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Sample records for two-layer tissue phantoms

  1. Reflected light intensity profile of two-layer tissues: phantom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankri, Rinat; Taitelbaum, Haim; Fixler, Dror

    2011-08-01

    Experimental measurements of the reflected light intensity from two-layer phantoms are presented. We report, for the first time, an experimental observation of a typical reflected light intensity behavior for the two-layer structure characterized by two different slopes in the reflected light profile of the irradiated tissue. The point in which the first slope changes to the second slope, named as the crossover point, depends on the upper layer thickness as well as on the ratio between the absorption coefficients of the two layers. Since similar experiments from one-layer phantoms present a monotonic decay behavior, the existence and the location of the crossover point can be used as a diagnostic fingerprint for two-layer tissue structures. This pertains to two layers with greater absorptivity in the upper layer, which is the typical biological case in tissues like skin.

  2. Determining particle size distribution and refractive index in a two-layer tissue phantom by linearly polarized light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Deng; Qiang Lu; Qingming Luo

    2006-01-01

    We report a new method for measuring particle size distribution (PSD) and refractive index of the top layer in a two-layer tissue phantom simulated epithelium tissue by varying the azimuth angle of incident linearly polarized light. The polarization gating technique is used to decouple the single and multiple scattering components in the returned signal. The theoretical model based on Mie theory is presented and a nonlinear inversion method - floating genetic algorithm - is applied to inverting the azimuth dependence of component of polarization light backscattered. The experiment results demonstrate that the size distribution and refractive index of the scatters of the top layer can be determined by measuring and analyzing the differential signal of the parallel and perpendicular components from a two-layer tissue phantom. The method implies to detect precancerous changes in human epithelial tissue.

  3. Optimal estimation reconstruction of the optical properties of a two-layered tissue phantom from time-resolved single-distance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Del Bianco, Samuele; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Cavalieri, Stefano; Di Ninni, Paola; Binzoni, Tiziano; Jelzow, Alexander; Macdonald, Rainer; Wabnitz, Heidrun

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we have tested the optimal estimation (OE) algorithm for the reconstruction of the optical properties of a two-layered liquid tissue phantom from time-resolved single-distance measurements. The OE allows a priori information, in particular on the range of variation of fit parameters, to be included. The purpose of the present investigations was to compare the performance of OE with the Levenberg-Marquardt method for a geometry and real experimental conditions typically used to reconstruct the optical properties of biological tissues such as muscle and brain. The absorption coefficient of the layers was varied in a range of values typical for biological tissues. The reconstructions performed demonstrate the substantial improvements achievable with the OE provided a priori information is available. We note the extreme reliability, robustness, and accuracy of the retrieved absorption coefficient of the second layer obtained with the OE that was found for up to six fit parameters, with an error in the retrieved values of less than 10%. A priori information on fit parameters and fixed forward model parameters clearly improves robustness and accuracy of the inversion procedure.

  4. Tissue-like phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangioni, John V.; De Grand, Alec M.

    2007-10-30

    The invention is based, in part, on the discovery that by combining certain components one can generate a tissue-like phantom that mimics any desired tissue, is simple and inexpensive to prepare, and is stable over many weeks or months. In addition, new multi-modal imaging objects (e.g., beads) can be inserted into the phantoms to mimic tissue pathologies, such as cancer, or merely to serve as calibration standards. These objects can be imaged using one, two, or more (e.g., four) different imaging modalities (e.g., x-ray computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence) simultaneously.

  5. Optical characterization of two-layered turbid media for non-invasive, absolute oximetry in cerebral and extracerebral tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertan Hallacoglu

    Full Text Available We introduce a multi-distance, frequency-domain, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS method to measure the optical coefficients of two-layered media and the thickness of the top layer from diffuse reflectance measurements. This method features a direct solution based on diffusion theory and an inversion procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. We have validated our method through Monte Carlo simulations, experiments on tissue-like phantoms, and measurements on the forehead of three human subjects. The Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements have shown that, in ideal two-layered samples, our method accurately recovers the top layer thickness (L, the absorption coefficient (µ a and the reduced scattering coefficient (µ' s of both layers with deviations that are typically less than 10% for all parameters. Our method is aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral and extracerebral tissue of adult human subjects, where the top layer (layer 1 represents extracerebral tissue (scalp, skull, dura mater, subarachnoid space, etc. and the bottom layer (layer 2 represents cerebral tissue. Human subject measurements have shown a significantly greater total hemoglobin concentration in cerebral tissue (82±14 µM with respect to extracerebral tissue (30±7 µM. By contrast, there was no significant difference between the hemoglobin saturation measured in cerebral tissue (56%±10% and extracerebral tissue (62%±6%. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an inversion procedure in the frequency domain with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge is used for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  6. Polarized light propagation through tissue and tissue phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, V; Walsh, J T JR; Maitland, D J

    2000-02-08

    We show that standard tissue phantoms can be used to mimic the intensity and polarization properties of tissue. Polarized light propagation through biologic tissue is typically studied using tissue phantoms consisting of dilute aqueous suspensions of microspheres. The dilute phantoms can empirically match tissue polarization and intensity properties. One discrepancy between the dilute phantoms and tissue exist: common tissue phantoms, such as dilute Intralipid and dilute 1-{micro}m-diameter polystyrene microsphere suspensions, depolarize linearly polarized light more quickly than circularly polarized light. In dense tissue, however, where scatterers are often located in close proximity to one another, circularly polarized light is depolarized similar to or more quickly than linearly polarized light. We also demonstrate that polarized light propagates differently in dilute versus densely packed microsphere suspensions, which may account for the differences seen between polarized light propagation in common dilute tissue phantoms versus dense biologic tissue.

  7. Photoacoustic microscopy of bilirubin in tissue phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-12-01

    Determining both bilirubin's concentration and its spatial distribution are important in disease diagnosis. Here, for the first time, we applied quantitative multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect bilirubin concentration and distribution simultaneously. By measuring tissue-mimicking phantoms with different bilirubin concentrations, we showed that the root-mean-square error of prediction has reached 0.52 and 0.83 mg/dL for pure bilirubin and for blood-mixed bilirubin detection (with 100% oxygen saturation), respectively. We further demonstrated the capability of the PAM system to image bilirubin distribution both with and without blood. Finally, by underlaying bilirubin phantoms with mouse skins, we showed that bilirubin can be imaged with consistent accuracy down to >400 μm in depth. Our results show that PAM has potential for noninvasive bilirubin monitoring in vivo, as well as for further clinical applications.

  8. A Two-Layer Mathematical Modelling of Drug Delivery to Biological Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Chakravarty, Koyel

    2016-01-01

    Local drug delivery has received much recognition in recent years, yet it is still unpredictable how drug efficacy depends on physicochemical properties and delivery kinetics. The purpose of the current study is to provide a useful mathematical model for drug release from a drug delivery device and consecutive drug transport in biological tissue, thereby aiding the development of new therapeutic drug by a systemic approach. In order to study the complete process, a two-layer spatio-temporal model depicting drug transport between the coupled media is presented. Drug release is described by considering solubilisation dynamics of drug particle, diffusion of the solubilised drug through porous matrix and also some other processes like reversible dissociation / recrystallization, drug particle-receptor binding and internalization phenomena. The model has led to a system of partial differential equations describing the important properties of drug kinetics. This model contributes towards the perception of the roles...

  9. Intercostal HIFU Treatment: A Tissue Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illing, Rowland O.; Kennedy, James E.; ter Haar, Gail R.

    2005-03-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) when used clinically to treat liver and kidney tumours is often directed between the ribs. This paper details the construction of a tissue phantom, incorporating ribs, and its use to assess the clinical safety of HIFU exposures. The prefocal, acoustic side-lobes of the ultrasonic beam were studied with and without rib interference, and thermocouples used to assess in-situ temperature changes. The results show that there are implications in regards to the safety of clinical treatment, should the operator be unaware of the characteristics of the transducer being used.

  10. Influence of a fat layer on the near infrared spectra of human muscle: quantitative analysis based on two-layered Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Soyemi, Olusola O.; Landry, Michelle R.; Soller, Babs R.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of fat thickness on the diffuse reflectance spectra of muscle in the near infrared (NIR) region is studied by Monte Carlo simulations of a two-layer structure and with phantom experiments. A polynomial relationship was established between the fat thickness and the detected diffuse reflectance. The influence of a range of optical coefficients (absorption and reduced scattering) for fat and muscle over the known range of human physiological values was also investigated. Subject-to-subject variation in the fat optical coefficients and thickness can be ignored if the fat thickness is less than 5 mm. A method was proposed to correct the fat thickness influence. c2005 Optical Society of America.

  11. Toxicology Analysis of Tissue-Mimicking Phantom Made From Gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbashid, A. S.; Hamzah, N.; Zaman, W. S. W. K.; Mokhtar, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    Skin phantom mimics the biological skin tissues as it have the ability to respond to changes in its environment. The development of tissue-mimicking phantom could contributes towards the reduce usage of animal in cosmetics and pharmacokinetics. In this study, the skin phantoms made from gelatin were tested with four different commonly available cosmetic products to determine the toxicity of each substance. The four substances used were; mercury-based whitening face cream, carcinogenic liquid make-up foundation, paraben-based acne cleanser, and organic lip balm. Toxicity test were performed on all of the phantoms. For toxicity testing, topographical and electrophysiological changes of the phantoms were evaluated. The ability of each respective phantom to react with mild toxic substances and its electrical resistance were analysed in to determine the toxicity of all the phantom models. Four-electrode method along with custom made electrical impedance analyser was used to differentiate electrical resistance between intoxicated phantom and non-intoxicated phantom in this study. Electrical resistance values obtained from the phantom models were significantly higher than the control group. The result obtained suggests the phantom as a promising candidate to be used as alternative for toxicology testing in the future.

  12. Breast phantom for mammary tissue characterization by near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, D. A.; Cristiano, K. L.; Gutiérrez, J. C.

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer is a disease associated to a high morbidity and mortality in the entire world. In the study of early detection of breast cancer the development of phantom is so important. In this research we fabricate a breast phantom using a ballistic gel with special modifications to simulate a normal and abnormal human breast. Optical properties of woman breast in the near infrared region were modelled with the phantom we developed. The developed phantom was evaluated with near infrared spectroscopy in order to study its relation with breast tissue. A good optical behaviour was achieved with the model fabricated.

  13. Full scattering profile of circular optical phantoms mimicking biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Idit; Wróbel, Maciej S.; Duadi, Hamootal; Fixler, Dror; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, Malgorzata

    2017-02-01

    Human tissue is one of the most complex optical media since it is turbid and nonhomogeneous. In our poster, we suggest a new type of skin phantom and an optical method for sensing physiological tissue condition, basing on the collection of the ejected light at all exit angles, to receive the full scattering profile. Conducted experiments were carried out on an unique set-up for noninvasive encircled measurement. Set-up consisted of a laser, a photodetector and new tissues-like phantoms made with a polyvinyl chloride-plastisol (PVCP), silicone elastomer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and PDMS with glycerol mixture. Our method reveals an isobaric point, which is independent of the optical properties. Furthermore, we present the angular distribution of cylindrical phantoms, in order to sense physiological tissue state.

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of blood perfusion in tissue and phantoms

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    Pilatou, Magdalena C.; Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Bolt, Rene A.; de Mul, Frits F. M.

    2001-06-01

    To localize and monitor the blood content in tissue we developed a very sensitive photo-acoustical detector. PVDF has been used as piezo-electric material. In this detector also fibers for the illumination of the sample are integrated. Resolution is about 20 (m in depth and about 50-100 m laterally). We use 532 nm light. We will show how photoacoustics can be used for measuring the thickness of tissue above bone. We will also report measurements on tissue phantoms: e.g. a vessel delta from the epigastric artery branching of a Wistar rat, filled with an artificial blood-resembling absorber. The measurements have been carried out on phantoms containing vessels at several depths. Signal processing was enhanced by Fourier processing of the data.

  15. Manufacture and image characteristic changes observation by temperature of ultrasound tissue mimicking phantom

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    Ma, Sang Chull [Dept. of Radiological science, ShinHan university, Dongdocheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study is that in measures the acoustic propagate characteristics and temperature sensitivity of ultrasound tissue mimicking phantom(TM phantom). TM phantom manufacture according to the International Electronical Committee(IEC) guidelines for acoustic propagate characteristics of soft tissue. TM phantom was observed to have the image brightness and the image depth penetration decreases changes convergence which was the subject of ultrasound image characteristics in accordance with an external temperature hat the change is reduced in temperature below 22 .deg. C. This study provide a basis to create another TM Phantom and TM Phantom has been determined that it is appropriate for use in more than 22 .deg. C.

  16. Impedance of tissue-mimicking phantom material under compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Belmont

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The bioimpedance of tissues under compression is a field in need of study. While biological tissues can become compressed in a myriad of ways, very few experiments have been conducted to describe the relationship between the passive electrical properties of a material (impedance/admittance during mechanical deformation. Of the investigations that have been conducted, the exodus of fluid from samples under compression has been thought to be the cause of changes in impedance, though until now was not measured directly. Using a soft tissue-mimicking phantom material (tofu whose passive electrical properties are a function of the conducting fluid held within its porous structure, we have shown that the mechanical behavior of a sample under compression can be measured through bioimpedance techniques.

  17. Development of a Phantom Tissue for Blood Perfusion Measurements and Noninvasive Blood Perfusion Estimation in Living Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Mudaliar, Ashvinikumar

    2007-01-01

    A convenient method for testing and calibrating surface perfusion sensors has been developed. A phantom tissue model is used to mimic the non-directional blood flow of tissue perfusion. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was constructed in Fluent to design the phantom tissue and validate the experimental results. The phantom perfusion system was used with a perfusion sensor based on the clearance of thermal energy. A heat flux gage measures the heat flux response of tissue whe...

  18. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2010-12-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in vitro and predict in vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom's response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by the generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses, at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High-speed imaging of the optically transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation.

  19. Study of the optical properties of solid tissue phantoms using single and double integrating sphere systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Monem, S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue simulators, the so-called tissue phantoms, have been used to mimic human tissue for spectroscopic applications. Phantoms’ design depends on patterning the optical properties, namely absorption and scattering coefficients which characterize...

  20. Poly(vinyl alcohol) gels for use as tissue phantoms in photoacousttc mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kharine, Alexei; Manohar, Srirang; Seeton, Rosalyn; Kolkman, Roy G.M.; Bolt, Rene A.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Mul, de Frits F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Materials for solid photoacoustic breast phantoms, based on poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels, are presented. Phantoms intended for use in photoacoustics must possess both optical and acoustic properties of tissue. To realize the optical properties of tissue, one approach was to optimize the number of f

  1. Tissue equivalence of some phantom materials for proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Vasiliev, V N; Riazantsev, O B; Khaybullin, V G; Samarin, S I; Uglov, A S

    2010-01-01

    Tissue and water equivalence of some phantom materials originally developed for conventional radiation therapy was investigated on the ITEP medical proton beam facility. The proton CSDA range in three variants of Plastic Water, lung, adipose, muscle and compact bone substitute materials (CIRS Inc., USA) was measured by a silicon diode as well as the residual proton range in liquid water after passing a slab of each material under investigation. In addition, the proton range in five materials of known elemental composition was calculated by Monte Carlo technique. The obtained results were compared with reference data from ICRU report 49 for respective biological tissues and water. A total uncertainty of the proton range ratios was estimated to be from 0.9 to 1.5% (1SD). Within these uncertainties, Plastic Water, Plastic Water LR, Plastic Water DT, muscle and compact bone demonstrated a good agreement with the reference data. The range in adipose and lung substitutes is a few percents lower than that in the res...

  2. Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic based low cost tissue equivalent phantom for verification dosimetry in IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, S D; Deshpande, Sudesh; Ghadi, Yogesh; Shaiju, V S; Amols, H I; Mayya, Y S

    2009-12-17

    A novel IMRT phantom was designed and fabricated using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic. Physical properties of ABS plastic related to radiation interaction and dosimetry were compared with commonly available phantom materials for dose measurements in radiotherapy. The ABS IMRT phantom has provisions to hold various types of detectors such as ion chambers, radiographic/radiochromic films, TLDs, MOSFETs, and gel dosimeters. The measurements related to pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT of carcinoma prostate were carried out using ABS and Scanditronics-Wellhoffer RW3 IMRT phantoms for five different cases. Point dose data were acquired using ionization chamber and TLD discs while Gafchromic EBT and radiographic EDR2 films were used for generating 2-D dose distributions. Treatment planning system (TPS) calculated and measured doses in ABS plastic and RW3 IMRT phantom were in agreement within +/-2%. The dose values at a point in a given patient acquired using ABS and RW3 phantoms were found comparable within 1%. Fluence maps and dose distributions of these patients generated by TPS and measured in ABS IMRT phantom were also found comparable both numerically and spatially. This study indicates that ABS plastic IMRT phantom is a tissue equivalent phantom and dosimetrically it is similar to solid/plastic water IMRT phantoms. Though this material is demonstrated for IMRT dose verification but it can be used as a tissue equivalent phantom material for other dosimetry purposes in radiotherapy.

  3. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Scatter in medical imaging is typically cast off as image-related noise that detracts from meaningful diagnosis. It is therefore typically rejected or removed from medical images. However, it has been found that every material, including cancerous tissue, has a unique X-ray coherent scatter signature that can be used to identify the material or tissue. Such scatter-based tissue-identification provides the advantage of locating and identifying particular materials over conventional anatomical imaging through X-ray radiography. A coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter spectral imaging system has been developed in our group to classify different tissue types based on their unique scatter signatures. Previous experiments using our prototype have demonstrated that the depth-resolved coherent scatter spectral imaging system (CACSSI) can discriminate healthy and cancerous tissue present in the path of a non-destructive x-ray beam. A key to the successful optimization of CACSSI as a clinical imaging method is to obtain anatomically accurate phantoms of the human body. This thesis describes the development and fabrication of 3D printed anatomical scatter phantoms of the breast and lung. The purpose of this work is to accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Tissue-equivalent anatomical phantoms were designed to assess the capability of the CACSSI system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, malignant). These phantoms were 3D printed based on DICOM data obtained from CT scans of prone breasts. The phantoms were tested through comparison of measured scatter signatures with those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Tumors in the phantom were modeled using a variety of biological tissue including actual surgically excised benign and malignant tissue specimens. Lung based phantoms have also been printed for future

  4. Lambertian nature of tissue phantoms for use as calibrators in near infrared fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litorja, Maritoni; Lorenzo, Simón; Zhu, Banghe; Sevick Muraca, Eva

    2016-03-01

    The use of tissue phantoms as calibrators to transfer SI-referenced scale to an imager offers convenience, compared to other methods of calibration. The tissue phantoms are calibrated separately for radiance at emission wavelength per irradiance at excitation wavelength. This calibration is only performed at a single geometric configuration, typically with the detector normal to the sample. In the clinic however, the imager can be moved around, resulting in a geometric configuration different from the calibration configuration. In this study, radiometric measurements are made at different sample-imager angles to test whether the tissue phantoms are Lambertian and the angular limits to which the calibration values hold true.

  5. Bone tissue phantoms for optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacing generated by 3D-stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Torricelli, Alessandro; Giust, Remo; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Bernhard, Paul; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    A bone tissue phantom prototype allowing to test, in general, optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacings, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry or diffuse correlation spectroscopy, has been developed by 3D-stereolithography technique. It has been demonstrated that complex tissue vascular systems of any geometrical shape can be conceived. Absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and refractive index of the optical phantom have been measured to ensure that the optical parameters reasonably reproduce real human bone tissue in vivo. An experimental demonstration of a possible use of the optical phantom, utilizing a laser-Doppler flowmeter, is also presented.

  6. A heterogeneous human tissue mimicking phantom for RF heating and MRI thermal monitoring verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu; Wyatt, Cory; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul; Craciunescu, Oana; MacFall, James; Dewhirst, Mark; Das, Shiva K.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a heterogeneous phantom that mimics a human thigh with a deep-seated tumor, for the purpose of studying the performance of radiofrequency (RF) heating equipment and non-invasive temperature monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The heterogeneous cylindrical phantom was constructed with an outer fat layer surrounding an inner core of phantom material mimicking muscle, tumor and marrow-filled bone. The component materials were formulated to have dielectric and thermal properties similar to human tissues. The dielectric properties of the tissue mimicking phantom materials were measured with a microwave vector network analyzer and impedance probe over the frequency range of 80-500 MHz and at temperatures of 24, 37 and 45 °C. The specific heat values of the component materials were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter over the temperature range of 15-55 °C. The thermal conductivity value was obtained from fitting the curves obtained from one-dimensional heat transfer measurement. The phantom was used to verify the operation of a cylindrical four-antenna annular phased array extremity applicator (140 MHz) by examining the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermal imaging patterns for various magnitude/phase settings (including settings to focus heating in tumors). For muscle and tumor materials, MRI was also used to measure T1/T2* values (1.5 T) and to obtain the slope of the PRFS phase change versus temperature change curve. The dielectric and thermal properties of the phantom materials were in close agreement to well-accepted published results for human tissues. The phantom was able to successfully demonstrate satisfactory operation of the tested heating equipment. The MRI-measured thermal distributions matched the expected patterns for various magnitude/phase settings of the applicator, allowing the phantom to be used as a quality assurance tool. Importantly, the material formulations for the various tissue types

  7. Studying the distribution of deep Raman spectroscopy signals using liquid tissue phantoms with varying optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaki, Martha Z; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2015-08-01

    In this study we employed large volume liquid tissue phantoms, consisting of a scattering agent (Intralipid), an absorption agent (Indian ink) and a synthesized calcification powder (calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP)) similar to that found in cancerous tissues (e.g. breast and prostate), to simulate human tissues. We studied experimentally the magnitude and origin of Raman signals in a transmission Raman geometry as a function of optical properties of the medium and the location of calcifications within the phantom. The goal was to inform the development of future noninvasive cancer screening applications in vivo. The results provide insight into light propagation and Raman scattering distribution in deep Raman measurements, exploring also the effect of the variation of relative absorbance of laser and Raman photons within the phantoms. Most notably when modeling breast and prostate tissues it follows that maximum signals is obtained from the front and back faces of the tissue with the central region contributing less to the measured spectrum.

