WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-level system noise

  1. Entropy as a measure of the noise extent in a two-level quantum feedback controlled system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tao-Bo; Fang Mao-Fa; Hu Yao-Hua

    2007-01-01

    By introducing the von Neumann entropy as a measure of the extent of noise, this paper discusses the entropy evolution in a two-level quantum feedback controlled system. The results show that the feedback control can induce the reduction of the degree of noise, and different control schemes exhibit different noise controlling ability, the extent of the reduction also related with the position of the target state on the Bloch sphere. It is shown that the evolution of entropy can provide a real time noise observation and a systematic guideline to make reasonable choice of control strategy.

  2. Noise level estimation in weakly nonlinear slowly time-varying systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerts, J R M; Dirckx, J J J; Lataire, J; Pintelon, R

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a method using multisine excitation was proposed for estimating the frequency response, the nonlinear distortions and the disturbing noise of weakly nonlinear time-invariant systems. This method has been demonstrated on the measurement of nonlinear distortions in the vibration of acoustically driven systems such as a latex membrane, which is a good example of a time-invariant system [1]. However, not all systems are perfectly time invariant, e.g. biomechanical systems. This time variation can be misinterpreted as an elevated noise floor, and the classical noise estimation method gives a wrong result. Two improved methods to retrieve the correct noise information from the measurements are presented. Both of them make use of multisine excitations. First, it is demonstrated that the improved methods give the same result as the classical noise estimation method when applied to a time-invariant system (high-quality microphone membrane). Next, it is demonstrated that the new methods clearly give an improved estimate of the noise level on time-varying systems. As an application example results for the vibration response of an eardrum are shown

  3. Two Stochastic Resonances Induced by Two Different Multiplicative Telegraphic Noises for an Electric System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinghui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an electric system with two dichotomous resistors is investigated. It is shown that this system can display two stochastic resonances, which are the amplitude of the periodic response as the functions of the two dichotomous resistors strengthes respectively. In the limits of Gaussian white noise and shot white noise (i.e., the two noises are both Gaussian white noise or shot white noise), no phenomena of resonance appear. By further study, we find that when the system is with three or more multiplicative telegraphic noises, there are three or more stochastic resonances

  4. Entanglement dynamics of two-qubit systems in different quantum noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Chang-Ning; Fang Jian-Shu; Li-Fei; Fang Mao-Fa

    2011-01-01

    The entanglement dynamics of two-qubit systems in different quantum noises are investigated by means of the operator-sum representation method. We find that, except for the amplitude damping and phase damping quantum noise, the sudden death of entanglement is always observed in different two-qubit systems with generalized amplitude damping and depolarizing quantum noise. (general)

  5. Noise-induced drift in two-dimensional anisotropic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farago, Oded

    2017-10-01

    We study the isothermal Brownian dynamics of a particle in a system with spatially varying diffusivity. Due to the heterogeneity of the system, the particle's mean displacement does not vanish even if it does not experience any physical force. This phenomenon has been termed "noise-induced drift," and has been extensively studied for one-dimensional systems. Here, we examine the noise-induced drift in a two-dimensional anisotropic system, characterized by a symmetric diffusion tensor with unequal diagonal elements. A general expression for the mean displacement vector is derived and presented as a sum of two vectors, depicting two distinct drifting effects. The first vector describes the tendency of the particle to drift toward the high diffusivity side in each orthogonal principal diffusion direction. This is a generalization of the well-known expression for the noise-induced drift in one-dimensional systems. The second vector represents a novel drifting effect, not found in one-dimensional systems, originating from the spatial rotation in the directions of the principal axes. The validity of the derived expressions is verified by using Langevin dynamics simulations. As a specific example, we consider the relative diffusion of two transmembrane proteins, and demonstrate that the average distance between them increases at a surprisingly fast rate of several tens of micrometers per second.

  6. Noise Levels in Two Emergency Departments Before and After the Introduction of Electronic Whiteboards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2013-01-01

    . The maximum equivalent continuous noise levels across 1 second were above 80 dB(A) at all four coordination centres. At two of the centres above 80 dB(A) noises also occurred at night. After the introduction of electronic whiteboards the noise level was lowered at one ED but unchanged at the other ED...

  7. Effects of self-reported sensitivity and road-traffic noise levels on the immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahra Kim

    Full Text Available Sensitivity to noise, particularly road traffic noise, can increase cortisol levels and result in changes in immune system biomarkers. Therefore, continuous exposure to noise can have an effect on immune function, hormonal levels, and cardiovascular function, leading to hypertension and stress. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in stress-and immune system-related biomarkers according to the self-reported sensitivity to noise and exposure to road traffic noise, to ultimately determine the potential effects of noise on health. A survey was conducted through questionnaire (ISO/TS 15666 sent to 172 female subjects in Korea, including 128 from Ulsan and 44 from Seoul. The average noise level was calculated, and blood samples were collected for measurements of cortisol levels, Natural killer (NK / Natural killer T (NKT cell populations, and NK cell activity (through measurements of interleukin-12 (IL-12 and interferon-gamma (INF-γ concentrations. Multivariate linear regression analysis of the measured biomarkers according to the road traffic noise level and self-reported noise sensitivity was conducted adjusting for the effects of age, alcohol status, smoking status, regular exercise, and residence period. IL-12 levels increased, whereas the NKT cell population decreased with increasing noise levels. The results further suggested that cortisol levels are more influenced by the subject's sensitivity to noise than to the level of chronic road traffic noise. Therefore, noise appears to have the largest effect on IL-12 levels as well as the population and activity of NKT cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that low-level road traffic noise and sensitivity to noise can affect health by causing changes in the immune response through mechanisms other than increased cortisol.

  8. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine A. Janssen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A‑weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels.

  9. Interacting two-level defects as sources of fluctuating high-frequency noise in superconducting circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Clemens [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Lisenfeld, Juergen [Physikalisches Institut, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Shnirman, Alexander [Institut fuer Theory der Kondensierten Materie, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); LD Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Poletto, Stefano [IBM TJ Watson Research Centre, Yorktown Heights (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Since the very first experiments, superconducting circuits have suffered from strong coupling to environmental noise, destroying quantum coherence and degrading performance. In state-of-the-art experiments, it is found that the relaxation time of superconducting qubits fluctuates as a function of time. We present measurements of such fluctuations in a 3D-transmon circuit and develop a qualitative model based on interactions within a bath of background two-level systems (TLS) which emerge from defects in the device material. In our model, the time-dependent noise density acting on the qubit emerges from its near-resonant coupling to high-frequency TLS which experience energy fluctuations due to their interaction with thermally fluctuating TLS at low frequencies. We support the model by providing experimental evidence of such energy fluctuations observed in a single TLS in a phase qubit circuit.

  10. A direct method for calculating instrument noise levels in side-by-side seismometer evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, L. Gary

    1989-01-01

    The subject of determining the inherent system noise levels present in modem broadband closed loop seismic sensors has been an evolving topic ever since closed loop systems became available. Closed loop systems are unique in that the system noise can not be determined via a blocked mass test as in older conventional open loop seismic sensors. Instead, most investigators have resorted to performing measurements on two or more systems operating in close proximity to one another and to analyzing the outputs of these systems with respect to one another to ascertain their relative noise levels.The analysis of side-by-side relative performance is inherently dependent on the accuracy of the mathematical modeling of the test configuration. This report presents a direct approach to extracting the system noise levels of two linear systems with a common coherent input signal. The mathematical solution to the problem is incredibly simple; however the practical application of the method encounters some difficulties. Examples of expected accuracies are presented as derived by simulating real systems performance using computer generated random noise. In addition, examples of the performance of the method when applied to real experimental test data are shown.

  11. The simulation of the non-Markovian behaviour of a two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semina, I.; Petruccione, F.

    2016-05-01

    Non-Markovian relaxation dynamics of a two-level system is studied with the help of the non-linear stochastic Schrödinger equation with coloured Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise. This stochastic Schrödinger equation is investigated numerically with an adapted Platen scheme. It is shown, that the memory effects have a significant impact to the dynamics of the system.

  12. Quantum nonlocality in two three-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acin, A.; Durt, T.; Gisin, N.; Latorre, J.I.

    2002-01-01

    Recently a new Bell inequality has been introduced by Collins et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 040404 (2002)], which is strongly resistant to noise for maximally entangled states of two d-dimensional quantum systems. We prove that a larger violation, or equivalently a stronger resistance to noise, is found for a nonmaximally entangled state. It is shown that the resistance to noise is not a good measure of nonlocality and we introduce some other possible measures. The nonmaximally entangled state turns out to be more robust also for these alternative measures. From these results it follows that two von Neumann measurements per party may be not optimal for detecting nonlocality. For d=3,4, we point out some connections between this inequality and distillability. Indeed, we demonstrate that any state violating it, with the optimal von Neumann settings, is distillable

  13. Noise level in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Werther B; Pedreira, Mavilde L G; de Aguiar, Maria Augusta L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the noise level at a PICU. This prospective observational study was performed in a 10 bed PICU at a teaching hospital located in a densely populated district within the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Sound pressure levels (dBA) were measured 24 hours during a 6-day period. Noise recording equipment was placed in the PICU access corridor, nursing station, two open wards with three and five beds, and in isolation rooms. The resulting curves were analyzed. A basal noise level variation between 60 and 70 dBA was identified, with a maximum level of 120 dBA. The most significant noise levels were recorded during the day and were produced by the staff. The basal noise level identified exceeds International Noise Council recommendations. Education regarding the effects of noise on human hearing and its relation to stress is the essential basis for the development of a noise reduction program.

  14. Noise-induced phase space transport in two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelov, I V; Kandrup, H E

    1999-08-01

    First passage time experiments were used to explore the effects of low amplitude noise as a source of accelerated phase space diffusion in two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, and these effects were then compared with the effects of periodic driving. The objective was to quantify and understand the manner in which "sticky" chaotic orbits that, in the absence of perturbations, are confined near regular islands for very long times, can become "unstuck" much more quickly when subjected to even very weak perturbations. For both noise and periodic driving, the typical escape time scales logarithmically with the amplitude of the perturbation. For white noise, the details seem unimportant: Additive and multiplicative noise typically have very similar effects, and the presence or absence of a friction related to the noise by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is also largely irrelevant. Allowing for colored noise can significantly decrease the efficacy of the perturbation, but only when the autocorrelation time, which vanishes for white noise, becomes so large that there is little power at frequencies comparable to the natural frequencies of the unperturbed orbit. Similarly, periodic driving is relatively inefficient when the driving frequency is not comparable to these natural frequencies. This suggests that noise-induced extrinsic diffusion, like modulational diffusion associated with periodic driving, is a resonance phenomenon. The logarithmic dependence of the escape time on amplitude reflects the fact that the time required for perturbed and unperturbed orbits to diverge a given distance scales logarithmically in the amplitude of the perturbation.

  15. Pilot survey of subway and bus stop noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Robyn R M; Neitzel, Richard; Barrera, Marissa A; Akram, Muhammad

    2006-09-01

    Excessive noise exposure is a serious global urban health problem, adversely affecting millions of people. One often cited source of urban noise is mass transit, particularly subway systems. As a first step in determining risk within this context, we recently conducted an environmental survey of noise levels of the New York City transit system. Over 90 noise measurements were made using a sound level meter. Average and maximum noise levels were measured on subway platforms, and maximum levels were measured inside subway cars and at several bus stops for comparison purposes. The average noise level measured on the subway platforms was 86 +/- 4 dBA (decibel-A weighting). Maximum levels of 106, 112, and 89 dBA were measured on subway platforms, inside subway cars, and at bus stops, respectively. These results indicate that noise levels in subway and bus stop environments have the potential to exceed recommended exposure guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), given sufficient exposure duration. Risk reduction strategies following the standard hierarchy of control measures should be applied, where feasible, to reduce subway noise exposure.

  16. Noise-induced phase space transport in two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelov, I.V.; Kandrup, H.E.

    1999-01-01

    First passage time experiments were used to explore the effects of low amplitude noise as a source of accelerated phase space diffusion in two-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, and these effects were then compared with the effects of periodic driving. The objective was to quantify and understand the manner in which open-quotes stickyclose quotes chaotic orbits that, in the absence of perturbations, are confined near regular islands for very long times, can become open-quotes unstuckclose quotes much more quickly when subjected to even very weak perturbations. For both noise and periodic driving, the typical escape time scales logarithmically with the amplitude of the perturbation. For white noise, the details seem unimportant: Additive and multiplicative noise typically have very similar effects, and the presence or absence of a friction related to the noise by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem is also largely irrelevant. Allowing for colored noise can significantly decrease the efficacy of the perturbation, but only when the autocorrelation time, which vanishes for white noise, becomes so large that there is little power at frequencies comparable to the natural frequencies of the unperturbed orbit. Similarly, periodic driving is relatively inefficient when the driving frequency is not comparable to these natural frequencies. This suggests that noise-induced extrinsic diffusion, like modulational diffusion associated with periodic driving, is a resonance phenomenon. The logarithmic dependence of the escape time on amplitude reflects the fact that the time required for perturbed and unperturbed orbits to diverge a given distance scales logarithmically in the amplitude of the perturbation. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  17. Comparison of the Effect of Noise Levels on Stress Response in Two Different Operation Groups in an Orthopedic Surgery Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasibe Baytan Yildiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this randomized, single-blinded study was to evaluate the effects of noise on hemodynamic and neuroendocrine stress response by measuring the level of noise in the surgery rooms of patients undergoing knee operations under neuroaxial anesthesia. Gerec ve Yontem: We compared patient responses from two groups of patients: those undergoing knee operations in a surgery room where the noise level (measured in decibels is high, and those undergoing meniscus operations in a surgery room with lower noise levels. The STAI, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-1, and the anxiety test (STAI-2wereperformed at preoperative and postoperative periods. 20 ml of blood sample was taken for basal, intraoperative 30th minute, and postoperative 1st hour measurements. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures were found to be higher in the high noise level group. ACTH levels were increased during the early postoperative period and became normal during the late postoperative period in the high noise level group whereas ACTH levels were significantly decreased in the low-noise level group. Basal cortisol levels were significantly higher in the high noise level group. HCRP, an inflammatory response mediator was found to be decreased in both groups. Early and late blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the high noise group. There was a greater increase in early and late blood glucose levels in the high noise group. In the postoperative period, although the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI-2 levels being higher in patients subject to noisier environment determines how people feel independent of the conditions and state they are in, this result made us consider that the noise the patients were subjected to in the intraoperative period may cause a stress response. Discussion: As a result we believe that standard noise levels should be achieved by reducing the factors causing high noise levels in the operating room. This will

  18. High level white noise generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Blalock, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application

  19. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  20. Advanced supersonic propulsion study. [with emphasis on noise level reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatella, J. A. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the promising propulsion systems for advanced supersonic transport application, and to identify the critical propulsion technology requirements. It is shown that noise constraints have a major effect on the selection of the various engine types and cycle parameters. Several promising advanced propulsion systems were identified which show the potential of achieving lower levels of sideline jet noise than the first generation supersonic transport systems. The non-afterburning turbojet engine, utilizing a very high level of jet suppression, shows the potential to achieve FAR 36 noise level. The duct-heating turbofan with a low level of jet suppression is the most attractive engine for noise levels from FAR 36 to FAR 36 minus 5 EPNdb, and some series/parallel variable cycle engines show the potential of achieving noise levels down to FAR 36 minus 10 EPNdb with moderate additional penalty. The study also shows that an advanced supersonic commercial transport would benefit appreciably from advanced propulsion technology. The critical propulsion technology needed for a viable supersonic propulsion system, and the required specific propulsion technology programs are outlined.

  1. Noise enhanced stability effect in a metastable system with two different kinds of time delays and cross-correlated noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Zhenglin; Mei Dongcheng

    2011-01-01

    We numerically investigate the influences of the time delay τ simultaneously existing in both the deterministic and fluctuating forces, the time delay τ r existing only in the fluctuating force and the cross-correlation strength λ on the enhancement of the mean first-passage time (MFPT) as a function of the additive D and the multiplicative α noise intensities in a metastable system. The results indicate that both the multiplicative and additive noises can induce the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect. An increase of λ can enhance or weaken the NES effect induced by the additive noise, depending on the value of τ. However, it weakens the NES effect induced by the multiplicative noise with a suppression of the effect of λ caused by increasing τ. The τ-induced critical behavior on both NES effects can be observed, i.e. an increase of τ can enhance or restrain the NES effects induced by the two kinds of noises. With an increase of λ and τ, MFPT versus D shows a transition from one peak to two peaks and finally one peak, implying the multiple NES effect caused by λ and τ. An increase of τ r can enhance the NES effect induced by the additive noise and weaken the NES effect induced by the multiplicative noise.

  2. Prevalence and awareness of noise induced hearing loss in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noise above a certain acceptable level or sustained noise may cause damage to the ears. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and level of awareness of noise induced hearing loss in Calabar. Seventy-five workers from two noise producing companies, in Calabar- Flour mill and Wartsilla were chosen for this ...

  3. Detection System of Sound Noise Level (SNL) Based on Condenser Microphone Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagukguk, Juniastel; Eka Sari, Nurdieni

    2018-03-01

    The research aims to know the noise level by using the Arduino Uno as data processing input from sensors and called as Sound Noise Level (SNL). The working principle of the instrument is as noise detector with the show notifications the noise level on the LCD indicator and in the audiovisual form. Noise detection using the sensor is a condenser microphone and LM 567 as IC op-amps, which are assembled so that it can detect the noise, which sounds are captured by the sensor will turn the tide of sinusoida voice became sine wave energy electricity (altering sinusoida electric current) that is able to responded to complaints by the Arduino Uno. The tool is equipped with a detector consists of a set indicator LED and sound well as the notification from the text on LCD 16*2. Work setting indicators on the condition that, if the measured noise > 75 dB then sound will beep, the red LED will light up indicating the status of the danger. If the measured value on the LCD is higher than 56 dB, sound indicator will be beep and yellow LED will be on indicating noisy. If the noise measured value <55 dB, sound indicator will be quiet indicating peaceful from noisy. From the result of the research can be explained that the SNL is capable to detecting and displaying noise level with a measuring range 50-100 dB and capable to delivering the notification noise in audiovisual.

  4. Prediction and comparison of noise levels from ground and elevated flare systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obasi, E.

    2009-01-01

    Flaring is a process to dispose of hydrocarbons during clean-up, emergency shut downs or dispose a small volume waste streams of mixed gasses that cannot easily or safely be separated. This presentation discussed flaring as a noise issue. It focused on flaring noise characterization; flare noise modeling; flare sound power levels; and flare sound pressure level comparison at a distance of 1.5 km. The presentation included a photograph of flaring at a gas plant in Nigeria. The presentation listed some of the potential health effects associated with long term exposure to excessive noise, such as hearing loss; headaches; stress; fatigue; sleep disturbance; and high blood pressure. Companies flare gas to dispose waste gases in a safe and reliable manner through combustion and to depressurize gas lines during maintenance and emergencies. This presentation also discussed ground and elevated flares; components of flare noise characterization; and key factors affecting flare noise. A model to predict flaring noise was also presented. It demonstrated that at the same gas mass flow rate, the noise level from elevated flare stacks are significantly higher than ground flares. tabs., figs.

  5. Prediction and comparison of noise levels from ground and elevated flare systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obasi, E. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Surrey, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Flaring is a process to dispose of hydrocarbons during clean-up, emergency shut downs or dispose a small volume waste streams of mixed gasses that cannot easily or safely be separated. This presentation discussed flaring as a noise issue. It focused on flaring noise characterization; flare noise modeling; flare sound power levels; and flare sound pressure level comparison at a distance of 1.5 km. The presentation included a photograph of flaring at a gas plant in Nigeria. The presentation listed some of the potential health effects associated with long term exposure to excessive noise, such as hearing loss; headaches; stress; fatigue; sleep disturbance; and high blood pressure. Companies flare gas to dispose waste gases in a safe and reliable manner through combustion and to depressurize gas lines during maintenance and emergencies. This presentation also discussed ground and elevated flares; components of flare noise characterization; and key factors affecting flare noise. A model to predict flaring noise was also presented. It demonstrated that at the same gas mass flow rate, the noise level from elevated flare stacks are significantly higher than ground flares. tabs., figs.

  6. Engineering the Flow of Liquid Two-Phase Systems by Passive Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeyi; Kong, Tiantian; Zhou, Chunmei; Wang, Liqiu

    2018-02-01

    We investigate a passive noise-control approach to engineering the two-phase flow in a microfluidic coflow system. The presence or absence of the jet breakup is studied for two immiscible oil phases, in a straight microchannel (referred to as the J device in the main text), an expansion microchannel (the W device) and a microchannel with the expansion-contraction geometry (the S device), respectively. We show that the jet breaks into droplets, in the jetting regime and the dripping regime (also referred to as the widening-jetting regime) for the straight channel and expansion channel, respectively, while a stable long jet does not break for the expansion-contraction geometry. As the inner phase passes the expansion-contraction functional unit, the random noise on the interface is significantly reduced and the hydrodynamic instability is suppressed, for a range of experimental parameters including flow rates, device geometry, liquid viscosity, and interfacial tension. We further present scale-up devices with multiple noise-control units and achieve decimeter-long yet stable jets. Our simple, effective, and robust noise-control approach can benefit microfluidic applications such as microfiber fabrication, interface chemical reaction, and on-chip distance transportation.

  7. Background noise levels in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Gjestland, Truls

    2008-01-01

    - This report gives a brief overview of typical background noise levels in Europe, and suggests a procedure for the prediction of background noise levels based on population density. A proposal for the production of background noise maps for Europe is included.

  8. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  9. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjec...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  10. Noise levels in Damascus city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Oudat, M.; Maslmani, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Outdoor noise levels were measured at 22 sites in Damascus city. Sound level meter model NC-10 with a 20-140 dBA selectable range was used in the current investigation. At each site noise data were collected from 7 to 21 o'clock. The results showed that the noise levels were higher than WHO (World Health Organization) standard by 5-24.7 dB, 10-16 dB, 10-11 dB and 12-17 dB in residential, commercial, Commercial-industrial, and Heavy traffic streets respectively. Indoor and outdoor noise levels in some hospitals were higher than WHO standard by 15-28 dB and 19-23 dB respectively. The study showed that the authorities administration must take necessary procedures to reduce the noise levels in residential regions and in the regions surrounding the hospitals. (author)

  11. Noise pollution survey of a two-storey intersection station in Tehran metropolitan subway system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotbi, Mohammad Reza; Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Asadi, Mohammad; Fard, Samaneh Momen Bellah

    2012-01-01

    According to the world population increase and demand on transportation in mega cities, modern and low-cost technologies are remarkably considered. Meanwhile, subway system, as a means to transfer a large population of people, is extremely welcomed due to its particular advantages including time and cost savings, traffic jam avoidance, and unaffected by weather. Nevertheless, despite the benefits of these technologies, such devices also have been associated with disadvantages for human. In many subway systems, noisy environments are clearly observed; therefore, workers and even the passengers are exposed to higher noise levels than permissible limit. In this research, noise measurements were performed at Imam Khomeini Station as the most crowded intersection subway station in Tehran. In this descriptive-sectional survey, the amount of noise pollution was investigated at both stories of Imam Khomeini Intersection Station. A variety of noise pollution indicators such as L(eq) 10 min were separately measured at each storey through five measurement points from 7 A.M. to 10 P.M. It was shown that the equivalent sound level range at Imam Khomeini station towards Elmo Sanat and Imam Khomeini towards Mirdamad were between 70.56-79.54 and 68.35-79.12 dB (A), respectively. It was indicated that except for the entrance stairs to the subway waiting platform and the first section of the platform on both stories, other measurement stations have the same equivalent sound levels.

  12. Definition of 1992 Technology Aircraft Noise Levels and the Methodology for Assessing Airplane Noise Impact of Component Noise Reduction Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Henry A.; Martinez, Michael M.; Weir, Donald S.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the methodology for assessing the impact of component noise reduction on total airplane system noise. The methodology is intended to be applied to the results of individual study elements of the NASA-Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program, which will address the development of noise reduction concepts for specific components. Program progress will be assessed in terms of noise reduction achieved, relative to baseline levels representative of 1992 technology airplane/engine design and performance. In this report, the 1992 technology reference levels are defined for assessment models based on four airplane sizes - an average business jet and three commercial transports: a small twin, a medium sized twin, and a large quad. Study results indicate that component changes defined as program final goals for nacelle treatment and engine/airframe source noise reduction would achieve from 6-7 EPNdB reduction of total airplane noise at FAR 36 Stage 3 noise certification conditions for all of the airplane noise assessment models.

  13. Increased noise levels have different impacts on the anti-predator behaviour of two sympatric fish species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene K Voellmy

    Full Text Available Animals must avoid predation to survive and reproduce, and there is increasing evidence that man-made (anthropogenic factors can influence predator-prey relationships. Anthropogenic noise has been shown to have a variety of effects on many species, but work investigating the impact on anti-predator behaviour is rare. In this laboratory study, we examined how additional noise (playback of field recordings of a ship passing through a harbour, compared with control conditions (playback of recordings from the same harbours without ship noise, affected responses to a visual predatory stimulus. We compared the anti-predator behaviour of two sympatric fish species, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus and the European minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus, which share similar feeding and predator ecologies, but differ in their body armour. Effects of additional-noise playbacks differed between species: sticklebacks responded significantly more quickly to the visual predatory stimulus during additional-noise playbacks than during control conditions, while minnows exhibited no significant change in their response latency. Our results suggest that elevated noise levels have the potential to affect anti-predator behaviour of different species in different ways. Future field-based experiments are needed to confirm whether this effect and the interspecific difference exist in relation to real-world noise sources, and to determine survival and population consequences.

  14. Critical Low-Noise Technologies Being Developed for Engine Noise Reduction Systems Subproject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's previous Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) Noise Reduction Program delivered the initial technologies for meeting a 10-year goal of a 10-dB reduction in total aircraft system noise. Technology Readiness Levels achieved for the engine-noise-reduction technologies ranged from 4 (rig scale) to 6 (engine demonstration). The current Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) project is building on those AST accomplishments to achieve the additional noise reduction needed to meet the Aerospace Technology Enterprise's 10-year goal, again validated through a combination of laboratory rig and engine demonstration tests. In order to meet the Aerospace Technology Enterprise goal for future aircraft of a 50- reduction in the perceived noise level, reductions of 4 dB are needed in both fan and jet noise. The primary objectives of the Engine Noise Reduction Systems (ENRS) subproject are, therefore, to develop technologies to reduce both fan and jet noise by 4 dB, to demonstrate these technologies in engine tests, and to develop and experimentally validate Computational Aero Acoustics (CAA) computer codes that will improve our ability to predict engine noise.

  15. METHODS OF NOISE LEVEL REDUCTION OF DRIVE IN LATHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz ROGULA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is method presentation to noise level reduction of fixed headstock of the lathe. It is connected with the causes finding of non-uniform work of lathe headstock, description of recent design and its analysis. Problem of the excessive noise level concern to near 35% of the lathes have been produced. In spite of lack of noise reduction possibility there were no system solution of problem. Design optimisation weren’t done after application the electric motor with inverter. New solution of electric motor control let to reduce number of gear wheels in lathe drive system. For this drive solution there weren’t made the analysis of drive particular parts influence on the noise generation.

  16. A Two-Sensor Noise Reduction System: Applications for Hands-Free Car Kit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guérin Alexandre

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-microphone speech enhancer designed to remove noise in hands-free car kits. The algorithm, based on the magnitude squared coherence, uses speech correlation and noise decorrelation to separate speech from noise. The remaining correlated noise is reduced using cross-spectral subtraction. Particular attention is focused on the estimation of the different spectral densities (noise and noisy signals power spectral densities which are critical for the quality of the algorithm. We also propose a continuous noise estimation, avoiding the need of vocal activity detector. Results on recorded signals are provided, showing the superiority of the two-sensor approach to single microphone techniques.

  17. Effect of external classroom noise on schoolchildren's reading and mathematics performance: correlation of noise levels and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Skenteris, N; Piperakis, S M

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of low, medium, and high traffic road noise as well as irrelevant background speech noise on primary school children's reading and mathematical performance. A total of 676 participants (324 boys, 47.9% and 352 girls, 52.1%) of the 4th and 5th elementary classes participated in the project. The participants were enrolled in public primary schools from urban areas and had ages ranging from 9 to 10 years and from. Schools were selected on the basis of increasing levels of exposure to road traffic noise and then classified into three categories (Low noise: 55-66 dB, Medium noise: 67-77 dB, and High noise: 72-80 dB). We measured reading comprehension and mathematical skills in accordance with the national guidelines for elementary education, using a test designed specifically for the purpose of this study. On the one hand, children in low-level noise schools showed statistically significant differences from children in medium- and high-level noise schools in reading performance (plevel noise schools differed significantly from children in high-level noise schools but only in mathematics performance (p=0.001). Girls in general did better in reading score than boys, especially in schools with medium- and high-level noise. Finally the levels of noise and gender were found to be two independent factors.

  18. Darboux transformation for two-level system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.; Baldiotti, M.; Gitman, D.; Shamshutdinova, V. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318-CEP, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil)

    2005-06-01

    We develop the Darboux procedure for the case of the two-level system. In particular, it is demonstrated that one can construct the Darboux intertwining operator that does not violate the specific structure of the equations of the two-level system, transforming only one real potential into another real potential. We apply the obtained Darboux transformation to known exact solutions of the two-level system. Thus, we find three classes of new solutions for the two-level system and the corresponding new potentials that allow such solutions. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Noise in restaurants: levels and mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Wai Ming; Chung, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (L(eq,1-h)) was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  20. Noise in restaurants: Levels and mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Ming To

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise affects the dining atmosphere and is an occupational hazard to restaurant service employees worldwide. This paper examines the levels of noise in dining areas during peak hours in different types of restaurants in Hong Kong SAR, China. A mathematical model that describes the noise level in a restaurant is presented. The 1-h equivalent continuous noise level (Leq,1-h was measured using a Type-1 precision integral sound level meter while the occupancy density, the floor area of the dining area, and the ceiling height of each of the surveyed restaurants were recorded. It was found that the measured noise levels using Leq,1-h ranged from 67.6 to 79.3 dBA in Chinese restaurants, from 69.1 to 79.1 dBA in fast food restaurants, and from 66.7 to 82.6 dBA in Western restaurants. Results of the analysis of variance show that there were no significant differences between means of the measured noise levels among different types of restaurants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was employed to determine the relationships between geometrical and operational parameters and the measured noise levels. Results of the regression analysis show that the measured noise levels depended on the levels of occupancy density only. By reconciling the measured noise levels and the mathematical model, it was found that people in restaurants increased their voice levels when the occupancy density increased. Nevertheless, the maximum measured hourly noise level indicated that the noise exposure experienced by restaurant service employees was below the regulated daily noise exposure value level of 85 dBA.

  1. Practical ranges of loudness levels of various types of environmental noise, including traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.; Janssen, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a

  2. On the variances of generation-recombination noise in a three-level system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooge, F.N.; Ren, L.

    1994-01-01

    A statistical treatment is given of the generation-recombination noise in a semiconductor with a conduction band and two traps X and Y. The system is described in terms of x and y, where x is half the harmonic mean of the numbers of occupied and empty traps X. A corresponding definition is given for

  3. Noise Levels in Dental Offices and Laboratories in Hamedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mojarad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise pollution is one of the most important situations requiring a solution by the contemporary world. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has identified noise as one of the ten leading causes of work-related diseases and injuries.Dentists and dental auxiliaries are exposed to different noise levels while working in dental offices or laboratories. The purpose of this study was to measure the noise level made by different dental instruments in dental offices and laboratories.Materials and Methods: Measurement of the noise level was performed in 89 dental offices and nine dental laboratories. The noise levels were determined using a sound level meter; type SL-4011(Lutron ,which was placed at the operator’s ear level in dental offices and laboratories and also at two-meter distance from the technician’s ear in laboratories.Results: The maximum sound level was 85.8 dB in dental offices and 92.0 dB in laboratories.In dental clinics, the highest noise was produced by the ultrasonic-scaler (85.8 dB and the lowest noise (49.7 dB by the high-volume aspirator, whereas in the laboratory,the highest noise was caused during grinding by the stonecutter (92.0 dB and the lowest by the denture-polishing unit (41.0 dB.Conclusion: After close evaluation, we believe that the maximum noise level in dental offices, although often beneath the damaging noise level for the human ear, is very close to the limit of hearing loss (85.0 dB. However, laboratory technicians may be at risk ifthey choose not to wear ear protection (earplugs or earmuffs.

  4. Noise Source Identification of Small Fan-BLDC Motor System for Refrigerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Han Kim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise levels in household appliances are increasingly attracting attention from manufacturers and customers. Legislation is becoming more severe on acceptable noise levels and low noise is a major marketing point for many products. The latest trend in the refrigerator manufacturing industry is to use brushless DC (BLDC motors instead of induction motors in order to reduce energy consumption and noise radiation. However, cogging torque from BLDC motor is an undesirable effect that prevents the smooth rotation of the rotor and results in noise. This paper presents a practical approach for identifying the source of excessive noise in the small fan-motor system for household refrigerators. The source is presumed to a mechanical resonance excited by torque ripple of the BLDC motor. By using finite element analysis, natural frequencies and mode shapes of the rotating part of the system are obtained and they are compared with experimental mode shapes obtained by electronic torsional excitation test which uses BLDC motor itself as an exciter. Two experimental validations are carried out to confirm the reduction of excessive noise.

  5. Adiabatically modeling quantum gates with two-site Heisenberg spins chain: Noise vs interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jipdi, M. N.; Tchoffo, M.; Fai, L. C.

    2018-02-01

    We study the Landau Zener (LZ) dynamics of a two-site Heisenberg spin chain assisted with noise and focus on the implementation of logic gates via the resulting quantum interference. We present the evidence of the quantum interference phenomenon in triplet spin states and confirm that, three-level systems mimic Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) interferometers with occupancies dependent on the effective phase. It emerges that, the critical parameters tailoring the system are obtained for constructive interferences where the two sets of the chain are found to be maximally entangled. Our findings demonstrate that the enhancement of the magnetic field strength suppresses noise effects; consequently, the noise severely impacts the occurrence of quantum interference for weak magnetic fields while for strong fields, quantum interference subsists and allows the modeling of universal sets of quantum gates.

  6. Identification and reduction of vibration and noise of a glass tempering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashhab, M S

    2015-01-01

    The vibration and noise of a glass tempering machine at a factory are studied. Experiments were conducted to identify the sources of vibration and noise. It was found that main sources for vibration and noise are two air barrels, the air pipes from the fans to the glass tempering machine and the fans location. Solutions were suggested to reduce vibration and noise from these three main sources. One of the solutions that were implemented is placing rubber dampers beneath the air barrels and pipes which almost cancelled the horizontal vibrations in the building structure and reduced the vertical vibrations to a low value most likely coming from noise. There are two types of noise, namely, radiation noise from the fans through the fans room walls and transmitted noise through the pipes caused by turbulence. A glass wool noise insulating layer was installed on the wall between the fans room and factory to reduce radiation noise through this wall. Part of the air pipe system in the factory is made of a light material which produced the highest levels of noise above 110 dBA. These air pipes were wrapped by glass wool rolls and the noise level near them was reduced to below 100 dBA which comes from other machine parts. In addition, noise levels were reduced between 2 and 15 dBA at different points in the factory. (paper)

  7. Speech understanding in background noise with the two-microphone adaptive beamformer BEAM in the Nucleus Freedom Cochlear Implant System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, Ann; Van Deun, Lieselot; Eftaxiadis, Kyriaky; Laneau, Johan; Moonen, Marc; van Dijk, Bas; van Wieringen, Astrid; Wouters, Jan

    2007-02-01

    This paper evaluates the benefit of the two-microphone adaptive beamformer BEAM in the Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant (CI) system for speech understanding in background noise by CI users. A double-blind evaluation of the two-microphone adaptive beamformer BEAM and a hardware directional microphone was carried out with five adult Nucleus CI users. The test procedure consisted of a pre- and post-test in the lab and a 2-wk trial period at home. In the pre- and post-test, the speech reception threshold (SRT) with sentences and the percentage correct phoneme scores for CVC words were measured in quiet and background noise at different signal-to-noise ratios. Performance was assessed for two different noise configurations (with a single noise source and with three noise sources) and two different noise materials (stationary speech-weighted noise and multitalker babble). During the 2-wk trial period at home, the CI users evaluated the noise reduction performance in different listening conditions by means of the SSQ questionnaire. In addition to the perceptual evaluation, the noise reduction performance of the beamformer was measured physically as a function of the direction of the noise source. Significant improvements of both the SRT in noise (average improvement of 5-16 dB) and the percentage correct phoneme scores (average improvement of 10-41%) were observed with BEAM compared to the standard hardware directional microphone. In addition, the SSQ questionnaire and subjective evaluation in controlled and real-life scenarios suggested a possible preference for the beamformer in noisy environments. The evaluation demonstrates that the adaptive noise reduction algorithm BEAM in the Nucleus Freedom CI-system may significantly increase the speech perception by cochlear implantees in noisy listening conditions. This is the first monolateral (adaptive) noise reduction strategy actually implemented in a mainstream commercial CI.

  8. Noise levels, noise annoyance, and hearing-related problems in a dental college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hafiz Omer; Ali, Wesal Jasim

    2017-05-04

    Through a cross-sectional survey and integrated sound level meter, this research examined noise exposure and auditory- and nonauditory-related problems experienced by students of a dentistry college located in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A structured interview questionnaire was used to examine hearing-related problems, noise annoyance, and awareness of 114 students toward noise. The results showed that maximum noise levels were between 65 and 79 dB(A) with peak levels (high and low frequencies) ranging between 89 and 93 dB(A). Around 80% of the students experienced a certain degree of noise annoyance; 54% reported one of the hearing-related problems; and about 10% claimed to have hearing loss to a certain extent. It is recommended that sound-absorbent materials be used during the construction of dental clinics and laboratories to reduce the noise levels.

  9. Analysis of noise pollution level in a University campus in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thattai, D.; Sudarsan, J. S.; Sathyanathan, R.; Ramasamy, Visalatchi

    2017-07-01

    Noise comprises those sounds occurring around us that are not part of the environment under consideration. Noise is also a type of pollution and impacts on our health and wellness. The prevalence of noise is increasing in magnitude and severity because of growing population and urbanization. Noise pollution leads to many chronic and socially significant impacts. This study analyzes the level of noise at different points in SRM University. As the University encompasses a hospital also, it is more important to identify the sources of high noise levels and control them. As per Indian standards the desirable noise pollution for educational institutions and hospitals in daytime is 50 dbA. Noise levels were measured with a sound level meter at 19 points within the campus at three different timings (8-10 am, 12-2 pm, and 3-5 pm) over two cycles of measurements. The preliminary results show higher noise levels during morning and evening. Noise during Cycle 2 (latter half of semester) was 20% more compared to that of Cycle 1 (beginning of semester).

  10. Transmission-line resonators for the study of individual two-level tunneling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Jan David; Bilmes, Alexander; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Lisenfeld, Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    Parasitic two-level tunneling systems (TLS) emerge in amorphous dielectrics and constitute a serious nuisance for various microfabricated devices, where they act as a source of noise and decoherence. Here, we demonstrate a new test bed for the study of TLS in various materials which provides access to properties of individual TLS as well as their ensemble response. We terminate a superconducting transmission-line resonator with a capacitor that hosts TLS in its dielectric. By tuning TLS via applied mechanical strain, we observe the signatures of individual TLS strongly coupled to the resonator in its transmission characteristics and extract the coupling components of their dipole moments and energy relaxation rates. The strong and well-defined coupling to the TLS bath results in pronounced resonator frequency fluctuations and excess phase noise, through which we can study TLS ensemble effects such as spectral diffusion, and probe theoretical models of TLS interactions.

  11. Excitation transfer in two two-level systems coupled to an oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelstein, P L; Chaudhary, I U

    2008-01-01

    We consider a generalization of the spin-boson model in which two different two-level systems are coupled to an oscillator, under conditions where the oscillator energy is much less than the two-level system energies, and where the oscillator is highly excited. We find that the two-level system transition energy is shifted, producing a Bloch-Siegert shift in each two-level system similar to what would be obtained if the other were absent. At resonances associated with energy exchange between a two-level system and the oscillator, the level splitting is about the same as would be obtained in the spin-boson model at a Bloch-Siegert resonance. However, there occur resonances associated with the transfer of excitation between one two-level system and the other, an effect not present in the spin-boson model. We use a unitary transformation leading to a rotated system in which terms responsible for the shift and splittings can be identified. The level splittings at the anticrossings associated with both energy exchange and excitation transfer resonances are accounted for with simple two-state models and degenerate perturbation theory using operators that appear in the rotated Hamiltonian

  12. Investigations of internal noise levels for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Minah; Choi, Shinkook; Baek, Jongduk

    2014-03-01

    To describe internal noise levels for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures, Gaussian targets with four different sizes (i.e., standard deviation of 2,4,6 and 8) and three different noise structures(i.e., white, low-pass, and highpass) were generated. The generated noise images were scaled to have standard deviation of 0.15. For each noise type, target contrasts were adjusted to have the same detectability based on NPW, and the detectability of CHO was calculated accordingly. For human observer study, 3 trained observers performed 2AFC detection tasks, and correction rate, Pc, was calculated for each task. By adding proper internal noise level to numerical observer (i.e., NPW and CHO), detectability of human observer was matched with that of numerical observers. Even though target contrasts were adjusted to have the same detectability of NPW observer, detectability of human observer decreases as the target size increases. The internal noise level varies for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures, demonstrating different internal noise levels should be considered in numerical observer to predict the detection performance of human observer.

  13. Noise levels of neonatal high-flow nasal cannula devices--an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Kai; Stock, Ellen L; Jarvis, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Excessive ambient noise levels have been identified as a potential risk factor for adverse outcome in very preterm infants. Noise level measurements for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices demonstrated that these constantly exceed current recommendations. The use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as an alternative non-invasive ventilation modality has become more popular in recent years in neonatal care. To study noise levels of two HFNC devices commonly used in newborns. As a comparison, noise levels of a continuous flow CPAP device were also studied. In-vitro study. The noise levels of two contemporary HFNC devices (Fisher & Paykel NHF™ and Vapotherm Precision Flow®) and one CPAP device (Dräger Babylog® 8000 plus) were measured in the oral cavity of a newborn manikin in an incubator in a quiet environment. HFNC flows of 4-8 l/min and CPAP pressures of 4-8 cm H2O were applied. The CPAP flow was set at 8 l/min as per unit practice. Vapotherm HFNC generated the highest noise levels, measuring 81.2-91.4 dB(A) with increasing flow. Fisher & Paykel HFNC noise levels were between 78.8 and 81.2 dB(A). The CPAP device generated the lowest noise levels between 73.9 and 77.4 dB(A). Both HFNC devices generated higher noise levels than the CPAP device. All noise levels were far above current recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics. In light of the long duration of non-invasive respiratory support of very preterm infants, less noisy devices are required to prevent the potentially adverse effects of continuing excessive noise exposure in the neonatal intensive care unit. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Nuisance levels of noise effects radiologists' performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Coffey, Amina; Ryan, John; O'Beirne, Aaron; Toomey, Rachel; Evanoff, Micheal; Manning, David; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2010-02-01

    This study aimed to measure the sound levels in Irish x-ray departments. The study then established whether these levels of noise have an impact on radiologists performance Noise levels were recorded 10 times within each of 14 environments in 4 hospitals, 11 of which were locations where radiologic images are judged. Thirty chest images were then presented to 26 senior radiologists, who were asked to detect up to three nodular lesions within 30 posteroanterior chest x-ray images in the absence and presence of noise at amplitude demonstrated in the clinical environment. The results demonstrated that noise amplitudes rarely exceeded that encountered with normal conversation with the maximum mean value for an image-viewing environment being 56.1 dB. This level of noise had no impact on the ability of radiologists to identify chest lesions with figure of merits of 0.68, 0.69, and 0.68 with noise and 0.65, 0.68, and 0.67 without noise for chest radiologists, non-chest radiologists, and all radiologists, respectively. the difference in their performance using the DBM MRMC method was significantly better with noise than in the absence of noise at the 90% confidence interval (p=0.077). Further studies are required to establish whether other aspects of diagnosis are impaired such as recall and attention and the effects of more unexpected noise on performance.

  15. Noise pollution levels in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Bree; Joshi, Prashant; Heard, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Patients and staff may experience adverse effects from exposure to noise. This study assessed noise levels in the pediatric intensive care unit and evaluated family and staff opinion of noise. Noise levels were recorded using a NoisePro DLX. The microphone was 1 m from the patient's head. The noise level was averaged each minute and levels above 70 and 80 dBA were recorded. The maximum, minimum, and average decibel levels were calculated and peak noise level great than 100 dBA was also recorded. A parent questionnaire concerning their evaluation of noisiness of the bedside was completed. The bedside nurse also completed a questionnaire. The average maximum dB for all patients was 82.2. The average minimum dB was 50.9. The average daily bedside noise level was 62.9 dBA. The average % time where the noise level was higher than 70 dBA was 2.2%. The average percent of time that the noise level was higher than 80 dBA was 0.1%. Patients experienced an average of 115 min/d where peak noise was greater than 100 dBA. The parents and staff identified the monitors as the major contribution to noise. Patients experienced levels of noise greater than 80 dBA. Patients experience peak noise levels in excess of 100 dB during their pediatric intensive care unit stay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Noise analysis of a digital radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, B.A.; Scheibe, P.O.

    1984-01-01

    The sources of noise in a digital video subtraction angiography system were identified and analyzed. Signal-to-noise ratios of digital radiography systems were measured using the digital image data recorded in the computer. The major sources of noise include quantum noise, TV camera electronic noise, quantization noise from the analog-to-digital converter, time jitter, structure noise in the image intensifier, and video recorder electronic noise. A new noise source was identified, which results from the interplay of fixed pattern noise and the lack of image registration. This type of noise may result from image-intensifier structure noise in combination with TV camera time jitter or recorder time jitter. A similar noise source is generated from the interplay of patient absorption inhomogeneities and patient motion or image re-registration. Signal-to-noise ratios were measured for a variety of experimental conditions using subtracted digital images. Image-intensifier structure noise was shown to be a dominant noise source in unsubtracted images at medium to high radiation exposure levels. A total-system signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 750:1 was measured for an input exposure of 1 mR/frame at the image intensifier input. The effect of scattered radiation on subtracted image SNR was found to be greater than previously reported. The detail SNR was found to vary approximately as one plus the scatter degradation factor. Quantization error noise with 8-bit image processors (signal-to-noise ratio of 890:1) was shown to be of increased importance after recent improvements in TV cameras. The results of the analysis are useful both in the design of future digital radiography systems and the selection of optimum clinical techniques

  17. Adaptive EMG noise reduction in ECG signals using noise level approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marouf, Mohamed; Saranovac, Lazar

    2017-12-01

    In this paper the usage of noise level approximation for adaptive Electromyogram (EMG) noise reduction in the Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals is introduced. To achieve the adequate adaptiveness, a translation-invariant noise level approximation is employed. The approximation is done in the form of a guiding signal extracted as an estimation of the signal quality vs. EMG noise. The noise reduction framework is based on a bank of low pass filters. So, the adaptive noise reduction is achieved by selecting the appropriate filter with respect to the guiding signal aiming to obtain the best trade-off between the signal distortion caused by filtering and the signal readability. For the evaluation purposes; both real EMG and artificial noises are used. The tested ECG signals are from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database Directory, while both real and artificial records of EMG noise are added and used in the evaluation process. Firstly, comparison with state of the art methods is conducted to verify the performance of the proposed approach in terms of noise cancellation while preserving the QRS complex waves. Additionally, the signal to noise ratio improvement after the adaptive noise reduction is computed and presented for the proposed method. Finally, the impact of adaptive noise reduction method on QRS complexes detection was studied. The tested signals are delineated using a state of the art method, and the QRS detection improvement for different SNR is presented.

  18. Some insights into the relationship between urban air pollution and noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Ho, Duy Xuan; Brown, Richard J C; Oh, J-M; Park, Chan Goo; Ryu, In Cheol

    2012-05-01

    The relationship between noise and air pollution was investigated in eight different districts across Seoul, Korea, between September and November 2010. The noise levels in each district were measured at both roadside and non-roadside locations. It was found that the maximum levels of noise were generally at frequencies of around 1000 Hz. The equivalent noise levels (L(eq)), over all districts, averaged 61.4 ± 7.36 dB which is slightly lower than the noise guidelines set by the World Health Organization (WHO) of 70 dB for industrial, commercial, traffic, and outdoor areas. Comparison of L(eq) levels in each district consistently indicates that noise levels are higher at roadside sites than non-roadside sites. In addition the relative dominance of noise during daytime as compared to nighttime was also apparent. Moreover, the results of an analysis relating sound levels with air pollutant levels indicate strongly that the correlation between these two parameters is the strongest at roadside sites (relative to non-roadside sites) and during nighttime (relative to daytime). The results of our data analysis point to a positive, but complex, correlation between noise levels and air pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Existing Noise Level at Railway Stations in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidan Shahiron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Railway transportation known as one of the most environmental friendly transportation mode. However, the significance problems of railway transportation are noise pollution and negatively impact the wellbeing of the whole community. Unfortunately, there has been lack of public awareness about the noise level produce by the railway transportation in Malaysia. This study investigates the noise level produced by railway transportation in Malaysia specifically by Keretapi Tanah Melayu Berhad (KTMB. Methods of collecting existing noise level at railway stations in Malaysia are briefly discussed in this study. The finding indicates that the noise level produced by the railway transportation in Malaysia which is by KTMB is considered as dangerous to human being and also exceed the noise limit that has been assigned by Department of Environment Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of Malaysia. A better noise barrier and improved material should be developed to mitigate the existing noise level produced by railway transportations in Malaysia.

  20. The effect of total noise on two-dimension OCDMA codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulaimi, Layth A. Khalil Al; Badlishah Ahmed, R.; Yaakob, Naimah; Aljunid, Syed A.; Matem, Rima

    2017-11-01

    In this research, we evaluate the performance of total noise effect on two dimension (2-D) optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA) performance systems using 2-D Modified Double Weight MDW under various link parameters. The impact of the multi-access interference (MAI) and other noise effect on the system performance. The 2-D MDW is compared mathematically with other codes which use similar techniques. We analyzed and optimized the data rate and effective receive power. The performance and optimization of MDW code in OCDMA system are reported, the bit error rate (BER) can be significantly improved when the 2-D MDW code desired parameters are selected especially the cross correlation properties. It reduces the MAI in the system compensate BER and phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN) in incoherent OCDMA The analysis permits a thorough understanding of PIIN, shot and thermal noises impact on 2-D MDW OCDMA system performance. PIIN is the main noise factor in the OCDMA network.

  1. The effect of total noise on two-dimension OCDMA codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Al Dulaimi Layth A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we evaluate the performance of total noise effect on two dimension (2-D optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA performance systems using 2-D Modified Double Weight MDW under various link parameters. The impact of the multi-access interference (MAI and other noise effect on the system performance. The 2-D MDW is compared mathematically with other codes which use similar techniques. We analyzed and optimized the data rate and effective receive power. The performance and optimization of MDW code in OCDMA system are reported, the bit error rate (BER can be significantly improved when the 2-D MDW code desired parameters are selected especially the cross correlation properties. It reduces the MAI in the system compensate BER and phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN in incoherent OCDMA The analysis permits a thorough understanding of PIIN, shot and thermal noises impact on 2-D MDW OCDMA system performance. PIIN is the main noise factor in the OCDMA network.

  2. Potential of neuro-fuzzy methodology to estimate noise level of wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Vlastimir; Petković, Dalibor; Por, Lip Yee; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Zamani, Mazdak; Ćojbašić, Žarko; Motamedi, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Wind turbines noise effect became large problem because of increasing of wind farms numbers since renewable energy becomes the most influential energy sources. However, wind turbine noise generation and propagation is not understandable in all aspects. Mechanical noise of wind turbines can be ignored since aerodynamic noise of wind turbine blades is the main source of the noise generation. Numerical simulations of the noise effects of the wind turbine can be very challenging task. Therefore in this article soft computing method is used to evaluate noise level of wind turbines. The main goal of the study is to estimate wind turbine noise in regard of wind speed at different heights and for different sound frequency. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is used to estimate the wind turbine noise levels.

  3. Recommendation of maximum allowable noise levels for offshore wind power systems; Empfehlung von Laermschutzwerten bei der Errichtung von Offshore-Windenergieanlagen (OWEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Stefanie [Umweltbundesamt, Dessau-Rosslau (Germany). Fachgebiet II 2.3

    2011-05-15

    When offshore wind farms are constructed, every single pile is hammered into the sediment by a hydraulic hammer. Noise levels at Horns Reef wind farm were in the range of 235 dB. The noise may cause damage to the auditory system of marine mammals. The Federal Environmental Office therefore recommends the definition of maximum permissible noise levels. Further, care should be taken that no marine mammals are found in the immediate vicinity of the construction site. (AKB)

  4. Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Residences Near Two Civil Airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidell, Sanford; Howe, Richard R.; Tabachnick, Barbara G.; Pearsons, Karl S.; Sneddon, Matthew D.

    1995-01-01

    A large-scale field study of noise-induced sleep disturbance was conducted in the vicinities of Stapleton International Airport (DEN) and Denver International Airport (DIA) in anticipation of the closure of the former and opening of the latter. Both indoor and outdoor measurements of aircraft and other nighttime noises were made during four time periods. Measurements were made in 57 homes located as close as feasible to the runway ends of the two airports. Sleep disturbance was measured by several indices of behaviorally confirmed awakening (button pushes upon awakening) and body movement (as measured with wrist-worn actimeters). A total of 2717 subject-nights of observations were made over the course of the study. Although average noise event levels measured outdoors decreased markedly at DEN after closure of the airport and increased slightly at DIA after its opening, indoor noise event levels varied much less in homes near both airports. No large differences were observed in noise-induced sleep disturbance at either airport. Indoor sound exposure levels of noise events were, however, closely related to and good predictors of actimetrically defined motility and arousal.

