T-H-M experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan; Task 3: monitoring of current development in rock fracture research; and Task 4: report on treatment of T-H-M processes in Performance Assessment works for nuclear waste repositories. The project started in 1995 and is scheduled to be finalised in June 1999. This report concerns the Task 1 of the DECOVALEX 11 project. Task 1 consists of three subtasks: i) Task 1 A - the blind numerical prediction to the hydraulic response of the rock mass of the in-situ RCF3 pump test in the Borrowdale Volcanic Group (BVG) at Sellafield, UK; ii) Task 1B -calibration of the numerical models of Task 1A against measured results of the RCF3 pump test; iii) Task 1C - the numerical predictions of the hydro-mechanical effects of the BVG rock mass to the excavation of a shaft along the axis of the RCF3 borehole, without actual excavation of the shaft and associated experiments and measurements. The aim of the subtasks 1 (A+B) was to characterise the hydro-mechanical property field of the fractured rock mass at the RCF3 test site, which could then be used to predict the hydro-mechanical responses of the rock mass to the excavation of a shaft centred on the RCF3 borehole. Task 1C involves a numerical simulation of an assumed excavation of a single shaft on the line of the RCF3 borehole used for Task 1 (A+B). The subtask is basically a generic prediction, with realistic site geology and hydrogeology data but without feedback from an actual excavation of the shaft and associated measurements. A model calibration is not possible due to lack of measured results. On the other hand, some additional components were introduced into the subtask, such as studies of EDZ formation

  1. Constrained Task Assignment and Scheduling On Networks of Arbitrary Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Justin Patrick

    solves this problem. The algorithm is correct, complete, outputs time optimal schedules, and has low average-case time complexity. Separation of the task assignment and task scheduling problems is exploited here to ameliorate the effects of an incomplete communication network. The mission-modeling conditions that allow this and the benefits gained are discussed in detail. It is shown that the distributed task assignment and task scheduling algorithms developed here can operate concurrently and maintain their correctness, completeness, and optimality properties.

  2. TASK 2: QUENCH ZONE SIMULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fusselman, Steve

    2015-09-30

    Aerojet Rocketdyne (AR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept incorporating advanced technologies in ultra-dense phase dry feed system, rapid mix injector, and advanced component cooling to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to commercially available state-of-the-art systems. A key feature of the AR gasifier design is the transition from the gasifier outlet into the quench zone, where the raw syngas is cooled to ~ 400°C by injection and vaporization of atomized water. Earlier pilot plant testing revealed a propensity for the original gasifier outlet design to accumulate slag in the outlet, leading to erratic syngas flow from the outlet. Subsequent design modifications successfully resolved this issue in the pilot plant gasifier. In order to gain greater insight into the physical phenomena occurring within this zone, AR developed a cold flow simulation apparatus with Coanda Research & Development with a high degree of similitude to hot fire conditions with the pilot scale gasifier design, and capable of accommodating a scaled-down quench zone for a demonstration-scale gasifier. The objective of this task was to validate similitude of the cold flow simulation model by comparison of pilot-scale outlet design performance, and to assess demonstration scale gasifier design feasibility from testing of a scaled-down outlet design. Test results did exhibit a strong correspondence with the two pilot scale outlet designs, indicating credible similitude for the cold flow simulation device. Testing of the scaled-down outlet revealed important considerations in the design and operation of the demonstration scale gasifier, in particular pertaining to the relative momentum between the downcoming raw syngas and the sprayed quench water and associated impacts on flow patterns within the quench zone. This report describes key findings from the test program, including assessment of pilot plant configuration simulations relative to actual

  3. EFFORTS Sub-task report on task 4.1: Experimental Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Bay, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Task 4.1 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.1 the existing experimental techniques has been conditioned to the tasks ahead in physical modelling.......Task 4.1 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.1 the existing experimental techniques has been conditioned to the tasks ahead in physical modelling....

  4. Factorizing the time evolution operator

    CERN Document Server

    Quijas, P C G

    2006-01-01

    There is a widespread belief in the quantum physical community, and in textbooks used to teach Quantum Mechanics, that it is a difficult task to apply the time evolution operator on an initial wave function. That is to say, because the hamiltonian operator generally is the sum of two operators, then it is a difficult task to apply the time evolution operator on an initial wave function, because it implies to apply terms like (A+B)^n. A possible solution of this problem is to factorize the time evolution operator and then apply successively the individual exponential operator on the initial wave function. However, the exponential operator does not directly factorize. In this work we present useful ways to factorizing the time evolution operator when the argument of the exponential is a sum of two operators which obey specific commutation relations. Then, we apply the exponential operator as an evolution operator for the case of elementary unidimensional potentials, like the harmonic oscillator. Also, we argue ...

  5. Operational amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Dostal, Jiri

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the reader with the practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. It presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits.Provides the reader with practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. Presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits

  6. Divergent Perceptions of Telecollaborative Language Learning Tasks: Task-as-Workplan vs. Task-as-Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dooly, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    ... place. The task design and its implementation are key elements for efficient language learning to develop--a carefully designed task or activity that requires off- and online co-construction of knowledge not only provides opportunities for target language practice, it also helps integrate language use as the means for shared knowledge-build...

  7. Proceedings of the first meeting of IEA, Bioenergy, Task 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christersson, L.; Ledin, S. [eds.

    1999-07-01

    The present proceedings are the result of the first meeting of Task 17 within the frame of IEA, Bioenergy. During the meeting the objectives of Task 17 were discussed and determined to be: * to stimulate the full-scale implementation of energy crops in participating countries; * to strengthen the contacts and co-operation between participating countries, scientists, biomass producers, machine developers, entrepreneurs, and end users; * to select the most urgent research and development areas, and to suggest projects of co-operation; * to deliver Proceedings from the meetings, and * to inform Ex-Co-members. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all the 7 papers presented.

  8. DYNAMIC TASK SCHEDULING ON MULTICORE AUTOMOTIVE ECUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetishree Mishra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Automobile manufacturers are controlled by stringent govt. regulations for safety and fuel emissions and motivated towards adding more advanced features and sophisticated applications to the existing electronic system. Ever increasing customer’s demands for high level of comfort also necessitate providing even more sophistication in vehicle electronics system. All these, directly make the vehicle software system more complex and computationally more intensive. In turn, this demands very high computational capability of the microprocessor used in electronic control unit (ECU. In this regard, multicore processors have already been implemented in some of the task rigorous ECUs like, power train, image processing and infotainment. To achieve greater performance from these multicore processors, parallelized ECU software needs to be efficiently scheduled by the underlaying operating system for execution to utilize all the computational cores to the maximum extent possible and meet the real time constraint. In this paper, we propose a dynamic task scheduler for multicore engine control ECU that provides maximum CPU utilization, minimized preemption overhead, minimum average waiting time and all the tasks meet their real time deadlines while compared to the static priority scheduling suggested by Automotive Open Systems Architecture (AUTOSAR

  9. Dynamic Task Scheduling on Multicore Automotive ECUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetishree Mishra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Automobile manufacturers are controlled by stringen t govt. regulations for safety and fuel emissions a nd motivated towards adding more advanced features and sophisticated applications to the existing electro nic system. Ever increasing customer’s demands for high level of comfort also necessitate providing even m ore sophistication in vehicle electronics system. All t hese, directly make the vehicle software system mor e complex and computationally more intensive. In turn , this demands very high computational capability o f the microprocessor used in electronic control unit (ECU. In this regard, multicore processors have already been implemented in some of the task rigoro us ECUs like, power train, image processing and infotainment. To achieve greater performance from t hese multicore processors, parallelized ECU softwar e needs to be efficiently scheduled by the underlayin g operating system for execution to utilize all the computational cores to the maximum extent possible and meet the real time constraint. In this paper, w e propose a dynamic task scheduler for multicore engi ne control ECU that provides maximum CPU utilization, minimized preemption overhead, minimum average waiting time and all the tasks meet their real time deadlines while compared to the static pr iority scheduling suggested by Automotive Open Syst ems Architecture (AUTOSAR.

  10. Application of psychomotor vigilance task in fatigue assessment of aerospace and related operations and in evaluation of the medical protection measures%精神运动警觉性任务在航空航天及相关作业疲劳评估与卫生防护措施评价中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹皓; 葛华; 付威威; 董月芳

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the research advances related to the application of psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) in the fatigue assessment of aerospace and related operations and in the evaluation of the medical protection measures.Literature resource and selection Relevant articles published in China and abroad.Literature quotation Thirty-eight published references were cited.Literature synthesis The research advances related to the application of PVT in fatigue assessment of aerospace and related operations and in evaluation of the medical protection measures were reviewed.PVT is a commonly used method to evaluate the alertness.It can detect the sustained attention and reaction time of subjects to visual stimuli.On the basis of the classical detection method,PVT had done a portable intelligent modification and the personal test time was significantly reduced to improve the detection efficiency.Many investigations had demonstrated that PVT was used in the detection of central fatigue induced by sleep deprivation,hard mental work and environmental heat stress and other experimental conditions.In simulated and practical aerospace operations,PVT was also a useful method to evaluate the central fatigue of aircrew and astronauts.In addition,PVT can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the following medical protection measures against aerospace and related operational fatigue,such as reasonable arrangement of work and rest,white light irradiation,transcranial direct current stimulation,rational use of hypnotics and wake-promoting agents and so on.Conclusions Because of the advantages of easy operation and reliable results,PVT have been widely used in fatigue assessment of aerospace and related operations as well as the evaluation of the medical protection measures.In practice,its evaluation efficiency would be further improved if it combined with other method.%目的 综述有关精神运动警觉性任务(psychomotor vigilance task,PVT)在航空航天及相关作业

  11. A case of 'task-switching acalculia'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domahs, Frank; Benke, Thomas; Delazer, Margarete

    2011-02-01

    In this study we describe a patient (FR) with left frontal lesions due to a cerebrovascular disorder of embolic origin. Beyond a general slowness, FR showed deficits in simple multiplication only when problems were presented in a mixed operations list (multiplication, addition, and subtraction), while no such deficits were observed for the same multiplication problems in blocked presentation. Deficits were restricted to trials directly affected by a switch (increased switch costs), but not to subsequent trials (no increased mixing costs). Thus, we provide the first detailed description of a condition which could be termed 'task-switching acalculia' in a stroke patient. This case highlights the need for mixed operation lists in the diagnosis of acalculia.

  12. General purpose operator interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, S. I.

    1979-07-01

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in Richland, Washington is developing a general-purpose operator interface for controlling set-point driven processes. The interface concept is being developed around graphics display devices with touch-sensitive screens for direct interaction with the displays. Additional devices such as trackballs and keyboards are incorporated for the operator's convenience, but are not necessary for operation. The hardware and software are modular; only those capabilities needed for a particular application need to be used. The software is written in FORTRAN IV with minimal use of operating system calls to increase portability. Several ASCII files generated by the user define displays and correlate the display variables with the process parameters. It is also necessary for the user to build an interface routine which translates the internal graphics commands into device-specific commands. The interface is suited for both continuous flow processes and unit operations. An especially useful feature for controlling unit operations is the ability to generate and execute complex command sequences from ASCII files. This feature relieves operators of many repetitive tasks. 2 figures.

  13. Task Space Tracking for Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Egeland

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of controlling a manipulator in the task space, a linear model with task space position and velocity as state variables can be developed. This is done by means of exact compensation of the state-space model non-linearities using non-linear feedback. In this paper, feedback control for this linear state space model is developed using optimal control theory. Integral action is included to compensate for unmodeled forces and torques. In the resulting control system, the problem of transforming the task space trajectory to the joint space is avoided, and the controller parameters can be chosen to satisfy requirements specified in the task space. Simulation experiments show promising results.

  14. Inductive System Monitors Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) software developed at Ames Research Center uses artificial intelligence and data mining techniques to build system-monitoring knowledge bases from archived or simulated sensor data. This information is then used to detect unusual or anomalous behavior that may indicate an impending system failure. Currently helping analyze data from systems that help fly and maintain the space shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS), the IMS has also been employed by data classes are then used to build a monitoring knowledge base. In real time, IMS performs monitoring functions: determining and displaying the degree of deviation from nominal performance. IMS trend analyses can detect conditions that may indicate a failure or required system maintenance. The development of IMS was motivated by the difficulty of producing detailed diagnostic models of some system components due to complexity or unavailability of design information. Successful applications have ranged from real-time monitoring of aircraft engine and control systems to anomaly detection in space shuttle and ISS data. IMS was used on shuttle missions STS-121, STS-115, and STS-116 to search the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) data for signs of possible damaging impacts during launch. It independently verified findings of the WLEIDS Mission Evaluation Room (MER) analysts and indicated additional points of interest that were subsequently investigated by the MER team. In support of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, IMS is being deployed as an anomaly detection tool on ISS mission control consoles in the Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate. IMS has been trained to detect faults in the ISS Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) systems. In laboratory tests, it has already detected several minor anomalies in real-time CMG data. When tested on archived data, IMS was able to detect precursors of the CMG1 failure nearly 15 hours in advance of

  15. Supervisory control of multiple robots in dynamic tasking environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jessie Y C; Barnes, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    A military targeting environment was simulated to examine the effects of an intelligent route-planning agent RoboLeader, which could support dynamic robot re-tasking based on battlefield developments, on the performance of robotics operators. We manipulated the level of assistance (LOAs) provided by RoboLeader as well as the presence of a visualisation tool that provided feedback to the participants on their primary task (target encapsulation) performance. Results showed that the participants' primary task benefited from RoboLeader on all LOAs conditions compared to manual performance; however, visualisation had little effect. Frequent video gamers demonstrated significantly better situation awareness of the mission environment than did infrequent gamers. Those participants with higher spatial ability performed better on a secondary target detection task than did those with lower spatial ability. Finally, participants' workload assessments were significantly lower when they were assisted by RoboLeader than when they performed the target entrapment task manually. Practitioner Summary: This study demonstrated the utility of an intelligent agent for enhancing robotics operators' supervisory control performance as well as reducing their workload during a complex urban scenario involving moving targets. The results furthered the understanding of the interplay among level-of-autonomy, multitasking performance and individual differences in military tasking environments.

  16. A limited role for mediodorsal thalamus in devaluation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Charles L

    2008-06-01

    Six experiments were performed to determine the role of mediodorsal thalamus (MD) in the devaluation task, varying the type of contingencies (Pavlovian or operant), the number of reinforcers (one vs. two), and the order of experiments (in naïve or experimentally experienced rats). MD-lesioned rats were impaired in devaluation performance when switched between Pavlovian and operant devaluation tasks, but not when switched from one Pavlovian devaluation task to another Pavlovian devaluation task. MD lesions caused no devaluation impairment in a multiple-reinforcer Pavlovian devaluation task. These results suggest that MD lesions impair performance in devaluation tasks as a result of an inability to switch the form of associations made from one type of outcome-encoding association to another. This is in accord with previous literature suggesting that MD is needed for strategy set shifting. The results further suggest that MD is a necessary part of devaluation circuits only in cases in which previous associations need to be suppressed in order for new associations to be learned and control behavior, and otherwise the devaluation circuit does not require MD.

  17. Annual Progress report - General Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesnousky, S.G.

    1993-09-30

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project {open_quotes}Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI).{close_quotes} A similar report was previously provided for the period of 1 October 1991 to 30 September 1992. The report initially covers the activities of the General Task and is followed by sections that describe the progress of the other ongoing tasks.

  18. Evaluation of reward-relevant learning and memory behavior with operant conditioning task in rats%奖励性操作式条件反射任务在大鼠学习记忆研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石哲; 曲丽娜; 刘新民; 陈善广; 陈玲玲; 孙秀萍; 宋广青; 王琼; 常琪; 李海清; 李莹辉

    2012-01-01

    目的 将奖励性操作式条件反射方法应用于学习记忆研究.方法 首次采用奖励性操作式条件反射方法,设置单次操作训练、连续多次操作训练、信号辨识与消退四种检测模式,研究Wistar大鼠和SHR大鼠学习记忆能力.结果 奖赏训练中,SHR组鼻触次数显著增多(vs.Wistar&Donepezil,P<0.05);单次操作训练中,三组动物对操作反应的获得无显著差异;连续多次操作学习任务中,SHR组错误操作次数增多(vs.Wistar,P<0.05),奖赏获得次数减少(vs.Donepezil,P<0.001),反应准确率显著降低(vs.Wistar & Donepezil,P<0.05);信号辨识任务中SHR组错误反应次数显著增多(vs.Wistar & Donepezil,P<0.05),而反应准确率降低,组间差异有显著性( vs.Wistar & DonepezilP<0.05);消退实验中,三组动物差异无显著性.神经递质检测发现,SHR组大鼠谷氨酸[(1.0639 ±0.07086) mg/g]、乙酰胆碱[(2.7760±0.2609)μg/g]与五羟色胺[(1.2200±0.1137)μg/g]含量均显著低于Wistar组大鼠(P<0.05),多奈哌齐组大鼠乙酰胆碱含量显著增加[(3.9344±0.2747) μg/g]( vs.Wistar,P<0.05;vs.SHR,P<0.001).结论 奖励性操作式条件反射方法可作为一种正性增强条件反射检测新方法应用于大鼠学习记忆研究.%Objective To apply reward directed operant conditioning task for learning and memory research in laboratory animals. Methods Sixteen adult male SHR rats and 8 Wistar rats were included in this study. Operant conditioning procedure was used to assess the learning ability of Wistar and SHR rats with magazine training, fixed ratio, signal discrimination and extinction procedure. Results Significant difference was found in magazine training. The SHR rats performed more NP vs. Wistar rats and SHR rats treated with donepezil ( P < 0. 05 ). There was no significant difference during FR1 schedule. While in higher response ratio FR2 and FR4 schedule, the SHR group showed significantly higher error responses ( vs

  19. Following the time course of face gender and expression processing: a task-dependent ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Conroy, Berenice; Aguado, Luis; Fernández-Cahill, María; Romero-Ferreiro, Verónica; Diéguez-Risco, Teresa

    2014-05-01

    The effects of task demands and the interaction between gender and expression in face perception were studied using event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants performed three different tasks with male and female faces that were emotionally inexpressive or that showed happy or angry expressions. In two of the tasks (gender and expression categorization) facial properties were task-relevant while in a third task (symbol discrimination) facial information was irrelevant. Effects of expression were observed on the visual P100 component under all task conditions, suggesting the operation of an automatic process that is not influenced by task demands. The earliest interaction between expression and gender was observed later in the face-sensitive N170 component. This component showed differential modulations by specific combinations of gender and expression (e.g., angry male vs. angry female faces). Main effects of expression and task were observed in a later occipito-temporal component peaking around 230 ms post-stimulus onset (EPN or early posterior negativity). Less positive amplitudes in the presence of angry faces and during performance of the gender and expression tasks were observed. Finally, task demands also modulated a positive component peaking around 400 ms (LPC, or late positive complex) that showed enhanced amplitude for the gender task. The pattern of results obtained here adds new evidence about the sequence of operations involved in face processing and the interaction of facial properties (gender and expression) in response to different task demands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental Operations and Support for LITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    This scope of this task was to provide for the setup, measurement and data analysis of current and future efforts related to high-power solid state lasers. Laboratory operations and fiber laser development support are discussed.

  1. Hybrid Heuristic-Based Artificial Immune System for Task Scheduling

    CERN Document Server

    sanei, Masoomeh

    2011-01-01

    Task scheduling problem in heterogeneous systems is the process of allocating tasks of an application to heterogeneous processors interconnected by high-speed networks, so that minimizing the finishing time of application as much as possible. Tasks are processing units of application and have precedenceconstrained, communication and also, are presented by Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAGs). Evolutionary algorithms are well suited for solving task scheduling problem in heterogeneous environment. In this paper, we propose a hybrid heuristic-based Artificial Immune System (AIS) algorithm for solving the scheduling problem. In this regard, AIS with some heuristics and Single Neighbourhood Search (SNS) technique are hybridized. Clonning and immune-remove operators of AIS provide diversity, while heuristics and SNS provide convergence of algorithm into good solutions, that is balancing between exploration and exploitation. We have compared our method with some state-of-the art algorithms. The results of the experiments...