  8. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCT, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180 (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica, Universidade Estadual Paulista-UNESP, Distrito de Rubiao Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age {<=}1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  9. FABRICATION OF TISSUE-SIMULATIVE PHANTOMS AND CAPILLARIES AND THEIR INVESTIGATION BY OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Bykov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods of tissue-simulative phantoms and capillaries fabrication from PVC-plastisol and silicone for application as test-objects in optical coherence tomography (OCT and skin and capillary emulation are considered. Comparison characteristics of these materials and recommendations for their application are given. Examples of phantoms visualization by optical coherence tomography method are given. Possibility of information using from B-scans for refractive index evaluation is shown.

  10. Dynamics of laser induced micro bubble clusters on tissue phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Andreas; Zegelin, Andrea; Ptaszynski, Lars; Birngruber, Reginald; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    Selective retina treatment (SRT) is a laser based method to treat retinal diseases associated with disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) while preserving photoreceptors and choroid. Applying microsecond laser pulses to the 100- 200 strongly absorbing melanin granules inside the RPE cells induces transient micro bubbles which disrupt the cells. Aim of this work is to understand bubble dynamics in clusters with respect to the influence of the adjacent retina. Bubble dynamics were investigated in vitro on porcine RPE. An about 200 μm thick layer of agarose gel was applied to the RPE layer in order to simulate the mechanical properties of retina. Different laser pulse durations from 1 ns (532 nm, Nd:YAG) to 1.7 μs (527 nm, Nd:YLF) were used. The bubbles were investigated interferometrically (fiber interferometer @ 830 nm) and with fast flash photography (25 ns flash duration). Bubble lifetimes were measured. The results show that with retina phantoms the bubble formation threshold was reached at 2.5 times higher irradiation than without retina phantom for 1.7 μs laser pulses. The microbubbles generated with 1 ns laser pulses were almost not influenced by the agarose layer. Irradiation twofold over bubble formation threshold resulted in 3.5 times longer bubble lifetimes for μs and 2 times longer for ns pulse durations, respectively.

  11. Experimental Study of Effect of Medium Boundary on Light Distribution in Tissue Phantoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tang; ZHANG Chun-Ping; TIAN Jian-Guo; SONG Feng; WANG Xin-Yu; ZHAO Cheng-Mei

    2005-01-01

    @@ An experimental method for investigating the effect of medium boundary on distributions of light in the biological tissue phantom intralipid is presented. Measurements of distributions of light in intralipid-10% suspensions at 633 nm are described, in which a narrow collimated beam is incident on the surface of the phantoms and into the different depths inside of the phantoms. The experimental results show that the effect of the boundary of the medium on the curves geometry of light distributions is trivial, but the effect on intensity of scattering light is obvious, the maximalrelative change of the energy fluence reaches 53.8 % and the position of the peak of the energy fluence curve has a shift of 1.1 mm in the reverse direction of incident light for the phantom with albedo a = 0.998, and the effect of the boundary is decreased with the increase of the absorption coefficients of tissue phantoms. The experimental results were analysed by the diffusion theory. These studies will be helpful for further understandings of the relation between the boundary of biological tissue and the distribution of light in tissue.

  12. 3D printing of tissue-simulating phantoms for calibration of biomedical optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zuhua; Zhou, Ximing; Shen, Shuwei; Liu, Guangli; Yuan, Li; Meng, Yuquan; Lv, Xiang; Shao, Pengfei; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-10-01

    Clinical utility of many biomedical optical devices is limited by the lack of effective and traceable calibration methods. Optical phantoms that simulate biological tissues used for optical device calibration have been explored. However, these phantoms can hardly simulate both structural and optical properties of multi-layered biological tissue. To address this limitation, we develop a 3D printing production line that integrates spin coating, light-cured 3D printing and Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) for freeform fabrication of optical phantoms with mechanical and optical heterogeneities. With the gel wax Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and colorless light-curable ink as matrix materials, titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder as the scattering ingredient, graphite powder and black carbon as the absorption ingredient, a multilayer phantom with high-precision is fabricated. The absorption and scattering coefficients of each layer are measured by a double integrating sphere system. The results demonstrate that the system has the potential to fabricate reliable tissue-simulating phantoms to calibrate optical imaging devices.

  13. Dynamic tissue phantoms and their use in assessment of a noninvasive optical plethysmography imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Jeffrey E.; Plant, Kevin D.; King, Darlene R.; Block, Kenneth L.; Fan, Wensheng; DiMaio, J. Michael

    2014-05-01

    Non-contact photoplethysmography (PPG) has been studied as a method to provide low-cost and non-invasive medical imaging for a variety of near-surface pathologies and two dimensional blood oxygenation measurements. Dynamic tissue phantoms were developed to evaluate this technology in a laboratory setting. The purpose of these phantoms was to generate a tissue model with tunable parameters including: blood vessel volume change; pulse wave frequency; and optical scattering and absorption parameters. A non-contact PPG imaging system was evaluated on this model and compared against laser Doppler imaging (LDI) and a traditional pulse oximeter. Results indicate non-contact PPG accurately identifies pulse frequency and appears to identify signals from optically dense phantoms with significantly higher detection thresholds than LDI.

  14. Numerical investigation of thermal response of laser-irradiated biological tissue phantoms embedded with gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadnis, Akshay; Kumar, Sumit; Srivastava, Atul

    2016-10-01

    The work presented in this paper focuses on numerically investigating the thermal response of gold nanoshells-embedded biological tissue phantoms with potential applications into photo-thermal therapy wherein the interest is in destroying the cancerous cells with minimum damage to the surrounding healthy cells. The tissue phantom has been irradiated with a pico-second laser. Radiative transfer equation (RTE) has been employed to model the light-tissue interaction using discrete ordinate method (DOM). For determining the temperature distribution inside the tissue phantom, the RTE has been solved in combination with a generalized non-Fourier heat conduction model namely the dual phase lag bio-heat transfer model. The numerical code comprising the coupled RTE-bio-heat transfer equation, developed as a part of the current work, has been benchmarked against the experimental as well as the numerical results available in the literature. It has been demonstrated that the temperature of the optical inhomogeneity inside the biological tissue phantom embedded with gold nanoshells is relatively higher than that of the baseline case (no nanoshells) for the same laser power and operation time. The study clearly underlines the impact of nanoshell concentration and its size on the thermal response of the biological tissue sample. The comparative study concerned with the size and concentration of nanoshells showed that 60nm nanoshells with concentration of 5×10(15)mm(-3) result into the temperature levels that are optimum for the irreversible destruction of cancer infected cells in the context of photo-thermal therapy. To the best of the knowledge of the authors, the present study is one of the first attempts to quantify the influence of gold nanoshells on the temperature distributions inside the biological tissue phantoms upon laser irradiation using the dual phase lag heat conduction model.

  15. Quantitative endoscopic imaging elastic scattering spectroscopy: model system/tissue phantom validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsley, E. H.; Farkas, D. L.

    2008-02-01

    We have designed and built an imaging elastic scattering spectroscopy endoscopic instrument for the purpose of detecting cancer in vivo. As part of our testing and validation of the system, known targets representing potential disease states of interest were constructed using polystyrene beads of known average diameter and TiO II crystals embedded in a two-layer agarose gel. Final construction geometry was verified using a dissection microscope. The phantoms were then imaged using the endoscopic probe at a known incident angle, and the results compared to model predictions. The mathematical model that was used combines classic ray-tracing optics with Mie scattering to predict the images that would be observed by the probe at a given physical distance from a Mie-regime scattering media. This model was used generate the expected observed response for a broad range of parameter values, and these results were then used as a library to fit the observed data from the phantoms. Compared against the theoretical library, the best matching signal correlated well with known phantom material dimensions. These results lead us to believe that imaging elastic scattering can be useful in detection/diagnosis, but further refinement of the device will be necessary to detect the weak signals in a real clinical setting.

  16. Feasibility of noncontact piezoelectric detection of photoacoustic signals in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Blomme, E.; Cool, T.; Bilcke, M.; Van Leeuwen, T.G.; Steenbergen, W.; Grimbergen, K.A.; Den Heeten, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of air-coupled ultrasound transducers to detect laser-induced ultrasound from artificial blood vessels embedded in an optically scattering phantom is demonstrated. These air-coupled transducers allow new applications in biomedical photoacoustic imaging where contact with tissue is

  17. Feasibility of noncontact piezoelectric detection of photoacoustic signals in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G.M.; Blomme, Erik; Cool, Tijl; Bilcke, Mattias; Leeuwen, van Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Grimbergen, Kees A.; Heeten, den Gerard J.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of air-coupled ultrasound transducers to detect laser-induced ultrasound from artificial blood vessels embedded in an optically scattering phantom is demonstrated. These air-coupled transducers allow new applications in biomedical photoacoustic imaging where contact with tissue is no

  18. Design and Characterisation of Tissue-Mimicking Gel Phantoms for Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Portakal, Ziyafer Gizem; Spezi, Emiliano; Tuncel, Nina; Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to create tissue-mimicking gel phantoms appropriate for diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI). Diffusion coefficients, including the well-known apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and the diffusion coefficient based on the kurtosis model for the decay of the diffusion signal and (excess) kurtosis values were experimentally determined for the gelling agents of agar, agarose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel commonly used in multi-modal imaging. Although we observe an increase in kurtosis with the concentration of the gelling agents, the values obtained from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) were too low (under the expectations) to mimic the range of values reported in the literature for various healthy and diseased tissues. To create tissue-mimicking gels phantoms with more realistic kurtosis values, different concentrations of glass microbeads were added. Experimental characterisation showed that realistic kurtosis values for a range of tissues may be obtained...

  19. Heating in vascular tissue and flow-through tissue phantoms induced by focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinlan

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to control bleeding, both from individual blood vessels as well as from gross damage to the capillary bed. This process, called acoustic hemostasis, is being studied in the hope that such a method would ultimately provide a lifesaving treatment during the so-called "golden hour", a brief grace period after a severe trauma in which prompt therapy can save the life of an injured person. Thermal effects play a major role in occlusion of small vessels and also appear to contribute to the sealing of punctures in major blood vessels. However, aggressive ultrasound-induced tissue heating can also impact healthy tissue and can lead to deleterious mechanical bioeffects. Moreover, the presence of vascularity can limit one's ability to elevate the temperature of blood vessel walls owing to convective heat transport. In an effort to better understand the heating process in tissues with vascular structure we have developed a numerical simulation that couples models for ultrasound propagation, acoustic streaming, ultrasound heating and blood cooling in Newtonian viscous media. The 3-D simulation allows for the study of complicated biological structures and insonation geometries. We have also undertaken a series of in vitro experiments, in non-uniform flow-through tissue phantoms, designed to provide a ground truth verification of the model predictions. The calculated and measured results were compared over a range of values for insonation pressure, insonation time, and flow rate; we show good agreement between predictions and measurements. We then conducted a series of simulations that address two limiting problems of interest: hemostasis in small and large vessels. We employed realistic human tissue properties and considered more complex geometries. Results show that the heating pattern in and around a blood vessel is different for different vessel sizes, flow rates and for varying beam orientations relative to the flow axis

  20. Three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling of tissue-simulating phantom for biomedical optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Erbao; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Minjie; Xie, Yanjun; Li, Shidi; Shao, Pengfei; Cheng, Liuquan; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-12-01

    Biomedical optical devices are widely used for clinical detection of various tissue anomalies. However, optical measurements have limited accuracy and traceability, partially owing to the lack of effective calibration methods that simulate the actual tissue conditions. To facilitate standardized calibration and performance evaluation of medical optical devices, we develop a three-dimensional fuse deposition modeling (FDM) technique for freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms. The FDM system uses transparent gel wax as the base material, titanium dioxide (TiO2) powder as the scattering ingredient, and graphite powder as the absorption ingredient. The ingredients are preheated, mixed, and deposited at the designated ratios layer-by-layer to simulate tissue structural and optical heterogeneities. By printing the sections of human brain model based on magnetic resonance images, we demonstrate the capability for simulating tissue structural heterogeneities. By measuring optical properties of multilayered phantoms and comparing with numerical simulation, we demonstrate the feasibility for simulating tissue optical properties. By creating a rat head phantom with embedded vasculature, we demonstrate the potential for mimicking physiologic processes of a living system.

  1. 3D printing of microtube in solid phantom to simulate tissue oxygenation and perfusion (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiang; Xue, Yue; Wang, Haili; Shen, Shu Wei; Zhou, Ximing; Liu, Guangli; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald X.

    2017-03-01

    Tissue-simulating phantoms with interior vascular network may facilitate traceable calibration and quantitative validation of many medical optical devices. However, a solid phantom that reliably simulates tissue oxygenation and blood perfusion is still not available. This paper presents a new method to fabricate hollow microtubes for blood vessel simulation in solid phantoms. The fabrication process combines ultraviolet (UV) rapid prototyping technique with fluid mechanics of a coaxial jet flow. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a UV-curable polymer are mixed at the designated ratio and extruded through a coaxial needle device to produce a coaxial jet flow. The extruded jet flow is quickly photo-polymerized by ultraviolet (UV) light to form vessel-simulating solid structures at different sizes ranging from 700 μm to 1000 μm. Microtube structures with adequate mechanical properties can be fabricated by adjusting material compositions and illumination intensity. Curved, straight and stretched microtubes can be formed by adjusting the extrusion speed of the materials and the speed of the 3D printing platform. To simulate vascular structures in biologic tissue, we embed vessel-simulating microtubes in a gel wax phantom of 10 cm x10 cm x 5 cm at the depth from 1 to 2 mm. Bloods at different oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration levels are circulated through the microtubes at different flow rates in order to simulate different oxygenation and perfusion conditions. The simulated physiologic parameters are detected by a tissue oximeter and a laser speckle blood flow meter respectively and compared with the actual values. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed 3D printing process is able to produce solid phantoms with simulated vascular networks for potential applications in medical device calibration and drug delivery studies.

  2. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopic Studies on Broiler Chicken Tissue Suitable for the Development of Practical Phantoms in Multifrequency EIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Kanti Bera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Phantoms are essential for assessing the system performance in Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. Saline phantoms with insulator inhomogeneity fail to mimic the physiological structure of real body tissue in several aspects. Saline or any other salt solutions are purely resistive and hence studying multifrequency EIT systems cannot be assessed with saline phantoms because the response of the purely resistive materials do not change over frequency. Animal tissues show a variable response over a wide band of signal frequency due to their complex physiological and physiochemical structures and hence they can suitably be used as bathing medium and inhomogeneity in the phantoms of multifrequency EIT system. An efficient assessment of a multifrequency EIT system with real tissue phantom needs a prior knowledge of the impedance profile of the bathing medium as well as the inhomogeneity. In this direction Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS of broiler chicken muscle tissue paste and broiler chicken fat tissue is conducted from 10 Hz to 2 MHz using an impedance analyzer and their impedance profiles are thoroughly studied. Results show that the broiler chicken muscle tissue paste is less resistive than the fat tissue and hence it can be successfully used as the bathing medium of the phantoms for resistivity imaging in multifrequency EIT. Fat tissue is found more resistive than the muscle tissue which makes it more suitable for the inhomogeneity in phantoms of resistivity imaging study. doi:10.5617/jeb.174 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 48-63, 2011

  3. Characterization of biomechanical properties of agar based tissue mimicking phantoms for ultrasound stiffness imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Seshadri, Suresh

    2014-07-01

    Pathological changes of the body have been observed to change the mechanical properties of soft tissue types which can be imaged by ultrasound elastography. Though initial clinical results using ultrasound elastography in detection of tumors are promising, quantification of signal to noise ratio, resolution and strain image patterns are the best achieved under a controlled study using phantoms with similar biomechanical properties of normal and abnormal tissues. The purpose of this work is to characterize the biomechanical properties of agar based tissue mimicking phantoms by varying the agar concentration from 1.7 to 6.6% by weight and identify the optimum property to be used in classification of cancerous tissues. We performed quasi-static uniaxial compression test under a strain rate of 0.5mm/min up to 15% strain and measured Young's modulus of phantom samples which are from 50kPa to 450kPa. Phantoms show nonlinear stress-strain characteristics at finite strain which were characterized using hyperelastic parameters by fitting Neo-Hookean, Mooney Rivlin, Ogden and Veronda Westmann models. We also investigated viscoelastic parameters of the samples by conducting oscillatory shear rheometry at various precompression levels (2-5%). Loss modulus values are always less than storage modulus which represents the behavior of soft tissues. The increase in agar concentration increases the shear modulus of the samples as well as decreases the linear viscoelastic region. The results suggest that dynamic shear modul are more promising than linear and nonlinear elastic modul in differentiation of various classes of abnormal tissues.

  4. Tissue quantification for development of pediatric phantom; Quantificacao de tecidos para desenvolvimento de fantoma pediatrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, A.F.F.; Miranda, J.R.A., E-mail: allan_ffa@hotmail.com, E-mail: jmiranda@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica e Biofisica. Inst. de Biociencias de Botucatu; Pina, D.R., E-mail: drpina@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina de Botucatu. Dept. de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-11-01

    The optimization of the risk- benefit ratio is a major concern in the pediatric radiology, due to the greater vulnerability of children to the late somatic effects and genetic effects of exposure to radiation compared to adults. In Brazil, it is estimated that the causes of death from head trauma are 18 % for the age group between 1-5 years and the radiograph is the primary diagnostic test for the detection of skull fracture . Knowing that the image quality is essential to ensure the identification of structures anatomical and minimizing errors diagnostic interpretation, this paper proposed the development and construction of homogeneous phantoms skull, for the age group 1-5 years. The construction of the phantoms homogeneous was performed using the classification and quantification of tissue present in the skull of pediatric patients. In this procedure computational algorithms were used, using Matlab, to quantify distinct biological tissues present in the anatomical regions studied , using pictures retrospective CT scans. Preliminary data obtained from measurements show that between the ages of 1-5 years, assuming an average anteroposterior diameter of the pediatric skull region of the 145.73 {+-} 2.97 mm, can be represented by 92.34 mm {+-} 5.22 of lucite and 1.75 {+-} 0:21 mm of aluminum plates of a provision of PEP (Pacient equivalent phantom). After its construction, the phantoms will be used for image and dose optimization in pediatric protocols process to examinations of computerized radiography.

  5. An Alternative Method of Evaluating 1540NM Exposure Laser Damage using an Optical Tissue Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    difficult. Agar (Sigma Aldrich, MO) is another material that is used for creating phantoms. It is a dry powder comprised of seaweed polysaccharides ...could be easily done by using a thermal camera to record surface and edge temperature changes as the tissue heats and then cools. Characterizing the...Roach, "Median Effective Dose Determination and Histologic Characterization of Porcine (Sus scrofa domestica) Dermal Lesions Induced by 1540-nm Laser

  6. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-03: Tissue Equivalent Material Phantom to Test and Optimize Coherent Scatter Imaging for Tumor Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, K; Morris, R; Lakshmanan, M; Greenberg, J; Kapadia, A [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Methods: A breast phantom has been designed to assess the capability of coded aperture coherent x-ray scatter imaging system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, tumor). The tissue-equivalent phantom was modeled as a hollow plastic cylinder containing multiple cylindrical and spherical inserts that can be positioned, rearranged, or removed to model different breast geometries. Each enclosure can be filled with a tissue-equivalent material and excised human tumors. In this study, beef and lard, placed inside 2-mm diameter plastic Nalgene containers, were used as surrogates for fibroglandular and adipose tissue, respectively. The phantom was imaged at 125 kVp, 40 mA for 10 seconds each with a 1-mm pencil beam. The raw data were reconstructed using a model-based reconstruction algorithm and yielded the location and form factor, or momentum transfer (q) spectrum of the materials that were imaged. The measured material form factors were then compared to the ground truth measurements acquired by x-ray diffraction (XRD) imaging. Results: The tissue equivalent phantom was found to accurately model different types of breast tissue by qualitatively comparing our measured form factors to those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Our imaging system has been able to define the location and composition of the various materials in the phantom. Conclusion: This work introduces a new tissue equivalent phantom for testing and optimization of our coherent scatter imaging system for material classification. In future studies, the phantom will enable the use of a variety of materials including excised human tissue specimens in evaluating and optimizing our imaging system using pencil- and fan-beam geometries. United States Department of Homeland Security Duke University

  7. New developments in eye models with retina tissue phantoms for ophthalmic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, T. Scott; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2012-03-01

    We document our latest work in developing eye models with solid-state retinal tissue phantoms designed for demonstrating, validating and comparing ophthalmic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) instruments. Eye models with retina tissue phantoms can serve a variety of purposes, including demonstrating OCT functionality and performance in both the clinic and exhibit hall, validating retina layer thickness measurements from different commercial OCT instruments and as an aide for the R&D engineer and field service technician in the development and repair of instruments, respectively. The ideal eye model for OCT, the optical cross-sectional imaging modality, would have a volumetric morphology and scattering and absorption properties similar to that of normal human retina. These include a multi-layered structure of equivalent thickness to nominal human retina layers, a foveal pit that can be used to orient the image, and a RPE/OS and choroid like layers to demonstrate the depth penetration of the OCT system. A solid state tissue phantom relieves the user of constant cleaning and maintenance associated with the more common water bath model eyes. Novel processes12 have been developed to create retinal layers model that closely mimic the reflectance and scattering coefficients of the real layers of the retina, as imaged by spectral bandwidth of OCT.