  5. Statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in clinical CT systems: Experimental assessment of noise performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ke; Tang, Jie [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To reduce radiation dose in CT imaging, the statistical model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) method has been introduced for clinical use. Based on the principle of MBIR and its nonlinear nature, the noise performance of MBIR is expected to be different from that of the well-understood filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction method. The purpose of this work is to experimentally assess the unique noise characteristics of MBIR using a state-of-the-art clinical CT system. Methods: Three physical phantoms, including a water cylinder and two pediatric head phantoms, were scanned in axial scanning mode using a 64-slice CT scanner (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at seven different mAs levels (5, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 300). At each mAs level, each phantom was repeatedly scanned 50 times to generate an image ensemble for noise analysis. Both the FBP method with a standard kernel and the MBIR method (Veo{sup ®}, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) were used for CT image reconstruction. Three-dimensional (3D) noise power spectrum (NPS), two-dimensional (2D) NPS, and zero-dimensional NPS (noise variance) were assessed both globally and locally. Noise magnitude, noise spatial correlation, noise spatial uniformity and their dose dependence were examined for the two reconstruction methods. Results: (1) At each dose level and at each frequency, the magnitude of the NPS of MBIR was smaller than that of FBP. (2) While the shape of the NPS of FBP was dose-independent, the shape of the NPS of MBIR was strongly dose-dependent; lower dose lead to a “redder” NPS with a lower mean frequency value. (3) The noise standard deviation (σ) of MBIR and dose were found to be related through a power law of σ ∝ (dose){sup −β} with the component β ≈ 0.25, which violated the classical σ ∝ (dose){sup −0.5} power law in FBP. (4) With MBIR, noise reduction was most prominent for thin image slices. (5) MBIR lead to better noise spatial

  6. Measurement of speech levels in the presence of time varying background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Horonjeff, R.

    1982-01-01

    Short-term speech level measurements which could be used to note changes in vocal effort in a time varying noise environment were studied. Knowing the changes in speech level would in turn allow prediction of intelligibility in the presence of aircraft flyover noise. Tests indicated that it is possible to use two second samples of speech to estimate long term root mean square speech levels. Other tests were also performed in which people read out loud during aircraft flyover noise. Results of these tests indicate that people do indeed raise their voice during flyovers at a rate of about 3-1/2 dB for each 10 dB increase in background level. This finding is in agreement with other tests of speech levels in the presence of steady state background noise.

  7. Acceptable noise level with Danish, Swedish, and non-semantic speech materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, K Jonas; Lantz, Johannes; Nielsen, Lars Holme

    2012-01-01

    reported results from American studies. Generally, significant differences were seen between test conditions using different types of noise within ears in each population. Significant differences were seen for ANL across populations, also when the non-semantic ISTS was used as speech signal. Conclusions......Abstract Objective: Acceptable noise level (ANL) has been established as a method to quantify the acceptance of background noise while listening to speech presented at the most comfortable level. The aim of the present study was to generate Danish, Swedish, and a non-semantic version of the ANL...... test and investigate normal-hearing Danish and Swedish subjects' performance on these tests. Design: ANL was measured using Danish and Swedish running speech with two different noises: Speech-weighted amplitude-modulated noise, and multitalker speech babble. ANL was also measured using the non...

  8. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  9. Evaluation of noise level in architecture department building in University of Sumatera Utara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, Novrial; Damanik, Novita Hillary Christy

    2018-03-01

    Noise is one the comfort factors that need to be noticed, particularly in an educational environment. Hearing a high noise in a period can affect students’ learning performance. The aims of this study were to know the noise level and get an appropriate design to reduce noise in Architecture Department building in the University of Sumatera Utara, considering that architecture students often spend most of their time inside the room. The measurement was conducted in four rooms for two days each from 09:00 – 12:00 and from 13:00 – 16:00 by using Sound Level Meter that placed near the noise source of the room. The result indicated that the average of noise level exceeded the 55 dB(A) so it still needs the appropriate design to reduce the noise that occurs in the building.

  10. Fast noise level estimation algorithm based on principal component analysis transform and nonlinear rectification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaoping; Zeng, Xiaoxia; Jiang, Yinnan; Tang, Yiling

    2018-01-01

    We proposed a noniterative principal component analysis (PCA)-based noise level estimation (NLE) algorithm that addresses the problem of estimating the noise level with a two-step scheme. First, we randomly extracted a number of raw patches from a given noisy image and took the smallest eigenvalue of the covariance matrix of the raw patches as the preliminary estimation of the noise level. Next, the final estimation was directly obtained with a nonlinear mapping (rectification) function that was trained on some representative noisy images corrupted with different known noise levels. Compared with the state-of-art NLE algorithms, the experiment results show that the proposed NLE algorithm can reliably infer the noise level and has robust performance over a wide range of image contents and noise levels, showing a good compromise between speed and accuracy in general.

  11. Estimating the level of dynamical noise in time series by using fractal dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sase, Takumi, E-mail: sase@sat.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Ramírez, Jonatán Peña [CONACYT Research Fellow, Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education at Ensenada (CICESE), Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana No. 3918, Zona Playitas, C.P. 22860, Ensenada, Baja California (Mexico); Kitajo, Keiichi [BSI-Toyota Collaboration Center, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2016-03-11

    We present a method for estimating the dynamical noise level of a ‘short’ time series even if the dynamical system is unknown. The proposed method estimates the level of dynamical noise by calculating the fractal dimensions of the time series. Additionally, the method is applied to EEG data to demonstrate its possible effectiveness as an indicator of temporal changes in the level of dynamical noise. - Highlights: • A dynamical noise level estimator for time series is proposed. • The estimator does not need any information about the dynamics generating the time series. • The estimator is based on a novel definition of time series dimension (TSD). • It is demonstrated that there exists a monotonic relationship between the • TSD and the level of dynamical noise. • We apply the proposed method to human electroencephalographic data.

  12. Estimating the level of dynamical noise in time series by using fractal dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sase, Takumi; Ramírez, Jonatán Peña; Kitajo, Keiichi; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for estimating the dynamical noise level of a ‘short’ time series even if the dynamical system is unknown. The proposed method estimates the level of dynamical noise by calculating the fractal dimensions of the time series. Additionally, the method is applied to EEG data to demonstrate its possible effectiveness as an indicator of temporal changes in the level of dynamical noise. - Highlights: • A dynamical noise level estimator for time series is proposed. • The estimator does not need any information about the dynamics generating the time series. • The estimator is based on a novel definition of time series dimension (TSD). • It is demonstrated that there exists a monotonic relationship between the • TSD and the level of dynamical noise. • We apply the proposed method to human electroencephalographic data.

  13. Dynamics of a quantum two-level system under the action of phase-diffusion field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobakinskaya, E.A. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Pankratov, A.L., E-mail: alp@ipm.sci-nnov.ru [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Vaks, V.L. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures of RAS, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-09

    We study a behavior of quantum two-level system, interacting with noisy phase-diffusion field. The dynamics is shown to split into two regimes, determined by the coherence time of the phase-diffusion field. For both regimes we present a model of quantum system behavior and discuss possible applications of the obtained effect for spectroscopy. In particular, the obtained analytical formula for the macroscopic polarization demonstrates that the phase-diffusion field does not affect the absorption line shape, which opens up an intriguing possibility of noisy spectroscopy, based on broadband sources with Lorentzian line shape. -- Highlights: ► We study dynamics of quantum system interacting with noisy phase-diffusion field. ► At short times the phase-diffusion field induces polarization in the quantum system. ► At long times the noise leads to polarization decay and heating of a quantum system. ► Simple model of interaction is derived. ► Application of the described effects for spectroscopy is discussed.

  14. A preliminary assessment of noise level during Deepawali festival in Balasore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Shreerup; Swain, Bijay Kumar; Mohapatra, Hara Prasad; Bal, Kshirod Kumar

    2013-11-01

    A preliminary assessment of noise levels during Deepawali, was made in the present study. In order to assess the situation of noise levels in and around Balasore during two consecutive Deepawali of the year 2010 and 2011; noise monitoring was carried out in three different specified times (4:30-7:00 p.m., 7:00-10:30 p.m., 10:30 p.m.-1:00 a.m.). Noise descriptors such as L10, L50, L90, Leq, noise pollution level and noise climate were assessed to reveal the extent of noise pollution in this festival of crackers. Permissible limit of noise levels (Leq) prescribed by WHO during the festival was 100 dB and Lmax must not exceed 110 dB during such occasion. However, in all the cases Lmax and NPL values exceeded 110 dB, while Leq values ranged from 92.9 to 101.9 dB during 2010 Deepawali and 81.5 to 100.8 dB during 2011 Deepawali. On the other hand, all the noise monitoring sites belonged to residential areas. The assessed noise levels during such festivity are much more than 55/45 dB i.e. prescribed for residential areas for day/night time by CPCB. However, it was observed that the noise of Deepawali (Leq) decreased considerably and was less during 2011 than 2010. These may be due to increased environmental awareness among the public. Subsequently, the people of Balasore prefered to celebrate Deepawali, the festival of lights without sound and smoke. Noise policy should also be worked out for a better understanding of such local, social and cultural festivals in which annoyance arise.

  15. Can weekly noise levels of urban road traffic, as predominant noise source, estimate annual ones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto Gajardo, Carlos; Barrigón Morillas, Juan Miguel; Rey Gozalo, Guillermo; Vílchez-Gómez, Rosendo

    2016-11-01

    The effects of noise pollution on human quality of life and health were recognised by the World Health Organisation a long time ago. There is a crucial dilemma for the study of urban noise when one is looking for proven methodologies that can allow, on the one hand, an increase in the quality of predictions, and on the other hand, saving resources in the spatial and temporal sampling. The temporal structure of urban noise is studied in this work from a different point of view. This methodology, based on Fourier analysis, is applied to several measurements of urban noise, mainly from road traffic and one-week long, carried out in two cities located on different continents and with different sociological life styles (Cáceres, Spain and Talca, Chile). Its capacity to predict annual noise levels from weekly measurements is studied. The relation between this methodology and the categorisation method is also analysed.

  16. Training Methods for Image Noise Level Estimation on Wavelet Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Stefano

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the standard deviation of noise contaminating an image is a fundamental step in wavelet-based noise reduction techniques. The method widely used is based on the mean absolute deviation (MAD. This model-based method assumes specific characteristics of the noise-contaminated image component. Three novel and alternative methods for estimating the noise standard deviation are proposed in this work and compared with the MAD method. Two of these methods rely on a preliminary training stage in order to extract parameters which are then used in the application stage. The sets used for training and testing, 13 and 5 images, respectively, are fully disjoint. The third method assumes specific statistical distributions for image and noise components. Results showed the prevalence of the training-based methods for the images and the range of noise levels considered.

  17. [Noise level in a care and teaching hospital institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Sánchez, R S; Roque-Sánchez, R H; Moncada-González, B

    1996-01-01

    Noise in the environment is increasing over the years. Disturbances produced by noise are varied, some lead to serious health consequences. Noise level was registered in a teaching hospital. Levels in the wards were between 50 and 59 dB. In the Intensive Care Unit, main hallways and outpatients department levels were higher than 59 dB. Isolated peaks up to 90.0 dB (Pediatrics) were detected. The noise level recommended for a hospital is under 50.0 dB. We found that the principal source of noise came from the medical and nursing staff.

  18. Variations in the microseismic noise level observed at the Bucovina Seismic Array (BURAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Radulian, Mircea; Popa, Mihaela

    2005-01-01

    The microseismic noise level analysis for a seismic array is an essential step to accurately process the data recorded by the system. Basically, the observed background noise is a complex combination of natural and cultural sources as local geology, specific area activity (roads traffic, agricultural and industrial activities) or weather conditions.The understanding of the BURAR site noise characteristics is important for the array specific techniques (beamforming, f-k analysis), to apply the correct bandpass filtering, in order to obtain noise suppression and conservation of the 'true' seismic signal. The array monitoring potential of very small earthquakes and explosions will be enhanced, based on the best signal-to-noise ratio.The noise study at BURAR was carried out over one-year period, considering the noise power spectra in a 0.1 to 10 Hz frequency interval, for every 24 hours: 5 minutes during day and 5 minutes during night. Only short-period vertical sensors were considered. Systematic variations in the microseismic noise level at the BURAR site were observed:- diurnal: a decreasing of about 40% in night noise level at 1 Hz frequency; at 6 Hz frequency, the decreasing could reach 80-90% for 'non-winter' months (May to October); - seasonal: during the winter time, a lower noise level is observed, due to the restraining of the local specific activity (especially agriculture and farming) and of the road traffic. To summarize the level of microseismic noise observed at BURAR for one-year observations, a model curve for array noise level has been estimated, including upper and lower bounds of noise power density together with average spectrum. The BURAR noise model will be useful in the process of local site conditions estimation, by eliminating the noise contribution from the array recording. Also, the detection processing, phase identification and events location procedures will be significantly improved. (authors)

  19. The Relationship between Personality Type and Acceptable Noise Levels: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, Cliff; Johnson, Laura V.; White, Letitia; Franklin, Clay; Smith-Olinde, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined the relationship between acceptable noise level (ANL) and personality. ANL is the difference between a person’s most comfortable level for speech and the loudest level of background noise they are willing to accept while listening to speech. Design. Forty young adults with normal hearing participated. ANLs were measured and two personality tests (Big Five Inventory, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) were administered. Results. The analysis revealed a correlation bet...

  20. On the variances of generation-recombination noise in a three-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooge, F. N.; Ren, L.

    1994-01-01

    A statistical treatment is given of the generation-recombination noise in a semiconductor with a conduction band and two traps X and Y. The system is described in terms of x and y, where x is half the harmonic mean of the numbers of occupied and empty traps X. A corresponding definition is given for y. The use of x and y makes the formalism very transparent. Simple, explicit relations are easily found, which can be further simplified by approximations depending on the ratios between N, x and y. We consider correlations and Burgess' theorem; time dependence and spectra are not discussed.

  1. Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs—Noise maps and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, Paulo Eduardo Kirrian; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2015-01-01

    A study was made of some of the main traffic hubs in a Latin American metropolis, in order to determine the presence or absence of noise by means of noise measurements and acoustic mapping. To characterize noise in the evaluated road stretches, 232 measurements were taken at different points. The Predictor software package was used for the noise mapping calculations. Noise sensitive areas, e.g., hospitals, were identified in the evaluated road stretches. Noise maps were calculated for two hospitals, showing the current levels of noise that reach their facades. Hypothetical scenarios were simulated by making changes in the composition of traffic and total number of vehicles, and an assessment was made of the potential influence of these modifications in reducing the noise levels reaching the facades of the buildings in question. The simulations indicated that a 50% reduction in total traffic flow, or a 50% reduction in heavy vehicle traffic flow, would reduce the noise levels by about 3 dB(A). - Highlights: • Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs • Street systems • Environmental noise impacts • Noise mapping

  2. Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs—Noise maps and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Paulo Eduardo Kirrian; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta, E-mail: paulo.zannin@pesquisador.cnpq.br

    2015-02-15

    A study was made of some of the main traffic hubs in a Latin American metropolis, in order to determine the presence or absence of noise by means of noise measurements and acoustic mapping. To characterize noise in the evaluated road stretches, 232 measurements were taken at different points. The Predictor software package was used for the noise mapping calculations. Noise sensitive areas, e.g., hospitals, were identified in the evaluated road stretches. Noise maps were calculated for two hospitals, showing the current levels of noise that reach their facades. Hypothetical scenarios were simulated by making changes in the composition of traffic and total number of vehicles, and an assessment was made of the potential influence of these modifications in reducing the noise levels reaching the facades of the buildings in question. The simulations indicated that a 50% reduction in total traffic flow, or a 50% reduction in heavy vehicle traffic flow, would reduce the noise levels by about 3 dB(A). - Highlights: • Evaluation of noise pollution in urban traffic hubs • Street systems • Environmental noise impacts • Noise mapping.

  3. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G. (José M. G.), 1972-; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  4. Modular Engine Noise Component Prediction System (MCP) Program Users' Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Robert A. (Technical Monitor); Herkes, William H.; Reed, David H.

    2004-01-01

    This is a user's manual for Modular Engine Noise Component Prediction System (MCP). This computer code allows the user to predict turbofan engine noise estimates. The program is based on an empirical procedure that has evolved over many years at The Boeing Company. The data used to develop the procedure include both full-scale engine data and small-scale model data, and include testing done by Boeing, by the engine manufacturers, and by NASA. In order to generate a noise estimate, the user specifies the appropriate engine properties (including both geometry and performance parameters), the microphone locations, the atmospheric conditions, and certain data processing options. The version of the program described here allows the user to predict three components: inlet-radiated fan noise, aft-radiated fan noise, and jet noise. MCP predicts one-third octave band noise levels over the frequency range of 50 to 10,000 Hertz. It also calculates overall sound pressure levels and certain subjective noise metrics (e.g., perceived noise levels).

  5. Noise from Two-Blade Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, E Z; Deming, A F

    1936-01-01

    The two-blade propeller, one of the most powerful sources of sound known, has been studied with the view of obtaining fundamental information concerning the noise emission. In order to eliminate engine noise, the propeller was mounted on an electric motor. A microphone was used to pick up the sound whose characteristics were studied electrically. The distribution of noise throughout the frequency range, as well as the spatial distribution about the propeller, was studied. The results are given in the form of polar diagrams. An appendix of common acoustical terms is included.

  6. Lateralization of noise bursts in interaurally correlated or uncorrelated background noise using interaural level differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Darrin K; van de Par, Steven

    2015-10-01

    The interaural level difference (ILD) of a lateralized target source may be effectively reduced when the target is presented together with background noise containing zero ILD. It is not certain whether listeners perceive a position congruent with the reduced ILD or the actual target ILD in a lateralization task. Two sets of behavioral experiments revealed that many listeners perceived a position at or even larger than that corresponding to the presented target ILD when a temporal onset/offset asynchrony between the broadband target and the broadband background noise was present. When no temporal asynchrony was present, however, the perceived lateral position indicated a dependency on the coherence of the background noise for several listeners. With interaurally correlated background noise, listeners reported a reduced ILD resulting from the combined target and background noise stimulus. In contrast, several of the listeners made a reasonable estimate of the position corresponding to the target ILD for interaurally uncorrelated, broadband, background noise. No obvious difference in performance was seen between low- or high-frequency stimuli. Extension of a weighting template to the output of a standard equalization-cancellation model was shown to remove a lateral bias on the predicted target ILD resulting from the presence of background noise. Provided that an appropriate weighting template is applied based on knowledge of the background noise coherence, good prediction of the behavioral data is possible.

  7. Improvement of two-way continuous variable quantum cryptography by using additional noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Minjie; Pan Wei

    2010-01-01

    The performance of quantum key distribution such as one-way continuous variable protocols, can be increased by adding some noise on the reference side of error correction in the error-correction phase. For this reason, we here study this possibility in the case of two-way continuous variable system. Finally, the numerical results show that the using of additional noise gives two-way schemes better security performance in terms of secret key rates and resistance to channel excess noise.

  8. Synchronization of two Hodgkin-Huxley neurons due to internal noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casado, Jose Manuel

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that a strong coupling can synchronize a population of nonlinear oscillators. This fact has deep implications for the current understanding of information processing by the brain. The focus of this Letter is on the role of conductance noise on a system of two coupled Hodgkin-Huxley neurons in the so-called excitable region, where both neurons are at rest in the absence of noise. It is shown that, in this region, conductance noise allows the neurons to achieve both frequency and phase synchronization. This suggests that internal noise could play a role in the emergence of synchronous neural activity in populations of weakly coupled neurons

  9. Kalman Filtering for Discrete Stochastic Systems with Multiplicative Noises and Random Two-Step Sensor Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyan Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the optimal Kalman filtering problem for a class of discrete stochastic systems with multiplicative noises and random two-step sensor delays. Three Bernoulli distributed random variables with known conditional probabilities are introduced to characterize the phenomena of the random two-step sensor delays which may happen during the data transmission. By using the state augmentation approach and innovation analysis technique, an optimal Kalman filter is constructed for the augmented system in the sense of the minimum mean square error (MMSE. Subsequently, the optimal Kalman filtering is derived for corresponding augmented system in initial instants. Finally, a simulation example is provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed filtering method.

  10. Reduction of external noise of mobile energy facilities by using active noise control system in muffler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivaev, O. I.; Kuznetsov, A. N.; Larionov, A. N.; Beliansky, R. G.

    2018-03-01

    The paper describes a method for the reducing emission of low-frequency noise of modern automotive vehicles into the environment. The importance of reducing the external noise of modern mobile energy facilities made in Russia is substantiated. Standard methods for controlling external noise in technology are of low efficiency when low-frequency sound waves are reduced. In this case, it is in the low-frequency zone of the sound range that the main power of the noise emitted by the machinery lies. The most effective way to reduce such sound waves is to use active noise control systems. A design of a muffler using a similar system is presented. This muffler allowed one to reduce the emission of increased noise levels into the environment by 7-11 dB and to increase acoustic comfort at the operator's workplace by 3-5 dB.

  11. An evaluation of primary school students' views about noise levels in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Bulunuz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Effective education and teaching requires keeping classroom noise levels within specific limits. The purpose of this study is to evaluate students’ views about the noise level in school, its effects, and control of it at two primary schools (one public school and one private school located in a district of Bursa - within the scope of the TÜBİTAK 1001 project numbered 114K738. The research sample consists of 432 third and fourth graders, 223 of whom are from the public school and 209 of whom are from the private school. To collect data, a 20-question survey was administered to the students, and noise measurements were carried out in the schools. According to the findings obtained from the analysis of the answers from the student questionnaire, the students think that the noise level is high especially during break times. In parallel with the student views, the average noise level at break time during recess was found to be 74.56 dBA at the private primary school and 82.18 dBA at the public primary school. These values are much higher than the limits prescribed in the Regulation on Assessment and Management of Environmental Noise in Turkey (RAMEN European Union Harmonization Laws. The research findings show that this important problem must be dealt with urgently, and substantive efforts and activities must be launched to reduce high noise levels in schools.

  12. Stochastic resonance and MFPT in an asymmetric bistable system driven by correlated multiplicative colored noise and additive white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pei-Ming; Li, Qun; Han, Dong-Ying

    2017-06-01

    This paper investigates a new asymmetric bistable model driven by correlated multiplicative colored noise and additive white noise. The mean first-passage time (MFPT) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as the indexes of evaluating the model are researched. Based on the two-state theory and the adiabatic approximation theory, the expressions of MFPT and SNR have been obtained for the asymmetric bistable system driven by a periodic signal, correlated multiplicative colored noise and additive noise. Simulation results show that it is easier to generate stochastic resonance (SR) to adjust the intensity of correlation strength λ. Meanwhile, the decrease of asymmetric coefficient r2 and the increase of noise intensity are beneficial to realize the transition between the two steady states in the system. At the same time, the twice SR phenomena can be observed by adjusting additive white noise and correlation strength. The influence of asymmetry of potential function on the MFPTs in two different directions is different.

  13. Electronic noise in CT detectors: Impact on image noise and artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Leng, Shuai; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Grant, Katharine; Flohr, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate in phantoms the differences in CT image noise and artifact level between two types of commercial CT detectors: one with distributed electronics (conventional) and one with integrated electronics intended to decrease system electronic noise. Cylindric water phantoms of 20, 30, and 40 cm in diameter were scanned using two CT scanners, one equipped with integrated detector electronics and one with distributed detector electronics. All other scanning parameters were identical. Scans were acquired at four tube potentials and 10 tube currents. Semianthropomorphic phantoms were scanned to mimic the shoulder and abdominal regions. Images of two patients were also selected to show the clinical values of the integrated detector. Reduction of image noise with the integrated detector depended on phantom size, tube potential, and tube current. Scans that had low detected signal had the greatest reductions in noise, up to 40% for a 30-cm phantom scanned using 80 kV. This noise reduction translated into up to 50% in dose reduction to achieve equivalent image noise. Streak artifacts through regions of high attenuation were reduced by up to 45% on scans obtained using the integrated detector. Patient images also showed superior image quality for the integrated detector. For the same applied radiation level, the use of integrated electronics in a CT detector showed a substantially reduced level of electronic noise, resulting in reductions in image noise and artifacts, compared with detectors having distributed electronics.

  14. Traffic background level and signal duration effects on aircraft noise judgment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, G W; Haasz, A A

    1977-04-22

    The effects of background traffic noise level and signal duration on perceived aircraft noise levels during a flyover event are investigated. Tapes of traffic noise at different levels on which aircraft flyover noise events of different durations were superimposed were played to groups of observers in a room simulating indoor conditions. It is found that the presence of steady background traffic noise reduces the perceived noisiness of aircraft flyovers provided that the duration of the flyover event is sufficiently short in relation to flyover time. For a given event level, a reduction of 21 dB(A) in background noise level leads to the perception of a 5.5 dB(A) increase in peak event level. Regressions of observer response with the noise pollution index show a lower correlation than those with variables based on background noise level and peak signal level, although the data are found to exhibit a number of significant trends associated with noise pollution index variations.

  15. Threshold-based system for noise detection in multilead ECG recordings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jekova, Irena; Krasteva, Vessela; Christov, Ivaylo; Abächerli, Roger

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a system for detection of the most common noise types seen on the electrocardiogram (ECG) in order to evaluate whether an episode from 12-lead ECG is reliable for diagnosis. It implements criteria for estimation of the noise corruption level in specific frequency bands, aiming to identify the main sources of ECG quality disruption, such as missing signal or limited dynamics of the QRS components above 4 Hz; presence of high amplitude and steep artifacts seen above 1 Hz; baseline drift estimated at frequencies below 1 Hz; power–line interference in a band ±2 Hz around its central frequency; high-frequency and electromyographic noises above 20 Hz. All noise tests are designed to process the ECG series in the time domain, including 13 adjustable thresholds for amplitude and slope criteria which are evaluated in adjustable time intervals, as well as number of leads. The system allows flexible extension toward application-specific requirements for the noise levels in acceptable quality ECGs. Training of different thresholds’ settings to determine different positive noise detection rates is performed with the annotated set of 1000 ECGs from the PhysioNet database created for the Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2011. Two implementations are highlighted on the receiver operating characteristic (area 0.968) to fit to different applications. The implementation with high sensitivity (Se = 98.7%, Sp = 80.9%) appears as a reliable alarm when there are any incidental problems with the ECG acquisition, while the implementation with high specificity (Sp = 97.8%, Se = 81.8%) is less susceptible to transient problems but rather validates noisy ECGs with acceptable quality during a small portion of the recording. (paper)

  16. Judgments of aircraft noise in a traffic noise background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine subjective response to aircraft noise in different road traffic backgrounds. In addition, two laboratory techniques for presenting the aircraft noise with the background noise were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over an entire test session; for the other, the background noise level was changed with each aircraft noise during a session. Subjective response to aircraft noise was found to decrease with increasing background noise level, for a range of typical indoor noise levels. Subjective response was found to be highly correlated with the Noise Pollution Level (NPL) measurement scale.

  17. Comparative study of adaptive-noise-cancellation algorithms for intrusion detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, J.P.; Patterson, M.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some intrusion detection systems are susceptible to nonstationary noise resulting in frequent nuisance alarms and poor detection when the noise is present. Adaptive inverse filtering for single channel systems and adaptive noise cancellation for two channel systems have both demonstrated good potential in removing correlated noise components prior detection. For such noise susceptible systems the suitability of a noise reduction algorithm must be established in a trade-off study weighing algorithm complexity against performance. The performance characteristics of several distinct classes of algorithms are established through comparative computer studies using real signals. The relative merits of the different algorithms are discussed in the light of the nature of intruder and noise signals

  18. The geometric phase in two-level atomic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Mingzhen; Barber, Zeb W.; Fischer, Joe A.; Randall Babbitt, Wm.

    2004-01-01

    We report the observation of the geometric phase in a closed two-level atomic system using stimulated photon echoes. The two-level system studied consists of the two-electronic energy levels ( 3 H 4 and 3 H 6 ) of Tm 3+ doped in YAG crystal. When a two-level atom at an arbitrary superposition state is excited by a pair of specially designed laser pulses, the excited state component gains a relative phase with respect to the ground state component. We identified the phase shift to be of pure geometric nature. The dynamic phase associated to the driving Hamiltonian is unchanged. The experiment results of the phase change agree with the theory to the extent of the measurement limit

  19. Chaos and thermal noise in the rf-biased Josephson junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautz, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of thermal noise on chaotic behavior in the rf-biased Josephson junction is studied through digital simulations. In instances for which chaotic behavior occurs in the noise-free system, it is found that the dynamics of the system are almost unchanged by the addition of thermal noise unless the level of thermal noise exceeds that of the chaotic state. In instances for which the only stable states of the noise-free system are periodic solutions, small amounts of thermal noise can induce the junction to hop between two different dynamical states, producing a low-frequency noise level much higher than that of the thermal noise. Such noise-induced hopping can occur either between two periodic solutions or between a periodic solution and a metastable chaotic solution. When a metastable chaotic state is involved, temperatures somewhat higher than those which produce hopping can destablize the periodic solution to the point where the system spends virtually all of its time in the metastable chaotic state, creating noise-induced chaos. The similarities between chaotic behavior at zero temperature and noise-induced chaos are sufficiently strong that it may be difficult to distinguish the two cases experimentally

  20. Novel Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Approaches In Hearing Aid Applications Using Probe Noise and Probe Noise Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    . In many cases, this bias problem causes the cancellation system to fail. The traditional probe noise approach, where a noise signal is added to the loudspeaker signal can, in theory, prevent the bias. However, in practice, the probe noise level must often be so high that the noise is clearly audible...... and annoying; this makes the traditional probe noise approach less useful in practical applications. In this work, we explain theoretically the decreased convergence rate when using low-level probe noise in the traditional approach, before we propose and study analytically two new probe noise approaches...... the proposed approaches much more attractive in practical applications. We demonstrate this through a simulation experiment with audio signals in a hearing aid acoustic feedback cancellation system, where the convergence rate is improved by as much as a factor of 10....

  1. Self-reported sleep disturbances due to railway noise: exposure-response relationships for nighttime equivalent and maximum noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Moum, Torbjorn; Engdahl, Bo

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the present survey was to study self-reported sleep disturbances due to railway noise with respect to nighttime equivalent noise level (L(p,A,eq,night)) and maximum noise level (L(p,A,max)). A sample of 1349 people in and around Oslo in Norway exposed to railway noise was studied in a cross-sectional survey to obtain data on sleep disturbances, sleep problems due to noise, and personal characteristics including noise sensitivity. Individual noise exposure levels were determined outside of the bedroom facade, the most-exposed facade, and inside the respondents' bedrooms. The exposure-response relationships were analyzed by using logistic regression models, controlling for possible modifying factors including the number of noise events (train pass-by frequency). L(p,A,eq,night) and L(p,A,max) were significantly correlated, and the proportion of reported noise-induced sleep problems increased as both L(p,A,eq,night) and L(p,A,max) increased. Noise sensitivity, type of bedroom window, and pass-by frequency were significant factors affecting noise-induced sleep disturbances, in addition to the noise exposure level. Because about half of the study population did not use a bedroom at the most-exposed side of the house, the exposure-response curve obtained by using noise levels for the most-exposed facade underestimated noise-induced sleep disturbance for those who actually have their bedroom at the most-exposed facade.

  2. In vitro comparison of noise levels produced by different CPAP generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Lieselotte; Wald, Martin; Jeitler, Valerie; Pollak, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Minimization of noise exposure is an important aim of modern neonatal intensive care medicine. Binasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) generators are among the most important sources of continuous noise in neonatal wards. The aim of this study was to find out which CPAP generator creates the least noise. In an experimental setup, two jet CPAP generators (Infant Flow® generator and MediJet®) and two conventional CPAP generators (Bubble CPAP® and Baby Flow®) were compared. Noise production was measured in decibels in an A-weighted scale [dB(A)] in a closed incubator at 2 mm lateral distance from the end of the nasal prongs. Reproduction of constant airway pressure and air leak was achieved by closure of the nasal prongs with a type of adhesive tape that is semipermeable to air. The noise levels produced by the four generators were significantly different (p CPAP® and 55 dB(A) for the Baby Flow®. Conventional CPAP generators work more quietly than the currently available jet CPAP generators. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Sedimentary noise and sea levels linked to land-ocean water exchange and obliquity forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingsong; Hinnov, Linda A; Huang, Chunju; Ogg, James G

    2018-03-08

    In ancient hothouses lacking ice sheets, the origins of large, million-year (myr)-scale sea-level oscillations remain a mystery, challenging current models of sea-level change. To address this mystery, we develop a sedimentary noise model for sea-level changes that simultaneously estimates geologic time and sea level from astronomically forced marginal marine stratigraphy. The noise model involves two complementary approaches: dynamic noise after orbital tuning (DYNOT) and lag-1 autocorrelation coefficient (ρ 1 ). Noise modeling of Lower Triassic marine slope stratigraphy in South China reveal evidence for global sea-level variations in the Early Triassic hothouse that are anti-phased with continental water storage variations in the Germanic Basin. This supports the hypothesis that long-period (1-2 myr) astronomically forced water mass exchange between land and ocean reservoirs is a missing link for reconciling geological records and models for sea-level change during non-glacial periods.

  4. Effects of venting on wind noise levels measured at the eardrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King

    2013-01-01

    Wind noise can be a nuisance to hearing aid users. With the advent of sophisticated feedback reduction algorithms, people with higher degrees of hearing loss are fit with larger vents than previously allowed, and more people with lesser degrees of hearing loss are fit with open hearing aids. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of venting on wind noise levels in the ear canal for hearing aids with omnidirectional and directional microphones. Two behind-the-ear hearing aids were programmed when they were worn on a Knowles Electronics Manikin for Acoustic Research. The hearing aid worn on the right ear was programmed to the omnidirectional microphone mode and the one on the left to the directional microphone mode. The hearing aids were adjusted to linear amplification with flat frequency response in an anechoic chamber. Gains below 10 dB were used to avoid output limiting of wind noise levels at low input levels. Wind noise samples were recorded at the eardrum location in a wind tunnel at wind velocities ranging from a gentle to a strong breeze. The hearing aids were coupled to #13 tubings (i.e., open vent), or conventional skeleton earmolds with no vent, pressure vents, or 3mm vents. Polar and spectral characteristics of wind noise were analyzed off-line using MatLab programs. Wind noise levels in the ear canals were mostly predicted by vent-induced frequency response changes in the conventional earmold conditions for both omnidirectional and directional hearing aids. The open vent condition, however, yielded the lowest levels, which could not be entirely predicted by the frequency response changes of the hearing aids. This indicated that a wind-related vent effect permitted an additional amount of sound reduction in the ear canal, which could not be explained by known vent effects. For the microphone location, form factor, and gain settings tested, open fit hearing aids yielded lower noise levels at the eardrum location than conventional behind

  5. Noise and vibration analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, J.R.; Williams, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of noise and vibration data from an operating nuclear plant can provide valuable information that can identify and characterize abnormal conditions. Existing plant monitoring equipment, such as loose parts monitoring systems (LPMS) and neutron flux detectors, may be capable of gathering noise data, but may lack the analytical capability to extract useful meanings hidden in the noise. By analyzing neutron noise signals, the structural motion and integrity of core components can be assessed. Computer analysis makes trending of frequency spectra within a fuel cycle and from one cycle to another a practical means of core internals monitoring. The Babcock and Wilcox Noise and Vibration Analysis System (NVAS) is a powerful, compact system that can automatically perform complex data analysis. The system can acquire, process, and store data, then produce report-quality plots of the important parameter. Software to perform neutron noise analysis and loose parts analysis operates on the same hardware package. Since the system is compact, inexpensive, and easy to operate, it allows utilities to perform more frequency analyses without incurring high costs and provides immediate results

  6. The Relationship between Personality Type and Acceptable Noise Levels: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Cliff; Johnson, Laura V; White, Letitia; Franklin, Clay; Smith-Olinde, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. This study examined the relationship between acceptable noise level (ANL) and personality. ANL is the difference between a person's most comfortable level for speech and the loudest level of background noise they are willing to accept while listening to speech. Design. Forty young adults with normal hearing participated. ANLs were measured and two personality tests (Big Five Inventory, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) were administered. Results. The analysis revealed a correlation between ANL and the openness and conscientious personality dimensions from the Big Five Inventory; no correlation emerged between ANL and the Myers-Briggs personality types. Conclusions. Lower ANLs are correlated with full-time hearing aid use and the openness personality dimension; higher ANLs are correlated with part-time or hearing aid nonuse and the conscientious personality dimension. Current data suggest that those more open to new experiences may accept more noise and possibly be good hearing aid candidates, while those more conscientious may accept less noise and reject hearing aids, based on their unwillingness to accept background noise. Knowing something about a person's personality type may help audiologists determine if their patients will likely be good candidates for hearing aids.

  7. Noise level in neonatal incubators: A comparative study of three models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Zacarías, F; Beira Jiménez, J L; Bustillo Velázquez-Gaztelu, P J; Hernández Molina, R; Lubián López, Simón

    2018-04-01

    Preterm infants usually have to spend a long time in an incubator, excessive noise in which can have adverse physiological and psychological effects on neonates. In fact, incubator noise levels typically range from 45 to 70 dB but differences in this respect depend largely on the noise measuring method used. The primary aim of this work was to assess the extent to which noise in an incubator comes from its own fan and how efficiently the incubator can isolate external noise. Three different incubator models were characterized for acoustic performance by measuring their internal noise levels in an anechoic chamber, and also for noise isolation efficiency by using a pink noise source in combination with an internal and an external microphone that were connected to an SVAN958 noise analyzer. The incubators studied produced continuous equivalent noise levels of 53.5-58 dB and reduced external noise by 5.2-10.4 dB. A preterm infant in an incubator is exposed to noise levels clearly exceeding international recommendations even though such levels usually comply with the limit set in the standard IEC60601-2-19: 2009 (60 dBA) under normal conditions of use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Are the noise levels acceptable in a built environment like Hong Kong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Wai Ming; Mak, Cheuk Ming; Chung, Wai Leung

    2015-01-01

    Governments all over the world have enacted environmental noise directives and noise control ordinances/acts to protect tranquility in residential areas. However, there is a lack of literature on the evaluation of whether the Acceptable Noise Levels (ANLs) stipulated in the directive/ordinance/act are actually achievable. The study aimed at measuring outdoor environmental noise levels in Hong Kong and identifying whether the measured noise levels are lower than the stipulated ANLs at 20 categories of residential areas. Data were gathered from a territory-wide noise survey. Outdoor noise measurements were conducted at 203 residential premises in urban areas, low-density residential areas, rural areas, and other areas. In total, 366 daytime hourly Leq outdoor noise levels, 362 nighttime hourly Leq outdoor noise levels, and 20 sets of daily, that is, 24 Leq,1-h outdoor noise levels were recorded. The mean daytime Leq,1-h values ranged 54.4-70.8 dBA, while the mean nighttime Leq,1-h values ranged 52.6-67.9 dBA. When the measured noise levels were compared with the stipulated ANLs, only three out of the 20 categories of areas had outdoor noise levels below ANLs during daytime. All other areas (and all areas during nighttime) were found to have outdoor noise levels at or above ANLs. PMID:26572703

  9. Two-antenna GNSS Aided-INS Alignment Using Adaptive Control of Filter Noise Covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO Yushi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper developed a theory of INS fine alignment in order to restrain the divergence of yaw angle,two antennas GNSS aided-INS integrated alignment algorithm was utilized.An attitude error measurement equation was conducted based on the relationship between baseline vectors calculated by two sensors and attitude error.The algorithm was executed by EKF using adaptive control of filter noise covariance.The experimental results showed that stability of the integrated system was improved under the system noise covariance adaptive control mechanism;The measurement noise covariance adaptive control mechanism can reduce the influence of measurement noise and improve the alignment absolute accuracy;Further improvement was achieved under the condition of minim bias of baseline length.The accuracy of roll and pitch was 0.02°,the accuracy of yaw was 0.04°.

  10. Noise-induced annoyance from transportation noise: short-term responses to a single noise source in a laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Lim, Changwoo; Hong, Jiyoung; Lee, Soogab

    2010-02-01

    An experimental study was performed to compare the annoyances from civil-aircraft noise, military-aircraft noise, railway noise, and road-traffic noise. Two-way within-subjects designs were applied in this research. Fifty-two subjects, who were naive listeners, were given various stimuli with varying levels through a headphone in an anechoic chamber. Regardless of the frequency weighting network, even under the same average energy level, civil-aircraft noise was the most annoying, followed by military-aircraft noise, railway noise, and road-traffic noise. In particular, penalties in the time-averaged, A-weighted sound level (TAL) of about 8, 5, and 5 dB, respectively, were found in the civil-aircraft, military-aircraft, and railway noises. The reason could be clarified through the high-frequency component and the variability in the level. When people were exposed to sounds with the same maximum A-weighted level, a railway bonus of about 3 dB was found. However, transportation noise has been evaluated by the time-averaged A-weighted level in most countries. Therefore, in the present situation, the railway bonus is not acceptable for railway vehicles with diesel-electric engines.

  11. Period analysis at high noise level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, G.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical expressions are derived for the variances of some types of the periodograms due to normal-distributed noise present in the data. The equivalence of the Jurkevich and the Warner and Robinson methods is proved. The optimum phase cell number of the Warner and Robinson method is given; this number depends on the data length, signal form and noise level. The results are illustrated by numerical examples. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of Acceptable Noise Level with Background Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyun-Jung; Bahng, Junghwa; Lee, Jae Hee

    2015-09-01

    Acceptable noise level (ANL) is a measure of the maximum background noise level (BNL) that a person is willing to tolerate while following a target story. Although researchers have used various sources of target sound in ANL measures, a limited type of background noise has been used. Extending the previous study of Gordon-Hickey & Moore (2007), the current study determined the effect of music genre and tempo on ANLs as possible factors affecting ANLs. We also investigated the relationships between individual ANLs and the familiarity of music samples and between music ANLs and subjective preference. Forty-one participants were seperated into two groups according to their ANLs, 29 low-ANL listeners and 12 high-ANL listeners. Using Korean ANL material, the individual ANLs were measured based on the listeners' most comfortable listening level and BNL. The ANLs were measured in six conditions, with different music tempo (fast, slow) and genre (K-pop, pop, classical) in a counterbalanced order. Overall, ANLs did not differ by the tempo of background music, but music genre significantly affected individual ANLs. We observed relatively higher ANLs with K-pop music and relatively lower ANLs with classical music. This tendency was similar in both low-ANL and high-ANL groups. However, the subjective ratings of music familiarity and preference affected ANLs differently for low-ANL and high-ANL groups. In contrast to the low-ANL listeners, the ANLs of the high-ANL listeners were significantly affected by music familiarity and preference. The genre of background music affected ANLs obtained using background music. The degree of music familiarity and preference appears to be associated with individual susceptibility to background music only for listeners who are greatly annoyed by background noise (high-ANL listeners).

  13. Noise from wind turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, B.; Larsen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Denmark has 3200 wind turbines with an installed maximum capacity of 418MW. The most important Danish research projects into wind turbine noise and the main results are listed. These date from 1983. Two comprehensive studies are currently in progress. The first is an analytical and empirical investigation of aerodynamic noise from wind turbine rotors and has so far dealt mainly with tip noise. The measurement method, using a hard board mounted microphone on the ground near the turbine, is described. Four different tip designs have been tested. Some examples of reference sound power level spectra for three of the designs are presented. During the past two years a computerbased data acquisition system has been used for real-time determination of sound power levels. The second study, which has just commenced, is on annoyance from wind turbine noise. It will include noise measurements, masking calculations and a social survey on the perceived nuisance. (UK)

  14. Noise reduction and estimation in multiple micro-electro-mechanical inertial systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waegli, Adrian; Skaloud, Jan; Guerrier, Stéphane; Parés, Maria Eulàlia; Colomina, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    This research studies the reduction and the estimation of the noise level within a redundant configuration of low-cost (MEMS-type) inertial measurement units (IMUs). Firstly, independent observations between units and sensors are assumed and the theoretical decrease in the system noise level is analyzed in an experiment with four MEMS-IMU triads. Then, more complex scenarios are presented in which the noise level can vary in time and for each sensor. A statistical method employed for studying the volatility of financial markets (GARCH) is adapted and tested for the usage with inertial data. This paper demonstrates experimentally and through simulations the benefit of direct noise estimation in redundant IMU setups

  15. LOW-NOISE PAVEMENT AS A WAY OF LIMITATION OF TRAFFIC NOISE LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Gardziejczyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Road surface can significantlyreduce the trafficnoise level. Depending on the characteristic of the upper surface layers the differences between the maximum rolling noise levels from passing vehicles to reach values about 10 dB (A. A special group is low-noise pavements characterized by the presence of voids above 15%. Application the porous asphalt layers or asphalt mixture type BBTM affects a significantreduction the width of land surrounded the roads where permissible equivalent sound level is exceeded. Such solutions in some cases can replace acoustic barriers. Road pavements with a higher content of voids require proper maintenance because their acoustic performances are reduced during operation.

  16. Performance Analysis of Spectral-Phase-Encoded Optical CDMA System Using Two-Photon-Absorption Receiver Structure for Asynchronous and Slot-Level Synchronous Transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Kambiz; Salehi, Jawad A.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of a nonlinear two-photon-absorption (TPA) receiver and compare its performance with that of a single-photon-absorption (SPA) receiver in the context of spectral-phase-encoded optical code-division multiple access (CDMA) technique. The performances for the above systems are evaluated for two different transmission scenarios, namely, asynchronous and slot-level synchronous transmitters. Performance evaluation includes different sources of degradation such as multiple-access interference, noise due to optical amplification, shot noise, and thermal noise. In obtaining the performance, the mean and variance of the received signal in each of the above techniques are derived, and bit error rate is obtained using Gaussian approximation. In general, it is shown that TPA receivers are superior in performance with respect to SPA receivers when the receiver employs a much slower photodetector in comparison with the laser's transmitted pulse duration. This, indeed, is the reason behind the choice of nonlinear receivers, such as TPA, in most spectral-phase-encoded optical CDMA systems.

  17. Mixing phases of unstable two-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.V.; Brentano, P. von.

    1993-01-01

    An unstable two-level system decaying into an arbitrary number of channels is considered. It is shown that the mixing phases of the two overlapping resonances can be expressed in the terms of their partial widths and one additional universal mixing parameter. Some applications to a doublet of 2 + resonances in 8 Be and to the ρ-ω systems are considered. 18 refs

  18. Effects of a traffic noise background on judgements of aircraft noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted in which subjects judged aircraft noises in the presence of road traffic background noise. Two different techniques for presenting the background noises were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over the whole of a test session. For the other, the background noise was changed with each aircraft noise. A range of aircraft noise levels and traffic noise levels were presented to simulate typical indoor levels.

  19. Protecting quantum coherence of two-level atoms from vacuum fluctuations of electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaobao; Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of open quantum systems, we study the dynamics of a static polarizable two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field and explore under which conditions the coherence of the open quantum system is unaffected by the environment. For both a single-qubit and two-qubit systems, we find that the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise when the atom interacts with a non-boundary electromagnetic field. However, with the presence of a boundary, the dynamical conditions for the insusceptible of quantum coherence are fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction. -- Highlights: •We study the dynamics of a two-level atom interacting with a bath of fluctuating vacuum electromagnetic field. •For both a single and two-qubit systems, the quantum coherence cannot be protected from noise without a boundary. •The insusceptible of the quantum coherence can be fulfilled only when the atom is close to the boundary and is transversely polarizable. •Otherwise, the quantum coherence can only be protected in some degree in other polarizable direction.

  20. Anthropogenic noise alters bat activity levels and echolocation calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie P. Bunkley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative impacts from anthropogenic noise are well documented for many wildlife taxa. Investigations of the effects of noise on bats however, have not been conducted outside of the laboratory. Bats that hunt arthropods rely on auditory information to forage. Part of this acoustic information can fall within the spectrum of anthropogenic noise, which can potentially interfere with signal reception and processing. Compressor stations associated with natural gas extraction produce broadband noise 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. With over half a million producing gas wells in the U.S. this infrastructure is a major source of noise pollution across the landscape. We conducted a ‘natural experiment’ in the second largest gas extraction field in the U.S. to investigate the potential effects of gas compressor station noise on the activity levels of the local bat assemblage. We used acoustic monitoring to compare the activity level (number of minutes in a night with a bat call of the bat assemblage at sites with compressor stations to sites lacking this infrastructure. We found that activity levels for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis were 40% lower at loud compressor sites compared to quieter well pads, whereas the activity levels of four other species (Myotis californicus, M. cillolabrum, M. lucifugus, Parastrellus hesperus were not affected by noise. Furthermore, our results reveal that the assemblage of bat species emitting low frequency (35 kHz echolocation did not exhibit altered activity levels in noise. Lower activity levels of Brazilian free-tailed bats at loud sites indicate a potential reduction in habitat for this species. Additionally, a comparison of echolocation search calls produced by free-tailed bats at sites with and without compressor stations reveal that this species modifies its echolocation search calls in noise—producing longer calls with a narrower bandwidth. Call alterations might affect prey

  1. Photonic microwave signals with zeptosecond-level absolute timing noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaopeng; Bouchand, Romain; Nicolodi, Daniele; Giunta, Michele; Hänsel, Wolfgang; Lezius, Matthias; Joshi, Abhay; Datta, Shubhashish; Alexandre, Christophe; Lours, Michel; Tremblin, Pierre-Alain; Santarelli, Giorgio; Holzwarth, Ronald; Le Coq, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Photonic synthesis of radiofrequency (RF) waveforms revived the quest for unrivalled microwave purity because of its ability to convey the benefits of optics to the microwave world. In this work, we perform a high-fidelity transfer of frequency stability between an optical reference and a microwave signal via a low-noise fibre-based frequency comb and cutting-edge photodetection techniques. We demonstrate the generation of the purest microwave signal with a fractional frequency stability below 6.5 × 10-16 at 1 s and a timing noise floor below 41 zs Hz-1/2 (phase noise below -173 dBc Hz-1 for a 12 GHz carrier). This outperforms existing sources and promises a new era for state-of-the-art microwave generation. The characterization is achieved through a heterodyne cross-correlation scheme with the lowermost detection noise. This unprecedented level of purity can impact domains such as radar systems, telecommunications and time-frequency metrology. The measurement methods developed here can benefit the characterization of a broad range of signals.

  2. A Comparative Land Use-Based Analysis of Noise Pollution Levels in Selected Urban Centers of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloye, David O; Palamuleni, Lobina G

    2015-09-29

    Growth in the commercialization, mobility and urbanization of human settlements across the globe has greatly exposed world urban population to potentially harmful noise levels. The situation is more disturbing in developing countries like Nigeria, where there are no sacrosanct noise laws and regulations. This study characterized noise pollution levels in Ibadan and Ile-Ife, two urban areas of Southwestern Nigeria that have experienced significant increases in population and land use activities. Eight hundred noise measurements, taken at 20 different positions in the morning, afternoon, and evening of carefully selected weekdays, in each urban area, were used for this study. Findings put the average noise levels in the urban centers at between 53 dB(A) and 89 dB (A), a far cry from the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible limits in all the land use types, with highest noise pollution levels recorded for transportation, commercial, residential and educational land use types. The result of the one-way ANOVA test carried out on the dependent variable noise and fixed factor land use types reveals a statistically significant mean noise levels across the study area (F(3,34) = 15.13, p = 0.000). The study underscores noise pollution monitoring and the urgent need to control urban noise pollution with appropriate and effective policies.

  3. Automatic exposure control systems designed to maintain constant image noise: effects on computed tomography dose and noise relative to clinically accepted technique charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    To compare computed tomography dose and noise arising from use of an automatic exposure control (AEC) system designed to maintain constant image noise as patient size varies with clinically accepted technique charts and AEC systems designed to vary image noise. A model was developed to describe tube current modulation as a function of patient thickness. Relative dose and noise values were calculated as patient width varied for AEC settings designed to yield constant or variable noise levels and were compared to empirically derived values used by our clinical practice. Phantom experiments were performed in which tube current was measured as a function of thickness using a constant-noise-based AEC system and the results were compared with clinical technique charts. For 12-, 20-, 28-, 44-, and 50-cm patient widths, the requirement of constant noise across patient size yielded relative doses of 5%, 14%, 38%, 260%, and 549% and relative noises of 435%, 267%, 163%, 61%, and 42%, respectively, as compared with our clinically used technique chart settings at each respective width. Experimental measurements showed that a constant noise-based AEC system yielded 175% relative noise for a 30-cm phantom and 206% relative dose for a 40-cm phantom compared with our clinical technique chart. Automatic exposure control systems that prescribe constant noise as patient size varies can yield excessive noise in small patients and excessive dose in obese patients compared with clinically accepted technique charts. Use of noise-level technique charts and tube current limits can mitigate these effects.

  4. Development of Active Noise Control System for Quieting Transformer Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bok Kyu; Song, Seik Young; Choi, Huo Yul [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Dae Hea; Lee, Hyuk Jae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The passive noise control technique made use of sound-absorbing or soundproofing materials, so it required a large area and high cost for installation and had a drawback of poor performance at low frequency. Compared to this, the Active Noise Control attenuates noise sound pressure by using secondary source which has same performance ay low-frequency. Furthermore, it is able to save space and expenses. - research on adaptive algorithms - evaluation of global attenuation of the control - computer simulation - real-time Active Noise Control System Hardware Implementation - ANC system setting in the noisy area.

  5. Pilot study of methods and equipment for in-home noise level measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzel, Richard L; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Williams, Christopher C; Viet, Susan Marie; Dellarco, Michael

    2015-01-15

    Knowledge of the auditory and non-auditory effects of noise has increased dramatically over the past decade, but indoor noise exposure measurement methods have not advanced appreciably, despite the introduction of applicable new technologies. This study evaluated various conventional and smart devices for exposure assessment in the National Children's Study. Three devices were tested: a sound level meter (SLM), a dosimeter, and a smart device with a noise measurement application installed. Instrument performance was evaluated in a series of semi-controlled tests in office environments over 96-hour periods, followed by measurements made continuously in two rooms (a child's bedroom and a most used room) in nine participating homes over a 7-day period with subsequent computation of a range of noise metrics. The SLMs and dosimeters yielded similar A-weighted average noise levels. Levels measured by the smart devices often differed substantially (showing both positive and negative bias, depending on the metric) from those measured via SLM and dosimeter, and demonstrated attenuation in some frequency bands in spectral analysis compared to SLM results. Virtually all measurements exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency's 45 dBA day-night limit for indoor residential exposures. The measurement protocol developed here can be employed in homes, demonstrates the possibility of measuring long-term noise exposures in homes with technologies beyond traditional SLMs, and highlights potential pitfalls associated with measurements made by smart devices.