  2. Emotional intelligence and stress in medical students performing surgical tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sonal; Russ, Stephanie; Petrides, K V; Sirimanna, Pramudith; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Darzi, Ara; Sevdalis, Nick

    2011-10-01

    Poor stress management skills can compromise performance in the operating room, particularly in inexperienced trainees. Little is known about individual differences in managing stress. This study aimed to explore the relationship between trait emotional intelligence (EI) and objective and subjective measures of stress in medical students faced with unfamiliar surgical tasks. Seventeen medical undergraduates completed an unfamiliar laparoscopic task on a simulator during January to April 2008. Subjective stress before, during (retrospectively), and after the task was measured using the self-report State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Objective stress was measured using continuous heart rate (HR) monitoring. Participants also completed the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire short form (TEIQue-SF). The authors computed scores for global trait EI and the TEIQue-SF four factors and carried out descriptive and correlational analyses. The highest levels of subjective stress were reported during the task and correlated positively with trait EI as well as with the trait EI factors of well-being and emotionality. Objective stress (mean HR) during the task was positively related to the sociability factor of trait EI. Higher trait EI scores were also associated with better after-task recovery from stress experienced during the task. Students with higher trait EI are more likely to experience stress during unfamiliar surgical scenarios but are also more likely to recover better compared with their lower-trait-EI peers. Trait EI has implications for the design of effective stress management training tailored to individual needs and potential applications to surgical trainee selection and development.

  3. Neural correlates of metacognition: A critical perspective on current tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insabato, Andrea; Pannunzi, Mario; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    Humans have a remarkable ability to reflect upon their behavior and mental processes, a capacity known as metacognition. Recent neurophysiological experiments have attempted to elucidate the neural correlates of metacognition in other species. Despite this increased attention, there is still no operational definition of metacognition and the ability of behavioral tasks to reflect metacognition is the subject of debate. The most widely used task for studying metacognition in animals, the uncertain-option task, has been criticized because it can be solved by simple associative mechanisms. Here we propose a broad perspective that generalizes those critiques to another task, post-decision wagering. Moreover, we extend this critical view to account for recent neurophysiological evidence. We argue these tasks are simple enough that any animal could solve them using very simple mechanisms such as sensory-motor associations. In this case, it is impossible to know whether all animals are metacognitive, or if the tasks are simply not appropriate. Therefore, we suggest using better defined concepts until a suitable task for metacognition is available. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Network operating system focus technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    An activity structured to provide specific design requirements and specifications for the Space Station Data Management System (DMS) Network Operating System (NOS) is outlined. Examples are given of the types of supporting studies and implementation tasks presently underway to realize a DMS test bed capability to develop hands-on understanding of NOS requirements as driven by actual subsystem test beds participating in the overall Johnson Space Center test bed program. Classical operating system elements and principal NOS functions are listed.

  5. Yucca Mountain Task 4, Final report FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, J.N.

    1993-09-30

    Four major projects at UNRSL have been supported by NWPO-Neotectonics Yucca Mountain Task 4 funds during the last year: (1) Operation and analysis of data from the UNRSL microearthquake network at Yucca Mountain. (2) Continued operation, maintenance, and calibration of three broadband stations. Limited data analysis was also initiated. (3) Continued review by Dr. Brune of documents and literature related to seismic hazard and tectonics of the Yucca Mountain region. (4) Testing of noise levels in boreholes.

  6. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload.

  7. A Multiprocessor Operating System Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gary M.; Campbell, Roy H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a multiprocessor operating system simulator that was developed by the authors in the Fall semester of 1987. The simulator was built in response to the need to provide students with an environment in which to build and test operating system concepts as part of the coursework of a third-year undergraduate operating systems course. Written in C++, the simulator uses the co-routine style task package that is distributed with the AT&T C++ Translator to provide a hierarchy of classes that represents a broad range of operating system software and hardware components. The class hierarchy closely follows that of the 'Choices' family of operating systems for loosely- and tightly-coupled multiprocessors. During an operating system course, these classes are refined and specialized by students in homework assignments to facilitate experimentation with different aspects of operating system design and policy decisions. The current implementation runs on the IBM RT PC under 4.3bsd UNIX.

  8. Algorithms for Temperature-Aware Task Scheduling in Microprocessor Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chrobak, Marek; Hurand, Mathilde; Robert, Julien

    2008-01-01

    We study scheduling problems motivated by recently developed techniques for microprocessor thermal management at the operating systems level. The general scenario can be described as follows. The microprocessor's temperature is controlled by the hardware thermal management system that continuously monitors the chip temperature and automatically reduces the processor's speed as soon as the thermal threshold is exceeded. Some tasks are more CPU-intensive than other and thus generate more heat during execution. The cooling system operates non-stop, reducing (at an exponential rate) the deviation of the processor's temperature from the ambient temperature. As a result, the processor's temperature, and thus the performance as well, depends on the order of the task execution. Given a variety of possible underlying architectures, models for cooling and for hardware thermal management, as well as types of tasks, this scenario gives rise to a plethora of interesting and never studied scheduling problems. We focus on s...

  9. Effects of a no-go Task 2 on Task 1 performance in dual - tasking: From benefits to costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczyk, Markus; Huestegge, Lynn

    2017-04-01

    When two tasks are combined in a dual-task experiment, characteristics of Task 2 can influence Task 1 performance, a phenomenon termed the backward crosstalk effect (BCE). Besides instances depending on the (spatial) compatibility of both responses, a particularly interesting example was introduced by Miller (2006): If Task 2 was a no-go task (i.e., one not requiring any action at all), responses were slowed in Task 1. Subsequent work, however, also reported the opposite result-that is, faster Task 1 responses in cases of no-go Task 2 trials. We report three experiments aiming to more precisely identify the conditions under which a no-go Task 2 facilitates or impedes Task 1 performance. The results suggest that an adverse no-go BCE is only observed when the Task 2 response(s) are sufficiently prepared in advance, yielding strong inhibitory control demands for Task 2 that eventually hamper Task 1 processing as well (i.e., inhibitory costs). If this is not the case, encountering a no-go Task 2 trial facilitates Task 1 performance, suggesting that the underlying task representation is reduced to a single - task. These results are discussed in the context of other recent work on BCEs and of recently suggested accounts of the no-go BCE.

  10. Operational calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Boehme, Thomas K

    1987-01-01

    Operational Calculus, Volume II is a methodical presentation of operational calculus. An outline of the general theory of linear differential equations with constant coefficients is presented. Integral operational calculus and advanced topics in operational calculus, including locally integrable functions and convergence in the space of operators, are also discussed. Formulas and tables are included.Comprised of four sections, this volume begins with a discussion on the general theory of linear differential equations with constant coefficients, focusing on such topics as homogeneous and non-ho

  11. Operating systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tsichritzis, Dionysios C; Rheinboldt, Werner

    1974-01-01

    Operating Systems deals with the fundamental concepts and principles that govern the behavior of operating systems. Many issues regarding the structure of operating systems, including the problems of managing processes, processors, and memory, are examined. Various aspects of operating systems are also discussed, from input-output and files to security, protection, reliability, design methods, performance evaluation, and implementation methods.Comprised of 10 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of what constitutes an operating system, followed by a discussion on the definition and pr

  12. Operate a Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpter, Bonnie J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom use of a computer program originally published in Creative Computing magazine. "The Nuclear Power Plant" (runs on Apple II with 48K memory) simulates the operating of a nuclear generating station, requiring students to make decisions as they assume the task of managing the plant. (JN)

  13. The effect of varying path properties in path steering tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, L.; Liere, R. van

    2010-01-01

    Path steering is a primitive 3D interaction task that requires the user to navigate through a path of a given length and width. In a previous paper, we have conducted controlled experiments in which users operated a pen input device to steer a cursor through a 3D path subject to fixed path propertie

  14. Scheduling technicians and tasks in a telecommunications company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeau, J. F.; Laporte, G.; Pasin, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a construction heuristic and an adaptive large neighborhood search heuristic for the technician and task scheduling problem arising in a large telecommunications company. This problem was solved within the framework of the 2007 challenge set up by the French Operational Research...

  15. Building the Guatemalan Interagency Task Force Tecun Uman: Lessons Identified

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Support Team MOB main operating base xx Building the Guatemalan Interagency Task Force Tecún Umán MOD Ministry of Defense (Guatemalan) MoDA Ministry...Advisors ( MoDA ) program.1 1 This program partners the U.S. Department of Defense civilian experts with foreign counterparts to build ministerial core

  16. Polishing a Data Task: Seeking Better Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawojewski, Judith S.

    1996-01-01

    Shares a teacher's stages of selecting and revising a performance-assessment task focusing on data handling. Discusses selection and revision criteria, examining student work, reflecting on the task, and revising the final task. (MKR)

  17. Evaluating input device usability as a function of task difficulty in a tracking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Michael A; Oppold, Paul; McConnell, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    Game controllers are emerging as a preferred choice for the manual control of unmanned vehicles, but an understanding of their usability characteristics has yet to emerge. We compared the usability of an Xbox 360 game controller in a dual task situation using MATB II to the traditional joystick and keyboard interface in two experiments. In the first experiment, performance with the game controller was associated with fewer tracking errors. In a second experiment, we trained users on the devices, and found that even after training the game controller was still associated with fewer tracking errors as well as higher usability and lower workload ratings. These results are consistent with the idea that game controllers are highly usable input devices and do not require high mental workload to operate, thus making them suitable for complex control tasks.

  18. Schwartz operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyl, M.; Kiukas, J.; Werner, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schwartz operators as a non-commutative analog of Schwartz functions and provide a detailed discussion of their properties. We equip them, in particular, with a number of different (but equivalent) families of seminorms which turns the space of Schwartz operators into a Fréchet space. The study of the topological dual leads to non-commutative tempered distributions which are discussed in detail as well. We show, in particular, that the latter can be identified with a certain class of quadratic forms, therefore making operations like products with bounded (and also some unbounded) operators and quantum harmonic analysis available to objects which are otherwise too singular for being a Hilbert space operator. Finally, we show how the new methods can be applied by studying operator moment problems and convergence properties of fluctuation operators.

  19. Transition Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Alcock-Zeilinger, Judith

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we give a generic algorithm of the transition operators between Hermitian Young projection operators corresponding to equivalent irreducible representations of SU(N), using the compact expressions of Hermitian Young projection operators derived in a companion paper. We show that the Hermitian Young projection operators together with their transition operators constitute a fully orthogonal basis for the algebra of invariants of $V^{\\otimes m}$ that exhibits a systematically simplified multiplication table. We discuss the full algebra of invariants over $V^{\\otimes 3}$ and $V^{\\otimes 4}$ as explicit examples. In our presentation we make use of various standard concepts such as Young projection operators, Clebsch-Gordan operators, and invariants (in birdtrack notation). We tie these perspectives together and use them to shed light on each other.

  20. Task-irrelevant perceptual expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yetta K; Folstein, Jonathan R; Gauthier, Isabel

    2011-12-05

    Perceptual learning (PL) and perceptual expertise (PE) are two fields of visual training studies that investigate how practice improves visual performance. However, previous research suggests that PL can be acquired in a task-irrelevant manner while PE cannot and that PL is highly specific to the training objects and conditions while PE generalizes. These differences are difficult to interpret since PL and PE studies tend to differ on multiple dimensions. We designed a training study with novel objects to compare PL and PE while varying only the training task, such that the training objects, visual field, training duration, and type of learning assessment were kept constant. Manipulations of the training task sufficed to produce the standard effects obtained in PE and PL. In contrast to prior studies, we demonstrated that some degree of PE can be acquired in a task-irrelevant manner, similar to PL. Task-irrelevant PE resulted in similar shape matching ability compared to the directly trained PE. In addition, learning in both PE and PL generalizes to different untrained conditions, which does not support the idea that PE generalizes while PL is specific. Degrees of generalization can be explained by considering the psychological space of the stimuli used for training and the test of transfer.

  1. TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force status report and short-term recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Review of the Three Mile Island accident by the TMI-2 Lessons Learned Task Force has disclosed a number of actions in the areas of design and analysis and plant operations that the Task Force recommends be required in the short term to provide substantial additional protection which is required for the public health and safety. All nuclear power plants in operation or in various stages of construction or licensing action are affected to varying degrees by the specific recommendations. The Task Force is continuing work in areas of general safety criteria, systems design requirements, nuclear power plant operations, and nuclear power plant licensing.

  2. The Effects of Varied Extinction Conditions Following Acquisition on a 100 Per Cent Rewarded Task in Alcoholics and Nonalcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okultich, Peter V.; Marlatt, G. Alan

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine whether alcoholics will show greater persistance in responding under punishment in a simple operant task as compared to nonalcoholics; and (2) with this task, under what conditions alcoholics will suppress their responses to the same extent as nonalcoholics. In the task, all subjects during…

  3. Clarifying the Antisystemic Elements of Special Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anton Asklund; Højstrup, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Strategic theories and definitions on the phenomena of special operations are still at an underdeveloped stage. Without proper definition, special operations are misunderstood and likely to be poorly implemented. This article aims to address that issue and to contribute with an expanded vocabulary...... and understanding of the capabilities and limitations of the phenomena special operations on a conceptual level. The authors complete this task by studying some of the more vaguely described elements, and thereby solidifying the terminology on what constitute special operations....

  4. Spacecraft operations

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmaier, Florian; Schmidhuber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The book describes the basic concepts of spaceflight operations, for both, human and unmanned missions. The basic subsystems of a space vehicle are explained in dedicated chapters, the relationship of spacecraft design and the very unique space environment are laid out. Flight dynamics are taught as well as ground segment requirements. Mission operations are divided into preparation including management aspects, execution and planning. Deep space missions and space robotic operations are included as special cases. The book is based on a course held at the German Space Operation Center (GSOC).

  5. Situation awareness and driving performance in a simulated navigation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, R; Kaber, D B

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify task and vehicle factors that may affect driver situation awareness (SA) and its relationship to performance, particularly in strategic (navigation) tasks. An experiment was conducted to assess the effects of in-vehicle navigation aids and reliability on driver SA and performance in a simulated navigation task. A total of 20 participants drove a virtual car and navigated a large virtual suburb. They were required to follow traffic signs and navigation directions from either a human aid via a mobile phone or an automated aid presented on a laptop. The navigation aids operated under three different levels of information reliability (100%, 80% and 60%). A control condition was used in which each aid presented a telemarketing survey and participants navigated using a map. Results revealed perfect navigation information generally improved driver SA and performance compared to unreliable navigation information and the control condition (task-irrelevant information). In-vehicle automation appears to mediate the relationship of driver SA to performance in terms of operational and strategic (navigation) behaviours. The findings of this work support consideration of driver SA in the design of future vehicle automation for navigation tasks.

  6. RTNS-II operations guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, D.W.

    1985-04-01

    This guidebook is intended to provide training criteria, procedures and guidelines for operation of the RTNS-II neutron sources and ancilliary equipment. Use of this document requires full knowledge of the RTNS-II Facility Safety Procedure (FSP) and any Operational Safety Procedures (OSP) in effect. The RTNS-II FSP defines the hazards which may be encountered at RTNS-II and defines the procedures which must be followed in performing any task including operations. The purpose of this document is to provide a central source of detailed information concerning systems and equipment used in operating the RTNS-II neutron sources on a day-to-day basis. All members of the Operations Group are expected to be familiar with its contents. It is also intended to be used in training new members of the Operations Group.

  7. Effects of automation and task load on task switching during human supervision of multiple semi-autonomous robots in a dynamic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, P N; Parasuraman, R

    2010-08-01

    The present study assessed the impact of task load and level of automation (LOA) on task switching in participants supervising a team of four or eight semi-autonomous robots in a simulated 'capture the flag' game. Participants were faster to perform the same task than when they chose to switch between different task actions. They also took longer to switch between different tasks when supervising the robots at a high compared to a low LOA. Task load, as manipulated by the number of robots to be supervised, did not influence switch costs. The results suggest that the design of future unmanned vehicle (UV) systems should take into account not simply how many UVs an operator can supervise, but also the impact of LOA and task operations on task switching during supervision of multiple UVs. The findings of this study are relevant for the ergonomics practice of UV systems. This research extends the cognitive theory of task switching to inform the design of UV systems and results show that switching between UVs is an important factor to consider.

  8. A Population of Assessment Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daro, Phil; Burkhardt, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    We propose the development of a "population" of high-quality assessment tasks that cover the performance goals set out in the "Common Core State Standards for Mathematics." The population will be published. Tests are drawn from this population as a structured random sample guided by a "balancing algorithm."

  9. Scientists and the Selection Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.; Ransdell, Sarah E.

    1986-01-01

    Presents findings of a study of scientists on the Wason four-card selection task, finding little understanding of the effect of disconfirmatory data in assessing conditionals. Found performance influenced by problem content. Explains performance as memory-cueing plus reasoning-by-analogy. (JM)

  10. Computer-Related Task Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longstreet, Phil; Xiao, Xiao; Sarker, Saonee

    2016-01-01

    The existing information system (IS) literature has acknowledged computer self-efficacy (CSE) as an important factor contributing to enhancements in computer-related task performance. However, the empirical results of CSE on performance have not always been consistent, and increasing an individua...

  11. A Population of Assessment Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daro, Phil; Burkhardt, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    We propose the development of a "population" of high-quality assessment tasks that cover the performance goals set out in the "Common Core State Standards for Mathematics." The population will be published. Tests are drawn from this population as a structured random sample guided by a "balancing algorithm."

  12. Use cases versus task descriptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Søren; Kuhail, Mohammad Amin

    2011-01-01

    to specify require-ments for the same project: Acquire a new system to support a hotline. [Princi-pal ideas/results] Among the 15 replies, eight used traditional use cases that specified a dialog between users and system. Seven used a related technique, task description, which specified the customer's needs...

  13. Task-Based Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantis, Alexandros

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of task-based writing instruction, a communicative language-teaching method, on second language acquisition and differentiation of instruction for English language learners during the independent work time instructional component of the Open Court Reading program. Through student-teacher…

  14. On the Tasks of Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓菊

    2012-01-01

      Many linguists, translators, and theorists have been arguing over the approaches on translation. While putting these into use a translator may experience many pleasure and problems as well. The purpose of this article is to discuss the tasks of translation and the way of choosing the proper translation approaches according to the author’s own experience of practice.

  15. Operation REDWING

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-07-31

    only 16mm cinemascope films would be available after 1 August 1956t Act- tion was taken to modify the screens of the Terrace and Starlite theaters...approximately 900, was in operation throughout the interim and operational period. The Starlite Theater, which seats approximately 600, opened in

  16. OPERATION ASKARI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operation using conventional arms against Swapo Plan, while they were still massed in their .... stationed there was no real threat to our planned operation. the idea was to sow confusion in the minds ...... A four by four transport vehi- cle, based ...

  17. Operational Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Rosendal; Hustvedt, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    by Bakhtinian theory, Brian Edmiston developed a solution to this in the 1990s: the principle of ‘dialogic sequencing’. Aiming to escape the conflict between relativism and absolutism, we present an alternative to Edmiston’s approach, based on Niklas Luhmann’s theory of ‘operational closure’: operational...