  8. Shear wave vibrometry evaluation in transverse isotropic tissue mimicking phantoms and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizabal, Sara; Amador, Carolina; Qiang, Bo; Kinnick, Randall R; Nenadic, Ivan Z; Greenleaf, James F; Urban, Matthew W

    2014-12-21

    Ultrasound radiation force-based methods can quantitatively evaluate tissue viscoelastic material properties. One of the limitations of the current methods is neglecting the inherent anisotropy nature of certain tissues. To explore the phenomenon of anisotropy in a laboratory setting, we created two phantom designs incorporating fibrous and fishing line material with preferential orientations. Four phantoms were made in a cube-shaped mold; both designs were arranged in multiple layers and embedded in porcine gelatin using two different concentrations (8%, 14%). An excised sample of pork tenderloin was also studied. Measurements were made in the phantoms and the pork muscle at different angles by rotating the phantom with respect to the transducer, where 0° and 180° were defined along the fibers, and 90° and 270° across the fibers. Shear waves were generated and measured by a Verasonics ultrasound system equipped with a linear array transducer. For the fibrous phantom, the mean and standard deviations of the shear wave speeds along (0°) and across the fibers (90°) with 8% gelatin were 3.60  ±  0.03 and 3.18  ±  0.12 m s(-1) and with 14% gelatin were 4.10  ±  0.11 and 3.90  ±  0.02 m s(-1). For the fishing line material phantom, the mean and standard deviations of the shear wave speeds along (0°) and across the fibers (90°) with 8% gelatin were 2.86  ±  0.20 and 2.44  ±  0.24 m s(-1) and with 14% gelatin were 3.40  ±  0.09 and 2.84  ±  0.14 m s(-1). For the pork muscle, the mean and standard deviations of the shear wave speeds along the fibers (0°) at two different locations were 3.83  ±  0.16 and 3.86  ±  0.12 m s(-1) and across the fibers (90°) were 2.73  ±  0.18 and 2.70  ±  0.16 m s(-1), respectively. The fibrous and fishing line gelatin-based phantoms exhibited anisotropy that resembles that observed in the pork muscle.

  9. Effect of Graphite Concentration on Shear-Wave Speed in Gelatin-Based Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Pamela G.; Rouze, Ned C.; Palmeri, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Elasticity-based imaging modalities are becoming popular diagnostic tools in clinical practice. Gelatin-based, tissue mimicking phantoms that contain graphite as the acoustic scattering material are commonly used in testing and validating elasticity-imaging methods to quantify tissue stiffness. The gelatin bloom strength and concentration are used to control phantom stiffness. While it is known that graphite concentration can be modulated to control acoustic attenuation, the impact of graphite concentrationon phantom elasticity has not been characterized in these gelatin phantoms. This work investigates the impact of graphite concentration on phantom shear stiffness as characterized by shear-wave speed measurements using impulsive acoustic-radiation-force excitations. Phantom shear-wave speed increased by 0.83 (m/s)/(dB/(cm MHz)) when increasing the attenuation coefficient slope of the phantom material through increasing graphite concentration. Therefore, gelatin-phantom stiffness can be affected by the conventional ways that attenuation is modulated through graphite concentration in these phantoms. PMID:21710828

  10. Optical quantification of harmonic acoustic radiation force excitation in a tissue-mimicking phantom

    CERN Document Server

    Suomi, Visa; Cleveland, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Optical tracking was used to characterize acoustic radiation force (ARF) induced displacements in a tissue-mimicking phantom. Amplitude modulated (AM) 3.3 MHz ultrasound was used to induce ARF in the phantom which was embedded with 10 {\\mu}m microspheres that were tracked using a microscope objective and high speed camera. For sine and square AM the harmonic components of the fundamental and second and third harmonic frequencies were measured. The displacement amplitudes were found to increase linearly with ARF up to 10 {\\mu}m with sine modulation having 19.5% lower peak-to-peak amplitude values than square modulation. Square modulation produced almost no second harmonic but energy was present in the third harmonic. For the sine modulation energy was present in the second harmonic and low energy in the third harmonic. A finite element model was used to simulate the deformation and was both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with the measurements.

  11. Determination of agar tissue phantoms depth profiles with pulsed photothermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2007-07-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) can be used for non-invasive depth profiling of skin vascular lesions (e.g., port wine stain birthmarks), aimed towards optimizing laser therapy on an individual patient basis. Optimal configuration of the experimental setup must be found and its performance characterized on samples with well defined structure, before introducing the technique into clinical practice. The aim of our study is to determine how sample structure and width of spectruml acquisition band affect the accuracy of measured depth profiles. We have constructed tissue phantoms composed of multiple layers of agar and of thin absorbing layers between the agar layers. Three phantoms had a single absorber layer at various depths between 100 and 500 μm, and one phantom had two absorber layers. In each sample we induced a non-homogeneous temperature profile with a 585 nm pulsed laser and acquired the resulting radiometric signal with a fast InSb infrared camera. We tested two configurations of the acquisition system, one using the customary 3-5 um spectruml band and one with a custom 4.5 μm cut-on filter. The laser-induced temperature depth profiles were reconstructed from measured PPTR signals using a custom algorithm and compared with sample structure as determined by histology and optical coherent tomography (OCT). PPTR determined temperature profiles correlate well with sample structure in all samples. Determination of the absorbing layer depth shows good repeatability with spatial resolution decreasing with depth. Spectruml filtering improved the accuracy of reconstructed profiles for shallow absorption layers (100-200 μm). PPTR technique enables reliable determination of structure in tissue phantoms with thin absorbing layers. Narrowing of the spectruml acquisition band (to 4.5 - 5.3 μm) improves reconstruction of objects near the surface.

  12. Measurements of optical parameters of phantom solution and bulk animal tissues in vitro at 650 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-02-01

    Optical parameters of bulk animal tissue in vitro, including absorption coefficient ( μa), reduced scattering coefficient ( μ' s) or scattering coefficient ( μs), total attenuation coefficient ( μt), anisotropy factor ( g) and refractive index ( n) are measured at wavelength of 650 nm. Clinical Intralipid-10% is diluted in distilled water into different concentrations to use as tissue phantoms. Four types of animal tissues in vitro are studied. The relationships among the optical parameters are analyzed systemically. For animal tissues, μa, μ' s or μs and n rely on muscle fiber orientations. μs and μt range from 10 to 20 mm -1, μa from 10 -2 to 10 -3 mm -1 and g from 0.95 to 0.99.

  13. Analytical prediction of sub surface thermal history in translucent tissue phantoms during plasmonic photo thermotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Dhar, Purbarun; Narasimhan, Arunn; Das, Sarit K

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of thermal history in biological tissues during laser based hyperthermia is essential to achieve necrosis of tumour orcarcinoma cells. A semi analytical model to predict sub surface thermal history in translucent, soft, bio tissue mimics has been proposed. The model can accurately predict the spatio temporal temperature variations along depth and the anomalous thermal behaviour in such media, viz. occurrence of sub surface temperature peaks. Based on opto thermal properties, the augmented temperature and shift of the peak positions in case of gold nanostructure mediated tissue phantom hyperthermia can be predicted. Employing inverse approach, the absorbance coefficient of nano graphene infused tissue mimics is determined from the peak temperature and found to provide appreciably accurate predictions along depth. Furthermore, a simplistic, dimensionally consistent correlation to theoretically determine the position of the peak in such media is proposed and found to be consistent with experiments and ...

  14. Measurement of hard tissue density of head phantom based on the HU by using CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Sun; Kang, Dong Wan; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine a conversion coefficient for Hounsfield Units(HU) to material density (g cm{sup -3}) obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBMercuRay{sup TM}) data and to measure the hard tissue density based on the Hounsfield scale on dental head phantom. CT Scanner Phantom (AAPM) equipped with CT Number Insert consists of five cylindrical pins of materials with different densities and teflon ring was scanned by using the CBMercuRay{sup TM} (Hitachi, Tokyo, Japan) volume scanner. The raw data were converted into DICOM format and the HU of different areas of CT number insert measured by using CBWorks{sup TM}. Linear regression analysis and Student t-test were performed statistically. There was no significant difference (P>0.54) between real densities and measured densities. A linear regression was performed using the density, {rho} (g cm{sup -3}), as the dependent variable in terms of the HU (H). The regression equation obtained was {rho}=0.00072 H-0.01588 with an R2 value of 0.9968. Density values based on the Hounsfield scale was 1697.1 {+-} 24.9 HU in cortical bone, 526.5 {+-} 44.4 HU in trabecular bone, 2639.1 {+-} 48.7 HU in enamel, 1246.1 {+-} 39.4 HU in dentin of dental head phantom. CBCT provides an effective option for determination of material density expressed as Hounsfield Units.

  15. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures.

  16. Feasibility of endoscopic laser speckle imaging modality in the evaluation of auditory disorder: study in bone-tissue phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Lee, Sangyeob; Park, Jihoon; Ha, Myungjin; Radfar, Edalat; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of an endoscopic laser speckle imaging modality (ELSIM) in the measurement of perfusion of flowing fluid in optical bone tissue phantom(OBTP). Many studies suggested that the change of cochlear blood flow was correlated with auditory disorder. Cochlear microcirculation occurs under the 200μm thickness bone which is the part of the internal structure of the temporal bone. Concern has been raised regarding of getting correct optical signal from hard tissue. In order to determine the possibility of the measurement of cochlear blood flow under bone tissue using the ELSIM, optical tissue phantom (OTP) mimicking optical properties of temporal bone was applied.

  17. Quantitative assessment of photoacoustic tomography systems integrating clinical ultrasound transducers using novel tissue-simulating phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) systems based on commercial ultrasound instruments have the benefit of dualmodality imaging, which increases their appeal from a clinical standpoint. However, factors that influence PAT system performance have not been thoroughly investigated and standardized test methods have not been established for image quality evaluation. To address these issues we have adapted phantom-based approaches from ultrasound imaging standards and implemented them to assess a PAT system developed for vascular imaging. Our system comprises a tunable near-infrared pulsed laser and a commercial ultrasound imaging system, including four interchangeable linear array clinical ultrasound transducers with varying center frequencies, acoustic bandwidths and geometries. Phantoms consisted of a customized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisol gel that simulates both optical and acoustic properties of breast tissue. One phantom incorporates a sub-resolution filament array suitable for bimodal ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging, while another contains an array of hemoglobin-filled cylindrical inclusions at various depths. Key performance characteristics were evaluated, including spatial resolution, signal uniformity, contrast, and penetration depth. These characteristics were evaluated at 750 nm at radiant exposures below ANSI safety limits. Effects of transducer properties on imaging performance were evaluated. Axial and lateral resolution ranged from 0.27-0.83 mm and 0.28-1.8 mm, respectively, and penetration depths from 1.9-4.2 cm were achieved. These results demonstrate variation in PAT system performance based on clinical transducer selection, as well as the utility of realistic phantom-based test methods in performing benchtop evaluations of system performance.

  18. Interlaboratory comparison of backscatter coefficient estimates for tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janelle J; Herd, Maria-Teresa; King, Michael R; Haak, Alexander; Hafez, Zachary T; Song, Jun; Oelze, Michael L; Madsen, Ernest L; Zagzebski, James A; O'Brien, William D; Hall, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter is useful for characterizing tissues and several groups have reported methods for estimating backscattering properties. Previous interlaboratory comparisons have been made to test the ability to accurately estimate the backscatter coefficient (BSC) by different laboratories around the world. Results of these comparisons showed variability in BSC estimates but were acquired only for a relatively narrow frequency range, and, most importantly, lacked reference to any independent predictions from scattering theory. The goal of this study was to compare Faran-scattering-theory predictions with cooperatively-measured backscatter coefficients for low-attenuating and tissue-like attenuating phantoms containing glass sphere scatterers of different sizes for which BSCs can independently be predicted. Ultrasonic backscatter measurementswere made for frequencies from 1 to 12 MHz. Backscatter coefficients were estimated using two different planar-reflector techniques at two laboratories for two groups of phantoms. Excellent agreement was observed between BSC estimates from both laboratories. In addition, good agreement with the predictions of Faran's theory was obtained, with average fractional (bias) errors ranging from 8-14%. This interlaboratory comparison demonstrates the ability to accurately estimate parameters derived from the BSC, including an effective scatterer size and the acoustic concentration, both of which may prove useful for diagnostic applications of ultrasound tissue characterization.

  19. Ultrasound induced bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2016-11-01

    Soft tissue fractionation induced by acoustic cavitation is desired for non-invasive tissue removal in histotripsy, while being a potential injury mechanism in other therapeutic ultrasound treatments such as lithotripsy. In this work, we investigate the formation of bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts to inform a class of damage models. Agar phantoms of different stiffness were subjected to a series of multi-cycle ultrasound bursts, using a burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) protocol, and simultaneously imaged at 200 frames per second (1 image per ultrasound burst). Some bubbles become visible in images ( 200 microns) due to the negative pressure ( 7.5 MPa) in the initial bursts, and the number of visible bubbles increases continuously during the subsequent bursts. A Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics model, which accounts for viscoelastic confinement of agar gels, is developed. Material fatigue leading to eventual irreversible fracture-like failure in this model is proposed to explain the key observations. In addition to isolated, approximately spherical bubbles, long tunnel-like features are observed, which are seemingly lines of joined bubbles along a possible fracture or defect. The geometry of these tunnel-like features is quantified, and a physical explanation for tunnel formation is proposed in terms of bubble expansion and unstable collapse. This work was supported by NIH NIDDK Grant P01-DK043881.

  20. Study of dose distribution in a human body in international space station compartments with the tissue-equivalent spherical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, Vyacheslav A.; Tolochek, Raisa V.; Kartsev, Ivan S.; Petrov, Vladislav M.; Nikolaev, Igor V.; Moskalyova, Svetlana I.; Lyagushin, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is known to be key hazard of manned space mission. To estimate accurately radiation health risk detailed study of dose distribution inside human body by means of human phantom is conducted. In the space experiment MATROSHKA-R, the tissue-equivalent spherical phantom (32 kg mass, 35 cm diameter and 10 cm central spherical cave) made in Russia has been used on board the ISS for more than 8 years. Owing to the specially chosen phantom shape and size, the chord length distributions of the detector locations are attributed to self-shielding properties of the critical organs in a real human body. If compared with the anthropomorphic phantom Rando used inside and outside the ISS, the spherical phantom has lower mass, smaller size and requires less crew time for the detector installation/retrieval; its tissue-equivalent properties are closer to the standard human body tissue than the Rando-phantom material. Originally the spherical phantom was installed in the star board crew cabin of the ISS Service Module, then in the Piers-1, MIM-2 and MIM-1 modules of the ISS Russian segment, and finally in JAXA Kibo module. Total duration of the detector exposure is more than 1700 days in 8 sessions. In the first phase of the experiment with the spherical phantom, the dose measurements were realized with only passive detectors (thermoluminescent and solid-state track detectors). The detectors are placed inside the phantom along the axes of 20 containers and on the phantom outer surface in 32 pockets of the phantom jacket. After each session the passive detectors are returned to the ground. The results obtained show the dose difference on the phantom surface as much as a factor of 2, the highest dose being observed close to the outer wall of the compartment, and the lowest dose being in the opposite location along the phantom diameter. Maximum dose rate measured in the phantom is obviously due to the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and Earth' radiation belt contribution on

  1. Measurements of optical parameters of phantom solution and bulk animal tissues ex vivo at 650 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jian

    2008-12-01

    Optical parameters of biological tissues, including absorption coefficient (μa), reduced scattering coefficient (μs') or scattering coefficient (μs), anisotropy factor (g) and refractive index (n) are investigated extensively and systemically at wavelength of 650 nm. Intralipid solution was selected to be the tissue phantom in order to test the validity of measurements. Considering the factors of fiber orientation and haemoglobin content, we chose some fresh bulk animal tissues in vitro which were bovine adipose, bovine muscle, porcine adipose, porcine muscle, porcine kidney, porcine liver, mutton and chicken breast. The basic assumption is that in vitro samples are a reasonable representation of the in vivo situation. We have gained numbers of experimental data of Intralipid and some tissues. Particularly, we have set up the close relationships among six optical parameters involving μa, μs', μs, g, n and μt. The experimental results show that for animal tissues, μa, μs' or μs and n rely deeply on muscle fiber orientations. Both of μs and μt range from 10mm-1 to 20mm-1. μa ranges from 10-2 mm-1 to 10-3 mm-1 and g from 0.95 to 0.99. The results of this study will be helpful in further understanding of optical properties of tissues.

  2. Fabrication of various optical tissue phantoms by the spin-coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihoon; Ha, Myungjin; Yu, Sungkon; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-06-01

    Although numerous studies have been performed to fabricate various optical tissue phantom (OTP) models, the fabrication of OTPs that simulate skin layers is laborious and time-consuming owing to the intricate characteristics of skin tissue. This study presents various OTP models that optically and structurally simulate the epidermis-dermis skin layer. The spin-coating method was employed to reproduce a uniform thin layer that mimics the epidermis layer, and the fabrication parameters were optimized for epoxy and silicone reference materials. Various OTP models simulating blood vessels and hyperpigmentation lesions were fabricated using the two reference materials to determine their feasibility. The suitability of each of the two reference materials for OTP fabrication was qualitatively evaluated by comparing the quality of the OTP models.

  3. Pulmonary ultrasound elastography: a feasibility study with phantoms and ex-vivo tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Man Minh; Xie, Hua; Paluch, Kamila; Stanton, Douglas; Ramachandran, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Elastography has become widely used for minimally invasive diagnosis in many tumors as seen with breast, liver and prostate. Among different modalities, ultrasound-based elastography stands out due to its advantages including being safe, real-time, and relatively low-cost. While lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality among both men and women, the use of ultrasound elastography for lung cancer diagnosis has hardly been investigated due to the limitations of ultrasound in air. In this work, we investigate the use of static-compression based endobronchial ultrasound elastography by a 3D trans-oesophageal echocardiography (TEE) transducer for lung cancer diagnosis. A water-filled balloon was designed to 1) improve the visualization of endobronchial ultrasound and 2) to induce compression via pumping motion inside the trachea and bronchiole. In a phantom study, we have successfully generated strain images indicating the stiffness difference between the gelatin background and agar inclusion. A similar strain ratio was confirmed with Philips ultrasound strain-based elastography product. For ex-vivo porcine lung study, different tissue ablation methods including chemical injection, Radio Frequency (RF) ablation, and direct heating were implemented to achieve tumor-mimicking tissue. Stiff ablated lung tissues were obtained and detected with our proposed method. These results suggest the feasibility of pulmonary elastography to differentiate stiff tumor tissue from normal tissue.

  4. Selective photothermal interaction using near-infrared laser and laser-absorbing dye in gel phantom and chicken breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Thomas M.; Liu, Guangyu; Simmons, Sarah; Real, Jeremy; Lucroy, Michael D.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2002-06-01

    Photothermal interaction of an 805-nm diode laser with an absorptive dye, indocyanine green (ICG), has been shown to be an efficacious therapy for metastatic breast tumors in a rat model when combined with immunoadjuvant. When ICG solution was injected into the target tissue, selective tissue destruction can be achieved. To study the selective photothermal interaction, temperature change in irradiated tissue was achieved. To study the selective photothermal interaction, temperature change in irradiated tissue was studied using chicken breast tissue and phantom composed of gelatin and intralipid. ICG solution was mixed with gel phantom to simulate dye-enhanced target tissue. The target gel was then embedded in chicken breast tissue. The temperature change of irradiated chicken and gel phantom was measured by needle temperature probes at different tissue depths and radii from the center of the laser beam to construct a two-dimensional array of temperature change in a cylindrical coordinate system. It was shown that it is possible to selectively raise the temperature of deep target tissue while not substantially heating nontargeted tissue. A Nd:YAG laser was also used to irradiate the tissue-gel system and the photothermal results were compared with that using the 805-nm laser.