  6. Modeling signal-to-noise ratio of otoacoustic emissions in workers exposed to different industrial noise levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Nassiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Noise is considered as the most common cause of harmful physical effects in the workplace. A sound that is generated from within the inner ear is known as an otoacoustic emission (OAE. Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs assess evoked emission and hearing capacity. The aim of this study was to assess the signal-to-noise ratio in different frequencies and at different times of the shift work in workers exposed to various levels of noise. It was also aimed to provide a statistical model for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of OAEs in different frequencies based on the two variables of sound pressure level (SPL and exposure time. Materials and Methods: This case–control study was conducted on 45 workers during autumn 2014. The workers were divided into three groups based on the level of noise exposure. The SNR was measured in frequencies of 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz in both ears, and in three different time intervals during the shift work. According to the inclusion criterion, SNR of 6 dB or greater was included in the study. The analysis was performed using repeated measurements of analysis of variance, spearman correlation coefficient, and paired samples t-test. Results: The results showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the three exposed groups in terms of the mean values of SNR (P > 0.05. Only in signal pressure levels of 88 dBA with an interval time of 10:30–11:00 AM, there was a statistically significant difference between the right and left ears with the mean SNR values of 3000 frequency (P = 0.038. The SPL had a significant effect on the SNR in both the right and left ears (P = 0.023, P = 0.041. The effect of the duration of measurement on the SNR was statistically significant in both the right and left ears (P = 0.027, P < 0.001. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrated that after noise exposure during the shift, SNR of OAEs reduced from the

  7. Field-Deployable Acoustic Digital Systems for Noise Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Wright, Kenneth D.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Smith, Charlie D.

    2000-01-01

    Langley Research Center (LaRC) has for years been a leader in field acoustic array measurement technique. Two field-deployable digital measurement systems have been developed to support acoustic research programs at LaRC. For several years, LaRC has used the Digital Acoustic Measurement System (DAMS) for measuring the acoustic noise levels from rotorcraft and tiltrotor aircraft. Recently, a second system called Remote Acquisition and Storage System (RASS) was developed and deployed for the first time in the field along with DAMS system for the Community Noise Flight Test using the NASA LaRC-757 aircraft during April, 2000. The test was performed at Airborne Airport in Wilmington, OH to validate predicted noise reduction benefits from alternative operational procedures. The test matrix was composed of various combinations of altitude, cutback power, and aircraft weight. The DAMS digitizes the acoustic inputs at the microphone site and can be located up to 2000 feet from the van which houses the acquisition, storage and analysis equipment. Digitized data from up to 10 microphones is recorded on a Jaz disk and is analyzed post-test by microcomputer system. The RASS digitizes and stores acoustic inputs at the microphone site that can be located up to three miles from the base station and can compose a 3 mile by 3 mile array of microphones. 16-bit digitized data from the microphones is stored on removable Jaz disk and is transferred through a high speed array to a very large high speed permanent storage device. Up to 30 microphones can be utilized in the array. System control and monitoring is accomplished via Radio Frequency (RF) link. This paper will present a detailed description of both systems, along with acoustic data analysis from both systems.

  8. Evaluation of noise pollution level based upon community exposure and response data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results and procedures are reported from an evaluation of noise pollution level as a predictor of annoyance, based on aircraft noise exposure and community response data. The measures of noise exposure presented include composite noise rating, noise exposure forecast, noise and number index. A proposed measure as a universal noise exposure measure for noise pollution level (L sub NP) is discussed.

  9. Profiles of noise exposure levels in South African mining

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Edwards, A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available were exposed to noise levels of above the 85 dBA legislated occupational exposure level. The conclusion was made that information obtained through the study could be developed into a national personal noise exposure database, including audiometric...

  10. Synchronization of uncoupled excitable systems induced by white and coloured noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano, Samuel; Marino, Ines P; Seoane, Jesus M; Sanjuan, Miguel A F; Euzzor, Stefano; Geltrude, Andrea; Meucci, Riccardo; Arecchi, Fortunato T

    2010-01-01

    We study, both numerically and experimentally, the synchronization of uncoupled excitable systems due to a common noise. We consider two identical FitzHugh-Nagumo systems, which display both spiking and non-spiking behaviours in chaotic or periodic regimes. An electronic circuit provides a laboratory implementation of these dynamics. Synchronization is tested with both white and coloured noise, showing that coloured noise is more effective in inducing synchronization of the systems. We also study the effects on the synchronization of parameter mismatch and of the presence of intrinsic (not common) noise, and we conclude that the best performance of coloured noise is robust under these distortions.

  11. Studies on assessment of traffic noise level in Aurangabad city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B J Bhosale

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid rate of urbanization of Aurangabad city due to the expanding industrialization, the problem of noise pollution has become a concern for urban dwellers and government authority too. Noise pollution due to vehicular traffic is one of the growing environmental problems of urban centers. The study deals with the assessment of traffic noise levels in Aurangabad city. With respect to the total number of vehicles passing the road in unit time, which was surveyed by direct count method, six different sites from Aurangabad city, viz., Nagar Naka, Kranti Chowk, CIDCO bus stand, Railway station area, Dhoot Hospital and Baba petrol pump were selected to study the vehicular noise level. Noise measurements were carried out at these six locations on both working day and holiday during the peak traffic hours, i.e. 8:00 a.m. - 11:a.m., 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m., in the morning, afternoon and evening sessions, respectively, after 5 minutes time interval. The noise level was monitored using noise level meter. The results obtained from this investigation showed that the Nagar Naka, Kranti chowk and CIDCO bus stand area have dense traffic zones when compared with the Railway station area, Dhoot Hospital and Baba petrol pump. The minimum and the maximum noise levels are 74 and 86 dB, respectively, on working day and 70 and 81 dB, respectively, on holiday. The measured noise level values exceed the prescribed noise level.

  12. Pilot task-based assessment of noise levels among firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzel, Rl; Hong, O; Quinlan, P; Hulea, R

    2013-11-01

    Over one million American firefighters are routinely exposed to various occupational hazards agents. While efforts have been made to identify and reduce some causes of injuries and illnesses among firefighters, relatively little has been done to evaluate and understand occupational noise exposures in this group. The purpose of this pilot study was to apply a task-based noise exposure assessment methodology to firefighting operations to evaluate potential noise exposure sources, and to use collected task-based noise levels to create noise exposure estimates for evaluation of risk of noise-induced hearing loss by comparison to the 8-hr and 24-hr recommended exposure limits (RELs) for noise of 85 and 80.3 dBA, respectively. Task-based noise exposures (n=100 measurements) were measured in three different fire departments (a rural department in Southeast Michigan and suburban and urban departments in Northern California). These levels were then combined with time-at-task information collected from firefighters to estimate 8-hr noise exposures for the rural and suburban fire departments (n=6 estimates for each department). Data from 24-hr dosimetry measurements and crude self-reported activity categories from the urban fire department (n=4 measurements) were used to create 24-hr exposure estimates to evaluate the bias associated with the task-based estimates. Task-based noise levels were found to range from 82-109 dBA, with the highest levels resulting from use of saws and pneumatic chisels. Some short (e.g., 30 min) sequences of common tasks were found to result in nearly an entire allowable daily exposure. The majority of estimated 8-hr and 24-hr exposures exceeded the relevant recommended exposure limit. Predicted 24-hr exposures showed substantial imprecision in some cases, suggesting the need for increased task specificity. The results indicate potential for overexposure to noise from a variety of firefighting tasks and equipment, and suggest a need for further

  13. Aircraft noise prediction program theoretical manual: Rotorcraft System Noise Prediction System (ROTONET), part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Donald S.; Jumper, Stephen J.; Burley, Casey L.; Golub, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the theoretical methods used in the rotorcraft noise prediction system (ROTONET), which is a part of the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). The ANOPP code consists of an executive, database manager, and prediction modules for jet engine, propeller, and rotor noise. The ROTONET subsystem contains modules for the prediction of rotor airloads and performance with momentum theory and prescribed wake aerodynamics, rotor tone noise with compact chordwise and full-surface solutions to the Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings equations, semiempirical airfoil broadband noise, and turbulence ingestion broadband noise. Flight dynamics, atmosphere propagation, and noise metric calculations are covered in NASA TM-83199, Parts 1, 2, and 3.

  14. Dynamics of a Landau-Zener transitions in a two-level system driven by a dissipative environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateuafack, M. E.; Diffo, J. T.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-02-01

    The paper investigates the effects of a two-level quantum system coupled to transversal and longitudinal dissipative environment. The time-dependent phase accumulation, LZ transition probability and entropy in the presence of fast-ohmic, sub-ohmic and super-ohmic quantum noise are derived. Analytical results are obtained in terms of temperature, dissipation strength, LZ parameter and bath cutoff frequency. The bath is observed to modify the standard occupation difference by a decaying random phase factor and also produces dephasing during the transfer of population. The dephasing characteristics or the initial non-zero decoherence rate are observed to increase in time with the bath temperature and depend on the system-bath coupling strength and cutoff frequency. These parameters are found to strongly affect the memory and thus tailor the coherence process of the system.

  15. Dynamics of a Landau–Zener transitions in a two-level system driven by a dissipative environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ateuafack, M.E., E-mail: esouamath@yahoo.fr [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon); Diffo, J.T., E-mail: diffojaures@yahoo.com [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon); Department of Physics, Higher Teachers' Training College, The University of Maroua, PO Box 55 Maroua (Cameroon); Fai, L.C., E-mail: corneliusfai@yahoo.fr [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang (Cameroon)

    2016-02-15

    The paper investigates the effects of a two-level quantum system coupled to transversal and longitudinal dissipative environment. The time-dependent phase accumulation, LZ transition probability and entropy in the presence of fast-ohmic, sub-ohmic and super-ohmic quantum noise are derived. Analytical results are obtained in terms of temperature, dissipation strength, LZ parameter and bath cutoff frequency. The bath is observed to modify the standard occupation difference by a decaying random phase factor and also produces dephasing during the transfer of population. The dephasing characteristics or the initial non-zero decoherence rate are observed to increase in time with the bath temperature and depend on the system-bath coupling strength and cutoff frequency. These parameters are found to strongly affect the memory and thus tailor the coherence process of the system.

  16. Dynamics of a Landau–Zener non-dissipative system with fluctuating energy levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fai, L.C. [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang (Cameroon); Diffo, J.T., E-mail: diffojaures@yahoo.com [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang (Cameroon); Department of Physics, Higher Teachers’ Training College, The University of Maroua, Maroua (Cameroon); Ateuafack, M.E.; Tchoffo, M.; Fouokeng, G.C. [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang (Cameroon)

    2014-12-01

    This paper considers a Landau–Zener (two-level) system influenced by a three-dimensional Gaussian and non-Gaussian coloured noise and finds a general form of the time dependent diabatic quantum bit (qubit) flip transition probabilities in the fast, intermediate and slow noise limits. The qubit flip probability is observed to mimic (for low-frequencies noise) that of the standard LZ problem. The qubit flip probability is also observed to be the measure of quantum coherence of states. The transition probability is observed to be tailored by non-Gaussian low-frequency noise and otherwise by Gaussian low-frequency coloured noise. Intermediate and fast noise limits are observed to alter the memory of the system in time and found to improve and control quantum information processing.

  17. Dynamics of a Landau–Zener non-dissipative system with fluctuating energy levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fai, L.C.; Diffo, J.T.; Ateuafack, M.E.; Tchoffo, M.; Fouokeng, G.C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers a Landau–Zener (two-level) system influenced by a three-dimensional Gaussian and non-Gaussian coloured noise and finds a general form of the time dependent diabatic quantum bit (qubit) flip transition probabilities in the fast, intermediate and slow noise limits. The qubit flip probability is observed to mimic (for low-frequencies noise) that of the standard LZ problem. The qubit flip probability is also observed to be the measure of quantum coherence of states. The transition probability is observed to be tailored by non-Gaussian low-frequency noise and otherwise by Gaussian low-frequency coloured noise. Intermediate and fast noise limits are observed to alter the memory of the system in time and found to improve and control quantum information processing

  18. Power distribution and substrate noise coupling investigations on the behavioral level for photon counting imaging readout circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, Jan; Abdalla, Suliman; O'Nils, Mattias; Oelmann, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    In modern mixed-signal system design, there are increasing problems associated with noise coupling caused by switching digital parts to sensitive analog parts. As a consequence, there is a growing necessity to understand these problems. In order to avoid costly design iterations, noise coupling simulations should be initiated as early as possible in the design chain. The problems associated with on-chip noise coupling have been discovered in photon counting pixel detector readout systems, where the level of integration of analog and digital circuits is very high on a very small area, and it would appear that these problems will continue to increase for future system designs in this field. This paper deals with the functionality of utilizing behavioral level models for simulating noise coupling in these readout systems. The methods and models are described and simulation results are shown for a photon counting pixel detector readout system

  19. Assessment of Work Zone Noise Levels at a Cement Factory in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Work Zone Noise Levels at a Cement Factory in Tanga, Tanzania. ... measured in most production sections exceeded the allowed limit value of 85 ... Keywords: Noise levels, Noise exposure, Cement factory, Survey, Tanzania ...

  20. The Effect of Age and Type of Noise on Speech Perception under Conditions of Changing Context and Noise Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitelbaum-Swead, Riki; Fostick, Leah

    2016-01-01

    Everyday life includes fluctuating noise levels, resulting in continuously changing speech intelligibility. The study aims were: (1) to quantify the amount of decrease in age-related speech perception, as a result of increasing noise level, and (2) to test the effect of age on context usage at the word level (smaller amount of contextual cues). A total of 24 young adults (age 20-30 years) and 20 older adults (age 60-75 years) were tested. Meaningful and nonsense one-syllable consonant-vowel-consonant words were presented with the background noise types of speech noise (SpN), babble noise (BN), and white noise (WN), with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 0 and -5 dB. Older adults had lower accuracy in SNR = 0, with WN being the most difficult condition for all participants. Measuring the change in speech perception when SNR decreased showed a reduction of 18.6-61.5% in intelligibility, with age effect only for BN. Both young and older adults used less phonemic context with WN, as compared to other conditions. Older adults are more affected by an increasing noise level of fluctuating informational noise as compared to steady-state noise. They also use less contextual cues when perceiving monosyllabic words. Further studies should take into consideration that when presenting the stimulus differently (change in noise level, less contextual cues), other perceptual and cognitive processes are involved. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Subjective annoyance caused by indoor low-level and low frequency noise and control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DI Guo-qing; ZHANG Bang-jun; SHANG Qi

    2005-01-01

    The influence of low-level noise has not been widely noticed. This paper discovered that low-level and low frequency noise(Aweighted equivalent level Leq < 45 dB) causes higher probability of subjective annoyance. The fuzzy mathematic principle was applied to deal with the threshold level of subjective annoyance from noise in this study; there is preferable relationship between the indoor noise and noise annoyance at low frequency noise level. Study indicated at the same centered noise level, the change of annoyance probability is mainly caused by the change of the frequency spectrum characteristic of the indoor noise. Under low noise level environment, without change of the medium-low frequency noise, the slight increase of medium-high frequency noise level with the help of noise sheltering effect can significantly reduce the noise annoyance. This discovery brings a new resolution on how to improve the environmental quality of working or living places. A noise control model is given in this study according to the acoustic analysis.

  2. Dynamics of two competing species in the presence of Lévy noise sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cognata, A.; Valenti, D.; Dubkov, A. A.; Spagnolo, B.

    2010-07-01

    We consider a Lotka-Volterra system of two competing species subject to multiplicative α -stable Lévy noise. The interaction parameter between the species is a random process which obeys a stochastic differential equation with a generalized bistable potential in the presence both of a periodic driving term and an additive α -stable Lévy noise. We study the species dynamics, which is characterized by two different regimes, exclusion of one species and coexistence of both. We find quasiperiodic oscillations and stochastic resonance phenomenon in the dynamics of the competing species, analyzing the role of the Lévy noise sources.

  3. REDUCTION OF CLASSROOM NOISE LEVELS USING GROUP CONTINGENCIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ring, Brandon M.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Eubanks, Sean L.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic workplace is an employment-based abstinence reinforcement intervention for unemployed drug users where trainees receive on-the-job employment skills training in a classroom setting. The study is an extension of prior therapeutic workplace research, which suggested that trainees frequently violated noise standards. Participants received real-time graphed feedback of noise levels and had the opportunity to earn monetary group reinforcement for maintaining a low number of noise v...

  4. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S Baldwin

    Full Text Available The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system's input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple "linear amplifier" model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer's detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system's internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity. Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF. We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies.

  5. Equilibrium and shot noise in mesoscopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, T.

    1994-10-01

    Within the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the study of noise in Mesoscopic devices, both experimentally and theoretically. Noise in solid state devices can have different origins: there is 1/f noise, which is believed to arise from fluctuations in the resistance of the sample due to the motion of impurities. On top of this contribution is a frequency independent component associated with the stochastic nature of electron transport, which will be the focus of this paper. If the sample considered is small enough that dephasing and inelastic effects can be neglected, equilibrium (thermal) and excess noise can be completely described in terms of the elastic scattering properties of the sample. As mentioned above, noise arises as a consequence of random processes governing the transport of electrons. Here, there are two sources of randomness: first, electrons incident on the sample occupy a given energy state with a probability given by the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Secondly, electrons can be transmitted across the sample or reflected in the same reservoir where they came from with a probability given by the quantum mechanical transmission/reflection coefficients. Equilibrium noise refers to the case where no bias voltage is applied between the leads connected to the sample, where thermal agitation alone allows the electrons close to the Fermi level to tunnel through the sample. In general, equilibrium noise is related to the conductance of the sample via the Johnson-Nyquist formula. In the presence of a bias, in the classical regime, one expects to recover the full shot noise < {Delta}{sup 2}I >= 2I{Delta}{mu} as was observed a long time ago in vacuum diodes. In the Mesoscopic regime, however, excess noise is reduced below the shot noise level. The author introduces a more intuitive picture, where the current passing through the device is a superposition of pulses, or electron wave packets, which can be transmitted or reflected.

  6. Environmental noise levels affect the activity budget of the Florida manatee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.; Donaghay, Percy L.; Miller, James H.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2005-09-01

    Manatees inhabit coastal bays, lagoons, and estuaries because they are dependent on the aquatic vegetation that grows in shallow waters. Food requirements force manatees to occupy the same areas in which human activities are the greatest. Noise produced from human activities has the potential to affect these animals by eliciting responses ranging from mild behavioral changes to extreme aversion. This study quantifies the behavioral responses of manatees to both changing levels of ambient noise and transient noise sources. Results indicate that elevated environmental noise levels do affect the overall activity budget of this species. The proportion of time manatees spend feeding, milling, and traveling in critical habitats changed as a function of noise level. More time was spent in the directed, goal-oriented behaviors of feeding and traveling, while less time was spent milling when noise levels were highest. The animals also responded to the transient noise of approaching vessels with changes in behavioral state and movements out of the geographical area. This suggests that manatees detect and respond to changes in environmental noise levels. Whether these changes legally constitute harassment and produce biologically significant effects need to be addressed with hypothesis-driven experiments and long-term monitoring. [For Animal Bioacoustics Best Student Paper Award.

  7. Noise level and MPEG-2 encoder statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungwoo

    1997-01-01

    Most software in the movie and broadcasting industries are still in analog film or tape format, which typically contains random noise that originated from film, CCD camera, and tape recording. The performance of the MPEG-2 encoder may be significantly degraded by the noise. It is also affected by the scene type that includes spatial and temporal activity. The statistical property of noise originating from camera and tape player is analyzed and the models for the two types of noise are developed. The relationship between the noise, the scene type, and encoder statistics of a number of MPEG-2 parameters such as motion vector magnitude, prediction error, and quant scale are discussed. This analysis is intended to be a tool for designing robust MPEG encoding algorithms such as preprocessing and rate control.

  8. Annoyance from Road Traffic, Trains, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, Martina S; Goudreau, Sophie; Plante, Céline; Perron, Stéphane; Fournier, Michel; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2015-12-29

    There is a lack of studies assessing the exposure-response relationship between transportation noise and annoyance in North America. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of noise annoyance induced by road traffic, trains and airplanes in relation to distance to transportation noise sources, and to total environmental noise levels in Montreal, Canada; annoyance was assessed as noise-induced disturbance. A telephone-based survey among 4336 persons aged >18 years was conducted. Exposure to total environmental noise (A-weighted outdoor noise levels-LAeq24h and day-evening-night equivalent noise levels-Lden) for each study participant was determined using a statistical noise model (land use regression-LUR) that is based on actual outdoor noise measurements. The proportion of the population annoyed by road traffic, airplane and train noise was 20.1%, 13.0% and 6.1%, respectively. As the distance to major roads, railways and the Montreal International Airport increased, the percentage of people disturbed and highly disturbed due to the corresponding traffic noise significantly decreased. When applying the statistical noise model we found a relationship between noise levels and disturbance from road traffic and total environmental noise, with Prevalence Proportion Ratios (PPR) for highly disturbed people of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07-1.13) and 1.04 (1.02-1.06) per 1 dB(A) Lden, respectively. Our study provides the first comprehensive information on the relationship between transportation noise levels and disturbance in a Canadian city. LUR models are still in development and further studies on transportation noise induced annoyance are consequently needed, especially for sources other than road traffic.

  9. Assessment of noise level and noise propagation generated by light-lift helicopters in mountain natural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigolato, Stefano; Mologni, Omar; Proto, Andrea Rosario; Zimbalatti, Giuseppe; Cavalli, Raffaele

    2018-01-20

    The use of helicopter rises discussion about environmental noise propagation especially when it operates in proximity of environmentally sensitive areas (ESAs) for an extended period because of its potential implications in wildlife behaviours. In order to support decisions on helicopter logging operation management in proximity of ESAs, this study focused on (i) analysing the noise spectrum of a light-lift helicopter during logging operations and on (ii) assessing the noise propagation in the surrounding environments. This study investigated a helicopter logging operation for wood fuel extraction in the eastern part of the Italian Alps. The potential disturbance area covered for the entire helicopter logging operation was evaluated by a specific GIS application according to hearing sensitivity of the most sensitive wildlife species in the study area (different strigiform species). The noise level at the ground appeared to be affected by the location regardless both the use of equivalent continuous sound pressures level dB(A) (LAeq) and the single-event level (SEL) noise metrics. The lowest values were recorded when the helicopter was flown over the sound meter level located under the forest canopy, while the highest was recorded when the helicopter was unhooking the loads at the landing. The GIS application highlighted the consistent of the exceeded noise area (weighted to strigiform hearing range and sensitivity) for the lower frequency bands (0.016-0.250 kHz). A more restricted exceeded noise area concerned instead the most sensitive frequency bands" for the strigiform (1-2 kHz). Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  10. Environmental impact of noise levels in and around opencast bauxite mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisku, G C; Barman, S C; Kidwai, M M; Bhargava, S K

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, noise pollution has not been paid adequate attention as air, water and land pollution. In order to assess (predict) the impact of bauxite mine noise on employees health and in and around bauxite mine environment, general noise sources and equipment noise were monitored. All these noise sources were compared with prescribed standard noise levels laid down by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). Data has also been compared with reference site, north block hill top which is barren and virgin plateau/top covered with grass only and free from human interference. Equipment noise levels were much higher than the other zone of the mine which does not have the corresponding standards. Rock breaker recorded the highest noise level with 73.1 +/- 14.2 to 89.5 +/- 10.1 dB (A) while from ripper dozer it was least with 61.0 +/- 17.3 to 76.2 +/- 6.2 dB (A). Meteorological parameters did not have much influence upon equipment noise up to 100 feet from the source.

  11. Noise sensitivity, rather than noise level, predicts the non-auditory effects of noise in community samples: a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangho Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive noise affects human health and interferes with daily activities. Although environmental noise may not directly cause mental illness, it may accelerate and intensify the development of latent mental disorders. Noise sensitivity (NS is considered a moderator of non-auditory noise effects. In the present study, we aimed to assess whether NS is associated with non-auditory effects. Methods We recruited a community sample of 1836 residents residing in Ulsan and Seoul, South Korea. From July to November 2015, participants were interviewed regarding their demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, medical history, and NS. The non-auditory effects of noise were assessed using the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression, Insomnia Severity index, State Trait Anxiety Inventory state subscale, and Stress Response Inventory-Modified Form. Individual noise levels were recorded from noise maps. A three-model multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors that might affect psychiatric illnesses. Results Participants ranged in age from 19 to 91 years (mean: 47.0 ± 16.1 years, and 37.9% (n = 696 were male. Participants with high NS were more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes and hyperlipidemia and to use psychiatric medication. The multivariable analysis indicated that even after adjusting for noise-related variables, sociodemographic factors, medical illness, and duration of residence, subjects in the high NS group were more than 2 times more likely to experience depression and insomnia and 1.9 times more likely to have anxiety, compared with those in the low NS group. Noise exposure level was not identified as an explanatory value. Conclusions NS increases the susceptibility and hence moderates there actions of individuals to noise. NS, rather than noise itself, is associated with an elevated susceptibility to non-auditory effects.

  12. Reducing Indoor Noise Levels Using People's Perception on Greenery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediastika, Christina E.; Binarti, Floriberta

    2013-12-01

    Employees working in cubicles of open-plan offices in Indonesia were studied in regard to their perception on the ability of indoor greenery to reduce noise levels. Sansevieria trifasciata and Scindapsus sp were used. Each was placed in the cubicle and noise levels were measured without plants, with Sansevieria, and with Scindapsus in place. The meters showed very insignificant difference. However, responses to surveys indicated a perception of lower noise in the presence of greenery. This seemed to be supported by prior knowledge and preconception and may be useful in creating a "quieter" indoor environment.

  13. Evaluation of speech reception threshold in noise in young Cochlear™ Nucleus® system 6 implant recipients using two different digital remote microphone technologies and a speech enhancement sound processing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razza, Sergio; Zaccone, Monica; Meli, Aannalisa; Cristofari, Eliana

    2017-12-01

    Children affected by hearing loss can experience difficulties in challenging and noisy environments even when deafness is corrected by Cochlear implant (CI) devices. These patients have a selective attention deficit in multiple listening conditions. At present, the most effective ways to improve the performance of speech recognition in noise consists of providing CI processors with noise reduction algorithms and of providing patients with bilateral CIs. The aim of this study was to compare speech performances in noise, across increasing noise levels, in CI recipients using two kinds of wireless remote-microphone radio systems that use digital radio frequency transmission: the Roger Inspiro accessory and the Cochlear Wireless Mini Microphone accessory. Eleven Nucleus Cochlear CP910 CI young user subjects were studied. The signal/noise ratio, at a speech reception threshold (SRT) value of 50%, was measured in different conditions for each patient: with CI only, with the Roger or with the MiniMic accessory. The effect of the application of the SNR-noise reduction algorithm in each of these conditions was also assessed. The tests were performed with the subject positioned in front of the main speaker, at a distance of 2.5 m. Another two speakers were positioned at 3.50 m. The main speaker at 65 dB issued disyllabic words. Babble noise signal was delivered through the other speakers, with variable intensity. The use of both wireless remote microphones improved the SRT results. Both systems improved gain of speech performances. The gain was higher with the Mini Mic system (SRT = -4.76) than the Roger system (SRT = -3.01). The addition of the NR algorithm did not statistically further improve the results. There is significant improvement in speech recognition results with both wireless digital remote microphone accessories, in particular with the Mini Mic system when used with the CP910 processor. The use of a remote microphone accessory surpasses the benefit of

  14. Measurement of signal-to-noise ratio performance of TV fluoroscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geluk, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed for direct measurement of Signal-to-Noise ratio performance on X-ray TV systems. To this end the TV signal resulting from a calibrated test object, is compared with the noise level in the image. The method is objective and produces instantaneous readout, which makes it very suitable for system evaluation under dynamic conditions. (author)

  15. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Phase Noise Compensation for OFDM Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Amir; Yemini, Michal

    2017-11-01

    We describe a low complexity method for time domain compensation of phase noise in OFDM systems. We extend existing methods in several respects. First we suggest using the Karhunen-Lo\\'{e}ve representation of the phase noise process to estimate the phase noise. We then derive an improved datadirected choice of basis elements for LS phase noise estimation and present its total least square counterpart problem. The proposed method helps overcome one of the major weaknesses of OFDM systems. We also generalize the time domain phase noise compensation to the multiuser MIMO context. Finally we present simulation results using both simulated and measured phased noise. We quantify the tracking performance in the presence of residual carrier offset.

  17. The Effect of the Cholesterol Levels on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mehmet Gokhan; Aydin, Sedat

    2018-01-01

    Introduction  Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), which is one of the most common occupational diseases among industrialized populations, is associated with longstanding exposure to high levels of noise. The pathogenesis of NIHL is not clear, but some genes and their activity at the tissue level have been investigated. Hypercholesterolemia, which can disturb the microcirculation, can be one of the underlying pathologies in hearing loss. Objective  To investigate the relationship between NIHL and hypercholesterolemia. Methods  The study group was selected among workers who had an occupational exposure of 85 dB of noise for at least 10 years. The audiologic assessment was recorded at seven frequencies (500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 2,000 Hz, 3,000 Hz, 4,000 Hz, 6,000 Hz and 8,000 Hz). A total of 456 workers were included in the study and divided into two groups: the control group (252 patients) and the NIHL group (204 patients). After the audiologic measurement, blood samples were taken and investigated for blood cholesterol levels. According to these results, the groups were compared. Results  Both groups were similarly distributed regarding age and occupational exposure time ( p  > 0.05). We could not detect any association between cholesterol levels and noise-induced hearing loss ( p   0.05). Conclusion  Noise-induced hearing loss is still a common occupational problem that can be prevented by hearing conservation programs and occupational health and safety training. Still, we know little about the relationship between NIHL and hypercholesterolemia. According to our findings, we cannot detect any relationship. Controlled studies and studies with human individuals can be made possible in the future with diagnostic innovations in tissue imaging and tissue microcircular sampling.

  18. Effect of external pressure environment on the internal noise level due to a source inside a cylindrical tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Roussos, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    A small cylindrical tank was used to study the effect on the noise environment within a tank of conditions of atmospheric (sea level) pressure or vacuum environments on the exterior. Experimentally determined absorption coefficients were used to calculate transmission loss, transmissibility coefficients and the sound pressure (noise) level differences in the interior. The noise level differences were also measured directly for the two exterior environments and compared to various analytical approximations with limited agreement. Trend study curves indicated that if the tank transmission loss is above 25 dB, the difference in interior noise level between the vacuum and ambient pressure conditions are less than 2 dB.

  19. Ramsey interferometry with a two-level generalized Tonks-Girardeau gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi, S. V.; Campo, A. del; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a solvable generalization of the Tonks-Girardeau model that describes a coherent one-dimensional (1D) gas of cold two-level bosons which interact with two external fields in a Ramsey interferometer. They also interact among themselves by idealized, infinitely strong contact potentials, with interchange of momentum and internal state. We study the corresponding Ramsey fringes and the quantum projection noise which, essentially unaffected by the interactions, remains that for ideal bosons. The dual system of this gas, an ideal gas of two-level fermions coupled by the interaction with the separated fields, produces the same fringes and noise fluctuations. The cases of time-separated and spatially separated fields are studied. For spatially separated fields the fringes may be broadened slightly by increasing the number of particles, but only for large particle numbers far from present experiments with Tonks-Girardeau gases. The uncertainty in the determination of the atomic transition frequency diminishes, essentially with the inverse root of the particle number. The difficulties to implement the model experimentally and possible shortcomings of strongly interacting 1D gases for frequency standards and atomic clocks are discussed

  20. Quality-aware features-based noise level estimator for block matching and three-dimensional filtering algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaoping; Hu, Lingyan; Yang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    The performance of conventional denoising algorithms is usually controlled by one or several parameters whose optimal settings depend on the contents of the processed images and the characteristics of the noises. Among these parameters, noise level is a fundamental parameter that is always assumed to be known by most of the existing denoising algorithms (so-called nonblind denoising algorithms), which largely limits the applicability of these nonblind denoising algorithms in many applications. Moreover, these nonblind algorithms do not always achieve the best denoised images in visual quality even when fed with the actual noise level parameter. To address these shortcomings, in this paper we propose a new quality-aware features-based noise level estimator (NLE), which consists of quality-aware features extraction and optimal noise level parameter prediction. First, considering that image local contrast features convey important structural information that is closely related to image perceptual quality, we utilize the marginal statistics of two local contrast operators, i.e., the gradient magnitude and the Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG), to extract quality-aware features. The proposed quality-aware features have very low computational complexity, making them well suited for time-constrained applications. Then we propose a learning-based framework where the noise level parameter is estimated based on the quality-aware features. Based on the proposed NLE, we develop a blind block matching and three-dimensional filtering (BBM3D) denoising algorithm which is capable of effectively removing additive white Gaussian noise, even coupled with impulse noise. The noise level parameter of the BBM3D algorithm is automatically tuned according to the quality-aware features, guaranteeing the best performance. As such, the classical block matching and three-dimensional algorithm can be transformed into a blind one in an unsupervised manner. Experimental results demonstrate that the

  1. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, F.; Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition, (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems. S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, A.M. Zagoskin, F. Nori, Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields, Phys. Rev. A 75, 063414 (2007). S. Ashhab et al, unpublished.

  2. Two-level Robust Measurement Fusion Kalman Filter for Clustering Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; QI Wen-Juan; DENG Zi-Li

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the distributed fusion Kalman filtering over clustering sensor networks. The sensor network is partitioned as clusters by the nearest neighbor rule and each cluster consists of sensing nodes and cluster-head. Using the minimax robust estimation principle, based on the worst-case conservative system with the conservative upper bounds of noise variances, two-level robust measurement fusion Kalman filter is presented for the clustering sensor network systems with uncertain noise variances. It can significantly reduce the communication load and save energy when the number of sensors is very large. A Lyapunov equation approach for the robustness analysis is presented, by which the robustness of the local and fused Kalman filters is proved. The concept of the robust accuracy is presented, and the robust accuracy relations among the local and fused robust Kalman filters are proved. It is proved that the robust accuracy of the two-level weighted measurement fuser is equal to that of the global centralized robust fuser and is higher than those of each local robust filter and each local weighted measurement fuser. A simulation example shows the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  3. Rat hippocampal alterations could underlie behavioral abnormalities induced by exposure to moderate noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uran, S L; Aon-Bertolino, M L; Caceres, L G; Capani, F; Guelman, L R

    2012-08-30

    Noise exposure is known to affect auditory structures in living organisms. However, it should not be ignored that many of the effects of noise are extra-auditory. Previous findings of our laboratory demonstrated that noise was able to induce behavioral alterations that are mainly related to the cerebellum (CE) and the hippocampus (HC). Therefore, the aim of this work was to reveal new data about the vulnerability of developing rat HC to moderate noise levels through the assessment of potential histological changes and hippocampal-related behavioral alterations. Male Wistar rats were exposed to noise (95-97 dB SPL, 2h daily) either for 1 day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or between postnatal days 15 and 30 (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal histological evaluation as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) habituation and recognition memory assessments were performed. Results showed a mild disruption in the different hippocampal regions after ANE and SANE schemes, along with significant behavioral abnormalities. These data suggest that exposure of developing rats to noise levels of moderate intensity is able to trigger changes in the HC, an extra-auditory structure of the Central Nervous System (CNS), that could underlie the observed behavioral effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitigation of Beat Noise in Time Wavelength Optical Code-Division Multiple-Access Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Taher M.; Harle, David; Andonovic, Ivan

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis of two methods for enhancing the performance of two-dimensional time wavelength Optical code-division multiple-access systems by mitigating the effects of beat noise. The first methodology makes use of an optical hard limiter (OHL) in the receiver prior to the optical correlator; a general formula for the error probability as a function of crosstalk level for systems adopting OHLs is given, and the implications of the OHL's nonideal transfer characteristics are then examined. The second approach adopts pulse position modulation, and system performance is estimated and compared to that associated with on off keying.

  5. Analog phase lock between two lasers at LISA power levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diekmann, Christian; Steier, Frank; Sheard, Benjamin; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of an analog optical phase-locked-loop with an offset frequency of about 20MHz between two lasers, where the detected light powers were of the order of 31 pW and 200 μW. The goal of this setup was the design and characterization of a photodiode transimpedance amplifier for application in LISA. By application of a transimpedance amplifier designed to have low noise and low power consumption, the phase noise between the two lasers was a factor of two above the shot noise limit down to 60mHz. The achievable phase sensitivity depends ultimately on the available power of the highly attenuated master laser and on the input current noise of the transimpedance amplifier of the photodetector. The limiting noise source below 60mHz was the analog phase measurement system that was used in this experiment. A digital phase measurement system that is currently under development at the AEI will be used in the near future. Its application should improve the sensitivity.

  6. Analog phase lock between two lasers at LISA power levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, Christian; Steier, Frank; Sheard, Benjamin; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten, E-mail: Christian.Diekmann@aei.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institute for Gravitational Physics, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents the implementation of an analog optical phase-locked-loop with an offset frequency of about 20MHz between two lasers, where the detected light powers were of the order of 31 pW and 200 muW. The goal of this setup was the design and characterization of a photodiode transimpedance amplifier for application in LISA. By application of a transimpedance amplifier designed to have low noise and low power consumption, the phase noise between the two lasers was a factor of two above the shot noise limit down to 60mHz. The achievable phase sensitivity depends ultimately on the available power of the highly attenuated master laser and on the input current noise of the transimpedance amplifier of the photodetector. The limiting noise source below 60mHz was the analog phase measurement system that was used in this experiment. A digital phase measurement system that is currently under development at the AEI will be used in the near future. Its application should improve the sensitivity.

  7. Ambient noise levels and characterization in Aegean region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Fatih; Zor, Ekrem; Açıkgöz, Cem; Tarancıoğlu, Adil

    2018-03-01

    We assessed the ambient noise level in the Aegean region and analyzed its diurnal variation and its relation to the earthquake detection capability of the Aegean Region Seismic Network (ARSN). We prepared probability density functions (PDFs) for 19 broadband stations in the Aegean region operated by the Earth and Marine Sciences Institute (EMSI) of the Marmara Research Center (MRC) of the Turkish Scientific Research Council (TÜBİTAK). The power spectral densities (PSDs) used to construct PDFs for each station were computed for the periods between 0.02 and 180 s. In addition, we generated noise map of the Aegean region for different periods using the PDFs to assess the origin of the noise. We analyzed earthquake activity in the region and found that there are more local events recorded at night than during the day for each station. This difference is strongly related to diurnal variation of background noise level for the period range mostly covering the frequency range for the local events. We observed daytime noise level 15 to 20 dB higher than that at the nighttime in high frequencies for almost all stations caused by its proximity to settled areas and roads. Additionally, we observed a splitting peak within the Double Frequency (DF) microseism band; it showed a clear noise increase around the short period DF band at all the stations, decreasing inland. This peak may be related to sea waves locally generated in the Aegean Sea. We also identified a prominent increase related to marble saw companies in some stations' noise PDFs.

  8. Children's speech recognition and loudness perception with the Desired Sensation Level v5 Quiet and Noise prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crukley, Jeffery; Scollie, Susan D

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether Desired Sensation Level (DSL) v5 Noise is a viable hearing instrument prescriptive algorithm for children, in comparison with DSL v5 Quiet. In particular, the authors compared children's performance on measures of consonant recognition in quiet, sentence recognition in noise, and loudness perception when fitted with DSL v5 Quiet and Noise. Eleven children (ages 8 to 17 years) with stable, congenital sensorineural hearing losses participated in the study. Participants were fitted bilaterally to DSL v5 prescriptions with behind-the-ear hearing instruments. The order of prescription was counterbalanced across participants. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare performance between prescriptions. Use of the Noise prescription resulted in a significant decrease in consonant perception in Quiet with low-level input, but no difference with average-level input. There was no significant difference in sentence-in-noise recognition between the two prescriptions. Loudness ratings for input levels above 72 dB SPL were significantly lower with the noise prescription. Average-level consonant recognition in quiet was preserved and aversive loudness was alleviated by the Noise prescription relative to the quiet prescription, which suggests that the DSL v5 Noise prescription may be an effective approach to managing the nonquiet listening needs of children with hearing loss.

  9. Automotive engine air intake system with variable noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenssen, David J.; Hellie, Mark D.; Koston, John D.; Shaw, Christopher E.

    2005-09-01

    Engine air intake systems are routinely tasked with delivering a specific target sound which involves meeting an overall noise level and, in many cases, desired frequency content over the entire engine speed range. In order to meet these targets, it is generally necessary to incorporate one or more reactive tuning devices, such as Helmholtz resonators, into the intake system. Traditional devices provide deep attenuation at their designed frequency, but they also introduce undesirable sideband resonances at a higher and a lower frequency. Even after the addition of several devices, it may still not be possible to match the desired intake noise targets due to their deep attenuation and sideband amplification. The subject of this work is to introduce an electronically controlled variable noise control (VNC) device for engine air intake systems which is capable of adjusting the air intake system's frequency response as commanded by the engine operating conditions. The VNC device permits the desired amount of attenuation of peaks in the air intake noise without introducing undesirable sideband resonances. In addition, because the tuning is controlled electronically, the VNC device can deliver a target-specific response using the same hardware across multiple vehicle programs.

  10. Ambient and at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlien-Søborg, Mai C; Schmedes, Astrid S; Stokholm, Z A

    2016-01-01

    -the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides when accounting for well-established predictors of lipid levels. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 424 industrial workers and 84 financial......OBJECTIVES: Occupational and residential noise exposure has been related to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alteration of serum lipid levels has been proposed as a possible causal pathway. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between ambient and at...... workers to obtain contrast in noise exposure levels. They provided a serum sample and wore portable dosimeters that every 5-s recorded ambient noise exposure levels during a 24-h period. We extracted measurements obtained during work and calculated the full-shift mean ambient noise level. For 331 workers...

  11. Non-zero temperature two-mode squeezing for time-dependent two-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliaga, J.; Gruver, J.L.; Proto, A.N.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1994-01-01

    A Maximum Entropy Principle density matrix method, valid for systems with temperature different from zero, is presented making it possible two-mode squeezed states in two-level systems with relevant operators and Hamiltonian connected with O(3,2). A method which allows one to relate the appearance of squeezing to the relevant operators, included in order to define the density matrix of the system is given. (author). 14 refs, 1 fig

  12. Vibration Noise Modeling for Measurement While Drilling System Based on FOGs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxi Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to improve survey accuracy of Measurement While Drilling (MWD based on Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs in the long period, the external aiding sources are fused into the inertial navigation by the Kalman filter (KF method. The KF method needs to model the inertial sensors’ noise as the system noise model. The system noise is modeled as white Gaussian noise conventionally. However, because of the vibration while drilling, the noise in gyros isn’t white Gaussian noise any more. Moreover, an incorrect noise model will degrade the accuracy of KF. This paper developed a new approach for noise modeling on the basis of dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR. In contrast to conventional white noise models, the new noise model contains both the white noise and the color noise. With this new noise model, the KF for the MWD was designed. Finally, two vibration experiments have been performed. Experimental results showed that the proposed vibration noise modeling approach significantly improved the estimated accuracies of the inertial sensor drifts. Compared the navigation results based on different noise model, with the DAVAR noise model, the position error and the toolface angle error are reduced more than 90%. The velocity error is reduced more than 65%. The azimuth error is reduced more than 50%.

  13. Vibration Noise Modeling for Measurement While Drilling System Based on FOGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxi; Wang, Lu; Gao, Shuang; Lin, Tie; Li, Xianmu

    2017-10-17

    Aiming to improve survey accuracy of Measurement While Drilling (MWD) based on Fiber Optic Gyroscopes (FOGs) in the long period, the external aiding sources are fused into the inertial navigation by the Kalman filter (KF) method. The KF method needs to model the inertial sensors' noise as the system noise model. The system noise is modeled as white Gaussian noise conventionally. However, because of the vibration while drilling, the noise in gyros isn't white Gaussian noise any more. Moreover, an incorrect noise model will degrade the accuracy of KF. This paper developed a new approach for noise modeling on the basis of dynamic Allan variance (DAVAR). In contrast to conventional white noise models, the new noise model contains both the white noise and the color noise. With this new noise model, the KF for the MWD was designed. Finally, two vibration experiments have been performed. Experimental results showed that the proposed vibration noise modeling approach significantly improved the estimated accuracies of the inertial sensor drifts. Compared the navigation results based on different noise model, with the DAVAR noise model, the position error and the toolface angle error are reduced more than 90%. The velocity error is reduced more than 65%. The azimuth error is reduced more than 50%.

  14. Noise-driven phenomena in hysteretic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dimian, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    Noise-Driven Phenomena in Hysteretic Systems provides a general approach to nonlinear systems with hysteresis driven by noisy inputs, which leads to a unitary framework for the analysis of various stochastic aspects of hysteresis. This book includes integral, differential and algebraic models that are used to describe scalar and vector hysteretic nonlinearities originating from various areas of science and engineering. The universality of the authors approach is also reflected by the diversity of the models used to portray the input noise, from the classical Gaussian white noise to its impulsive forms, often encountered in economics and biological systems, and pink noise, ubiquitous in multi-stable electronic systems. The book is accompanied by HysterSoft© - a robust simulation environment designed to perform complex hysteresis modeling – that can be used by the reader to reproduce many of the results presented in the book as well as to research both disruptive and constructive effects of noise in hysteret...

  15. Quantum iSWAP gate in optical cavities with a cyclic three-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guo-an; Qiao, Hao-xue; Lu, Hua

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present a scheme to directly implement the iSWAP gate by passing a cyclic three-level system across a two-mode cavity quantum electrodynamics. In the scheme, a three-level Δ -type atom ensemble prepared in its ground state mediates the interaction between the two-cavity modes. For this theoretical model, we also analyze its performance under practical noise, including spontaneous emission and the decay of the cavity modes. It is shown that our scheme may have a high fidelity under the practical noise.

  16. A system for evaluating the impact of noise pollution on the population's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressane, Adriano; Mochizuki, Patricia Satie; Caram, Rosana Maria; Roveda, José Arnaldo Frutuoso

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a support system for the evaluation of noise pollution, applied to the central urban area of Rio Claro, São Paulo State, Brazil. Data were obtained from noise measurements and interviews with the population, generating the following indicators: equivalent sound level (Leq ), traffic noise index (LTNI ), and a participatory diagnosis (Dp ), integrated through a fuzzy inference system (FIS). The proposed system allowed classifying the measurement points according to the degree of impact of noise pollution on the population's health (IPS ) in the study area. Impact was considered significant in 31.4% of the measurement points and very significant in 62.9%. The FIS can be adjusted to local conditions, allowing generalization and thus also supporting noise pollution evaluation and respective environmental noise management in other geographic areas.

  17. The Security Analysis of Two-Step Quantum Direct Communication Protocol in Collective-Rotation Noise Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jian; Sun Feng-Qi; Pan Ze-Shi; Nie Jin-Rui; Chen Yan-Hua; Yuan Kai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the security of two-step quantum direct communication protocol (QDCP) by using Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen pair proposed by Deng et al. [Phys. Rev. A 68 (2003) 042317] in collective-rotation noise channel, an excellent model of noise analysis is proposed. In the security analysis, the method of the entropy theory is introduced, and is compared with QDCP, an error rate point Q 0 (M : (Q 0 , 1.0)) is given. In different noise levels, if Eve wants to obtain the same amount of information, the error rate Q is distinguishable. The larger the noise level ϵ is, the larger the error rate Q is. When the noise level ϵ is lower than 11%, the high error rate is 0.153 without eavesdropping. Lastly, the security of the proposed protocol is discussed. It turns out that the quantum channel will be safe when Q < 0.153. Similarly, if error rate Q > 0.153 = Q 0 , eavesdropping information I > 1, which means that there exist eavesdroppers in the quantum channel, and the quantum channel will not be safe anymore. (paper)

  18. EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL NOISE LEVELS IN ABUJA MUNICIPALITY USING MOBILE PHONES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, T; Folorunso, D; Ebuta, A; Amodu, J; Nwegbu, M; Mairami, Z; Liman, I; Okebaram, C; Chimdi, C; Durogbola, B; Suleiman, H; Mamven, H; Baamlong, N; Dahilo, E; Gbujie, I; Ibekwe, P; Nwaorgu, O

    2016-12-01

    Noise remains a nuisance which impacts negatively on the physical, social and psychological wellbeing of man. It aggravates chronic illnesses like hypertension and other cardiopulmonary diseases. Unfortunately, increased activities from industrialization and technological transfers/drifts have tumultuously led to increased noise pollution in most of our fast growing cities today and hence the need for concerted efforts in monitoring and regulating our environmental noise. To assess the equivalent noise level (Leq) in Abuja municipality and promote a simple method for regular assessment of Leq within our environment. This is a cross-sectional community based study of the environmental Leq of Abuja municipality conducted between January 2014 and January 2016. The city was divided into 12 segments including residential, business and market areas via the Abuja Geographic Information System. The major markets were captured separately on a different scale. Measurements were taken with the mobile phone softwares having validated this with Extech 407730 digital sound level meter, serial no Z310135 . Leq(A) were measured at different points and hours of the day and night. The average Leq(A) were classified according to localities and compared with WHO standard safety levels. LeqD ranged 71-92dB(A); 42-79dB(A) and 69-90dB(A) in business/ parks, residential and market places respectively. The Night measurements were similar 18dB(A)-56dB(A) and the day-night Leq(A)=77.2dB(A) and 90.4dB(A) for residential and business zones. The night noise levels are satisfactory but the day and day-night levels are above the recommended tolerable values by WHO and therefore urgently call for awareness and legislative regulations.

  19. The influence of subway station design on noise levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravi R; Suen, Jonathan J; Cellum, Ilana P; Spitzer, Jaclyn B; Lalwani, Anil K

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the impact of subway station design on platform noise levels. Observational. Continuous A-weighted decibel (dBA) sound levels were recorded in 20 New York City subway stations, where trains entered on either a straight track or curved track in 10 stations each. Equivalent continuous noise levels (L eq ) at various locations on the boarding platform (inbound end, midplatform, and outbound end) during train entry and exit were compared between the straight and curved stations in broadband as well as narrow one-third octave bands. Overall, curved stations trended louder than straight stations, although the difference in broadband L eq did not reach statistical significance (curve, 83.4 dBA; straight, 82.6 dBA; P = .054). Noise levels were significantly louder at the inbound end of the platform during train entry (inbound, 89.7 dBA; mid, 85.5 dBA; outbound, 78.7 dBA; P < .001) and at the outbound end during train exit (inbound, 79.7 dBA; mid, 85.3 dBA; outbound, 89.1 dBA; P < .001). Narrow band analysis showed that curved stations were significantly louder than straight stations at 100 Hz and high frequencies from 8 to 20 kHz. Peak impact levels ranged from 104 to 121 dBA. Curved stations have a different noise profile compared to straight stations and are significantly louder than straight stations at high frequencies. Designing stations with straight tracks within the platform can help reduce commuter noise exposure. NA Laryngoscope, 127:1169-1174, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. The effects of noise-bandwidth, noise-fringe duration, and temporal signal location on the binaural masking-level difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Ifat; Henning, G Bruce

    2012-07-01

    The effects of forward and backward noise fringes on binaural signal detectability were investigated. Masked thresholds for a 12-ms, 250-Hz, sinusoidal signal masked by Gaussian noise, centered at 250 Hz, with bandwidths from 3 to 201 Hz, were obtained in N(0)S(0) and N(0)S(π) configurations. The signal was (a) temporally centered in a 12-ms noise burst (no fringe), (b) presented at the start of a 600-ms noise burst (backward fringe), or (c) temporally centered in a 600-ms noise burst (forward-plus-backward fringe). For noise bandwidths between 3 and 75 Hz, detection in N(0)S(0) improved with the addition of a backward fringe, improving further with an additional forward fringe; there was little improvement in N(0)S(π). The binaural masking-level difference (BMLD) increased from 0 to 8 dB with a forward-plus-backward fringe as noise bandwidths increased to 100 Hz, increasing slightly to 10 dB at 201 Hz. This two-stage increase was less pronounced with a backward fringe. With no fringe, the BMLD was about 10-14 dB at all bandwidths. Performance appears to result from the interaction of across-time and across-frequency listening strategies and the possible effects of gain reduction and suppression, which combine in complex ways. Current binaural models are, as yet, unable to account fully for these effects.

  1. Effects of noise in excitable systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, B.; Garcia-Ojalvo, J.; Neiman, A.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2004-01-01

    We review the behavior of theoretical models of excitable systems driven by Gaussian white noise. We focus mainly on those general properties of such systems that are due to noise, and present several applications of our findings in biophysics and lasers. As prototypes of excitable stochastic dynamics we consider the FitzHugh-Nagumo and the leaky integrate-and-fire model, as well as cellular automata and phase models. In these systems, taken as individual units or as networks of globally or locally coupled elements, we study various phenomena due to noise, such as noise-induced oscillations, stochastic resonance, stochastic synchronization, noise-induced phase transitions and noise-induced pulse and spiral dynamics. Our approach is based on stochastic differential equations and their corresponding Fokker-Planck equations, treated by both analytical calculations and/or numerical simulations. We calculate and/or measure the rate and diffusion coefficient of the excitation process, as well as spectral quantities like power spectra and degree of coherence. Combined with a multiparametric bifurcation analysis of the corresponding cumulant equations, these approaches provide a comprehensive picture of the multifaceted dynamical behaviour of noisy excitable systems

  2. evaluation of the environmental noise levels in abuja municipality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Background: Noise remains a nuisance which impacts negatively on the ..... Furthermore, Erikson et al postulated that a persistent noise level .... Hessel PA, Sluis-Cremer G K. Hearing loss in ... Ear & Hearing 2006; 27(1): 1-19. 13.

  3. GPK heading machines with noise suppression means. [USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geshlin, L.A.; Anenberg, G.I.

    1981-11-01

    Chain conveyor is the main noise pollution source of the GPK heading machine. When the conveyor forms a straight line its noise level ranges from 100 to 106 dB and when bent at a 30 degree angle the noise level is from 102 to 107 dB. The mean noise level in the two positions is 103 and 105 dB respectively. The Donetsk Research Scientific Institute for Occupational Hygiene has developed a system for noise suppression using rubber elements which are particularly efficient when the conveyor is bent. Rubber elements also reduce mechanical vibrations of the chain. Design of the modernized conveyors is shown in three schemes. Operational tests show that use of rubber suppresses noise by 5 to 10 dB, and on the average by 8 dB. Noise level measured at the operator's working place amounts to 89 dB. The noise pollution control measures developed by the Institute are economical and do not exceed 1% of the conveyor price.