  18. Business & Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agron, Joe

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with John D. Musso, executive director of the Association of School Business Officials (ASBO) International. Musso talks about trends and issues that will most affect school business and operations in 2007 and beyond. Despite the challenges facing school operations, he believes that the key to being successful at…

  19. Operation crosscheck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, F. C.

    1964-11-06

    This report consists of three sections covering the three major areas of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory`s participation in Operation Crosscheck. These areas are: Diagnostic Aircraft; Radiochemical Sampling; and Device Assembly and Handling, Barbers Point. The information contained in these sections has been extracted from Crosscheck post-operation reports.

  20. Operational Amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  1. Sitewide task team report for Internet policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aichele, D.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Internet is rapidly becoming the standard for communications, information transfer, and information sharing among U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organizations. It has long been used by the major laboratories, but is now beginning to be used by headquarters staff to communicate with field offices and contractors and as the access point to DOE`s repositories of information. It will soon become key to efficient conduct of operations. Sites without effective access to the Internet will have to rely on secondary, less effective communications. Therefore, the task team believes it is essential that Hanford become a full participant in utilizing this resource. To make this happen an effective access and delivery infrastructure must be provided to DOE and contractor staff and standard ways of doing business on the Internet are required. Much of the technology exists today for robust electronic interchange of information. The use of this technology needs to be expanded and coordinated throughout the DOE and Hanford contractor community. As the use of Internet within DOE is advancing rapidly, it will become the preferred method for communication and information sharing within 5 years. The conclusion of the Internet Inter-Contractor task team is that the use of the Internet is essential to communicate as well as provide and obtain information and knowledge. The Hanford Site must foster, support, and implement necessary changes to the technology infrastructure to improve user access, maintain security, and assure we are effective participants in the networked community.

  2. Multisensory temporal integration: Task and stimulus dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of human sensory systems to integrate information across the different modalities provides a wide range of behavioral and perceptual benefits. This integration process is dependent upon the temporal relationship of the different sensory signals, with stimuli occurring close together in time typically resulting in the largest behavior changes. The range of temporal intervals over which such benefits are seen is typically referred to as the temporal binding window (TBW). Given the importance of temporal factors in multisensory integration under both normal and atypical circumstances such as autism and dyslexia, the TBW has been measured with a variety of experimental protocols that differ according to criterion, task, and stimulus type, making comparisons across experiments difficult. In the current study we attempt to elucidate the role that these various factors play in the measurement of this important construct. The results show a strong effect of stimulus type, with the TBW assessed with speech stimuli being both larger and more symmetrical than that seen using simple and complex non-speech stimuli. These effects are robust across task and statistical criteria, and are highly consistent within individuals, suggesting substantial overlap in the neural and cognitive operations that govern multisensory temporal processes. PMID:23604624

  3. The Importance of Context in Task Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Context is at the core of any statistical investigation, yet many statistics tasks barely require students to go beyond superficial consideration of the contexts the tasks are situated in. In this article, I discuss a framework for evaluating the level of interaction with context a task requires of students and how to modify tasks to increase the…

  4. Tasks for Easily Modifiable Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swier, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of learner interaction in virtual worlds have tended to select basic tasks involving open-ended communication. There is evidence that such tasks are supportive of language acquisition, however it may also be beneficial to consider more complex tasks. Research in task-based learning has identified features such as non-linguistic…

  5. Cosmetology: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    These task analyses are designed to be used in combination with the "Trade and Industrial Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the cosmetology program in Virginia. The task analysis document contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the secondary…

  6. The Importance of Context in Task Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Context is at the core of any statistical investigation, yet many statistics tasks barely require students to go beyond superficial consideration of the contexts the tasks are situated in. In this article, I discuss a framework for evaluating the level of interaction with context a task requires of students and how to modify tasks to increase the…

  7. Using Multiple Unmanned Systems for a Site Security Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew O. Anderson; Curtis W. Nielsen; Mark D. McKay; Derek C. Wadsworth; Ryan C. Hruska; John A. Koudelka

    2009-04-01

    Unmanned systems are often used to augment the ability of humans to perform challenging tasks. While the value of individual unmanned vehicles have been proven for a variety of tasks, it is less understood how multiple unmanned systems should be used together to accomplish larger missions such as site security. The purpose of this paper is to discuss efforts by researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to explore the utility and practicality of operating multiple unmanned systems for a site security mission. This paper reviews the technology developed for a multi-agent mission and summarizes the lessons-learned from a technology demonstration.

  8. TRU drum corrosion task team report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooda, K.E.; Lavery, C.A.; Zeek, D.P.

    1996-05-01

    During routine inspections in March 1996, transuranic (TRU) waste drums stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) were found with pinholes and leaking fluid. These drums were overpacked, and further inspection discovered over 200 drums with similar corrosion. A task team was assigned to investigate the problem with four specific objectives: to identify any other drums in RWMC TRU storage with pinhole corrosion; to evaluate the adequacy of the RWMC inspection process; to determine the precise mechanism(s) generating the pinhole drum corrosion; and to assess the implications of this event for WIPP certifiability of waste drums. The task team investigations analyzed the source of the pinholes to be Hcl-induced localized pitting corrosion. Hcl formation is directly related to the polychlorinated hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the waste. Most of the drums showing pinhole corrosion are from Content Code-003 (CC-003) because they contain the highest amounts of polychlorinated VOCs as determined by headspace gas analysis. CC-001 drums represent the only other content code with a significant number of pinhole corrosion drums because their headspace gas VOC content, although significantly less than CC-003, is far greater than that of the other content codes. The exact mechanisms of Hcl formation could not be determined, but radiolytic and reductive dechlorination and direct reduction of halocarbons were analyzed as the likely operable reactions. The team considered the entire range of feasible options, ranked and prioritized the alternatives, and recommended the optimal solution that maximizes protection of worker and public safety while minimizing impacts on RWMC and TRU program operations.

  9. Manipulator Performance Evaluation Using Fitts' Taping Task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, J.V.; Jared, B.C.; Noakes, M.W.

    1999-04-25

    Metaphorically, a teleoperator with master controllers projects the user's arms and hands into a re- mote area, Therefore, human users interact with teleoperators at a more fundamental level than they do with most human-machine systems. Instead of inputting decisions about how the system should func- tion, teleoperator users input the movements they might make if they were truly in the remote area and the remote machine must recreate their trajectories and impedance. This intense human-machine inter- action requires displays and controls more carefully attuned to human motor capabilities than is neces- sary with most systems. It is important for teleoperated manipulators to be able to recreate human trajectories and impedance in real time. One method for assessing manipulator performance is to observe how well a system be- haves while a human user completes human dexterity tasks with it. Fitts' tapping task has been, used many times in the past for this purpose. This report describes such a performance assessment. The International Submarine Engineering (ISE) Autonomous/Teleoperated Operations Manipulator (ATOM) servomanipulator system was evalu- ated using a generic positioning accuracy task. The task is a simple one but has the merits of (1) pro- ducing a performance function estimate rather than a point estimate and (2) being widely used in the past for human and servomanipulator dexterity tests. Results of testing using this task may, therefore, allow comparison with other manipulators, and is generically representative of a broad class of tasks. Results of the testing indicate that the ATOM manipulator is capable of performing the task. Force reflection had a negative impact on task efficiency in these data. This was most likely caused by the high resistance to movement the master controller exhibited with the force reflection engaged. Measurements of exerted forces were not made, so it is not possible to say whether the force reflection helped

  10. Automated Trait Scores for "TOEFL"® Writing Tasks. Research Report. ETS RR-15-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attali, Yigal; Sinharay, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    The "e-rater"® automated essay scoring system is used operationally in the scoring of "TOEFL iBT"® independent and integrated tasks. In this study we explored the psychometric added value of reporting four trait scores for each of these two tasks, beyond the total e-rater score.The four trait scores are word choice, grammatical…

  11. Differential Endocannabinoid Regulation of Extinction in Appetitive and Aversive Barnes Maze Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harloe, John P.; Thorpe, Andrew J.; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2008-01-01

    CB[subscript 1] receptor-compromised animals show profound deficits in extinguishing learned behavior from aversive conditioning tasks, but display normal extinction learning in appetitive operant tasks. However, it is difficult to discern whether the differential involvement of the endogenous cannabinoid system on extinction results from the…

  12. Crafting Instructions Collaboratively: Student Questions and Dual Addressivity in Classroom Task Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Oliver; Cromdal, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    This study examines classroom task instructions--phases traditionally associated with noninteractional objectives and operations--and reveals their composition as interactionally complex and cocrafted. Analyses of video sequences of task instructional activity from three different secondary school lessons show that student questions routinely…

  13. Task allocation in a distributed computing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual framework is examined for task allocation in distributed systems. Application and computing system parameters critical to task allocation decision processes are discussed. Task allocation techniques are addressed which focus on achieving a balance in the load distribution among the system's processors. Equalization of computing load among the processing elements is the goal. Examples of system performance are presented for specific applications. Both static and dynamic allocation of tasks are considered and system performance is evaluated using different task allocation methodologies.

  14. Evolution of Task Partitioning in Swarm Robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrante, Eliseo,; Duenez-Guzman, E.; Turgut, A. E.; Wenseleers, Tom

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Task-partitioning refers to the process whereby a task is divided into two or more sub-tasks. Through task partitioning both efficiency and effectiveness can be improved provided the right environmental conditions. We synthesize self-organized task partitioning behaviors for a swarm of mobile robots using artificial evolution. Through validation experiments, we show that the synthesized behaviors exploits behavioral specialization despite being based on homogeneous ind...

  15. Individual Differences in Secondary Task Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    task similar to that used by Atkinson and Shiffrin (1968). The spatial task in- volved holding in memory a random pattern of plus signs. In all cases...may serve to attenuate the easy-to-hard correlation. I *1,~ __ __ _ Secondary Task Performance 33 References Atkinson , R. C., & Shiffrin , R. M. Human...aIde if nec.eaar, and Identify by block number) ability, attention, dual task, information processing, individual differences memory , secondary task

  16. Accelerator Operators and Software Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    April Miller; Michele Joyce

    2001-11-01

    At Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, accelerator operators perform tasks in their areas of specialization in addition to their machine operations duties. One crucial area in which operators contribute is software development. Operators with programming skills are uniquely qualified to develop certain controls applications because of their expertise in the day-to-day operation of the accelerator. Jefferson Lab is one of the few laboratories that utilizes the skills and knowledge of operators to create software that enhances machine operations. Through the programs written; by operators, Jefferson Lab has improved machine efficiency and beam availability. Because many of these applications involve automation of procedures and need graphical user interfaces, the scripting language Tcl and the Tk toolkit have been adopted. In addition to automation, some operator-developed applications are used for information distribution. For this purpose, several standard web development tools such as perl, VBScript, and ASP are used. Examples of applications written by operators include injector steering, spin angle changes, system status reports, magnet cycling routines, and quantum efficiency measurements. This paper summarizes how the unique knowledge of accelerator operators has contributed to the success of the Jefferson Lab control system. *This work was supported by the U.S. DOE contract No. DE-AC05-84-ER40150.

  17. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  18. Operating System for Runtime Reconfigurable Multiprocessor Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Göhringer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating systems traditionally handle the task scheduling of one or more application instances on processor-like hardware architectures. RAMPSoC, a novel runtime adaptive multiprocessor System-on-Chip, exploits the dynamic reconfiguration on FPGAs to generate, start and terminate hardware and software tasks. The hardware tasks have to be transferred to the reconfigurable hardware via a configuration access port. The software tasks can be loaded into the local memory of the respective IP core either via the configuration access port or via the on-chip communication infrastructure (e.g. a Network-on-Chip. Recent-series of Xilinx FPGAs, such as Virtex-5, provide two Internal Configuration Access Ports, which cannot be accessed simultaneously. To prevent conflicts, the access to these ports as well as the hardware resource management needs to be controlled, e.g. by a special-purpose operating system running on an embedded processor. For that purpose and to handle the relations between temporally and spatially scheduled operations, the novel approach of an operating system is of high importance. This special purpose operating system, called CAP-OS (Configuration Access Port-Operating System, which will be presented in this paper, supports the clients using the configuration port with the services of priority-based access scheduling, hardware task mapping and resource management.

  19. 76 FR 61371 - All-Hazard Position Task Books for Type 3 Incident Management Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... Section Chief. 9. Service Branch Director/Support Branch Director. 10. Branch Director (Operations Section). 11. Division/Group Supervisor. 12. Unit Leader. 13. Strike Team/Task Force Leader. 14. Technical...

  20. Developing Operator Models for UAV Search Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertuccelli, L.F.; Beckers, N.W.M.; Cummings, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    With the increased use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), it is envisioned that UAV operators will become high level mission supervisors, responsible for information management and task planning. In the context of search missions, operators supervising a large number of UAVs can become overwhelmed

  1. Net Operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋昌俊; 吴哲辉

    1992-01-01

    Two kinds of net operations.addition and Cartesian production of P/T nets,are introduced.They are defined on the set of underlying net of P/T systems.The conditions for preserving structural properties of Petri net after these operations are discussed.It is shown that the set of P/T nets forms and Abelian group for net addition operation and the inverse net of a P/T net in usual meaning of net theory is exactly the inverse of this P/T net as an element of the P/T net group;and that the set of P/T nets forms an Abelian ring for net addition and Caresian product operations.

  2. Operable Units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of operable unit data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times and...

  3. Operator theory

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    A one-sentence definition of operator theory could be: The study of (linear) continuous operations between topological vector spaces, these being in general (but not exclusively) Fréchet, Banach, or Hilbert spaces (or their duals). Operator theory is thus a very wide field, with numerous facets, both applied and theoretical. There are deep connections with complex analysis, functional analysis, mathematical physics, and electrical engineering, to name a few. Fascinating new applications and directions regularly appear, such as operator spaces, free probability, and applications to Clifford analysis. In our choice of the sections, we tried to reflect this diversity. This is a dynamic ongoing project, and more sections are planned, to complete the picture. We hope you enjoy the reading, and profit from this endeavor.

  4. ATLAS Maintenance and Operation management system

    CERN Multimedia

    Copy, B

    2007-01-01

    The maintenance and operation of the ATLAS detector will involve thousands of contributors from 170 physics institutes. Planning and coordinating the action of ATLAS members, ensuring their expertise is properly leveraged and that no parts of the detector are understaffed or overstaffed will be a challenging task. The ATLAS Maintenance and Operation application (referred to as Operation Task Planner inside the ATLAS experiment) offers a fluent web based interface that combines the flexibility and comfort of a desktop application, intuitive data visualization and navigation techniques, with a lightweight service oriented architecture. We will review the application, its usage within the ATLAS experiment, its underlying design and implementation.

  5. Novel Peritonsillar Abscess Task Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven R; Chang, C W David

    2014-07-01

    The management of peritonsillar abscesses is a skill developed early in residency training. Although drainage is not technically complicated, the procedure is intimidating to the neophyte. Task simulators have become increasingly common to provide training opportunities in a controlled environment. The authors designed a peritonsillar abscess simulator using a latex moulage of the oral cavity and other common materials. Twelve medical professionals of various levels of experience were instructed to expose, anesthetize, aspirate, and drain the simulated abscess. After completion, a questionnaire was completed by each volunteer. Initial impressions were positive that the model adequately replicated the tasks requisite for abscess drainage and was suitable as an instructional device. The initial construct cost was approximately 10 dollars, with disposables costing roughly 25 cents. Further research is under way to formally assess the simulator for face, content, and construct validity.

  6. Fuel oil quality task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laisy, J.; Turk, V. [R.W. Beckett Corp., Elyria, OH (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In April, 1996, the R.W. Beckett Corporation became aware of a series of apparently unrelated symptoms that made the leadership of the company concerned that there could be a fuel oil quality problem. A task force of company employees and industry consultants was convened to address the topic of current No. 2 heating oil quality and its effect on burner performance. The task force studied changes in fuel oil specifications and trends in properties that have occurred over the past few years. Experiments were performed at Beckett and Brookhaven National Laboratory to understand the effect of changes in some fuel oil properties. Studies by other groups were reviewed, and field installations were inspected to gain information about the performance of fuel oil that is currently being used in the U.S. and Canada. There was a special concern about the use of red dye in heating oils and the impact of sulfur levels due to the October, 1993 requirement of low sulfur (<0.05%) for on-highway diesel fuel. The results of the task force`s efforts were published in July, 1996. The primary conclusion of the task force was that there is not a crisis or widespread general problem with fuel oil quality. Localized problems that were seen may have been related to refinery practices and/or non-traditional fuel sources. System cleanliness is very important and the cause of many oil burner system problems. Finally, heating oil quality should get ongoing careful attention by Beckett engineering personnel and heating oil industry groups.

  7. Measuring Multi-tasking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    research. Table 2. Candidate MT Jobs Emergency Room Nurse Emergency Medical Technician Emergency Room Physician Intensive Care Nurse Floor Nurse Waitress ...the ICU and floor nurses, chefs, Army combat leaders, LCAC Craftmasters and LCAC Navigators who educated us about multi- tasking in the working world...different for intensive care nurses than for floor nurses. Hence, individuals were interviewed who had performed a variety of food preparation

  8. Evolutionary Computation for Sensor Planning: The Task Distribution Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Enrique; Olague, Gustavo

    2003-12-01

    Autonomous sensor planning is a problem of interest to scientists in the fields of computer vision, robotics, and photogrammetry. In automated visual tasks, a sensing planner must make complex and critical decisions involving sensor placement and the sensing task specification. This paper addresses the problem of specifying sensing tasks for a multiple manipulator workcell given an optimal sensor placement configuration. The problem is conceptually divided in two different phases: activity assignment and tour planning. To solve such problems, an optimization methodology based on evolutionary computation is developed. Operational limitations originated from the workcell configuration are considered using specialized heuristics as well as a floating-point representation based on the random keys approach. Experiments and performance results are presented.

  9. Comparative Study of Static Task Scheduling Algorithms for Heterogeneous Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miss. Kalpana A. Manudhane

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available On the distributed or parallel heterogeneous computing systems, an application is usually decomposed into several interdependent sets of co-operating subtasks and assigned to a set of available processors for execution. Task scheduling is in general NP-compete problem. Static task scheduling algorithms are categorized as Heuristic based and Guided random search based scheduling algorithms. Heuristic algorithms guaranteed to find near optimal solution in less than polynomial time. Heuristic based list scheduling algorithms are Heterogeneous Earliest Finish Time (HEFT and Critical-Path-On- -Processor (CPOP. Whereas, Guided random search based scheduling algorithms have shown robust performance on verity of schedulingproblems. Typical examples are Multiple Priority Queueing Genetic Algorithm (MPQGA, Tabu Search(TS, Ant Colony System (ACS. This paper gives comparative study of all these static task scheduling algorithms and compares them on the basis of average makespan, schedule length ratio (SLR and speedup and running time of algorithm.

  10. Evolutionary Computation for Sensor Planning: The Task Distribution Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunn Enrique

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous sensor planning is a problem of interest to scientists in the fields of computer vision, robotics, and photogrammetry. In automated visual tasks, a sensing planner must make complex and critical decisions involving sensor placement and the sensing task specification. This paper addresses the problem of specifying sensing tasks for a multiple manipulator workcell given an optimal sensor placement configuration. The problem is conceptually divided in two different phases: activity assignment and tour planning. To solve such problems, an optimization methodology based on evolutionary computation is developed. Operational limitations originated from the workcell configuration are considered using specialized heuristics as well as a floating-point representation based on the random keys approach. Experiments and performance results are presented.

  11. Cooperative Task Allocation Method of MCAV/UCAV Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle (UCAV cooperative task allocation under Manned Combat Aerial Vehicle’s (MCAV limited control is one of the important problems in UCAV research field. Hereto, we analyze the key technical and tactical indices influence task allocation problem and build an appropriate model to maximize the objective function values as well as reflecting various constraints. A novel improved multigroup ant colony algorithm (IMGACA is proposed to solve the model; the algorithm mainly includes random sequence-based UCAV selection strategy, constraint-based candidate task generation strategy, objective function value-based state transition strategy, and crossover operator-based local search strategy. Simulation results show that the built model is reasonable and the proposed algorithm performs well in feasibility, timeliness, and stability.