  5. Localization of focused-ultrasound beams in a tissue phantom, using remote thermocouple arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Dibaji, Seyed Ahmad Reza; Banerjee, Rupak K; Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Myers, Matthew R

    2014-12-01

    In focused-ultrasound procedures such as vessel cauterization or clot lysis, targeting accuracy is critical. To investigate the targeting accuracy of the focused-ultrasound systems, tissue phantoms embedded with thermocouples can be employed. This paper describes a method that utilizes an array of thermocouples to localize the focused ultrasound beam. All of the thermocouples are located away from the beam, so that thermocouple artifacts and sensor interference are minimized. Beam propagation and temperature rise in the phantom are simulated numerically, and an optimization routine calculates the beam location that produces the best agreement between the numerical temperature values and those measured with thermocouples. The accuracy of the method was examined as a function of the array characteristics, including the number of thermocouples in the array and their orientation. For exposures with a 3.3-MHz source, the remote-thermocouple technique was able to predict the focal position to within 0.06 mm. Once the focal location is determined using the localization method, temperatures at desired locations (including the focus) can be estimated from remote thermocouple measurements by curve fitting an analytical solution to the heat equation. Temperature increases in the focal plane were predicted to within 5% agreement with measured values using this method.

  6. A novel method to obtain modulus image of soft tissues using ultrasound water jet indentation: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Huang, Qing-Hua

    2007-01-01

    The alteration of tissue stiffness is generally known to be associated with pathological changes. Ultrasound indentation is one of the methods that can be used to assess the mechanical properties of the soft tissues. It uses a flat-ended ultrasound transducer to directly contact the tissue to sense tissue deformation under an applied load. This paper introduced a novel noncontact ultrasound indentation system using water jet compression. The key idea was to utilize a water jet as the indenter as well as the coupling medium for propagation of the ultrasound beam. High frequency focused ultrasound (20 MHz) was used to measure the indentation deformation at a microscopic level. It has been demonstrated that the system could effectively assess the tissue-mimic phantoms with different stiffness. Water jet coupling allows the system to conduct C-scan on soft tissues rapidly and conveniently. By applying different pressures while taking C-scan sequences, the modulus images of the phantoms could be obtained based on the applied pressure and the phantom deformation and thickness. This paper presented the preliminary results on gel phantoms. The spatial resolution, the contrast resolution of the measurements and the reproducibility of the results were also discussed.

  7. The Parametric Images of Microbubbles and Tissue Mimicking Phantoms Based on the Nakagami Parameters Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardjess, Bahbah; Hakim, Djelouah; Bouakaz, A.

    The ultrasonic B-mode imaging is an important clinical tool used to examine internal structures of biological tissue and contrast microbubbles. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional B-scans which cannot fully reflect the nature of the tissue, other imaging methods based on stochastic models are proposed. Among these models, the Nakagami statistical model was chosen, because it is more general and simpler to apply than other statistical models (Rayleigh and K models), to generate parametric images based on the Nakagami parameters. Experiments were performed using a 2.5 MHz linear array connected to an open research platform. A commercially phantom was used to mimic tissue and microbubbles backscatters. For several regions of interest and for different microbubbles dilutions, the RF signals have been generated at 3 and 5 transmit cycles. The Nakagami image can be combined with the use of the B-mode image simultaneously to visualize the tissue and the contrast microbubbles structures for a better medical diagnosis.

  8. In vivo spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nguyen, John Quan M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and local oxygen saturation can inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities can be estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis and epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. Therefore, a method is desired that decouples the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. A previously developed inverse method based on a neural network forward model was applied to simulated spatial frequency domain reflectance of skin for multiple wavelengths in the near infrared. It is demonstrated that the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis can be determined independently and with minimal coupling. Then, the same inverse method was applied to reflectance measurements from a tissue simulating phantom and in vivo human skin. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentrations were estimated from the volar forearms of weakly and strongly pigmented subjects using a standard homogeneous model and the present two layer model.

  9. Comparison of Ultrasound Attenuation and Backscatter Estimates in Layered Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms among Three Clinical Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kibo; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Ghoshal, Goutam; Pawlicki, Alexander D.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zagzebski, James A.; O’Brien, William D.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Backscatter and attenuation coefficient estimates are needed in many quantitative ultrasound strategies. In clinical applications, these parameters may not be easily obtained because of variations in scattering by tissues overlying a region of interest (ROI). The goal of this study is to assess the accuracy of backscatter and attenuation estimates for regions distal to nonuniform layers of tissue-mimicking materials. In addition, this work compares results of these estimates for “layered” phantoms scanned using different clinical ultrasound machines. Two tissue-mimicking phantoms were constructed, each exhibiting depth-dependent variations in attenuation or backscatter. The phantoms were scanned with three ultrasound imaging systems, acquiring radio frequency echo data for offline analysis. The attenuation coefficient and the backscatter coefficient (BSC) for sections of the phantoms were estimated using the reference phantom method. Properties of each layer were also measured with laboratory techniques on test samples manufactured during the construction of the phantom. Estimates of the attenuation coefficient versus frequency slope, α0, using backscatter data from the different systems agreed to within 0.24 dB/cm-MHz. Bias in the α0 estimates varied with the location of the ROI. BSC estimates for phantom sections whose locations ranged from 0 to 7 cm from the transducer agreed among the different systems and with theoretical predictions, with a mean bias error of 1.01 dB over the used bandwidths. This study demonstrates that attenuation and BSCs can be accurately estimated in layered inhomogeneous media using pulse-echo data from clinical imaging systems. PMID:23160474

  10. Spectral filtering in pulsed photothermal temperature profiling of collagen tissue phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2009-11-01

    We present an experimental comparison of pulsed photothermal (PPT) profiling in collagen-based tissue phantoms utilizing different midinfrared spectral bands. Laser-induced temperature profiles are reconstructed using a custom optimization code within the customary monochromatic approximation. Both experimental results and a detailed numerical simulation of the procedure demonstrate that, despite the associated reduction of signal-to-noise ratio, appropriate spectral filtering reduces the broadening of temperature peaks and thus improves the accuracy of temperature profiling. For our experimental system, best performance is obtained when applying a long-pass filter with cut-on wavelength at 3.4-3.8 μm. Because our collagen gel mimics infrared and thermal properties of human skin, we believe that this conclusion is transferrable to PPT radiometric profiling of human skin in vivo.

  11. Spectral filtering in pulsed photothermal temperature profiling of collagen tissue phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanic, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental comparison of pulsed photothermal (PPT) profiling in collagen-based tissue phantoms utilizing different midinfrared spectral bands. Laser-induced temperature profiles are reconstructed using a custom optimization code within the customary monochromatic approximation. Both experimental results and a detailed numerical simulation of the procedure demonstrate that, despite the associated reduction of signal-to-noise ratio, appropriate spectral filtering reduces the broadening of temperature peaks and thus improves the accuracy of temperature profiling. For our experimental system, best performance is obtained when applying a long-pass filter with cut-on wavelength at 3.4-3.8 microm. Because our collagen gel mimics infrared and thermal properties of human skin, we believe that this conclusion is transferrable to PPT radiometric profiling of human skin in vivo.

  12. Particle velocity measurements with macroscopic fluorescence imaging in lymph tissue mimicking microfluidic phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Ricky; Koo, Chiwan; Ton, Phuc; Han, Arum; Righetti, Raffaella; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound poroelastography can quantify structural and mechanical properties of tissues such as stiffness, compressibility, and fluid flow rate. This novel ultrasound technique is being explored to detect tissue changes associated with lymphatic disease. We have constructed a macroscopic fluorescence imaging system to validate ultrasonic fluid flow measurements and to provide high resolution imaging of microfluidic phantoms. The optical imaging system is composed of a white light source, excitation and emission filters, and a camera with a zoom lens. The field of view can be adjusted from 100 mm x 75 mm to 10 mm x 7.5 mm. The microfluidic device is made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and has 9 channels, each 40 μm deep with widths ranging from 30 μm to 200 μm. A syringe pump was used to propel water containing 15 μm diameter fluorescent microspheres through the microchannels, with flow rates ranging from 0.5 μl/min to 10 μl/min. Video was captured at a rate of 25 frames/sec. The velocity of the microspheres in the microchannels was calculated using an algorithm that tracked the movement of the fluorescent microspheres. The imaging system was able to measure particle velocities ranging from 0.2 mm/sec to 10 mm/sec. The range of flow velocities of interest in lymph vessels is between 1 mm/sec to 10 mm/sec; therefore our imaging system is sufficient to measure particle velocity in phantoms modeling lymphatic flow.

  13. An accurate homogenized tissue phantom for broad spectrum autofluorescence studies: a tool for optimizing quantum dot-based contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mathieu; Wilson, Brian C.

    2008-02-01

    We are investigating the use of ZnS-capped CdSe quantum dot (QD) bioconjugates combined with fluorescence endoscopy for improved early cancer detection in the esophagus, colon and lung. A major challenge in using fluorescent contrast agents in vivo is to extract the relevant signal from the tissue autofluorescence (AF). The present studies are aimed at maximizing the QD signal to AF background ratio (SBR) to facilitate detection. These contrast optimization studies require optical phantoms that simulate tissue autofluorescence, absorption and scattering over the entire visible spectrum, while allowing us to control the optical thickness. We present an optical phantom made of fresh homogenized tissue diluted in water. The homogenized tissue is poured into a clear polymer tank designed to hold a QD-loaded silica capillary in its center. Because of the non-linear effects of absorption and scattering on measured autofluorescence, direct comparison between results obtained using tissue phantoms of different concentration is not possible. We introduce mathematical models that make it possible to perform measurements on diluted tissue homogenates and subsequently extrapolate the results to intact (non-diluted) tissue. Finally, we present preliminary QD contrast data showing that the 380-420 nm spectral window is optimal for surface QD imaging.

  14. Optical parameter measurement of highly diffusive tissue body phantoms with specifically designed sample holder for photo diagnostic and PDT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, A.; Rehman, K.; Anwar, S.; Firdous, S.; Nawaz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of optical properties (absorption coefficients, scattering Coefficients, and anisotropy) is necessary for understanding light tissue interactions. Optical parameters define the behavior of light in the tissues. Intralipid and Indian ink are well-established tissue body phantoms. Quantitative characterization of biological tissues in terms of optical properties is achieved with integrating sphere. However, samples having significantly higher scattering and absorption coefficients such as malignant tissues potentially reduce the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and accuracy of integrating sphere. We have measured the diffuse reflection and transmission of these phantoms by placing them in integrating sphere at 632.8 nm and then applied IAD method to determine the optical properties tissue phantoms composed of Indian ink (1.0%) and Intralipid (20%). We have fabricated a special sample holder with thin microscopic cover slips which can be used to measure signal from highly concentrated intralipid and Indian ink solutions. Experiments conducted with various phantoms reveal significant improvement of SNR for a wide range of optical properties. This approach opens up a field for potential applications in measurement of optical properties of highly diffusive biological tissues. For 20% intralipid μa =0.112+/-0.046 cm-1 and μs =392.299+/-10.090 cm-1 at 632.8 nm and for 1.0% Indian ink μa =9.808+/-0.490 cm-1 and μs =1.258+/-0.063 cm-1 at same wavelength. System shows good repeatability and reproducibility within 4.9% error. Work may have important biomedical applications in photo-diagnosis and Photodynamic therapy.

  15. Characterization of paraffin based breast tissue equivalent phantom using a CdTe detector pulse height analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Solen; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    In this study, paraffin was selected as a base material and mixed with different amounts of CaSO4·2H2O and H3BO3 compounds in order to mimic breast tissue. Slab phantoms were produced with suitable mixture ratios of the additives in the melted paraffin. Subsequently, these were characterized in terms of first half-value layer (HVL) in the mammographic X-ray range using a pulse-height spectroscopic analysis with a CdTe detector. Irradiations were performed in the energy range of 23-35 kVp under broad beam conditions from Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combinations. X-ray spectra were acquired with a CdTe detector without and with phantom material interposition in increments of 1 cm thickness and then evaluated to obtain the transmission data. The net integral areas of the spectra for the slabs were used to plot the transmission curves and these curves were fitted to the Archer model function. The results obtained for the slabs were compared with those of standard mammographic phantoms such as CIRS BR series phantoms and polymethylmethacrylate plates (PMMA). From the evaluated transmission curves, the mass attenuation coefficients and HVLs of some mixtures are close to those of the commercially available standard mammography phantoms. Results indicated that when a suitable proportion of H3BO3 and CaSO4·2H2O is added to the paraffin, the resulting material may be a good candidate for a breast tissue equivalent phantom.

  16. The effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the acoustic properties of tissue-mimicking agar-gel phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefczak, A.; Kaczmarek, K.; Kubovčíková, M.; Rozynek, Z.; Hornowski, T.

    2017-06-01

    In ultrasonic hyperthermia, ultrasound-induced heating is achieved by the absorption of wave energy and its conversion into heat. The effectiveness of ultrasounds can be improved by using sonosensitisers that greatly attenuate ultrasonic waves and then dissipate the acquired energy in the form of heat. One possible candidate for such a sonosensitiser are superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles embedded in a tissue-mimicking agar-gel matrix. Such tissue-mimicking phantoms possess acoustic properties similar to those of real tissues, and are used as a tool for performance testing and optimisation of medical ultrasound systems. In this work, we studied the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the acoustic properties of agar-gel phantoms, including the attenuation of ultrasonic waves.

  17. Anisotropic polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel phantom for shear wave elastography in fibrous biological soft tissue: a multimodality characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelin, Simon; Bernal, Miguel; Deffieux, Thomas; Papadacci, Clément; Flaud, Patrice; Nahas, Amir; Boccara, Claude; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    Shear wave elastography imaging techniques provide quantitative measurement of soft tissues elastic properties. Tendons, muscles and cerebral tissues are composed of fibers, which induce a strong anisotropic effect on the mechanical behavior. Currently, these tissues cannot be accurately represented by existing elastography phantoms. Recently, a novel approach for orthotropic hydrogel mimicking soft tissues has been developed (Millon et al 2006 J. Biomed. Mater. Res. B 305-11). The mechanical anisotropy is induced in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel by stretching the physical crosslinks of the polymeric chains while undergoing freeze/thaw cycles. In the present study we propose an original multimodality imaging characterization of this new transverse isotropic (TI) PVA hydrogel. Multiple properties were investigated using a large variety of techniques at different scales compared with an isotropic PVA hydrogel undergoing similar imaging and rheology protocols. The anisotropic mechanical (dynamic and static) properties were studied using supersonic shear wave imaging technique, full-field optical coherence tomography (FFOCT) strain imaging and classical linear rheometry using dynamic mechanical analysis. The anisotropic optical and ultrasonic spatial coherence properties were measured by FFOCT volumetric imaging and backscatter tensor imaging, respectively. Correlation of mechanical and optical properties demonstrates the complementarity of these techniques for the study of anisotropy on a multi-scale range as well as the potential of this TI phantom as fibrous tissue-mimicking phantom for shear wave elastographic applications.

  18. An examination of the elastic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms using vibro-acoustography and a muscle motor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccabi, A.; Taylor, Z.; Bajwa, N.; Mallen-St. Clair, J.; St. John, M.; Sung, S.; Grundfest, W.; Saddik, G.

    2016-02-01

    Tissue hardness, often quantified in terms of elasticity, is an important differentiating criterion for pathological identity and is extensively used by surgeons for tumor localization. Delineation of malignant regions from benign regions is typically performed by visual inspection and palpation. Although practical, this method is highly subjective and does not provide quantitative metrics. We have previously reported on Vibro-Acoustography (VA) for tumor delineation. VA is unique in that it uses the specific, non-linear properties of tumor tissue in response to an amplitude modulated ultrasound beam to generate spatially resolved, high contrast maps of tissue. Although the lateral and axial resolutions (sub-millimeter and sub-centimeter, respectively) of VA have been extensively characterized, the relationship between static stiffness assessment (palpation) and dynamic stiffness characterization (VA) has not been explicitly established. Here we perform a correlative exploration of the static and dynamic properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms, specifically elasticity, using VA and a muscle motor system. Muscle motor systems, commonly used to probe the mechanical properties of materials, provide absolute, quantitative point measurements of the elastic modulus, analogous to Young's modulus, of a target. For phantoms of varying percent-by-weight concentrations, parallel VA and muscle motor studies conducted on 18 phantoms reveal a negative correlation (p modulus values from force vs. indentation depth curves. Comparison of these elasticity measurements may provide additional information to improve tissue modeling, system characterization, as well as offer valuable insights for in vivo applications, specifically surgical extirpation of tumors.

  19. A pre-clinical phantom comparison of tissue harmonic and brightness mode imaging for application in ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, G K; Dunscombe, P B; Khan, R F H

    2011-07-01

    The current practice of prostate brachytherapy utilizes the brightness (B) mode ultrasound imaging for volume definition and needle guidance. However, tissue harmonic (H) mode available with new scanners has shown the improved image quality. The aim of this study was to perform a pre-clinical phantom evaluation of harmonic imaging as an alternative to B mode in prostate brachytherapy. Performance characteristics viz. dead zone, depth of penetration, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution, tissue to clutter ratio (TCR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR), were compared between two modes using an in-house phantom. Images were acquired under the same settings except the gain; which is higher for the H mode than that of B mode. A qualitative comparison between two modes was also performed using commercial CIRS053 phantom. Dead zone, depth of penetration and geometric accuracy were respectively 8 cm and Images with CIRS053 phantom in H mode demonstrate sharper boundaries for prostate and urethra, freedom from background clutter, and better identification of the brachytherapy needles. This study indicates the superiority of H over B mode, in terms of spatial resolution, relative contrast, and overall image quality. Thus H mode has the potential benefit in prostate brachytherapy. This study provides the basis to move forward to investigate whether the superior image quality observed in the laboratory can be translated into a higher treatment quality for the patient. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intravascular optical coherence tomography to characterize tissue deformation during angioplasty: preliminary experiments with artery phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarnoush, Hamed; Vergnole, Sébastien; Pazos, Valérie; Bisaillon, Charles-Étienne; Boulet, Benoit; Lamouche, Guy

    2012-09-01

    We explored the potential of intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) to assess deformation during angioplasty balloon inflation. Using a semi-compliant balloon and artery phantoms, we considered two experimental scenarios. The goal for the first scenario was to investigate if variation in the elasticity of the structure surrounding the balloon could be sensed by IVOCT monitoring. In this scenario, we used three single-layer phantoms with various mechanical properties. Image analysis was performed to extract the inner and outer diameters of the phantoms at various pressures. The goal for the second scenario was twofold. First, we investigated the IVOCT capability to monitor a more complex balloon inflation process. The balloon was in a folded state prior to inflation. This allowed studying two stages of deformation: during balloon unfolding and during balloon expansion. Second, we investigated IVOCT capability to monitor the deformation in a three-layer phantom used to better mimic a true artery. So, not only were the IVOCT images processed to provide the inner and outer diameters of the phantom, but the layer thicknesses were also determined. In both scenarios, IVOCT monitoring revealed to be very efficient in providing relevant information about the phantom deformation during balloon inflation.

  1. Technical Note: Radiological properties of tissue surrogates used in a multimodality deformable pelvic phantom for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niebuhr, Nina I., E-mail: n.niebuhr@dkfz.de; Johnen, Wibke; Güldaglar, Timur; Runz, Armin; Echner, Gernot; Mann, Philipp; Möhler, Christian; Pfaffenberger, Asja; Greilich, Steffen [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Phantom surrogates were developed to allow multimodal [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and teletherapy] and anthropomorphic tissue simulation as well as materials and methods to construct deformable organ shapes and anthropomorphic bone models. Methods: Agarose gels of variable concentrations and loadings were investigated to simulate various soft tissue types. Oils, fats, and Vaseline were investigated as surrogates for adipose tissue and bone marrow. Anthropomorphic shapes of bone and organs were realized using 3D-printing techniques based on segmentations of patient CT-scans. All materials were characterized in dual energy CT and MRI to adapt CT numbers, electron density, effective atomic number, as well as T1- and T2-relaxation times to patient and literature values. Results: Soft tissue simulation could be achieved with agarose gels in combination with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and NaF to simulate muscle, prostate, and tumor tissues. Vegetable oils were shown to be a good representation for adipose tissue in all modalities. Inner bone was realized using a mixture of Vaseline and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, resulting in both a fatty bone marrow signal in MRI and inhomogeneous areas of low and high attenuation in CT. The high attenuation of outer bone was additionally adapted by applying gypsum bandages to the 3D-printed hollow bone case with values up to 1200 HU. Deformable hollow organs were manufactured using silicone. Signal loss in the MR images based on the conductivity of the gels needs to be further investigated. Conclusions: The presented surrogates and techniques allow the customized construction of multimodality, anthropomorphic, and deformable phantoms as exemplarily shown for a pelvic phantom, which is intended to study adaptive treatment scenarios in MR-guided radiation therapy.