  4. Intensity Noise Transfer Through a Diode-pumped Titanium Sapphire Laser System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawfieq, Mahmoud; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2017-01-01

    higher RIN than a setup with only a single nonlinear crystal. The Ti:S is shown to have a cut-off frequency around 500 kHz, which means that noise structures of the pump laser above this frequency are strongly suppressed. Finally, the majority of the Ti:S noise seems to originate from the laser itself......In this paper, we investigate the noise performance and transfer in a titanium sapphire (Ti:S) laser system. This system consists of a DBR tapered diode laser, which is frequency doubled in two cascaded nonlinear crystals and used to pump the Ti:S laser oscillator. This investigation includes...... electrical noise characterizations of the utilized power supplies, the optical noise of the fundamental light, the second harmonic light, and finally the optical noise of the femtosecond pulses emitted by the Ti:S laser. Noise features originating from the electric power supply are evident throughout...

  5. Estimating occupant satisfaction of HVAC system noise using quality assessment index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Forouharmajd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise may be defined as any unwanted sound. Sound becomes noise when it is too loud, unexpected, uncontrolled, happens at the wrong time, contains unwanted pure tones or unpleasant. In addition to being annoying, loud noise can cause hearing loss, and, depending on other factors, can affect stress level, sleep patterns and heart rate. The primary object for determining subjective estimations of loudness is to present sounds to a sample of listeners under controlled conditions. In heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC systems only the ventilation fan industry (e.g., bathroom exhaust and sidewall propeller fans uses loudness ratings. In order to find satisfaction, percent of exposure to noise is the valuable issue for the personnel who are working in these areas. The room criterion (RC method has been defined by ANSI standard S12.2, which is based on measured levels of in HVAC systems noise in spaces and is used primarily as a diagnostic tool. The RC method consists of a family of criteria curves and a rating procedure. RC measures background noise in the building over the frequency range of 16-4000 Hz. This rating system requires determination of the mid-frequency average level and determining the perceived balance between high-frequency (HF sound and low-frequency (LF sound. The arithmetic average of the sound levels in the 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz octave bands is 44.6 dB; therefore, the RC 45 curve is selected as the reference for spectrum quality evaluation. The spectral deviation factors in the LF, medium-frequency sound and HF regions are 2.9, 7.5 and -2.3, respectively, giving a Quality Assessment Index (QAI of 9.8. This concludes the QAI is useful in estimating an occupant′s probable reaction when the system design does not produce optimum sound quality. Thus, a QAI between 5 and 10 dB represents a marginal situation in which acceptance by an occupant is questionable. However, when sound pressure levels in the 16 or 31.5 Hz octave

  6. Estimating occupant satisfaction of HVAC system noise using quality assessment index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forouharmajd, Farhad; Nassiri, Parvin; Monazzam, Mohammad R; Yazdchi, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Noise may be defined as any unwanted sound. Sound becomes noise when it is too loud, unexpected, uncontrolled, happens at the wrong time, contains unwanted pure tones or unpleasant. In addition to being annoying, loud noise can cause hearing loss, and, depending on other factors, can affect stress level, sleep patterns and heart rate. The primary object for determining subjective estimations of loudness is to present sounds to a sample of listeners under controlled conditions. In heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems only the ventilation fan industry (e.g., bathroom exhaust and sidewall propeller fans) uses loudness ratings. In order to find satisfaction, percent of exposure to noise is the valuable issue for the personnel who are working in these areas. The room criterion (RC) method has been defined by ANSI standard S12.2, which is based on measured levels of in HVAC systems noise in spaces and is used primarily as a diagnostic tool. The RC method consists of a family of criteria curves and a rating procedure. RC measures background noise in the building over the frequency range of 16-4000 Hz. This rating system requires determination of the mid-frequency average level and determining the perceived balance between high-frequency (HF) sound and low-frequency (LF) sound. The arithmetic average of the sound levels in the 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz octave bands is 44.6 dB; therefore, the RC 45 curve is selected as the reference for spectrum quality evaluation. The spectral deviation factors in the LF, medium-frequency sound and HF regions are 2.9, 7.5 and -2.3, respectively, giving a Quality Assessment Index (QAI) of 9.8. This concludes the QAI is useful in estimating an occupant's probable reaction when the system design does not produce optimum sound quality. Thus, a QAI between 5 and 10 dB represents a marginal situation in which acceptance by an occupant is questionable. However, when sound pressure levels in the 16 or 31.5 Hz octave bands exceed 65

  7. Listen to the noise: noise is beneficial for cognitive performance in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Göran; Sikström, Sverker; Smart, Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Noise is typically conceived of as being detrimental to cognitive performance. However, given the mechanism of stochastic resonance, a certain amount of noise can benefit performance. We investigate cognitive performance in noisy environments in relation to a neurocomputational model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and dopamine. The Moderate Brain Arousal model (MBA; Sikström & Söderlund, 2007) suggests that dopamine levels modulate how much noise is required for optimal cognitive performance. We experimentally examine how ADHD and control children respond to different encoding conditions, providing different levels of environmental stimulation. Participants carried out self-performed mini tasks (SPT), as a high memory performance task, and a verbal task (VT), as a low memory task. These tasks were performed in the presence, or absence, of auditory white noise. Noise exerted a positive effect on cognitive performance for the ADHD group and deteriorated performance for the control group, indicating that ADHD subjects need more noise than controls for optimal cognitive performance. The positive effect of white noise is explained by the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), i.e., the phenomenon that moderate noise facilitates cognitive performance. The MBA model suggests that noise in the environment, introduces internal noise into the neural system through the perceptual system. This noise induces SR in the neurotransmitter systems and makes this noise beneficial for cognitive performance. In particular, the peak of the SR curve depends on the dopamine level, so that participants with low dopamine levels (ADHD) require more noise for optimal cognitive performance compared to controls.

  8. Ambient noise levels in the Taiwan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, W.; Liu, C.; Chen, R.; Huang, B.; Wu, F. T.; Wang, C.

    2008-12-01

    To characterize the island-wide background seismic noise in Taiwan, we estimate the power spectral density (PSD) at broadband stations of both the BATS (Broadband Array in Taiwan for Seismology) and the TAIGER experiment (Apr. 2006~Apr. 2008) for periods ranging from ~0.2 to 100 seconds. A new approach to calculate the probability density functions of noise power (PDFs, MaNamara and Buland, 2004) is used in this study. The results indicate that the cultural noise at higher frequencies is significant at populated area, which shows diurnal and weekly variation as what we expected. The noise power for microseisms centered at a period of ~5 seconds around the western costal plain show ~20dB higher than what observed at eastern Taiwan. This observation supports the inference that the coastal regions having narrow shelf with irregular coastlines are know to be especially efficient at radiating the predominat microseisms. Results from the linear array across central Taiwan demonstrate that the average noise power is quietest at the eastern Central Range. We have mapped the PDF mode for stations at various periods to see the spatial distribution of ambient noise levels, which could be used as the basic information for future station siting. Temporal variation of noise PSD is also present to provide a quantitative description of the seismic data quality collected by both BATS and TAIGER experiment. Some operational problems like base tilt, sensitivity change can be identified easily as well.

  9. Coupled dynamic systems and Le Chatelier's principle in noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidanik, G.; Becker, K. J.

    2004-05-01

    Investigation of coupling an externally driven dynamic system-a master dynamic system-to a passive one-an adjunct dynamic system-reveals that the response of the adjunct dynamic system affects the precoupled response of the master dynamic system. The responses, in the two dynamic systems when coupled, are estimated by the stored energies (Es) and (E0), respectively. Since the adjunct dynamic system, prior to coupling, was with zero (0) stored energy, E0s=0, the precoupled stored energy (E00) in the master dynamic system is expected to be reduced to (E0) when coupling is instituted; i.e., one expects E0noise control of the master dynamic system would result from the coupling. It is argued that the change in the disposition of the stored energies as just described may not be the only change. The coupling may influence the external input power into the master dynamic system which may interfere with the expected noise control. Indeed, the coupling may influence the external input power such that the expected beneficial noise control may not materialize. Examples of these kinds of noise control reversals are cited.

  10. Wavelet Adaptive Algorithm and Its Application to MRE Noise Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To address the limitation of conventional adaptive algorithm used for active noise control (ANC system, this paper proposed and studied two adaptive algorithms based on Wavelet. The twos are applied to a noise control system including magnetorheological elastomers (MRE, which is a smart viscoelastic material characterized by a complex modulus dependent on vibration frequency and controllable by external magnetic fields. Simulation results reveal that the Decomposition LMS algorithm (D-LMS and Decomposition and Reconstruction LMS algorithm (DR-LMS based on Wavelet can significantly improve the noise reduction performance of MRE control system compared with traditional LMS algorithm.

  11. Characteristics of noise-canceling headphones to reduce the hearing hazard for MP3 users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Maojin; Zhao, Fei; French, David; Zheng, Yiqing

    2012-06-01

    Three pairs of headphones [standard iPod ear buds and two noise-canceling headphones (NCHs)] were chosen to investigate frequency characteristics of noise reduction, together with their attenuation effects on preferred listening levels (PLLs) in the presence of various types of background noise. Twenty-six subjects with normal hearing chose their PLLs in quiet, street noise, and subway noise using the three headphones and with the noise-canceling system on/off. Both sets of NCHs reduced noise levels at mid- and high-frequencies. Further noise reductions occurred in low frequencies with the noise canceling system switched on. In street noise, both NCHs had similar noise reduction effects. In subway noise, better noise reduction effects were found in the expensive NCH and with noise-canceling on. A two way repeated measures analysis of variance showed that both listening conditions and headphone styles were significant influencing factors on the PLLs. Subjects tended to increase their PLLs as the background noise level increased. Compared with ear buds, PLLs obtained from NCHs-on in the presence of background noise were reduced up to 4 dB. Therefore, proper selection and use of NCHs appears beneficial in reducing the risk of hearing damage caused by high music listening levels in the presence of background noise.

  12. Logical stochastic resonance in triple-well potential systems driven by colored noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiqing; Xu, Yong; Xu, Wei; Li, Xiuchun

    2012-12-01

    In this work, the logic stochastic resonance (LSR) phenomenon in a class of stochastic triple-well potential systems is investigated. Approximate Fokker-Planck equation is first obtained by using decoupling approximation. Then, we show that LSR can be successfully induced by additive or multiplicative Gaussian colored noise in some cases. In the absence of internal noise, LSR implementation seems impossible for a = 0 (The parameter a characterizes the depth of the potential well) since the two side wells are so deep that the particle cannot hop over the barrier into the middle well when the input signal is 0. With the increasing of a, the optimal noise band to yield flexible logic gates appears and moves to higher level of noise as the correlation time of noise increases. Compared with the Gaussian white noise, the reliable region in the parameter plane of potential depth parameter a and additive noise strength D first expands and then shrinks with increasing noise color. Furthermore, the effects of multiplicative Gaussian colored noise on LSR are investigated. It was found that the flexible and reliable logic behavior can be yielded for a = 0 due to the fact that the multiplicative Gaussian colored noise strongly affects the shape of the potential function. With the increasing of a, i.e., a = 0.25, multiplicative Gaussian white noise cannot yield desired logic behavior. Fortunately, LSR can also be expected by adjusting the correlation time of Gaussian colored noise. It can also be observed that the reliable region in the parameter plane of potential depth parameter a and multiplicative noise strength Q is small for the case of Gaussian white noise and it becomes larger with the increasing of noise color.

  13. Investigating impact of motor oil quality on vehicles engine induced noise level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Arefian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vehicle engine id one of the main sources of noise which its level is influenced by various parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of motor oils quality before and after oil change on the variability of vehicle engine induced noise level. In this study it is tried to follow-up the efficacy of motor oil quality on engines sound level. Material and Method: First, engine noise of 94 vehicles were recorded for 30 seconds before and after oil change and all the vehicles technical information including mileage, type of motor oil, and type of vehicle were registered. Following, the recorded noises were calibrated in semi-anechoic chamber and the sound pressure levels were measured with A and C-weighting network and main octav bands, using a sound level meters. The obtained results analyzed using SPSS software version 17. Results: The effects of motor oil quality on different noise levels of engines were determined and a significant reduction in noise level of vehicles engine was observed. Investigation of the relationship between mileage and motor oil quality on various engines sound level manifested that vehicles with mileage ranged 100000-150000 miles had significant reduction in their sound pressure levels in comparison with other vehicles. Conclusion: The results revealed that engine oil is among factors reducing the vehicle engine induced noise level. Moreover, the engine oil type and the vehicle mileage are key variables which determine the impact of engine oil quality on reduction of the sound level of vehicles engine.

  14. Applying intelligent transport systems to manage noise impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilmink, I.R.; Vonk, T.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution discusses how traffic management, and many other measures that can be categorised as Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS, i.e. all traffic and transport measures that use ICT) can help reduce noise levels by influencing mobility choices and driving behaviour. Several examples of

  15. Stationary states of two-level open quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardas, Bartlomiej; Puchala, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    A problem of finding stationary states of open quantum systems is addressed. We focus our attention on a generic type of open system: a qubit coupled to its environment. We apply the theory of block operator matrices and find stationary states of two-level open quantum systems under certain conditions applied on both the qubit and the surrounding.

  16. Predictive modelling of noise level generated during sawing of rocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents an experimental and statistical study on noise level generated during of rock sawing by circular diamond sawblades. Influence of the operating variables and rock properties on the noise level are investigated and analysed. Statistical analyses are then employed and models are built for the prediction of ...

  17. Noise-level determination for discrete spectra with Gaussian or Lorentzian probability density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Netzer

    2010-01-01

    A method, based on binomial filtering, to estimate the noise level of an arbitrary, smoothed pure signal, contaminated with an additive, uncorrelated noise component is presented. If the noise characteristics of the experimental spectrum are known, as for instance the type of the corresponding probability density function (e.g., Gaussian), the noise properties can be extracted. In such cases, both the noise level, as may arbitrarily be defined, and a simulated white noise component can be generated, such that the simulated noise component is statistically indistinguishable from the true noise component present in the original signal. In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the noise level extraction when the additive noise is Gaussian or Lorentzian. We show that the statistical parameters in these cases (mainly the variance and the half width at half maximum, respectively) can directly be obtained from the experimental spectrum even when the pure signal is erratic. Further discussion is given for cases where the noise probability density function is initially unknown.

  18. Industrial noise level study in a wheat processing factory in ilorin, nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, I.; Ajao, K. R.; Aremu, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    An industrial process such as wheat processing generates significant noise which can cause adverse effects on workers and the general public. This study assessed the noise level at a wheat processing mill in Ilorin, Nigeria. A portable digital sound level meter HD600 manufactured by Extech Inc., USA was used to determine the noise level around various machines, sections and offices in the factory at pre-determined distances. Subjective assessment was also mode using a World Health Organization (WHO) standard questionnaire to obtain information regarding noise ratings, effect of noise on personnel and noise preventive measures. The result of the study shows that the highest noise of 99.4 dBA was recorded at a pressure blower when compared to other machines. WHO Class-4 hearing protector is recommended for workers on the shop floor and room acoustics should be upgraded to absorb some sounds transmitted to offices.

  19. Analysis of Subway Interior Noise at Peak Commuter Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donguk; Kim, Gibbeum; Han, Woojae

    2017-07-01

    Although mass transit systems are convenient and efficient for urban people, little attention has been paid to the potential hearing hazard from their noise. The purpose of the current study was to measure and analyze levels of subway interior noise at peak commuter times and to provide information about commuters' daily dose of noise exposure. To measure the subway interior noise, nine subway lines inside Seoul (i.e., lines 1-9) and six lines surrounding the capital city area (i.e., Central, Bundang, Sinbundang, Incheon, Gyeongui, and Gyeongchun) were chosen. The noise was measured and recorded by a sound level meter for two-hour periods in the morning and evening. 1) In the LZeq analysis, the average noise level of all 15 lines was 72.78 dB; the maximum and minimum noise levels were 78.34 and 62.46 dB, respectively. The average noise level of the nine lines inside Seoul was 73.45 dB, which was 1.68-dB louder than that of the six lines surrounding the capital city area. 2) Based on the LZeq analysis of 33 measured frequencies, 12.5 Hz was the highest frequency and 20,000 Hz was the lowest. 3) There was no remarkable difference in the level of subway interior noise between morning and evening peak commuter times. We concluded that the level of subway interior noise was not loud enough for commuters to incur noise-induced hearing loss. Regardless, environmental noise control efforts in the subway system might be needed for commuters who take a subway every day.

  20. A comparison of high-frequency noise levels on Cascadia Initiative ocean-bottom seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmo, R.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Roland, E. C.; Bodin, P.; Connolly, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Cascadia Initiative (CI) included a four-year deployment of 70 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) on the Cascadia subduction zone and the Juan de Fuca plate for the purposes of characterizing seismicity and imaging the Earth's interior. The Cascadia subduction zone megathrust exhibits very low rates of seismicity relative to most other subduction zones, and there is great motivation to understand deformation on the megathrust because of its potential to produce a catastrophic M9 earthquake. An understanding of earthquake detectability of the CI network, based on knowledge of noise levels, could contribute to the interpretation of earthquake catalogs derived from the experiment and aid in the design of future networks. This project is aimed at estimating these thresholds of local earthquake detectability and how they change across the array both geographically and temporally. We characterize background noise levels recorded from 0.1 to 20 Hz with an emphasis on the frequency band used to detect local seismicity ( 3-15 Hz) to understand how noise levels depend on instrument design and environmental parameters including seafloor depth, season and oceanographic conditions. Our initial analysis of 3 weeks of vertical channel data in September, January, and May 2012-2013 shows that noise increase significantly moving from the continental shelf to deeper water. Noise levels at a given depth vary with instrument type but further analysis is required to determine whether this reflects variations in instrumental noise and ground coupling noise or errors in the scaling of the instrument response. There is also a strong seasonality in recorded noise levels at some frequencies, with winter noise levels exceeding spring and fall noise levels by up to 10 decibels in both the microseism band and in the fin whale calling band (15-20 Hz). In contrast, the seasonal noise level in the local seismicity band for a given instrument type and location shows smaller noise variation

  1. Statistics of A-weighted road traffic noise levels in shielded urban areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forssén, J.; Hornikx, M.C.J.

    2006-01-01

    In the context of community noise and its negative effects, the noise descriptors used are usually long-term equivalent levels and, sometimes, maximum levels. An improved description could be achieved by including the time variations of the noise. Here, the time variations of A-weighted road traffic

  2. Annoyance from Road Traffic, Trains, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina S. Ragettli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of studies assessing the exposure-response relationship between transportation noise and annoyance in North America. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of noise annoyance induced by road traffic, trains and airplanes in relation to distance to transportation noise sources, and to total environmental noise levels in Montreal, Canada; annoyance was assessed as noise-induced disturbance. A telephone-based survey among 4336 persons aged >18 years was conducted. Exposure to total environmental noise (A-weighted outdoor noise levels—LAeq24h and day-evening-night equivalent noise levels—Lden for each study participant was determined using a statistical noise model (land use regression—LUR that is based on actual outdoor noise measurements. The proportion of the population annoyed by road traffic, airplane and train noise was 20.1%, 13.0% and 6.1%, respectively. As the distance to major roads, railways and the Montreal International Airport increased, the percentage of people disturbed and highly disturbed due to the corresponding traffic noise significantly decreased. When applying the statistical noise model we found a relationship between noise levels and disturbance from road traffic and total environmental noise, with Prevalence Proportion Ratios (PPR for highly disturbed people of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07–1.13 and 1.04 (1.02–1.06 per 1 dB(A Lden, respectively. Our study provides the first comprehensive information on the relationship between transportation noise levels and disturbance in a Canadian city. LUR models are still in development and further studies on transportation noise induced annoyance are consequently needed, especially for sources other than road traffic.

  3. Annoyance from Road Traffic, Trains, Airplanes and from Total Environmental Noise Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Goudreau, Sophie; Plante, Céline; Perron, Stéphane; Fournier, Michel; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of studies assessing the exposure-response relationship between transportation noise and annoyance in North America. Our aims were to investigate the prevalence of noise annoyance induced by road traffic, trains and airplanes in relation to distance to transportation noise sources, and to total environmental noise levels in Montreal, Canada; annoyance was assessed as noise-induced disturbance. A telephone-based survey among 4336 persons aged >18 years was conducted. Exposure to total environmental noise (A-weighted outdoor noise levels—LAeq24h and day-evening-night equivalent noise levels—Lden) for each study participant was determined using a statistical noise model (land use regression—LUR) that is based on actual outdoor noise measurements. The proportion of the population annoyed by road traffic, airplane and train noise was 20.1%, 13.0% and 6.1%, respectively. As the distance to major roads, railways and the Montreal International Airport increased, the percentage of people disturbed and highly disturbed due to the corresponding traffic noise significantly decreased. When applying the statistical noise model we found a relationship between noise levels and disturbance from road traffic and total environmental noise, with Prevalence Proportion Ratios (PPR) for highly disturbed people of 1.10 (95% CI: 1.07–1.13) and 1.04 (1.02–1.06) per 1 dB(A) Lden, respectively. Our study provides the first comprehensive information on the relationship between transportation noise levels and disturbance in a Canadian city. LUR models are still in development and further studies on transportation noise induced annoyance are consequently needed, especially for sources other than road traffic. PMID:26729143

  4. Effect of background noise on neuronal coding of interaural level difference cues in rat inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokri, Yasamin; Worland, Kate; Ford, Mark; Rajan, Ramesh

    2015-07-01

    Humans can accurately localize sounds even in unfavourable signal-to-noise conditions. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying this, we studied the effect of background wide-band noise on neural sensitivity to variations in interaural level difference (ILD), the predominant cue for sound localization in azimuth for high-frequency sounds, at the characteristic frequency of cells in rat inferior colliculus (IC). Binaural noise at high levels generally resulted in suppression of responses (55.8%), but at lower levels resulted in enhancement (34.8%) as well as suppression (30.3%). When recording conditions permitted, we then examined if any binaural noise effects were related to selective noise effects at each of the two ears, which we interpreted in light of well-known differences in input type (excitation and inhibition) from each ear shaping particular forms of ILD sensitivity in the IC. At high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), in most ILD functions (41%), the effect of background noise appeared to be due to effects on inputs from both ears, while for a large percentage (35.8%) appeared to be accounted for by effects on excitatory input. However, as SNR decreased, change in excitation became the dominant contributor to the change due to binaural background noise (63.6%). These novel findings shed light on the IC neural mechanisms for sound localization in the presence of continuous background noise. They also suggest that some effects of background noise on encoding of sound location reported to be emergent in upstream auditory areas can also be observed at the level of the midbrain. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Aircraft and background noise annoyance effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate annoyance of multiple noise sources, two experiments were conducted. The first experiment, which used 48 subjects, was designed to establish annoyance-noise level functions for three community noise sources presented individually: jet aircraft flyovers, air conditioner, and traffic. The second experiment, which used 216 subjects, investigated the effects of background noise on aircraft annoyance as a function of noise level and spectrum shape; and the differences between overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance. In both experiments, rated annoyance was the dependent measure. Results indicate that the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for traffic is significantly different from that of flyover and air conditioner noise and that further research was justified to determine the influence of the two background noises on overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance (e.g., experiment two). In experiment two, total noise exposure, signal-to-noise ratio, and background source type were found to have effects on all three types of annoyance. Thus, both signal-to-noise ratio, and the background source must be considered when trying to determine community response to combined noise sources.

  6. Road traffic noise: self-reported noise annoyance versus GIS modelled road traffic noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Matthias; Ivina, Olga; von Klot, Stephanie; Babisch, Wolfgang; Heinrich, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    self-reported road traffic noise annoyance is commonly used in epidemiological studies for assessment of potential health effects. Alternatively, some studies have used geographic information system (GIS) modelled exposure to road traffic noise as an objective parameter. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between noise exposure due to neighbouring road traffic and the noise annoyance of adults, taking other determinants into consideration. parents of 951 Munich children from the two German birth cohorts GINIplus and LISAplus reported their annoyance due to road traffic noise at home. GIS modelled road traffic noise exposure (L(den), maximum within a 50 m buffer) from the noise map of the city of Munich was available for all families. GIS-based calculated distance to the closest major road (≥10,000 vehicles per day) and questionnaire based-information about family income, parental education and the type of the street of residence were explored for their potential influence. An ordered logit regression model was applied. The noise levels (L(den)) and the reported noise annoyance were compared with an established exposure-response function. the correlation between noise annoyance and noise exposure (L(den)) was fair (Spearman correlation r(s) = 0.37). The distance to a major road and the type of street were strong predictors for the noise annoyance. The annoyance modelled by the established exposure-response function and that estimated by the ordered logit model were moderately associated (Pearson's correlation r(p) = 0.50). road traffic noise annoyance was associated with GIS modelled neighbouring road traffic noise exposure (L(den)). The distance to a major road and the type of street were additional explanatory factors of the noise annoyance appraisal.

  7. Entropic noises-induced resonance in a geometrically confined system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Chunhua; Gong, Ailing; Wang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    We consider the motion of Brownian particles through a narrow tube of varying cross-section in a geometrically confined system subjected to a sinusoidal oscillating force. The varying cross-section of the confinement results in an effective purely entropic potential in reduced dimension. Besides an additive Langevin force, one external additive and another multiplicative noise are acting along the x-direction. We demonstrate that the presence of a periodic input may give rise to a maximum and a minimum of the spectral amplification at corresponding optimal values of the noise strength, and therefore to the appearance of the purely entropic stochastic resonance and reverse-resonance phenomena. Furthermore, we show that the cross-correlation between two noises leads to a decrease of the spectral amplification, i.e., we observe the cross-correlation between two noises weakening the resonance. Mechanisms for the cross-correlation weakening the resonance are explained from the point of view of the effective purely entropic potential. (paper)

  8. Effects of road traffic background noise on judgments of individual airplane noises. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Two laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of road-traffic background noise on judgments of individual airplane flyover noises. In the first experiment, 27 subjects judged a set of 16 airplane flyover noises in the presence of traffic-noise sessions of 30-min duration consisting of the combinations of 3 traffic-noise types and 3 noise levels. In the second experiment, 24 subjects judged the same airplane flyover noises in the presence of traffic-noise sessions of 10-min duration consisting of the combinations of 2 traffic-noise types and 4 noise levels. In both experiments the airplane noises were judged less annoying in the presence of high traffic-noise levels than in the presence of low traffic-noise levels.

  9. Methods For an Acceptable Traffic Noise Level Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Sviben

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Road noise disturbance on rough roads by means of loudnesssensor caused by wideband signal components with a significantimpact of tonal effects on smooth roads and in specificactions in driving lead to the annoyance of drivers. A systemicapproach has been applied for the sound quality estimation ofphysical properties of various noise sources and structuralvibroacoustic car properties and its components as an integratedparameter in car design for the purpose of the developmentand vehicle noise reduction. Simulation of the most importantcharacteristics of listening impressions was performedby modem systems of signal analysis together with the presentationof loudness, sharpness, and roughness as essential quantities.Optimization of the noise control measuring regarding vehiclesound was obtained by means of a simulation system withthe capability of the real time original sound filtering. Structuralanalysis was performed as an acoustic modal analysis on therear part and the car interior with the quantitative analysis ofsport and luxury car sounds. The possibility of active noise controlwas studied and examples are given for an application ofpsychoacoustic tools for car sound quality design. Sound qualitywas obtained by an observation of certain aspects, which areempirically or theoretically connected with the design. An experimentalsound synthesis with psychometrical measuring wasapplied. The sound quality of car interior is presented takinginto consideration the criteria of objectivity, reliability and validity.

  10. Comparison of two dose-response relationship of noise exposure evaluation results with high frequency hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Nan; Yang, Qiu-Ling; Qiu, Wei; Zhu, Liang-Liang; Tao, Li-Yuan; Davis, Robert I; Heyer, Nicholas; Zhao, Yi-Ming

    2015-03-20

    Complex noise and its relation to hearing loss are difficult to measure and evaluate. In complex noise measurement, individual exposure results may not accurately represent lifetime noise exposure. Thus, the mean L Aeq,8 h values of individuals in the same workgroup were also used to represent L Aeq,8 h in our study. Our study aimed to explore whether the mean exposure levels of workers in the same workgroup represented real noise exposure better than individual exposure levels did. A cross-sectional study was conducted to establish a model for cumulative noise exposure (CNE) and hearing loss in 205 occupational noise-exposed workers who were recruited from two large automobile manufacturers in China. We used a personal noise dosimeter and a questionnaire to determine the workers' occupational noise exposure levels and exposure times, respectively. A qualified audiologist used standardized audiometric procedures to assess hearing acuity after at least 16 h of noise avoidance. We observed that 88.3% of workers were exposed to more than 85 dB(A) of occupational noise (mean: 89.3 ± 4.2 dB(A)). The personal CNE (CNEp) and workgroup CNE (CNEg) were 100.5 ± 4.7 dB(A) and 100.5 ± 2.9 dB(A), respectively. In the binary logistic regression analysis, we established a regression model with high-frequency hearing loss as the dependent variable and CNE as the independent variable. The Wald value was 5.014 with CNEp as the independent variable and 8.653 with CNEg as the independent variable. Furthermore, we found that the figure for CNEg was more similar to the stationary noise reference than CNEp was. The CNEg model was better than the CNEp model. In this circumstance, we can measure some subjects instead of the whole workgroup and save manpower. In a complex noise environment, the measurements of average noise exposure level of the workgroup can improve the accuracy and save manpower.

  11. Comparison of Two Dose-response Relationship of Noise Exposure Evaluation Results with High Frequency Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complex noise and its relation to hearing loss are difficult to measure and evaluate. In complex noise measurement, individual exposure results may not accurately represent lifetime noise exposure. Thus, the mean L Aeq,8 h values of individuals in the same workgroup were also used to represent L Aeq,8 h in our study. Our study aimed to explore whether the mean exposure levels of workers in the same workgroup represented real noise exposure better than individual exposure levels did. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted to establish a model for cumulative noise exposure (CNE and hearing loss in 205 occupational noise-exposed workers who were recruited from two large automobile manufacturers in China. We used a personal noise dosimeter and a questionnaire to determine the workers′ occupational noise exposure levels and exposure times, respectively. A qualified audiologist used standardized audiometric procedures to assess hearing acuity after at least 16 h of noise avoidance. Results: We observed that 88.3% of workers were exposed to more than 85 dB(A of occupational noise (mean: 89.3 ± 4.2 dB(A. The personal CNE (CNEp and workgroup CNE (CNEg were 100.5 ± 4.7 dB(A and 100.5 ± 2.9 dB(A, respectively. In the binary logistic regression analysis, we established a regression model with high-frequency hearing loss as the dependent variable and CNE as the independent variable. The Wald value was 5.014 with CNEp as the independent variable and 8.653 with CNEg as the independent variable. Furthermore, we found that the figure for CNEg was more similar to the stationary noise reference than CNEp was. The CNEg model was better than the CNEp model. In this circumstance, we can measure some subjects instead of the whole workgroup and save manpower. Conclusions: In a complex noise environment, the measurements of average noise exposure level of the workgroup can improve the accuracy and save manpower.

  12. Adaptive nonlocal means filtering based on local noise level for CT denoising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhoubo; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Lake, David S.; Blezek, Daniel J.; Manduca, Armando; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-01

    shape and peak frequency of the noise power spectrum better than commercial smoothing kernels, and indicate that the spatial resolution at low contrast levels is not significantly degraded. Both the subjective evaluation using the ACR phantom and the objective evaluation on a low-contrast detection task using a CHO model observer demonstrate an improvement on low-contrast performance. The GPU implementation can process and transfer 300 slice images within 5 min. On patient data, the adaptive NLM algorithm provides more effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume than standard NLM, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose. After a two week pilot study of lower dose CT urography and CT enterography exams, both GI and GU radiology groups elected to proceed with permanent implementation of adaptive NLM in their GI and GU CT practices. Conclusions: This work describes and validates a computationally efficient technique for noise map estimation directly from CT images, and an adaptive NLM filtering based on this noise map, on phantom and patient data. Both the noise map calculation and the adaptive NLM filtering can be performed in times that allow integration with clinical workflow. The adaptive NLM algorithm provides effective denoising of CT data throughout a volume, and may allow significant lowering of radiation dose

  13. Noise Pollution Control System in the Hospital Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Gallo, LM; Olivera, JM

    2016-04-01

    Problems related to environmental noise are not a new subject, but they became a major issue to solve because of the increasing, in complexity and intensity, of human activities due technological advances. Numerous international studies had dealt with the exposure of critical patients to noisy environment such as the Neonatal Intensive Care Units; their results show that there are difficulties in the organization in the developing brain, it can damage the delicate auditory structures and can cause biorhythm disorders, specially in preterm infants. The objective of this paper is to present the development and implementation of a control system that includes technical-management-training aspects to regulate the levels of specific noise sources in the neonatal hospitalization environment. For this purpose, there were applied different tools like: observations, surveys, procedures, an electronic control device and a training program for a Neonatal Service Unit. As a result, all noise sources were identified -some of them are eliminable-; all the service stable staff categories participated voluntarily; environmental noise measurements yielded values between 62.5 and 64.6 dBA and maximum were between 86.1 and 89.7 dBA; it was designed and installed a noise control device and the staff is being trained in noise reduction best practices.

  14. Noise Pollution Control System in the Hospital Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa Gallo, LM; Olivera, JM

    2016-01-01

    Problems related to environmental noise are not a new subject, but they became a major issue to solve because of the increasing, in complexity and intensity, of human activities due technological advances. Numerous international studies had dealt with the exposure of critical patients to noisy environment such as the Neonatal Intensive Care Units; their results show that there are difficulties in the organization in the developing brain, it can damage the delicate auditory structures and can cause biorhythm disorders, specially in preterm infants. The objective of this paper is to present the development and implementation of a control system that includes technical-management-training aspects to regulate the levels of specific noise sources in the neonatal hospitalization environment. For this purpose, there were applied different tools like: observations, surveys, procedures, an electronic control device and a training program for a Neonatal Service Unit. As a result, all noise sources were identified -some of them are eliminable-; all the service stable staff categories participated voluntarily; environmental noise measurements yielded values between 62.5 and 64.6 dBA and maximum were between 86.1 and 89.7 dBA; it was designed and installed a noise control device and the staff is being trained in noise reduction best practices. (paper)

  15. Preferred listening levels of mobile phone programs when considering subway interior noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyaehyoung Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, people listen to music loud using personal listening devices. Although a majority of studies have reported that the high volume played on these listening devices produces a latent risk of hearing problems, there is a lack of studies on "double noise exposures" such as environmental noise plus recreational noise. The present study measures the preferred listening levels of a mobile phone program with subway interior noise for 74 normal-hearing participants in five age groups (ranging from 20s to 60s. The speakers presented the subway interior noise at 73.45 dB, while each subject listened to three application programs [Digital Multimedia Broadcasting (DMB, music, game] for 30 min using a tablet personal computer with an earphone. The participants′ earphone volume levels were analyzed using a sound level meter and a 2cc coupler. Overall, the results showed that those in their 20s listened to the three programs significantly louder with DMB set at significantly higher volume levels than for the other programs. Higher volume levels were needed for middle frequency compared to the lower and higher frequencies. We concluded that any potential risk of noise-induced hearing loss for mobile phone users should be communicated when users listen regularly, although the volume level was not high enough that the users felt uncomfortable. When considering individual listening habits on mobile phones, further study to predict total accumulated environmental noise is still needed.

  16. Preferred listening levels of mobile phone programs when considering subway interior noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jyaehyoung; Lee, Donguk; Han, Woojae

    2016-01-01

    Today, people listen to music loud using personal listening devices. Although a majority of studies have reported that the high volume played on these listening devices produces a latent risk of hearing problems, there is a lack of studies on "double noise exposures" such as environmental noise plus recreational noise. The present study measures the preferred listening levels of a mobile phone program with subway interior noise for 74 normal-hearing participants in five age groups (ranging from 20s to 60s). The speakers presented the subway interior noise at 73.45 dB, while each subject listened to three application programs [Digital Multimedia Broadcasting (DMB), music, game] for 30 min using a tablet personal computer with an earphone. The participants' earphone volume levels were analyzed using a sound level meter and a 2cc coupler. Overall, the results showed that those in their 20s listened to the three programs significantly louder with DMB set at significantly higher volume levels than for the other programs. Higher volume levels were needed for middle frequency compared to the lower and higher frequencies. We concluded that any potential risk of noise-induced hearing loss for mobile phone users should be communicated when users listen regularly, although the volume level was not high enough that the users felt uncomfortable. When considering individual listening habits on mobile phones, further study to predict total accumulated environmental noise is still needed.

  17. A two-microphone noise reduction system for cochlear implant users with nearby microphones. Part II: Performance Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Kompis, Martin; Bertram, Matthias; Senn, Pascal; Müller, Joachim; Pelizzone, Marco; Häusler, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Users of cochlear implants (auditory aids, which stimulate the auditory nerve electrically at the inner ear) often suffer from poor speech understanding in noise. We evaluate a small (intermicrophone distance 7 mm) and computationally inexpensive adaptive noise reduction system suitable for behind-the-ear cochlear implant speech processors. The system is evaluated in simulated and real, anechoic and reverberant environments. Results from simulations show improvements of 3.4 to 9.3 dB in signa...

  18. Dimensioning BCH codes for coherent DQPSK systems with laser phase noise and cycle slips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, Miu Yoong; Larsen, Knud J.; Jacobsen, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Forward error correction (FEC) plays a vital role in coherent optical systems employing multi-level modulation. However, much of coding theory assumes that additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) is dominant, whereas coherent optical systems have significant phase noise (PN) in addition to AWGN...... approach for a target post-FEC BER of 10-5. Codes dimensioned with our bivariate binomial model meet the target within 0.2-dB signal-to-noise ratio....

  19. Noise of screen-film systems: origins and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, H

    1983-01-01

    When using the more sensitive rare-earth intensifying screens in radiography applying the screen-film system, one has to cope with an increase in quantum noise. Measurement of Wiener spectra will help to determine the noise of the film. With an appropriate apparatus, the noise spectra of screen-film systems of different sensitivity have been ascertained and compared with theoretical assessments. The integral noise made up of the components film noise, screen noise and quantum noise have been thoroughly analysed. Adequate choice of radiographic conditions (such as modification of film exposure time via the screen, change of tube voltage) will affect the number of absorbed X-ray quanta in the luminous substance and thus the quantum noise which, as was found out, largely contributes to the integral noise together with another factor, graininess of the film. The study shows that although quantum noise has to be cut back, this should not be done at any price, and due regard must be paid to other factors influencing the image quality of the system, such as contrast and MTF.

  20. Effect of beat noise on the performance of two-dimensional time-spreading/wavelength-hopping optical code-division multiple-access systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, T.; Harle, D.; Andonovic, I.; Meenakshi, M.

    2005-03-01

    The effect of beat noise on optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) systems using a range of two-dimensional (2-D) time-spreading/wavelength-hopping (TW) code families is presented. A derivation of a general formula for the error probability of the system is given. The properties of the 2-D codes--namely, the structure, length, and cross-correlation characteristics--are found to have a great influence on system performance. Improved performance can be obtained by use of real-time dynamic thresholding.

  1. Feedback damping of a microcantilever at room temperature to the minimum vibration amplitude limited by the noise level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Y; Kanegae, R

    2016-06-17

    Cooling the vibration amplitude of a microcantilever as low as possible is important to improve the sensitivity and resolutions of various types of scanning type microscopes and sensors making use of it. When the vibration amplitude is controlled to be smaller using a feed back control system, it is known that the obtainable minimum amplitude of the vibration is limited by the floor noise level of the detection system. In this study, we demonstrated that the amplitude of the thermal vibration of a microcantilever was suppressed to be about 0.15 pmHz(-1/2), which is the same value with the floor noise level, without the assistance of external cryogenic cooling. We think that one of the reason why we could reach the smaller amplitude at room temperature is due to stiffer spring constant of the lever, which leads to higher natural frequency and consequently lower floor noise level. The other reason is considered to be due to the increase in the laser power for the diagnostics, which lead to the decrease in the signal to noise ratio determined by the optical shot noise.

  2. Effects of pedagogical ideology on the perceived loudness and noise levels in preschools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Valdis; Rantala, Leena M; Oskarsson, Gudmundur Kr; Sala, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    High activity noise levels that result in detrimental effects on speech communication have been measured in preschools. To find out if different pedagogical ideologies affect the perceived loudness and levels of noise, a questionnaire study inquiring about the experience of loudness and voice symptoms was carried out in Iceland in eight private preschools, called "Hjalli model", and in six public preschools. Noise levels were also measured in the preschools. Background variables (stress level, age, length of working career, education, smoking, and number of children per teacher) were also analyzed in order to determine how much they contributed toward voice symptoms and the experience of noisiness. Results indicate that pedagogical ideology is a significant factor for predicting noise and its consequences. Teachers in the preschool with tighter pedagogical control of discipline (the "Hjalli model") experienced lower activity noise loudness than teachers in the preschool with a more relaxed control of behavior (public preschool). Lower noise levels were also measured in the "Hjalli model" preschool and fewer "Hjalli model" teachers reported voice symptoms. Public preschool teachers experienced more stress than "Hjalli model" teachers and the stress level was, indeed, the background variable that best explained the voice symptoms and the teacher's perception of a noisy environment. Discipline, structure, and organization in the type of activity predicted the activity noise level better than the number of children in the group. Results indicate that pedagogical ideology is a significant factor for predicting self-reported noise and its consequences.

  3. Bayesian analysis of radial velocity data of GJ667C with correlated noise: evidence for only two planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroz, F.; Hobson, M. P.

    2014-02-01

    GJ667C is the least massive component of a triple star system which lies at a distance of about 6.8 pc (22.1 light-year) from the Earth. GJ667C has received much attention recently due to the claims that it hosts up to seven planets including three super-Earths inside the habitable zone. We present a Bayesian technique for the analysis of radial velocity (RV) data sets in the presence of correlated noise component (`red noise'), with unknown parameters. We also introduce hyper-parameters in our model in order to deal statistically with under- or overestimated error bars on measured RVs as well as inconsistencies between different data sets. By applying this method to the RV data set of GJ667C, we show that this data set contains a significant correlated (red) noise component with correlation time-scale for HARPS data of the order of 9 d. Our analysis shows that the data only provide strong evidence for the presence of two planets: GJ667Cb and c with periods 7.19 and 28.13 d, respectively, with some hints towards the presence of a third signal with period 91 d. The planetary nature of this third signal is not clear and additional RV observations are required for its confirmation. Previous claims of the detection of additional planets in this system are due the erroneous assumption of white noise. Using the standard white noise assumption, our method leads to the detection of up to five signals in this system. We also find that with the red noise model, the measurement uncertainties from HARPS for this system are underestimated at the level of ˜50 per cent.

  4. Noise propagation in two-step series MAPK cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Dhananjaneyulu

    Full Text Available Series MAPK enzymatic cascades, ubiquitously found in signaling networks, act as signal amplifiers and play a key role in processing information during signal transduction in cells. In activated cascades, cell-to-cell variability or noise is bound to occur and thereby strongly affects the cellular response. Commonly used linearization method (LM applied to Langevin type stochastic model of the MAPK cascade fails to accurately predict intrinsic noise propagation in the cascade. We prove this by using extensive stochastic simulations for various ranges of biochemical parameters. This failure is due to the fact that the LM ignores the nonlinear effects on the noise. However, LM provides a good estimate of the extrinsic noise propagation. We show that the correct estimate of intrinsic noise propagation in signaling networks that contain at least one enzymatic step can be obtained only through stochastic simulations. Noise propagation in the cascade depends on the underlying biochemical parameters which are often unavailable. Based on a combination of global sensitivity analysis (GSA and stochastic simulations, we developed a systematic methodology to characterize noise propagation in the cascade. GSA predicts that noise propagation in MAPK cascade is sensitive to the total number of upstream enzyme molecules and the total number of molecules of the two substrates involved in the cascade. We argue that the general systematic approach proposed and demonstrated on MAPK cascade must accompany noise propagation studies in biological networks.

  5. 33 CFR 149.697 - What are the requirements for a noise level survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Equipment Noise Limits § 149.697 What are the requirements for a noise level survey? (a) A survey... measured over 12 hours to derive a time weighted average (TWA) using a sound level meter and an A-weighted filter or equivalent device. (c) If the noise level throughout a space is determined to exceed 85 db(A...

  6. Determination of the level of noise in nurseries and pre-schools and the teachers′ level of annoyance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozan Gokdogan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this article is to determine the level of noise in nurseries and pre-schools and also to compare measured levels with standard levels and evaluate the teachers’ level of annoyance. Materials and Methods: The level of noise was measured in three different schools. A total of 162 students, whose ages were between 3 and 6 years, and 12 teachers were included the study. Every age groups’ level of noise was measured during sleeping, gaming, and eating activity. In addition, teachers’ annoyance was assessed in different age groups. Results: The 4- to 6-year-old groups were found to have higher level of sounds than 3-year-old group. Eating period was found to be the highest level of sound whereas sleeping was found the lowest. Furthermore, teachers’ annoyance was found higher as the age decreased. Conclusion: Nurseries and pre-schools have noisy environment both for the students and the teachers. High level of noise, which has bad effects on health, is a public health problem. Both the students’ families and teachers must be aware of this annoying situation.

  7. Phase transitions in distributed control systems with multiplicative noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Nicolas; Bamieh, Bassam; Mitra, Partha; Sire, Clément

    2018-01-01

    Contemporary technological challenges often involve many degrees of freedom in a distributed or networked setting. Three aspects are notable: the variables are usually associated with the nodes of a graph with limited communication resources, hindering centralized control; the communication is subject to noise; and the number of variables can be very large. These three aspects make tools and techniques from statistical physics particularly suitable for the performance analysis of such networked systems in the limit of many variables (analogous to the thermodynamic limit in statistical physics). Perhaps not surprisingly, phase-transition like phenomena appear in these systems, where a sharp change in performance can be observed with a smooth parameter variation, with the change becoming discontinuous or singular in the limit of infinite system size. In this paper, we analyze the so called network consensus problem, prototypical of the above considerations, that has previously been analyzed mostly in the context of additive noise. We show that qualitatively new phase-transition like phenomena appear for this problem in the presence of multiplicative noise. Depending on dimensions, and on the presence or absence of a conservation law, the system performance shows a discontinuous change at a threshold value of the multiplicative noise strength. In the absence of the conservation law, and for graph spectral dimension less than two, the multiplicative noise threshold (the stability margin of the control problem) is zero. This is reminiscent of the absence of robust controllers for certain classes of centralized control problems. Although our study involves a ‘toy’ model, we believe that the qualitative features are generic, with implications for the robust stability of distributed control systems, as well as the effect of roundoff errors and communication noise on distributed algorithms.

  8. Noise levels from toys and recreational articles for children and teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellstrom, P A; Dengerink, H A; Axelsson, A

    1992-10-01

    This study examined the noise level emitted by toys and recreational articles used by children and teenagers. The results indicate that many of the items tested emit sufficiently intense noise to be a source of noise induced hearing loss in school-age children. While the baby toys provided noise exposure within the limits of national regulations, they are most intense in a frequency range that corresponds to the resonance frequency of the external auditory canal of very young children. Hobby motors emit noise that may require protection depending upon the length of use. Fire-crackers and cap guns emit impulse noises that exceed even conservative standards for noise exposure.

  9. I'm trying to heal...noise levels in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milette, Isabelle H; Carnevale, Franco A

    2003-01-01

    The literature demonstrates clearly that most intensive care units exceed the standard recommendations for noise levels in hospitals, and that high noise levels have negative impacts on patients and staff. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of noise in a PICU and compare it to the recommendations of international bodies. We outline recommendations to promote the awareness of this problem and suggest strategies to decrease the level of noise in a PICU. The orientations of these strategies are threefold: 1) architectural-acoustic design, 2) equipment design and, most importantly, 3) staff education.

  10. Application of the kurtosis statistic to the evaluation of the risk of hearing loss in workers exposed to high-level complex noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Ming; Qiu, Wei; Zeng, Lin; Chen, Shan-Song; Cheng, Xiao-Ru; Davis, Robert I; Hamernik, Roger P

    2010-08-01

    Develop dose-response relations for two groups of industrial workers exposed to Gaussian or non-Gaussian (complex) types of continuous noises and to investigate what role, if any, the kurtosis statistic can play in the evaluation of industrial noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Audiometric and noise exposure data were acquired on a population (N = 195) of screened workers from a textile manufacturing plant and a metal fabrication facility located in Henan province of China. Thirty-two of the subjects were exposed to non-Gaussian (non-G) noise and 163 were exposed to a Gaussian (G) continuous noise. Each subject was given a general physical and an otologic examination. Hearing threshold levels (0.5-8.0 kHz) were age adjusted (ISI-1999) and the prevalence of NIHL at 3, 4, or 6 kHz was determined. The kurtosis metric, which is sensitive to the peak and temporal characteristics of a noise, was introduced into the calculation of the cumulative noise exposure metric. Using the prevalence of hearing loss and the cumulative noise exposure metric, a dose-response relation for the G and non-G noise-exposed groups was constructed. An analysis of the noise environments in the two plants showed that the noise exposures in the textile plant were of a Gaussian type with an Leq(A)8hr that varied from 96 to 105 dB whereas the exposures in the metal fabrication facility with an Leq(A)8hr = 95 dB were of a non-G type containing high levels (up to 125 dB peak SPL) of impact noise. The kurtosis statistic was used to quantify the deviation of the non-G noise environment from the Gaussian. The dose-response relation for the non-G noise-exposed subjects showed a higher prevalence of hearing loss for a comparable cumulative noise exposure than did the G noise-exposed subjects. By introducing the kurtosis variable into the temporal component of the cumulative noise exposure calculation, the two dose-response curves could be made to overlap, essentially yielding an equivalent noise

  11. Experimental Hamiltonian identification for controlled two-level systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmer, S.G.; Kolli, A.; Oi, D.K.L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a strategy to empirically determine the internal and control Hamiltonians for an unknown two-level system (black box) subject to various (piecewise constant) control fields when direct readout by measurement is limited to a single, fixed observable

  12. Noise and Vibrations Measurements. External noise and vibrations measurements for offshore SODAR application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormel, F.T.; Eecen, P.J.; Herman, S.A.

    2003-10-01

    The partners in the WISE project investigate whether application of the SODAR (sonic detection and ranging) measurement technique in wind energy experimental work is feasible as a replacement for cup anemometers, wind direction sensors and tall meteorological masts. In Work Package 2 of the WISE project extensive controlled experiments with the SODAR are performed. For example SODAR measurements are compared with measurements from nearby masts and different brands of SODARs are compared. Part of the work package is the measurement of vibration and noise on an offshore SODAR system. The results of these measurements are presented in this report. ECN performed measurements at an offshore location to investigate the influence of noise and vibrations on the performance of a MiniSODAR measurement system. The aim of the measurements is to quantify the effect of these external noise and vibrations disturbances on the MiniSODAR's performance. Measurements on an identical SODAR system onshore are carried out to compare the disturbances of offshore and onshore external conditions. The effect of background noise on SODAR operation has clearly been established in literature. Therefore, measurements have been performed only to establish the absolute sound pressure levels. This is done at the Measuring Platform Noordwijk (MPN) located in the North Sea, nine kilometres out of the coast at Noordwijk, The Netherlands, and at two locations onshore. At the MPN-platform, the SODAR has been moved from the middle deck to the upper deck to diminish the influence of the diesel generator needed for the electric powering of the island. Although the absolute sound pressure level became higher at the new location, this level became lower at the most important frequencies inside the SODAR, due to the use of absorbing foam. With regards to the sound pressure level the move improved the situation. The sound pressure levels measured offshore were 6 to 15 dB higher than for the two locations

  13. Two-level systems driven by large-amplitude fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashhab, S.; Johansson, J. R.; Zagoskin, A. M.; Nori, Franco

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level system subject to driving by large-amplitude external fields, focusing on the resonance properties in the case of driving around the region of avoided level crossing. In particular, we consider three main questions that characterize resonance dynamics: (1) the resonance condition (2) the frequency of the resulting oscillations on resonance, and (3) the width of the resonance. We identify the regions of validity of different approximations. In a large region of the parameter space, we use a geometric picture in order to obtain both a simple understanding of the dynamics and quantitative results. The geometric approach is obtained by dividing the evolution into discrete time steps, with each time step described by either a phase shift on the basis states or a coherent mixing process corresponding to a Landau-Zener crossing. We compare the results of the geometric picture with those of a rotating wave approximation. We also comment briefly on the prospects of employing strong driving as a useful tool to manipulate two-level systems

  14. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions

  15. Effects of pedagogical ideology on the perceived loudness and noise levels in preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Valdis; Rantala, Leena M.; Oskarsson, Gudmundur Kr.; Sala, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    High activity noise levels that result in detrimental effects on speech communication have been measured in preschools. To find out if different pedagogical ideologies affect the perceived loudness and levels of noise, a questionnaire study inquiring about the experience of loudness and voice symptoms was carried out in Iceland in eight private preschools, called “Hjalli model”, and in six public preschools. Noise levels were also measured in the preschools. Background variables (stress level, age, length of working career, education, smoking, and number of children per teacher) were also analyzed in order to determine how much they contributed toward voice symptoms and the experience of noisiness. Results indicate that pedagogical ideology is a significant factor for predicting noise and its consequences. Teachers in the preschool with tighter pedagogical control of discipline (the “Hjalli model”) experienced lower activity noise loudness than teachers in the preschool with a more relaxed control of behavior (public preschool). Lower noise levels were also measured in the “Hjalli model” preschool and fewer “Hjalli model” teachers reported voice symptoms. Public preschool teachers experienced more stress than “Hjalli model” teachers and the stress level was, indeed, the background variable that best explained the voice symptoms and the teacher's perception of a noisy environment. Discipline, structure, and organization in the type of activity predicted the activity noise level better than the number of children in the group. Results indicate that pedagogical ideology is a significant factor for predicting self-reported noise and its consequences. PMID:26356370

  16. Resonant retuning of Rabi oscillations in a two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonov, A.V.; Feranchuk, I.D.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of a two-level system in a single-mode quantum field is considered beyond the rotating wave approximation. The existence of quasi-degenerate energy levels is shown to influence the essential characteristics of temporal and amplitude Rabi oscillations of the system in a resonant manner. (authors)

  17. Characterization of acoustic noise in a neonatal intensive care unit MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, Jean A.; Li, Yu; Pratt, Ronald G.; Loew, Wolfgang; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Dumoulin, Charles L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Baroch, Kelly A. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Audiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Merhar, Stephanie L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-08-15

    To eliminate the medical risks and logistical challenges of transporting infants from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the radiology department for magnetic resonance imaging, a small-footprint 1.5-T MRI scanner has been developed for neonatal imaging within the NICU. MRI is known to be noisy, and exposure to excessive acoustic noise has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in the term and preterm infant. To measure and compare the acoustic noise properties of the NICU MRI system against those of a conventional 1.5-T MRI system. We performed sound pressure level measurements in the NICU MRI scanner and in a conventional adult-size whole-body 1.5-T MRI system. Sound pressure level measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level value, reported in unweighted (dB) and A-weighted (dBA) decibels for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 73.8 dB and 88 dBA for the NICU scanner, and 87 dB and 98.4 dBA for the conventional MRI scanner. The sound pressure level values measured on the NICU scanner for each of the six MR imaging pulse sequences were consistently and significantly (P = 0.03) lower, with an average difference of 14.2 dB (range 10-21 dB) and 11 dBA (range 5-18 dBA). The sound pressure level frequency response of the two MR systems showed a similar harmonic structure above 200 Hz for all imaging sequences. The amplitude, however, was appreciably lower for the NICU scanner, by as much as 30 dB, for frequencies below 200 Hz. The NICU MRI system is quieter than conventional MRI scanners, improving safety for the neonate and facilitating siting of the unit within the NICU. (orig.)