  12. 78 FR 63208 - UPDATE-Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Services Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of... Force (Task Force). The in-person Task Force meeting is being replaced by an abbreviated conference call... necessary scientific and logistical support for the meeting. The Task Force is an independent,......

  13. 78 FR 2996 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health... Prevention (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). The Task Force is independent and nonfederal. Its members are nationally known leaders in public...

  14. 77 FR 56845 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health... Prevention (CDC) announces the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). The Task Force is independent and nonfederal. Its members are nationally known leaders in public...

  15. 78 FR 59939 - Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Task Force (Task Force) AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health..., announcing the next meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). The document did... inability to attend the Task Force meeting due to the strict security regulations on federal...

  16. Learner-Learner Interaction during Collaborative Pragmatic Tasks: The Role of Cognitive and Pragmatic Task Demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YouJin; Taguchi, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Previous task complexity studies have suggested that learners produce more negotiation of meaning opportunities during complex tasks than simple tasks (Robinson, 2011). The present study builds on the existing task complexity literature by examining the impact of task complexity and pragmatic situational demands on the number of learning…

  17. Remote Task-level Commanding of Centaur over Time Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenghost, Debra; Ngo, Tam; Burridge, Robert; Wang, Lui; Izygon, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Remote operation of robots on the lunar surface by ground controllers poses unique human-robot interaction challenges due to time delay and constrained bandwidth. One strategy for addressing these challenges is to provide task-level commanding of robots by a ground controller. Decision-support tools are being developed at JSC for remote task-level commanding over time-delay. The approach is to provide ground procedures that guide a controller when executing task-level command sequences and aid awareness of the state of command execution in the robot. This approach is being evaluated using the Centaur robot at JSC. The Centaur Central Commander provides a task-level command interface that executes on the robot side of the delay. Decision support tools have been developed for a human Supervisor in the JSC Cockpit to use when interacting with the Centaur Central Commander. Commands to the Central Commander are defined as instructions in a procedure. Sequences of these instructions are grouped into procedures for the Cockpit Supervisor. When a Supervisor is ready to perform a task, a procedure is loaded into the decision support tool. From this tool, the Supervisor can view command sequences and dispatch individual commands to Centaur. Commands are queued for execution on the robot side of the delay. Reliable command sequences can be dispatched automatically upon approval by the Supervisor. The decision support tool provides the Supervisor with feedback about which commands are waiting for execution and which commands have finished. It also informs the Supervisor when a command fails to have its intended effect. Cockpit procedures are defined using the Procedure Representation Language (PRL) developed at JSC for mission operations. The decision support tool is based on a Procedure Sequencer and multi-agent software developed for human-robot interaction. In this paper the approach for remote task-level commanding of robots is described and the results of the evaluation

  18. Mission operations and command assurance: Instilling quality into flight operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welz, Linda L.; Witkowski, Mona M.; Bruno, Kristin J.; Potts, Sherrill S.

    1993-03-01

    Mission Operations and Command Assurance (MO&CA) is a Total Quality Management (TQM) task on JPL projects to instill quality in flight mission operations. From a system engineering view, MO&CA facilitates communication and problem-solving among flight teams and provides continuous process improvement to reduce the probability of radiating incorrect commands to a spacecraft. The MO&CA task has evolved from participating as a member of the spacecraft team to an independent team reporting directly to flight project management and providing system level assurance. JPL flight projects have benefited significantly from MO&CA's effort to contain risk and prevent rather than rework errors. MO&CA's ability to provide direct transfer of knowledge allows new projects to benefit from previous and ongoing flight experience.

  19. Multi-heuristic dynamic task allocation using genetic algorithms in a heterogeneous distributed system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Andrew J; Keane, Thomas M; Naughton, Thomas J

    2010-07-01

    We present a multi-heuristic evolutionary task allocation algorithm to dynamically map tasks to processors in a heterogeneous distributed system. It utilizes a genetic algorithm, combined with eight common heuristics, in an effort to minimize the total execution time. It operates on batches of unmapped tasks and can preemptively remap tasks to processors. The algorithm has been implemented on a Java distributed system and evaluated with a set of six problems from the areas of bioinformatics, biomedical engineering, computer science and cryptography. Experiments using up to 150 heterogeneous processors show that the algorithm achieves better efficiency than other state-of-the-art heuristic algorithms.

  20. IEA Task 24 Solar procurement 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellehauge, K.; Oestergaard, I. [Teknologisk Institut, Taastrup. SolEnergiCentret (Denmark); Gramkow, L. [Esbensen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2002-04-01

    The objective of the project is to develop and improve large procurements of solar heating systems in order to be able to place large orders with manufacturers and suppliers. The project work will be carried out as an international co-operation under IEA Task 24 with the title 'Solar Procurement'. By co-ordinating the effort between the 4-6 participating countries, the objective is to purchase at least 10,000 solar heating systems, of this amount 1,000-2,000 in Denmark. Such large orders make it possible for manufacturers and suppliers to deliver systems considerably cheaper, and it will be possible to develop systems for given specifications on output and efficiency. These co-ordinated large orders are expected to improve the price/efficiency conditions by up to 50%. The so called 'procurement process' (co-ordinated international procurement based on goal-oriented system development in co-operation between customers and suppliers/manufacturers) will in the project be followed up by information/marketing, education, financing schemes, service schemes, quality assurance and technical support. The project is divided into two main areas (IEA subtasks). 1: 'Procurement and Marketing' and 2: 'Creation of Tools'. Denmark has been requested to be the project manager of subtask 2, 'Creation of Tools'. (EHS)

  1. Benefits of Instructed Responding in Manual Assembly Tasks: An ERP Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijović, Pavle; Ković, Vanja; De Vos, Maarten; Mačužić, Ivan; Jeremić, Branislav; Gligorijević, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The majority of neuroergonomics studies are focused mainly on investigating the interaction between operators and automated systems. Far less attention has been dedicated to the investigation of brain processes in more traditional workplaces, such as manual assembly, which are still ubiquitous in industry. The present study investigates whether assembly workers' attention can be enhanced if they are instructed with which hand to initiate the assembly operation, as opposed to the case when they can commence the operation with whichever hand they prefer. For this aim, we replicated a specific workplace, where 17 participants in the study simulated a manual assembly operation of the rubber hoses that are used in vehicle hydraulic brake systems, while wearing wireless electroencephalography (EEG). The specific EEG feature of interest for this study was the P300 components' amplitude of the event-related potential (ERP), as it has previously been shown that it is positively related to human attention. The behavioral attention-related modality of reaction times (RTs) was also recorded. Participants were presented with two distinct tasks during the simulated operation, which were counterbalanced across participants. In the first task, digits were used as indicators for the operation initiation (Numbers task), where participants could freely choose with which hand they would commence the action upon seeing the digit. In the second task, participants were presented with arrows, which served as instructed operation initiators (Arrows task), and they were instructed to start each operation with the hand that corresponded to the arrow direction. The results of this study showed that the P300 amplitude was significantly higher in the instructed condition. Interestingly, the RTs did not differ across any task conditions. This, together with the other findings of this study, suggests that attention levels can be increased using instructed responses without compromising work

  2. Applied Operations Research: Operator's Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operates high value critical equipment (HVCE) that requires trouble shooting, periodic maintenance and continued monitoring by Operations staff. The complexity HVCE and information required to maintain and trouble shoot HVCE to assure continued mission success as paper is voluminous. Training on new HVCE is commensurate with the need for equipment maintenance. LaRC Research Directorate has undertaken a proactive research to support Operations staff by initiation of the development and prototyping an electronic computer based portable maintenance aid (Operator's Assistant). This research established a goal with multiple objectives and a working prototype was developed. The research identified affordable solutions; constraints; demonstrated use of commercial off the shelf software; use of the US Coast Guard maintenance solution; NASA Procedure Representation Language; and the identification of computer system strategies; where these demonstrations and capabilities support the Operator, and maintenance. The results revealed validation against measures of effectiveness and overall proved a substantial training and capability sustainment tool. The research indicated that the OA could be deployed operationally at the LaRC Compressor Station with an expectation of satisfactorily results and to obtain additional lessons learned prior to deployment at other LaRC Research Directorate Facilities. The research revealed projected cost and time savings.

  3. Operational Risk Defined Through a Complex Operating Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-26

    NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Major Jeff Pattay 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...Development JOPP Joint Operations Planning Process NGO Non-Governmental Organization PRC Profitable Risk Control SWOT Strengths, Weaknesses...overwhelming, but systems are not impregnable due to 14 Robert Jervis, System Effects: Complexity in Political and Social Life (Princeton, NJ

  4. Wind power forecasting: IEA Wind Task 36 & future research issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, G.; Cline, J.; Frank, H.; Shaw, W.; Pinson, P.; Hodge, B.-M.; Kariniotakis, G.; Madsen, J.; Möhrlen, C.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the new International Energy Agency Wind Task 36 on Forecasting, and invites to collaborate within the group. Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from the weather prediction side and from the usage of the forecasts. The new International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on Forecasting for Wind Energy tries to organise international collaboration, among national meteorological centres with an interest and/or large projects on wind forecast improvements (NOAA, DWD, MetOffice, met.no, DMI,...), operational forecaster and forecast users. The Task is divided in three work packages: Firstly, a collaboration on the improvement of the scientific basis for the wind predictions themselves. This includes numerical weather prediction model physics, but also widely distributed information on accessible datasets. Secondly, we will be aiming at an international pre-standard (an IEA Recommended Practice) on benchmarking and comparing wind power forecasts, including probabilistic forecasts. This WP will also organise benchmarks, in cooperation with the IEA Task WakeBench. Thirdly, we will be engaging end users aiming at dissemination of the best practice in the usage of wind power predictions. As first results, an overview of current issues for research in short-term forecasting of wind power is presented.

  5. Task Classification Based Energy-Aware Consolidation in Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HeeSeok Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a cloud data center, in which the service provider supplies virtual machines (VMs on hosts or physical machines (PMs to its subscribers for computation in an on-demand fashion. For the cloud data center, we propose a task consolidation algorithm based on task classification (i.e., computation-intensive and data-intensive and resource utilization (e.g., CPU and RAM. Furthermore, we design a VM consolidation algorithm to balance task execution time and energy consumption without violating a predefined service level agreement (SLA. Unlike the existing research on VM consolidation or scheduling that applies none or single threshold schemes, we focus on a double threshold (upper and lower scheme, which is used for VM consolidation. More specifically, when a host operates with resource utilization below the lower threshold, all the VMs on the host will be scheduled to be migrated to other hosts and then the host will be powered down, while when a host operates with resource utilization above the upper threshold, a VM will be migrated to avoid using 100% of resource utilization. Based on experimental performance evaluations with real-world traces, we prove that our task classification based energy-aware consolidation algorithm (TCEA achieves a significant energy reduction without incurring predefined SLA violations.

  6. Dashboard Task Monitor for managing ATLAS user analysis on the Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, L; The ATLAS collaboration; Jha, M; Karavakis, E; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Saiz, P; Schovancova, J; Tuckett, D

    2013-01-01

    The organization of the distributed user analysis on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure is one of the most challenging tasks among the computing activities at the Large Hadron Collider. The Experiment Dashboard offers a solution that not only monitors but also manages (kill, resubmit) user tasks and jobs via a web interface. The ATLAS Dashboard Task Monitor provides analysis users with a tool that is operating system and GRID environment independent. This contribution describes the functionality of the application and its implementation details, in particular authentication, authorization and audit of the management operations.

  7. Dashboard Task Monitor for managing ATLAS user analysis on the Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, L; Jha, M; Karavakis, E; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Saiz, P; Schovancova, J; Tuckett, D

    2014-01-01

    The organization of the distributed user analysis on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure is one of the most challenging tasks among the computing activities at the Large Hadron Collider. The Experiment Dashboard offers a solution that not only monitors but also manages (kill, resubmit) user tasks and jobs via a web interface. The ATLAS Dashboard Task Monitor provides analysis users with a tool that is independent of the operating system and GRID environment . This contribution describes the functionality of the application and its implementation details, in particular authentication, authorization and audit of the management operations.

  8. The Logic Description of the System of Embedded Hardware Logic Task

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Dan; ZHU Yong; ZHANG Jiangling

    2006-01-01

    A new task mode, hardware logic task mode, is presented. Its architecture, schedule and implementation are described with HDL( Hardware Description Language ), and the validity of the system has been proved by logic simulation. It has advantage for real-time applications and overheadsaving for operating system, so it is profitable for the controller in the embedded system. The relationship among RTOS (Real-Time Operating System), SoC(System on Chip), VIA (Virtual Interface Architecture) and hardware logic task is also discussed in the paper.

  9. Dashboard Task Monitor for Managing ATLAS User Analysis on the Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, L.; Andreeva, J.; Jha, M.; Karavakis, E.; Kokoszkiewicz, L.; Saiz, P.; Schovancova, J.; Tuckett, D.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The organization of the distributed user analysis on the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) infrastructure is one of the most challenging tasks among the computing activities at the Large Hadron Collider. The Experiment Dashboard offers a solution that not only monitors but also manages (kill, resubmit) user tasks and jobs via a web interface. The ATLAS Dashboard Task Monitor provides analysis users with a tool that is independent of the operating system and Grid environment. This contribution describes the functionality of the application and its implementation details, in particular authentication, authorization and audit of the management operations.

  10. Quality of Language and Purpose of Task: Patterns of Learners' Language on Two Oral Communication Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygate, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Examines the performance of Hungarian secondary school students on two types of unscripted tasks--an argument task and a narrative task. Focuses on grammatical patterns of learner language, and reports significant differences in the learners' performance. (Author/VWL)

  11. Cognitive task load in a naval ship control centre: from identification to prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootjen, M; Neerincx, M A; Veltman, J A

    Deployment of information and communication technology will lead to further automation of control centre tasks and an increasing amount of information to be processed. A method for establishing adequate levels of cognitive task load for the operators in such complex environments has been developed. It is based on a model distinguishing three load factors: time occupied, task-set switching, and level of information processing. Application of the method resulted in eight scenarios for eight extremes of task load (i.e. low and high values for each load factor). These scenarios were performed by 13 teams in a high-fidelity control centre simulator of the Royal Netherlands Navy. The results show that the method provides good prediction of the task load that will actually appear in the simulator. The model allowed identification of under- and overload situations showing negative effects on operator performance corresponding to controlled experiments in a less realistic task environment. Tools proposed to keep the operator at an optimum task load are (adaptive) task allocation and interface support.

  12. Building a framework for a dual task taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Tara L; Lamberg, Eric M; Muratori, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    The study of dual task interference has gained increasing attention in the literature for the past 35 years, with six MEDLINE citations in 1979 growing to 351 citations indexed in 2014 and a peak of 454 cited papers in 2013. Increasingly, researchers are examining dual task cost in individuals with pathology, including those with neurodegenerative diseases. While the influence of these papers has extended from the laboratory to the clinic, the field has evolved without clear definitions of commonly used terms and with extreme variations in experimental procedures. As a result, it is difficult to examine the interference literature as a single body of work. In this paper we present a new taxonomy for classifying cognitive-motor and motor-motor interference within the study of dual task behaviors that connects traditional concepts of learning and principles of motor control with current issues of multitasking analysis. As a first step in the process we provide an operational definition of dual task, distinguishing it from a complex single task. We present this new taxonomy, inclusive of both cognitive and motor modalities, as a working model; one that we hope will generate discussion and create a framework from which one can view previous studies and develop questions of interest.

  13. Vowel reduction across tasks for male speakers of American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Christina; Weismer, Gary

    2016-07-01

    This study examined acoustic variation of vowels within speakers across speech tasks. The overarching goal of the study was to understand within-speaker variation as one index of the range of normal speech motor behavior for American English vowels. Ten male speakers of American English performed four speech tasks including citation form sentence reading with a clear-speech style (clear-speech), citation form sentence reading (citation), passage reading (reading), and conversational speech (conversation). Eight monophthong vowels in a variety of consonant contexts were studied. Clear-speech was operationally defined as the reference point for describing variation. Acoustic measures associated with the conventions of vowel targets were obtained and examined. These included temporal midpoint formant frequencies for the first three formants (F1, F2, and F3) and the derived Euclidean distances in the F1-F2 and F2-F3 planes. Results indicated that reduction toward the center of the F1-F2 and F2-F3 planes increased in magnitude across the tasks in the order of clear-speech, citation, reading, and conversation. The cross-task variation was comparable for all speakers despite fine-grained individual differences. The characteristics of systematic within-speaker acoustic variation across tasks have potential implications for the understanding of the mechanisms of speech motor control and motor speech disorders.

  14. Building a Framework for a Dual Task Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. McIsaac

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of dual task interference has gained increasing attention in the literature for the past 35 years, with six MEDLINE citations in 1979 growing to 351 citations indexed in 2014 and a peak of 454 cited papers in 2013. Increasingly, researchers are examining dual task cost in individuals with pathology, including those with neurodegenerative diseases. While the influence of these papers has extended from the laboratory to the clinic, the field has evolved without clear definitions of commonly used terms and with extreme variations in experimental procedures. As a result, it is difficult to examine the interference literature as a single body of work. In this paper we present a new taxonomy for classifying cognitive-motor and motor-motor interference within the study of dual task behaviors that connects traditional concepts of learning and principles of motor control with current issues of multitasking analysis. As a first step in the process we provide an operational definition of dual task, distinguishing it from a complex single task. We present this new taxonomy, inclusive of both cognitive and motor modalities, as a working model; one that we hope will generate discussion and create a framework from which one can view previous studies and develop questions of interest.

  15. Levels of Information Processing in a Fitts law task (LIPFitts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosier, K. L.; Hart, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    State-of-the-art flight technology has restructured the task of human operators, decreasing the need for physical and sensory resources, and increasing the quantity of cognitive effort required, changing it qualitatively. Recent technological advances have the most potential for impacting a pilot in two areas: performance and mental workload. In an environment in which timing is critical, additional cognitive processing can cause performance decrements, and increase a pilot's perception of the mental workload involved. The effects of stimulus processing demands on motor response performance and subjective mental workload are examined, using different combinations of response selection and target acquisition tasks. The information processing demands of the response selection were varied (e.g., Sternberg memory set tasks, math equations, pattern matching), as was the difficulty of the response execution. Response latency as well as subjective workload ratings varied in accordance with the cognitive complexity of the task. Movement times varied according to the difficulty of the response execution task. Implications in terms of real-world flight situations are discussed.

  16. Task modulates functional connectivity networks in free viewing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidkhani, Hossein; Nikolaev, Andrey R; Meghanathan, Radha Nila; Pezeshk, Hamid; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2017-08-03

    In free visual exploration, eye-movement is immediately followed by dynamic reconfiguration of brain functional connectivity. We studied the task-dependency of this process in a combined visual search-change detection experiment. Participants viewed two (nearly) same displays in succession. First time they had to find and remember multiple targets among distractors, so the ongoing task involved memory encoding. Second time they had to determine if a target had changed in orientation, so the ongoing task involved memory retrieval. From multichannel EEG recorded during 200 ms intervals time-locked to fixation onsets, we estimated the functional connectivity using a weighted phase lag index at the frequencies of theta, alpha, and beta bands, and derived global and local measures of the functional connectivity graphs. We found differences between both memory task conditions for several network measures, such as mean path length, radius, diameter, closeness and eccentricity, mainly in the alpha band. Both the local and the global measures indicated that encoding involved a more segregated mode of operation than retrieval. These differences arose immediately after fixation onset and persisted for the entire duration of the lambda complex, an evoked potential commonly associated with early visual perception. We concluded that encoding and retrieval differentially shape network configurations involved in early visual perception, affecting the way the visual input is processed at each fixation. These findings demonstrate that task requirements dynamically control the functional connectivity networks involved in early visual perception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Task-Based Method for Designing Underactuated Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Kamada

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce a task‐based method for designing underactuated multi‐joint prosthetic hands for specific grasping tasks. The designed robotic hands or prosthetic hands contain fewer independent actuators than joints. We chose a few specific grasping tasks that are frequently repeated in everyday life and analysed joint motions of the hand during the completion of each task and the level of participation of each joint. The information was used for the synthesis of dedicated underactuated mechanisms that can operate in a low dimensional task coordinate space. We propose two methods for reducing the actuators’ number. The kinematic parameters of the synthesized mechanism are determined by using a numerical approach. In this study the joint angles of the synthesized hand are considered as linearly dependent on the displacements of the actuators. We introduced a special error index that allowed us to compare the original trajectory and the trajectory performed by the synthesized mechanism, and to select the kinematic parameters of the new kinematic structure as a way to reduce the error. The approach allows the design of simple gripper mechanisms with good accuracy for the preliminary defined tasks.