  2. SU-C-213-01: 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantom Composed of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitute Plastics for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Higgins, P [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 3D printed phantoms constructed of multiple tissue approximating materials could be useful in both clinical and research aspects of radiotherapy. This work describes a 3D printed phantom constructed with tissue substitute plastics for both bone and soft tissue; air cavities were included as well. Methods: 3D models of an anonymized nasopharynx patient were generated for air cavities, soft tissues, and bone, which were segmented by Hounsfield Unit (HU) thresholds. HU thresholds were chosen to define air-to-soft tissue boundaries of 0.65 g/cc and soft tissue-to-bone boundaries of 1.18 g/cc based on clinical HU to density tables. After evaluation of several composite plastics, a bone tissue substitute was identified as an acceptable material for typical radiotherapy x-ray energies, composed of iron and PLA plastic. PET plastic was determined to be an acceptable soft tissue substitute. 3D printing was performed on a consumer grade dual extrusion fused deposition model 3D printer. Results: MVCT scans of the 3D printed heterogeneous phantom were acquired. Rigid image registration of the patient and the 3D printed phantom scans was performed. The average physical density of the soft tissue and bone regions was 1.02 ± 0.08 g/cc and 1.39 ± 0.14 g/cc, respectively, for the patient kVCT scan. In the 3D printed phantom MVCT scan, the average density of the soft tissue and bone was 1.01 ± 0.09 g/cc and 1.44 ± 0.12 g/cc, respectively. Conclusion: A patient specific phantom, constructed of heterogeneous tissue substitute materials was constructed by 3D printing. MVCT of the 3D printed phantom showed realistic tissue densities were recreated by the 3D printing materials. Funding provided by intra-department grant by University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  3. Measurement of the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube--tissue phantom composites with the hot wire probe method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Saugata; Zimmermann, Kristen; Leng, Weinan; Vikesland, Peter; Zhang, Jianfei; Dorn, Harry; Diller, Thomas; Rylander, Christopher; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2011-06-01

    Developing combinatorial treatments involving laser irradiation and nanoparticles require an understanding of the effect of nanoparticle inclusion on tissue thermal properties, such as thermal conductivity. This information will permit a more accurate prediction of temperature distribution and tumor response following therapy, as well as provide additional information to aid in the selection of the appropriate type and concentration of nanoparticles. This study measured the thermal conductivity of tissue representative phantoms containing varying types and concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs, length of 900-1200 nm and diameter of 40-60 nm), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs, length of 900-1200 nm and diameter hot wire probe method. Increasing CNT concentration from 0 to 1.0 mg/mL caused the thermal conductivity of phantoms containing SWNTs, SWNHs, and MWNTs to increase by 24, 30, and 66%, respectively. For identical CNT concentrations, phantoms containing MWNTs possessed the highest thermal conductivity.

  4. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based evaluation of biological tissue phantoms to study multifrequency electrical impedance tomography (Mf-EIT) systems

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Tushar Kanti

    2016-03-18

    Abstract: Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) phantoms are essential for the calibration, comparison and evaluation of the EIT systems. In EIT, the practical phantoms are typically developed based on inhomogeneities surrounded by a homogeneous background to simulate a suitable conductivity contrast. In multifrequency EIT (Mf-EIT) evaluation, the phantoms must be developed with the materials which have recognizable or distinguishable impedance variations over a wide range of frequencies. In this direction the impedance responses of the saline solution (background) and a number vegetable and fruit tissues (inhomogeneities) are studied with electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the frequency responses of bioelectrical impedance and conductivity are analyzed. A number of practical phantoms with different tissue inhomogeneities and different inhomogeneity configurations are developed and the multifrequency impedance imaging is studied with the Mf-EIT system to evaluate the phantoms. The conductivity of the vegetable inhomogeneities reconstructed from the EIT imaging is compared with the conductivity values obtained from the EIS studies. Experimental results obtained from multifrequency EIT reconstruction demonstrate that the electrical impedance of all the biological tissues inhomogenity decreases with frequency. The potato tissue phantom produces better impedance image in high frequency ranges compared to the cucumber phantom, because the cucumber impedance at high frequency becomes lesser than that of the potato at the same frequency range. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.] © 2016 The Visualization Society of Japan

  5. Study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities, kerma of alcohols, phantom and human organs, and tissues substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishwanath P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective atomic numbers (ZPIeff and electron densities of eighteen alcohols such as wood alcohol, CH3OH; grain alcohol, C2H5OH; rubbing alcohol, C3H7OH; butanol, C4H9OH; amyl alcohol, C5H11OH; cetyl alcohol, C16H33OH; ethylene glycol, C2H4(OH2; glycerin, C3H5(OH3; PVA, C2H4O; erythritol, C4H6(OH4; xylitol, C5H7(OH5; sorbitol, C6H8(OH6; volemitol, C7H9(OH7; allyl alcohol, C3H5OH; geraniol, C10H17OH; propargyl alcohol, C3H3OH; inositol, C6H6(OH6, and menthol, C10H19OH have been calculated in the photon energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV. The estimated values have been compared with experimental values wherever possible. The comparison of ZPIeff of the alcohols with water phantom and PMMA phantom indicate that the ethylene glycol, glycerin, and PVA are substitute for PMMA phantom and PVA is substitute of water phantom. ZPIeff of alcohols have also been compared with human organs and tissues. Ethylene glycol, glycerin and PVA, allyl alcohol, and wood alcohols are found tissue substitutes for most of human organs. Kerma which is the product of the energy fluence and mass energy-absorption coefficient, have been calculated in the energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for the alcohols. The results show the kerma is more or less independent of energy above 100 keV.

  6. Transcutaneous pneumatic injection of glucose solution: a morphometric evaluation of in vivo micropig skin and tissue-mimicking phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S B; Kwon, T R; Yoo, K H; Oh, C T; Choi, E J; Kim, B J

    2017-02-01

    Needle-free, transcutaneous pneumatic injection systems can be used to deliver therapeutic solutions to targeted layers of skin in a minimally invasive manner. To evaluate jet infiltration patterns and tissue reactions, 5% isotonic and 20% hypertonic glucose solutions were pneumatically injected into in vivo micropig skin. Gelatin TM phantom was additionally prepared to analyze penetration and dispersion patterns for different experimental settings. As immediate tissue reactions in the in vivo micropig skin, distinct pneumatic injection injury zones (PIIZs) in the dermis, extending from the papillary dermis deep into the dermo-subcutaneous junction, were generated with the 5% and 20% glucose solutions and with pneumatic pressures of 4.64 and 5.7 bars, respectively. PIIZs markedly decreased in appearance at 1 day after treatment, accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, and disappeared at 7 days post-treatment with increased collagen and elastin production. In TM phantom study, the PIIZs created by 20% glucose mainly comprised a single, homogenous, round to oval zone, whereas those created by 5% glucose were irregular and multi-lobular. The present study suggests that transcutaneous pneumatic injection therapy may exert mechanical stimulatory effects, immediate tissue shrinkage via hypertonic solutions, and late tissue regeneration effects during wound healing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Freeform fabrication of tissue-simulating phantoms by combining three-dimensional printing and casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuwei; Zhao, Zuhua; Wang, Haili; Han, Yilin; Dong, Erbao; Liu, Bin; Liu, Wendong; Cromeens, Barrett; Adler, Brent; Besner, Gail; Ray, William; Hoehne, Brad; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Appropriate surgical planning is important for improved clinical outcome and minimal complications in many surgical operations, such as a conjoined twin separation surgery. We combine 3D printing with casting and assembling to produce a solid phantom of high fidelity to help surgeons for better preparation of the conjoined twin separation surgery. 3D computer models of individual organs were reconstructed based on CT scanned data of the conjoined twins. The models were sliced, processed, and converted to an appropriate format for Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). The skeletons of the phantom were printed directly by FDM using Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS) material, while internal soft organs were fabricated by casting silicon materials of different compositions in FDM printed molds. The skeleton and the internal organs were then assembled with appropriate fixtures to maintain their relative positional accuracies. The assembly was placed in a FMD printed shell mold of the patient body for further casting. For clear differentiation of different internal organs, CT contrast agents of different compositions were added in the silicon cast materials. The produced phantom was scanned by CT again and compared with that of the original computer models of the conjoined twins in order to verify the structural and positional fidelity. Our preliminary experiments showed that combining 3D printing with casting is an effective way to produce solid phantoms of high fidelity for the improved surgical planning in many clinical applications.

  8. Report on research of calculus fragmentation by HIFU-induced cavitation in Tsinghua University: 1. Effects of tissue-mimicking phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Z. G.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    Study of the acoustic attenuation through human tissues was carried out, in order to accurately evaluate the damaging power of the generated cavitation cloud. Tissue phantom was made, with acoustic properties (acoustic speed and acoustic attenuation factor) similar to human tissues. Preliminary results show that, with the increase of intensity and acting time of the HIFU acoustic waves, the depths of the craters increase rapidly, while the radii of the craters increase mildly. Mass loss of the artificial stones in phantom is less than in water (about 50%), indicating considerable energy dissipation in tissues.

  9. Progress in theoretical, experimental, and computational investigations in turbid tissue phantoms and human teeth using laser infrared photothermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2002-03-01

    This paper reviews and describes the state-of-the-art in the development of frequency-domain infrared photothermal radiometry (FD-PTR) for biomedical and dental applications. The emphasis is placed on the measurement of the optical and thermal properties of tissue-like materials using FD-PTR. A rigorous three-dimensional thermal-wave formulation with three-dimensional diffuse and coherent photon-density-wave sources is presented, and is applied to data from model tissue phantoms and dental enamel samples. The combined theoretical, experimental and computational methodology shows good promise with regard to its analytical ability to measure optical properties of turbid media uniquely, as compared to PPTR, which exhibits uniqueness problems. From data sets obtained with calibrated test phantoms, the reduced optical scattering and absorption coefficients were found to be within 20% and 10%, respectively, from the independently derived values using Mie scattering theory and spectrophotometric measurements. Furthermore, the state-of-the-art and recent developments in applications of laser infrared FD-PTR to dental caries research is described, with examples and histological studies from carious dental tissue. The correlation of PTR signals with modulated dental luminescence is discussed as a very promising potential quantitative methodology for the clinical diagnosis of sub-surface incipient dental caries. The application of the turbid-medium thermal-wave model to the measurement of the optical absorption and scattering coefficients of enamel is also presented.

  10. Optical sectioning using a fiber probe with an angled illumination-collection geometry: evaluation in engineered tissue phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Linda; Myakov, Alexey; Aaron, Jesse; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2004-02-01

    We present a fiber optic probe that combines polarized illumination and detection with an angled distal probe geometry to detect the size-dependent scattering at a specific depth within epithelium. Analysis of the scattering signal by use of Mie theory allows the extraction of scatterer size and size distribution-key parameters for precancer detection. The probe was evaluated in two tissue phantoms: polystyrene beads atop collagen gel and multiple layers of cancer cells atop collagen. We also present in vivo measurements in the oral cavity of normal volunteers. The sizes of scatterers extracted from the scattering spectra corresponded to independently measured values.

  11. Focusing light through biological tissue and tissue-mimicking phantoms up to 9.6 cm in thickness with digital optical phase conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuecheng; Liu, Yan; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-08-01

    Optical phase conjugation (OPC)-based wavefront shaping techniques focus light through or within scattering media, which is critically important for deep-tissue optical imaging, manipulation, and therapy. However, to date, the sample thickness in OPC experiments has been limited to only a few millimeters. Here, by using a laser with a long coherence length and an optimized digital OPC system that can safely deliver more light power, we focused 532-nm light through tissue-mimicking phantoms up to 9.6 cm thick, as well as through ex vivo chicken breast tissue up to 2.5 cm thick. Our results demonstrate that OPC can be achieved even when photons have experienced on average 1000 scattering events. The demonstrated penetration of nearly 10 cm (˜100 transport mean free paths) has never been achieved before by any optical focusing technique, and it shows the promise of OPC for deep-tissue noninvasive optical imaging, manipulation, and therapy.

  12. Calculating Error Percentage in Using Water Phantom Instead of Soft Tissue Concerning 103Pd Brachytherapy Source Distribution via Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OL Ahmadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: 103Pd is a low energy source, which is used in brachytherapy. According to the standards of American Association of Physicists in Medicine, dosimetric parameters determination of brachytherapy sources before the clinical application was considered significantly important. Therfore, the present study aimed to compare the dosimetric parameters of the target source using the water phantom and soft tissue. Methods: According to the TG-43U1 protocol, the dosimetric parameters were compared around the 103Pd source in regard with water phantom with the density of 0.998 gr/cm3 and the soft tissue with the density of 1.04 gr/cm3 on the longitudinal and transverse axes using the MCNP4C code and the relative differences were compared between the both conditions. Results: The simulation results indicated that the dosimetric parameters depended on the radial dose function and the anisotropy function in the application of the water phantom instead of soft tissue up to a distance of 1.5 cm,  between which a good consistency was observed. With increasing the distance, the difference increased, so as within 6 cm from the source, this difference increased to 4%. Conclusions: The results of  the soft tissue phantom compared with those of the water phantom indicated 4% relative difference at a distance of 6 cm from the source. Therefore, the results of the water phantom with a maximum error of 4% can be used in practical applications instead of soft tissue. Moreover, the amount of differences obtained in each distance regarding using the soft tissue phantom could be corrected.

  13. Spectral Separation of Quantum Dots within Tissue Equivalent Phantom Using Linear Unmixing Methods in Multispectral Fluorescence Reflectance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Najafzadeh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-invasive Fluorescent Reflectance Imaging (FRI is used for accessing physiological and molecular processes in biological media. The aim of this article is to separate the overlapping emission spectra of quantum dots within tissue-equivalent phantom using SVD, Jacobi SVD, and NMF methods in the FRI mode. Materials and Methods In this article, a tissue-like phantom and an optical setup in reflectance mode were developed. The algorithm of multispectral imaging method was then written in Matlab environment. The setup included the diode-pumped solid-state lasers at 479 nm, 533 nm, and 798 nm, achromatic telescopic, mirror, high pass and low pass filters, and EMCCD camera. The FRI images were acquired by a CCD camera using band pass filter centered at 600 nm and high pass max at 615 nm for the first region and high pass filter max at 810 nm for the second region. The SVD and Jacobi SVD algorithms were written in Matlab environment and compared with a Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF and applied to the obtained images. Results PSNR, SNR, CNR of SVD, and NMF methods were obtained as 39 dB, 30.1 dB, and 0.7 dB, respectively. The results showed that the difference of Jacobi SVD PSNR with PSNR of NMF and modified NMF algorithm was significant (p

  14. Development of a stable and reproducible tissue-equivalent phantom for use in infrared spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firbank, Michael; Hiraoka, Mutsuhisa; Delpy, David T.

    1993-09-01

    Much of the experimental work reported on the applications of near infrared spectroscopy and imaging for therapeutic purposes has been performed on multifarious tissue simulating materials, which often have unreproducible optical properties. To facilitate the quantitative testing of spectroscopy equipment, stable, reproducible phantoms which replicate the optical properties of tissue are needed. This paper describes one such phantom. The base material is a clear, non polymerized liquid polyester resin, which forms a solid on addition of a catalyst. The polyester has a low intrinsic absorption coefficient for infrared light and is nonscattering. Before the resin is set, measured quantities of scattering particle suspensions and absorbing dyes can be added. The scattering phase function of these particles has been measured, and the mean cosine of the scattering angle, g, calculated. Knowing this, by varying the concentration of scattering particles a range of materials with known transport scattering coefficients can be produced. By varying the concentration and mix of dyes, the absorption coefficient of the resin can be easily controlled. The resin can be easily machined or cast into arbitrary shapes, with regions of differing optical properties. Once set, the polyester is stable, in terms of both physical and optical properties.

  15. Experimental study on tissue phantoms to understand the effect of injury and suturing on human skin mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Arnab; Unnikrishnan, Vinu; Flynn, Zachary; Lackey, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Skin injuries are the most common type of injuries occurring in day-to-day life. A skin injury usually manifests itself in the form of a wound or a cut. While a shallow wound may heal by itself within a short time, deep wounds require surgical interventions such as suturing for timely healing. To date, suturing practices are based on a surgeon's experience and may vary widely from one situation to another. Understanding the mechanics of wound closure and suturing of the skin is crucial to improve clinical suturing practices and also to plan automated robotic surgeries. In the literature, phenomenological two-dimensional computational skin models have been developed to study the mechanics of wound closure. Additionally, the effect of skin pre-stress (due to the natural tension of the skin) on wound closure mechanics has been studied. However, in most of these analyses, idealistic two-dimensional skin geometries, materials and loads have been assumed, which are far from reality, and would clearly generate inaccurate quantitative results. In this work, for the first time, a biofidelic human skin tissue phantom was developed using a two-part silicone material. A wound was created on the phantom material and sutures were placed to close the wound. Uniaxial mechanical tests were carried out on the phantom specimens to study the effect of varying wound size, quantity, suture and pre-stress on the mechanical behavior of human skin. Also, the average mechanical behavior of the human skin surrogate was characterized using hyperelastic material models, in the presence of a wound and sutures. To date, such a robust experimental study on the effect of injury and sutures on human skin mechanics has not been attempted. The results of this novel investigation will provide important guidelines for surgical planning and validation of results from computational models in the future.

  16. WAXS fat subtraction model to estimate differential linear scattering coefficients of fatless breast tissue: Phantom materials evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca; McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Develop a method to subtract fat tissue contributions to wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) signals of breast biopsies in order to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficients μ{sub s} of fatless tissue. Cancerous and fibroglandular tissue can then be compared independent of fat content. In this work phantom materials with known compositions were used to test the efficacy of the WAXS subtraction model. Methods: Each sample 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick was interrogated by a 50 kV 2.7 mm diameter beam for 3 min. A 25 mm{sup 2} by 1 mm thick CdTe detector allowed measurements of a portion of the θ = 6° scattered field. A scatter technique provided means to estimate the incident spectrum N{sub 0}(E) needed in the calculations of μ{sub s}[x(E, θ)] where x is the momentum transfer argument. Values of μ{sup ¯}{sub s} for composite phantoms consisting of three plastic layers were estimated and compared to the values obtained via the sum μ{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ∑}(x)=ν{sub 1}μ{sub s1}(x)+ν{sub 2}μ{sub s2}(x)+ν{sub 3}μ{sub s3}(x), where ν{sub i} is the fractional volume of the ith plastic component. Water, polystyrene, and a volume mixture of 0.6 water + 0.4 polystyrene labelled as fibphan were chosen to mimic cancer, fat, and fibroglandular tissue, respectively. A WAXS subtraction model was used to remove the polystyrene signal from tissue composite phantoms so that the μ{sub s} of water and fibphan could be estimated. Although the composite samples were layered, simulations were performed to test the models under nonlayered conditions. Results: The well known μ{sub s} signal of water was reproduced effectively between 0.5 < x < 1.6 nm{sup −1}. The μ{sup ¯}{sub s} obtained for the heterogeneous samples agreed with μ{sup ¯}{sub s}{sup ∑}. Polystyrene signals were subtracted successfully from composite phantoms. The simulations validated the usefulness of the WAXS models for nonlayered biopsies. Conclusions: The methodology to

  17. Detection of optical and mechanical property inhomogeneities in tissue mimicking phantoms using an ultrasound assisted optical probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, C Usha; Chandran, R Sreekumari Bharat; Vasu, R Mohan; Sood, Ajay K

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the issue of separating contributions from mechanical and optical properties of a moderately scattering tissue phantom to the modulation depth (M) of intensity autocorrelation measured in an ultrasound-assisted optical tomography system using axial and transverse illuminations. For axial illumination, M is affected by both the displacement and absorption coefficient, more prominently by displacement. But transverse illumination has very little contribution from displacement of scattering centers. Since displacement is related to the elastic property of the insonified region, we show that there is a possibility of separating the contributions from elastic and optical properties of the insonified region using axial and transverse illuminations. The main conclusions of our study using moderately scattering phantoms are: 1. axial illumination is the best for mapping storage modulus inhomogeneities, but M is also affected by optical absorption; 2. transverse illumination is the best for mapping absorption inhomogeneities; and 3. for the practically relevant case of an inclusion with larger storage modulus and absorption, both illuminations produced large contrast in M. When the scattering coefficient is high, the angle dependence of illumination is lost and the present method is shown to fail to separate these contributions based on direction of illumination.

  18. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Replacement Computational Phantoms to Estimate Dose in Out-Of-Field Organs and Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, K [Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Tannous, J; Nabha, R; Feghali, J; Ayoub, Z; Jalbout, W; Youssef, B [American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); Taddei, P [American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut (Lebanon); The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the absorbed dose in organs and tissues at risk for radiogenic cancer for children receiving photon radiotherapy for localized brain tumors (LBTs) by supplementing their missing body anatomies with those of replacement computational phantoms. Applied beyond the extent of the RT Images collected by computed tomography simulation, these phantoms included RT Image and RT Structure Set objects that encompassed sufficient extents and contours for dosimetric calculations. Method: Nine children, aged 2 to 14 years, who received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for low-grade LBTs, were randomly selected for this study under Institutional-Review-Board protocol. Because the extents of their RT Images were cranial only, they were matched for size and sex with patients from a previous study with larger extents and for whom contours of organs at risk for radiogenic cancer had already been delineated. Rigid fusion was performed between the patients’ data and those of the replacement computational phantoms using commercial software. In-field dose was calculated with a clinically-commissioned treatment planning system, and out-of-field dose was estimated with an analytical model. Results: Averaged over all nine children and normalized for a therapeutic dose of 54 Gy prescribed to the PTV, where the PTV is the GTV, the highest mean organ doses were 3.27, 2.41, 1.07, 1.02, 0.24, and 0.24 Gy in the non-tumor remainder, red bone marrow, thyroid, skin, breasts, and lungs, respectively. The mean organ doses ranged by a factor of 3 between the smallest and largest children. Conclusion: For children receiving photon radiotherapy for LBTs, we found their doses in organs at risk for second cancer to be non-negligible, especially in the non-tumor remainder, red bone marrow, thyroid, skin, breasts, and lungs. This study demonstrated the feasibility for patient dosimetry studies to augment missing patient anatomy by applying size- and sex-matched replacement

  19. Dual-frequency tissue harmonic suppression using phase-coded pulse sequence: proof of concept using a phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Chou; Wang, Hui-Ting

    2013-03-01

    The presence of tissue harmonic generation during acoustic propagation is one major limitation in nonlinear detection of microbubble contrast agents. However, conventional solutions for tissue harmonic suppression are not applicable in dual-frequency (DF) harmonic imaging. In DF harmonic imaging, the second harmonic signal at second harmonic (2f(0)) frequency and the inter-modulation harmonic signal at fundamental (f(0)) frequency are simultaneously generated for imaging and both need to be suppressed to improve contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR). In this study, a novel phase-coded pulse sequence is developed to accomplish DF tissue harmonic suppression. Phase-coded pulse sequence utilizes multiple firings with equidistant transmit phase for harmonic cancellation in the sum of respective echoes. For the f(0) transmit component, the transmit phase comes from the equidistant set of {-2π/3, 0, 2π/3} to suppress the second harmonic signal at 2f(0) frequency. Moreover, in order to provide the inter-modulation harmonic suppression at f(0) frequency, the 2f(0) transmit phase has to be particularly manipulated for the corresponding f(0) transmit phase. The proposed three-pulse sequence can remove not only the second-order harmonic signal but also other higher-order counterparts at both f(0) and 2f(0) frequencies. Measurements were performed at f(0) equal to 2.25 MHz and using hydrophone in water and contrast agents in tissue phantom. Experimental results indicate that the sequence reduces the tissue harmonic magnitude by about 20 dB along the entire axial depths and the corresponding CTR improves at both frequencies. In DF harmonic imaging, the proposed phase-coded sequence can effectively remove the tissue harmonic background at both f(0) and 2f(0) frequencies for improvement of contrast detection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reconstruction of the sound velocity and absorption spatial distributions in soft biological tissue phantoms from experimental ultrasound tomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, V. A.; Zotov, D. I.; Rumyantseva, O. D.