  18. Characterization of acoustic noise in a neonatal intensive care unit MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkach, Jean A.; Li, Yu; Pratt, Ronald G.; Loew, Wolfgang; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Baroch, Kelly A.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.

    2014-01-01

    To eliminate the medical risks and logistical challenges of transporting infants from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the radiology department for magnetic resonance imaging, a small-footprint 1.5-T MRI scanner has been developed for neonatal imaging within the NICU. MRI is known to be noisy, and exposure to excessive acoustic noise has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in the term and preterm infant. To measure and compare the acoustic noise properties of the NICU MRI system against those of a conventional 1.5-T MRI system. We performed sound pressure level measurements in the NICU MRI scanner and in a conventional adult-size whole-body 1.5-T MRI system. Sound pressure level measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level value, reported in unweighted (dB) and A-weighted (dBA) decibels for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 73.8 dB and 88 dBA for the NICU scanner, and 87 dB and 98.4 dBA for the conventional MRI scanner. The sound pressure level values measured on the NICU scanner for each of the six MR imaging pulse sequences were consistently and significantly (P = 0.03) lower, with an average difference of 14.2 dB (range 10-21 dB) and 11 dBA (range 5-18 dBA). The sound pressure level frequency response of the two MR systems showed a similar harmonic structure above 200 Hz for all imaging sequences. The amplitude, however, was appreciably lower for the NICU scanner, by as much as 30 dB, for frequencies below 200 Hz. The NICU MRI system is quieter than conventional MRI scanners, improving safety for the neonate and facilitating siting of the unit within the NICU. (orig.)

  19. Sea-Level Trend Uncertainty With Pacific Climatic Variability and Temporally-Correlated Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Sam; Watson, Christopher S.; Legrésy, Benoît; King, Matt A.; Church, John A.; Bos, Machiel S.

    2018-03-01

    Recent studies have identified climatic drivers of the east-west see-saw of Pacific Ocean satellite altimetry era sea level trends and a number of sea-level trend and acceleration assessments attempt to account for this. We investigate the effect of Pacific climate variability, together with temporally-correlated noise, on linear trend error estimates and determine new time-of-emergence (ToE) estimates across the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Sea-level trend studies often advocate the use of auto-regressive (AR) noise models to adequately assess formal uncertainties, yet sea level often exhibits colored but non-AR(1) noise. Standard error estimates are over- or under-estimated by an AR(1) model for much of the Indo-Pacific sea level. Allowing for PDO and ENSO variability in the trend estimate only reduces standard errors across the tropics and we find noise characteristics are largely unaffected. Of importance for trend and acceleration detection studies, formal error estimates remain on average up to 1.6 times those from an AR(1) model for long-duration tide gauge data. There is an even chance that the observed trend from the satellite altimetry era exceeds the noise in patches of the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans and the south-west and north-east Pacific gyres. By including climate indices in the trend analysis, the time it takes for the observed linear sea-level trend to emerge from the noise reduces by up to 2 decades.

  20. Seismic noise level variation in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, D.; Shin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The variations of seismic background noise in South Korea have been investigated by means of power spectral analysis. The Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and the Korea Meteorological Administation (KMA) have national wide seismic networks in South Korea, and, in the end of 2007, there are 30 broadband stations which have been operating for more than a year. In this study, we have estimated the power spectral density of seismic noise for 30 broadband stations from 2005 to 2007. Since we estimate PSDs from a large dataset of continuous waveform in this study, a robust PSD estimate of McNamara and Buland (2004) is used. In the frequency range 1-5 Hz, the diurnal variations of noise are observed at most of stations, which are especially larger at coastal stations and at insular than at inland. Some stations shows daily difference of diurnal variations, which represents that cultural activities contribute to the noise level of a station. The variation of number of triggered stations, however, shows that cultural noise has little influence on the detection capability of seismic network in South Korea. Seasonal variations are observed well in the range 0.1-0.5 Hz, while much less found in the frequency range 1-5 Hz. We observed that strong peaks in the range 0.1-0.5 Hz occur at the summer when Pacific typhoons are close to the Korean Peninsula.

  1. Excitation of graphene plasmons as an analogy with the two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Jiahui; Lv, Bo; Li, Rujiang; Ma, Ruyu; Chen, Wan; Meng, Fanyi

    2016-01-01

    The excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs) is presented as an interaction between the GPs and the incident electromagnetic field. In this Letter, the excitation of GPs in a plasmonic system is interpreted as an analogy with the two-level system by taking the two-coupled graphene-covered gratings as an example. Based on the equivalent circuit theory, the excitation of GPs in the graphene-covered grating is equivalent to the resonance of an oscillator. Thus, according to the governing equation, the electric currents at the resonant frequencies for two-coupled graphene-covered gratings correspond to the energy states in a two-level system. In addition, the excitation of GPs in different two-coupled graphene-covered gratings is numerically studied to validate our theoretical model. Our work provides an intuitive understanding of the excitation of GPs using an analogy with the two-level system. - Highlights: • The excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs) in graphene-covered grating is equivalent to the resonance of an oscillator. • We establish the equivalent circuit of two-level system to analyze the resonant character. • The excitation of GPs in different two-coupled graphene-covered gratings are numerically studied to validate our theoretical model.

  2. Excitation of graphene plasmons as an analogy with the two-level system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiahui [Microwave and Electromagnetic Laboratory, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, Xidazhi Street, Nangang District, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province (China); Lv, Bo, E-mail: lb19840313@126.com [Microwave and Electromagnetic Laboratory, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, Xidazhi Street, Nangang District, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province (China); Li, Rujiang [College of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Ma, Ruyu; Chen, Wan; Meng, Fanyi [Microwave and Electromagnetic Laboratory, Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92, Xidazhi Street, Nangang District, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province (China)

    2016-02-15

    The excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs) is presented as an interaction between the GPs and the incident electromagnetic field. In this Letter, the excitation of GPs in a plasmonic system is interpreted as an analogy with the two-level system by taking the two-coupled graphene-covered gratings as an example. Based on the equivalent circuit theory, the excitation of GPs in the graphene-covered grating is equivalent to the resonance of an oscillator. Thus, according to the governing equation, the electric currents at the resonant frequencies for two-coupled graphene-covered gratings correspond to the energy states in a two-level system. In addition, the excitation of GPs in different two-coupled graphene-covered gratings is numerically studied to validate our theoretical model. Our work provides an intuitive understanding of the excitation of GPs using an analogy with the two-level system. - Highlights: • The excitation of graphene plasmons (GPs) in graphene-covered grating is equivalent to the resonance of an oscillator. • We establish the equivalent circuit of two-level system to analyze the resonant character. • The excitation of GPs in different two-coupled graphene-covered gratings are numerically studied to validate our theoretical model.

  3. Giant 1/f noise in two-dimensional polycrystalline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snarskii, A.; Bezsudnov, I.

    2008-01-01

    The behaviour of excess (1/f noise) in two-dimensional polycrystalline media is investigated. On the base of current trap model, it is shown that there exists a certain anisotropy value of conductivity tensor for polycrystalline media when the amplitude of 1/f noise becomes giant

  4. Noise suppression in duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Barfeh, M.A.G.

    2001-01-01

    In air-conditioning system the noise generated by supply fan is carried by conditioned air through the ductwork. The noise created in ductwork run may be transmission, regenerative and ductborne. Transmission noise is fan noise, regenerative noise is due to turbulence in flow and ductborne noise is the noise radiating from duct to surroundings. Some noise is attenuated in ducts also but if noise level is high then it needs to be attenuated. A simple mitre bend can attenuate-noise. This principle is extended to V and M-shape ducts with inside lining of fibreglass, which gave maximum attenuation of 77 dB and 62 dB respectively corresponding to 8 kHz frequency as compared to mitre, bend giving maximum 18 dB attenuation. Sound level meter measured sound levels with octave band filter and tests were conducted in anechoic room. A V-shape attenuator can be used at fan outlet and high frequency noise can be minimized greatly. (author)

  5. Automated pattern recognition system for noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sides, W.H. Jr.; Piety, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    A pattern recognition system was developed at ORNL for on-line monitoring of noise signals from sensors in a nuclear power plant. The system continuousy measures the power spectral density (PSD) values of the signals and the statistical characteristics of the PSDs in unattended operation. Through statistical comparison of current with past PSDs (pattern recognition), the system detects changes in the noise signals. Because the noise signals contain information about the current operational condition of the plant, a change in these signals could indicate a change, either normal or abnormal, in the operational condition

  6. Superlinearly scalable noise robustness of redundant coupled dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F; Ditto, William L

    2016-03-01

    We illustrate through theory and numerical simulations that redundant coupled dynamical systems can be extremely robust against local noise in comparison to uncoupled dynamical systems evolving in the same noisy environment. Previous studies have shown that the noise robustness of redundant coupled dynamical systems is linearly scalable and deviations due to noise can be minimized by increasing the number of coupled units. Here, we demonstrate that the noise robustness can actually be scaled superlinearly if some conditions are met and very high noise robustness can be realized with very few coupled units. We discuss these conditions and show that this superlinear scalability depends on the nonlinearity of the individual dynamical units. The phenomenon is demonstrated in discrete as well as continuous dynamical systems. This superlinear scalability not only provides us an opportunity to exploit the nonlinearity of physical systems without being bogged down by noise but may also help us in understanding the functional role of coupled redundancy found in many biological systems. Moreover, engineers can exploit superlinear noise suppression by starting a coupled system near (not necessarily at) the appropriate initial condition.

  7. Maximizing noise energy for noise-masking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules Étienne, Cédric; Arleo, Angelo; Allard, Rémy

    2017-08-01

    Noise-masking experiments are widely used to investigate visual functions. To be useful, noise generally needs to be strong enough to noticeably impair performance, but under some conditions, noise does not impair performance even when its contrast approaches the maximal displayable limit of 100 %. To extend the usefulness of noise-masking paradigms over a wider range of conditions, the present study developed a noise with great masking strength. There are two typical ways of increasing masking strength without exceeding the limited contrast range: use binary noise instead of Gaussian noise or filter out frequencies that are not relevant to the task (i.e., which can be removed without affecting performance). The present study combined these two approaches to further increase masking strength. We show that binarizing the noise after the filtering process substantially increases the energy at frequencies within the pass-band of the filter given equated total contrast ranges. A validation experiment showed that similar performances were obtained using binarized-filtered noise and filtered noise (given equated noise energy at the frequencies within the pass-band) suggesting that the binarization operation, which substantially reduced the contrast range, had no significant impact on performance. We conclude that binarized-filtered noise (and more generally, truncated-filtered noise) can substantially increase the energy of the noise at frequencies within the pass-band. Thus, given a limited contrast range, binarized-filtered noise can display higher energy levels than Gaussian noise and thereby widen the range of conditions over which noise-masking paradigms can be useful.

  8. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  9. Application of system concept in vibration and noise reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHENG Meiping

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although certain vibration and noise control technologies are maturing, such as vibration absorption, vibration isolation, sound absorption and sound insulation, and new methods for specific frequency bands or special environments have been proposed unceasingly, there is still no guarantee that practical effective vibration and noise reduction can be obtained. An important constraint for vibration and noise reduction is the lack of a system concept, and the integrity and relevance of such practical systems as ship structure have not obtained enough attention. We have tried to use the system engineering theory in guiding vibration and noise reduction, and have already achieved certain effects. Based on the system concept, the noise control of a petroleum pipeline production workshop has been completed satisfactorily, and the abnormal noise source identification of an airplane has been accomplished successfully. We want to share our experience and suggestions to promote the popularization of the system engineering theory in vibration and noise control.

  10. Coupling of relative intensity noise and pathlength noise to the length measurement in the optical metrology system of LISA Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, Andreas; the LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a technology demonstration mission for the space-based gravitational wave observatory, LISA. It demonstrated that the performance requirements for the interferometric measurement of two test masses in free fall can be met. An important part of the data analysis is to identify the limiting noise sources. [1] This measurement is performed with heterodyne interferometry. The performance of this optical metrology system (OMS) at high frequencies is limited by sensing noise. One such noise source is Relative Intensity Noise (RIN). RIN is a property of the laser, and the photodiode current generated by the interferometer signal contains frequency dependant RIN. From this electric signal the phasemeter calculates the phase change and laser power, and the coupling of RIN into the measurement signal depends on the noise frequency. RIN at DC, at the heterodyne frequency and at two times the heterodyne frequency couples into the phase. Another important noise at high frequencies is path length noise. To reduce the impact this noise is suppressed with a control loop. Path length noise not suppressed will couple directly into the length measurement. The subtraction techniques of both noise sources depend on the phase difference between the reference signal and the measurement signal, and thus on the test mass position. During normal operations we position the test mass at the interferometric zero, which is optimal for noise subtraction purposes. This paper will show results from an in-flight experiment where the test mass position was changed to make the position dependant noise visible.

  11. Noise Pollution in Turkish Elementary Schools: Evaluation of Noise Pollution Awareness and Sensitivity Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulunuz, Nermin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates noise pollution levels in two elementary schools. Also, "noise level awareness and sensitivity training" was given for reducing noise pollution, and the effects and results of this training were evaluated. "Sensitivity" training was given to 611 students and 48 teachers in a private and a public school.…

  12. The magnitude and colour of noise in genetic negative feedback systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Bowsher, Clive G

    2012-08-01

    The comparative ability of transcriptional and small RNA-mediated negative feedback to control fluctuations or 'noise' in gene expression remains unexplored. Both autoregulatory mechanisms usually suppress the average (mean) of the protein level and its variability across cells. The variance of the number of proteins per molecule of mean expression is also typically reduced compared with the unregulated system, but is almost never below the value of one. This relative variance often substantially exceeds a recently obtained, theoretical lower limit for biochemical feedback systems. Adding the transcriptional or small RNA-mediated control has different effects. Transcriptional autorepression robustly reduces both the relative variance and persistence (lifetime) of fluctuations. Both benefits combine to reduce noise in downstream gene expression. Autorepression via small RNA can achieve more extreme noise reduction and typically has less effect on the mean expression level. However, it is often more costly to implement and is more sensitive to rate parameters. Theoretical lower limits on the relative variance are known to decrease slowly as a measure of the cost per molecule of mean expression increases. However, the proportional increase in cost to achieve substantial noise suppression can be different away from the optimal frontier-for transcriptional autorepression, it is frequently negligible.

  13. Projected contributions of future wind farm development to community noise and annoyance levels in Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield Aslund, Melissa L.; Ollson, Christopher A.; Knopper, Loren D.

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbines produce sound during their operation; therefore, jurisdictions around the world have developed regulations regarding the placement of electricity generating wind farms with the intent of preventing unacceptable levels of ‘community noise’ in their vicinity. However, as survey results indicate that the relationship between wind turbine noise and annoyance may differ from noise-annoyance relationships for other common noise sources (e.g., rail, traffic), there are concerns that the application of general noise guidelines for wind turbines may lead to unacceptably high levels of annoyance in communities. In this study, previously published survey results that quantified wind turbine noise and self-reported annoyance were applied to the predicted noise levels (from turbines and transformers) for over 8000 receptors in the vicinity of 13 planned wind power developments in the province of Ontario, Canada. The results of this analysis indicate that the current wind turbine noise restrictions in Ontario will limit community exposure to wind turbine related noise such that levels of annoyance are unlikely to exceed previously established background levels of noise-related annoyance from other common noise sources. This provides valuable context that should be considered by policy-makers when evaluating the potential impacts of wind turbine noise on the community. -- highlights: •Wind turbine noise-annoyance relationship used to predict annoyance in Ontario. •Noise annoyance predicted to be <8% for non-participants <1 km from turbines. •Predicted levels of wind turbine noise annoyance similar to that from traffic noise. •Wind turbine noise annoyance not expected to exceed existing background levels

  14. Honey and Vitamin E Restore the Plasma Level of Gonadal Hormones and Improve the Fertilization Capacity in Noise-Stressed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabzadeh Asghar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise as a natural teratogenic factor affects the body systems including the reproductive organ to reduce the fertility rate and fetus health. Honey and vitamin E as natural antioxidants protects the sperm released from the reproductive system. This study was conducted to examine the efficacy of honey and vitamin E on fertilization capacity in noise-exposed rats by assessing plasma sexual hormones levels i.e., follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and testosterone, altered in relation with noise stress. Materials and Methods: This study was targeted the 24 male rats that randomly were divided into four equal groups including one control group (unexposed to noise stress and three experimental groups pre-induced with noise stress for 50 days and then divided as: no treated, honey and vitamin E treated groups, respectively. Then, the blood samples of experimental and control groups were taken, and the serum level of the sexual hormones was analyzed. Finally, to investigate the fertility capacity of rats, the male rats of all groups were coupled with the female ones. Results: Our results showed that FSH and LH level in noise stressed male rats raised, and the testosterone secretion decreased compared to the control group. Moreover, noise stress injury could reduce weight and the survival rate of the fetus. However, the honey and vitamin E improved the testosterone concentration, declined the plasma FSH and LH level in noise - exposed rats and enhanced the fertility rate. Conclusion: These findings may also spell out a natural curative approach rather than pharmaceutical drugs to optimize of neuroendocrine gonadal axis and testicular integrity induced by pathogenesis stress, i.e., noise and enhance the male fertility capacity.

  15. Adaptive iterated function systems filter for images highly corrupted with fixed - Value impulse noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugavadivu, P.; Eliahim Jeevaraj, P. S.

    2014-06-01

    The Adaptive Iterated Functions Systems (AIFS) Filter presented in this paper has an outstanding potential to attenuate the fixed-value impulse noise in images. This filter has two distinct phases namely noise detection and noise correction which uses Measure of Statistics and Iterated Function Systems (IFS) respectively. The performance of AIFS filter is assessed by three metrics namely, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR), Mean Structural Similarity Index Matrix (MSSIM) and Human Visual Perception (HVP). The quantitative measures PSNR and MSSIM endorse the merit of this filter in terms of degree of noise suppression and details/edge preservation respectively, in comparison with the high performing filters reported in the recent literature. The qualitative measure HVP confirms the noise suppression ability of the devised filter. This computationally simple noise filter broadly finds application wherein the images are highly degraded by fixed-value impulse noise.

  16. Maintaining quantum coherence in the presence of noise through state monitoring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Konrad, T

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available in the presence of classical dephasing and amplitude noise, by simulating such measurements on a two-level system undergoing Rabi oscillations. Finite estimation fidelity is found to persist indefinitely after the decoherence times set by the noise fields...

  17. Crossing rule for a PT-symmetric two-level time-periodic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2011-01-01

    For a two-level system in a time-periodic field we show that in the non-Hermitian PT case the level crossing is of two quasistationary states that have the same dynamical symmetry property. At the field's parameters where the two levels which have the same dynamical symmetry cross, the corresponding quasienergy states coalesce and a self-orthogonal state is obtained. This situation is very different from the Hermitian case where a crossing of two quasienergy levels happens only when the corresponding two quasistationary states have different dynamical symmetry properties and, unlike the situation in the non-Hermitian case, the spectrum remains complete also when the two levels cross.

  18. Evaluation of noise level at intensive care units in selected hospitals of Sanandaj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nammam Ali Azadi

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: We found the noise levels were always above the EPA thresholds at all three hospitals both during the day and night. It is recommended to train hospital officials and staffs for keeping noise levels to an acceptable level.

  19. [Environmental noise levels in 2 intensive care units in a tertiary care centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Zárate-Coronado, Olivia; Gaxiola-González, Fabiola; Neyoy-Sombra, Venigna

    2017-04-03

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) has established a maximum noise level of 40 decibels (dB) for an intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to compare the noise levels in 2 different intensive care units at a tertiary care centre. Using a cross-sectional design study, an analysis was made of the maximum noise level was within the intensive coronary care unit and intensive care unit using a digital meter. A measurement was made in 4 different points of each room, with 5minute intervals, for a period of 60minutes 7:30, 14:30, and 20:30. The means of the observations were compared with descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U. An analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to the mean noise level. The noise observed in the intensive care unit had a mean of 64.77±3.33dB (P=.08), which was similar to that in the intensive coronary care unit, with a mean of 60.20±1.58dB (P=.129). Around 25% or more of the measurements exceeded the level recommended by the WHO by up to 20 points. Noise levels measured in intensive care wards exceed the maximum recommended level for a hospital. It is necessary to design and implement actions for greater participation of health personnel in the reduction of environmental noise. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Ambient Noise Levels in Acute Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia R. B D'Souza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advances in neonatal care have resulted in improved survival of neonates admitted to the intensive care of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. However, the NCU may be an inappropriate milieu, with presence of overwhelming stimuli, most potent being the continuous presence of noise in the ambience of the NICU. Aim and Objectives: To determine and describe the ambient noise levels in the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital. Material and Methods: The ambient noise, in this study was the background sound existing in the environment of the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital in South India. The ambient noise levels were analyzed by an audiologist and acoustical engineer using a standardized and calibrated Sound Level Meter (SLM i.e., the Hand Held Analyzer type 2250, Brüel and Kjær, Denmark on a weighted frequency A and reported as dB (A. Results: The ambient noise levels were timed measurements yielded by the SLM in terms of L eq, L as well as L exceeded the standard A 10 Aeqmax levels (Leq< 45 dB, L ≤ 50 dB, and Lmax ≤ 65 10 dB.The L eq ranged from 59.4 to 62.12 dB A. A Ventilators with alarms caused the maximum amount of ambient noise yielding a L Sound Pressure Level AF (SPL of 82.14 dB A. Conclusion: The study has found high levels of ambient noise in the acute NICU. Though there are several measures to reduce the ambient noise levels in the NICU, it is essential to raise awareness among health care personnel regarding the observed ambient noise levels and its effects on neonates admitted to the NICU.

  1. Corrosion detection of carbon steel in water/oil two phases environment by electrochemical noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusmano, G.; Montesperelli, G.; De Grandis, A.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the electrochemical noise analysis to detect the onset of corrosion phenomena in a very high resistivity medium. Tests were carried out on carbon steel electrodes immersed in a water/mineral oil two phases environment with high concentration of CO 2 , different aqueous/organic phase ratio, sulphide content between 0 and 0.5 g/l and pH between 1 and 5. The evolution of corrosion phenomena were followed by collecting current and potential noise between three nominally identical electrodes. The noise data were analysed in the time and in the frequency domain. In spite of a great loss of sensitivity of the method with respect to tests performed in aqueous solution, the data indicate a good agreement between the standard deviations and the power level of power spectra density (PSD) of current and potential noise signals and corrosion rates by means of weight loss. The values of the PSD slope, indicate the form of corrosion. The effect of water/oil ratio, sulphide concentration and pH on the corrosion rate was determined. Finally two methods to increase the sensitivity of the electrochemical noise are proposed. (orig.)

  2. Measuring and Assessment the Noise Level in Different Regions in Baghdad City And Compare it with The Allowable Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibtihaj Abdulwahhab Abdulrazzak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study includes measurement of the noise level of four regions in the city of Baghdad (industrial region, commercial region, residential region and quiet region and compare the value of noise in each region with the World Health Organization (WHO allowable limits, and the effect of noise on human health was explained. The "sound level meter (SLM" instrument measuring the noise value in the four regions, three measurement per month through one year was recorded (one measurement every ten days from 1/1/2015 to 30/12/2015. The noise level of the industrial region (75dB compared with the World Health Organization level allowable limit (65dB, while the commercial region (76.28dB versus (55dB and the residential region (74.94dB versus (50dB and the quiet region was (62.36dB versus (40dB of the (WHO allowable limit.

  3. The J-Staff System, Network Synchronisation and Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    0 19th ICCRTS “C2 Agility: Lessons Learned from Research and Operations” The J-Staff System, Network Synchronisation and Noise Topics: 2, 5...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The J-Staff System, Network Synchronisation and Noise 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 1 The J-staff system, Network Synchronisation and Noise Alexander Kalloniatis, Mathew Zuparic Joint & Operations Analysis

  4. Modeling Speech Level as a Function of Background Noise Level and Talker-to-Listener Distance for Talkers Wearing Hearing Protection Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouserhal, Rachel E.; Bockstael, Annelies; MacDonald, Ewen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Studying the variations in speech levels with changing background noise level and talker-to-listener distance for talkers wearing hearing protection devices (HPDs) can aid in understanding communication in background noise. Method: Speech was recorded using an intra-aural HPD from 12...... complements the existing model presented by Pelegrín-García, Smits, Brunskog, and Jeong (2011) and expands on it by taking into account the effects of occlusion and background noise level on changes in speech sound level. Conclusions: Three models of the relationship between vocal effort, background noise...

  5. Environmental impact assessment - baseline noise survey and noise impact assessment for Aurora Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, S.

    1996-01-01

    A noise impact assessment was conducted at Syncrude's proposed Aurora Mine site to comply with Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (AEUB) Noise Control Directive ID 94-4. Noise assessments were conducted near a major noise source, i.e. the hydraulic and electric shovels. Noise levels at 50 meters away from the source varied from 72.3 to 79.7 dBA. The worst case noise level was 75 dBA measured at 100 meters away from a hydraulic shovel. This assessment was used to calculate the predicted design sound level from a noise source at the nearest or most impacted occupied dwelling. Two cabins located near the access road and along Kearl Lake respectively, were identified as the most impacted and nearest dwellings to the mine site. The predicted sound level at one cabin was 43 dBA, and 55 dBA at the other. Fort McKay was also assessed because it is the nearest community to the mine site. The sound level at Fort McKay was predicted to be 34 dBA. These results indicate that the sound level from Aurora Mine is not in compliance with the AEUB Noise Control Directive. Attenuation measures are required to reduce the noise to acceptable level at Cabin A and B. Predicted sound level at Fort McKay is lower than the permitted sound level

  6. The impact of a noise reduction quality improvement project upon sound levels in the open-unit-design neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W F

    2010-07-01

    To decrease measured sound levels in the neonatal intensive care unit through implementation of human factor and minor design modification strategies. Prospective time series. Two open-unit-design neonatal centers. Implementation of a coordinated program of noise reduction strategies did not result in any measurable improvement in levels of loudness or quiet. Two centers, using primarily human behavior noise reduction strategies, were unable to demonstrate measurable improvements in sound levels within the occupied open-unit-design neonatal intensive care unit.

  7. Hysteretic behavior of spin-crossover noise driven system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudyma, Iurii [Department of General Physics, Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi 58012 (Ukraine); Maksymov, Artur, E-mail: maxyartur@gmail.com [Department of General Physics, Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi 58012 (Ukraine); Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Dimian, Mihai [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Howard University, Washington DC, 20059 (United States); Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Stefan cel Mare University, Suceava 720229 (Romania)

    2016-04-01

    The influence of white Gaussian noise on hysteretic behavior of spin-crossover system is analyzed in the framework of stochastic Langevin dynamics. Various stochastic simulations are performed and several important properties of spin-transition in spin-crossover system driven by noise are reproduced. The numerical results are tested against the stationary probability function and the associated dynamic potential obtained from Fokker–Planck equation corresponding to spin-crossover Langevin dynamics. The dependence of light-induced optical hysteresis width and non-hysteretic transition curve slope on the noise intensity is illustrated. The role of low-spin and high-spin phase stabilities in the hysteretic behavior of noise-driven spin-crossover system is discussed.

  8. Stochastic resonance in an asymmetric bistable system driven by multiplicative colored noise and additive white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bingchang; Xu Wei

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a bistable system driven by multiplicative colored and additive white noises and a periodic rectangular signal with a constant component is studied by using the unified colored noise approximation and the theory of signal-to-noise (SNR) in the adiabatic limit. The analytic expression of the SNR is obtained for arbitrary signal amplitude without being restricted to small amplitudes. The SNR is a non-monotonic function of intensities of multiplicative colored and additive white noises and correlation time of multiplicative colored noise, so SR exhibits in the bistable system. The effects of potential asymmetry r and correlation time τ of multiplicative colored noise on SNR are opposite. Moreover, It is more sensitive to control SR through adjusting the additive white noise intensity D than adjusting the multiplicative colored noise intensity Q

  9. Assessment of noise levels generated by music shops in an urban city in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebare, M N; Omuemu, V O; Isah, E C

    2011-09-01

    To assess the level of noise generated by music shops in an urban city in Nigeria. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. The study involved music shops in three out of eight identified clusters of market areas in Benin City. A semi-structured, researcher-administered questionnaire was also used to collect data from music shop owners. Noise levels generated by speakers in the music shops were measured using a sound level meter, and blood pressure measurements were taken with a mercury sphygmomanometer. Of the 250 music shops studied, more than 90.0% generated noise levels >85 dB, and 54.8% had a continuous pattern of noise. Longer duration of working years was significantly associated with decreased hearing (P = 0.01), shouting when talking (P = 0.04) and high blood pressure (P = 0.003). The position of music dealers in relation to the speakers was significantly associated with shouting when talking (P = 0.000). A significant association was found between higher levels of noise and high blood pressure (P = 0.004). This study found very high levels of noise in music shops, which could be a source of occupational noise exposure among music dealers. Enlightenment campaigns on the hazards of exposure to loud noise and periodic audiometry examinations are recommended for this occupational group. Copyright © 2011 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stochastic resonance in a time-delayed mono-stable system with correlated multiplicative and additive white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yu-Rong

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the stochastic resonance for a time-delayed mono-stable system, driven by correlated multiplicative and additive white noise. It finds that the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) varies non-monotonically with the delayed times. The SNR varies non-monotonically with the increase of the intensities of the multiplicative and additive noise, with the increase of the correlation strength between the two noises, as well as with the system parameter. (general)

  11. Stochastic systems with cross-correlated Gaussian white noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cheng-Yu; Song Yu-Min; Zhou Peng; Yang Hai; Gao Yun

    2010-01-01

    This paper theoretically investigates three stochastic systems with cross-correlation Gaussian white noises. Both steady state properties of the stochastic nonlinear systems and the nonequilibrium transitions induced by the cross-correlated noises are studied. The stationary solutions of the Fokker—Planck equation for three specific examples are analysed. It is shown explicitly that the cross-correlation of white noises can induce nonequilibrium transitions

  12. Two-party quantum key agreement protocols under collective noise channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Qian, Song-Rong

    2018-06-01

    Recently, quantum communication has become a very popular research field. The quantum key agreement (QKA) plays an important role in the field of quantum communication, based on its unconditional security in terms of theory. Among all kinds of QKA protocols, QKA protocols resisting collective noise are widely being studied. In this paper, we propose improved two-party QKA protocols resisting collective noise and present a feasible plan for information reconciliation. Our protocols' qubit efficiency has achieved 26.67%, which is the best among all the two-party QKA protocols against collective noise, thus showing that our protocol can improve the transmission efficiency of quantum key agreement.

  13. Shot noise of spin current and spin transfer torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunjin; Zhan, Hongxin; Wan, Langhui; Wang, Bin; Wei, Yadong; Sun, Qingfeng; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-01

    We report the theoretical investigation of the shot noise of the spin current (Sσ) and the spin transfer torque (Sτ) for non-collinear spin polarized transport in a spin-valve device which consists of a normal scattering region connected by two ferromagnetic electrodes (MNM system). Our theory was developed using the non-equilibrium Green’s function method, and general nonlinear Sσ - V and Sτ - V relations were derived as a function of the angle θ between the magnetizations of two leads. We have applied our theory to a quantum dot system with a resonant level coupled with two ferromagnetic electrodes. It was found that, for the MNM system, the auto-correlation of the spin current is enough to characterize the fluctuation of the spin current. For a system with three ferromagnetic layers, however, both auto-correlation and cross-correlation of the spin current are needed to characterize the noise of the spin current. For a quantum dot with a resonant level, the derivative of spin torque with respect to bias voltage is proportional to sinθ when the system is far away from resonance. When the system is near resonance, the spin transfer torque becomes a non-sinusoidal function of θ. The derivative of the noise of the spin transfer torque with respect to the bias voltage Nτ behaves differently when the system is near or far away from resonance. Specifically, the differential shot noise of the spin transfer torque Nτ is a concave function of θ near resonance while it becomes a convex function of θ far away from resonance. For certain bias voltages, the period Nτ(θ) becomes π instead of 2π. For small θ, it was found that the differential shot noise of the spin transfer torque is very sensitive to the bias voltage and the other system parameters.

  14. Method for numerical simulation of two-term exponentially correlated colored noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, B.; Ayik, S.; Abe, Y.; Gokalp, A.; Yilmaz, O.

    2006-01-01

    A method for numerical simulation of two-term exponentially correlated colored noise is proposed. The method is an extension of traditional method for one-term exponentially correlated colored noise. The validity of the algorithm is tested by comparing numerical simulations with analytical results in two physical applications

  15. Noise and time delay induce critical point in a bistable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Nie, Linru; Yu, Lilong; Zhang, Xinyu

    2014-07-01

    We study relaxation time Tc of time-delayed bistable system driven by two cross-correlated Gaussian white noises that one is multiplicative and the other is additive. By means of numerical calculations, the results indicate that: (i) Combination of noise and time delay can induce two critical points about the relaxation time at some certain noise cross-correlation strength λ under the condition that the multiplicative intensity D equals to the additive noise intensity α. (ii) For each fixed D or α, there are two symmetrical critical points which locates in the regions of positive and negative correlations, respectively. Namely, as λ equals to the critical value λc, Tc is independent of the delay time and the result of Tc versus τ is a horizontal line, but as |λ|>|λc| (or |λ|decreases) with the delay time increasing. (iii) In the presence of D = α, the change of λc with D is two symmetrical curves about the axis of λc = 0, and the critical value λc is close to zero for a smaller D, which approaches to +1 or -1 for a greater D.

  16. Global noise studies for CMS Tracker upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Arteche, F; Echevarria, I; Iglesias, M; Rivetta, C; Vila, I; 10.1088/1748-0221/5/12/C12029

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of the noise emissions of DC-DC converters at system level is critical to optimize the design of the detector and define rules for the integration strategy. This paper presents the impedance effects on the noise emissions of DC-DC converters at system level. Conducted and radiated noise emissions at the input and at the output from DC-DC converters have been simulated for different types of power network and FEE impedances. System aspects as granularity, stray capacitances of the system and different working conditions of the DC-DC converters are presented too. This study has been carried out using simulation models of noise emissions of DC-DC converters in the real scenario. The results of these studies show important recommendations and criteria to be applied to integrate the DC-DC converters and decrease the system noise level

  17. STUDY NOISE POLLUTION TYUMEN USING GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dobryakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most harmful factors of environment of the city is the noise, and its weight among the factors adversely affecting the life and health of the population has been increasing steadily [Sheina and etc., 2007; Polovinkina and etc., 2012]. Today, most major cities of the Russian Federation (70% have a high noise pollution problem. The system of support for the monitoring and control of acoustic situation in the city can be considered noise pollution electronic cards made using geographic information systems (GIS. There are two fundamentally different approaches to the selection of software for creation of noise maps. According to the first of them, use universal multifunctional complexes GIS (ArcGIS, MapInfo. According to the distribution of data points on the noise characteristics is created TIN model. A second approach to create noise maps using highly specialized software (MapNoise, SoundPLAN, Mitha, Cadna, ExNOISE et al.. To calculate noise propagation area is divided on the grid with a certain step, the most relevant mapping purposes. Calculation of noise levels is carried out in a grid cell by measurements based on diffraction and reflection of sound barriers and absorbing underlying surface. Noise pollution is also displayed using contour lines.

  18. Measuring changes in ambient noise levels from the installation and operation of a surge wave energy converter in the coastal ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haxel, Joe H [Oregon State Univ., Newport, OR (United States); Henkel, Sarah K [Oregon State Univ., Newport, OR (United States)

    2017-10-18

    Ecosystem impacts resulting from elevated underwater noise levels generated by anthropogenic activities in the coastal ocean are poorly understood and remain difficult to address as a result of a significant gap in knowledge for existing nearshore sound levels. Ambient noise is an important habitat component for marine mammals and fish that use sound for essential functions such as communication, navigation, and foraging. Questions surrounding the amplitudes, frequency distributions, and durations of noise emissions from renewable wave energy conversion (WEC) projects during their construction and operation present concerns for long-term consequences in marine habitats. Oregon’s dynamic nearshore environment presents significant challenges for passive acoustic monitoring that include flow noise contamination from wave orbital motions, turbulence from breaking surf, equipment burial, and fishing pressure from sport and commercial crabbers. This project included 2 techniques for passive acoustic data collection: 1) campaign style deployments of fixed hydrophone lander stations to capture temporal variations in noise levels and 2) a drifting hydrophone system to record spatial variations within the project site. The hydrophone lander deployments were effective and economically feasible for enabling robust temporal measurements of ambient noise levels in a variety of sea state conditions. Limiting factors for the fixed stations included 1) a flow shield mitigation strategy failure in the first deployment resulting in significant wideband data contamination and 2) flow noise contamination of the unshielded sensors restricting valuable analysis to frequencies above 500 Hz for subsequent deployments. Drifting hydrophone measurements were also effective and economically feasible (although logistically challenging in the beginning of the project due to vessel time constraints) providing a spatial distribution of sound levels, comparisons of noise levels in varying levels

  19. Effect of Two Advanced Noise Reduction Technologies on the Aerodynamic Performance of an Ultra High Bypass Ratio Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christoper E.; Gazzaniga, John A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center anechoic 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel to investigate two new advanced noise reduction technologies in support of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The goal of the experiment was to demonstrate the noise reduction potential and effect on fan model performance of the two noise reduction technologies in a scale model Ultra-High Bypass turbofan at simulated takeoff and approach aircraft flight speeds. The two novel noise reduction technologies are called Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment and Soft Vanes. Both technologies were aimed at modifying the local noise source mechanisms of the fan tip vortex/fan case interaction and the rotor wake-stator interaction. For the Over-the-Rotor acoustic treatment, two noise reduction configurations were investigated. The results showed that the two noise reduction technologies, Over-the-Rotor and Soft Vanes, were able to reduce the noise level of the fan model, but the Over-the-Rotor configurations had a significant negative impact on the fan aerodynamic performance; the loss in fan aerodynamic efficiency was between 2.75 to 8.75 percent, depending on configuration, compared to the conventional solid baseline fan case rubstrip also tested. Performance results with the Soft Vanes showed that there was no measurable change in the corrected fan thrust and a 1.8 percent loss in corrected stator vane thrust, which resulted in a total net thrust loss of approximately 0.5 percent compared with the baseline reference stator vane set.

  20. Study on traffic noise level of Sylhet by multiple regression analysis associated with health hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Alam, M. Jobair Bin Alam, M. M. Rahman, A. K. Dikshit, S. K. Khan

    Full Text Available The study reports the level of traffic-induced noise pollution in Sylhet City. For this purpose noise levels have been measured at thirty-seven major locations of the city from 7 am to 11 pm during the working days. It was observed that at all the locations the level of noise remains far above the acceptable limit for all the time. The noise level on the main road near residential area, hospital area and educational area were above the recommended level (65dBA. It was found that the predictive equations are in 60-70% correlated with the measured noise level. The study suggests that vulnerable institutions like school and hospital should be located about 60m away from the roadside unless any special arrangement to alleviate sound is used.

  1. Numerical results on noise-induced dynamics in the subthreshold regime for thermoacoustic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vikrant; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian Oliver; Kabiraj, Lipika

    2017-03-01

    Thermoacoustic instability is a serious issue in practical combustion systems. Such systems are inherently noisy, and hence the influence of noise on the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability is an aspect of practical importance. The present work is motivated by a recent report on the experimental observation of coherence resonance, or noise-induced coherence with a resonance-like dependence on the noise intensity as the system approaches the stability margin, for a prototypical premixed laminar flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Phys. Rev. E, 4 (2015)). We numerically investigate representative thermoacoustic models for such noise-induced dynamics. Similar to the experiments, we study variation in system dynamics in response to variations in the noise intensity and in a critical control parameter as the systems approach their stability margins. The qualitative match identified between experimental results and observations in the representative models investigated here confirms that coherence resonance is a feature of thermoacoustic systems. We also extend the experimental results, which were limited to the case of subcritical Hopf bifurcation, to the case of supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We identify that the phenomenon has qualitative differences for the systems undergoing transition via subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations. Two important practical implications are associated with the findings. Firstly, the increase in noise-induced coherence as the system approaches the onset of thermoacoustic instability can be considered as a precursor to the instability. Secondly, the dependence of noise-induced dynamics on the bifurcation type can be utilised to distinguish between subcritical and supercritical bifurcation prior to the onset of the instability.

  2. Preparation of Ultracold Atom Clouds at the Shot Noise Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, M.; Hilliard, A. J.; Kristensen, Mick

    2016-01-01

    We prepare number stabilized ultracold atom clouds through the real-time analysis of nondestructive images and the application of feedback. In our experiments, the atom number N∼10^6 is determined by high precision Faraday imaging with uncertainty ΔN below the shot noise level, i.e., ΔN... on this measurement, feedback is applied to reduce the atom number to a user-defined target, whereupon a second imaging series probes the number stabilized cloud. By this method, we show that the atom number in ultracold clouds can be prepared below the shot noise level....

  3. Noise-spectroscopy of multiqubit systems: Determining all their parameters by applying an external classical noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savel' ev, S., E-mail: S.Saveliev@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Zagoskin, A.M. [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Omelyanchouk, A.N. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2010-10-05

    Imagine that you have several sets of two coupled qubits, but you do not know the parameters of their Hamitonians. How to determine these without resorting to the usual spectroscopy approach to the problem? Based on numerical modeling, we show that all the parameters of a system of two coupled qubits can be determined by applying to it an external classical noise and analyzing the Fourier spectrum of the elements of the system's density matrix. In particular, the interlevel spacings as well as the strength and sign of the qubit-qubit coupling can be determined this way.

  4. Correlated Levy Noise in Linear Dynamical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srokowski, T.

    2011-01-01

    Linear dynamical systems, driven by a non-white noise which has the Levy distribution, are analysed. Noise is modelled by a specific stochastic process which is defined by the Langevin equation with a linear force and the Levy distributed symmetric white noise. Correlation properties of the process are discussed. The Fokker-Planck equation driven by that noise is solved. Distributions have the Levy shape and their width, for a given time, is smaller than for processes in the white noise limit. Applicability of the adiabatic approximation in the case of the linear force is discussed. (author)

  5. Noise aliasing in interline-video-based fluoroscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, H.; Cunningham, I.A.

    2002-01-01

    Video-based imaging systems for continuous (nonpulsed) x-ray fluoroscopy use a variety of video formats. Conventional video-camera systems may operate in either interlaced or progressive-scan modes, and CCD systems may operate in interline- or frame-transfer modes. A theoretical model of the image noise power spectrum corresponding to these formats is described. It is shown that with respect to frame-transfer or progressive-readout modes, interline or interlaced cameras operating in a frame-integration mode will result in a spectral shift of 25% of the total image noise power from low spatial frequencies to high. In a field-integration mode, noise power is doubled with most of the increase occurring at high spatial frequencies. The differences are due primarily to the effect of noise aliasing. In interline or interlaced formats, alternate lines are obtained with each video field resulting in a vertical sampling frequency for noise that is one half of the physical sampling frequency. The extent of noise aliasing is modified by differences in the statistical correlations between video fields in the different modes. The theoretical model is validated with experiments using an x-ray image intensifier and CCD-camera system. It is shown that different video modes affect the shape of the noise-power spectrum and therefore the detective quantum efficiency. While the effect on observer performance is not addressed, it is concluded that in order to minimize image noise at the critical mid-to-high spatial frequencies for a specified x-ray exposure, fluoroscopic systems should use only frame-transfer (CCD camera) or progressive-scan (conventional video) formats

  6. Classification of Partial Discharge Measured under Different Levels of Noise Contamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Jee Keen Raymond

    Full Text Available Cable joint insulation breakdown may cause a huge loss to power companies. Therefore, it is vital to diagnose the insulation quality to detect early signs of insulation failure. It is well known that there is a correlation between Partial discharge (PD and the insulation quality. Although many works have been done on PD pattern recognition, it is usually performed in a noise free environment. Also, works on PD pattern recognition in actual cable joint are less likely to be found in literature. Therefore, in this work, classifications of actual cable joint defect types from partial discharge data contaminated by noise were performed. Five cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE cable joints with artificially created defects were prepared based on the defects commonly encountered on site. Three different types of input feature were extracted from the PD pattern under artificially created noisy environment. These include statistical features, fractal features and principal component analysis (PCA features. These input features were used to train the classifiers to classify each PD defect types. Classifications were performed using three different artificial intelligence classifiers, which include Artificial Neural Networks (ANN, Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS and Support Vector Machine (SVM. It was found that the classification accuracy decreases with higher noise level but PCA features used in SVM and ANN showed the strongest tolerance against noise contamination.

  7. A Two-Microphone Noise Reduction System for Cochlear Implant Users with Nearby Microphones—Part II: Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Häusler

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Users of cochlear implants (auditory aids, which stimulate the auditory nerve electrically at the inner ear often suffer from poor speech understanding in noise. We evaluate a small (intermicrophone distance 7 mm and computationally inexpensive adaptive noise reduction system suitable for behind-the-ear cochlear implant speech processors. The system is evaluated in simulated and real, anechoic and reverberant environments. Results from simulations show improvements of 3.4 to 9.3 dB in signal to noise ratio for rooms with realistic reverberation and more than 18 dB under anechoic conditions. Speech understanding in noise is measured in 6 adult cochlear implant users in a reverberant room, showing average improvements of 7.9–9.6 dB, when compared to a single omnidirectional microphone or 1.3–5.6 dB, when compared to a simple directional two-microphone device. Subjective evaluation in a cafeteria at lunchtime shows a preference of the cochlear implant users for the evaluated device in terms of speech understanding and sound quality.

  8. Data acquisition and processing system for reactor noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa Oliveira, J.; Morais Da Veiga, C.; Forjaz Trigueiros, D.; Pombo Duarte, J.

    1975-01-01

    A data acquisition and processing system for reactor noise analysis by time correlation methods is described, consisting in one to four data feeding channels (transducer, associated electronics and V/f converter), a sampling unit, a landline transmission system and a PDP 15 computer. This system is being applied to study the kinetic parameters of the 'Reactor Portugues de Investigacao', a swimming-pool 1MW reactor. The main features that make such a data acquisition and processing system a useful tool to perform noise analysis are: the improved characteristics of analog-to-digital converters employed to quantize the signals; the use of an on-line computer which allows a great accumulation and a rapid treatment of data together with an easy check of the correctness of the experiments; and the adoption of the time cross-correlation technique using two-detectors which by-pass the limitation of low efficiency detectors. (author)

  9. Noise rectifier based on the two-dimensional electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheremisin, M. V., E-mail: tcher_max@yahoo.com [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    The dc voltage observed at low temperatures in a 2D electron sample in the absence of noticeable external excitations [1] is accounted by the Schottky contact rectification of the noise generated in the measuring circuit. The rectified voltage is shown to depend on the asymmetry of the contact pair. The dependence of the rectified voltage on the noise amplitude first follows the trivial quadratic law, then exhibits a nearly linear behavior, and finally, levels off.

  10. Reduction of environmental MHz noise for SQUID application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, T. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: araya@sup.ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kitamura, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kamishiro, M. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Sakuta, K. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Itozaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: itozaki@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-10-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in measurement using SQUIDs without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is an effective method to remove the environmental noise. The environmental noise has been reduced by the ANC system in the radio frequency region around MHz. The anti-phase waves of the environmental noise should be generated by this system. The ANC system including the phase and amplitude control circuit was developed to make the anti-phase waves in the MHz region. In this paper, sinusoidal waves with a MHz frequency were used as the environmental noise. When a coil antenna was used for a receiver antenna, this ANC system suppressed these sinusoidal waves to the white noise level about 40 dB. When we used a SQUID as a receiver antenna, we also cancelled sinusoidal waves to the white noise level by this system. This shows that the ANC system is useful to reduce an environmental noise when this ANC system is developed to cancel multi-frequency noise.

  11. Reduction of environmental MHz noise for SQUID application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Kamishiro, M.; Sakuta, K.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-01-01

    It is important to remove large environmental noise in measurement using SQUIDs without magnetic shielding. Active noise control (ANC) is an effective method to remove the environmental noise. The environmental noise has been reduced by the ANC system in the radio frequency region around MHz. The anti-phase waves of the environmental noise should be generated by this system. The ANC system including the phase and amplitude control circuit was developed to make the anti-phase waves in the MHz region. In this paper, sinusoidal waves with a MHz frequency were used as the environmental noise. When a coil antenna was used for a receiver antenna, this ANC system suppressed these sinusoidal waves to the white noise level about 40 dB. When we used a SQUID as a receiver antenna, we also cancelled sinusoidal waves to the white noise level by this system. This shows that the ANC system is useful to reduce an environmental noise when this ANC system is developed to cancel multi-frequency noise

  12. Robust extended Kalman filter of discrete-time Markovian jump nonlinear system under uncertain noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jin; Park, Jun Hong; Lee, Kwan Soo; Spiryagin, Maksym

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the problem of robust extended Kalman filter design for discrete -time Markovian jump nonlinear systems with noise uncertainty. Because of the existence of stochastic Markovian switching, the state and measurement equations of underlying system are subject to uncertain noise whose covariance matrices are time-varying or un-measurable instead of stationary. First, based on the expression of filtering performance deviation, admissible uncertainty of noise covariance matrix is given. Secondly, two forms of noise uncertainty are taken into account: Non- Structural and Structural. It is proved by applying game theory that this filter design is a robust mini-max filter. A numerical example shows the validity of the method

  13. Synchronizing the noise-perturbed Lue chaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yan; Chen Shihua; Zhou Hong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, synchronization between unidirectionally coupled Lue chaotic systems with noise perturbation is investigated theoretically and numerically. Sufficient conditions of synchronization between these noise-perturbed systems are established by means of the so-called sliding mode control method. Some numerical simulations are also included to visualize the effectiveness and the feasibility of the developed approach.

  14. Maintaining reduced noise levels in a resource-constrained neonatal intensive care unit by operant conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, A; Denzil, S B; Linda, R; Josephine, P K; Nagapoornima, M; Suman Rao, P N; Swarna Rekha, A

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of operant conditioning in sustaining reduced noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Quasi-experimental study on quality of care. Level III NICU of a teaching hospital in south India. 26 staff employed in the NICU. (7 Doctors, 13 Nursing staff and 6 Nursing assistants). Operant conditioning of staff activity for 6 months. This method involves positive and negative reinforcement to condition the staff to modify noise generating activities. Comparing noise levels in decibel: A weighted [dB (A)] before conditioning with levels at 18 and 24 months after conditioning. Decibel: A weighted accounts for noise that is audible to human ears. Operant conditioning for 6 months sustains the reduced noise levels to within 62 dB in ventilator room 95% CI: 60.4 - 62.2 and isolation room (95% CI: 55.8 - 61.5). In the preterm room, noise can be maintained within 52 dB (95% CI: 50.8 - 52.6). This effect is statistically significant in all the rooms at 18 months (P = 0.001). At 24 months post conditioning there is a significant rebound of noise levels by 8.6, 6.7 and 9.9 dB in the ventilator, isolation and preterm room, respectively (P =0.001). Operant conditioning for 6 months was effective in sustaining reduced noise levels. At 18 months post conditioning, the noise levels were maintained within 62 dB (A), 60 dB (A) and 52 dB (A) in the ventilator, isolation and pre-term room, respectively. Conditioning needs to be repeated at 12 months in the ventilator room and at 18 months in the other rooms.

  15. Predetermining acceptable noise limits of EXAFS spectra in the limit of stochastic noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Yung-Jin; Booth, Corwin H

    2009-01-01

    The effect of stochastic noise on Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data measurement, analysis, and fitting is discussed. Stochastic noise reduces the ability to uniquely fit a calculated model to measured EXAFS data. Such noise can be reduced by common methods that increase the signal-to-noise ratio; however, these methods are not always practical. Therefore, predetermined, quantitative knowledge of the level of acceptable stochastic noise when fitting for a particular model system is essential in maximizing the chances of a successful EXAFS experiment and minimizing wasted beamtime. This paper outlines a method to estimate, through simulation, the acceptable level of stochastic noise in EXAFS spectra that still allows a successful test of a proposed model compound.

  16. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  17. Longitudinal beam dynamics with rf noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Cogburn, R.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-06-01

    The Dome-Krinsky-Wang (DKW) diffusion-inaction theory for rf-noise-induced emittance dilution is reviewed and related to recent work on the approximation of stochastic processes by Markov processes. An accurate and efficient numerical procedure is developed to integrate the diffusion equation of the DKW theory. Tracking simulations are undertaken to check the validity of the theory in the parameter range of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and to provide additional information. The study of effects of rf noise is applied to two problems of interest at the SSC: (1) determination of noise tolerance levels in the rf system, and (2) feasibility of beam extraction using crystal channeling

  18. A study on the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise, we conducted two experiments. In Experiment 1, eight male subjects were exposed to seven types of low-frequency noise stimuli: two pure tones [a 31.5-Hz, 100-dB(SPL tone and a 50-Hz, 100-dB(SPL tone] and five complex noises composed of the pure tones. For the complex noise stimuli, the sound pressure level of one tonal component was 100 dB(SPL and that of another one was either 90, 95, or 100 dB(SPL. Vibration induced on the body surface was measured at five locations, and the correlation with the subjective rating of the vibratory sensation at each site of measurement was examined. In Experiment 2, the correlation between the body surface vibration and the vibratory sensation was similarly examined using seven types of noise stimuli composed of a 25-Hz tone and a 50-Hz tone. In both the experiments, we found that at the chest and the abdomen, the rating of the vibratory sensation was in close correlation with the vibration acceleration level (VAL of the body surface vibration measured at each corresponding location. This was consistent with our previous results and suggested that at the trunk of the body (the chest and the abdomen, the mechanoreception of body vibrations plays an important role in the experience of the vibratory sensation in persons exposed to high-level low-frequency noise. At the head, however, no close correlation was found between the rating of the vibratory sensation and the VAL of body surface vibration. This suggested that at the head, the perceptual mechanisms of vibration induced by high-level low-frequency noise were different from those in the trunk of the body.