  18. National Ignition Facility (NIF) operations procedures plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantrom, D.

    1998-05-06

    The purpose of this Operations Procedures Plan is to establish a standard procedure which outlines how NIF Operations procedures will be developed (i.e , written, edited, reviewed, approved, published, revised) and accessed by the NIF Operations staff who must use procedures in order to accomplish their tasks. In addition, this Plan is designed to provide a guide to the NIF Project staff to assist them in planning and writing procedures. Also, resource and scheduling information is provided.

  19. The new IEA Wind Task 36 on Wind Power Forecasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebel, Gregor; Cline, Joel; Frank, Helmut;

    Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from the weather prediction side and from the usage of the forecasts. The new International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on Forecasting for Wind...... Energy tries to organise international collaboration, among national weather centres with an interest and/or large projects on wind forecast improvements (NOAA, DWD, …), operational forecaster and forecast users. The Task is divided in three work packages: Firstly, a collaboration on the improvement...... of the scientific basis for the wind predictions themselves. This includes numerical weather prediction model physics, but also widely distributed information on accessible datasets. Secondly, we will be aiming at an international pre-standard (an IEA Recommended Practice) on benchmarking and comparing wind power...

  20. International solar energy research co-operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P.; Peippo, K.; Konttinen, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Advanced Energy Systems

    1998-10-01

    Finland has participated in several IEA activities during 1996-97. HUT coordinates the activities, but practical participation in collaborative actions take place both in industrial companies and research organisations. Neste Ltd has directly participated in several tasks and information of results has been disseminated more widely to Finnish industries and organisations. Co-operation projects covered here are: (1) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 1 `Information dissemination`, (2) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 3 `Use of Photovoltaic systems in Stand Alone and Island Applications`, (3) IEA Photovoltaic Power Systems Task 7 `Photovoltaics in built environment`, (4) IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Program Task 16 `Photovoltaics in buildings` and (5) IEA Working Group `Materials in Solar Thermal Collectors`

  1. Gasification Studies Task 4 Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitty, Kevin; Fletcher, Thomas; Pugmire, Ronald; Smith, Philip; Sutherland, James; Thornock, Jeremy; Boshayeshi, Babak; Hunsacker, Isaac; Lewis, Aaron; Waind, Travis; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-02-01

    A key objective of the Task 4 activities has been to develop simulation tools to support development, troubleshooting and optimization of pressurized entrained-flow coal gasifiers. The overall gasifier models (Subtask 4.1) combine submodels for fluid flow (Subtask 4.2) and heat transfer (Subtask 4.3) with fundamental understanding of the chemical processes (Subtask 4.4) processes that take place as coal particles are converted to synthesis gas and slag. However, it is important to be able to compare predictions from the models against data obtained from actual operating coal gasifiers, and Subtask 4.6 aims to provide an accessible, non-proprietary system, which can be operated over a wide range of conditions to provide well-characterized data for model validation. Highlights of this work include: • Verification and validation activities performed with the Arches coal gasification simulation tool on experimental data from the CANMET gasifier (Subtask 4.1). • The simulation of multiphase reacting flows with coal particles including detailed gas-phase chemistry calculations using an extension of the one-dimensional turbulence model’s capability (Subtask 4.2). • The demonstration and implementation of the Reverse Monte Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) radiation algorithm in the ARCHES code (Subtask 4.3). • Determination of steam and CO{sub 2} gasification kinetics of bituminous coal chars at high temperature and elevated pressure under entrained-flow conditions (Subtask 4.4). In addition, attempts were made to gain insight into the chemical structure differences between young and mature coal soot, but both NMR and TEM characterization efforts were hampered by the highly reacted nature of the soot. • The development, operation, and demonstration of in-situ gas phase measurements from the University of Utah’s pilot-scale entrained-flow coal gasifier (EFG) (Subtask 4.6). This subtask aimed at acquiring predictable, consistent performance and characterizing the

  2. TASKS OF THE "INTENSIVE READING"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍向梅

    1984-01-01

    @@ To Chinese students who are learning English as a foreign language, the "intensive reading" course is of great practical value,especially in the intermediate stage,i.e.senior-middle school or the second or third year in college. "Intensive reading"implies the recognition of the configuration, pronunciation, grammatical inflexion and structure of words, sentences, paragraphs, and the whole text. It strength ens listening and speaking, affords language, content, and models for writing.It helps the student lay a solid foundation of the language. Thus, the tasks assigned to the "intensive reading" are worth studying.

  3. Task descriptions versus use cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Søren; Kuhail, Mohammad Amin

    2011-01-01

    Use cases are widely used as a substantial part of requirements, also when little programming is expected (COTS-based systems, Commercial-Off-The-Shelf). Are use cases effective as requirements? To answer this question, we invited professionals and researchers to specify requirements for the same...... project: Acquire a new system to support a hotline. Among the 15 replies, eight used traditional use cases that specified a dialog between user and system. Seven used a related technique, task description, which specified the customer’s needs without specifying a dialog. It also allowed the analyst...

  4. Use cases versus task descriptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Søren; Kuhail, Mohammad Amin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract. [Context and motivation] Use cases are widely used as a substantial part of requirements, also when little programming is expected (COTS-based systems). [Question/problem] Are use cases effective as requirements? To an-swer this question, we invited professionals and researchers...... to specify require-ments for the same project: Acquire a new system to support a hotline. [Princi-pal ideas/results] Among the 15 replies, eight used traditional use cases that specified a dialog between users and system. Seven used a related technique, task description, which specified the customer's needs...

  5. Operational Circulars

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Operational Circular N° 4 - April 2003 Conditions for use by members of the CERN personnel of vehicles belonging to or rented by CERN - This circular has been drawn up. Operational Circular N° 5 - October 2000 Use of CERN computing facilities - Further details on the personal use of CERN computing facilities Operational Circular N° 5 and its Subsidiary Rules http://cern.ch/ComputingRules defines the rules for the use of CERN computing facilities. One of the basic principles governing such use is that it must come within the professional duties of the user concerned, as defined by the user's divisional hierarchy. However, personal use of the computing facilities is tolerated or allowed provided : a) It is in compliance with Operational Circular N° 5 and not detrimental to official duties, including those of other users; b) the frequency and duration is limited and there is a negligible use of CERN resources; c) it does not constitute a political, commercial and/or profit-making activity; d) it is not...

  6. Operative links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2010-01-01

    as networks: second, a semantic perspective on discourses and concepts of health, and, third, a health pedagogical perspective on participation, intervention, and roles. This paper argues for the importance of 'operative links' between different levels in health strategies. It is proposed that such links...

  7. Operation Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stüben, Henning; Tietjen, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: This paper seeks to challenge the notion of context from an operational perspective. Can we grasp the forces that shape the complex conditions for an architectural or urban design within the notion of context? By shifting the gaze towards the agency of architecture, contextual analysis...

  8. EFFORTS Sub-task report on task 4.2: Cold forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Christensen, Thomas Vennick; Bay, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Task 4.2 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.2 experimental analysis of cold forming as regards form filling, interface stresses and forces and moments using sof model materials have been carried out.......Task 4.2 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.2 experimental analysis of cold forming as regards form filling, interface stresses and forces and moments using sof model materials have been carried out....

  9. Assignment of Cooperating UAVs to Simultaneous Tasks using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-18

    multiple task assignment problem TSP travelling salesman problem UAV unmanned aerial vehicle VRP vehicle routing problem I. Introduction Many...assignment problem (GAP),3 and the vehicle routing problem (VRP).4 In all of these classical problems the minimum cost assignment is sought, where: in...17–23. 16Baker, B. M. and Ayechew, M. A., “A Genetic Algorithm for the Vehicle Routing Problem ,” Computers and Operations Research, Vol. 30, 2003, pp

  10. Five strands of math tasks big book : grades pk-2

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat; Forest, Chris

    2009-01-01

    For grades PK-2, our Common Core State Standards-based resource meets the five strands of math concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to learn and review the concepts in unique ways. Included are challenging problem-solving tasks which will push the boundaries of critical thought and demonstrate to students the importance of mathematical problems in Number & Operations, Geometry, Measurement, Data Analysis & Probability and Algebra using real world situations.

  11. Strategy Generalization across Orientation Tasks: Testing a Computational Cognitive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Shepard & Metzler, 1971) and vision (e.g., Tarr & Pinker , 1989). Although orientation tasks are a class of problem that share important features, there...experimental literature (Hirtle & Jonides, 1985; McNamara, 1986; McNamara, Hardy, & Hirtle 1989; Stevens & Coupe, 1978). However, the operations that are...J. (1971). Mental rotation of three dimensional objects. Science, 171, 701–703. Stevens , A., & Coupe, P. (1978). Distortions in judged spatial

  12. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Comment In an effort to make the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations clearer and ... Current as of: May 2016 Internet Citation: Home . U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. August 2016. https://www. ...

  13. Pre-task music improves swimming performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirmaul, B P; Dos Santos, R V; Da Silva Neto, L V

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pre-task music on swimming performance and other psychological variables. A randomized counterbalanced within-subjects (experimental and control condition) design was employed. Eighteen regional level male swimmers performed two 200-m freestyle swimming time trials. Participants were exposed to either 5 minutes of self-selected music (pre-task music condition) or 5 minutes of silence (control condition) and, after 1 minute, performed the swimming task. Swimming time was significantly shorter (-1.44%) in the pre-task music condition. Listening to pre-task music increased motivation to perform the swimming task, while arousal remained unchanged. While fatigue increased after the swimming task in both conditions, vigor, ratings of perceived exertion and affective valence were unaltered. It is concluded, for the first time, that pre-task music improves swimming performance.

  14. The ability to solve methodical tasks as an inner reserve of teacher’s methodical competency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Алексеевна Скворцова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We interprete the teacher's methodical competency as an ability to carry out methodical activity effectively. We present the teacher's methodical activity as solving a number of methodical tasks. Thus, we consider the ability to carry out methodical activity as an ability to solve methodical tasks. We define a methodical task as a situation that occurs in the process of teacher's methodical activity the purpose of which is to teach pupils certain content.Methodical tasks are classified according to the nature of interaction "teacher-pupil" on practical (providing direct interaction "teacher-pupil" and intellectual (not providing direct interaction "teacher-pupil"; according to problematic level - on standard (a teacher possesses ready means of action with methodical objects and problematic (a teacher does not possess any examples of methodical activity and is in a situation of uncertainty. The result of teacher's solving a practical methodical task is teaching pupils certain subject contents; the result of teacher's solving an intellectual task is receiving certain methodical concept, fact or method of operation. Meanwhile, both practical and intellectual methodical tasks may occur either standard or problematic for a teacher. On the basis of an author's classification of methodical tasks on standard, problematic, practical and intellectual we've studied the inner composition of the ability to solve different kinds of methodical tasks such as standard intellectual, standard practical, problematic intellectual and problematic practical tasks. It is clear that the inner composition of these abilities much differs, but, in general, in order to solve any methodical task a teacher must carry out a number of actions: 1 a definition of a situation's goal and the conditions of its achievement: a definition of a task and / or analysis of a task situation; 2 actualization of theoretical information and a known way of solving a task; 3 usage of a known way

  15. Measurement of SIFT operating system overhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, D. L.; Butler, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The overhead of the software implemented fault tolerance (SIFT) operating system was measured. Several versions of the operating system evolved. Each version represents different strategies employed to improve the measured performance. Three of these versions are analyzed. The internal data structures of the operating systems are discussed. The overhead of the SIFT operating system was found to be of two types: vote overhead and executive task overhead. Both types of overhead were found to be significant in all versions of the system. Improvements substantially reduced this overhead; even with these improvements, the operating system consumed well over 50% of the available processing time.

  16. Repository operational criteria comparative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hageman, J.P.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the ``Repository Operational Criteria (ROC) Feasibility Studies`` (or ROC task) was to conduct comprehensive and integrated analyses of repository design, construction, and operations criteria in 10 CFR Part 60 regulations considering the interfaces among the components of the regulations and impacts of any potential changes to those regulations. The ROC task addresses regulatory criteria and uncertainties related to the preclosure aspects of the geologic repository. Those parts of 10 CFR Part 60 that require routine guidance or minor changes to the rule were addressed in Hageman and Chowdhury, 1992. The ROC task shows a possible need for further regulatory clarity, by major changes to the rule, related to the design bases and siting of a geologic repository operations area and radiological emergency planning in order to assure defense-in-depth. The analyses, presented in this report, resulted in the development and refinement of regulatory concepts and their supporting rationale for recommendations for potential major changes to 10 CFR Pan 0 regulations.

  17. Benefits of Instructed Responding in Manual Assembly Tasks: An ERP Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavle eMijović

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of neuroergonomics studies are focused mainly on investigating the interaction between operators and automated systems. Far less attention has been dedicated to the investigation of brain processes in more traditional workplaces, such as manual assembly, which are still ubiquitous in industry. The present study investigates whether assembly workers’ attention can be enhanced if they are instructed with which hand to initiate the assembly operation, as opposed to the case when they can commence the operation with whichever hand they prefer. For this aim, we replicated a specific workplace, where seventeen participants in the study simulated a manual assembly operation of the rubber hoses that are used in vehicle hydraulic brake systems, while wearing wireless electroencephalography (EEG. The specific EEG feature of interest for this study was the P300 components’ amplitude of the event-related potential (ERP, as it has previously been shown that it is positively related to human attention. The behavioral attention-related modality of reaction times (RTs was also recorded. Participants were presented with two distinct tasks during the simulated operation, which were counterbalanced across participants. In the first task, digits were used as indicators for the operation initiation (Numbers task, where participants could freely choose with which hand they would commence the action upon seeing the digit. In the second task, participants were presented with arrows, which served as instructed operation initiators (Arrows task, and they were instructed to start each operation with the hand that corresponded to the arrow direction. The results of this study showed that the P300 amplitude was significantly higher in the instructed condition. Interestingly, the RTs did not differ across any task conditions. This, together with the other findings of this study, suggests that attention levels can be increased using instructed responses

  18. The classification of vigilance tasks in the real world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Fiona M

    2008-11-01

    The ability to generalise vigilance research to operational environments has been questioned, largely due to differences between laboratory research and real-world settings. The taxonomy of vigilance tasks proposed by Parasuraman and Davies (1977) represents an attempt to classify vigilance tasks so that tasks with similar information-processing demands can be compared and the ability to generalise results enhanced. Although the taxonomy originally included complexity, the term specifically referred to multiple sources of information. Complexity has been overlooked in much of the traditional vigilance literature, although it is included in more recent studies of jobs such as air traffic control. In this paper, the taxonomy is evaluated in relation to two vigilance intensive jobs - closed circuit television surveillance operators and air traffic controllers. In its present form, the existing taxonomy of experimental settings has limited applicability to these operational settings. Therefore, recommendations for expanding the taxonomy to include more aspects of complexity are made. It is argued that the revised taxonomy be used in conjunction with situation awareness, which makes provision for the cognitive processes involved in these jobs.

  19. Task Difficulty in Oral Speech Act Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Naoko

    2007-01-01

    This study took a pragmatic approach to examining the effects of task difficulty on L2 oral output. Twenty native English speakers and 59 Japanese students of English at two different proficiency levels produced speech acts of requests and refusals in a role play task. The task had two situation types based on three social variables:…

  20. A Task Is a Task Is a Task Is a Task... Or Is It? Researching Telecollaborative Teacher Competence Development--The Need for More Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hartmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The concept of task has become central not only to an understanding of language learning per se, but also to the design and research of Online Intercultural Exchanges (OIEs). While research on the design of tasks in OIEs has been very productive, we still lack insights into how teachers develop competences in task design on the micro-level.…

  1. Task Repetition and Second Language Speech Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Craig; Kormos, Judit; Minn, Danny

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between the repetition of oral monologue tasks and immediate gains in L2 fluency. It considers the effect of aural-oral task repetition on speech rate, frequency of clause-final and midclause filled pauses, and overt self-repairs across different task types and proficiency levels and relates these findings to…

  2. Imagining Mathematics Teaching via Scripting Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazkis, Rina; Sinclair, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    We discuss an innovative task used in teacher education--Lesson Play--that involves presenting a lesson in the form of an interaction between a teacher and students. We describe the motivation for the development of this task and, through specific examples, describe the iterative design process in which the task was refined and improved. We…

  3. What Makes a Mathematical Task Interesting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Rimma

    2016-01-01

    The study addresses the question of what makes a mathematical task interesting to the 9th year students. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 15 students of purposive selection of the 9th year. The students were asked to recall a task they found interesting and engaging during the past three years. An analysis of the tasks was made…

  4. Task Complexity and Second Language Narrative Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Examines differences in oral narrative discourse of adult second-language learners of English on narrative tasks simulating the ability to describe events in the Here-and-Now versus the There-and-Then. Results indicate that complex tasks elicit less fluent, but more accurate and complex narration than do simpler tasks. (90 references) (Author/CK)

  5. Research on Task-Based Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玲玲

    2014-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief introduction to Task-Based Language Teaching(TBLT).The Task-Based Language Teaching(TBLA) has gained popularity in the field of language teaching since the last decade of the 20th century.This paper mainly il ustrates the definition,importance and approaches of Task-Based Language Teaching(TBLA).

  6. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD After Your Operation Back to Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD Welcome Your Lung ...

  7. Machine Learning with Operational Costs

    CERN Document Server

    Tulabandhula, Theja

    2011-01-01

    This work concerns the way that statistical models are used to make decisions. In particular, we aim to merge the way estimation algorithms are designed with how they are used for a subsequent task. Our methodology considers the operational cost of carrying out a policy, based on a predictive model. The operational cost becomes a regularization term in the learning algorithm's objective function, allowing either an \\textit{optimistic} or \\textit{pessimistic} view of possible costs. Limiting the operational cost reduces the hypothesis space for the predictive model, and can thus improve generalization. We show that different types of operational problems can lead to the same type of restriction on the hypothesis space, namely the restriction to an intersection of an $\\ell_{q}$ ball with a halfspace. We bound the complexity of such hypothesis spaces by proposing a technique that involves counting integer points in polyhedrons.