    2015-03-01

    The paper is devoted to implementing in a specific tomographic device a two-step algorithm designed to reconstruct the spatial distributions of the sound velocity and absorption coefficient, primarily in soft biological tissues. To generate the input data of the first and second steps, a correlation algorithm is used based on determination of the time shift in the signal propagation time in the presence of an object. The results of reconstruction are presented, which are based on data measured for objects-phantoms using a developed experimental ultrasound tomograph model. We discuss problems that arise during reconstruction with a low resolution at the first step of the algorithm, and we demonstrate the high spatial resolving power achieved at the second step.

  1. Detection, numerical simulation and approximate inversion of optoacoustic signals generated in multi-layered PVA hydrogel based tissue phantoms

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenröther, E; Wollweber, M; Roth, B

    2016-01-01

    In this article we characterize optoacoustic signals generated from layered tissue phantoms via short laser pulses by experimental and numerical means. In particular, we consider the case where scattering is effectively negligible and the absorbed energy density follows Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. is characterized by an exponential decay within the layers and discontinuities at interfaces. We complement experiments on samples with multiple layers, where the material properties are known a priori, with numerical calculations for a pointlike detector, tailored to suit our experimental setup. Experimentally, we characterize the acoustic signal observed by a piezoelectric detector in the acoustic far-field in backward mode and we discuss the implication of acoustic diffraction on our measurements. We further attempt an inversion of an OA signal in the far-field approximation.

  2. Measurement of real-time tissue elastography in a phantom model and comparison with transient elastography in pediatric patients with liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Jens-Peter; Alzen, Gerhard; Klingmüller, Volker; Teufel, Ulrike; Sakka, Saroa El; Engelmann, Guido; Selmi, Buket

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the comparability of real-time tissue elastography (RTE) and transient elastography (TE) in pediatric patients with liver diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS RTE was performed on the Elasticity QA Phantom Model 049 (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems Company Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA), which has five areas with different levels of stiffness. RTE measurements of relative stiffness (MEAN [mean value of tissue elasticity], AREA [% of blue color-coded stiffer tissue]) in the phantom were compared with the phantom stiffness specified in kPa (measurement unit of TE). RTE and TE were performed on 147 pediatric patients with various liver diseases. A total of 109 measurements were valid. The participants had following diseases: metabolic liver disease (n=25), cystic fibrosis (n=20), hepatopathy of unknown origin (n=11), autoimmune hepatitis (n=12), Wilson’s disease (n=11), and various liver parenchyma alterations (n=30). Correlations between RTE and TE measurements in the patients were calculated. In addition, RTE was performed on a control group (n=30), and the RTE values between the patient and control groups were compared. RESULTS The RTE parameters showed good correlation in the phantom model with phantom stiffness (MEAN/kPa, r=−0.97; AREA/kPa, r=0.98). However, the correlation of RTE and TE was weak in the patient group (MEAN/kPa, r=−0.23; AREA/kPa, r=0.24). A significant difference was observed between the patient and control groups (MEAN, P = 5.32 e-7; AREA, P = 1.62 e-6). CONCLUSION In the phantom model, RTE was correlated with kPa, confirming the presumed comparability of the methods. However, there was no direct correlation between RTE and TE in patients with defined liver diseases under real clinical conditions. PMID:24317333

  3. Velocity and attenuation of shear waves in the phantom of a muscle-soft tissue matrix with embedded stretched fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Tsyuryupa, S. N.; Sarvazyan, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a theory of the elasticity moduli and dissipative properties of a composite material: a phantom simulating muscle tissue anisotropy. The model used in the experiments was made of a waterlike polymer with embedded elastic filaments imitating muscle fiber. In contrast to the earlier developed phenomenological theory of the anisotropic properties of muscle tissue, here we obtain the relationship of the moduli with characteristic sizes and moduli making up the composite. We introduce the effective elasticity moduli and viscosity tensor components, which depend on stretching of the fibers. We measure the propagation velocity of shear waves and the shear viscosity of the model for regulated tension. Waves were excited by pulsed radiation pressure generated by modulated focused ultrasound. We show that with increased stretching of fibers imitating muscle contraction, an increase in both elasticity and viscosity takes place, and this effect depends on the wave propagation direction. The results of theoretical and experimental studies support our hypothesis on the protective function of stretched skeletal muscle, which protects bones and joints from trauma.

  4. Helical antenna arrays for interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate cancer: tissue phantom testing and simulations for treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherar, Michael D.; Gladman, Aviv S.; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Trachtenberg, John; Gertner, Mark R.

    2001-07-01

    Interstitial microwave therapy is an experimental treatment for prostate cancer. The objective of this work was to measure the power deposition (specific absorption rate, SAR) patterns of helical microwave antennae both individually and in array patterns that would be useful for clinical treatment protocols. Commercial helical antenna 3D SAR patterns were measured in muscle equivalent phantoms using a thermographic technique. Two array patterns were tested: a `square' and a `crescent' array, both surrounding the urethra. To assess the feasibility of pre-treatment planning, the measured SAR patterns were input to a treatment planning computer simulation program based on a series of trans-rectal ultrasound images from a prostate cancer patient. The simulation solved the Pennes linear bioheat heat transfer equation in prostate tissue, with the aim of achieving a target of 55 °C at the prostate periphery while not allowing normal surrounding tissues (bladder, urethra, rectum) to rise above 42 °C. These criteria could not be met with the square array but they could be met with the crescent array, provided that the prostate was first dissected away from the rectum. This can be done with a procedure such as `hydrodissection', where sterile saline is injected to separate the prostate and rectum. The results of these SAR measurements and heat transfer simulations indicate that arrays of helical antennae could be used for safe and effective thermal therapy for prostate cancer.

  5. The response of MRI contrast parameters in in vitro tissues and tissue mimicking phantoms to fractionation by histotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Steven P.; Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Shi, Jiaqi; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.

    2017-09-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive, focused ultrasound lesioning technique that can ablate precise volumes of soft tissue using a novel mechanical fractionation mechanism. Previous research suggests that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be a sensitive image-based feedback mechanism for histotripsy. However, there are insufficient data to form some unified understanding of the response of the MR contrast mechanisms in tissues to histotripsy. In this paper, we investigate the response of the MR contrast parameters R1, R2, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) to various treatment levels of histotripsy in in vitro porcine liver, kidney, muscle, and blood clot as well in formulations of bovine red blood cells suspended in agar gel. We also make a histological analysis of histotripsy lesions in porcine liver. We find that R2 and the ADC are both sensitive to ablation in all materials tested here, and the degree of response varies with tissue type. Correspondingly, under histologic analysis, the porcine liver exhibited various levels of mechanical disruption and necrotic debris that are characteristic of histotripsy. While the area of intact red blood cells and nuclei found within these lesions both decreased with increasing amounts of treatment, the area of red blood cells decreased much more rapidly than the area of intact nuclei. Additionally, the decrease in area of intact red blood cells saturated at the same treatment levels at which the response of the R2 saturated while the area of intact nuclei appeared to vary linearly with the response of the ADC.

  6. High field MREIT: setup and tissue phantom imaging at 11 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Rosalind; Grant, Samuel; Zhang, Sung Uk; Oh, Suk Hoon; Lee, Byung Il; Woo, Eung Je

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has the potential to provide conductivity and current density images with high spatial resolution and accuracy. Recent experimental studies at a field strength of 3 T showed that the spatial resolution of conductivity and current density images may be similar to that of conventional MR images as long as enough current is injected, at least 20 mA when the object being imaged has a size similar to the human head. To apply the MREIT technique to image small conductivity changes using less injection current, we performed MREIT studies at 11 T field strength, where noise levels in measured magnetic flux density data are significantly lower. In this paper we present the experimental results of imaging biological tissues with different conductivity values using MREIT at 11 T. We describe technical difficulties encountered in using high-field MREIT systems and possible solutions. High-field MREIT is suggested as a research tool for obtaining accurate conductivity data from tissue samples and animal subjects. PMID:16636417

  7. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is still there. This painless phenomenon, known as phantom limb sensation, may rarely occur in people who were born without limbs. Phantom limb sensations may include feelings of coldness, warmth, or ...

  8. Adaptive Thermal Therapy using Planar Ultrasound Transducers with Real-time MR Temperature Feedback: Demonstration in Gel Phantoms and Ex-vivo Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kee; Choy, Vanessa; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2007-05-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. The main goal of this study was to evaluate active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5T MR imager to control conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both thermal gel phantoms and ex-vivo tissue with a single-element transurethral heating applicator. The applicator rotation rate and power were controlled based on MRI-temperature measurements. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) was also investigated in gel phantoms. The 55°C isotherm generated during heating closely matched the targeted prostate shape, with an average distance error of 0.9 mm ± 0.4 mm in turkey breasts, 1.3 mm ± 0.5 mm in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. Accurate, MRI-guided, active feedback has been successfully demonstrated experimentally and has the capability to adjust for unpredictable and varying tissue properties during the treatment.

  9. An empirical formula to obtain tissue-phantom ratios from percentage depth-dose curves for small fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X.; Krauss, Rob

    2013-07-01

    For small photon fields, accurate values of a tissue-phantom ratio (TPR) are difficult to obtain either by direct measurement or by the conventional method of converting from measured percentage depth doses (%dd). This study aims to develop an empirical method to accurately obtain TPRs from %dd curves for small radiosurgery beams. The Monte Carlo simulation codes BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc were used to simulate the accelerator head and small, collimated fields including the circular cone accessory. The Monte Carlo directly calculated TPR values as a function of depth were compared with TPRs converted from %dd curves in a water phantom for field sizes ranging from 4 mm diameter to 10 × 10 cm2 fields. Direct measurements of TPRs were performed with the detector remaining fixed at a SAD of 100 cm and increasing the detector depth by adding water. The %dd curves were measured at 100 cm SSD in a 50 × 50 × 50 cm3 water tank. Using the Monte Carlo values, we developed an empirical formula to obtain TPRs from %dd and validated its accuracy. The conventional method of obtaining TPRs from %dd underestimate TPR by 3.4% and 0.6% at a depth 1.5 cm and overestimate TPR by 6.4% and 1.7% at a depth of 25 cm for 4 mm and 30 mm diameter circular fields, respectively. The empirical formula is derived from realistic Monte Carlo simulations using field sizes ranging from 4 to 30 mm and depth ranging from 1.5 to 25 cm. TPRs calculated using this function deviate from TPRs directly calculated from Monte Carlo by less than 0.5%. The accuracy of this empirical formula is validated against the directly measured TPRs in water. The developed empirical method has the potential to greatly simply the work in obtaining TPRs from measured %dd curves for small fields. By using this developed empirical formula the uncertainties between directly measured TPRs and converted TPRs from measured %dd curves are within 1%.

  10. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Neil; Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4cm(2) and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm(2), 2 × 2-cm(2), and 3 × 3-cm(2) fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4cm(2) or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data.

  11. Two-Layer Quantum Key Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Rubens Viana

    2012-01-01

    Recently a new quantum key distribution protocol using coherent and thermal states was proposed. In this work this kind of two-layer QKD protocol is formalized and its security against the most common attacks, including external control and Trojan horse attacks, is discussed.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations incorporating Mie calculations of light transport in tissue phantoms: Examination of photon sampling volumes for endoscopically compatible fiber optic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourant, J.R.; Hielscher, A.H.; Bigio, I.J.

    1996-04-01

    Details of the interaction of photons with tissue phantoms are elucidated using Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, photon sampling volumes and photon pathlengths are determined for a variety of scattering and absorption parameters. The Monte Carlo simulations are specifically designed to model light delivery and collection geometries relevant to clinical applications of optical biopsy techniques. The Monte Carlo simulations assume that light is delivered and collected by two, nearly-adjacent optical fibers and take into account the numerical aperture of the fibers as well as reflectance and refraction at interfaces between different media. To determine the validity of the Monte Carlo simulations for modeling the interactions between the photons and the tissue phantom in these geometries, the simulations were compared to measurements of aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres in the wavelength range 450-750 nm.

  13. Accuracy of fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurement of the amount of fibroglandular breast tissue using MRI: correlation with anthropomorphic breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengert, Georg J; Pinker, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H; Vogl, Wolf-Dieter; Spijker, Sylvia M; Bickel, Hubert; Polanec, Stephan H; Baltzer, Pascal A

    2017-06-01

    To demonstrate the accuracy of fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurement of the amount of fibroglandular breast tissue (FGT), using MRI, and to investigate the impact of different MRI sequences using anthropomorphic breast phantoms as the ground truth. In this study, 10 anthropomorphic breast phantoms that consisted of different known fractions of adipose and protein tissue, which closely resembled normal breast parenchyma, were developed. Anthropomorphic breast phantoms were imaged with a 1.5 T unit (Siemens, Avantofit) using an 18-channel breast coil. The sequence protocol consisted of an isotropic Dixon sequence (Di), an anisotropic Dixon sequence (Da), and T1 3D FLASH sequences with and without fat saturation (T1). Fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurement of FGT for all anthropomorphic phantoms and sequences was performed and correlated with the amounts of fatty and protein components in the phantoms as the ground truth. Fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurements of FGT with MRI for all sequences ranged from 5.86 to 61.05% (mean 33.36%). The isotropic Dixon sequence yielded the highest accuracy (median 0.51%-0.78%) and precision (median range 0.19%) compared with anisotropic Dixon (median 1.92%-2.09%; median range 0.55%) and T1 -weighted sequences (median 2.54%-2.46%; median range 0.82%). All sequences yielded good correlation with the FGT content of the anthropomorphic phantoms. The best correlation of FGT measurements was identified for Dixon sequences (Di, R(2)  = 0.999; Da, R(2)  = 0.998) compared with conventional T1 -weighted sequences (R(2)  = 0.971). MRI yields accurate, fully automated, quantitative, volumetric measurements of FGT, an increasingly important and sensitive imaging biomarker for breast cancer risk. Compared with conventional T1 sequences, Dixon-type sequences show the highest correlation and reproducibility for automated, quantitative, volumetric FGT measurements using anthropomorphic breast

  14. Piecewise parabolic method for simulating one-dimensional shear shock wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, B. B.; Espíndola, D.; Pinton, G. F.

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of shear shock wave generation and propagation in the porcine brain suggests that this new shock phenomenology may be responsible for a broad range of traumatic injuries. Blast-induced head movement can indirectly lead to shear wave generation in the brain, which could be a primary mechanism for injury. Shear shock waves amplify the local acceleration deep in the brain by up to a factor of 8.5, which may tear and damage neurons. Currently, there are numerical methods that can model compressional shock waves, such as comparatively well-studied blast waves, but there are no numerical full-wave solvers that can simulate nonlinear shear shock waves in soft solids. Unlike simplified representations, e.g., retarded time, full-wave representations describe fundamental physical behavior such as reflection and heterogeneities. Here we present a piecewise parabolic method-based solver for one-dimensional linearly polarized nonlinear shear wave in a homogeneous medium and with empirical frequency-dependent attenuation. This method has the advantage of being higher order and more directly extendable to multiple dimensions and heterogeneous media. The proposed numerical scheme is validated analytically and experimentally and compared to other shock capturing methods. A Riemann step-shock problem is used to characterize the numerical dissipation. This dissipation is then tuned to be negligible with respect to the physical attenuation by choosing an appropriate grid spacing. The numerical results are compared to ultrasound-based experiments that measure planar polarized shear shock wave propagation in a tissue-mimicking gelatin phantom. Good agreement is found between numerical results and experiment across a 40 mm propagation distance. We anticipate that the proposed method will be a starting point for the development of a two- and three-dimensional full-wave code for the propagation of nonlinear shear waves in heterogeneous media.

  15. A comparison of small-field tissue phantom ratio data generation methods for an Elekta Agility 6 MV photon beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Neil, E-mail: neil.richmond@stees.nhs.uk; Brackenridge, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Tissue-phantom ratios (TPRs) are a common dosimetric quantity used to describe the change in dose with depth in tissue. These can be challenging and time consuming to measure. The conversion of percentage depth dose (PDD) data using standard formulae is widely employed as an alternative method in generating TPR. However, the applicability of these formulae for small fields has been questioned in the literature. Functional representation has also been proposed for small-field TPR production. This article compares measured TPR data for small 6 MV photon fields against that generated by conversion of PDD using standard formulae to assess the efficacy of the conversion data. By functionally fitting the measured TPR data for square fields greater than 4 cm in length, the TPR curves for smaller fields are generated and compared with measurements. TPRs and PDDs were measured in a water tank for a range of square field sizes. The PDDs were converted to TPRs using standard formulae. TPRs for fields of 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} and larger were used to create functional fits. The parameterization coefficients were used to construct extrapolated TPR curves for 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}, 2 × 2-cm{sup 2}, and 3 × 3-cm{sup 2} fields. The TPR data generated using standard formulae were in excellent agreement with direct TPR measurements. The TPR data for 1 × 1-cm{sup 2}, 2 × 2-cm{sup 2}, and 3 × 3-cm{sup 2} fields created by extrapolation of the larger field functional fits gave inaccurate initial results. The corresponding mean differences for the 3 fields were 4.0%, 2.0%, and 0.9%. Generation of TPR data using a standard PDD-conversion methodology has been shown to give good agreement with our directly measured data for small fields. However, extrapolation of TPR data using the functional fit to fields of 4 × 4 cm{sup 2} or larger resulted in generation of TPR curves that did not compare well with the measured data.

  16. NADH-fluorescence scattering correction for absolute concentration determination in a liquid tissue phantom using a novel multispectral magnetic-resonance-imaging-compatible needle probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Frank; Schalk, Robert; Heintz, Annabell; Feike, Patrick; Firmowski, Sebastian; Beuermann, Thomas; Methner, Frank-Jürgen; Kränzlin, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert; Rädle, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    In this report, a quantitative nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH) fluorescence measurement algorithm in a liquid tissue phantom using a fiber-optic needle probe is presented. To determine the absolute concentrations of NADH in this phantom, the fluorescence emission spectra at 465 nm were corrected using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy between 600 nm and 940 nm. The patented autoclavable Nitinol needle probe enables the acquisition of multispectral backscattering measurements of ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and fluorescence spectra. As a phantom, a suspension of calcium carbonate (Calcilit) and water with physiological NADH concentrations between 0 mmol l-1 and 2.0 mmol l-1 were used to mimic human tissue. The light scattering characteristics were adjusted to match the backscattering attributes of human skin by modifying the concentration of Calcilit. To correct the scattering effects caused by the matrices of the samples, an algorithm based on the backscattered remission spectrum was employed to compensate the influence of multiscattering on the optical pathway through the dispersed phase. The monitored backscattered visible light was used to correct the fluorescence spectra and thereby to determine the true NADH concentrations at unknown Calcilit concentrations. Despite the simplicity of the presented algorithm, the root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 0.093 mmol l-1.