  19. Characterization of a low frequency magnetic noise from a two stage pulse tube cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshraghi, Mohamad Javad; Sasada, Ichiro; Kim, Jin Mok; Lee, Yong Ho

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic noise of a two stage pulse tube cryocooler(PT) has been measured by a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate magnetometer and by a LTS SQUID gradiometer. The magnetometer was installed in a Dewar made of aluminum at 12 cm apart from a section containing magnetic regenerative materials of the PT. The magnetic noise shows a clear peak at 1.8 Hz which is the fundamental frequency of the He gas pumping rate. The 1.8 Hz magnetic noise took a peak, during the cooling process, when the cold stage temperature was at (or close to) 12 K, which resembles the variation of the temperature of the second cold stage of 1.8 Hz. Hence we attributed the main source of this magnetic noise to the temperature dependency of magnetic susceptibility of magnetic regenerative materials such as Er3Ni and HoCu2 used at the second stage. We pointed out that the superconducting magnetic shield by lead sheets reduced the interfering magnetic noise generated from this part. With this scheme, the magnetic noise amplitude measured with the first order gradiometer DROS, mounted in the vicinity of the magnetic regenerator, when the noise amplitude is minimum, which could be found from the fluxgate measurement results, was less than 500 pT peak to peak. Whereas without lead shielding the noise level was higher than the dynamic range of SQUID instrumentations which is around ±10nT. (author)

  20. BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF WHITE NOISE LEVELS IN THE FIVE-YEAR WMAP DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeneboom, N. E.; Eriksen, H. K.; Gorski, K.; Huey, G.; Jewell, J.; Wandelt, B.

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new Bayesian method for estimating white noise levels in CMB sky maps, and apply this algorithm to the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. We assume that the amplitude of the noise rms is scaled by a constant value, α, relative to a pre-specified noise level. We then derive the corresponding conditional density, P(α | s, C l , d), which is subsequently integrated into a general CMB Gibbs sampler. We first verify our code by analyzing simulated data sets, and then apply the framework to the WMAP data. For the foreground-reduced five-year WMAP sky maps and the nominal noise levels initially provided in the five-year data release, we find that the posterior means typically range between α = 1.005 ± 0.001 and α = 1.010 ± 0.001 depending on differencing assembly, indicating that the noise level of these maps are biased low by 0.5%-1.0%. The same problem is not observed for the uncorrected WMAP sky maps. After the preprint version of this letter appeared on astro-ph., the WMAP team has corrected the values presented on their web page, noting that the initially provided values were in fact estimates from the three-year data release, not from the five-year estimates. However, internally in their five-year analysis the correct noise values were used, and no cosmological results are therefore compromised by this error. Thus, our method has already been demonstrated in practice to be both useful and accurate.

  1. Critical assessment of day time traffic noise level at curbside open-air microenvironment of Kolkata City, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu Chowdhury, Anirban; Debsarkar, Anupam; Chakrabarty, Shibnath

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the research work is to assess day time traffic noise level at curbside open-air microenvironment of Kolkata city, India under heterogeneous environmental conditions. Prevailing traffic noise level in terms of A-weighted equivalent noise level (Leq) at the microenvironment was in excess of 12.6 ± 2.1 dB(A) from the day time standard of 65 dB(A) for commercial area recommended by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) of India. Noise Climate and Traffic Noise Index of the microenvironment were accounted for 13 ± 1.8 dB(A) and 88.8 ± 6.1 dB(A) respectively. A correlation analysis explored that prevailing traffic noise level of the microenvironment had weak negative (-0.21; p air temperature and relative humidity. A Varimax rotated principal component analysis explored that motorized traffic volume had moderate positive loading with background noise component (L90, L95, L99) and prevailing traffic noise level had very strong positive loading with peak noise component (L1, L5, L10). Background and peak noise component cumulatively explained 80.98 % of variance in the data set. Traffic noise level at curbside open-air microenvironment of Kolkata City was higher than the standard recommended by CPCB of India. It was highly annoying also. Air temperature and relative humidity had little influence and the peak noise component had the most significant influence on the prevailing traffic noise level at curbside open-air microenvironment. Therefore, traffic noise level at the microenvironment of the city can be reduced with careful honking and driving.

  2. Speech understanding in noise with integrated in-ear and muff-style hearing protection systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Abel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated hearing protection systems are designed to enhance free field and radio communications during military operations while protecting against the damaging effects of high-level noise exposure. A study was conducted to compare the effect of increasing the radio volume on the intelligibility of speech over the radios of two candidate systems, in-ear and muff-style, in 85-dBA speech babble noise presented free field. Twenty normal-hearing, English-fluent subjects, half male and half female, were tested in same gender pairs. Alternating as talker and listener, their task was to discriminate consonant-vowel-consonant syllables that contrasted either the initial or final consonant. Percent correct consonant discrimination increased with increases in the radio volume. At the highest volume, subjects achieved 79% with the in-ear device but only 69% with the muff-style device, averaged across the gender of listener/talker pairs and consonant position. Although there was no main effect of gender, female listener/talkers showed a 10% advantage for the final consonant and male listener/talkers showed a 1% advantage for the initial consonant. These results indicate that normal hearing users can achieve reasonably high radio communication scores with integrated in-ear hearing protection in moderately high-level noise that provides both energetic and informational masking. The adequacy of the range of available radio volumes for users with hearing loss has yet to be determined.

  3. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  4. On the Performance Analysis of Digital Communication Systems Perturbed by Non-Gaussian Noise and Interference

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2016-06-29

    The Gaussian distribution is typically used to model the additive noise affecting communication systems. However, in many cases the noise cannot be modeled by a Gaussian distribution. In this thesis, we investigate the performance of different communication systems perturbed by non-Gaussian noise. Three families of noise are considered in this work, namely the generalized Gaussian noise, the Laplace noise/interference, and the impulsive noise that is modeled by an α-stable distribution. More specifically, in the first part of this thesis, the impact of an additive generalized Gaussian noise is studied by computing the average symbol error rate (SER) of one dimensional and two dimensional constellations in fading environment. We begin by the simple case of two symbols, i.e. binary phase shift keying (BPSK) constellation. From the results of this constellation, we extended the work to the average SER of an M pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). The first 2 − D constellation is the M quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) (studied for two geometric shapes, namely square and rectangular), which is the combination of two orthogonal PAM signals (in-phase and quadrature phase PAM). In the second part, the system performance of a circular constellation, namely M phase shift keying (MPSK) is studied in conjunction with a Laplace noise with independent noise components. A closed form and an asymptotic expansion of the SER are derived for two detectors, maximum likelihood and minimum distance detectors. Next, we look at the intra cell interference of a full duplex cellular network which is shown to follow a Laplacian distribution with dependent, but uncorrelated, complex components. The densities of that interference are expressed in a closed form in order to obtain the SER of several communication systems (BPSK, PAM, QAM, and MPSK). Finally, we study the statistics of the α-stable distribution. Those statistics are expressed in closed form in terms of the Fox H function and

  5. Assessment of ambient noise levels in the intensive care unit of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem O Qutub

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion : Some sources of environmental noise, such as the use of oxygen, suction equipment or respirators are unavoidable. Nevertheless, hospital ICUs should have measures to minimize the level of exposure to noise in the ICU. Further research in this area might focus on the noise level and other modifiable environmental stress factors in the ICU that affect patients as well as the staff.

  6. Noise Prediction Module for Offset Stream Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda S.

    2011-01-01

    A Modern Design of Experiments (MDOE) analysis of data acquired for an offset stream technology was presented. The data acquisition and concept development were funded under a Supersonics NRA NNX07AC62A awarded to Dimitri Papamoschou at University of California, Irvine. The technology involved the introduction of airfoils in the fan stream of a bypass ratio (BPR) two nozzle system operated at transonic exhaust speeds. The vanes deflected the fan stream relative to the core stream and resulted in reduced sideline noise for polar angles in the peak jet noise direction. Noise prediction models were developed for a range of vane configurations. The models interface with an existing ANOPP module and can be used or future system level studies.

  7. Noise Pollution and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise pollution is of particular importance due to the physical and psychological effects on humans. Noise is a stressor that affects the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Noise is also a threat to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Health risks from noise are correlated with road traffic. In other words, noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. Objectives This study aims to determine the effect of noise pollution (near roadways on health issues in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, equivalent sound pressure level were measured by sound level meters TES-1353 in 75 locations around 4 roadways, which had a high load of traffic in Ahvaz City during day time. During the study, 820 measurements were recorded at measuring stations, for 7 days per week with 1-hour interval between each measurement. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS software. Results According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were 76.28 ± 3.12 dB (Mean ± SD. According to sound measurements and the survey questionnaire, noise pollution is higher than EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency and Iran standard level. Based on result of this study the worst noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality during 2012. Conclusions According to the results of this study, with increasing load of traffic, there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans to control noise pollution and prevent its effects.

  8. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.; /Fermilab

    2001-12-18

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  9. Debuncher Momentum Cooling Systems Signal to Noise Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquinelli, Ralph J.

    2001-01-01

    The Debuncher Momentum cooling systems were carefully measured for signal to noise. It was observed that cooling performance was not optimum. Closer inspection shows that the installed front-end bandpass filters are wider than the pickup response. (The original filters were specified to be wider so that none of the available bandwidth would be clipped.) The end result is excess noise is amplified and passed onto the kickers unimpeded, hence, reducing the achievable system gain. From this data, new filters should be designed to improve performance. New system bandwidths are specified on the data figures. Also included are the transfer function measurements that clearly show adjacent band response. In band 4 upper, the adjacent lobes are strong and out of phase. This is also degrading the system performance. The correlation between spectrum analyzer signal to noise and network analyzer system transfer functions is very strong. The table below has a calculation of expected improvement of front noise reduction by means of building new front-end bandpass filters. The calculation is based on a flat input noise spectrum and is a linear estimation of improvement. The listed 3dB bandwidths of the original filters are from measured data. The expected bandwidth is taken from the linear spectrum analyzer plots and is closer to a 10 dB bandwidth making the percentage improvement conservative. The signal to noise measurements are taken with circulating pbars in the Debuncher. One cooling system was measured at a time with all others off. Beam currents are below ten microamperes.

  10. Rapid characterization of microscopic two-level systems using Landau-Zener transitions in a superconducting qubit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Xinsheng; Yu, Haifeng; Yu, Yang; Han, Siyuan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a fast method to detect microscopic two-level systems in a superconducting phase qubit. By monitoring the population leak after sweeping the qubit bias flux, we are able to measure the two-level systems that are coupled with the qubit. Compared with the traditional method that detects two-level systems by energy spectroscopy, our method is faster and more sensitive. This method supplies a useful tool to investigate two-level systems in solid-state qubits

  11. A comparative study of noise pollution levels in some selected areas in Ilorin Metropolis, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyedepo, Olayinka S; Saadu, Abdullahi A

    2009-11-01

    The noise pollution is a major problem for the quality of life in urban areas. This study was conducted to compare the noise pollution levels at busy roads/road junctions, passengers loading parks, commercial, industrial and residential areas in Ilorin metropolis. A total number of 47-locations were selected within the metropolis. Statistical analysis shows significant difference (P noise pollution levels between industrial areas and low density residential areas, industrial areas and high density areas, industrial areas and passengers loading parks, industrial areas and commercial areas, busy roads/road junctions and low density areas, passengers loading parks and commercial areas and commercial areas and low density areas. There is no significant difference (P > 0.05) in noise pollution levels between industrial areas and busy roads/road junctions, busy roads/road junctions and high density areas, busy roads/road junctions and passengers loading parks, busy roads/road junctions and commercial areas, passengers loading parks and high density areas, passengers loading parks and commercial areas and commercial areas and high density areas. The results show that Industrial areas have the highest noise pollution levels (110.2 dB(A)) followed by busy roads/Road junctions (91.5 dB(A)), Passengers loading parks (87.8 dB(A)) and Commercial areas (84.4 dB(A)). The noise pollution levels in Ilorin metropolis exceeded the recommended level by WHO at 34 of 47 measuring points. It can be concluded that the city is environmentally noise polluted and road traffic and industrial machineries are the major sources of it. Noting the noise emission standards, technical control measures, planning and promoting the citizens awareness about the high noise risk may help to relieve the noise problem in the metropolis.

  12. Advantages of binaural amplification to acceptable noise level of directional hearing aid users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ja-Hee; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Ho-Ki

    2014-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine whether Acceptable Noise Levels (ANLs) would be lower (greater acceptance of noise) in binaural listening than in monaural listening condition and also whether meaningfulness of background speech noise would affect ANLs for directional microphone hearing aid users. In addition, any relationships between the individual binaural benefits on ANLs and the individuals' demographic information were investigated. Fourteen hearing aid users (mean age, 64 years) participated for experimental testing. For the ANL calculation, listeners' most comfortable listening levels and background noise level were measured. Using Korean ANL material, ANLs of all participants were evaluated under monaural and binaural amplification with a counterbalanced order. The ANLs were also compared across five types of competing speech noises, consisting of 1- through 8-talker background speech maskers. Seven young normal-hearing listeners (mean age, 27 years) participated for the same measurements as a pilot testing. The results demonstrated that directional hearing aid users accepted more noise (lower ANLs) with binaural amplification than with monaural amplification, regardless of the type of competing speech. When the background speech noise became more meaningful, hearing-impaired listeners accepted less amount of noise (higher ANLs), revealing that ANL is dependent on the intelligibility of the competing speech. The individuals' binaural advantages in ANLs were significantly greater for the listeners with longer experience of hearing aids, yet not related to their age or hearing thresholds. Binaural directional microphone processing allowed hearing aid users to accept a greater amount of background noise, which may in turn improve listeners' hearing aid success. Informational masking substantially influenced background noise acceptance. Given a significant association between ANLs and duration of hearing aid usage, ANL measurement can be useful for

  13. Wideband noise observed at ground level in the auroral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.F.; Desch, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    A sideband noise event was detected at ground level from the Andoya Rocket Range in Norway in January 1989. The signals were observed on four commercial communication receivers (tuned to 159, 515, 905, and 1200 kHz), an ionosonde (200-kHz to 3.5-MHz interference-free observations) and a riometer (32.5 MHz). The event, which occurred during a period of magnetic disturbance near magnetic midnight, was the only one observed during nearly 3 weeks of operations. This low frequency-of-occurrence is attributed partly to high local noise levels. The ease with which this event was identified on the ionograms produced by the local ionosonde suggests that routine ionosonde recordings should be inspected in search for such events. Such an effort would enhance existing research directed toward developing techniques for identifying quiet communication channels and help to identify the origin and frequency-of-occurrence of high-latitude wideband noise events. 20 refs

  14. Systems for noise diagnostics of WWER nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a short overview of the noise diagnostics system developed by Hungarian firms which are in operation in WWER type NPP Units. Giving a list of systems developed for noise diagnostics of WWER reactors we present their main characteristics, their goal and some of their achievements. The second part deals with the problem of acceptance of noise system by NPP and regulations. (author). 24 refs

  15. Systems for noise diagnostics of WWER nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Por, G [Technical Univ. of Budapest, Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this paper is to give a short overview of the noise diagnostics system developed by Hungarian firms which are in operation in WWER type NPP Units. Giving a list of systems developed for noise diagnostics of WWER reactors we present their main characteristics, their goal and some of their achievements. The second part deals with the problem of acceptance of noise system by NPP and regulations. (author). 24 refs.

  16. Statistical characterization of speckle noise in coherent imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavsky, Leonid; Shefler, A.

    2003-05-01

    Speckle noise imposes fundamental limitation on image quality in coherent radiation based imaging and optical metrology systems. Speckle noise phenomena are associated with properties of objects to diffusely scatter irradiation and with the fact that in recording the wave field, a number of signal distortions inevitably occur due to technical limitations inherent to hologram sensors. The statistical theory of speckle noise was developed with regard to only limited resolving power of coherent imaging devices. It is valid only asymptotically as much as the central limit theorem of the probability theory can be applied. In applications this assumption is not always applicable. Moreover, in treating speckle noise problem one should also consider other sources of the hologram deterioration. In the paper, statistical properties of speckle due to the limitation of hologram size, dynamic range and hologram signal quantization are studied by Monte-Carlo simulation for holograms recorded in near and far diffraction zones. The simulation experiments have shown that, for limited resolving power of the imaging system, widely accepted opinion that speckle contrast is equal to one holds only for rather severe level of the hologram size limitation. For moderate limitations, speckle contrast changes gradually from zero for no limitation to one for limitation to less than about 20% of hologram size. The results obtained for the limitation of the hologram sensor"s dynamic range and hologram signal quantization reveal that speckle noise due to these hologram signal distortions is not multiplicative and is directly associated with the severity of the limitation and quantization. On the base of the simulation results, analytical models are suggested.

  17. Noise-Induced Riddling in Chaotic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.; Grebogi, C.

    1996-01-01

    Recent works have considered the situation of riddling where, when a chaotic attractor lying in an invariant subspace is transversely stable, the basin of the attractor can be riddled with holes that belong to the basin of another attractor. We show that riddling can be induced by arbitrarily small random noise even if the attractor is transversely unstable, and we obtain universal scaling laws for noise-induced riddling. Our results imply that the phenomenon of riddling can be more prevalent than expected before, as noise is practically inevitable in dynamical systems. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Occupational Noise Reduction in CNC Striping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmad Khairai, Kamarulzaman; Shamime Salleh, Nurul; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Occupational noise hearing loss with high level exposure is common occupational hazards. In CNC striping process, employee that exposed to high noise level for a long time as 8-hour contributes to hearing loss, create physical and psychological stress that reduce productivity. In this paper, CNC stripping process with high level noises are measured and reduced to the permissible noise exposure. First condition is all machines shutting down and second condition when all CNC machine under operations. For both conditions, noise exposures were measured to evaluate the noise problems and sources. After improvement made, the noise exposures were measured to evaluate the effectiveness of reduction. The initial average noise level at the first condition is 95.797 dB (A). After the pneumatic system with leakage was solved, the noise reduced to 55.517 dB (A). The average noise level at the second condition is 109.340 dB (A). After six machines were gathered at one area and cover that area with plastic curtain, the noise reduced to 95.209 dB (A). In conclusion, the noise level exposure in CNC striping machine is high and exceed the permissible noise exposure can be reduced to acceptable levels. The reduction of noise level in CNC striping processes enhanced productivity in the industry.

  19. Effects of acoustic treatment on the interior noise levels of a twin-engine propeller aircraft - Experimental flight results and theoretical predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, T. B.; Powell, C. A.; Daniels, E. F.; Pope, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    In-flight noise level measurements were made within two cabin configurations of a general aviation business aircraft. The Fairchild Merlin IVC twin-engine aircraft was tested with bare walls and fiberglass insulation and in an executive trim configuration. Narrow-band and octave format data were subjected to analyses which permitted identification of the blade passage harmonics (BPH). Cabin noise level reductions (insertion losses) due to added insulation varied with position in the cabin, the BPH number, cabin pressure, and engine torque. The measurements were closely predicted using the propeller aircraft interior noise (PAIN) mode.

  20. Using Kalman Filters to Reduce Noise from RFID Location System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, José; Reis, Luís Paulo; Petry, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, there are many technologies that support location systems involving intrusive and nonintrusive equipment and also varying in terms of precision, range, and cost. However, the developers some time neglect the noise introduced by these systems, which prevents these systems from reaching their full potential. Focused on this problem, in this research work a comparison study between three different filters was performed in order to reduce the noise introduced by a location system based on RFID UWB technology with an associated error of approximately 18 cm. To achieve this goal, a set of experiments was devised and executed using a miniature train moving at constant velocity in a scenario with two distinct shapes—linear and oval. Also, this train was equipped with a varying number of active tags. The obtained results proved that the Kalman Filter achieved better results when compared to the other two filters. Also, this filter increases the performance of the location system by 15% and 12% for the linear and oval paths respectively, when using one tag. For a multiple tags and oval shape similar results were obtained (11–13% of improvement). PMID:24592186

  1. Noise levels in a neonatal intensive care unit in the Cape metropole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Continuous noise exposure is potentially harmful to infants\\' auditory systems and wellbeing. Although the effects of noise on infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have been well researched overseas, limited studies have been conducted in South Africa. Aim. To conduct a detailed noise assessment ...

  2. Theory of deep level trap effects on generation-recombination noise in HgCdTe photoconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iverson, A.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    We present a theory of the effect of deep level centers on the generation-recombination (g-r) noise and responsivity of an intrinsic photoconductor. The deep level centers can influence the g-r noise and responsivity in three main ways: (i) they can shorten the bulk carrier lifetime by Shockley--Read--Hall recombination; (ii) for some values of the capture cross sections, deep level densities, and temperature, the deep levels can trap a significant fraction of the photogenerated minority carriers. This trapping reduces the effective minority carrier mobility and diffusivity and thus reduces the effect of carrier sweep out on both g-r noise and responsivity; (iii) the deep level centers add a new thermal noise source, which results from fluctuations between bound and free carriers. The strength of this new noise source decreases with decreasing temperature at a slower rate than band-to-band thermal g-r noise. Calculations have been performed for a X = 0.21, n-type Hg/sub 1-x/Cd/sub x/Te photoconductor using the parameters of a commonly occurring deep level center in this material. We find that for typical operating conditions photoconductive detector performance begins to degrade as the deep level density begins to exceed 10 16 cm -3

  3. Listening level of music through headphones in train car noise environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Soeta, Yoshiharu

    2012-09-01

    Although portable music devices are useful for passing time on trains, exposure to music using headphones for long periods carries the risk of damaging hearing acuity. The aim of this study is to examine the listening level of music through headphones in the noisy environment of a train car. Eight subjects adjusted the volume to an optimum level (L(music)) in a simulated noisy train car environment. In Experiment I, the effects of noise level (L(train)) and type of train noise (rolling, squealing, impact, and resonance) were examined. Spectral and temporal characteristics were found to be different according to the train noise type. In Experiment II, the effects of L(train) and type of music (five vocal and five instrumental music) were examined. Each music type had a different pitch strength and spectral centroid, and each was evaluated by φ(1) and W(φ(0)), respectively. These were classified as factors of the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the music. Results showed that L(music) increased as L(train) increased in both experiments, while the type of music greatly influenced L(music). The type of train noise, however, only slightly influenced L(music). L(music) can be estimated using L(train) and the ACF factors φ(1) and W(φ(0)).

  4. Investment strategy due to the minimization of portfolio noise level by observations of coarse-grained entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Krzysztof Urbanowicz; Janusz A. Holyst

    2004-01-01

    Using a recently developed method of noise level estimation that makes use of properties of the coarse grained-entropy we have analyzed the noise level for the Dow Jones index and a few stocks from the New York Stock Exchange. We have found that the noise level ranges from 40 to 80 percent of the signal variance. The condition of a minimal noise level has been applied to construct optimal portfolios from selected shares. We show that implementation of a corresponding threshold investment stra...

  5. STUDY ON NOISE LEVEL GENERATED BY HUMAN ACTIVITIES IN SIBIU CITY, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina STANCA-MOISE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I have proposed an analysis and monitoring of the noise sources in the open spaces of air traffic, rail and car in Sibiu. From centralizing data obtained from the analysis of the measurements performed with equipment noise levels, we concluded that the noise and vibration produced by means of Transportation (air, road, rail can affect human health if they exceed limits. Noise is present and part of our lives and always a source of pollution as any of modern man is not conscious.

  6. Stochastic systems driven by alpha-stable noises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Ditlevsen, P.

    1998-01-01

    with observed data. In particular the tailsof the observed response distributions may even for linear systems be more fat than the tails obtained for Gaussianwhite noise input. Also the excitation may show jumps that cannot be modeled by Gaussian white noise. The paper supports the possibility of using...... the larger class of so-calledalpha-stable white noises to provide a better fit. A geophysical application concerning ice age climate variations is described....

  7. [Preventive effects of sound insulation windows on the indoor noise levels in a street residential building in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bin; Huang, Jing; Guo, Xin-biao

    2015-06-18

    To evaluate the preventive effects of sound insulation windows on traffic noise. Indoor noise levels of the residential rooms (on both the North 4th ring road side and the campus side) with closed sound insulation windows were measured using the sound level meter, and comparisons with the simultaneously measured outdoor noise levels were made. In addition, differences of indoor noise levels between rooms with closed sound insulation windows and open sound insulation windows were also compared. The average outdoor noise levels of the North 4th ring road was higher than 70 dB(A), which exceeded the limitation stated in the "Environmental Quality Standard for Noise" (GB 3096-2008) in our country. However, with the sound insulation windows closed, the indoor noise levels reduced significantly to the level under 35 dB(A) (Pwindows had significant influence on the indoor noise levels (Pwindow, when the sound insulation windows were closed, the indoor noise levels reduced 18.8 dB(A) and 8.3 dB(A) in residential rooms facing North 4th ring road side and campus side, respectively. The results indicated that installation of insulation windows had significant noise reduction effects on street residential buildings especially on the rooms facing major traffic roads. Installation of the sound insulation windows has significant preventive effects on indoor noise in the street residential building.

  8. The magnitude and colour of noise in genetic negative feedback systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voliotis, Margaritis; Bowsher, Clive G.

    2012-01-01

    The comparative ability of transcriptional and small RNA-mediated negative feedback to control fluctuations or ‘noise’ in gene expression remains unexplored. Both autoregulatory mechanisms usually suppress the average (mean) of the protein level and its variability across cells. The variance of the number of proteins per molecule of mean expression is also typically reduced compared with the unregulated system, but is almost never below the value of one. This relative variance often substantially exceeds a recently obtained, theoretical lower limit for biochemical feedback systems. Adding the transcriptional or small RNA-mediated control has different effects. Transcriptional autorepression robustly reduces both the relative variance and persistence (lifetime) of fluctuations. Both benefits combine to reduce noise in downstream gene expression. Autorepression via small RNA can achieve more extreme noise reduction and typically has less effect on the mean expression level. However, it is often more costly to implement and is more sensitive to rate parameters. Theoretical lower limits on the relative variance are known to decrease slowly as a measure of the cost per molecule of mean expression increases. However, the proportional increase in cost to achieve substantial noise suppression can be different away from the optimal frontier—for transcriptional autorepression, it is frequently negligible. PMID:22581772

  9. Investment strategy due to the minimization of portfolio noise level by observations of coarse-grained entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowicz, Krzysztof; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2004-12-01

    Using a recently developed method of noise level estimation that makes use of properties of the coarse-grained entropy, we have analyzed the noise level for the Dow Jones index and a few stocks from the New York Stock Exchange. We have found that the noise level ranges from 40% to 80% of the signal variance. The condition of a minimal noise level has been applied to construct optimal portfolios from selected shares. We show that the implementation of a corresponding threshold investment strategy leads to positive returns for historical data.

  10. Development of a low-noise, two-dimensional amplifier array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Sakumura, Takuto; Tamura, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the recent development of a low-noise, two-dimensional analog front-end ASIC for hybrid pixel imaging detectors. Based on the Open-IP LSI project, the ASIC is designed to meet a low-noise requirement of better than 100e - (rms) with self-triggering capability. The ASIC is intended for the readout of pixel sensors utilizing silicon (Si) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) as detector materials for spectroscopic imaging observations in the X-ray and gamma-ray regions. The readout chip consists of a 4x4 matrix of identical 270μmx270μm pixel cells and was implemented with TSMC 0.35-μm CMOS technology. Each pixel cell contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, pole-zero cancellation circuit, shaper, comparator, and peak hold circuit. Preliminary testing of the ASIC achieved an 88e - (rms) equivalent noise charge and a 25e - /pF noise slope with power consumption of 150μW per pixel.

  11. The Usability of Noise Level from Rock Cutting for the Prediction of Physico-Mechanical Properties of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delibalta, M. S.; Kahraman, S.; Comakli, R.

    2015-11-01

    Because the indirect tests are easier and cheaper than the direct tests, the prediction of rock properties from the indirect testing methods is important especially for the preliminary investigations. In this study, the predictability of the physico-mechanical rock properties from the noise level measured during cutting rock with diamond saw was investigated. Noise measurement test, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) test, Brazilian tensile strength (BTS) test, point load strength (Is) test, density test, and porosity test were carried out on 54 different rock types in the laboratory. The results were statistically analyzed to derive estimation equations. Strong correlations between the noise level and the mechanical rock properties were found. The relations follow power functions. Increasing rock strength increases the noise level. Density and porosity also correlated strongly with the noise level. The relations follow linear functions. Increasing density increases the noise level while increasing porosity decreases the noise level. The developed equations are valid for the rocks with a compressive strength below 150 MPa. Concluding remark is that the physico-mechanical rock properties can reliably be estimated from the noise level measured during cutting the rock with diamond saw.

  12. Noise-constrained switching times for heteroclinic computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Fabio Schittler; Voit, Maximilian; Timme, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Heteroclinic computing offers a novel paradigm for universal computation by collective system dynamics. In such a paradigm, input signals are encoded as complex periodic orbits approaching specific sequences of saddle states. Without inputs, the relevant states together with the heteroclinic connections between them form a network of states—the heteroclinic network. Systems of pulse-coupled oscillators or spiking neurons naturally exhibit such heteroclinic networks of saddles, thereby providing a substrate for general analog computations. Several challenges need to be resolved before it becomes possible to effectively realize heteroclinic computing in hardware. The time scales on which computations are performed crucially depend on the switching times between saddles, which in turn are jointly controlled by the system's intrinsic dynamics and the level of external and measurement noise. The nonlinear dynamics of pulse-coupled systems often strongly deviate from that of time-continuously coupled (e.g., phase-coupled) systems. The factors impacting switching times in pulse-coupled systems are still not well understood. Here we systematically investigate switching times in dependence of the levels of noise and intrinsic dissipation in the system. We specifically reveal how local responses to pulses coact with external noise. Our findings confirm that, like in time-continuous phase-coupled systems, piecewise-continuous pulse-coupled systems exhibit switching times that transiently increase exponentially with the number of switches up to some order of magnitude set by the noise level. Complementarily, we show that switching times may constitute a good predictor for the computation reliability, indicating how often an input signal must be reiterated. By characterizing switching times between two saddles in conjunction with the reliability of a computation, our results provide a first step beyond the coding of input signal identities toward a complementary coding for

  13. Physiologic correlates to background noise acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampas, Joanna; Harkrider, Ashley; Nabelek, Anna

    2004-05-01

    Acceptance of background noise can be evaluated by having listeners indicate the highest background noise level (BNL) they are willing to accept while following the words of a story presented at their most comfortable listening level (MCL). The difference between the selected MCL and BNL is termed the acceptable noise level (ANL). One of the consistent findings in previous studies of ANL is large intersubject variability in acceptance of background noise. This variability is not related to age, gender, hearing sensitivity, personality, type of background noise, or speech perception in noise performance. The purpose of the current experiment was to determine if individual differences in physiological activity measured from the peripheral and central auditory systems of young female adults with normal hearing can account for the variability observed in ANL. Correlations between ANL and various physiological responses, including spontaneous, click-evoked, and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem and middle latency evoked potentials, and electroencephalography will be presented. Results may increase understanding of the regions of the auditory system that contribute to individual noise acceptance.

  14. Shot noise of spin current and spin transfer torque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yunjin; Zhan Hongxin; Wan Langhui; Wang Bin; Wei Yadong; Sun Qingfeng; Wang Jian

    2013-01-01

    We report the theoretical investigation of the shot noise of the spin current (S σ ) and the spin transfer torque (S τ ) for non-collinear spin polarized transport in a spin-valve device which consists of a normal scattering region connected by two ferromagnetic electrodes (MNM system). Our theory was developed using the non-equilibrium Green’s function method, and general nonlinear S σ − V and S τ − V relations were derived as a function of the angle θ between the magnetizations of two leads. We have applied our theory to a quantum dot system with a resonant level coupled with two ferromagnetic electrodes. It was found that, for the MNM system, the auto-correlation of the spin current is enough to characterize the fluctuation of the spin current. For a system with three ferromagnetic layers, however, both auto-correlation and cross-correlation of the spin current are needed to characterize the noise of the spin current. For a quantum dot with a resonant level, the derivative of spin torque with respect to bias voltage is proportional to sinθ when the system is far away from resonance. When the system is near resonance, the spin transfer torque becomes a non-sinusoidal function of θ. The derivative of the noise of the spin transfer torque with respect to the bias voltage N τ behaves differently when the system is near or far away from resonance. Specifically, the differential shot noise of the spin transfer torque N τ is a concave function of θ near resonance while it becomes a convex function of θ far away from resonance. For certain bias voltages, the period N τ (θ) becomes π instead of 2π. For small θ, it was found that the differential shot noise of the spin transfer torque is very sensitive to the bias voltage and the other system parameters. (paper)

  15. Assessment of ambient noise levels in the urban residential streets of Eastern Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Gehan R

    2012-12-01

    Street of Alexandria have numerous unplanned, mixed, and noisy activities that may interfere with public health and comfort. The aim of this study was to assess A-weighted ambient noise levels in urban residential streets of Eastern Alexandria, Egypt, from September 2010 to January 2011, with the objective of recommending corrective actions to minimize high noise levels. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out, in which A-weighted ambient noise levels were measured on the basis of 24-h periods, using Ono sokki la-5120--precision integrating sound level meter, from September 2010 to January 2011. The measurements were taken on three streets, which were selected using stratified random sampling. Seven measurement sites, along the three streets under study, were selected by site visits according to predetermined criteria. A-weighted ambient noise levels (LAeq) were the highest [70.7 (24.2) dB] on high-traffic-density and high-human-activity streets followed by streets with moderate and low traffic density and human activity [67.5 (31.3) and 62.8 (38.2) dB], respectively. It varied significantly depending on means of transportation (road traffic, train, and/or tram) and human activities (parking lots, shops, and/or street merchants). The A-weighted ambient noise levels on urban residential streets of Eastern Alexandria, Egypt, exceeded the Egyptian National Standards during the three periods of the day (daytime, evening, and night), except in some relatively quiet locations during the night. Consequently, remedial actions to reduce noise levels were recommended.

  16. A survey of acoustic conditions and noise levels in secondary school classrooms in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Bridget; Conetta, Robert; Dockrell, Julie; Connolly, Daniel; Cox, Trevor; Mydlarz, Charles

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic survey of secondary schools in England has been undertaken. Room acoustic parameters and background noise levels were measured in 185 unoccupied spaces in 13 schools to provide information on the typical acoustic environment of secondary schools. The unoccupied acoustic and noise data were correlated with various physical characteristics of the spaces. Room height and the amount of glazing were related to the unoccupied reverberation time and therefore need to be controlled to reduce reverberation to suitable levels for teaching and learning. Further analysis of the unoccupied data showed that the introduction of legislation relating to school acoustics in England and Wales in 2003 approximately doubled the number of school spaces complying with current standards. Noise levels were also measured during 274 lessons to examine typical levels generated during teaching activities in secondary schools and to investigate the influence of acoustic design on working noise levels in the classroom. Comparison of unoccupied and occupied data showed that unoccupied acoustic conditions affect the noise levels occurring during lessons. They were also related to the time spent in disruption to the lessons (e.g., students talking or shouting) and so may also have an impact upon student behavior in the classroom.

  17. Monitoring ship noise to assess the impact of coastal developments on marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Nathan D; Pirotta, Enrico; Barton, Tim R; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-01-15

    The potential impacts of underwater noise on marine mammals are widely recognised, but uncertainty over variability in baseline noise levels often constrains efforts to manage these impacts. This paper characterises natural and anthropogenic contributors to underwater noise at two sites in the Moray Firth Special Area of Conservation, an important marine mammal habitat that may be exposed to increased shipping activity from proposed offshore energy developments. We aimed to establish a pre-development baseline, and to develop ship noise monitoring methods using Automatic Identification System (AIS) and time-lapse video to record trends in noise levels and shipping activity. Our results detail the noise levels currently experienced by a locally protected bottlenose dolphin population, explore the relationship between broadband sound exposure levels and the indicators proposed in response to the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive, and provide a ship noise assessment toolkit which can be applied in other coastal marine environments. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System for Turbofan Engines. Volume 3; Validation and Test Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney has developed a Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) for turbofan engines. This system computes the noise generated by turbulence impinging on the leading edges of the fan and fan exit guide vane, and noise generated by boundary-layer turbulence passing over the fan trailing edge. BFaNS has been validated on three fan rigs that were tested during the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST). The predicted noise spectra agreed well with measured data. The predicted effects of fan speed, vane count, and vane sweep also agreed well with measurements. The noise prediction system consists of two computer programs: Setup_BFaNS and BFaNS. Setup_BFaNS converts user-specified geometry and flow-field information into a BFaNS input file. From this input file, BFaNS computes the inlet and aft broadband sound power spectra generated by the fan and FEGV. The output file from BFaNS contains the inlet, aft and total sound power spectra from each noise source. This report is the third volume of a three-volume set documenting the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System: Volume 1: Setup_BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; Volume 2: BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; and Volume 3: Validation and Test Cases. The present volume begins with an overview of the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System, followed by validation studies that were done on three fan rigs. It concludes with recommended improvements and additional studies for BFaNS.

  19. Does the acceptable noise level (ANL) predict hearing-aid use?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Brännström, K Jonas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that individuals have an inherent acceptance of noise in the presence of speech, and that different acceptance of noise results in different hearing-aid (HA) use. The acceptable noise level (ANL) has been proposed for measurement of this property. It has been...... claimed that the ANL magnitude can predict hearing-aid use patterns. Many papers have been published reporting on different aspects of ANL, but none have challenged the predictive power of ANL. The purpose of this study was to discuss whether ANL can predict HA use and how more reliable ANL results can...... reviewed journals as well as a number of papers from trade journals, posters and oral presentations from audiology conventions. CONCLUSIONS: An inherent acceptance of noise in the presence of speech may exist, but no method for precise measurement of ANL is available. The ANL model for prediction of HA use...

  20. Noise level in a neonatal intensive care unit in Santa Marta - Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, Angélica Patricia; Camargo Caicedo, Yiniva; Velez-Pereira, Andres M

    2017-09-30

    The environment of neonatal intensive care units is influenced by numerous sources of noise emission, which contribute to raise the noise levels, and may cause hearing impairment and other physiological and psychological changes on the newborn, as well as problems with care staff. To evaluate the level and sources of noise in the neonatal intensive care unit. Sampled for 20 consecutive days every 60 seconds in A-weighting curves and fast mode with a Type I sound level meter. Recorded the average, maximum and minimum, and the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles. The values are integrated into hours and work shift, and studied by analysis of variance. The sources were characterized in thirds of octaves. The average level was 64.00 ±3.62 dB(A), with maximum of 76.04 ±5.73 dB(A), minimum of 54.84 ±2.61dB(A), and background noise of 57.95 ±2.83 dB(A). We found four sources with levels between 16.8-63.3 dB(A). Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the hours and work shift, with higher values in the early hours of the day. The values presented exceed the standards suggested by several organizations. The sources identified and measured recorded high values in low frequencies.

  1. Noise Reduction Effect of Multiple-Sampling-Based Signal-Readout Circuits for Ultra-Low Noise CMOS Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Kawahito

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the noise reduction effect of multiple-sampling-based signal readout circuits for implementing ultra-low-noise image sensors. The correlated multiple sampling (CMS technique has recently become an important technology for high-gain column readout circuits in low-noise CMOS image sensors (CISs. This paper reveals how the column CMS circuits, together with a pixel having a high-conversion-gain charge detector and low-noise transistor, realizes deep sub-electron read noise levels based on the analysis of noise components in the signal readout chain from a pixel to the column analog-to-digital converter (ADC. The noise measurement results of experimental CISs are compared with the noise analysis and the effect of noise reduction to the sampling number is discussed at the deep sub-electron level. Images taken with three CMS gains of two, 16, and 128 show distinct advantage of image contrast for the gain of 128 (noise(median: 0.29 e−rms when compared with the CMS gain of two (2.4 e−rms, or 16 (1.1 e−rms.

  2. The Analysis of Low Noise Protection Barriers Influence on Tram Traffic Noise Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahac Maja

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the analysis of tram traffic noise situation in residential areas in the vicinity of Drzic Avenue, one of the major routes between the northern and southern part of the Croatian capital city Zagreb, and the effect of low barriers placed by the tracks on tram noise mitigation. In order to evaluate the effect of planned protection measure, noise models were produced and verified with short-term field measurements. Calculations were conducted by means of noise prediction software, using European interim noise prediction method and 3D model of analyzed area. Finally, the results of noise calculations for existing tram traffic situation and planned measure of protection are presented on noise maps.

  3. Multi-Resonant-Activation for a System Only Driven by Multi-State Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinghui

    2010-01-01

    We consider the escape of the particles over fluctuating potential barrier for a system only driven by a multi-state noise. It is shown that, the noise can make the particles escape over the fluctuating potential barrier in some circumstances; but in other circumstances, it can not. If the noise can make the particle escape over the fluctuating potential barrier, the mean first passage time (MFPT) can display the phenomenon of multi-resonant-activation. For this phenomenon, there are two kinds of resonant activation to appear. One is resonant activation for the MFPTs as the function of the flipping rates of the fluctuating potential barrier; the other is that for the MFPTs as the functions of the transition rates of the multi-state noise. (general)

  4. [Comfort and noise level in infants with helmet interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, A; Alvarez Fernández, P; Rey Galán, C; Álvarez Mendiola, P; Álvarez Blanco, S; Vivanco Allende, A

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate comfort and noise intensity using the COMFORT scale in infants who receive respiratory support with a helmet interface. An observational descriptive study was conducted on all infants (1 to 12 months of age) admitted to a PICU from November 1st 2013 to March 31st 2014 and who received non-invasive ventilation with a helmet interface. Tolerance to the interface was assessed by use of the COMFORT scale. The intensity of the noise to which the infants were exposed was measured with a TES1350A HIBOK 412 sound-level meter. Three measurements were made every day. Twenty seven patients with bronchiolitis (median age: 54 days; range: 10 to 256) were included. Median COMFORT score in the first day was 21 points (14 - 28). An increase in patient comfort was found with a gradual decrease in the scores, with a maximum reduction of 22% from the first hours (score of 22) to the fifth day (score of 18). The minimum sound intensity registered was 42dB, and the maximum was 78dB. Background noise intensity was associated with noise intensity in the helmet. No differences were observed in COMFORT score and noise intensity between ventilator devices. Helmet interface was well tolerated by infants. COMFORT score results are an indicator that infants were comfortable or very comfortable. The measured noise intensity was in the safe range permitted by World Health Organization. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Minimax terminal approach problem in two-level hierarchical nonlinear discrete-time dynamical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorikov, A. F., E-mail: afshorikov@mail.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 S. Mira, Ekaterinburg, 620002, Russia Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 16 S. Kovalevskaya, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    We consider a discrete–time dynamical system consisting of three controllable objects. The motions of all objects are given by the corresponding vector nonlinear or linear discrete–time recurrent vector relations, and control system for its has two levels: basic (first or I level) that is dominating and subordinate level (second or II level) and both have different criterions of functioning and united a priori by determined informational and control connections defined in advance. For the dynamical system in question, we propose a mathematical formalization in the form of solving a multistep problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control over the terminal approach process with incomplete information and give a general scheme for its solving.

  6. Noise-induced transition in a quantum system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Barik, Debashis [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Ray, Deb Shankar [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2005-07-04

    We examine the noise-induced transition in a fluctuating bistable potential of a driven quantum system in thermal equilibrium. Making use of a Wigner canonical thermal distribution for description of the statistical properties of the thermal bath, we explore the generic effects of quantization like vacuum field fluctuation and tunneling in the characteristic stationary probability distribution functions undergoing transition from unimodal to bimodal nature and in signal-to-noise ratio characterizing the cooperative effect among the noise processes and the weak periodic signal.

  7. Noise-induced transition in a quantum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Barik, Debashis; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2005-01-01

    We examine the noise-induced transition in a fluctuating bistable potential of a driven quantum system in thermal equilibrium. Making use of a Wigner canonical thermal distribution for description of the statistical properties of the thermal bath, we explore the generic effects of quantization like vacuum field fluctuation and tunneling in the characteristic stationary probability distribution functions undergoing transition from unimodal to bimodal nature and in signal-to-noise ratio characterizing the cooperative effect among the noise processes and the weak periodic signal

  8. Distributed system for acquisition and analysis of NPP systems noise data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oprea, F.; Gruia, L.

    2001-01-01

    Since years '90 the noise analysis for nuclear stations is more frequently used because: - the data can be acquired by making use of the NPP instrumentation; - acquisition may be performed in a steady-state regime, at rated capacity; - reactor dynamical regime data are obtainable although steady-state regime data are used. The signal noise analysis is based on the dynamical information about the reactor operation obtained from instrumentation signal fluctuations as determined in steady-system regime. The small fluctuations are due to the stochastic effects inherent to physical processes such as heat transfer, boiling, turbulences in coolant flow, moderator collective motions, fission process, structural vibrations and pressure oscillations. Specifically, for CANDU type reactors, the results may be applied for: - surveillance of the functioning characteristics of detectors and transducers; - signaling or predicting misfunctioning of detectors and transducers, what implies establishment of optimal time rate for macro-sampling; - signaling or prediction of misfunctioning of reactor core components, what implies setting up methods and procedures for detecting vibrations inside the fuel channels, based mainly on the signals from the ROPT adjacent detectors and on the flow rate transducers. The system of signal acquisition is a distributed, fixed-data acquisition system provided with a limited number of inputs, based on a number of modules of local analog signal processing and conversion to digital representation. The signal, local processing implies noise removal out of signal through continuous current component elimination, an amplification of the signal, low-pass filtering for alias frequency removal, 16 bit analog-to-digital conversion and digital value serial way transmission. The local processing is based on the characteristics of the acquired signal (noise), namely: - the frequency band, 0.01 Hz - 200 Hz; - the signal amplitude level, 16 - 32 MeV superimposed

  9. Controlling the optical bistability and multistability in a two-level pumped-probe system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Sahrai, Mostafa; Masoumeh Mousavi, Seyede

    2010-01-01

    We study the behavior of the optical bistability (OB) and multistability (OM) in a two-level pumped-probe atomic system by means of a unidirectional ring cavity. We show that the optical bistability in a two-level atomic system can be controlled by adjusting the intensity of the pump field and the detuning between two fields. We find that applying the pumping field decreases the threshold of the optical bistability.

  10. Stochastic resonance for a metapopulation system driven by multiplicative and additive colored noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kang-Kang; Liu Xian-Bin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon induced by the periodic signal in a metapopulation system with colored noises. The analytical expression of signal-to-noise is derived in the adiabatic limit. By numerical calculation, the effects of the addictive noise intensity, the multiplicative noise intensity and two noise self-correlation times on SNR are respectively discussed. It shows that: (i) in the case that the addictive noise intensity M takes a small value, a SR phenomenon for the curve of SNR appears; however, when M takes a large value, SNR turns into a monotonic function on the multiplicative noise intensity Q. (ii) The resonance peaks in the plots of the multiplicative noise intensity Q versus its self-correlation time τ 1 and the addictive noise intensity M versus its self-correlation time τ 2 translate in parallel. Meanwhile, a parallel translation also appears in the plots of τ 1 versus Q and τ 2 versus M. (iii) The interactive effects between self-correlation times τ 1 and τ 2 are opposite. (general)

  11. The impact of noise level on students' learning performance at state elementary school in Medan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchari, Matondang, Nazaruddin

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the level and impact of noise on pupils' learning performance that was observed through a survey at State Elementary School (SDN 060882), which is located on the corner of Abdullah Lubis Street and Pattimura Medan Street. The study was done by measuring the noise level using the Threshold Limit Value (TLV) by taking 24 locations as the measurement points. The results indicated that the noise levels exceeded the standard TLV >55 dBA as regulated in the Decree of the Minister of Environment No. KEP/48/MENLH/11/1996. According to the data processing, the noise level at school was 70.79 dBA. The classrooms were classified into noisy zones based on the Noise Mapping. Those in Red Zone which noise level were in the range of (69-75 dBA) were Class IIIa, Class IVb, and Class VI. In addition, those in Yellow Zone which were in the range of (65-69 dBA) were Class II, Class IIIa, Class IVa and Class V. The noise brought the physiological impact in the forms of dizziness that had the highest percentage of 22% and emotional and uncomfortable feeling of 21%; the communication impact of teacher's explanation disturbance of 22%; and Pupils' learning performance was evidenced to decline of 22%. Some improvements are suggested to reduce the noise such as the reposition of windows, acoustic material to cover the classrooms' wall, and bamboo trees or grasses as the barried around the school area.

  12. Influence of Internal and External Noise on Spontaneous Visuomotor Synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, Manuel; Schmidt, R C; Richardson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, movement noise or variability is considered to be an undesirable property of biological motor systems. In particular, noise is typically assumed to degrade the emergence and stability of rhythmic motor synchronization. Recently, however, it has been suggested that small levels of noise might actually improve the functioning of motor systems and facilitate their adaptation to environmental events. Here, the authors investigated whether noise can facilitate spontaneous rhythmic visuomotor synchronization. They examined the influence of internal noise in the rhythmic limb movements of participants and external noise in the movement of an oscillating visual stimulus on the occurrence of spontaneous synchronization. By indexing the natural frequency variability of participants and manipulating the frequency variability of the visual stimulus, the authors demonstrated that both internal and external noise degrade synchronization when the participants' and stimulus movement frequencies are similar, but can actually facilitate synchronization when the frequencies are different. Furthermore, the two kinds of noise interact with each other. Internal noise facilitates synchronization only when external noise is minimal and vice versa. Too much internal and external noise together degrades synchronization. These findings open new perspectives for better understanding the role of noise in human rhythmic coordination.

  13. Influence of military low-level flight noise on the inner ear of guinea pigs. Der Einfluss von militaerischem Tieffluglaerm auf das Innenohr des Meerschweinchens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrig, W.; Meyer, P.; Kuhl, K.D.; Schmidt, R.; Gruetzmacher, W. (Greifswald Univ. (Germany). HNO-Klinik); Ising, H. (BGA, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasser-, Boden- und Lufthygiene); Ishi, K.; Merker, H.J. (Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie)

    1992-03-01

    The influence of different rises in noise level and - in cases of the repeated passage of aircraft - the impact of varying intervals between the events was to be investigated. The experimental animals used were pigmented guinea pigs of 250 to 500 grammes body weight. The auditory thresholds were measured on the anaesthesized animals by derivation of the acoustically evoked brain stem potentials from the EEGs. For the noise exposure of the animals, two types of military low-level flight noise were used: one flight overhead with a rise in noise level of 7.5 dB/s, and a second one with 75 dB/s.-unlike other cases of damage to the inner ear through noise, the damage sustained in this case was not restricted to the basal convolution but was observed in all four cochlear convolutions. This suggests a particularity of the harmful effect of low-level flight noise, which it is planned to follow up in the future. (orig./MG).

  14. Interplay of interfacial noise and curvature-driven dynamics in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Parna; Sen, Parongama

    2017-02-01

    We explore the effect of interplay of interfacial noise and curvature-driven dynamics in a binary spin system. An appropriate model is the generalized two-dimensional voter model proposed earlier [M. J. de Oliveira, J. F. F. Mendes, and M. A. Santos, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 26, 2317 (1993), 10.1088/0305-4470/26/10/006], where the flipping probability of a spin depends on the state of its neighbors and is given in terms of two parameters, x and y . x =0.5 andy =1 correspond to the conventional voter model which is purely interfacial noise driven, while x =1 and y =1 correspond to the Ising model, where coarsening is fully curvature driven. The coarsening phenomena for 0.5 x y =1 is studied in detail. The dynamical behavior of the relevant quantities show characteristic differences from both x =0.5 and 1. The most remarkable result is the existence of two time scales for x ≥xc where xc≈0.7 . On the other hand, we have studied the exit probability which shows Ising-like behavior with a universal exponent for any value of x >0.5 ; the effect of x appears in altering the value of the parameter occurring in the scaling function only.

  15. Parameter estimation of a delay dynamical system using synchronization in presence of noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakshit, Biswambhar; Chowdhury, A. Roy; Saha, Papri

    2007-01-01

    A method of parameter estimation of a time delay chaotic system through synchronization is discussed. It is assumed that the observed data can always be effected with some white Gaussian noise. A least square approach is used to derive a system of differential equations which governs the temporal evolution of the parameters. These system of equations together with the coupled delay dynamical systems, when integrated, leads to asymptotic convergence to the value of the parameter along with synchronization of the two system variables. This method is quite effective for estimating the delay time which is an important characteristic feature of a delay dynamical system. The procedure is quite robust in the presence of noise

  16. Noise levels in neonatal intensive care unit and use of sound absorbing panel in the isolette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuncu, E; Akman, I; Kulekci, S; Akdas, F; Bilgen, H; Ozek, E

    2009-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the noise level of a busy neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and to determine the effect of sound absorbing panel (SAP) on the level of noise inside the isolette. The sound pressure levels (SPL) of background noise, baby crying, alarms and closing of isolette's door/portholes were measured by a 2235-Brüel&Kjaer Sound Level Meter. Readings were repeated after applying SAP (3D pyramidal shaped open cell polyurethane foam) to the three lateral walls and ceiling of the isolette. The median SPL of background noise inside the NICU was 56dBA and it decreased to 47dBA inside the isolette. The median SPL of monitor alarms and baby crying inside the isolette were not different than SPL measured under radiant warmer (p>0.05). With SAP, the median SPL of temperature alarm inside the isolette decreased significantly from 82 to 72dBA, monitor alarm from 64 to 56dBA, porthole closing from 81 to 74dBA, and isolette door closing from 80 to 68dBA (pnoise produced by baby crying when SAP was used in the isolette (79dBA vs 69dBA, respectively) (pnoise. The noise level in our NICU is significantly above the universally recommended levels. Being inside the isolette protects infants from noise sources produced outside the isolette. However, very high noises are produced inside the isolette as well. Sound absorbing panel can be a simple solution and it attenuated the noise levels inside the isolette.