  8. Operations Data Files, driving force behind International Space Station operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppenbrouwers, Tom; Ferra, Lionel; Markus, Michael; Wolff, Mikael

    2017-09-01

    Almost all tasks performed by the astronauts on-board the International Space Station (ISS) and by ground controllers in Mission Control Centre, from operation and maintenance of station systems to the execution of scientific experiments or high risk visiting vehicles docking manoeuvres, would not be possible without Operations Data Files (ODF). ODFs are the User Manuals of the Space Station and have multiple faces, going from traditional step-by-step procedures, scripts, cue cards, over displays, to software which guides the crew through the execution of certain tasks. Those key operational documents are standardized as they are used on-board the Space Station by an international crew constantly changing every 3 months. Furthermore this harmonization effort is paramount for consistency as the crew moves from one element to another in a matter of seconds, and from one activity to another. On ground, a significant large group of experts from all International Partners drafts, prepares reviews and approves on a daily basis all Operations Data Files, ensuring their timely availability on-board the ISS for all activities. Unavailability of these operational documents will halt the conduct of experiments or cancel milestone events. This paper will give an insight in the ground preparation work for the ODFs (with a focus on ESA ODF processes) and will present an overview on ODF formats and their usage within the ISS environment today and show how vital they are. Furthermore the focus will be on the recently implemented ODF features, which significantly ease the use of this documentation and improve the efficiency of the astronauts performing the tasks. Examples are short video demonstrations, interactive 3D animations, Execute Tailored Procedures (XTP-versions), tablet products, etc.

  9. Delays without mistakes: response time and error distributions in dual-task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Esteban Kamienkowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When two tasks are presented within a short interval, a delay in the execution of the second task has been systematically observed. Psychological theorizing has argued that while sensory and motor operations can proceed in parallel, the coordination between these modules establishes a processing bottleneck. This model predicts that the timing but not the characteristics (duration, precision, variability... of each processing stage are affected by interference. Thus, a critical test to this hypothesis is to explore whether the quality of the decision is unaffected by a concurrent task. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In number comparison--as in most decision comparison tasks with a scalar measure of the evidence--the extent to which two stimuli can be discriminated is determined by their ratio, referred as the Weber fraction. We investigated performance in a rapid succession of two non-symbolic comparison tasks (number comparison and tone discrimination in which error rates in both tasks could be manipulated parametrically from chance to almost perfect. We observed that dual-task interference has a massive effect on RT but does not affect the error rates, or the distribution of errors as a function of the evidence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results imply that while the decision process itself is delayed during multiple task execution, its workings are unaffected by task interference, providing strong evidence in favor of a sequential model of task execution.

  10. The composite complex span: French validation of a short working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Corentin; Thomassin, Noémylle; Roulin, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-01

    Most studies in individual differences in the field of working memory research use complex span tasks to measure working memory capacity. Various complex span tasks based on different materials have been developed, and these tasks have proven both reliable and valid; several complex span tasks are often combined to provide a domain-general estimate of working memory capacity with even better psychometric properties. The present work sought to address two issues. Firstly, having participants perform several full-length complex span tasks in succession makes for a long and tedious procedure. Secondly, few complex span tasks have been translated and validated in French. We constructed a French working memory task labeled the Composite Complex Span (CCS). The CCS includes shortened versions of three classic complex span tasks: the reading span, symmetry span, and operation span. We assessed the psychometric properties of the CCS, including test-retest reliability and convergent validity, with Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices and with an alpha span task; the CCS demonstrated satisfying qualities in a sample of 1,093 participants. This work provides evidence that shorter versions of classic complex span tasks can yield valid working memory estimates. The materials and normative data for the CCS are also included.

  11. Operating systems. [of computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, P. J.; Brown, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A counter operating system creates a hierarchy of levels of abstraction, so that at a given level all details concerning lower levels can be ignored. This hierarchical structure separates functions according to their complexity, characteristic time scale, and level of abstraction. The lowest levels include the system's hardware; concepts associated explicitly with the coordination of multiple tasks appear at intermediate levels, which conduct 'primitive processes'. Software semaphore is the mechanism controlling primitive processes that must be synchronized. At higher levels lie, in rising order, the access to the secondary storage devices of a particular machine, a 'virtual memory' scheme for managing the main and secondary memories, communication between processes by way of a mechanism called a 'pipe', access to external input and output devices, and a hierarchy of directories cataloguing the hardware and software objects to which access must be controlled.

  12. TASK-1 and TASK-3 may form heterodimers in human atrial cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinné, Susanne; Kiper, Aytug K; Schlichthörl, Günter; Dittmann, Sven; Netter, Michael F; Limberg, Sven H; Silbernagel, Nicole; Zuzarte, Marylou; Moosdorf, Rainer; Wulf, Hinnerk; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Rolfes, Caroline; Decher, Niels

    2015-04-01

    TASK-1 channels have emerged as promising drug targets against atrial fibrillation, the most common arrhythmia in the elderly. While TASK-3, the closest relative of TASK-1, was previously not described in cardiac tissue, we found a very prominent expression of TASK-3 in right human auricles. Immunocytochemistry experiments of human right auricular cardiomyocytes showed that TASK-3 is primarily localized at the plasma membrane. Single-channel recordings of right human auricles in the cell-attached mode, using divalent-cation-free solutions, revealed a TASK-1-like channel with a single-channel conductance of about 30pS. While homomeric TASK-3 channels were not found, we observed an intermediate single-channel conductance of about 55pS, possibly reflecting the heteromeric channel formed by TASK-1 and TASK-3. Subsequent experiments with TASK-1/TASK-3 tandem channels or with co-expressed TASK-1 and TASK-3 channels in HEK293 cells or Xenopus oocytes, supported that the 55pS channels observed in right auricles have electrophysiological characteristics of TASK-1/TASK-3 heteromers. In addition, co-expression experiments and single-channel recordings suggest that heteromeric TASK-1/TASK-3 channels have a predominant surface expression and a reduced affinity for TASK-1 blockers. In summary, the evidence for heteromeric TASK-1/TASK-3 channel complexes together with an altered pharmacologic response to TASK-1 blockers in vitro is likely to have further impact for studies isolating ITASK-1 from cardiomyocytes and for the development of drugs specifically targeting TASK-1 in atrial fibrillation treatment.

  13. Operation Poorman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-03-18

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system.

  14. Task-selective memory effects for successfully implemented encoding strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Leshikar

    Full Text Available Previous behavioral evidence suggests that instructed strategy use benefits associative memory formation in paired associate tasks. Two such effective encoding strategies--visual imagery and sentence generation--facilitate memory through the production of different types of mediators (e.g., mental images and sentences. Neuroimaging evidence suggests that regions of the brain support memory reflecting the mental operations engaged at the time of study. That work, however, has not taken into account self-reported encoding task success (i.e., whether participants successfully generated a mediator. It is unknown, therefore, whether task-selective memory effects specific to each strategy might be found when encoding strategies are successfully implemented. In this experiment, participants studied pairs of abstract nouns under either visual imagery or sentence generation encoding instructions. At the time of study, participants reported their success at generating a mediator. Outside of the scanner, participants further reported the quality of the generated mediator (e.g., images, sentences for each word pair. We observed task-selective memory effects for visual imagery in the left middle occipital gyrus, the left precuneus, and the lingual gyrus. No such task-selective effects were observed for sentence generation. Intriguingly, activity at the time of study in the left precuneus was modulated by the self-reported quality (vividness of the generated mental images with greater activity for trials given higher ratings of quality. These data suggest that regions of the brain support memory in accord with the encoding operations engaged at the time of study.

  15. Garbage Collection Scheduling of Aperiodic Tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhang; Guang-Ze Xiong

    2009-01-01

    In the previous work of garbage collection (GC) models, scheduling analysis was given based on an assumption that there were no aperiodic mutator tasks. However, it is not true in practical real-time systems. The GC algorithm which can schedule aperiodic tasks is proposed, and the variance of live memory is analyzed. In this algorithm, active tasks are deferred to be processed by GC until the states of tasks become inactive, and the saved sporadic server time can be used to schedule aperiodic tasks. Scheduling the sample task sets demonstrates that this algorithm in this paper can schedule aperiodic tasks and decrease GC work. Thus, the GC algorithm proposed is more flexible and portable.

  16. Assessing Cognitive Load on Web Search Tasks

    CERN Document Server

    Gwizdka, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Assessing cognitive load on web search is useful for characterizing search system features and search tasks with respect to their demands on the searcher's mental effort. It is also helpful for examining how individual differences among searchers (e.g. cognitive abilities) affect the search process. We examined cognitive load from the perspective of primary and secondary task performance. A controlled web search study was conducted with 48 participants. The primary task performance components were found to be significantly related to both the objective and the subjective task difficulty. However, the relationship between objective and subjective task difficulty and the secondary task performance measures was weaker than expected. The results indicate that the dual-task approach needs to be used with caution.

  17. Is a "Complex" Task Really Complex? Validating the Assumption of Cognitive Task Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasayama, Shoko

    2016-01-01

    In research on task-based learning and teaching, it has traditionally been assumed that differing degrees of cognitive task complexity can be inferred through task design and/or observations of differing qualities in linguistic production elicited by second language (L2) communication tasks. Without validating this assumption, however, it is…

  18. How to Correct a Task Error: Task-Switch Effects Following Different Types of Error Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Marco

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that switch costs in task switching reflect the strengthening of task-related associations and that strengthening is triggered by response execution. The present study tested the hypothesis that only task-related responses are able to trigger strengthening. Effects of task strengthening caused by error corrections were…

  19. Adapting Non-Task-Based Materials to Fit a Task-Based Framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海英

    2007-01-01

    Analyzes the three -phases--pre -task, task cycle, post -task and their rationale in task -based language teaching, designs corresponding teaching activities after adapting one text from New Horizon College English, so that college English teachers can better understand and use this teaching approach, and then improve the teaching effect and college students'comprehensive application abilities of language.

  20. Is Performance in Task-Cuing Experiments Mediated by Task Set Selection or Associative Compound Retrieval?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Charlotte L. D.; Monsell, Stephen; McLaren, Ian P. L.

    2014-01-01

    Task-cuing experiments are usually intended to explore control of task set. But when small stimulus sets are used, they plausibly afford learning of the response associated with a combination of cue and stimulus, without reference to tasks. In 3 experiments we presented the typical trials of a task-cuing experiment: a cue (colored shape) followed,…

  1. Applied Railway Optimization in Production Planning at DSB-S-tog - Tasks, Tools and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    to the customers, and has concurrently been met with demands for higher efficiency in the daily operation. The plans of timetable, rolling stock and crew must hence allow for a high level of customer service, be efficient, and be robust against disturbances of operations. It is a highly non-trivial task to meet...

  2. Introducing artificial depth cues to improve task performance in ITER maintenance actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, C. J. M.; Eendebak, P. T.; Schropp, G. Y. R.; Hermes, H. V.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Magielsen, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance operations on ITER tokamak components will be largely performed by remote handling. In previous work it was shown that representative maintenance tasks could be performed significantly faster with direct visual feedback than with camera feedback. In post-test interviews, operators indica

  3. Introducing artificial depth cues to improve task performance in ITER maintenance actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, C.J.M.; Eendebak, P.T.; Schropp, G.Y.R.; Hermes, H.V.; Elzendoorn, B.S.Q.; Magielsen, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance operations on ITER tokamak components will be largely performed by remote handling. In previous work it was shown that representative maintenance tasks could be performed significantly faster with direct visual feedback than with camera feedback. In post-test interviews, operators indica

  4. The influence of task demand and learning on the psychophysiological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairclough, Stephen H; Venables, Louise; Tattersall, Andrew

    2005-05-01

    The level of expertise of an operator may significantly influence his/her psychophysiological response to high task demand. A naive individual may invest considerable mental effort during performance of a difficult task and psychophysiological reactivity will be high compared to the psychophysiological response of a highly skilled operator. A study on multitasking performance was conducted to investigate the interaction between learning and task demand on psychophysiological reactivity. Thirty naive participants performed high and low demand versions of the Multi-attribute Task Battery (MATB) over a learning period of 64 min. High and low task demand setting were preset via a pilot study. Psychophysiological variables were collected from four channels of EEG (Cz, P3, P4, Pz), ECG, EOG and respiration rate to measure the impact of task demand and learning. Several variables were sensitive to the task demand manipulation but not time-on-task, e.g., heart rate, Theta activity at parietal sites. The sensitivity of certain variables to high demand was compromised by skill acquisition, e.g., respiration rate, suppression of alpha activity. A sustained learning effect was observed during the high demand condition only; multiple regression analyses revealed that specific psychophysiological variables predicted learning at different stages on the learning curve. The implications for the sensitivity of psychophysiological variables are discussed.

  5. Task parameters affecting ergonomic demands and productivity of HVAC duct installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitropoulos, Panagiotis; Hussain, Sanaa; Guarascio-Howard, Linda; Memarian, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical installation workers experience work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) at high rates. (1) Quantify the ergonomic demands during HVAC installation, (2) identify the tasks and task parameters that generated extreme ergonomic demands, and (3) propose improvements to reduce the WMSDs among mechanical workers. The study focused on installation of rectangular ductwork components using ladders, and analyzed five operations by two mechanical contractors. Using continuous time observational assessment, the videotaped operations were analyzed along two dimensions: (1) the production tasks and durations, and (2) the ergonomic demands for four body regions (neck, arms/shoulders, back, and knees). The analysis identified tasks with low portion of productive time and high portion of extreme postures, and task parameters that generated extreme postures. Duct alignment was the task with the highest portion of extreme postures. The position of the ladder (angle and distance from the duct) was a task parameter that strongly influenced the extreme postures for back, neck and shoulders. Other contributing factors included the difficulty to reach the hand tools when working on the ladder, the congestion of components in the ceiling, and the space between the duct and the ceiling. The identified tasks and factors provide directions for improvement.

  6. An experimental approach to estimation of human information processing capacity for diagnosis tasks in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Tae

    2006-02-15

    The objectives of this research are 1) to determine the human's information processing capacity and 2) to describe the relationship between the information processing capacity and human factors. This research centers on the relationship, as experimentally determined, between an operator's mental workload and information flow during accident diagnosis tasks at nuclear power plants (NPPs). The relationship between the information flow rate and operator's mental workload is investigated experimentally. According to this relationship, the operator's information processing capacity can be established. Once the information processing capacity of a main control room (MCR) operator in a NPP is known, it is possible to apply it 1) to predict the operator's performance, 2) to design diagnosis tasks, and 3) to design human-machine interface. In advanced MCR, an operator's mental activity is more important than his or her physical activity. The mental workload is the portion of the operator's limited capacity that is actually required to perform a particular task. A high mental workload may cause an operator to make a mistake and consequently affect that the safe operation of NPPs. Thus, to predict an operator's performance is very important for the nuclear safety. The information processing capacity is the operator's ability to manage the amount of bits per second when an operator is diagnosing tasks or accidents. We can estimate the information processing capacity using the relationship between the information flow rate and human performance. That is, if the operator's performance decreases rapidly as the information flow rate (bit/sec) is increased, it is possible to determine the operator's information processing capacity. A diagnosis task is one of the most complex and mentally demanding tasks as well as a crucial part in maintaining the safe operation of NPPs. Diagnosis tasks refer to the overall tasks of finding the

  7. Assessing the Cost of Task Switching with a Three-Task Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Roger W.; Ruthruff, Eric; Johnston, James C.; Connors, Mary M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    To study task switching when subjects need not inhibit inappropriate responses, we examine tasks with non-overlapping stimulus sets (e.g. color patches and uncolored letters). A new three-task paradigm permits the dissociation of several otherwise confounded variables. We find that performance declines monotonically with increasing time since last performance of a task. Adjusting for the effects of this factor permits a fresh assessment of the relationship between task expectancy and recency (Ruthruff, Remington & Johnston, 1996).

  8. Visuospatial tasks affect locomotor control more than nonspatial tasks in older people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine C Menant

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that visuospatial processing requiring working memory is particularly important for balance control during standing and stepping, and that limited spatial encoding contributes to increased interference in postural control dual tasks. However, visuospatial involvement during locomotion has not been directly determined. This study examined the effects of a visuospatial cognitive task versus a nonspatial cognitive task on gait speed, smoothness and variability in older people, while controlling for task difficulty.Thirty-six people aged ≥75 years performed three walking trials along a 20 m walkway under the following conditions: (i an easy nonspatial task; (ii a difficult nonspatial task; (iii an easy visuospatial task; and (iv a difficult visuospatial task. Gait parameters were computed from a tri-axial accelerometer attached to the sacrum. The cognitive task response times and percentage of correct answers during walking and seated trials were also computed.No significant differences in either cognitive task type error rates or response times were evident in the seated conditions, indicating equivalent task difficulty. In the walking trials, participants responded faster to the visuospatial tasks than the nonspatial tasks but at the cost of making significantly more cognitive task errors. Participants also walked slower, took shorter steps, had greater step time variability and less smooth pelvis accelerations when concurrently performing the visuospatial tasks compared with the nonspatial tasks and when performing the difficult compared with the easy cognitive tasks.Compared with nonspatial cognitive tasks, visuospatial cognitive tasks led to a slower, more variable and less smooth gait pattern. These findings suggest that visuospatial processing might share common networks with locomotor control, further supporting the hypothesis that gait changes during dual task paradigms are not simply due to limited attentional

  9. The Wonderland of Operating the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Augustinus, A; Pinazza, O; Rosinský, P; Lechman, M; Jirdén, L; Chochula, P

    2011-01-01

    ALICE is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. Composed of 18 sub-detectors each with numerous subsystems that need to be controlled and operated in a safe and efficient way. The Detector Control System (DCS) is the key to this and has been used by detector experts with success during the commissioning of the individual detectors. During the transition from commissioning to operation, more and more tasks were transferred from detector experts to central operators. By the end of the 2010 datataking campaign, the ALICE experiment was run by a small crew of central operators, with only a single controls operator. The transition from expert to non-expert operation constituted a real challenge in terms of tools, documentation and training. A relatively high turnover and diversity in the operator crew that is specific to the HEP experiment environment (as opposed to the more stable operation crews for accelerators) made this challenge even bigger. Thi...

  10. Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Dorsomedial Striatum Are Necessary for the Trial-Unique, Delayed Nonmatching-to-Location (TUNL) Task in Rats: Role of NMDA Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Don A.; Hurtubise, Jessica L.; Greba, Quentin; Howland, John G.

    2017-01-01

    The trial-unique, delayed nonmatching-to-location (TUNL) task is a recently developed behavioral task that measures spatial working memory and a form of pattern separation in touchscreen-equipped operant conditioning chambers. Limited information exists regarding the neurotransmitters and neural substrates involved in the task. The present…

  11. Task-specificity of balance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Gruber, Markus; Kramer, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Despite much research on balance training, it is still unclear whether balance training leads to highly task-specific adaptations or rather non-specific adaptations. Hence, in this study we examined whether balance training increased performance only in the balance task that was trained or also in non-trained tasks. Forty healthy participants (28 m 12 f, 25 ± 4 years, 177 ± 10 cm, 73 ± 14 kg) were assigned to one of two training groups (TGs) or a control group. Both TGs completed six sessions over 2 weeks, only the training device differed. Before and after the training, performance in the trained task as well as in additional untrained tasks was recorded. ANOVAs showed that each TG outperformed the other groups only in the task they had trained (e.g., task trained by TG1: +225% in TG1, only +41% and +30% in TG2 and control, group*time interaction, pbalance training resulted in highly task-specific effects, no transfer even to very similar tasks was observed. Therefore, we recommend identifying and training exactly those tasks that need improvement, and test the efficacy of training programs using specific tests instead of general tests with limited functional relevance.