  17. Simulation of laser-tattoo pigment interaction in a tissue-mimicking phantom using Q-switched and long-pulsed lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, K J; Kim, B J; Cho, S B

    2017-08-01

    Laser therapy is the treatment of choice in tattoo removal. However, the precise mechanisms of laser-tattoo pigment interactions remain to be evaluated. We evaluated the geometric patterns of laser-tattoo pigment particle interactions using a tattoo pigment-embedded tissue-mimicking (TM) phantom. A Q-switched (QS) neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser was used at settings of 532-, 660-, and 1064-nm wavelengths, single-pulse and quick pulse-to-pulse treatment modes, and spot sizes of 4 and 7 mm. Most of the laser-tattoo interactions in the experimental conditions formed cocoon-shaped or oval photothermal and photoacoustic injury zones, which contained fragmented tattoo particles in various sizes depending on the conditions. In addition, a long-pulsed 755-nm alexandrite laser was used at a spot size of 6 mm and pulse widths of 3, 5, and 10 ms. The finer granular pattern of tattoo destruction was observed in TM phantoms treated with 3- and 5-ms pulse durations compared to those treated with a 10-ms pulse. We outlined various patterns of laser-tattoo pigment interactions in a tattoo-embedded TM phantom to predict macroscopic tattoo and surrounding tissue reactions after laser treatment for tattoo removal. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Shear wave elastography using ultrasound: effects of anisotropy and stretch stress on a tissue phantom and in vivo reactive lymph nodes in the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young [Dept. of Radiology, University of Inha College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, So Yeon; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwa [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Seon [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how the anisotropy and the static stretch stress of the cervical musculature influence the measured shear modulus in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in cervical lymph nodes in vivo by using shear wave elastography (SWE). SWE was performed on a phantom using a pig muscle and on the middle jugular cervical lymph nodes in six volunteers. Tissue elasticity was quantified using the shear modulus and a supersonic shear wave imaging technique. For the phantom study, first, the optimal depth for measurement was determined, and then, SWE was performed in parallel and perpendicular to the muscle fiber orientation with and without strain stress. For the in vivo study, SWE was performed on the cervical lymph nodes in parallel and perpendicular to the sternocleidomastoid muscle fiber direction with and without neck stretching. The mean values of the shear modulus (meanSM) were then analyzed. In the phantom study, the measured depth significantly influenced the meanSM with a sharp decrease at the depth of 1.5 cm (P<0.001). Strain stress increased the meanSM, irrespective of the muscle fiber orientation (P<0.001). In the in vivo study, the meanSM values obtained in parallel to the muscle fiber orientation were greater than those obtained perpendicular to the fiber orientation, irrespective of the stretch stress (P<0.001). However, meanSM was affected significantly by the stretch stress parallel to the muscle fiber orientation (P<0.001). The anisotropic nature of the cervical musculature and the applied stretch stress explain the variability of the SWE measurements and should be identified before applying Swee for the interpretation of the measured shear modulus values.

  19. Phantom Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, Andre; Vanduynhoven, Eric; van Kleef, Maarten; Huygen, Frank; Pope, Jason E.; Mekhail, Nagy

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the p

  20. Spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2011-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and oxygen saturation using biomedical optics techniques has the potential to inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities are typically estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in superficial tissue such as the skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis. Furthermore, epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. This study describes a technique for decoupling the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. An artificial neural network was used to map input optical properties to spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance of two layer media. Then, iterative fitting was used to determine the optical properties from simulated spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance. Additionally, an artificial neural network was trained to directly map spatial frequency domain reflectance to sets of optical properties of a two layer medium, thus bypassing the need for iteration. In both cases, the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis were determined independently. The accuracy and efficiency of the iterative fitting approach was compared with the direct neural network inversion.

  1. Conformal thermal therapy using planar ultrasound transducers and adaptive closed-loop MR temperature control: demonstration in gel phantoms and ex vivo tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K.; Choy, V.; Chopra, R.; Bronskill, M. J.

    2007-05-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Integrating a multi-element planar transducer with active MR temperature feedback can enable three-dimensional conformal thermal therapy of a target region within the prostate gland while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Continuous measurement of the temperature distribution in tissue enables dynamic compensation for unknown changes in blood flow and tissue properties during treatment. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5 T MR imager for conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both gel phantoms and excised tissue with a transurethral heating applicator, and the rotation rate and power were varied based on the thermal measurements. The capability to produce a region of thermal damage that matched a target boundary was evaluated. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) on the desired pattern of thermal damage was also investigated in gel phantoms. Results showed high correlation between the desired target boundary and the 55 °C isotherm generated during heating with an average distance error of 0.9 mm ± 0.4 mm (n = 6) in turkey breasts, 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm (n = 4) in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm ± 0.6 mm (n = 3) in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. The results were obtained using a temporal update rate of 5 s, a spatial resolution of 3 × 3 × 10 mm for the control point, and a temperature uncertainty of approximately 1 °C. The performance of the control algorithm under these conditions was comparable to that of simulations conducted previously by our group. Overall, the feasibility of generating targeted regions of thermal damage with a transurethral heating applicator and active MR temperature feedback has been demonstrated experimentally. This method of treatment

  2. Conformal thermal therapy using planar ultrasound transducers and adaptive closed-loop MR temperature control: demonstration in gel phantoms and ex vivo tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, K [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada); Choy, V [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada); Chopra, R [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada); Bronskill, M J [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-05-21

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Integrating a multi-element planar transducer with active MR temperature feedback can enable three-dimensional conformal thermal therapy of a target region within the prostate gland while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Continuous measurement of the temperature distribution in tissue enables dynamic compensation for unknown changes in blood flow and tissue properties during treatment. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5 T MR imager for conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both gel phantoms and excised tissue with a transurethral heating applicator, and the rotation rate and power were varied based on the thermal measurements. The capability to produce a region of thermal damage that matched a target boundary was evaluated. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) on the desired pattern of thermal damage was also investigated in gel phantoms. Results showed high correlation between the desired target boundary and the 55 deg. C isotherm generated during heating with an average distance error of 0.9 mm {+-} 0.4 mm (n = 6) in turkey breasts, 1.4 mm {+-} 0.6 mm (n = 4) in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm {+-} 0.6 mm (n = 3) in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. The results were obtained using a temporal update rate of 5 s, a spatial resolution of 3 x 3 x 10 mm for the control point, and a temperature uncertainty of approximately 1 deg. C. The performance of the control algorithm under these conditions was comparable to that of simulations conducted previously by our group. Overall, the feasibility of generating targeted regions of thermal damage with a transurethral heating applicator and active MR temperature feedback has been demonstrated experimentally. This method of

  3. Human phantom

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    This human phantom has been received by CERN on loan from the State Committee of the USSR for the Utilization of Atomic Energy. It is used by the Health Physics Group to study personel radiation doses near the accelerators.

  4. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J. Carl; Gertner, Mark R.; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Dolan, Alfred M.; Sherar, Michael D.

    2003-04-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 °C to 90 °C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy.

  5. A human-phantom coupling experiment and a dispersive simulation model for investigating the variation of dielectric properties of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Fukuhara, Yuto; He, Siyu; Saito, Kazuyuki; Ito, Koichi; Yu, Wenwei

    2015-06-01

    Variation of the dielectric properties of tissues could happen due to aging, moisture of the skin, muscle denervation, and variation of blood flow by temperature. Several studies used burst-modulated alternating stimulation to improve activation and comfort by reducing tissue impedance as a possible mechanism to generate muscle activation with less energy. The study of the effect of dielectric properties of biological tissues in nerve activation presents a fundamental problem, which is the difficulty of systematically changing the morphological factors and dielectric properties of the subjects under study. We tackle this problem by using a simulation and an experimental study. The experimental study is a novel method that combines a fat tissue-equivalent phantom, with known and adjustable dielectric properties, with the human thigh. In this way, the dispersion of the tissue under study could be modified to observe its effects systematically in muscle activation. We observed that, to generate a given amount of muscle or nerve activation under conditions of decreased impedance, the magnitude of the current needs to be increased while the magnitude of the voltage needs to be decreased.

  6. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  7. Spectra from 2.5-15 {mu}m of tissue phantom materials, optical clearing agents and ex vivo human skin: implications for depth profiling of human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viator, John A [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, CA (United States); Choi, Bernard [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, CA (United States); Peavy, George M [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimel, Sol [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, CA (United States); Nelson, J Stuart [Beckman Laser Institute, University of California, 1002 Health Sciences Road East, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-21

    Infrared measurements have been used to profile or image biological tissue, including human skin. Usually, analysis of such measurements has assumed that infrared absorption is due to water and collagen. Such an assumption may be reasonable for soft tissue, but introduction of exogenous agents into skin or the measurement of tissue phantoms has raised the question of their infrared absorption spectrum. We used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection mode to measure the infrared absorption spectra, in the range of 2-15 {mu}m, of water, polyacrylamide, Intralipid, collagen gels, four hyperosmotic clearing agents (glycerol, 1,3-butylene glycol, trimethylolpropane, Topicare{sup TM}), and ex vivo human stratum corneum and dermis. The absorption spectra of the phantom materials were similar to that of water, although additional structure was noted in the range of 6-10 {mu}m. The absorption spectra of the clearing agents were more complex, with molecular absorption bands dominating between 6 and 12 {mu}m. Dermis was similar to water, with collagen structure evident in the 6-10 {mu}m range. Stratum corneum had a significantly lower absorption than dermis due to a lower content of water. These results suggest that the assumption of water-dominated absorption in the 2.5-6 {mu}m range is valid. At longer wavelengths, clearing agent absorption spectra differ significantly from the water spectrum. This spectral information can be used in pulsed photothermal radiometry or utilized in the interpretation of reconstructions in which a constant {mu}{sub ir} is used. In such cases, overestimating {mu}{sub ir} will underestimate chromophore depth and vice versa, although the effect is dependent on actual chromophore depth. (note)

  8. Comparison between measured tissue phantom ratio values and calculated from percent depth doses with and without peak scatter correction factor in a 6 MV beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Narayanasamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of calculated tissue phantom ratio (TPR data with measured TPR values of a 6MV photon beam. TPR was calculated from the measured percent depth dose (PDD values using 2 methods – with and without correcting for the differences in peak scatter fraction (PSF. Mean error less than 1% was observed between the measured and calculated TPR values with the PSF correction, for all clinically relevant field sizes and depths. When not accounting for the PSF correction, mean difference between the measured and calculated TPR values was larger than 1% for square field sizes ranging from 3 cm to 10 cm.

  9. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeshu; Pei, Jing; Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P; Martin, Edward W; Hitchcock, Charles L; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting.

  10. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshu Zhang

    Full Text Available Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting.

  11. Combined chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental ultrasound imaging for intravascular ultrasound: 20-60 MHz phantom and ex vivo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinhyoung; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2013-02-01

    The application of chirp coded excitation to pulse inversion tissue harmonic imaging can increase signal to noise ratio. On the other hand, the elevation of range side lobe level, caused by leakages of the fundamental signal, has been problematic in mechanical scanners which are still the most prevalent in high frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. Fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging can achieve range side lobe levels lower than -60dB with Hanning window, but it yields higher side lobes level than pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic imaging (PI-CTHI). Therefore, in this paper a combined pulse inversion chirp coded tissue harmonic and fundamental imaging mode (CPI-CTHI) is proposed to retain the advantages of both chirp coded harmonic and fundamental imaging modes by demonstrating 20-60MHz phantom and ex vivo results. A simulation study shows that the range side lobe level of CPI-CTHI is 16dB lower than PI-CTHI, assuming that the transducer translates incident positions by 50μm when two beamlines of pulse inversion pair are acquired. CPI-CTHI is implemented for a proto-typed intravascular ultrasound scanner capable of combined data acquisition in real-time. A wire phantom study shows that CPI-CTHI has a 12dB lower range side lobe level and a 7dB higher echo signal to noise ratio than PI-CTHI, while the lateral resolution and side lobe level are 50μm finer and -3dB less than fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging respectively. Ex vivo scanning of a rabbit trachea demonstrates that CPI-CTHI is capable of visualizing blood vessels as small as 200μm in diameter with 6dB better tissue contrast than either PI-CTHI or fundamental chirp coded excitation imaging. These results clearly indicate that CPI-CTHI may enhance tissue contrast with less range side lobe level than PI-CTHI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Interfacial Stability in a Two-Layer Benard Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM Yuriko Renardy Technical Summary Report #2814 April 1985 I cti- Work Unit Number 2 - Physical Mathematics...34•"• -••’-’• ^ ••’••• VI , •• W -•- • •- ’•"• INTERFACIAL STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM Yuriko Renardy I. INTRODUCTION Two layers of fluids are...Subtltl») INTERFACIAL STABILITY IN A TWO-LAYER BENARD PROBLEM 7. AUTMORf.; Yuriko Renardy »• PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS

  13. Organosilicon phantom for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Kusmic, Claudia; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Meucci, Sandro; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Pini, Roberto; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique. Although commercially available photoacoustic imaging systems currently exist, the technology is still in its infancy. Therefore, the design of stable phantoms is essential to achieve semiquantitative evaluation of the performance of a photoacoustic system and can help optimize the properties of contrast agents. We designed and developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom with exceptionally fine geometry; the phantom was tested using photoacoustic experiments loaded with the standard indocyanine green dye and compared to an agar phantom pattern through polyethylene glycol-gold nanorods. The linearity of the photoacoustic signal with the nanoparticle number was assessed. The signal-tonoiseratio and contrast were employed as image quality parameters, and enhancements of up to 50 and up to 300%, respectively, were measured with the PDMS phantom with respect to the agar one. A tissue-mimicking (TM)-PDMS was prepared by adding TiO2 and India ink; photoacoustic tests were performed in order to compare the signal generated by the TM-PDMS and the biological tissue. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  14. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  15. A comparative study on patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the results of patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom. Methods: Fifteen intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans already planned on treatment planning system (TPS for head-and-neck cancer patients were exported on all three kinds of phantoms viz. slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom, and dose was calculated using anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA. All the gantry angles were set to zero in case of slab phantom while set to as it is in actual plan in case of other two phantoms. All the plans were delivered by linear accelerator (LA and dose for each plan was measured by 0.13 cc ion chamber. The percentage (% variations between planned and measured doses were calculated and analyzed. Results: The mean % variations between planned and measured doses of all IMRT quality assurance (QA plans were as 0.65 (Standard deviation (SD: 0.38 with confidence limit (CL 1.39, 1.16 (SD: 0.61 with CL 2.36 and 2.40 (SD: 0.86 with CL 4.09 for slab phantom, acrylic head phantom and goat head phantom respectively. Conclusion: Higher dose variations found in case of real tissue phantom compare to results in case of slab and acrylic body phantoms. The algorithm AAA does not calculate doses in heterogeneous medium as accurate as it calculates in homogeneous medium. Therefore the patient specific absolute dosimetry should be done using heterogeneous phantom mimicking density wise as well as design wise to the actual human body.  

  16. Detection, numerical simulation and approximate inversion of optoacoustic signals generated in multi-layered PVA hydrogel based tissue phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Blumenröther

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Optoacoustic (OA measurements can not only be used for imaging purposes but as a more general tool to “sense” physical characteristics of biological tissue, such as geometric features and intrinsic optical properties. In order to pave the way for a systematic model-guided analysis of complex objects we devised numerical simulations in accordance with the experimental measurements. We validate our computational approach with experimental results observed for layered polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel samples, using melanin as the absorbing agent. Experimentally, we characterize the acoustic signal observed by a piezoelectric detector in the acoustic far-field in backward mode and we discuss the implication of acoustic diffraction on our measurements. We further attempt an inversion of an OA signal in the far-field approximation.

  17. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi [Division of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Noto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Niigata 951-8520 (Japan); Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi, E-mail: masaito@clg.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  18. Theoretical Permeability of Two-layered Nonwoven Geotextiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li-fang; CHU Cai-yuan

    2006-01-01

    The two-layered nonwoven geotextile, which consists of a layer constructed with fine fibers for providing optimal filtration characteristics and another layer constructed with coarse fibers for providing the required mechanical properties, is desirable for drainage and filtration system.Based on Darcy's law and drag force theory, a mathematical model on vertical permeability coefficient of two-layered nonwoven geotextile is estabilished. Comparison with experimental results shows that the present model possesses 83.6% accuracy for needle-punched two-layered nonwoven geotextiles. And experimental results also show that with the increasing of needle density the vertical permeability coefficient of two-layered nonwoven geotextiless firstly decreases and then increases, reaching the smallest value at 470 p/cm2.

  19. 3D strain measurement in soft tissue: demonstration of a novel inverse finite element model algorithm on MicroCT images of a tissue phantom exposed to negative pressure wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, R; Zhao, Y; Cunningham, K; Kieswetter, K; Haridas, B

    2009-07-01

    This study describes a novel system for acquiring the 3D strain field in soft tissue at sub-millimeter spatial resolution during negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Recent research in advanced wound treatment modalities theorizes that microdeformations induced by the application of sub-atmospheric (negative) pressure through V.A.C. GranuFoam Dressing, a reticulated open-cell polyurethane foam (ROCF), is instrumental in regulating the mechanobiology of granulation tissue formation [Saxena, V., Hwang, C.W., Huang, S., Eichbaum, Q., Ingber, D., Orgill, D.P., 2004. Vacuum-assisted closure: Microdeformations of wounds and cell proliferation. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114, 1086-1096]. While the clinical response is unequivocal, measurement of deformations at the wound-dressing interface has not been possible due to the inaccessibility of the wound tissue beneath the sealed dressing. Here we describe the development of a bench-test wound model for microcomputed tomography (microCT) imaging of deformation induced by NPWT and an algorithm set for quantifying the 3D strain field at sub-millimeter resolution. Microdeformations induced in the tissue phantom revealed average tensile strains of 18%-23% at sub-atmospheric pressures of -50 to -200 mmHg (-6.7 to -26.7 kPa). The compressive strains (22%-24%) and shear strains (20%-23%) correlate with 2D FEM studies of microdeformational wound therapy in the reference cited above. We anticipate that strain signals quantified using this system can then be used in future research aimed at correlating the effects of mechanical loading on the phenotypic expression of dermal fibroblasts in acute and chronic ulcer models. Furthermore, the method developed here can be applied to continuum deformation analysis in other contexts, such as 3D cell culture via confocal microscopy, full scale CT and MRI imaging, and in machine vision.

  20. Improved efficient routing strategy on two-layer complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinlong; Han, Weizhan; Guo, Qing; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Junfang; Wang, Zhihao

    2016-10-01

    The traffic dynamics of multi-layer networks has become a hot research topic since many networks are comprised of two or more layers of subnetworks. Due to its low traffic capacity, the traditional shortest path routing (SPR) protocol is susceptible to congestion on two-layer complex networks. In this paper, we propose an efficient routing strategy named improved global awareness routing (IGAR) strategy which is based on the betweenness centrality of nodes in the two layers. With the proposed strategy, the routing paths can bypass hub nodes of both layers to enhance the transport efficiency. Simulation results show that the IGAR strategy can bring much better traffic capacity than the SPR and the global awareness routing (GAR) strategies. Because of the significantly improved traffic performance, this study is helpful to alleviate congestion of the two-layer complex networks.

  1. Two-Layer Tight Frame Sparsifying Model for Compressed Sensing Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xi; Dong, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Compressed sensing magnetic resonance imaging (CSMRI) employs image sparsity to reconstruct MR images from incoherently undersampled K-space data. Existing CSMRI approaches have exploited analysis transform, synthesis dictionary, and their variants to trigger image sparsity. Nevertheless, the accuracy, efficiency, or acceleration rate of existing CSMRI methods can still be improved due to either lack of adaptability, high complexity of the training, or insufficient sparsity promotion. To properly balance the three factors, this paper proposes a two-layer tight frame sparsifying (TRIMS) model for CSMRI by sparsifying the image with a product of a fixed tight frame and an adaptively learned tight frame. The two-layer sparsifying and adaptive learning nature of TRIMS has enabled accurate MR reconstruction from highly undersampled data with efficiency. To solve the reconstruction problem, a three-level Bregman numerical algorithm is developed. The proposed approach has been compared to three state-of-the-art methods over scanned physical phantom and in vivo MR datasets and encouraging performances have been achieved. PMID:27747226

  2. Two-layer sheet of gelatin: A new topical hemostatic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshitaka; Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki; Torii, Hiroko; Ozamoto, Yuki; Hagiwara, Akeo

    2016-11-02

    Uncontrolled surgical bleeding is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and hospital cost. Topical hemostatic agents available today have problems controlling hemostatic effects; furthermore, their handling is difficult and they are unsafe. We devised a new hemostatic agent comprising gelatin sponge and film designed to be applied to the bleeding site, thereby creating a topical hemostatic agent made of gelatin alone. The gelatin was prepared by alkali treatment to eliminate viral activity. Hemostatic effects, surgical handling, and tissue reactions of the materials, namely a two-layer sheet of gelatin, TachoSil, and gelatin sponge, were evaluated using 21 dogs' spleens. The two-layer gelatin sheet and gelatin sponge exhibited superior hemostatic effects (100% hemostasis completed) compared with TachoSil (0-17% hemostasis). The gelatin matrix immediately absorbed blood flowing from wounds and activated the autologous components in the absorbed blood that promoted coagulation at the bleeding site. The two-layer gelatin sheet had the best surgical handling among the evaluated materials. Materials made of gelatin were associated with fewer inflammatory reactions compared with materials of TachoSil. The two-layer sheet of gelatin is a useful topical agent because of its superior hemostatic effects and usability, and is associated with a lower risk of transmitting diseases and inflammatory reactions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  3. Phantom breast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom breast syndrome is a type of condition in which patients have a sensation of residual breast tissue and can include both non-painful sensations as well as phantom breast pain. The incidence varies in different studies, ranging from approximately 30% to as high as 80% of patients after mastectomy. It seriously affects quality of life through the combined impact of physical disability and emotional distress. The breast cancer incidence rate in India as well as Western countries has risen in recent years while survival rates have improved; this has effectively increased the number of women for whom post-treatment quality of life is important. In this context, chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer surgery is a significantly under-recognized and under-treated problem. Various types of chronic neuropathic pain may arise following breast cancer surgery due to surgical trauma. The cause of these syndromes is damage to various nerves during surgery. There are a number of assumed factors causing or perpetuating persistent neuropathic pain after breast cancer surgery. Most well-established risk factors for developing phantom breast pain and other related neuropathic pain syndromes are severe acute postoperative pain and greater postoperative use of analgesics. Based upon current evidence, the goals of prophylactic strategies could first target optimal peri-operative pain control and minimizing damage to nerves during surgery. There is some evidence that chronic pain and sensory abnormalities do decrease over time. The main group of oral medications studied includes anti-depressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, N-methyl-D-asparate receptor antagonists, mexilitine, topical lidocaine, cannabinoids, topical capsaicin and glysine antagonists. Neuromodulation techniques such as motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug therapies have been used to treat various neuropathic pain syndromes.