  17. Evaluation of noise pollution level in the operating rooms of hospitals: A study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giv, Masoumeh Dorri; Sani, Karim Ghazikhanlou; Alizadeh, Majid; Valinejadi, Ali; Majdabadi, Hesamedin Askari

    2017-06-01

    Noise pollution in the operating rooms is one of the remaining challenges. Both patients and physicians are exposed to different sound levels during the operative cases, many of which can last for hours. This study aims to evaluate the noise pollution in the operating rooms during different surgical procedures. In this cross-sectional study, sound level in the operating rooms of Hamadan University-affiliated hospitals (totally 10) in Iran during different surgical procedures was measured using B&K sound meter. The gathered data were compared with national and international standards. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA, t -test, and Pearson's correlation test. Noise pollution level at majority of surgical procedures is higher than national and international documented standards. The highest level of noise pollution is related to orthopedic procedures, and the lowest one related to laparoscopic and heart surgery procedures. The highest and lowest registered sound level during the operation was 93 and 55 dB, respectively. Sound level generated by equipments (69 ± 4.1 dB), trolley movement (66 ± 2.3 dB), and personnel conversations (64 ± 3.9 dB) are the main sources of noise. The noise pollution of operating rooms are higher than available standards. The procedure needs to be corrected for achieving the proper conditions.

  18. Noise levels of a track-laying tractor during field operations in the vineyard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Catania

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Noise in agriculture is one of the risk factors to be taken into account in the assessment of the health and safety of workers; in particular, it is known that the tractor is a source of high noise. The Italian Low Decree 81/2008 defined the requirements for assessing and managing noise risk identifying a number of procedures to be adopted at different noise levels to limit workers exposure. This paper concerns the analysis of the noise risk arising from the use of a tracklaying tractor during field operations carried out in the vineyard. The objective of this study was to evaluate the noise level that comes close to the ear of the operator driving the tractor measuring the values of equivalent sound level (Leq(A and peak sound pressure (LCpk. We considered four options related to the same tractor coupled with the following tools to perform some farming operations: rototilling, chisel plough, flail mowers and vibro farmer. We considered three test conditions: T1 in flat (slope 0%, T2 uphill and T3 downhill (both 30% slope. The instrument used for the measurements is a precision integrating portable sound level meter, class 1, model HD2110L by Delta OHM, Italy. Each survey lasted 2 minutes, with an interval of measurement equal to 0.5 s. The tests were performed in compliance with the standards ISO 9612 and ISO 9432. The results show that the measured sound levels exceed the limits allowed by the regulations in almost all the test conditions; values exceeding the threshold limit of 80 dB(A were recorded coming up to a maximum value of 92.8 dB(A for flail mowers in test T1. When limits imposed by the regulations are exceeded, the operator is obliged to wear the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment.

  19. Minimizing noise in fiberglass aquaculture tanks: Noise reduction potential of various retrofits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equipment used in intensive aquaculture systems, such as pumps and blowers can produce underwater sound levels and frequencies within the range of fish hearing. The impacts of underwater noise on fish are not well known, but limited research suggests that subjecting fish to noise could result in imp...

  20. Assessment of traffic noise levels in urban areas using different soft computing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, J; Bogojević, N; Pljakić, M; Šumarac-Pavlović, D

    2016-10-01

    Available traffic noise prediction models are usually based on regression analysis of experimental data, and this paper presents the application of soft computing techniques in traffic noise prediction. Two mathematical models are proposed and their predictions are compared to data collected by traffic noise monitoring in urban areas, as well as to predictions of commonly used traffic noise models. The results show that application of evolutionary algorithms and neural networks may improve process of development, as well as accuracy of traffic noise prediction.

  1. Assessment and analysis of noise levels in and around Ib river coalfield, Orissa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Haraprasad; Goswami, Shreerup

    2012-05-01

    Heavy earth moving machineries, different capacities of dumpers and loaders, blasting and drilling make the mining environment noisy. A study was carried out to assess the noise level in different opencast projects in and around Belpahar and Brajarajnagar areas of Ib river coalfield. Noise assessment was carried out in various residential, commercial and industrial places. The noise levels, especially L(eq) values of different wheel loaders, dumpers, shovel and crusher units were also assessed and were more than permissible limit (90dB) in some of their operating conditions. Sound ressure level measurements while drilling into coal and overburden at Lakhanpur opencast project yielded noise levels (L(eq)) of 81.33 to 96.2 dB. Thus, these L(eq) values of drilling machines in most of the operating conditions were above permissible limit. The average noise intensities (6 a.m.-10 p.m.: 51.6-60.875dB and 10 p.m.-6 a.m.: 42.6-49.8dB) and L(eq) values (6 a.m.-10 p.m.: 50.9-67.0dB and 10 p.m.-6 a.m.: 40.8-53.3dB) during both day and night time of the residential areas around the Ib river coalfield were in close proximity or beyond the permissible limit. The L(eq) values at some of the commercial and industrial places were beyond (6 a.m.-10 p.m.: 61.6-88.3 dB and 10 p.m.-6 a.m.: 55.4-64.8dB) permissible limit. However, in most of the cases, the L(max) noise values were more (6 a.m.-10 p.m.: 68.5-91.4 dB and 10 p.m.-6 a.m.: 69.3-76.4dB) than the permissible limit. Analysis of variance was also computed for heavy earth moving machineries in different operating conditions and also for different residential, commercial and industrial places to infer the level of significance. The difference of noise intensity produced by different wheel loaders at Lakhanpur and Lilari opencast projects, drilling machines at Lakhanpur opencast project, 50 tons capacity dumpers at various conditions of Ib river coalfield within the same operating condition was significant at both 5% and 1% levels

  2. Experimental Results on the Level Crossing Intervals of the Phase of Sine Wave Plus Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Neji; Munakata, Tsutomu; Mimaki, Tadashi

    1993-03-01

    Experimental study was made on the level crossing intervals of a phase process of a sine wave plus narrow-band Gaussian noise. Since successive level crossings of phase do not necessarily occur alternately in the upward and downward direction due to the phase jump beyond 2π, the usual definitions of the probability densities of the level crossing intervals for continuous random processes are not applicable in the case of the phase process. Therefore, the probability densities of level crossing intervals of phase process are newly defined. Measurements of these densities were performed for noise having lowpass spectra of Gaussian and 7th order Butterworth types. Results are given for various values of the signal-to-noise power ratio and of the crossing level, and compared with corresponding approximation developed under the assumption of quasi-independence. The validity of the assumption depends on the spectrum shape of the noise.

  3. Four-level and two-qubit systems, subalgebras, and unitary integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, A.R.P.; Selvaraj, G.; Uskov, D.

    2005-01-01

    Four-level systems in quantum optics, and for representing two qubits in quantum computing, are difficult to solve for general time-dependent Hamiltonians. A systematic procedure is presented which combines analytical handling of the algebraic operator aspects with simple solutions of classical, first-order differential equations. In particular, by exploiting su(2)+su(2) and su(2)+su(2)+u(1) subalgebras of the full SU(4) dynamical group of the system, the nontrivial part of the final calculation is reduced to a single Riccati (first-order, quadratically nonlinear) equation, itself simply solved. Examples are provided of two-qubit problems from the recent literature, including implementation of two-qubit gates with Josephson junctions

  4. Current Background Noise Sources and Levels in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Jaeger, Stephen; Soderman, Paul; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Background noise measurements were made of the acoustic environment in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel (40x80) at NASA Ames Research Center. The measurements were acquired subsequent to the 40x80 Aeroacoustic Modernization Project, which was undertaken to improve the anechoic characteristics of the 40x80's closed test section as well as reduce the levels of background noise in the facility. The resulting 40x80 anechoic environment was described by Soderman et. al., and the current paper describes the resulting 40x80 background noise, discusses the sources of the noise, and draws comparisons to previous 40x80 background noise levels measurements. At low wind speeds or low frequencies, the 40x80 background noise is dominated by the fan drive system. To obtain the lowest fan drive noise for a given tunnel condition, it is possible in the 40x80 to reduce the fans' rotational speed and adjust the fans' blade pitch, as described by Schmidtz et. al. This idea is not new, but has now been operationally implemented with modifications for increased power at low rotational speeds. At low to mid-frequencies and at higher wind speeds, the dominant noise mechanism was thought to be caused by the surface interface of the previous test section floor acoustic lining. In order to reduce this noise mechanism, the new test section floor lining was designed to resist the pumping of flow in and out of the space between the grating slats required to support heavy equipment. In addition, the lining/flow interface over the entire test section was designed to be smoother and quieter than the previous design. At high wind speeds or high frequencies, the dominant source of background noise in the 40x80 is believed to be caused by the response of the in-flow microphone probes (required by the nature of the closed test section) to the fluctuations in the freestream flow. The resulting background noise levels are also different for probes of various

  5. An excess noise measurement system for weak responsivity avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Dimler, Simon J.; Baharuddin, Aina N. A. P.; Green, James E.; David, John P. R.

    2018-06-01

    A system for measuring, with reduced photocurrent, the excess noise associated with the gain in avalanche photodiodes (APDs), using a transimpedance amplifier front-end and based on phase-sensitive detection is described. The system can reliably measure the excess noise power of devices, even when the un-multiplied photocurrent is low (~10 nA). This is more than one order of magnitude better than previously reported systems and represents a significantly better noise signal to noise ratio. This improvement in performance has been achieved by increasing the value of the feedback resistor and reducing the op-amp bandwidth. The ability to characterise APD performance with such low photocurrents enables the use of low power light sources such as light emitting diode rather than lasers to investigate the APD noise performance.

  6. A Novel Electromotance Noise Mitigation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket propulsion environments generate electromotance effects that often introduce undesirable noise within the instrumentation systems. These effects are also...

  7. A study on traffic noise of two campuses of University, Balasore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Shreerup; Nayak, Subrata Kumar; Pradhan, Akula Chandra; Dey, Surjendu Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Noise pollution is a significant environmental problem in many rapidly urbanizing areas of Orissa, India. Transportation sector is one of the major contributors to noise in these areas. The present study is an attempt to estimate traffic noise pollution at five places on the way from Vyasa Vihar Campus to Gyan Vigyan Vihar Campus of Fakir Mohan University, Balasore, Orissa. The sources of noise at the studied sites are predominantly attributable to motor vehicular traffic. The noise levels of all the five locations were found to be beyond permissible limit during the day time. The contributions of different types of vehicles to environmental noise were found to ranging from 70.4-94.2, 79.0-96.1, 77.8-110.2, 70.8-90.3, 71.0-87.5, 71.1-84.4, 72.5-86.9 and 74.0-85.4 dB (A) by cargo carrying Trucks, Tractors, Dumpers, Town Buses, Motor cycles, Bolero/Trucker, Pick up and Tempo respectively. The contributions of individual vehicles towards noise pollution were found to be more than the road traffic noise-limit i.e., 70 dB (A). On certain local inhabitants interviewed, the impact of noise was observed in the forms of alterations in their physical, psychological and personal aspects. This study warrants attention from all sections of people to deal with the problem of noise pollution.

  8. Neutron density fluctuations in point reactor systems with dichotomic reactivity noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Okitsugu

    1984-01-01

    The exactly solvable stochastic point reactor model systems are analyzed through the stochastic Liouville equation. Three kinds of model systems are treated: (1) linear system without delayed neutrons, (2) linear system with one-group of delayed neutrons, and (3) nonlinear system with direct power feedback. The exact expressions for the fluctuations of neutron density, such as the moments, autocorrelation function and power spectral density, are derived in the case where the colored reactivity noise is described by the dichotomic, or two state, Markov process with arbitrary correlation time and intensity, and the effects of the finite correlation time and intensity of the noise on the neutron density fluctuations are investigated. The influence of presence of delayed neutrons and the effect of nonlinearity of system on the neutron density fluctuations are also elucidated. When the reactivity correlation time is very short, the correlation time has almost no effect on the power spectral density, and the relative fluctuation of neutron density in the stationary state is not affected very much by the presence of delayed neutrons and also by the nonlinearity of system. On the other hand, if the reactivity correlation time is very long, the effect of the reactivity noise on the power spectral density appears at very low frequency, and the presence of delayed neutrons has an effect of reducing the neutron density fluctuations. (author)

  9. Theoretical investigation of the neutron noise diagnostics of two-dimensional control rod vibrations in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.; Analytis, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    In order to develop a method for monitoring control rod vibrations by neutron noise measurements, the noise induced by two-dimensional vibrations of control elements is investigated. The two-dimensional Green's function relating the small stochastic cross-section fluctuations to the neutron noise is determined for a rectangular slab reactor in the modified one-group theory, and subsequently, the neutron response to two-dimensional vibrating noise sources is investigated. Two possible diagnostical applications are considered: (a) the reconstruction of the mechanical trajectory of the vibrating element by neutron noise measurements, and (b) the possibility of locating the vibrating element in the core. (author)

  10. Shot noise in systems with semi-Dirac points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Feng; Wang, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the ballistic conductance and shot noise of electrons through a two-dimensional stripe system (width W ≫ length L) with semi-Dirac band-touching points. We find that the ratio between zero-temperature noise power and mean current (the Fano factor) is highly anisotropic. When the transport is along the linear-dispersion direction and the Fermi energy is fixed at the semi-Dirac point, the Fano factor has a universal value F = 0.179 while a minimum conductivity exists and scales with L 1∕2 . Along the parabolic dispersion direction, the Fano factor at the semi-Dirac point has a contact-independent limit exceeding 0.9, which varies weakly with L due to the common-path interference of evanescent waves. Our findings suggest a way to discern the type of band-touching points

  11. Noise level in intensive care units of a public university hospital in Santa Marta (Colombia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the noise level in adult, pediatric and neonatal intensive care units of a university hospital in the city of Santa Marta (Colombia). A descriptive, observational, non-interventional study with follow-up over time was carried out. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days for each unit using a type i sound level meter, filter frequency in A weighting and Fast mode. We recorded the maximum values, the 90th percentile as background noise, and the continuous noise level. The mean hourly levels in the adult unit varied between 57.40±1.14-63.47±2.13dBA, with a maximum between 71.55±2.32-77.22±1.94dBA, and a background noise between 53.51±1.16-60.26±2.10dBA; in the pediatric unit the mean hourly levels varied between 57.07±3.07-65.72±2.46dBA, with a maximum of 68.69±3.57-79.06±2.34dBA, and a background noise between 53.33±3.54-61.96±2.85dBA; the neonatal unit in turn presented mean hourly values between 59.54±2.41-65.33±1.77dBA, with a maximum value between 67.20±2.13-77.65±3.74dBA, and a background noise between 55.02±2.03-58.70±1.95dBA. Analysis of variance revealed a significant difference between the hourly values and between the different units, with the time of day exhibiting a greater influence. The type of unit affects the noise levels in intensive care units, the pediatric unit showing the highest values and the adult unit the lowest values. However, the parameter exerting the greatest influence upon noise level is the time of day, with higher levels in the morning and evening, and lower levels at night and in the early morning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Changing noise levels in a high CO2/lower pH ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P. G.; Hester, K. C.; Peltzer, E. T.; Kirkwood, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    We show that ocean acidification from fossil fuel CO2 invasion and from increased respiration/reduced ventilation, has significantly reduced ocean sound absorption and thus increased ocean noise levels in the kHz frequency range. Below 10 kHz, sound absorption occurs due to well known chemical relaxations in the B(OH)3/B(OH)4- and HCO3-/CO32- systems. The pH dependence of these chemical relaxations results in decreased sound absorption (α = dB/km) as the ocean becomes more acidic from increased CO2 levels. The scale of surface ocean pH change today from the +105 ppmv change in atmospheric CO2 is about - 0.12 pH, resulting in frequency dependent decreases in sound absorption that now exceed 12% over pre- industrial. Under reasonable projections of future fossil fuel CO2 emissions and other sources a pH change of 0.3 units or more can be anticipated by mid-century, resulting in a decrease in α by almost 40%. Increases in water temperature have a smaller effect but also contribute to decreased sound absorption. Combining a lowering of 0.3 pH units with an increase of 3°C, α will decrease further to almost 45%. Ambient noise levels in the ocean within the auditory range critical for environmental, military, and economic interests are set to increase significantly due to the combined effects of decreased absorption and increasing sources from mankind's activities. Incorporation of sound absorption in modeling future ocean scenarios (R. Zeebe, personal communication) and long-term monitoring possibly with the aid of modern cabled observatories can give insights in how ocean noise will continue to change and its effect on groups such as marine mammals which communicate in the affected frequency range.

  13. Exponential signaling gain at the receptor level enhances signal-to-noise ratio in bacterial chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Neumann

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling systems show astonishing precision in their response to external stimuli despite strong fluctuations in the molecular components that determine pathway activity. To control the effects of noise on signaling most efficiently, living cells employ compensatory mechanisms that reach from simple negative feedback loops to robustly designed signaling architectures. Here, we report on a novel control mechanism that allows living cells to keep precision in their signaling characteristics - stationary pathway output, response amplitude, and relaxation time - in the presence of strong intracellular perturbations. The concept relies on the surprising fact that for systems showing perfect adaptation an exponential signal amplification at the receptor level suffices to eliminate slowly varying multiplicative noise. To show this mechanism at work in living systems, we quantified the response dynamics of the E. coli chemotaxis network after genetically perturbing the information flux between upstream and downstream signaling components. We give strong evidence that this signaling system results in dynamic invariance of the activated response regulator against multiplicative intracellular noise. We further demonstrate that for environmental conditions, for which precision in chemosensing is crucial, the invariant response behavior results in highest chemotactic efficiency. Our results resolve several puzzling features of the chemotaxis pathway that are widely conserved across prokaryotes but so far could not be attributed any functional role.

  14. Predictive modelling of noise level generated during sawing of rocks ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents an experimental and statistical study on noise level generated .... hardness were determined according to related ISRM (1981) suggested methods. Thin section ..... tistical Package for the Social Sciences). Additionally, the ...

  15. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Gyuseong.

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was ∼400 MHz and the noise charge ∼1000 electrons at a 1 μsec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of ∼0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB

  16. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyuseong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was ~400 MHz and the noise charge ~1000 electrons at a 1 μsec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of ~0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB.

  17. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyuseong.

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was {approximately}400 MHz and the noise charge {approximately}1000 electrons at a 1 {mu}sec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of {approximately}0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB.

  18. System test and noise performance studies at the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weingarten, J.

    2007-09-01

    The central component of the ATLAS Inner Tracker is the pixel detector. It consists of three barrel layers and three disk-layers in the end-caps in both forward directions. The innermost barrel layer is mounted at a distance of about 5 cm from the interaction region. With its very high granularity, truly two-dimensional hit information, and fast readout it is well suited to cope with the high densities of charged tracks, expected this close to the interaction region. The huge number of readout channels necessitates a very complex services infrastructure for powering, readout and safety. After a description of the pixel detector and its services infrastructure, key results from the system test at CERN are presented. Furthermore the noise performance of the pixel detector, crucial for high tracking and vertexing efficiencies, is studied. Measurements of the single-channel random noise are presented together with studies of common mode noise and measurements of the noise occupancy using a random trigger generator. (orig.)

  19. System test and noise performance studies at the ATLAS pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingarten, J.

    2007-09-15

    The central component of the ATLAS Inner Tracker is the pixel detector. It consists of three barrel layers and three disk-layers in the end-caps in both forward directions. The innermost barrel layer is mounted at a distance of about 5 cm from the interaction region. With its very high granularity, truly two-dimensional hit information, and fast readout it is well suited to cope with the high densities of charged tracks, expected this close to the interaction region. The huge number of readout channels necessitates a very complex services infrastructure for powering, readout and safety. After a description of the pixel detector and its services infrastructure, key results from the system test at CERN are presented. Furthermore the noise performance of the pixel detector, crucial for high tracking and vertexing efficiencies, is studied. Measurements of the single-channel random noise are presented together with studies of common mode noise and measurements of the noise occupancy using a random trigger generator. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of the environmental noise levels in Abuja Municipality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess the equivalent noise level (Leq) in Abuja municipality and promote a simple method for regular assessment of Leq within our environment. Methods: This is a cross-sectional community based study of the environmental Leq of Abuja municipality conducted between January 2014 and January 2016.

  1. Stochastic resonance and noise delayed extinction in a model of two competing species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, D.; Fiasconaro, A.; Spagnolo, B.

    2004-01-01

    We study the role of the noise in the dynamics of two competing species. We consider generalized Lotka-Volterra equations in the presence of a multiplicative noise, which models the interaction between the species and the environment. The interaction parameter between the species is a random process which obeys a stochastic differential equation with a generalized bistable potential in the presence of a periodic driving term, which accounts for the environment temperature variation. We find noise-induced periodic oscillations of the species concentrations and stochastic resonance phenomenon. We find also a nonmonotonic behavior of the mean extinction time of one of the two competing species as a function of the additive noise intensity.

  2. Effects of internal noise in mesoscopic chemical systems near Hopf bifurcation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Tiejun; Ma Juan; Hou Zhonghuai; Xin Houwen

    2007-01-01

    The effects of internal noise in mesoscopic chemical oscillation systems have been studied analytically, in the parameter region close to the deterministic Hopf bifurcation. Starting from chemical Langevin equations, stochastic normal form equations are obtained, governing the evolution of the radius and phase of the stochastic oscillation. By stochastic averaging, the normal form equation can be solved analytically. Stationary distributions of the radius and auto-correlation functions of the phase variable are obtained. It is shown that internal noise can induce oscillation; even no deterministic oscillation exists. The radius of the noise-induced oscillation (NIO) becomes larger when the internal noise increases, but the correlation time becomes shorter. The trade-off between the strength and regularity of the NIO leads to a clear maximum in its signal-to-noise ratio when the internal noise changes, demonstrating the occurrence of internal noise coherent resonance. Since the intensity of the internal noise is inversely proportional to the system size, the phenomenon also indicates the existence of an optimal system size. These theoretical results are applied to a circadian clock system and excellent agreement with the numerical results is obtained

  3. Polarimetry noise in fiber-based optical coherence tomography instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ellen Ziyi; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    High noise levels in fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) have broadly limited its clinical utility. In this study we investigate contribution of polarization mode dispersion (PMD) to the polarimetry noise. We develop numerical models of the PS-OCT system including PMD and validate these models with empirical data. Using these models, we provide a framework for predicting noise levels, for processing signals to reduce noise, and for designing an optimized system. PMID:21935044

  4. Aircraft noise, health, and residential sorting: evidence from two quasi-experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Stefan; Nüesch, Stephan; Stillman, Steven

    2013-09-01

    We explore two unexpected changes in flight regulations to estimate the causal effect of aircraft noise on health. Detailed measures of noise are linked with longitudinal data on individual health outcomes based on the exact address information. Controlling for individual heterogeneity and spatial sorting into different neighborhoods, we find that aircraft noise significantly increases sleeping problems and headaches. Models that do not control for such heterogeneity and sorting substantially underestimate the negative health effects, which suggests that individuals self-select into residence based on their unobserved sensitivity to noise. Our study demonstrates that the combination of quasi-experimental variation and panel data is very powerful for identifying causal effects in epidemiological field studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Decreased Hippocampal 5-HT and DA Levels Following Sub-Chronic Exposure to Noise Stress: Impairment in both Spatial and Recognition Memory in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Saida; Naqvi, Fizza; Batool, Zehra; Tabassum, Saiqa; Perveen, Tahira; Saleem, Sadia; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2012-01-01

    Mankind is exposed to a number of stressors, and among them noise is one which can cause intense stress. High levels of background noise can severely impair one's ability to concentrate. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of sub-chronic noise stress on cognitive behavior and hippocampal monoamine levels in male rats. The study was performed on 12 male Wistar rats, divided into two groups; the control and noise-exposed. The rats in the test group were subjected to noise stress, 4h daily for 15 days. Cognitive testing was performed by the Elevated Plus Maze test (EPM) and Novel Object Recognition test (NOR). HPLC-EC was used to determine hippocampal monoamine levels and their metabolites. The data obtained revealed a significant decrease in hippocampal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and dopamine (DA) levels, whereas turnover ratios of 5-HT and DA were significantly increased compared to the controls. Rats exposed to noise exhibited a significant decrement in spatial memory. A significantly decreased recognition index of rats exposed to noise as compared to the control was also observed in the NOR test. Results of the present findings suggest the role of decreased hippocampal 5-HT and DA in the impairment of cognitive function following noise exposure.

  6. 1/f noise: diffusive systems and music

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, R.F.

    1975-11-01

    Measurements of the 1/f voltage noise in continuous metal films are reported. At room temperature, samples of pure metals and bismuth (with a carrier density smaller by 10/sup 5/) of similar volume had comparable noise. The results suggest that the noise arises from equilibrium temperature fluctuations modulating the resistance. Spatial correlation of the noise implied that the fluctuations obey a diffusion equation. The empirical inclusion of an explicit 1/f region and appropriate normalization lead to excellent agreement with the measured noise. If the fluctuations are assumed to be spatially correlated, the diffusion equation can yield an extended 1/f region in the power spectrum. The temperature response of a sample to delta and step function power inputs is shown to have the same shape as the autocorrelation function for uncorrelated and correlated temperature fluctuations, respectively. The spectrum obtained from the cosine transform of the measured step function response is in excellent agreement with the measured 1/f voltage noise spectrum. Spatially correlated equilibrium temperature fluctuations are not the dominant source of 1/f noise in semiconductors and metal films. However, the agreement between the low-frequency spectrum of fluctuations in the mean-square Johnson noise voltage and the resistance fluctuation spectrum measured in the presence of a current demonstrates that in these systems the 1/f noise is also due to equilibrium resistance fluctuations. Loudness fluctuations in music and speech and pitch fluctuations in music also show the 1/f behavior. 1/f noise sources, consequently, are demonstrated to be the natural choice for stochastic composition. 26 figures, 1 table. (auth)

  7. Dichotomous-noise-induced pattern formation in a reaction-diffusion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debojyoti; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2013-06-01

    We consider a generic reaction-diffusion system in which one of the parameters is subjected to dichotomous noise by controlling the flow of one of the reacting species in a continuous-flow-stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) -membrane reactor. The linear stability analysis in an extended phase space is carried out by invoking Furutzu-Novikov procedure for exponentially correlated multiplicative noise to derive the instability condition in the plane of the noise parameters (correlation time and strength of the noise). We demonstrate that depending on the correlation time an optimal strength of noise governs the self-organization. Our theoretical analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on pattern formation in a chlorine-dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system.

  8. Shot noise and Fano factor in tunneling in three-band pseudospin-1 Dirac-Weyl systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Hui, Pak Ming

    2017-06-01

    Tunneling through a potential barrier of height V0 in a two-dimensional system with a band structure consisting of three bands with a flat band intersecting the touching apices of two Dirac cones is studied. Results of the transmission coefficient at various incident angles, conductivity, shot noise, and Fano factor in this pseudospin-1 Dirac-Weyl system are presented and contrasted with those in graphene which is typical of a pseudospin-1/2 system. The pseudospin-1 system is found to show a higher transmission and suppressed shot noise in general. Significant differences in the shot noise and Fano factor due to the super Klein tunneling effect that allows perfect transmission at all incident angles under certain conditions are illustrated. For Fermi energy EF =V0 / 2, super Klein tunneling leads to a noiseless conductivity that takes on the maximum value 2e2 DkF / (πh) for 0 ≤EF ≤V0. This gives rise to a minimum Fano factor, in sharp contrast with that of a local maximum in graphene. For EF =V0, the band structure of pseudospin-1 system no longer leads to a quantized value of the conductivity as in graphene. Both the conductivity and the shot noise show a minimum with the Fano factor approaching 1/4, which is different from the value of 1/3 in graphene.

  9. Impact of bowtie filter and object position on the two-dimensional noise power spectrum of a clinical MDCT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Cruz-Bastida, Juan Pablo [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Budde, Adam; Hsieh, Jiang [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and GE Healthcare, 3000 N Grandview Boulevard, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Noise characteristics of clinical multidetector CT (MDCT) systems can be quantified by the noise power spectrum (NPS). Although the NPS of CT has been extensively studied in the past few decades, the joint impact of the bowtie filter and object position on the NPS has not been systematically investigated. This work studies the interplay of these two factors on the two dimensional (2D) local NPS of a clinical CT system that uses the filtered backprojection algorithm for image reconstruction. Methods: A generalized NPS model was developed to account for the impact of the bowtie filter and image object location in the scan field-of-view (SFOV). For a given bowtie filter, image object, and its location in the SFOV, the shape and rotational symmetries of the 2D local NPS were directly computed from the NPS model without going through the image reconstruction process. The obtained NPS was then compared with the measured NPSs from the reconstructed noise-only CT images in both numerical phantom simulation studies and experimental phantom studies using a clinical MDCT scanner. The shape and the associated symmetry of the 2D NPS were classified by borrowing the well-known atomic spectral symbols s, p, and d, which correspond to circular, dumbbell, and cloverleaf symmetries, respectively, of the wave function of electrons in an atom. Finally, simulated bar patterns were embedded into experimentally acquired noise backgrounds to demonstrate the impact of different NPS symmetries on the visual perception of the object. Results: (1) For a central region in a centered cylindrical object, an s-wave symmetry was always present in the NPS, no matter whether the bowtie filter was present or not. In contrast, for a peripheral region in a centered object, the symmetry of its NPS was highly dependent on the bowtie filter, and both p-wave symmetry and d-wave symmetry were observed in the NPS. (2) For a centered region-ofinterest (ROI) in an off-centered object, the symmetry of

  10. Impact of bowtie filter and object position on the two-dimensional noise power spectrum of a clinical MDCT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel; Cruz-Bastida, Juan Pablo; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong; Budde, Adam; Hsieh, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Noise characteristics of clinical multidetector CT (MDCT) systems can be quantified by the noise power spectrum (NPS). Although the NPS of CT has been extensively studied in the past few decades, the joint impact of the bowtie filter and object position on the NPS has not been systematically investigated. This work studies the interplay of these two factors on the two dimensional (2D) local NPS of a clinical CT system that uses the filtered backprojection algorithm for image reconstruction. Methods: A generalized NPS model was developed to account for the impact of the bowtie filter and image object location in the scan field-of-view (SFOV). For a given bowtie filter, image object, and its location in the SFOV, the shape and rotational symmetries of the 2D local NPS were directly computed from the NPS model without going through the image reconstruction process. The obtained NPS was then compared with the measured NPSs from the reconstructed noise-only CT images in both numerical phantom simulation studies and experimental phantom studies using a clinical MDCT scanner. The shape and the associated symmetry of the 2D NPS were classified by borrowing the well-known atomic spectral symbols s, p, and d, which correspond to circular, dumbbell, and cloverleaf symmetries, respectively, of the wave function of electrons in an atom. Finally, simulated bar patterns were embedded into experimentally acquired noise backgrounds to demonstrate the impact of different NPS symmetries on the visual perception of the object. Results: (1) For a central region in a centered cylindrical object, an s-wave symmetry was always present in the NPS, no matter whether the bowtie filter was present or not. In contrast, for a peripheral region in a centered object, the symmetry of its NPS was highly dependent on the bowtie filter, and both p-wave symmetry and d-wave symmetry were observed in the NPS. (2) For a centered region-ofinterest (ROI) in an off-centered object, the symmetry of

  11. Noiseonomics: the relationship between ambient noise levels in the sea and global economic trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, George V

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the topic of noise in the sea and its effects on marine mammals has attracted considerable attention from both the scientific community and the general public. Since marine mammals rely heavily on acoustics as a primary means of communicating, navigating, and foraging in the ocean, any change in their acoustic environment may have an impact on their behavior. Specifically, a growing body of literature suggests that low-frequency, ambient noise levels in the open ocean increased approximately 3.3 dB per decade during the period 1950-2007. Here we show that this increase can be attributed primarily to commercial shipping activity, which in turn, can be linked to global economic growth. As a corollary, we conclude that ambient noise levels can be directly related to global economic conditions. We provide experimental evidence supporting this theory and discuss its implications for predicting future noise levels based on global economic trends.

  12. A noise power spectrum study of a new model-based iterative reconstruction system: Veo 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Liu, Xinming; Dodge, Cristina T; Jensen, Corey T; Rong, X John

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance of the third generation of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) system, Veo 3.0, based on noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis with various clinical presets over a wide range of clinically applicable dose levels. A CatPhan 600 surrounded by an oval, fat-equivalent ring to mimic patient size/shape was scanned 10 times at each of six dose levels on a GE HD 750 scanner. NPS analysis was performed on images reconstructed with various Veo 3.0 preset combinations for comparisons of those images reconstructed using Veo 2.0, filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruc-tion (ASiR). The new Target Thickness setting resulted in higher noise in thicker axial images. The new Texture Enhancement function achieved a more isotropic noise behavior with less image artifacts. Veo 3.0 provides additional reconstruction options designed to allow the user choice of balance between spatial resolution and image noise, relative to Veo 2.0. Veo 3.0 provides more user selectable options and in general improved isotropic noise behavior in comparison to Veo 2.0. The overall noise reduction performance of both versions of MBIR was improved in comparison to FBP and ASiR, especially at low-dose levels. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. On common noise-induced synchronization in complex networks with state-dependent noise diffusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giovanni; Shorten, Robert

    2018-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the study of common noise-induced synchronization phenomena in complex networks of diffusively coupled nonlinear systems. We consider the case where common noise propagation depends on the network state and, as a result, the noise diffusion process at the nodes depends on the state of the network. For such networks, we present an algebraic sufficient condition for the onset of synchronization, which depends on the network topology, the dynamics at the nodes, the coupling strength and the noise diffusion. Our result explicitly shows that certain noise diffusion processes can drive an unsynchronized network towards synchronization. In order to illustrate the effectiveness of our result, we consider two applications: collective decision processes and synchronization of chaotic systems. We explicitly show that, in the former application, a sufficiently large noise can drive a population towards a common decision, while, in the latter, we show how common noise can synchronize a network of Lorentz chaotic systems.

  14. Noise in nonlinear nanoelectromechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Vidal, Diego N.

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS), due to their nanometer scale size, possess a number of desirable attributes: high sensitivity to applied forces, fast response times, high resonance frequencies and low power consumption. However, ultra small size and low power handling result in unwanted consequences: smaller signal size and higher dissipation, making the NEMS devices more susceptible to external and intrinsic noise. The simplest version of a NEMS, a suspended nanomechanical structure with two distinct excitation states, can be used as an archetypal two state system to study a plethora of fundamental phenomena such as Duffing nonlinearity, stochastic resonance, and macroscopic quantum tunneling at low temperatures. From a technical perspective, there are numerous applications such nanomechanical memory elements, microwave switches and nanomechanical computation. The control and manipulation of the mechanical response of these two state systems can be realized by exploiting a (seemingly) counterintuitive physical phenomenon, Stochastic Resonance: in a noisy nonlinear mechanical system, the presence of noise can enhance the system response to an external stimulus. This Thesis is mainly dedicated to study possible applications of Stochastic Resonance in two-state nanomechanical systems. First, on chip signal amplification by 1/falpha is observed. The effectiveness of the noise assisted amplification is observed to decrease with increasing a. Experimental evidence shows an increase in asymmetry between the two states with increasing noise color. Considering the prevalence of 1/f alpha noise in the materials in integrated circuits, the signal enhancement demonstrated here, suggests beneficial use of the otherwise detrimental noise. Finally, a nanomechanical device, operating as a reprogrammable logic gate, and performing fundamental logic functions such as AND/OR and NAND/NOR is presented. The logic function can be programmed (from AND to OR) dynamically, by

  15. Environmental propagation of noise in mines and nearby villages: A study through noise mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena D Manwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noise mapping being an established practice in Europe is hardly practiced for noise management in India although it is mandatory in Indian mines as per guidelines of the Directorate General of Mines Safety (DGMS. As a pilot study, noise mapping was conducted in an opencast mine with three different models; one based on the baseline operating conditions in two shifts (Situation A, and two other virtual situations where either production targets were enhanced by extending working hours to three shifts (Situation B or only by increased mechanization and not changing the duration of work (Situation C. Methods: Noise sources were categorized as point, line, area, and moving sources. Considering measured power of the sources, specific meteorological and geographical parameters, noise maps were generated using Predictor LimA software. Results: In all three situations, Lden values were 95 dB(A and 70–80 dB(A near drill machine and haul roads, respectively. Noise contours were wider in Situation C due to increase in frequency of dumpers. Lden values near Shovel 1 and Shovel 2 under Situation B increased by 5 dB and 3 dB, respectively due to expansion of working hours. In Situation C, noise levels were >82 dB(A around shovels. Noise levels on both sides of conveyor belts were in the range of 80–85 dB(A in Situations A and C whereas it was 85–90 dB(A in Situation B. Near crusher plants, it ranged from 80 to 90 dB(A in Situations A and C and between 85 and 95 dB(A in Situation B. In all situations, noise levels near residential areas exceeded the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB limits, i.e., 55 dB(A. Conclusions: For all situations, predicted noise levels exceeded CPCB limits within the mine and nearby residential area. Residential areas near the crusher plants are vulnerable to increased noise propagation. It is recommended to put an acoustic barrier near the crusher plant to attenuate the noise propagation.

  16. Two interacting spins in external fields. Four-level systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G.; Baldiotti, M.C.; Gitman, D.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318-CEP, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Levin, A.D. [Dexter Research Center (United States)

    2007-04-15

    In the present article, we consider the so-called two-spin equation that describes four-level quantum systems. Recently, these systems attract attention due to their relation to the problem of quantum computation. We study general properties of the two-spin equation and show that the problem for certain external backgrounds can be identified with the problem of one spin in an appropriate background. This allows one to generate a number of exact solutions for two-spin equations on the basis of already known exact solutions of the one-spin equation. Besides, we present some exact solutions for the two-spin equation with an external background different for each spin but having the same direction. We study the eigenvalue problem for a time-independent spin interaction and a time-independent external background. A possible analogue of the Rabi problem for the two-spin equation is defined. We present its exact solution and demonstrate the existence of magnetic resonances in two specific frequencies, one of them coinciding with the Rabi frequency, and the other depending on the rotating field magnitude. The resonance that corresponds to the second frequency is suppressed with respect to the first one. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Perturbation Theory for Open Two-Level Nonlinear Quantum Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhijie; Jiang Dongguang; Wang Wei

    2011-01-01

    Perturbation theory is an important tool in quantum mechanics. In this paper, we extend the traditional perturbation theory to open nonlinear two-level systems, treating decoherence parameter γ as a perturbation. By this virtue, we give a perturbative solution to the master equation, which describes a nonlinear open quantum system. The results show that for small decoherence rate γ, the ratio of the nonlinear rate C to the tunneling coefficient V (i.e., r = C/V) determines the validity of the perturbation theory. For small ratio r, the perturbation theory is valid, otherwise it yields wrong results. (general)

  18. A Ratiometric Method for Johnson Noise Thermometry Using a Quantized Voltage Noise Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S. W.; Benz, S. P.; Martinis, J. M.; Dresselhaus, P.; Tew, W. L.; White, D. R.

    2003-09-01

    Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) involves the measurement of the statistical variance of a fluctuating voltage across a resistor in thermal equilibrium. Modern digital techniques make it now possible to perform many functions required for JNT in highly efficient and predictable ways. We describe the operational characteristics of a prototype JNT system which uses digital signal processing for filtering, real-time spectral cross-correlation for noise power measurement, and a digitally synthesized Quantized Voltage Noise Source (QVNS) as an AC voltage reference. The QVNS emulates noise with a constant spectral density that is stable, programmable, and calculable in terms of known parameters using digital synthesis techniques. Changes in analog gain are accounted for by alternating the inputs between the Johnson noise sensor and the QVNS. The Johnson noise power at a known temperature is first balanced with a synthesized noise power from the QVNS. The process is then repeated by balancing the noise power from the same resistor at an unknown temperature. When the two noise power ratios are combined, a thermodynamic temperature is derived using the ratio of the two QVNS spectral densities. We present preliminary results where the ratio between the gallium triple point and the water triple point is used to demonstrate the accuracy of the measurement system with a standard uncertainty of 0.04 %.

  19. Modeling Speech Level as a Function of Background Noise Level and Talker-to-Listener Distance for Talkers Wearing Hearing Protection Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouserhal, Rachel E.; Bockstael, Annelies; MacDonald, Ewen; Falk, Tiago H.; Voix, Jérémie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Studying the variations in speech levels with changing background noise level and talker-to-listener distance for talkers wearing hearing protection devices (HPDs) can aid in understanding communication in background noise. Method: Speech was recorded using an intra-aural HPD from 12 different talkers at 5 different distances in 3…

  20. Dichotomous Markov Noise:. Exact Results for Out-Of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bena, Ioana

    Nonequilibrium systems driven by additive or multiplicative dichotomous Markov noise appear in a wide variety of physical and mathematical models. We review here some prototypical examples, with an emphasis on analytically-solvable situations. In particular, it has escaped attention till recently that the standard results for the long-time properties of such systems cannot be applied when unstable fixed points are crossed in the asymptotic regime. We show how calculations have to be modified to deal with these cases and present a few relevant applications — the hypersensitive transport, the rocking ratchet, and the stochastic Stokes' drift. These results reinforce the impression that dichotomous noise can be put on par with Gaussian white noise as far as obtaining analytical results is concerned. They convincingly illustrate the interplay between noise and nonlinearity in generating nontrivial behaviors of nonequilibrium systems and point to various practical applications.

  1. Stationary response of multi-degree-of-freedom vibro-impact systems to Poisson white noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.; Zhu, W.Q.

    2008-01-01

    The stationary response of multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) vibro-impact (VI) systems to random pulse trains is studied. The system is formulated as a stochastically excited and dissipated Hamiltonian system. The constraints are modeled as non-linear springs according to the Hertz contact law. The random pulse trains are modeled as Poisson white noises. The approximate stationary probability density function (PDF) for the response of MDOF dissipated Hamiltonian systems to Poisson white noises is obtained by solving the fourth-order generalized Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation using perturbation approach. As examples, two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) VI systems under external and parametric Poisson white noise excitations, respectively, are investigated. The validity of the proposed approach is confirmed by using the results obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. It is shown that the non-Gaussian behaviour depends on the product of the mean arrival rate of the impulses and the relaxation time of the oscillator

  2. Hearing impairment among workers exposed to excessive levels of noise in ginning industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalesh J Dube

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton ginning workers have a risk of hearing loss due to excessive noise levels at the workplace environment. In this study, estimates of typical sound levels prevailing at the workplace environment and its effects on hearing ability of the exposed workers were made among cotton ginning workers. Data on self-reported health status was collected by a questionnaire survey at 10 cotton ginning industries located at Jalgaon district of Maharashtra state, India. The cotton ginning workers were exposed to continuous noise levels between 89 and 106 dBA. The hearing ability of the subjects was accessed by pure tone audiometry. The results of audiometry show mild, moderate and moderately severe degree of hearing impairment among the cotton ginning workers. The data generated during the study show that hearing loss was significantly associated with period of exposure to the workplace noise (P <0.0001. The prevalence of audiometric hearing impairment defined as a threshold average greater than 25 dB hearing level was 96% for binaural low-frequency average, 97% for binaural mid frequency average and 94% for binaural high-frequency average in the cotton ginning workers. We recommend the compulsory use of personal protective equipment like ear plug by the cotton ginning workers at the workplace environment. A regular maintenance of ginning and pressing machineries will avoid the emission of excessive noise at the workplace environment of cotton gins. A regular periodic medical examination is necessary to measure the impact of workplace noise on the health of cotton ginning workers.

  3. Estimation of background noise level on seismic station using statistical analysis for improved analysis accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S. M.; Hahm, I.

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the background noise level of seismic stations in order to collect the observation data of high quality and produce accurate seismic information. Determining of the background noise level was used PSD (Power Spectral Density) method by McNamara and Buland (2004) in this study. This method that used long-term data is influenced by not only innate electronic noise of sensor and a pulse wave resulting from stabilizing but also missing data and controlled by the specified frequency which is affected by the irregular signals without site characteristics. It is hard and inefficient to implement process that filters out the abnormal signal within the automated system. To solve these problems, we devised a method for extracting the data which normally distributed with 90 to 99% confidence intervals at each period. The availability of the method was verified using 62-seismic stations with broadband and short-period sensors operated by the KMA (Korea Meteorological Administration). Evaluation standards were NHNM (New High Noise Model) and NLNM (New Low Noise Model) published by the USGS (United States Geological Survey). It was designed based on the western United States. However, Korean Peninsula surrounded by the ocean on three sides has a complicated geological structure and a high population density. So, we re-designed an appropriate model in Korean peninsula by statistically combined result. The important feature is that secondary-microseism peak appeared at a higher frequency band. Acknowledgements: This research was carried out as a part of "Research for the Meteorological and Earthquake Observation Technology and Its Application" supported by the 2015 National Institute of Meteorological Research (NIMR) in the Korea Meteorological Administration.

  4. Battery Recharging Issue for a Two-Power-Level Flywheel System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel battery recharging system for an all-electric driveline comprising a flywheel with a permanent magnet double wound synchronous machine (motor/generator is presented. The double winding enables two voltage levels and two different power levels. This topology supersedes other all-electric drivelines. The battery operates in a low-power regime supplying the average power whereas the flywheel delivers and absorbs power peaks, which are up to a higher order of magnitude. The topology presents new challenges for the power conversion system, which is the focus of this investigation. The main challenge is the control of the power flow to the battery when the vehicle is parked despite the decay of the flywheel machine voltage; which is dependent on its charge state, that is, rotational speed. The design and simulation of an unidirectional DC/DC buck/boost converter for a variable rotational speed flywheel is presented. Conventional power electronic converters are used in a new application, which can maintain a constant current or voltage on the battery side. Successful PI current control has been implemented and simulated, together with the complete closed loop system.

  5. Impulse noise estimation and removal for OFDM systems

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2014-03-01

    Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is a modulation scheme that is widely used in wired and wireless communication systems. While OFDM is ideally suited to deal with frequency selective channels and AWGN, its performance may be dramatically impacted by the presence of impulse noise. In fact, very strong noise impulses in the time domain might result in the erasure of whole OFDM blocks of symbols at the receiver. Impulse noise can be mitigated by considering it as a sparse signal in time, and using recently developed algorithms for sparse signal reconstruction. We propose an algorithm that utilizes the guard band subcarriers for the impulse noise estimation and cancellation. Instead of relying on ℓ1 minimization as done in some popular general-purpose compressive sensing schemes, the proposed method jointly exploits the specific structure of this problem and the available a priori information for sparse signal recovery. The computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is very competitive with respect to sparse signal reconstruction schemes based on ℓ1 minimization. The proposed method is compared with respect to other state-of-the-art methods in terms of achievable rates for an OFDM system with impulse noise and AWGN. © 2014 IEEE.

  6. Impulse noise estimation and removal for OFDM systems

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Quadeer, Ahmed Abdul; Caire, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is a modulation scheme that is widely used in wired and wireless communication systems. While OFDM is ideally suited to deal with frequency selective channels and AWGN, its performance may be dramatically impacted by the presence of impulse noise. In fact, very strong noise impulses in the time domain might result in the erasure of whole OFDM blocks of symbols at the receiver. Impulse noise can be mitigated by considering it as a sparse signal in time, and using recently developed algorithms for sparse signal reconstruction. We propose an algorithm that utilizes the guard band subcarriers for the impulse noise estimation and cancellation. Instead of relying on ℓ1 minimization as done in some popular general-purpose compressive sensing schemes, the proposed method jointly exploits the specific structure of this problem and the available a priori information for sparse signal recovery. The computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is very competitive with respect to sparse signal reconstruction schemes based on ℓ1 minimization. The proposed method is compared with respect to other state-of-the-art methods in terms of achievable rates for an OFDM system with impulse noise and AWGN. © 2014 IEEE.

  7. Effects of traffic noise on tree frog stress levels, immunity, and color signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troïanowski, Mathieu; Mondy, Nathalie; Dumet, Adeline; Arcanjo, Caroline; Lengagne, Thierry

    2017-10-01

    During the last decade, many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of noise pollution on acoustic communication. Surprisingly, although it is known that noise exposure strongly influences health in humans, studies on wildlife remain scarce. In order to gain insight into the consequences of traffic noise exposure, we experimentally manipulated traffic noise exposure as well as the endocrine status of animals to investigate physiological and phenotypic consequences of noise pollution in an anuran species. We showed that noise exposure increased stress hormone level and induced an immunosuppressive effect. In addition, both traffic noise exposure and stress hormone application negatively impacted H. arborea vocal sac coloration. Moreover, our results suggest profound changes in sexual selection processes because the best quality males with initial attractive vocal sac coloration were the most impacted by noise. Hence, our study suggests that the recent increases in anthropogenic noise worldwide might affect a broader range of animal species than previously thought, because of alteration of visual signals and immunity. Generalizing these results to other taxa is crucial for the conservation of biodiversity in an increasingly noisy world. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Stochastic Resonance-Like and Resonance Suppression-Like Phenomena in a Bistable System with Time Delay and Additive Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Chang-Zheng; Nie Lin-Ru; Zhou Zhong-Rao

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR)-like and resonance suppression (RS)-like phenomena in a time-delayed bistable system driven by additive white noise are investigated by means of stochastic simulations of the power spectrum, the quality factor of the power spectrum, and the mean first-passage time (MFPT) of the system. The calculative results indicate that: (i) as the system is driven by a small periodic signal, the quality factor as a function delay time exhibits a maximal value at smaller noise intensities, i.e., an SR-like phenomenon. With the increment in additive noise intensity, the extremum gradually disappears and the quality factor decreases monotonously with delay time. (ii) As the additive noise intensity is smaller, the curve of the MFPT with respect to delay time displays a peak, i.e., an RS-like phenomenon. At higher levels of noise, however, the non-monotonic behavior is lost. (general)

  9. Triple play service under the impact of nonstationary noise in a DSL system: an Amazon approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Lamartine V.; Cardoso, Diego; Silva, Marcelino; Seruffo, Marcos; Francês, Carlos R. L.; Costa, João C. W. A.; Castro, Agostinho L. S.; Cavalcante, Gervásio; Rius i Riu, Jaume

    2007-09-01

    The Brazilian Amazon has sui generis characteristics that affect strongly the communication technologies, such as high humidity and temperature. These characteristics cause impact in the existent infrastructure, especially in twisted-pair copper lines. At the moment, new services are based on multimedia applications, as voice over internet protocol (VoIP), video on demand (VoD), and internet protocol television (IPTV). Such services use digital broadband networks such as ADSL2+ (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line) to transmit the data. Broadband services require data rates which can only be achieved by using relatively high spectrum frequencies. At high frequencies the DSL signal is more susceptible to external noise sources, such as radio frequency interference and impulsive noise. For this purpose, an experimental setup has been built at UFPA that consists of noise generator, traffic generator, real cables, modems and DSLAM (digital subscriber line access multiplexer). This paper aims at characterizing how the noise impacts on triple play services for a broadband system using a DSL loop on Amazon environment. The objective of the noise impact experimentation is to observe the behavior of a DSL system under more realistic but controlled line conditions. Metrics as lost packet, jitter, latency, and throughput are used to characterize the triple play service in a DSL loop under the noise impact. Through the real experiments and controlled loop conditions, this paper allow identify, from application level point of view, how robust DSL system is in respect to noise occurrence. Additionally, it is described a methodology for noise impact measurements using a DSL system.

  10. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao

    2016-08-01

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative.

  11. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao

    2016-01-01

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative.

  12. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei, E-mail: weixu@nwpu.edu.cn; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao [Department of Applied Mathematics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2016-08-15

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative.

  13. High-power noise-like pulse generation using a 1.56-µm all-fiber laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Shian; Hwang, Sheng-Kwang; Liu, Jia-Ming

    2015-07-13

    We demonstrated an all-fiber, high-power noise-like pulse laser system at the 1.56-µm wavelength. A low-power noise-like pulse train generated by a ring oscillator was amplified using a two-stage amplifier, where the performance of the second-stage amplifier determined the final output power level. The optical intensity in the second-stage amplifier was managed well to avoid not only the excessive spectral broadening induced by nonlinearities but also any damage to the device. On the other hand, the power conversion efficiency of the amplifier was optimized through proper control of its pump wavelength. The pump wavelength determines the pump absorption and therefore the power conversion efficiency of the gain fiber. Through this approach, the average power of the noise-like pulse train was amplified considerably to an output of 13.1 W, resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 36.1% and a pulse energy of 0.85 µJ. To the best of our knowledge, these amplified pulses have the highest average power and pulse energy for noise-like pulses in the 1.56-µm wavelength region. As a result, the net gain in the cascaded amplifier reached 30 dB. With peak and pedestal widths of 168 fs and 61.3 ps, respectively, for the amplified pulses, the pedestal-to-peak intensity ratio of the autocorrelation trace remains at the value of 0.5 required for truly noise-like pulses.

  14. Evaluation of noise pollution in oil extracting region of Lavan and the effect of noise enclosure on noise abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Golbabaei

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims   Overexposure to industrial noise pollution induce hearing loss workers. Occupational hearing loss may cause interference whit oral communication, so it may  increase the risk of occupational accidents in workplace as well as affects whit social activities.  This study was conducted on Lavan Island, are of oil extracting regions in the south of Iran. The  object of this study was to evaluate noise pollution and determining the effect of noise enclosure  on noise abatement.   Methods   The noise sources were recognized and noise pressure level was measured by CEL- 440. Noise dose of the exposed workers in high level noise area were measured by CEL 272.   Results   Major noise sources were gas turbines, diesel generators, compressors, fans and gas containing pips, noise contour map revealers that noise level were higher than the recommended national exposure limit. The results of workers noise dose show that their noise exposure were  higher than the recommended value, (p<0.001. Finally, by using the results of noise frequency  analysis of different noise sources, the noise pressure level of each sources was determined in   terms of enclosing them.   Conclusion   By enclosing the noise sources, noise pressure levels can be lowered douse to  acceptable levels but limitation of applying enclosure should be regarded.  