  12. Teacher’s methodical activity as a source of educational and methodical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Скворцова С. А.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article of S. Skvortsova “Teacher’s methodical activity as a source of educational and methodical tasks”, interprets the teacher’s methodical activity as solving a number of methodical tasks. We define a methodical task as a situation that occurs in the process of teacher's methodical activity the purpose of which is to teach pupils certain content. Educational and methodical tasks are the models of such situations formulated in words. The goal of educational and methodical tasks is to form future teachers’ methodical competency. Methodical tasks are classified on practical and intellectual, that in its turn are divided into standard and problematic. Taking into consideration the external structure of the process of solving methodical tasks we define the teacher’s ability to solve methodical tasks as a complex of actions to be performed to solve a methodical task on the basis of a teacher’s conscious use of methodical knowledge and ways of action. Educational and methodical tasks are used in order to form the ability to solve methodical tasks in the process of teacher’s methodical training in pedagogical universities. Educational and methodical tasks, as opposed to methodical tasks, are classified: 1 according to the level of methodical activity on standard, partially-standard and creative; 2 according to the types of methodical activity on informational-analytical, analytically-synthetic, operationally-practical, projective-modelling, synthetic-constructing; 3 according to the content of teacher’s methodical activity on basic and special ones. Standard and partially-standard educational and methodical tasks are the symbolic models of standard methodical tasks in teacher’s activity, and creative educational and methodical tasks are the symbolic models of problematic methodical tasks. Educational and methodical tasks are mainly the models of intellectual methodical tasks as they don’t suggest the interaction between a

  13. Modeling Operating Modes for the Monju Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Yoshikawa, H.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2012-01-01

    The specification of supervision and control tasks in complex processes requires definition of plant states on various levels of abstraction related to plant operation in start-up, normal operation and shut-down. Modes of plant operation are often specified in relation to a plant decomposition in...... for the Japanese fast breeder reactor plant MONJU....

  14. Modeling Operating Modes for the Monju Nuclear Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2012-01-01

    The specification of supervision and control tasks in complex processes requires definition of plant states on various levels of abstraction related to plant operation in start-up, normal operation and shut-down. Modes of plant operation are often specified in relation to a plant decomposition in...

  15. User-Assisted Store Recycling for Dynamic Task Graph Schedulers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, Mehmet Can [Quantcast Corporation, San Francisco, CA; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA; Agrawal, Gagan [The Ohio State University, Neil Avenue Columbus, OH; Ren, Bin [The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA

    2016-12-28

    The emergence of the multi-core era has led to increased interest in designing effective yet practical parallel programming models. Models based on task graphs that operate on single-assignment data are attractive in several ways: they can support dynamic applications and precisely represent the available concurrency. However, they also require nuanced algorithms for scheduling and memory management for efficient execution. In this paper, we consider memory-efficient dynamic scheduling of task graphs. Specifically, we present a novel approach for dynamically recycling the memory locations assigned to data items as they are produced by tasks. We develop algorithms to identify memory-efficient store recycling functions by systematically evaluating the validity of a set of (user-provided or automatically generated) alternatives. Because recycling function can be input data-dependent, we have also developed support for continued correct execution of a task graph in the presence of a potentially incorrect store recycling function. Experimental evaluation demonstrates that our approach to automatic store recycling incurs little to no overheads, achieves memory usage comparable to the best manually derived solutions, often produces recycling functions valid across problem sizes and input parameters, and efficiently recovers from an incorrect choice of store recycling functions.

  16. On the importance of Task 1 and error performance measures in PRP dual-task studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilo eStrobach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Psychological Refractory Period (PRP paradigm is a dominant research tool in the literature on dual-task performance. In this paradigm a first and second component task (i.e., Task 1 and 2 are presented with variable stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs and priority to perform Task 1. The main indicator of dual-task impairment in PRP situations is an increasing Task 2-RT with decreasing SOAs. This impairment is typically explained with some task components being processed strictly sequentially in the context of the prominent central bottleneck theory. This assumption could implicitly suggest that processes of Task 1 are unaffected by Task 2 and bottleneck processing, i.e. decreasing SOAs do not increase RTs and error rates of the first task. The aim of the present review is to assess whether PRP dual-task studies included both RT and error data presentations and statistical analyses and whether studies including both data types (i.e., RTs and error rates show data consistent with this assumption (i.e., decreasing SOAs and unaffected RTs and/ or error rates in Task 1. This review demonstrates that, in contrast to RT presentations and analyses, error data is underrepresented in a substantial number of studies. Furthermore, a substantial number of studies with RT and error data showed a statistically significant impairment of Task 1 performance with decreasing SOA. Thus, these studies produced data that is not primarily consistent with the strong assumption that processes of Task 1 are unaffected by Task 2 and bottleneck processing in the context of PRP dual-task situations; this calls for a more careful report and analysis of Task 1 performance in PRP studies and for a more careful consideration of theories proposing additions to the bottleneck assumption, which are sufficiently general to explain Task 1 and Task 2 effects.

  17. Operator Engagement Detection for Robot Behavior Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan Sarkar

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that in human-robot interaction, the effectiveness of a robot varies inversely with the operator engagement in the task. Given the importance of maintaining optimal task engagement when working with a robot, it would be immensely useful to have a robotic system that can detect the level of operator engagement and modify its behavior if required. This paper presents a framework for human-robot interaction that allows inference of operator?s engagement level through the analysis of his/her physiological signals, and adaptation of robot behavior as a function of the operator?s engagement level. Peripheral physiological signals were measured through wearable biofeedback sensors and a control architecture inspired by Riley?s original information-flow model was developed to implement such human-robot interaction. The results from affect- elicitation tasks for human participants showed that it was possible to detect engagement through physiological sensing in real-time. An open-loop teleoperation-based robotic experiment was also conducted where the recorded physiological signals were transmitted to the robot in real-time speed to demonstrate that the presented control architecture allowed the robot to adapt its behavior based on operator engagement level.

  18. A task parallel implementation of fast multipole methods

    KAUST Repository

    Taura, Kenjiro

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a task parallel implementation of ExaFMM, an open source implementation of fast multipole methods (FMM), using a lightweight task parallel library MassiveThreads. Although there have been many attempts on parallelizing FMM, experiences have almost exclusively been limited to formulation based on flat homogeneous parallel loops. FMM in fact contains operations that cannot be readily expressed in such conventional but restrictive models. We show that task parallelism, or parallel recursions in particular, allows us to parallelize all operations of FMM naturally and scalably. Moreover it allows us to parallelize a \\'\\'mutual interaction\\'\\' for force/potential evaluation, which is roughly twice as efficient as a more conventional, unidirectional force/potential evaluation. The net result is an open source FMM that is clearly among the fastest single node implementations, including those on GPUs; with a million particles on a 32 cores Sandy Bridge 2.20GHz node, it completes a single time step including tree construction and force/potential evaluation in 65 milliseconds. The study clearly showcases both programmability and performance benefits of flexible parallel constructs over more monolithic parallel loops. © 2012 IEEE.

  19. Wind power forecasting: IEA Wind Task 36 & future research issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giebel, Gregor; Cline, J.; Frank, Helmut Paul

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the new International Energy Agency Wind Task 36 on Forecasting, and invites to collaborate within the group. Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from the wea......Bench. Thirdly, we will be engaging end users aiming at dissemination of the best practice in the usage of wind power predictions. As first results, an overview of current issues for research in short-term forecasting of wind power is presented.......This paper presents the new International Energy Agency Wind Task 36 on Forecasting, and invites to collaborate within the group. Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from...... the weather prediction side and from the usage of the forecasts. The new International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on Forecasting for Wind Energy tries to organise international collaboration, among national meteorological centres with an interest and/or large projects on wind forecast improvements (NOAA, DWD...

  20. Suspended Operations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A ship from China’s State Oceanic Administration (SOA) evaluates ConocoPhillips’s clean-up efforts in the Bohai Bay on September 2.That day, the SOA ordered the U.S. oil giant to cease all operations on the Penglai 19-3 Oilfield after the company failed to plug leaks in the oilfield by the administration’s August 31 deadline.The oil leaking from the oilfield caused by ConocoPhillips at the Penglai 19-3 Oilfield in the Bohai Bay was first spotted in June. The oil has since spread to beaches in China’s Hebei and Liaoning provinces, causing huge losses in the provinces’ tourism and aquatic farming industries.On September 7, ConocoPhillips said it will establish a fund to compensate victims of the oil spill in line with Chinese laws and to benefit the general environment of the Bohai Bay.

  1. Task-focused modeling in automated agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriesenga, Mark R.; Peleg, K.; Sklansky, Jack

    1993-01-01

    Machine vision systems analyze image data to carry out automation tasks. Our interest is in machine vision systems that rely on models to achieve their designed task. When the model is interrogated from an a priori menu of questions, the model need not be complete. Instead, the machine vision system can use a partial model that contains a large amount of information in regions of interest and less information elsewhere. We propose an adaptive modeling scheme for machine vision, called task-focused modeling, which constructs a model having just sufficient detail to carry out the specified task. The model is detailed in regions of interest to the task and is less detailed elsewhere. This focusing effect saves time and reduces the computational effort expended by the machine vision system. We illustrate task-focused modeling by an example involving real-time micropropagation of plants in automated agriculture.

  2. Designing CALL Tasks for College English Learners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>As CALL(Computer Assisted Language Learning) became a new trend among China’s college English learners nowadays,it is time that teachers reflected on their teaching methodology innovation with the new technological advancement,one part of it is writing CALL tasks for their own individual classes.This paper presents a few basic principles and rationales of designing such tasks,and hope to work as a reminder for task writers.These principles and rationales include how to realize CLT(communicative language teaching) and learner-centredness and foster learner autonomy.In order to achieve this,it is reminded that task writers pay attention to a few points,like the communicativeness,contextualization,authenticity,and relatedness in task writing. Aspects of syllabus design,choice of texts,contents of activities and tasks and sequencing are put under investigation.

  3. Unnecessary work tasks and mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Tripathi, Manisha; Borritz, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: According to the "stress-as-offense-to-self" perspective, work tasks that are considered unnecessary or unreasonable - so-called "illegitimate work tasks" - are likely to elicit stress-reactions. Previous studies, mostly cross-sectional, have shown that illegitimate tasks are associated...... with increased self-reported stress, cortisol, and counterproductive work behavior. In this article, we examine the prospective association between unnecessary work tasks, one type of illegitimate work tasks, and mental health among Danish human service workers. Further, we explore whether this association...... is modified by sex, age, occupational position, and baseline mental health status. METHODS: The data were obtained from self-administered questionnaires from 1351 Danish human service workers in three waves of data-collection during 1999-2005. We measured unnecessary work tasks by a single item, and assessed...

  4. The harder the task, the more inconsistent the performance: a PPT analysis on task difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen; Geels, Kasha; Hackett, Holly Raye; Trafimow, David; McCarley, Jason S; Schwark, Jeremy; Hunt, Gayle

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that as task difficulty increases, task performance subsequently decreases. These decrements in task performance as difficulty increases have been attributed to the processes individuals use to complete tasks. Over a series of three experiments, Potential Performance Theory (PPT; Trafimow & Rice, 2008 ; 2009), was used to test the hypothesis that decreases in task performance are, in part, due to inconsistency rather than only systematic factors. Task difficulty was manipulated in three visual search tasks by increasing set size (Experiment 1), decreasing contrast (Experiment 2), and increasing background distracters (Experiment 3). Findings over the three studies indicated that decreases in observed task performance as task difficulty increases are primarily due to a decrease of consistency rather than systematic factors. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Selecting Operations for Assembler Encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Praczyk

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembler Encoding is a neuro-evolutionary method in which a neural network is represented in the form of a simple program called Assembler Encoding Program. The task of the program is to create the so-called Network Definition Matrix which maintains all the information necessary to construct the network. To generate Assembler Encoding Programs and the subsequent neural networks evolutionary techniques are used.
    The performance of Assembler Encoding strongly depends on operations used in Assembler Encoding Programs. To select the most effective operations, experiments in the optimization and the predator-prey problem were carried out. In the experiments, Assembler Encoding Programs equipped with different types of operations were tested. The results of the tests are presented at the end of the paper.

  6. Team-computer interfaces in complex task environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terranova, M.

    1990-09-01

    This research focused on the interfaces (media of information exchange) teams use to interact about the task at hand. This report is among the first to study human-system interfaces in which the human component is a team, and the system functions as part of the team. Two operators dynamically shared a simulated fluid flow process, coordinating control and failure detection responsibilities through computer-mediated communication. Different computer interfaces representing the same system information were used to affect the individual operators' mental models of the process. Communication was identified as the most critical variable, consequently future research is being designed to test effective modes of communication. The results have relevance for the development of team-computer interfaces in complex systems in which responsibility must be shared dynamically among all members of the operation.

  7. Individualized Cognitive Modeling for Close-Loop Task Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Wang, Wei; Li, Jiang; Schnell, Tom; Keller, Mike

    2010-01-01

    An accurate real-time operator functional state assessment makes it possible to perform task management, minimize risks, and improve mission performance. In this paper, we discuss the development of an individualized operator functional state assessment model that identifies states likely leading to operational errors. To address large individual variations, we use two different approaches to build a model for each individual using its data as well as data from subjects with similar responses. If a subject's response is similar to that of the individual of interest in a specific functional state, all the training data from this subject will be used to build the individual model. The individualization methods have been successfully verified and validated with a driving test data set provided by University of Iowa. With the individualized models, the mean squared error can be significantly decreased (by around 20%).

  8. Intellectual productivity under task ambient lighting

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A subjective experiment was conducted to evaluate intellectual productivity in three lighting conditions: (a) conventional ambient lighting, (b) task ambient lighting with normal colour temperature (5000 K), and (c) task ambient lighting with high colour temperature (6200 K). In the experiment, cognitive tasks were given to 24 participants. The concentration time ratio, which is a quantitative and objective evaluation index of the degree of concentration, was measured. The results showed that...

  9. Learning Multiple Tasks with Deep Relationship Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Mingsheng; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Deep neural networks trained on large-scale dataset can learn transferable features that promote learning multiple tasks for inductive transfer and labeling mitigation. As deep features eventually transition from general to specific along the network, a fundamental problem is how to exploit the relationship structure across different tasks while accounting for the feature transferability in the task-specific layers. In this work, we propose a novel Deep Relationship Network (DRN) architecture...

  10. Microsoft System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Beaumont (MVP), Steve; Odika, Chiyo; Ryan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    If you are tasked with monitoring the IT infrastructure within your organization, this book demonstrates how System Center 2012 R2 Operations Manager offers a radical and exciting solution to modern administration.

  11. Operating Reserves and Wind Power Integration: An International Comparison; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, M.; Donohoo, P.; Lew, D.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Lannoye, E.; Flynn, D.; O' Malley, M.; Miller, N.; Eriksen, P. B.; Gottig, A.; Rawn, B.; Gibescu, M.; Lazaro, E. G.; Robitaille, A.; Kamwa, I.

    2010-10-01

    This paper provides a high-level international comparison of methods and key results from both operating practice and integration analysis, based on an informal International Energy Agency Task 25: Large-scale Wind Integration.

  12. Analysis of Task-based Syllabus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马进胜

    2011-01-01

    Task-based language teaching is very popular in the modem English teaching.It is based on the Task-based Syllabus.Taskbased Syllabus focuses on the learners' communicative competence,which stresses learning by doing.From the theoretical assumption and definitions of the task,the paper analysizes the components of the task,then points out the merits and demerits of the syllabus.By this means the paper may give some tips to teachers and students when they use the tsk-based language teaching.

  13. Dynamic Task Allocation in Cooperative Robot Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Tsalatsanis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a dynamic task allocation and controller design methodology for cooperative robot teams is presented. Fuzzy logic based utility functions are derived to quantify each robot\\'s ability to perform a task. These utility functions are used to allocate tasks in real-time through a limited lookahead control methodology partially based on the basic principles of discrete event supervisory control theory. The proposed controller design methodology accommodates flexibility in task assignments, robot coordination, and tolerance to robot failures and repairs. Implementation details of the proposed methodology are demonstrated through a warehouse patrolling case study.

  14. Dynamic Task Allocation in Cooperative Robot Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Tsalatsanis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a dynamic task allocation and controller design methodology for cooperative robot teams is presented. Fuzzy logic based utility functions are derived to quantify each robot's ability to perform a task. These utility functions are used to allocate tasks in real-time through a limited lookahead control methodology partially based on the basic principles of discrete event supervisory control theory. The proposed controller design methodology accommodates flexibility in task assignments, robot coordination, and tolerance to robot failures and repairs. Implementation details of the proposed methodology are demonstrated through a warehouse patrolling case study.

  15. Adaptive training using an artificial neural network and EEG metrics for within- and cross-task workload classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Carryl L; Penaranda, B N

    2012-01-02

    Adaptive training using neurophysiological measures requires efficient classification of mental workload in real time as a learner encounters new and increasingly difficult levels of tasks. Previous investigations have shown that artificial neural networks (ANNs) can accurately classify workload, but only when trained on neurophysiological exemplars from experienced operators on specific tasks. The present study examined classification accuracies for ANNs trained on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity recorded while participants performed the same (within task) and different (cross) tasks for short periods of time with little or no prior exposure to the tasks. Participants performed three working memory tasks at two difficulty levels with order of task and difficulty level counterbalanced. Within-task classification accuracies were high when ANNs were trained on exemplars from the same task or a set containing the to-be-classified task, (M=87.1% and 85.3%, respectively). Cross-task classification accuracies were significantly lower (average 44.8%) indicating consistent systematic misclassification for certain tasks in some individuals. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for developing neurophysiologically driven adaptive training platforms.

  16. Task-driven equipment inspection system based on safe workflow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinyou; Liu, Yangguang

    2010-12-01

    An equipment inspection system is one that contains a number of equipment queues served in cyclic order. In order to satisfy multi-task scheduling and multi-task combination requirements for equipment inspection system, we propose a model based on inspection workflow in this paper. On the one hand, the model organizes all kinds of equipments according to inspection workflow, elemental work units according to inspection tasks, combination elements according to the task defined by users. We proposed a 3-dimensional workflow model for equipments inspection system including organization sub-model, process sub-model and data sub-model. On the other hand, the model is based on the security authorization which defined by relation between roles, tasks, pre-defined business workflows and inspection data. The system based on proposed framework is safe and efficient. Our implement shows that the system is easy to operate and manage according to the basic performance.

  17. Optimizing Manpower Allocation for Ground Handling Tasks in Airports using Column Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Dohn; Kolind, Esben

    2008-01-01

    of the staff, synchronization requirements between teams, and union regulations. The problem is solved using column generation in a Branch-and-Price framework. Synchronization between teams is enforced by branching on time windows. The resource constrained shortest path subproblem is solved by a label setting......The Manpower Allocation Problem with Time Windows, Job-Teaming Constraints and a limited number of teams (m-MAPTWTC) is the problem of assigning m teams to a number of tasks, where both teams and tasks are restricted by time windows outside which operation is not possible. Tasks may require several...... individual teams to cooperate. Cooperating teams have to be synchronized with each other. Due to the limited number of teams, some tasks may have to be left unassigned. The objective is to maximize the number of assigned tasks. The problem arises in various crew scheduling contexts where cooperation between...

  18. Model-based estimation and prediction of task-imposed mental workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madni, A. M.; Lyman, J.

    1983-01-01

    Mental workload has been an area of intensive research for better than a decade. One specific area of interest in aircrew related workload research is concerned with the development of quantitative indices of workload in aircraft piloting tasks. This paper presents a model-based approach for quantifying mental workload in operational terms. The suggested modeling framework is based on an interpreted Petri net characterization of a task in which 'places' are equated to specific task-related activities and 'transitions' are viewed as internal or external forcing events. It is shown that within this framework quantitative assessments can be made of both cumulative and instantaneous workload associated with the performance of a task and its individual component subtasks. It is suggested that insights gained from analyzing task-specific workload within this modeling paradigm can suggest plausible explanations for reconciling discrepancies between subjectively elicited workload estimates and behavioral/performance measures.

  19. Ergonomic workforce scheduling under complex worker limitation and task requirements:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuchporn Wongwien

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The ergonomic workforce scheduling problem (WPS is addressed in this paper. Unlike its previous related works, theproblem considers realistic worker limitation and task requirements that include heterogeneous workforce with limited taskflexibility, varying worker team sizes, and pre-defined task operation schedules. Its main objective is to find a daily rotatingwork schedule solution using a minimum number of workers such that all workers’ ergonomics hazard exposures do notexceed a permissible limit. Initially, the ergonomic WPS is explained. Its mathematical model and approximation procedure toobtain the workforce schedule solution are described. From the results of the computation experiment, it can be concludedthat the approximation procedure is both efficient and effective in solving large-sized ergonomic workforce schedulingproblems.