  15. A Survey of the Relationship Between Noised Pollution, Honey and Vitamin E and Plasma Level of Blood Sexual Hormones in Noise-Exposed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background This study was conducted to examine the efficacy of honey and vitamin E on fertilization capacity of noise-exposed rats by assessing whether the plasma sexual hormones levels i.e. follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH and testosterone are altered in relation with noise stress. Objectives Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of honey and vitamin E on the levels of sex hormones and male fertilization capacity of noise-exposed rats. Materials and Methods This study targeted 24 male rats that were randomly divided into four equal groups including the control group that were not exposed to noise and experimental groups 1, 2 and 3 that were the untreated, honey treated and vitamin E treated groups, respectively; all of which were exposed to noise for 50 days. Next, in order to measure serum sexual hormones, blood samples of experimental and control groups were taken and analyzed. Also in order to investigate the fertility capacity of rats, the male rats of all groups were coupled with female rats. Results The results showed that in the male rats exposed to the noise stress, the levels of FSH and LH rose and the testosterone secretion fell sharply compared to not exposed rats. Additionally, the continuing effects of noise stress injury could reduce the weight of the fetus and the number of live fetuses and survival rate of the fetus. However, honey and vitamin E improved serum testosterone concentration, while declined plasma FSH and LH secretion in noise-exposed rats and enhanced fertility rate by increasing the rate of healthy alive fetuses. Conclusions It seems that noise pollution has harmful effects on the fertility of males. Also these findings may suggest the use of a natural curative approach rather than pharmaceutical drugs to optimize both neuroendocrine gonadal axis and testicular integrity induced by pathogenesis stress, and enhance fertility capacity in men.

  16. Sources and levels of background noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Paul T.

    1988-01-01

    Background noise levels are measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel following installation of a sound-absorbent lining on the test-section walls. Results show that the fan-drive noise dominated the empty test-section background noise at airspeeds below 120 knots. Above 120 knots, the test-section broadband background noise was dominated by wind-induced dipole noise (except at lower harmonics of fan blade-passage tones) most likely generated at the microphone or microphone support strut. Third-octave band and narrow-band spectra are presented for several fan operating conditions and test-section airspeeds. The background noise levels can be reduced by making improvements to the microphone wind screen or support strut. Empirical equations are presented relating variations of fan noise with fan speed or blade-pitch angle. An empirical expression for typical fan noise spectra is also presented. Fan motor electric power consumption is related to the noise generation. Preliminary measurements of sound absorption by the test-section lining indicate that the 152 mm thick lining will adequately absorb test-section model noise at frequencies above 300 Hz.

  17. Measured Noise from Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph; McSwain, Robert; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Proposed uses of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), including home package delivery, have the potential to expose large portions of communities to a new noise source. This paper discusses results of flyover noise measurements of four small UAVs, including an internal combustion-powered model airplane and three battery-powered multicopters. Basic noise characteristics of these vehicles are discussed, including spectral properties and sound level metrics such as sound pressure level, effective perceived noise level, and sound exposure level. The size and aerodynamic characteristics of the multicopters in particular make their flight path susceptible to atmospheric disturbances such as wind gusts. These gusts, coupled with a flight control system that varies rotor speed to maintain vehicle stability, create an unsteady acoustic signature. The spectral variations resulting from this unsteadiness are explored, in both hover and flyover conditions for the multicopters. The time varying noise, which differs from the relatively steady noise generated by large transport aircraft, may complicate the prediction of human annoyance using conventional sound level metrics.

  18. 36 CFR 3.15 - What is the maximum noise level for the operation of a vessel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... level for the operation of a vessel? 3.15 Section 3.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... level for the operation of a vessel? (a) A person may not operate a vessel at a noise level exceeding... vessel is being operated in excess of the noise levels established in paragraph (a) of this section may...

  19. Noise annoyance from wind turbines a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Eja

    2003-08-01

    This study summarises present knowledge on noise perception and annoyances from wind turbines in areas were people live or spend recreation time. There are two main types of noise from a wind turbine: mechanical noise and aerodynamic noise. The aerodynamic noise emits from the rotor blades passing the air. It has a swishing character with a modulation that makes it noticeable from the background noise. This part of the wind turbine noise was found to be the most annoying. Field studies performed among people living in the vicinity of wind turbines showed that there was a correlation between sound pressure level and noise annoyance, but annoyance was also influenced by visual factors such as the attitude to wind turbines' impact on the landscape. Noise annoyance was found at lower sound pressure levels than in studies of annoyance from traffic noise. There is no scientific evidence that noise at levels created by wind turbines could cause health problems other than annoyance. No studies on noise from wind turbines in wilderness areas have been found, but the reaction to other noise sources such as aircraft have been studied. In recreational areas, the expectation of quietness is high among visitors, but wind turbines are, in contrary to aircraft, stationary and could be avoided by recreationists. The visual impact of wind turbines might though be the dominant source of annoyance. Regulations on noise from wind turbines are based on different principles. Some states, e.g. Denmark, have a special legislation concerning wind turbines, while others, like Sweden, have used recommendations originally developed for a different noise source. The noise level could either be absolute, as in Germany, or related to the background noise level as in France. This background noise level could be standardised, measured or related to wind speed

  20. MMSE-based algorithm for joint signal detection, channel and noise variance estimation for OFDM systems

    CERN Document Server

    Savaux, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an algorithm for the detection of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in a cognitive radio context by means of a joint and iterative channel and noise estimation technique. Based on the minimum mean square criterion, it performs an accurate detection of a user in a frequency band, by achieving a quasi-optimal channel and noise variance estimation if the signal is present, and by estimating the noise level in the band if the signal is absent. Organized into three chapters, the first chapter provides the background against which the system model is pr

  1. Phenomenon of entropic stochastic resonance with asymmetric dichotomous noise and white noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Feng; Li, Shao-Fu; Cheng, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The entropic stochastic resonance (ESR) in a confined system subject to asymmetric dichotomous noise, white noise, and a periodic square-wave signal is investigated. Under the adiabatic approximation condition, by use of the properties of the dichotomous noise, we obtain the expression of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) based on two-state theory. The SNR is shown to be a nonmonotonic function of the strength and asymmetry of the dichotomous noise, the intensity of the white noise, and the amplitude of the square-wave signal. The SNR varies non-monotonically with increases in the parameters of the confined structure. The influence of the correlation rate of the dichotomous noise and the frequency of the external constant force on the SNR is also discussed.

  2. modelling traffic noise level on roadside traders at wurukum market

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    . This leads to poor planning and traffic control strategies within the town to reduce ... embark on a study to assess the level of noise pollution .... industrial products such as cement, fuel, timber, water, waste, etc ... used for a manual traffic count.

  3. Noise Measurements of High Aspect Ratio Distributed Exhaust Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers far-field acoustic measurements of a family of rectangular nozzles with aspect ratio 8, in the high subsonic flow regime. Several variations of nozzle geometry, commonly found in embedded exhaust systems, are explored, including bevels, slants, single broad chevrons and notches, and internal septae. Far-field acoustic results, presented previously for the simple rectangular nozzle, showed that increasing aspect ratio increases the high frequency noise, especially directed in the plane containing the minor axis of the nozzle. Detailed changes to the nozzle geometry generally made little difference in the noise, and the differences were greatest at low speed. Having an extended lip on one broad side (bevel) did produce up to 3 decibels more noise in all directions, while extending the lip on the narrow side (slant) produced up to 2 decibels more noise, primarily on the side with the extension. Adding a single, non-intrusive chevron, made no significant change to the noise, while inverting the chevron (notch) produced up to 2decibels increase in the noise. Having internal walls (septae) within the nozzle, such as would be required for structural support or when multiple fan ducts are aggregated, reduced the noise of the rectangular jet, but could produce a highly directional shedding tone from the septae trailing edges. Finally, a nozzle with both septae and a beveled nozzle, representative of the exhaust system envisioned for a distributed electric propulsion aircraft with a common rectangular duct, produced almost as much noise as the beveled nozzle, with the septae not contributing much reduction in noise.

  4. Autonomous data acquisition system for Paks NPP process noise signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipcsei, S.; Kiss, S.; Czibok, T.; Dezso, Z.; Horvath, Cs.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype of a new concept noise diagnostics data acquisition system has been developed recently to renew the aged present system. This new system is capable of collecting the whole available noise signal set simultaneously. Signal plugging and data acquisition are performed by autonomous systems (installed at each reactor unit) that are controlled through the standard plant network from a central computer installed at a suitable location. Experts can use this central unit to process and archive data series downloaded from the reactor units. This central unit also provides selected noise diagnostics information for other departments. The paper describes the hardware and software architecture of the new system in detail, emphasising the potential benefits of the new approach. (author)

  5. Effect of Parametric Dichotomic Markov Noise on the Properties of Chaotic Transitions in Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gac, J. M.; Żebrowski, J. J.

    A chaotic transition occurs when a continuous change of one of the parameters of the system causes a discontinuous change in the properties of the chaotic attractor of the system. Such phenomena are present in many dynamical systems, in which a chaotic behavior occurs. The best known of these transitions are: the period-doubling bifurcation cascade, intermittency and crises. The effect of dichotomous Markov noise (DMN) on the properties of systems with chaotic transitions is discussed. DMN is a very simple two-valued stochastic process, with constant transition rates between the two states. In spite of its simplicity, this kind of noise is a very powerful tool to describe various phenomena present in many physical, chemical or biological systems. Many interesting phenomena induced by DMN are known. However, there is no research on the effect of this kind of noise on intermittency or crises. We present the change of the mean laminar phase length and of laminar phase length distribution caused by DMN modulating the parameters of a system with intermittency and the modification of the mean life time on the pre-crisis attractor in the case of a boundary crisis. The results obtained analytically are compared with numerical simulations for several simple dynamical systems.

  6. Levels And Spectra Of Aircraft Noise And People\\'s Reactions In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of sound levels and spectral distribution as well as people\\'s reactions to aircraft noise in three Nigerian international airports have been conducted. The study comprised physical measurements and social survey. Results show that maximum octave band pressure levels (BPLs) for Margaret Ekpo, Port Harcourt and ...

  7. Near-Capacity Coding for Discrete Multitone Systems with Impulse Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kschischang Frank R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the design of near-capacity-achieving error-correcting codes for a discrete multitone (DMT system in the presence of both additive white Gaussian noise and impulse noise. Impulse noise is one of the main channel impairments for digital subscriber lines (DSL. One way to combat impulse noise is to detect the presence of the impulses and to declare an erasure when an impulse occurs. In this paper, we propose a coding system based on low-density parity-check (LDPC codes and bit-interleaved coded modulation that is capable of taking advantage of the knowledge of erasures. We show that by carefully choosing the degree distribution of an irregular LDPC code, both the additive noise and the erasures can be handled by a single code, thus eliminating the need for an outer code. Such a system can perform close to the capacity of the channel and for the same redundancy is significantly more immune to the impulse noise than existing methods based on an outer Reed-Solomon (RS code. The proposed method has a lower implementation complexity than the concatenated coding approach.

  8. Noise-induced temporal dynamics in Turing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schumacher, Linus J.; Woolley, Thomas E.; Baker, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the ability of intrinsic noise to produce complex temporal dynamics in Turing pattern formation systems, with particular emphasis on the Schnakenberg kinetics. Using power spectral methods, we characterize the behavior of the system using

  9. Aspects of two-level systems under external time-dependent fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G.; Wreszinski, W.F. [Tomsk State University and Tomsk Institute of High Current Electronics (Russian Federation); Barata, J.C.A.; Gitman D.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil)]. E-mails: jbarata@fma.if.usp.br; gitman@fma.if.usp.br

    2001-12-14

    The dynamics of two-level systems in time-dependent backgrounds is under consideration. We present some new exact solutions in special backgrounds decaying in time. On the other hand, following ideas of Feynman et al, we discuss in detail the possibility of reducing the quantum dynamics to a classical Hamiltonian system. This, in particular, opens the possibility of directly applying powerful methods of classical mechanics (e.g. KAM methods) to study the quantum system. Following such an approach, we draw conclusions of relevance for 'quantum chaos' when the external background is periodic or quasi-periodic in time. (author)

  10. Speech Intelligibility with Helicopter Noise: Tests of Three Helmet-Mounted Communication Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ribera, John

    2004-01-01

    ...) in background noise and reduce exposure to harmful levels of noise. Some aviators, over the course of their aviation career, develop noise-induced hearing loss that may affect their ability to perform required tasks...

  11. Experiences of building a medical data acquisition system based on two-level modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Li, Jianbin; Lan, Xiaoyun; An, Ying; Gao, Wuqiang; Jiang, Yuqiao

    2018-04-01

    Compared to traditional software development strategies, the two-level modeling approach is more flexible and applicable to build an information system in the medical domain. However, the standards of two-level modeling such as openEHR appear complex to medical professionals. This study aims to investigate, implement, and improve the two-level modeling approach, and discusses the experience of building a unified data acquisition system for four affiliated university hospitals based on this approach. After the investigation, we simplified the approach of archetype modeling and developed a medical data acquisition system where medical experts can define the metadata for their own specialties by using a visual easy-to-use tool. The medical data acquisition system for multiple centers, clinical specialties, and diseases has been developed, and integrates the functions of metadata modeling, form design, and data acquisition. To date, 93,353 data items and 6,017 categories for 285 specific diseases have been created by medical experts, and over 25,000 patients' information has been collected. OpenEHR is an advanced two-level modeling method for medical data, but its idea to separate domain knowledge and technical concern is not easy to realize. Moreover, it is difficult to reach an agreement on archetype definition. Therefore, we adopted simpler metadata modeling, and employed What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get (WYSIWYG) tools to further improve the usability of the system. Compared with the archetype definition, our approach lowers the difficulty. Nevertheless, to build such a system, every participant should have some knowledge in both medicine and information technology domains, as these interdisciplinary talents are necessary. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Noise and crosstalk in two quorum-sensing inputs of Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Joel T

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the puzzles in bacterial quorum sensing is understanding how an organism integrates the information gained from multiple input signals. The marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri regulates its bioluminescence through a quorum sensing mechanism that receives input from three pheromone signals, including two acyl homoserine lactone (HSL signals. While the role of the 3-oxo-C6 homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL signal in activating the lux genes has been extensively studied and modeled, the role of the C8 homoserine lactone (C8HSL is less obvious, as it can either activate luminescence or block its activation. It remains unclear how crosstalk between C8HSL and 3OC6HSL affects the information that the bacterium obtains through quorum sensing. Results We have used microfluidic methods to measure the response of individual V.fischeri cells to combinations of C8HSL and 3OC6HSL. By measuring the fluorescence of individual V.fischeri cells containing a chromosomal gfp-reporter for the lux genes, we study how combinations of exogenous HSLs affect both the population average and the cell-to-cell variability of lux activation levels. At the level of a population average, the crosstalk between the C8HSL and 3OC6HSL inputs is well-described by a competitive inhibition model. At the level of individual cells, the heterogeneity in the lux response depends only on the average degree of activation, so that the noise in the output is not reduced by the presence of the second HSL signal. Overall we find that the mutual information between the signal inputs and the lux output is less than one bit. A nonlinear correlation between fluorescence and bioluminescence outputs from lux leads to different noise properties for these reporters. Conclusions The lux genes in V.fischeri do not appear to distinguish between the two HSL inputs, and even with two signal inputs the regulation of lux is extremely noisy. Hence the role of crosstalk from the C8HSL input

  13. Suppression of Squeal Noise Excited by the Pressure Pulsation from the Flapper-Nozzle Valve inside a Hydraulic Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Squeal noise often occurs in a two-stage electrohydraulic servo-valve, which is an unfavorable issue of modern hydraulic energy systems. The root causes of such noise from the servo-valve are still unclear. The objective of this paper is to explore the noise mechanism in a servo-valve excited by the pressure pulsations from the hydraulic energy system perspective. The suppressing capability of squeal noise energy is investigated by changing the pressure pulsation frequency and natural frequency of the flapper-armature assembly. The frequencies of the pressure pulsations are adjusted by setting different speeds of the hydraulic pump varying from 10,400–14,400 rpm, and two flapper-armature assemblies with different armature lengths are used in the tested hydraulic energy system. The first eight vibration mode shapes and natural frequencies of the flapper-armature assembly are obtained by numerical modal analysis using two different armature lengths. The characteristics of pressure pulsations at the pump outlet and in the chamber of the flapper-nozzle valve, armature vibration and noise are tested and compared with the natural frequencies of the flapper-armature assembly. The results reveal that the flapper-armature assembly vibrates and makes the noise with the same frequencies as the pressure pulsations inside the hydraulic energy system. Resonance appears when the frequency of the pressure pulsations coincides with the natural frequency of the flapper-armature assembly. Therefore, it can be concluded that the pressure pulsation energy from the power supply may excite the vibration of the flapper-armature assembly, which may consequently cause the squeal noise inside the servo-valve. It is verified by the numerical simulations and experiments that setting the pressure pulsation frequencies different from the natural frequencies of the flapper-armature assembly can suppress the resonance and squeal noise.

  14. The effect of hearing aid signal-processing schemes on acceptable noise levels: perception and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Stangl, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test determines the maximum noise level that an individual is willing to accept while listening to speech. The first objective of the present study was to systematically investigate the effect of wide dynamic range compression processing (WDRC), and its combined effect with digital noise reduction (DNR) and directional processing (DIR), on ANL. Because ANL represents the lowest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that a listener is willing to accept, the second objective was to examine whether the hearing aid output SNR could predict aided ANL across different combinations of hearing aid signal-processing schemes. Twenty-five adults with sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. ANL was measured monaurally in two unaided and seven aided conditions, in which the status of the hearing aid processing schemes (enabled or disabled) and the location of noise (front or rear) were manipulated. The hearing aid output SNR was measured for each listener in each condition using a phase-inversion technique. The aided ANL was predicted by unaided ANL and hearing aid output SNR, under the assumption that the lowest acceptable SNR at the listener's eardrum is a constant across different ANL test conditions. Study results revealed that, on average, WDRC increased (worsened) ANL by 1.5 dB, while DNR and DIR decreased (improved) ANL by 1.1 and 2.8 dB, respectively. Because the effects of WDRC and DNR on ANL were opposite in direction but similar in magnitude, the ANL of linear/DNR-off was not significantly different from that of WDRC/DNR-on. The results further indicated that the pattern of ANL change across different aided conditions was consistent with the pattern of hearing aid output SNR change created by processing schemes. Compared with linear processing, WDRC creates a noisier sound image and makes listeners less willing to accept noise. However, this negative effect on noise acceptance can be offset by DNR, regardless of microphone mode

  15. The recommendations of the noise working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legerton, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    In 1993 the DTI set up a Working Group to define a framework which can be used to measure and rate the noise from wind turbines. The final report of the Noise Working Group is now available for publication. The advice on the setting of noise limits for wind farms is largely unaltered from the preliminary recommendations presented at the 17th BWEA Annual Conference [1]. This paper recaps on those recommendations and provides additional information on the measurement procedures to be used with the recommendations on noise limits. The paper describes the measurement of the existing background noise climate on which the limits are based and the procedure to be used for the measurement of turbine noise levels in the investigation of complaints. The noise limits are rated noise levels in that they can include a penalty for tones present in the noise. The level of penalty depends upon the audibility of the tone and measurement procedure for determining audibility and the associated penalty system are also described. (author)

  16. Two-level tunneling systems in amorphous alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Irina V.; Paz, Alejandro P.; Tokatly, Ilya V.; Rubio, Angel

    2014-03-01

    The decades of research on thermal properties of amorphous solids at temperatures below 1 K suggest that their anomalous behaviour can be related to quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms between two nearly equivalent states that can be described as a two-level system (TLS). This theory is also supported by recent studies on microwave spectroscopy of superconducting qubits. However, the microscopic nature of the TLS remains unknown. To identify structural motifs for TLSs in amorphous alumina we have performed extensive classical molecular dynamics simulations. Several bistable motifs with only one or two atoms jumping by considerable distance ~ 0.5 Å were found at T=25 K. Accounting for the surrounding environment relaxation was shown to be important up to distances ~ 7 Å. The energy asymmetry and barrier for the detected motifs lied in the ranges 0.5 - 2 meV and 4 - 15 meV, respectively, while their density was about 1 motif per 10 000 atoms. Tuning of motif asymmetry by strain was demonstrated with the coupling coefficient below 1 eV. The tunnel splitting for the symmetrized motifs was estimated on the order of 0.1 meV. The discovered motifs are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The financial support from the Marie Curie Fellowship PIIF-GA-2012-326435 (RespSpatDisp) is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Two-dimensional atom localization via two standing-wave fields in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongtao; Wang Hui; Wang Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the two-dimensional (2D) localization of an atom in a four-level Y-type atomic system. By applying two orthogonal standing-wave fields, the atoms can be localized at some special positions, leading to the formation of sub-wavelength 2D periodic spatial distributions. The localization peak position and number as well as the conditional position probability can be controlled by the intensities and detunings of optical fields.

  18. Low dose CT simulation using experimental noise model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Satori; Zamyatin, Alexander A. [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Tochigi, Otawarashi (Japan); Silver, Michael D. [Toshiba Medical Research Institute, Vernon Hills, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We suggest a method to obtain system noise model experimentally without relying on assumptions on statistical distribution of the noise; also, knowledge of DAS gain and electronic noise level are not required. Evaluation with ultra-low dose CT data (5 mAs) shows good match between simulated and real data noise. (orig.)

  19. Investigation of a glottal related harmonics-to-noise ratio and spectral tilt as indicators of glottal noise in synthesized and human voice signals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Peter J

    2008-03-01

    The harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR) of the voiced speech signal has implicitly been used to infer information regarding the turbulent noise level at the glottis. However, two problems exist for inferring glottal noise attributes from the HNR of the speech wave form: (i) the measure is fundamental frequency (f0) dependent for equal levels of glottal noise, and (ii) any deviation from signal periodicity affects the ratio, not just turbulent noise. An alternative harmonics-to-noise ratio formulation [glottal related HNR (GHNR\\')] is proposed to overcome the former problem. In GHNR\\' a mean over the spectral range of interest of the HNRs at specific harmonic\\/between-harmonic frequencies (expressed in linear scale) is calculated. For the latter issue [(ii)] two spectral tilt measures are shown, using synthesis data, to be sensitive to glottal noise while at the same time being comparatively insensitive to other glottal aperiodicities. The theoretical development predicts that the spectral tilt measures reduce as noise levels increase. A conventional HNR estimator, GHNR\\' and two spectral tilt measures are applied to a data set of 13 pathological and 12 normal voice samples. One of the tilt measures and GHNR\\' are shown to provide statistically significant differentiating power over a conventional HNR estimator.

  20. Virtual Reality Platform Based Simulation System of Environmental Noise Abatement Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yijun, Liu; Yu, Fang; Xiaoman, He; Yongyou, Wang

    The general mathematic mode of computing noise abatement is commonly used for most project planning and appraisal of environmental noise abatement projects. However, the inconvenient and impracticable mode and algorithm usually cannot meet the real world computation and testing. Therefore, a more practicable abatement mode and algorithm (multiple noise sources with multiband under sound barriers) which had been applied to VR based simulation system. That implemented the function of real-time demonstrating noise scattering condition within 3D virtual space, furthermore, with sound barriers added in 3D scene, the effectiveness of denoise by sound barriers also can be demonstrated within this system. That provides a significant solution for environmental noise abatement projects as a whole.

  1. Determination of Noise Level and Its Sources in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Neonatal Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jahangir Blourchian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Neonatal intensive care units (NICU different sound intensities and frequencies are produced from different sources, which may exert undesirable physiological effects on the infants. The aim of this study was to determine the noise level and its sources in the NICU and neonatal ward of Al-Zahra Hospital of Rasht, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the intensity of the sounds generated by the internal and external sources in the NICU and neonatal ward was measured using a sound level meter device. The sound produced by each of the sources was individually calculated. Data were analyzed performing descriptive and analytical statistics, using SPSS version 19. Results: The mean noise levels in six rooms and a hallway during morning, afternoon and night shifts with the electromechanical devices turned on were 61.67±4.5, 61.32±4.32 and 60.71±4.56 dB, respectively. Moreover, with the devices tuned off the mean noise levels during morning, afternoon and evening shifts were 64.97±2.6, 60.6±1.29 and 57.91±4.73 dB, respectively. The differences between the mean noise levels in the neonatal wards (standard noise level=45 dB during each shift with the electromechanical devices turned on and off were statistically significant (P=0.002 and P

  2. Phase noise estimation and mitigation for DCT-based coherent optical OFDM systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuanchuan; Yang, Feng; Wang, Ziyu

    2009-09-14

    In this paper, as an attractive alternative to the conventional discrete Fourier transform (DFT) based orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), discrete cosine transform (DCT) based OFDM which has certain advantages over its counterpart is studied for optical fiber communications. As is known, laser phase noise is a major impairment to the performance of coherent optical OFDM (CO-OFDM) systems. However, to our knowledge, detailed analysis of phase noise and the corresponding mitigation methods for DCT-based CO-OFDM systems have not been reported yet. To address these issues, we analyze the laser phase noise in the DCT-based CO-OFDM systems, and propose phase noise estimation and mitigation schemes. Numerical results show that the proposal is very effective in suppressing phase noise and could significantly improve the performance of DCT-based CO-OFDM systems.

  3. Relationship between lighting and noise levels and productivity of the occupants in automotive assembly industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Jafar; Dehghan, Habibollah; Azmoon, Hiva; Forouharmajd, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Work environment affects human productivity and his performance. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of lighting and noise levels on human productivity in the automotive assembly industry. Subjects were 181 workers from different parts of an automobile assembly industry. Illuminance (Lx) at the height of 30 inches from the surface of work station and noise (dBA) were locally measured. Also human productivity by the Goldsmith and Hersey scale (1980) was measured. Data were analyzed by using SPSS v20 Pearson correlation coefficient. The results showed that the relationship between noise level and human productivity is negative and significant (P productivity (P > 0.05). Based on the results, in assembly tasks, noise has a negative impact on human productivity, and lighting does not affect this. So, in order to increase employee productivity, noise control and reduction to less than the standard values (less than 85 dB) is necessary.

  4. Relationship between Lighting and Noise Levels and Productivity of the Occupants in Automotive Assembly Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Akbari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Work environment affects human productivity and his performance. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of lighting and noise levels on human productivity in the automotive assembly industry. Method. Subjects were 181 workers from different parts of an automobile assembly industry. Illuminance (Lx at the height of 30 inches from the surface of work station and noise (dBA were locally measured. Also human productivity by the Goldsmith and Hersey scale (1980 was measured. Data were analyzed by using SPSS v20 Pearson correlation coefficient. Results. The results showed that the relationship between noise level and human productivity is negative and significant (, , but there was no significant relationship between lighting and human productivity (. Conclusion. Based on the results, in assembly tasks, noise has a negative impact on human productivity, and lighting does not affect this. So, in order to increase employee productivity, noise control and reduction to less than the standard values (less than 85 dB is necessary.

  5. Noise, impulse noise, and other physical factors: combined effects on hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, J

    1995-01-01

    In most of the epidemiologic studies conducted during the last 20 years, impulse noise caused increased risk of hearing loss in comparison to continuous noise with the same acoustical energy. The interaction between noise exposure (broadband at 100 dB(A)) and hand-arm vibration (125 Hz at 2 ms-2 acceleration level) has been proven for people having vibration-induced white finger symptoms. This interaction is evidenced as a permanent hearing loss. However, why the interaction is seen only in people with VWF is not known. The mechanisms may be related to individual susceptibility, and hypotheses are given on the role of the autonomous nervous system regulating the peripheral vascular reaction. Whole-body vibration (2-10 Hz, at 10 ms-2 level) seems to increase the TTS when noise (broadband at 90 dB(A)) is present. This effect is more pronounced at higher temperatures. The hypothermia protects hearing against the effects of noise in animal studies. The interaction between noise and temperature decrease seems obvious in animal studies. Exercise has both increased and decreased the TTS during noise exposure. The effects have been successfully explained as the depression of the stapedius reflex. Thus, less protection against noise is provided for the inner ear in exercise conditions. The increase of the blood temperature also has been suggested to increase noise-induced TTS during exercise. Electromagnetic fields have been found to cause acoustical interactions in the inner ear. Animal studies and human studies have given contradictory results on the effects of magnetic coil devices on hearing. The MR imaging devices produce noise levels of 82-93 dB, which is not sufficient to produce the risk of permanent hearing loss when short exposure durations are taken into consideration. More systematic research is needed with accurately defined electromagnetic characteristics to reveal the potential interactions. The interactions seem to exist, but relatively high levels and

  6. Minimum time control of a pair of two-level quantum systems with opposite drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Raffaele; D’Alessandro, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we solve two equivalent time optimal control problems. On one hand, we design the control field to implement in minimum time the SWAP (or equivalent) operator on a two-level system, assuming that it interacts with an additional, uncontrollable, two-level system. On the other hand, we synthesize the SWAP operator simultaneously, in minimum time, on a pair of two-level systems subject to opposite drifts. We assume that it is possible to perform three independent control actions, and that the total control strength is bounded. These controls either affect the dynamics of the target system, under the first perspective, or, simultaneously, the dynamics of both systems, in the second view. We obtain our results by using techniques of geometric control theory on Lie groups. In particular, we apply the Pontryagin maximum principle, and provide a complete characterization of singular and nonsingular extremals. Our analysis shows that the problem can be formulated as the motion of a material point in a central force, a well known system in classical mechanics. Although we focus on obtaining the SWAP operator, many of the ideas and techniques developed in this work apply to the time optimal implementation of an arbitrary unitary operator. (paper)

  7. A low noise ASIC for two dimensional neutron gas detector with performance of high spatial resolution (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Hideshi; Toh, Kentaro; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Sakasai, Kaoru; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    An ASD-ASIC (Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator ASIC) with fast response and low noise performances has been designed for two-dimensional position sensitive neutron gas detectors (InSPaD). The InSPaD is a 2D neutron detector system with 3 He gas and provides a high spatial resolution by making distinction between proton and triton particles generated in the gas chamber. The new ASD-ASIC is required to have very low noise, a wide dynamic range, good output linearity and high counting rate. The new ASD-ASIC has been designed by using CMOS and consisted of 64-channel ASDs, a 16-channel multiplexer with LVTTL drivers and sum amplifier system for summing all analog signals. The performances were evaluated by the Spice simulation. It was confirmed that the new ASD-ASIC had very low noise performance, wide dynamic range and fast signal processing functions. (author)

  8. PHASE NOISE COMPARISON OF SHORT PULSE LASER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; John Hansknecht; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    This paper describes phase noise measurements of several different laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on state-of-the-art short pulse lasers, especially drive lasers for photocathode injectors. Phase noise comparison of the FEL drive laser, electron beam and FEL laser output also will be presented.

  9. Effect of noise on the bifurcation behavior of nonlinear dynamical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, Apostolos [Department of Economics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta., T2N 1N4 (Canada)]. E-mail: Serletis@ucalgary.ca; Shahmoradi, Asghar [Faculty of Economics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Serletis, Demitre [Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., M5G 1L5 (Canada)

    2007-08-15

    We argue that dynamical noise can dramatically change the dynamics of low dimensional chaotic systems. Moreover, we show that chaos tests are highly sensitive to dynamical noise and this becomes worse when the intensity of the noise increases.

  10. Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System for Turbofan Engines. Volume 2; BFaNS User's Manual and Developer's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney has developed a Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System (BFaNS) for turbofan engines. This system computes the noise generated by turbulence impinging on the leading edges of the fan and fan exit guide vane, and noise generated by boundary-layer turbulence passing over the fan trailing edge. BFaNS has been validated on three fan rigs that were tested during the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology Program (AST). The predicted noise spectra agreed well with measured data. The predicted effects of fan speed, vane count, and vane sweep also agreed well with measurements. The noise prediction system consists of two computer programs: Setup_BFaNS and BFaNS. Setup_BFaNS converts user-specified geometry and flow-field information into a BFaNS input file. From this input file, BFaNS computes the inlet and aft broadband sound power spectra generated by the fan and FEGV. The output file from BFaNS contains the inlet, aft and total sound power spectra from each noise source. This report is the second volume of a three-volume set documenting the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System: Volume 1: Setup_BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; Volume 2: BFaNS User s Manual and Developer s Guide; and Volume 3: Validation and Test Cases. The present volume begins with an overview of the Broadband Fan Noise Prediction System, followed by step-by-step instructions for installing and running BFaNS. It concludes with technical documentation of the BFaNS computer program.

  11. Compressor noise control begins with design--Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the typical methods used by oil and gas pipeline companies to reduce the noise level associated with their pump and compressor stations. The common method is for the design engineer to specify an acceptable noise level at a specified distance. Unfortunately, the results by this method are rarely acceptable because vendors have not considered the effects of sound propagation outside the station, the owners have not considered the cumulative effect of various machinery, and there is little methodology available to distinguish the individual components which might be contributing the acoustically unacceptable noise levels in a multi-component system. This article stresses balanced noise control designs using noise control engineering

  12. Arduino-based noise robust online heart-rate detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sangita; Pal, Saurabh; Mitra, Madhuchhanda

    2017-04-01

    This paper introduces a noise robust real time heart rate detection system from electrocardiogram (ECG) data. An online data acquisition system is developed to collect ECG signals from human subjects. Heart rate is detected using window-based autocorrelation peak localisation technique. A low-cost Arduino UNO board is used to implement the complete automated process. The performance of the system is compared with PC-based heart rate detection technique. Accuracy of the system is validated through simulated noisy ECG data with various levels of signal to noise ratio (SNR). The mean percentage error of detected heart rate is found to be 0.72% for the noisy database with five different noise levels.

  13. Optical scatterometry system for detecting specific line edge roughness of resist gratings subjected to detector noises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yen-Min; Li, Jia-Han; Cheng, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Fu-Min; Shen, Yu-Tian; Tsai, Kuen-Yu; Shieh, Jason J; Chen, Alek C

    2014-01-01

    The Fourier scatterometry model was used to measure the ZEP 520A electron beam resist lines with specific line edge roughness (LER). By obtaining the pupils via an objective lens, the angle-resolved diffraction spectrum was collected efficiently without additional mechanical scanning. The concavity of the pupil was considered as the weight function in specimen recognition. A series of white noises was examined in the model, and the tolerant white noise levels for different system numerical apertures (NAs) were reported. Our numerical results show that the scatterometry model of a higher NA can identify a target with a higher white noise level. Moreover, the fabricated ZEP 520A electron beam resist gratings with LER were measured by using our model, and the fitting results were matched with scanning electron microscope measurements. (paper)

  14. Spectral Weighting Functions for Single-symbol Phase-noise Specifications in OFDM Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, F.W.; Schiphorst, Roelof; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2003-01-01

    For the specification of phase-noise requirements for the front-end of a HiperLAN/2 system we investigated available literature on the subject. Literature differed in several aspects. One aspect is in the type of phase-noise used (Wiener phase-noise or small-angle phase noise). A Wiener phase-noise

  15. Investigation and measures to noise on spectroscopic measurement system in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Susumu; Kubo, Hirotaka; Sugie, Tatsuo; Onizawa, Masami; Kawai, Isao; Nakata, Hisao.

    1997-11-01

    Breakdown of a negative-ion-based neutral beam injection (N-NBI) has caused noise trouble to several systems. The control circuit of a spectroscopic measurement system had not well worked because of the noise. The noise has been measured by an optical-fiber isolation system during operation of JT-60U. The amplitude and the frequency were 15-18 V and 15 MHz respectively. The transmission noise has been reduced by putting ferrite cores to all cables connecting with the control circuits. As a result, the trouble with the spectroscopic measurement system has completely been solved. Adding condensers and resistors to the circuit was not effective to reduce the noise. (author)

  16. Twenty-two cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark and in other industrialized countries there are cases where people complain about annoying low-frequency or infrasonic noise in their homes. Besides noise annoyance people often report other adverse effects such as insomnia, headache, lack of concentration etc. In many cases the noise...

  17. Noise Considerations for V/STOL Transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, George C.

    1968-01-01

    Noise consideration may well be as important a factor in future aircraft concept selection as such economic factors as operating cost and profitability. The impact of noise on some of the design and operational aspects of future V/STOL transports is examined in detail, including consideration of configuration, attitude-control system, lift system, and terminal flight pattern. Extended vertical rise of VTOL aircraft as a method of limiting the intense noise exposure to the terminal area is shown to be only partially effective as well as costly. Comparisons are made of noise contours for conceptual V/STOL transports for several PNdB criteria. The variation in extent of affected area with configuration and criterion emphasizes the importance of establishing an "acceptable" noise level for "city-center" operation.

  18. The social side of noise annoyance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, Eveline

    2008-01-01

    Unfairness increases noise annoyance Noise annoyance increases due to unfair sound management. Fair sound management reduces annoyance, however only when the sound pressure level is high, concludes Eveline Maris based on two laboratory experiments. Being exposed to man-made sound is more than

  19. Noise exposure levels for musicians during rehearsal and performance times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvaine, Devon; Stewart, Michael; Anderson, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine daily noise doses and 8-hour time weighted averages for rock band musicians, crew members, and spectators during a typical rehearsal and performance using both Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) measurement criteria. Personal noise dosimetry was completed on five members of a rock band during one 2-hr rehearsal and one 4-hr performance. Time-weighted averages (TWA) and daily dose values were calculated using both OSHA and NIOSH criteria and compared to industry guidelines for enrollment in hearing conservation programs and the use of hearing protection devices. TWA values ranged from 84.3 to 90.4 dBA (OSHA) and from 90.0 to 96.4 dBA (NIOSH) during the rehearsal. The same values ranged from 91.0 to 99.7 dBA (OSHA) and 94.0 to 102.8 dBA (NIOSH) for the performance. During the rehearsal, daily noise doses ranged from 45.54% to 106.7% (OSHA) and from 317.74% to 1396.07% (NIOSH). During the performance, doses ranged from 114.66% to 382.49% (OSHA) and from 793.31% to 5970.15% (NIOSH). The musicians in this study were exposed to dangerously high levels of noise and should be enrolled in a hearing conservation programs. Hearing protection devices should be worn, especially during performances. The OSHA measurement criteria yielded values significantly more conservative than those produced by NIOSH criteria. Audiologists should counsel musician-patients about the hazards of excessive noise (music) exposure and how to protect their hearing.

  20. Demographic and attitudinal factors that modify annoyance from transportation noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Vos, H.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of demographic variables (sex, age, education level, occupational status, size of household, homeownership, dependency on the noise source, and use of the noise source) and two attitudinal variables (noise sensitivity and fear of the noise source) on noise annoyance is investigated. It is

  1. Minimax approach problem with incomplete information for the two-level hierarchical discrete-time dynamical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorikov, A. F. [Ural Federal University, 19 S. Mira, Ekaterinburg, 620002, Russia and Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, 16 S. Kovalevskaya, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-18

    We consider a discrete-time dynamical system consisting of three controllable objects. The motions of all objects are given by the corresponding vector linear or convex discrete-time recurrent vector relations, and control system for its has two levels: basic (first or I level) that is dominating and subordinate level (second or II level) and both have different criterions of functioning and united a priori by determined informational and control connections defined in advance. For the dynamical system in question, we propose a mathematical formalization in the form of solving a multistep problem of two-level hierarchical minimax program control over the terminal approach process with incomplete information and give a general scheme for its solution.

  2. Influence of Signal and Noise on Statistical Fluctuation of Single-Mode Laser System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Dahai; Cheng Qinghua; Cao Li; Wu Dajin

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of calculating the steady-state mean normalized intensity fluctuation of a signal-mode laser system driven by both colored pump noise with signal modulation and the quantum noise with cross-correlation between its real and imaginary parts, we analyze the influence of modulation signal, noise, and its correlation form on the statistical fluctuation of the laser system. We have found that when the amplitude of modulation signal weakens and its frequency quickens, the statistical fluctuation will reduce rapidly. The statistical fluctuation of the laser system can be restrained by reducing the intensity of pump noise and quantum noise. Moreover, with prolonging of colored cross-correlation time, the statistical fluctuation of laser system experiences a repeated changing process, that is, from decreasing to augmenting, then to decreasing, and finally to augmenting again. With the decreasing of the value of cross-correlation coefficient, the statistical fluctuation will decrease too. When the cross-correlation form between the real part and imaginary part of quantum noise is zero correlation, the statistical fluctuation of laser system has a minimum. Compared with the influence of intensity of pump noise, the influence of intensity of quantum noise on the statistical fluctuation is smaller.

  3. The design and research of anti-color-noise chaos M-ary communication system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yongqing, E-mail: fuyongqing@hrbeu.edu.cn; Li, Xingyuan; Li, Yanan [College of information and Communication Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang, Lin [College of Underwater Acoustic Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Previously a novel chaos M-ary digital communication method based on spatiotemporal chaos Hamilton oscillator has been proposed. Without chaos synchronization circumstance, it has performance improvement in bandwidth efficiency, transmission efficiency and anti-white-noise performance compared with traditional communication method. In this paper, the channel noise influence on chaotic modulation signals and the construction problem of anti-color-noise chaotic M-ary communication system are studied. The formula of zone partition demodulator’s boundary in additive white Gaussian noise is derived, besides, the problem about how to determine the boundary of zone partition demodulator in additive color noise is deeply studied; Then an approach on constructing anti-color-noise chaos M-ary communication system is proposed, in which a pre-distortion filter is added after the chaos baseband modulator in the transmitter and whitening filter is added before zone partition demodulator in the receiver. Finally, the chaos M-ary communication system based on Hamilton oscillator is constructed and simulated in different channel noise. The result shows that the proposed method in this paper can improve the anti-color-noise performance of the whole communication system compared with the former system, and it has better anti-fading and resisting disturbance performance than Quadrature Phase Shift Keying system.

  4. The design and research of anti-color-noise chaos M-ary communication system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Yongqing; Li, Xingyuan; Li, Yanan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Previously a novel chaos M-ary digital communication method based on spatiotemporal chaos Hamilton oscillator has been proposed. Without chaos synchronization circumstance, it has performance improvement in bandwidth efficiency, transmission efficiency and anti-white-noise performance compared with traditional communication method. In this paper, the channel noise influence on chaotic modulation signals and the construction problem of anti-color-noise chaotic M-ary communication system are studied. The formula of zone partition demodulator’s boundary in additive white Gaussian noise is derived, besides, the problem about how to determine the boundary of zone partition demodulator in additive color noise is deeply studied; Then an approach on constructing anti-color-noise chaos M-ary communication system is proposed, in which a pre-distortion filter is added after the chaos baseband modulator in the transmitter and whitening filter is added before zone partition demodulator in the receiver. Finally, the chaos M-ary communication system based on Hamilton oscillator is constructed and simulated in different channel noise. The result shows that the proposed method in this paper can improve the anti-color-noise performance of the whole communication system compared with the former system, and it has better anti-fading and resisting disturbance performance than Quadrature Phase Shift Keying system.

  5. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  6. A noise power spectrum study of a new model‐based iterative reconstruction system: Veo 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Liu, Xinming; Dodge, Cristina T.; Jensen, Corey T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance of the third generation of model‐based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) system, Veo 3.0, based on noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis with various clinical presets over a wide range of clinically applicable dose levels. A CatPhan 600 surrounded by an oval, fat‐equivalent ring to mimic patient size/shape was scanned 10 times at each of six dose levels on a GE HD 750 scanner. NPS analysis was performed on images reconstructed with various Veo 3.0 preset combinations for comparisons of those images reconstructed using Veo 2.0, filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). The new Target Thickness setting resulted in higher noise in thicker axial images. The new Texture Enhancement function achieved a more isotropic noise behavior with less image artifacts. Veo 3.0 provides additional reconstruction options designed to allow the user choice of balance between spatial resolution and image noise, relative to Veo 2.0. Veo 3.0 provides more user selectable options and in general improved isotropic noise behavior in comparison to Veo 2.0. The overall noise reduction performance of both versions of MBIR was improved in comparison to FBP and ASiR, especially at low‐dose levels. PACS number(s): 87.57.‐s, 87.57.Q‐, 87.57.C‐, 87.57.nf, 87.57.C‐, 87.57.cm PMID:27685118

  7. Noise and Fuel Burn Reduction Potential of an Innovative Subsonic Transport Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping; Nickol, Craig L.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    A study is presented for the noise and fuel burn reduction potential of an innovative double deck concept aircraft with two three-shaft direct-drive turbofan engines. The engines are mounted from the fuselage so that the engine inlet is over the main wing. It is shown that such an aircraft can achieve a cumulative Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL) about 28 dB below the current aircraft noise regulations of Stage 4. The combination of high bypass ratio engines and advanced wing design with laminar flow control technologies provide fuel burn reduction and low noise levels simultaneously. For example, the fuselage mounted engine position provides more than 4 EPNLdB of noise reduction by shielding the inlet radiated noise. To identify the potential effect of noise reduction technologies on this concept, parametric studies are presented to reveal the system level benefits of various emerging noise reduction concepts, for both engine and airframe noise reduction. These concepts are discussed both individually to show their respective incremental noise reduction potential and collectively to assess their aggregate effects on the total noise. Through these concepts approximately about 8 dB of additional noise reduction is possible, bringing the cumulative noise level of this aircraft to 36 EPNLdB below Stage 4, if the entire suite of noise reduction technologies would mature to practical application. In a final step, an estimate is made for this same aircraft concept but with higher bypass ratio, geared, turbofan engines. With this geared turbofan propulsion system, the noise is estimated to reach as low as 40-42 dB below Stage 4 with a fuel burn reduction of 43-47% below the 2005 best-in-class aircraft baseline. While just short of the NASA N+2 goals of 42 dB and 50% fuel burn reduction, for a 2025 in service timeframe, this assessment shows that this innovative concept warrants refined study. Furthermore, this design appears to be a viable potential future passenger

  8. LTP interferometer-noise sources and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, David; Killow, Christian; Ward, Harry; Hough, Jim; Heinzel, Gerhard; Garcia, Antonio; Wand, Vinzenz; Johann, Ulrich; Braxmaier, Claus

    2005-01-01

    The LISA Technology Package (LTP) uses laser interferometry to measure the changes in relative displacement between two inertial test masses. The goals of the mission require a displacement measuring precision of 10 pm Hz -1/2 at frequencies in the 3-30 mHz band. We report on progress with a prototype LTP interferometer optical bench in which fused silica mirrors and beamsplitters are fixed to a ZERODUR (registered) substrate using hydroxide catalysis bonding to form a rigid interferometer. The couplings to displacement noise of this interferometer of two expected noise sources-laser frequency noise and ambient temperature fluctuations-have been investigated, and an additional, unexpected, noise source has been identified. The additional noise is due to small amounts of signal at the heterodyne frequency arriving at the photodiode preamplifiers with a phase that quasistatically changes with respect to the optical signal. The phase shift is caused by differential changes in the external optical paths the beams travel before they reach the rigid interferometer. Two different external path length stabilization systems have been demonstrated and these allowed the performance of the overall system to meet the LTP displacement noise requirement

  9. Effects of measurement noise on modal parameter identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorvash, S; Pakzad, S N

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, much research has been conducted on data-driven structural health monitoring (SHM) algorithms with use of sensor measurements. A fundamental step in this SHM application is to identify the dynamic characteristics of structures. Despite the significant efforts devoted to development and enhancement of the modal parameter identification algorithms, there are still substantial uncertainties in the results obtained in real-life deployments. One of the sources of uncertainties in the results is the existence of noise in the measurement data. Depending on the subsequent application of the system identification, the level of uncertainty in the results and, consequently, the level of noise contamination can be very important. As an effort towards understanding the effect of measurement noise on the modal identification, this paper presents parameters that quantify the effects of measurement noise on the modal identification process and determine their influence on the accuracy of results. The performance of these parameters is validated by a numerically simulated example. They are then used to investigate the accuracy of identified modal properties of the Golden Gate Bridge using ambient data collected by wireless sensors. The vibration monitoring tests of the Golden Gate Bridge provided two synchronized data sets collected by two different sensor types. The influence of the sensor noise level on the accuracy of results is investigated throughout this work and it is shown that high quality sensors provide more accurate results as the physical contribution of response in their measured data is significantly higher. Additionally, higher purity and consistency of modal parameters, identified by higher quality sensors, is observed in the results. (paper)

  10. Salt-and-pepper noise removal using modified mean filter and total variation minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajarian, Mickael; McInroy, John E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.

    2018-01-01

    The search for effective noise removal algorithms is still a real challenge in the field of image processing. An efficient image denoising method is proposed for images that are corrupted by salt-and-pepper noise. Salt-and-pepper noise takes either the minimum or maximum intensity, so the proposed method restores the image by processing the pixels whose values are either 0 or 255 (assuming an 8-bit/pixel image). For low levels of noise corruption (less than or equal to 50% noise density), the method employs the modified mean filter (MMF), while for heavy noise corruption, noisy pixels values are replaced by the weighted average of the MMF and the total variation of corrupted pixels, which is minimized using convex optimization. Two fuzzy systems are used to determine the weights for taking average. To evaluate the performance of the algorithm, several test images with different noise levels are restored, and the results are quantitatively measured by peak signal-to-noise ratio and mean absolute error. The results show that the proposed scheme gives considerable noise suppression up to a noise density of 90%, while almost completely maintaining edges and fine details of the original image.

  11. Orbital Noise in the Earth System and Climate Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han-Shou; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Frequency noise in the variations of the Earth's obliquity (tilt) can modulate the insolation signal for climate change. Including this frequency noise effect on the incoming solar radiation, we have applied an energy balance climate model to calculate the climate fluctuations for the past one million years. Model simulation results are in good agreement with the geologically observed paleoclimate data. We conclude that orbital noise in the Earth system may be the major cause of the climate fluctuation cycles.

  12. An improved two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol with added noise in homodyne detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Maozhu; Peng Xiang; Guo Hong

    2013-01-01

    We propose an improved two-way continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV QKD) protocol by adding proper random noise on the receiver’s homodyne detection, the security of which is analysed against general collective attacks. The simulation result under the collective entangling cloner attack indicates that despite the correlation between two-way channels decreasing the secret key rate relative to the uncorrelated channels slightly, the performance of the two-way protocol is still far beyond that of the one-way protocols. Importantly, the added noise in detection is beneficial for the secret key rate and the tolerable excess noise of this two-way protocol. With the reasonable reconciliation efficiency of 90%, the two-way CV QKD with added noise allows the distribution of secret keys over 60 km fibre distance. (paper)

  13. Detuning-induced stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in dense two-level systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Lin, Gongwei; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the coherence generation in dense two-level systems under detuning-induced stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (D-STIRAP). In the dense two-level system, the near dipole-dipole (NDD) interaction should be taken into consideration. With the increase in the strength of the NDD interaction, it is found that a switchlike transition of the generated coherence from maximum value to zero appears. Meanwhile, the adiabatic condition of the D-STIRAP is destroyed in the presence of the NDD interaction. In order to avoid the sudden decrease in the generated coherence and maintain the maximum value, we can use stronger detuning pulse or pump pulse, between which increasing the intensity of the detuning pulse is of more efficiency. Except for taking advantage of such maximum coherence in the high density case into areas like enhancing the four-wave mixing process, we also point out that the phenomenon of the coherence transition can be applied as an optical switch.

  14. Communication system with adaptive noise suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, David (Inventor); Devault, James A. (Inventor); Birr, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction process eliminates noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. The process first pre-emphasizes the frequency components of the input sound signal which contain the consonant information in human speech. Next, a signal-to-noise ratio is determined and a spectral subtraction proportion adjusted appropriately. After spectral subtraction, low amplitude signals can be squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoiced frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Spectral subtraction may be performed on a composite noise-corrupted signal, or upon individual sub-bands of the noise-corrupted signal. Pre-averaging of the input signal's magnitude spectrum over multiple time frames may be performed to reduce musical noise.

  15. System Noise Prediction of the DGEN 380 Turbofan Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    The DGEN 380 is a small, separate-flow, geared turbofan. Its manufacturer, Price Induction, is promoting it for a small twinjet application in the emerging personal light jet market. Smaller, and producing less thrust than other entries in the industry, Price Induction is seeking to apply the engine to a 4- to 5-place twinjet designed to compete in an area currently dominated by propeller-driven airplanes. NASA is considering purchasing a DGEN 380 turbofan to test new propulsion noise reduction technologies in a relevant engine environment. To explore this possibility, NASA and Price Induction have signed a Space Act Agreement and have agreed to cooperate on engine acoustic testing. Static acoustic measurements of the engine were made by NASA researchers during July, 2014 at the Glenn Research Center. In the event that a DGEN turbofan becomes a NASA noise technology research testbed, it is in the interest of NASA to develop procedures to evaluate engine system noise metrics. This report documents the procedures used to project the DGEN static noise measurements to flight conditions and the prediction of system noise of a notional airplane powered by twin DGEN engines.

  16. Noise-induced coherence in bistable systems with multiple time delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yu; Dong, Shi-Hai; Lozada-Cassou, M.

    2004-01-01

    We study the correlation properties of noise-driven bistable systems with multiple time-delay feedbacks. For small noisy perturbation and feedback magnitude, we derive the autocorrelation function and the power spectrum based on the two-state model with transition rates depending on the earlier states of the system. A comparison between the single and double time delays reveals that the auto correlation functions exhibit exponential decay with small undulation for the double time delays, in contrast with the remarkable oscillatory behavior at small time lags for the single time delay

  17. Integration of Bass Enhancement and Active Noise Control System in Automobile Cabin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of digital signal processing technologies, consumers are more concerned with the quality of multimedia entertainment in automobiles. In order to meet this demand, an audio enhancement system is needed to improve bass reproduction and cancel engine noise in the cabins. This paper presents an integrated active noise control system that is based on frequency-sampling filters to track and extract the bass information from the audio signal, and a multifrequency active noise equalizer to tune the low-frequency engine harmonics to enhance the bass reproduction. In the noise cancellation mode, a maximum of 3 dB bass enhancement can be achieved with significant noise suppression, while higher bass enhancement can be achieved in the bass enhance mode. The results show that the proposed system is effective for solving both the bass audio reproduction and the noise control problems in automobile cabins.

  18. Aero-acoustic design and test of a multiple splitter exhaust noise suppressor for a 0.914m diameter lift fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpert, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A lift fan exhaust suppression system to meet future VTOL aircraft noise goals was designed and tested. The test vehicle was a 1.3 pressure ratio, 36 inch (91.44 cm) diameter lift fan with two chord rotor to stator spacing. A two splitter fan exhaust suppression system thirty inches (76.2 cm) long achieved 10 PNdB exhaust suppression in the aft quadrant compared to a design value of 20 PNdB. It was found that a broadband noise floor limited the realizable suppression. An analytical investigation of broadband noise generated by flow over the treatment surfaces provided very good agreement with the measured suppression levels and noise floor sound power levels. A fan thrust decrement of 22% was measured for the fully suppressed configuration of which 11.1% was attributed to the exhaust suppression hardware.