  20. Multi-Task Collaboration CPS Modeling Based on Immune Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiying Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a dynamic multi-task collaboration CPS control model based on the self-adaptive immune feedback is proposed and implemented in the smart home environment. First, the internal relations between CPS and the biological immune system are explored via their basic theories. Second, CPS control mechanism is elaborated through the analysis of CPS control structure. Finally, a comprehensive strategy for support is introduced into multi-task collaboration to improve the dynamic cognitive ability. At the same time, the performance of parameters is correspondingly increased by the operator of the antibody concentration and the selective pressure. Furthermore, the model has been put into service in the smart home laboratory. The experimental results show that this model can integrate user’s needs into the environment for properly regulating the home environment.

  1. Cooperative Tasks between Humans and Robots in Industrial Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Corrales

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative tasks between human operators and robotic manipulators can improve the performance and flexibility of industrial environments. Nevertheless, the safety of humans should always be guaranteed and the behaviour of the robots should be modified when a risk of collision may happen. This paper presents the research that the authors have performed in recent years in order to develop a human‐robot interaction system which guarantees human safety by precisely tracking the complete body of the human and by activating safety strategies when the distance between them is too small. This paper not only summarizes the techniques which have been implemented in order to develop this system, but it also shows its application in three real human‐robot interaction tasks.

  2. Evaluation of the Display of Cognitive State Feedback to Drive Adaptive Task Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneich, Michael C.; Passinger, Břetislav; Hamblin, Christopher; Keinrath, Claudia; Vašek, Jiři; Whitlow, Stephen D.; Beekhuyzen, Martijn

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive system intended to address workload imbalances between pilots in future flight decks. Team performance can be maximized when task demands are balanced within crew capabilities and resources. Good communication skills enable teams to adapt to changes in workload, and include the balancing of workload between team members This work addresses human factors priorities in the aviation domain with the goal to develop concepts that balance operator workload, support future operator roles and responsibilities, and support new task requirements, while allowing operators to focus on the most safety critical tasks. A traditional closed-loop adaptive system includes the decision logic to turn automated adaptations on and off. This work takes a novel approach of replacing the decision logic, normally performed by the automation, with human decisions. The Crew Workload Manager (CWLM) was developed to objectively display the workload between pilots and recommend task sharing; it is then the pilots who “close the loop” by deciding how to best mitigate unbalanced workload. The workload was manipulated by the Shared Aviation Task Battery (SAT-B), which was developed to provide opportunities for pilots to mitigate imbalances in workload between crew members. Participants were put in situations of high and low workload (i.e., workload was manipulated as opposed to being measured), the workload was then displayed to pilots, and pilots were allowed to decide how to mitigate the situation. An evaluation was performed that utilized the SAT-B to manipulate workload and create workload imbalances. Overall, the CWLM reduced the time spent in unbalanced workload and improved the crew coordination in task sharing while not negatively impacting concurrent task performance. Balancing workload has the potential to improve crew resource management and task performance over time, and reduce errors and fatigue. Paired with a real-time workload measurement system

  3. Some Reflections on Task-Based Language Performance Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Lyle F.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses problems in task-based language assessment, including the definition and sampling of tasks, generalizations across tasks, interpretations about broad ability and language use domains, and the notion of task difficulty. (Author/VWL)

  4. Operational Strategy of CBPs for load balancing of Operators in Advanced Main Control Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Yochan; Jung, Wondea [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    With the using of a computer-based control room in an APR1400 (Advanced Pressurized Reactor-1400), the operators' behaviors in the main control room had changed. However, though the working environment of operators has been changed a great deal, digitalized interfaces can also change the cognitive tasks or activities of operators. First, a shift supervisor (SS) can confirm/check the conduction of the procedures and the execution of actions of board operators (BOs) while confirming directly the operation variables without relying on the BOs. Second, all operators added to their work the use of a new CBP and Soft Controls, increasing their procedural workload. New operational control strategies of CBPs are necessary for load balancing of operator's task load in APR1400. In this paper, we compared the workloads of operators in an APR1400 who work with two different usages of the CBP. They are SS oriented usage and SS-BO collaborative usage. In this research, we evaluated the workloads of operators in an advanced main control room by the COCOA method. Two types of CBP usages were defined and the effects of these usages on the workloads were investigated. The obtained results showed that the workloads between operators in a control room can be balanced according to the CBP usages by assigning control authority to the operators.

  5. Drug and alcohol task force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordey, T. [ConocoPhillips Canada Resources Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Sunstrum, M. [Enform, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Worker absenteeism due to substance abuse costs the Alberta economy approximately $720 million a year. It is estimated that 20 per cent of all drivers in fatal crashes were using alcohol, and the use of cannabis and cocaine in Alberta has more than doubled over the last 15 years. In addition, 1 in 10 Alberta workers have reported using alcohol while at work and 4 per cent have reported using alcohol 4 hours prior to coming to work during the previous 12 months. In an effort to ensure appropriate health and safety for workers in the Canadian petroleum industry, 6 trade associations in the sector have joined together as the Enform Alcohol and Drug Initiative and are now working to develop a common approach to drug and alcohol guidelines and workplace rules. The task group will determine if existing policies and guidelines are sufficient to ensure a safe workplace and will consider standardizing the testing, application and rehabilitation of workers with respect to the use of drugs and alcohol. In the past, disciplinary actions have often been reversed because employers have not been consistent or did not follow established alcohol and drug policies or test to specific standards. Various work rules for inappropriate alcohol and drug use were reviewed, as well as education and communication strategies regarding policy content. Standards for testing criteria were discussed, as well as issues concerning duty-to-accommodate circumstances. An excerpt of concentration standards was presented. It was concluded that a matrix for companies to assess and determine safety sensitive positions is needed. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Synchronizing Parallel Tasks Using STM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Saptarshi Ray

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have marked the start of a historic transition from sequential to parallel computation. The necessity to write parallel programs is increasing as systems are getting more complex while processor speed increases are slowing down. Current parallel programming uses low-level programming constructs like threads and explicit synchronization using locks to coordinate thread execution. Parallel programs written with these constructs are difficult to design, program and debug. Also locks have many drawbacks which make them a suboptimal solution. One such drawback is that locks should be only used to enclose the critical section of the parallel-processing code. If locks are used to enclose the entire code then the performance of the code drastically decreases. Software Transactional Memory (STM is a promising new approach to programming shared-memory parallel processors. It is a concurrency control mechanism that is widely considered to be easier to use by programmers than locking. It allows portions of a program to execute in isolation, without regard to other, concurrently executing tasks. A programmer can reason about the correctness of code within a transaction and need not worry about complex interactions with other, concurrently executing parts of the program. If STM is used to enclose the entire code then the performance of the code is the same as that of the code in which STM is used to enclose the critical section only and is far better than code in which locks have been used to enclose the entire code. So STM is easier to use than locks as critical section does not need to be identified in case of STM. This paper shows the concept of writing code using Software Transactional Memory (STM and the performance comparison of codes using locks with those using STM. It also shows why the use of STM in parallel-processing code is better than the use of locks.

  7. The shielding function of task rules in the context of task switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenauer, Renate; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that task rules help shield the response against distractor interference. Here, the authors investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying this assumed shielding function of task rules and how it is adjusted to changing task demands. In two experiments, participants switched between a noun categorization and an adjective categorization task. Target words were superimposed on distractor pictures. These pictures were always irrelevant and depicted either objects also used as target words in the noun task (noun distractors) or objects that were not part of the noun target-set but could be categorized according to the noun task (noun-related distractors). Results show that (a) on task repetitions shielding prevents interference from any distractors associated with a competing task; this is indicated by the lack of interference on adjective task repetitions; and (b) shielding is reduced on task switches. In the noun task, this reduction resulted in attenuated interference by noun-related distractors. In the adjective task, spatial distractors did not interfere despite the reduction. This result suggests that shielding is supported by a processing advantage for task-related information and not by distractor suppression.

  8. SOCIAL MEDIA MINING SHARED TASK WORKSHOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Abeed; Nikfarjam, Azadeh; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Social media has evolved into a crucial resource for obtaining large volumes of real-time information. The promise of social media has been realized by the public health domain, and recent research has addressed some important challenges in that domain by utilizing social media data. Tasks such as monitoring flu trends, viral disease outbreaks, medication abuse, and adverse drug reactions are some examples of studies where data from social media have been exploited. The focus of this workshop is to explore solutions to three important natural language processing challenges for domain-specific social media text: (i) text classification, (ii) information extraction, and (iii) concept normalization. To explore different approaches to solving these problems on social media data, we designed a shared task which was open to participants globally. We designed three tasks using our in-house annotated Twitter data on adverse drug reactions. Task 1 involved automatic classification of adverse drug reaction assertive user posts; Task 2 focused on extracting specific adverse drug reaction mentions from user posts; and Task 3, which was slightly ill-defined due to the complex nature of the problem, involved normalizing user mentions of adverse drug reactions to standardized concept IDs. A total of 11 teams participated, and a total of 24 (18 for Task 1, and 6 for Task 2) system runs were submitted. Following the evaluation of the systems, and an assessment of their innovation/novelty, we accepted 7 descriptive manuscripts for publication--5 for Task 1 and 2 for Task 2. We provide descriptions of the tasks, data, and participating systems in this paper.

  9. Different neuroplasticity for task targets and distractors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsie Y Spingath

    Full Text Available Adult learning-induced sensory cortex plasticity results in enhanced action potential rates in neurons that have the most relevant information for the task, or those that respond strongly to one sensory stimulus but weakly to its comparison stimulus. Current theories suggest this plasticity is caused when target stimulus evoked activity is enhanced by reward signals from neuromodulatory nuclei. Prior work has found evidence suggestive of nonselective enhancement of neural responses, and suppression of responses to task distractors, but the differences in these effects between detection and discrimination have not been directly tested. Using cortical implants, we defined physiological responses in macaque somatosensory cortex during serial, matched, detection and discrimination tasks. Nonselective increases in neural responsiveness were observed during detection learning. Suppression of responses to task distractors was observed during discrimination learning, and this suppression was specific to cortical locations that sampled responses to the task distractor before learning. Changes in receptive field size were measured as the area of skin that had a significant response to a constant magnitude stimulus, and these areal changes paralleled changes in responsiveness. From before detection learning until after discrimination learning, the enduring changes were selective suppression of cortical locations responsive to task distractors, and nonselective enhancement of responsiveness at cortical locations selective for target and control skin sites. A comparison of observations in prior studies with the observed plasticity effects suggests that the non-selective response enhancement and selective suppression suffice to explain known plasticity phenomena in simple spatial tasks. This work suggests that differential responsiveness to task targets and distractors in primary sensory cortex for a simple spatial detection and discrimination task arise from

  10. Different neuroplasticity for task targets and distractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spingath, Elsie Y; Kang, Hyun Sug; Plummer, Thane; Blake, David T

    2011-01-31

    Adult learning-induced sensory cortex plasticity results in enhanced action potential rates in neurons that have the most relevant information for the task, or those that respond strongly to one sensory stimulus but weakly to its comparison stimulus. Current theories suggest this plasticity is caused when target stimulus evoked activity is enhanced by reward signals from neuromodulatory nuclei. Prior work has found evidence suggestive of nonselective enhancement of neural responses, and suppression of responses to task distractors, but the differences in these effects between detection and discrimination have not been directly tested. Using cortical implants, we defined physiological responses in macaque somatosensory cortex during serial, matched, detection and discrimination tasks. Nonselective increases in neural responsiveness were observed during detection learning. Suppression of responses to task distractors was observed during discrimination learning, and this suppression was specific to cortical locations that sampled responses to the task distractor before learning. Changes in receptive field size were measured as the area of skin that had a significant response to a constant magnitude stimulus, and these areal changes paralleled changes in responsiveness. From before detection learning until after discrimination learning, the enduring changes were selective suppression of cortical locations responsive to task distractors, and nonselective enhancement of responsiveness at cortical locations selective for target and control skin sites. A comparison of observations in prior studies with the observed plasticity effects suggests that the non-selective response enhancement and selective suppression suffice to explain known plasticity phenomena in simple spatial tasks. This work suggests that differential responsiveness to task targets and distractors in primary sensory cortex for a simple spatial detection and discrimination task arise from nonselective

  11. Supervisory Control of a Humanoid Robot in Microgravity for Manipulation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Logan C.; Strawser, Phil; Hambuchen, Kimberly; Baker, Will; Badger, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Teleoperation is the dominant form of dexterous robotic tasks in the field. However, there are many use cases in which direct teleoperation is not feasible such as disaster areas with poor communication as posed in the DARPA Robotics Challenge, or robot operations on spacecraft a large distance from Earth with long communication delays. Presented is a solution that combines the Affordance Template Framework for object interaction with TaskForce for supervisory control in order to accomplish high level task objectives with basic autonomous behavior from the robot. TaskForce, is a new commanding infrastructure that allows for optimal development of task execution, clear feedback to the user to aid in off-nominal situations, and the capability to add autonomous verification and corrective actions. This framework has allowed the robot to take corrective actions before requesting assistance from the user. This framework is demonstrated with Robonaut 2 removing a Cargo Transfer Bag from a simulated logistics resupply vehicle for spaceflight using a single operator command. This was executed with 80% success with no human involvement, and 95% success with limited human interaction. This technology sets the stage to do any number of high level tasks using a similar framework, allowing the robot to accomplish tasks with minimal to no human interaction.

  12. Size effects on the touchpad, touchscreen, and keyboard tasks of netbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Chun; Wu, Chih-Fu

    2012-10-01

    The size of a netbook plays an important role in its success. Somehow, the viewing area on screen and ability to type fast were traded off for portability. To further investigate, this study compared the performances of different-sized touchpads, touchscreens, and keyboards of four-sized netbooks for five application tasks. Consequently, the 7" netbook was significantly slower than larger netbooks in all the tasks except the 8.9" netbook touchpad (successive selecting and clicking) or keyboard tasks. Differences were non-significant for the operating times among the 8.9", 10.1", and 11.6" netbooks in all the tasks except between the 8.9" and 11.6" netbooks in keyboards tasks. For error rates, device-type effects rather than size effects were significant. Gender effects were not significant for operating times in all the tasks but for error rates in touchscreen (multi-direction touching) and keyboard tasks. Considering size effects, the 10.1" netbooks seemed to optimally balance between portability and productivity.

  13. Excess Material Support: The Unrecognized Operational Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-17

    Lawrence D. Moreland 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Colonel Ronda Urey ...UNRECOGNIZED OPERATIONAL RISK by Colonel Lawrence D. Moreland United States Army Reserve Colonel Ronda Urey Project Adviser This SRP is submitted in partial

  14. Response and Reinforcement in Operant Audiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primus, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    Response and reinforcement features of operant discrimination paradigms used in audiometric assessment were investigated with normal 17-month-old children. Findings indicated more responses prior to onset of habituation when response tasks involved complex central processing skills and a twofold increase in number of subject responses when…

  15. Memory operations in rapid serial visual presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyürek, Elkan G.; Hommel, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    Short-term memory (STM) has often been considered to be a central resource in cognition. This study addresses its role in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) tasks tapping into temporal attention-the attentional blink (AB). Various STM operations are tested for their impact on performance and, i

  16. Associativity and Understanding of the Operation of Addition in Children with Learning Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobecker, Betsey; Lawrence, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-seven children (ages 7-10) with learning disabilities and 42 controls were tested on three different mathematics tasks. Significantly more controls abstracted composite unit structures suggestive of operational logic on modified nonverbal and associativity of length tasks. On a flash card task, children with learning disabilities achieved…

  17. Occupational exposure to electric fields and currents associated with 110 kV substation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpinen, Leena H; Kuisti, Harri A; Tarao, Hiroo; Elovaara, Jarmo A

    2012-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate occupational exposure to electric fields, and current densities and contact currents associated with tasks at air-insulated 110 kV substations and analyze if the action value of EU Directive 2004/40/EC was exceeded. Four workers volunteered to simulate the following tasks: Task (A) maintenance of an operating device of a disconnector at ground or floor level, Task (B) maintenance of an operating device of a circuit breaker at ground or floor level, Task (C) breaker head maintenance from a man hoist, and Task (D) maintenance of an operating device of a circuit breaker from a service platform. The highest maximum average current density in the neck was 1.8 mA/m(2) (calculated internal electric field 9.0-18.0 mV/m) and the highest contact current was 79.4 µA. All measured values at substations were lower than the limit value (10 mA/m(2)) of the EU Directive 2004/40/EC and the 2010 basic restrictions (0.1 and 0.8 V/m for central nervous system tissues of the head, and all tissues of the head and body, respectively) of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Control and Interference in Task Switching--A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, Andrea; Steinhauser, Marco; Wendt, Mike; Falkenstein, Michael; Jost, Kerstin; Philipp, Andrea M.; Koch, Iring

    2010-01-01

    The task-switching paradigm offers enormous possibilities to study cognitive control as well as task interference. The current review provides an overview of recent research on both topics. First, we review different experimental approaches to task switching, such as comparing mixed-task blocks with single-task blocks, predictable task-switching…

  19. Fatigue Management in Spaceflight Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Sleep loss and fatigue remain an issue for crewmembers working on the International Space Station, and the ground crews who support them. Schedule shifts on the ISS are required for conducting mission operations. These shifts lead to tasks being performed during the biological night, and sleep scheduled during the biological day, for flight crews and the ground teams who support them. Other stressors have been recognized as hindering sleep in space; these include workload, thinking about upcoming tasks, environmental factors, and inadequate day/night cues. It is unknown if and how other factors such as microgravity, carbon dioxide levels, or increased radiation, may also play a part. Efforts are underway to standardize and provide care for crewmembers, ground controllers and other support personnel. Through collaborations between research and operations, evidenced-based clinical practice guidelines are being developed to equip flight surgeons with the tools and processes needed for treating circadian desynchrony (and subsequent sleep loss) caused by jet lag and shift work. The proper implementation of countermeasures such as schedules, lighting protocols, and cognitive behavioral education can hasten phase shifting, enhance sleep and optimize performance. This panel will focus on Fatigue Management in Spaceflight Operations. Speakers will present on research-based recommendations and technologies aimed at mitigating sleep loss, circadian desynchronization and fatigue on-orbit. Gaps in current mitigations and future recommendations will also be discussed.

  20. Ergonomic evaluation of the wood cutting task using chain saw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Gaurav; Farooq, Mohd; Khan, Abid Ali; Muzammil, Mohammad

    2013-10-01

    Workers whose hands are regularly exposed to hand-arm vibration may suffer from damage to the tissues of the hands and arms, which cause the symptoms collectively known as hand-arm vibration syndrome. However, investigations have shown that vibration hazards can be controlled and risks might be reduced by good design of the task/tools. In the present study, an experiment was conducted for the evaluation of risk in operating chain saw. The evaluation of chain saw ergonomically performed based on four parameters--Discomfort level, EMG activity of seven different forearm muscles (ECRB, ECU, EPB, FCR, FDS, FCU and PT), angular deviation in hand-arm system and the vibration transfer to hand-arm system, while operating the chain saw on a wooden block. Ten male candidates participated for the discomfort level experiment, four participants volunteered for the EMG activity and angular deviation experiment and two participants were involved in vibration transfer recordings. The results showed that ECRB muscle was mostly affected muscle in this task of operating a chain saw. The findings also indicated that the problems were occurred due to the bad design of the rear handle of chain saw in association with the available vibration levels on hand arm system.