  4. Synchronization of Stochastic Two-Layer Geophysical Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yongqian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the two-layer quasigeostrophic flow model under stochastic wind forcing is considered. It is shown that when the layer depth or density difference across the layers tends to zero, the dynamics on both layers synchronizes to an averaged geophysical flow model.

  5. Linear waves in two-layer fluids over periodic bottoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, J.; Maas, L.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    A new, exact Floquet theory is presented for linear waves in two-layer fluidsover a periodic bottom of arbitrary shape and amplitude. A method of conformaltransformation is adapted. The solutions are given, in essentially analytical form, forthe dispersion relation between wave frequency and general

  6. Linear waves in two-layer fluids over periodic bottoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Jie; Maas, L.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    A new, exact Floquet theory is presented for linear waves in two-layer fluids over a periodic bottom of arbitrary shape and amplitude. A method of conformal transformation is adapted. The solutions are given, in essentially analytical form, for the dispersion relation between wave frequency and gene

  7. 基于皮肤仿体的甘油光透明效果研究%Optical Clearing Effects Caused by Glycerol Based on Tissue-Simulating Phantoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋景英; 陈伟; 徐可欣

    2011-01-01

    In order to describe optical clearing effects of glycerol quantitatively, tissue-simulating phantoms whose optical properties are identical with that of human skin tissue are introduced.The optical clearing effects of tissuesimulating phantoms with different concentrations of glycerol have been studied by using double integrating spheres system and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometer.The results show that the scattering coefficients of skin phantoms decrease with the rising glycerol concentration at the wavelength of 632.8 nm, and the light penetration depth increases and the maximum percentage attains to 48.76%.Meanwhile, with the increase of glycerol concentration, the transmittance of skin phantoms increases as well, which equales the reduction of total attenuation coefficients.Therefore, the correlation can be obtained quantitatively between the optical clearing effects induced by glycerol and its concentration in tissue-simulating phantoms.%为了实现对甘油光透明效果的定量描述,引入组织仿体模拟皮肤的光学参数,分别利用双积分球系统及近红外光谱仪对含有不同浓度甘油的皮肤仿体的光学特性进行测量,研究甘油浓度变化对皮肤仿体光透明效果的影响.结果表明,在632.8 nm处随甘油浓度的增加皮肤仿体的散射系数降低,光穿透深度也得到提高,最大能提高48.76%;同时,皮肤仿体在近红外波段的透射能量也随着甘油浓度的增加而增大,即总衰减系数降低,从而表明利用皮肤仿体可描述甘油引起的光透明效果与甘油浓度变化的定量关系.

  8. Phantom limb pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation - phantom limb ... Bang MS, Jung SH. Phantom limb pain. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  9. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Segars, William P; Ghate, Sujata V; Nolte, Loren W; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y

    2015-07-01

    Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power-law descriptions of the phantom images

  10. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  11. The reference phantoms: voxel vs polygon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C H; Yeom, Y S; Nguyen, T T; Wang, Z J; Kim, H S; Han, M C; Lee, J K; Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N; Bolch, W E; Lee, C; Chung, B S

    2016-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference male and female adult phantoms, described in Publication 110, are voxel phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography scans of a male and a female patient, respectively. The voxel in-plane resolution and the slice thickness, of the order of a few millimetres, are insufficient for proper segmentation of smaller tissues such as the lens of the eye, the skin, and the walls of some organs. The calculated doses for these tissues therefore present some limitations, particularly for weakly penetrating radiation. Similarly, the Publication 110 phantoms cannot represent 8-40-µm-thick target regions in respiratory or alimentary tract organs. Separate stylised models have been used to represent these tissues for calculation of the ICRP reference dose coefficients (DCs). ICRP Committee 2 recently initiated a research project, the ultimate goal of which is to convert the Publication 110 phantoms to a high-quality polygon-mesh (PM) format, including all source and target regions, even those of the 8-40-µm-thick alimentary and respiratory tract organs. It is expected that the converted phantoms would lead to the same or very similar DCs as the Publication 110 reference phantoms for penetrating radiation and, at the same time, provide more accurate DCs for weakly penetrating radiation and small tissues. Additionally, the reference phantoms in the PM format would be easily deformable and, as such, could serve as a starting point to create phantoms of various postures for use, for example, in accidental dose calculations. This paper will discuss the current progress of the phantom conversion project and its significance for ICRP DC calculations.

  12. Pattern Synchronization in a Two-Layer Neuronal Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-Juan; LU Qi-Shao

    2009-01-01

    Pattern synchronization in a two-layer neuronal network is studied.For a single-layer network of Rulkov map neurons,there are three kinds of patterns induced by noise.Additive noise can induce ordered patterns at some intermediate noise intensities in a resonant way;however,for small and large noise intensities there exist excitable patterns and disordered patterns,respectively.For a neuronal network coupled by two single-layer networks with noise intensity differences between layers,we find that the two-layer network can achieve synchrony as the interlayer coupling strength increases.The synchronous states strongly depend on the interlayer coupling strength and the noise intensity difference between layers.

  13. TWO-LAYER MODEL DESCRIPTION OF POLYMER THIN FILM DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-dong Peng; Ran-xing Nancy Li; Chi-hang Lam; Ophelia K.C.Tsui

    2013-01-01

    Experiments in the past two decades have shown that the glass transition temperature of polymer films can become noticeably different from that of the bulk when the film thickness is decreased below ca.100 nm.It is broadly believed that these observations are caused by a nanometer interfacial layer with dynamics faster or slower than that of the bulk.In this paper,we examine how this idea may be realized by using a two-layer model assuming a hydrodynamic coupling between the interfacial layer and the remaining,bulk-like layer in the film.Illustrative examples will be given showing how the two-layer model is applied to the viscosity measurements of polystyrene and polymethylmethacrylate films supported by silicon oxide,where divergent thickness dependences are observed.

  14. Training two-layered feedforward networks with variable projection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C T; Lee, J J

    2008-02-01

    The variable projection (VP) method for separable nonlinear least squares (SNLLS) is presented and incorporated into the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm for training two-layered feedforward neural networks. It is shown that the Jacobian of variable projected networks can be computed by simple modification of the backpropagation algorithm. The suggested algorithm is efficient compared to conventional techniques such as conventional Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA), hybrid gradient algorithm (HGA), and extreme learning machine (ELM).

  15. Electromagnetic Scattering in a Two-layered Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG LI-XIN; LI YUAN; Ma Fu-ming

    2011-01-01

    The object of this paper is to investigate the three-dimensional electro-magnetic scattering problems in a two-layered background medium.These problems have an important application in today's technology,such as to detect objects that are buried in soil.Here,we model both the exterior impedance problem and the inhomogeneous medium problem in R3.We establish uniqueness and existence for the solution of the two scattering problems,respectively.

  16. Creating 3D gelatin phantoms for experimental evaluation in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Nils

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe and evaluate a setup to create gelatin phantoms by robotic 3D printing. Key aspects are the large workspace, reproducibility and resolution of the created phantoms. Given its soft tissue nature, the gelatin is kept fluid during inside the system and we present parameters for additive printing of homogeneous, solid objects. The results indicate that 3D printing of gelatin can be an alternative for quickly creating larger soft tissue phantoms without the need for casting a mold.

  17. Managing phantom pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay

    2004-07-01

    Since the first medical description of post-amputation phenomena reported by Ambrose Paré, persistent phantom pain syndromes have been well recognized. However, they continue to be difficult to manage. The three most commonly utilized terms include phantom sensation, phantom pain, and stump pain. Phantom limb sensation is an almost universal occurrence at some time during the first month following surgery. However, most phantom sensations generally resolve after two to three years without treatment, except in the cases where phantom pain develops. The incidence of phantom limb pain has been reported to vary from 0% to 88%. The incidence of phantom limb pain increases with more proximal amputations. Even though phantom pain may diminish with time and eventually fade away, it has been shown that even two years after amputation, the incidence is almost the same as at onset. Consequently, almost 60% of patients continue to have phantom limb pain after one year. In addition, phantom limb pain may also be associated with multiple pain problems in other areas of the body. The third symptom, stump pain, is located in the stump itself. The etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of phantom pain are not clearly defined. However, both peripheral and central neural mechanisms have been described, along with superimposed psychological mechanisms. Literature describing the management of phantom limb pain or stump pain is in its infancy. While numerous treatments have been described, there is little clinical evidence supporting drug therapy, psychological therapy, interventional techniques or surgery. This review will describe epidemiology, etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment modalities. The review also examines the effectiveness of various described modalities for prevention, as well as management of established phantom pain syndromes.

  18. Two-Layer Feedback Neural Networks with Associative Memories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Gui-Kun; ZHAO Hong

    2008-01-01

    We construct a two-layer feedback neural network by a Monte Carlo based algorithm to store memories as fixed-point attractors or as limit-cycle attractors. Special attention is focused on comparing the dynamics of the network with limit-cycle attractors and with fixed-point attractors. It is found that the former has better retrieval property than the latter. Particularly, spurious memories may be suppressed completely when the memories are stored as a long-limit cycle. Potential application of limit-cycle-attractor networks is discussed briefly.

  19. Tidal modulation of two-layer hydraulic exchange flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Frankcombe

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Time-dependent, two layer hydraulic exchange flow is studied using an idealised shallow water model. It is found that barotropic time-dependent perturbations, representing tidal forcing, increase the baroclinic exchange flux above the steady hydraulic limit, with flux increasing monotonically with tidal amplitude (measured either by height or flux amplitude over a tidal period. Exchange flux also depends on the non-dimensional tidal period, γ, which was introduced by Helfrich (1995. Resonance complicates the relationship between exchange flux and height amplitude, but, when tidal strength is characterised by flux amplitude, exchange flux is a monotonic function of γ.

  20. Baroclinic instability in the two-layer model. Interpretations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Joseph [Meteorological Inst., Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Two new interpretations of the wellknown instability criterion of the two-layer model of baroclinic instability are given whereby also a slight generalization of this model is introduced by admitting an interface on top with a reduced gravity g. It is found that instability sets in when the horizontal potential temperature advection by the barotropic mode becomes more important than the vertical temperature advection due to this mode. The second interpretation is based on potential vorticity (PV) thinking. Instability implies a dominance of the vertical PV coupling coefficient compared to horizontal mean state PV advection generated at the same level. The interface damps with decreasing g. (orig.)

  1. Interference testing of a two-layer commingled reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onur, M.; Reynolds, A.C. (Tulsa Univ., OK (USA))

    1989-12-01

    A two-well system in an infinite-acting, commingled, two-layer reservoir is considered. One well, the active well, is produced at a constant total rate, and the second well, the observation well, is shut in at all times. An analytical solution in Laplace space is presented, and the parametric groups that uniquely determine the pressure and rate solutions are identified. Results regarding crossflow through the observation well are presented. Conditions under which the line-source solution can be used to analyze observations-well pressure data are delineated.

  2. Nonlinear topographic effects in two-layer flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter George Baines

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the nature of non-linear flow of a two-layer fluid with a rigid lid over a long obstacle, such that the flow may be assumed to be hydrostatic. Such flows can generate hydraulic jumps upstream, and the model uses a new model of internal hydraulic jumps, which results in corrections to flows that have been computed using earlier models of jumps that are now known to be incorrect. The model covers the whole range of ratios of the densities of the two fluids, and is not restricted to the Boussinesq limit. The results are presented in terms of flow types in various regions of a Froude number-obstacle height (F0 – Hm diagram, in which the Froude number F0 is based on the initial flow conditions. When compared with single-layer flow, and some previous results with two layers, some surprising and novel patterns emerge on these diagrams. Specifically, in parts of the diagram where the flow may be supercritical (F0 > 1, there are regions where hysteresis may occur, implying that the flow may have two and sometimes three multiple flow states for the same conditions (i.e. values of F0 and Hm.

  3. Two-Layer Elastographic 3-D Traction Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Zhang, Shun; Gómez-González, Manuel; Meili, Ruedi; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; Del Álamo, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular traction force microscopy (TFM) requires knowledge of the mechanical properties of the substratum where the cells adhere to calculate cell-generated forces from measurements of substratum deformation. Polymer-based hydrogels are broadly used for TFM due to their linearly elastic behavior in the range of measured deformations. However, the calculated stresses, particularly their spatial patterns, can be highly sensitive to the substratum’s Poisson’s ratio. We present two-layer elastographic TFM (2LETFM), a method that allows for simultaneously measuring the Poisson’s ratio of the substratum while also determining the cell-generated forces. The new method exploits the analytical solution of the elastostatic equation and deformation measurements from two layers of the substratum. We perform an in silico analysis of 2LETFM concluding that this technique is robust with respect to TFM experimental parameters, and remains accurate even for noisy measurement data. We also provide experimental proof of principle of 2LETFM by simultaneously measuring the stresses exerted by migrating Physarum amoeboae on the surface of polyacrylamide substrata, and the Poisson’s ratio of the substrata. The 2LETFM method could be generalized to concurrently determine the mechanical properties and cell-generated forces in more physiologically relevant extracellular environments, opening new possibilities to study cell-matrix interactions.

  4. "Phantom" carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, D L; Root, B C

    1997-10-01

    Phantom sensation is ubiquitous among persons who have had amputation; however, if it develops into phantom pain, a thorough clinical investigation must ensue. We illustrate this with the case of a 49-year-old woman, 14 years after traumatic amputation of her left 2nd through 5th fingers, and 10 years after traumatic left transfemoral amputation. She had had phantom sensation in her absent fingers for years and developed progressive pain in her phantom fingers 3 months before presentation. Nerve conduction study revealed a high-normal distal motor latency of the left median nerve and a positive Bactrian test (sensitivity 87%). She was diagnosed with "phantom" carpal tunnel syndrome and treated with a resting wrist splint, decreased weight bearing on the left upper limb, and two corticosteroid carpal tunnel injections with marked improvement. Clinicians should recognize that phantom pain may be referred from a more proximal region and may be amenable to conservative management.

  5. Pipe Phantoms With Applications in Molecular Imaging and System Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiying; Herbst, Elizabeth B; Pye, Stephen D; Moran, Carmel M; Hossack, John A

    2017-01-01

    Pipe (vessel) phantoms mimicking human tissue and blood flow are widely used for cardiovascular related research in medical ultrasound. Pipe phantom studies require the development of materials and liquids that match the acoustic properties of soft tissue, blood vessel wall, and blood. Over recent years, pipe phantoms have been developed to mimic the molecular properties of the simulated blood vessels. In this paper, the design, construction, and functionalization of pipe phantoms are introduced and validated for applications in molecular imaging and ultrasound imaging system characterization. There are three major types of pipe phantoms introduced: 1) a gelatin-based pipe phantom; 2) a polydimethylsiloxane-based pipe phantom; and 3) the "Edinburgh pipe phantom." These phantoms may be used in the validation and assessment of the dynamics of microbubble-based contrast agents and, in the case of a small diameter tube phantom, for assessing imaging system spatial resolution/contrast performance. The materials and procedures required to address each of the phantoms are described.

  6. [Phantom limb pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Almost everyone who has amputated a limb will experience a phantom limb. They have the vivid impression, that the limb is still present. 60 to 70% of these amputees will suffer from phantom limb pain. The present paper gives an overview of the incidence and the characteristics of the so called "post amputation syndrome". Possible mechanism of this phenomena are presented, including peripheral, spinal, and central theories. Treatment of phantom limb pain is sometimes very difficult. It includes drug therapy, psychological therapy, physiotherapy as well as the prevention of phantom limb pain with regional analgesia techniques.

  7. Development of a HIFU Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Randy L.; Herman, Bruce A.; Maruvada, Subha; Wear, Keith A.; Harris, Gerald R.

    2007-05-01

    The field of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is developing rapidly. For basic research, quality control, and regulatory assessment a reusable phantom that has both thermal and acoustic properties close to that of soft tissue is critical. A hydrogel-based tissue mimicking material (TMM) has been developed that shows promise for such a phantom. The acoustic attenuation, speed of sound, B/A, thermal diffusivity and conductivity, as well as the cavitation threshold, were measured and found to mimic published values for soft tissue. The attenuation of 0.53f1.04 from 1 MHz to 8 MHz, as well as the sound speed of 1565 m/s and the tissue-like image quality, indicate the usefulness of the TMM for ultrasound imaging applications. These properties along with the thermal conductivity of 0.58 W/m- °C, diffusivity of 0.15 (mm2)/s, and the ability to withstand temperatures above 95 °C make this material appropriate for HIFU applications. The TMM also allows for the embedding of thermocouples and the formation of wall-less vessels that do not deteriorate as a result of continuous flow of blood mimicking fluids through the material. Tissue characteristics are strongly dependent on the fabrication technique, and care must be taken to achieve reproducible results. Note: This research was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

  8. Development of phantoms for spiral CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, D J; Levy, J R; Kasales, C

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new phantom for spiral CT. The phantom meets the increased demands on phantom z-axis uniformity in order that objects from the CT slice, immediately above and below the CT slice of interest, do not contribute perturbing information to the reconstructed CT slice. The phantom depends on formulation of tissue-like materials that can be cast and produced in both geometric and anthropomorphic shapes with sufficient z-axis length to enable unperturbed CT slices of test objects of interest. These materials are then used to produce a series of test objects of CT image quality including low contrast samples that do not require volume averaging or mixing of solutions, and that can reflect sub-slice thickness test objects and supra-slice thickness test objects. The overall phantom and its individual test objects provides meaningful tests of spiral CT image quality including slice sensitivity, CT number linearity and tests of high and low contrast resolution. Schematic designs and actual CT scans are shown. The new spiral phantom appears to meet the increased demands of spiral CT on phantom design, particularly z-axis length, and requirements for low contrast resolution test objects.

  9. Design and analysis of two-layer anonymous communication system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei-ping; WANG Jian-xin

    2007-01-01

    A new architecture for scalable anonymous communication system(SACS) was proposed. The users were divided into several subgroups managed by different sub-blenders, and all sub-blenders were managed by the main-blender using two layers management scheme. The identity information of members are distributed on different sub-blenders, which makes each member keep much less information and network overload greatly reduce. The anonymity and the overhead of the new scheme were analyzed and compared with that of Crowds, which shows the cost of storage and network overhead for the new scheme largely decreases while the anonymity is little degraded. The experiment results also show that the new system architecture is well scalable. The ratio of management cost of SACS to that of Crowds is about 1:25 while the value of P(I|H1+) only increases by 0.001-0.020, which shows that SACS keeps almost the same anonymity with Crowds.

  10. Dependences of optical properties of spherical two-layered nanoparticles on parameters of gold core and material shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovalov, V. K.; Astafyeva, L. G.; Zharov, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of nonlinear dependences of optical properties of spherical two-layered gold core and some material shell nanoparticles (NPs) placed in water on parameters of core and shell was carried out on the basis of the extended Mie theory. Efficiency cross-sections of absorption, scattering and extinction of radiation with wavelength 532 nm by core-shell NPs in the ranges of core radii r00=5-40 nm and of relative NP radii r1/r00=1-8 were calculated (r1-radius of two-layered nanoparticle). Shell materials were used with optical indexes in the ranges of refraction n1=0.2-1.5 and absorption k1=0-3.5 for the presentation of optical properties of wide classes of shell materials (including dielectrics, metals, polymers, vapor shell around gold core). Results show nonlinear dependences of optical properties of two-layered NPs on optical indexes of shell material, core r00 and relative NP r1/r00 radii. Regions with sharp decrease and increase of absorption, scattering and extinction efficiency cross-sections with changing of core and shell parameters were investigated. These dependences should be taken into account for applications of two-layered NPs in laser nanomedicine and optical diagnostics of tissues. The results can be used for experimental investigation of shell formation on NP core and optical determination of geometrical parameters of core and shell of two-layered NPs.

  11. Phantom cosmologies and fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Chimento, Luis P; Forte, Monica; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2007-01-01

    Form invariance transformations can be used for constructing phantom cosmologies starting with conventional cosmological models. In this work we reconsider the scalar field case and extend the discussion to fermionic fields, where the "phantomization" process exhibits a new class of possible accelerated regimes.

  12. 21. Phantom pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, A.P.; Vanduynhoven, E.; Kleef, M. van; Huygen, F.; Pope, J.E.; Mekhail, N.

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the p

  13. Standard operating procedure to prepare agar phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, R. M.; Santos, T. Q.; Oliveira, D. P.; Souza, R. M.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Agar phantoms are widely used as soft tissue mimics and some preparation techniques are described in the literature. There are also standards that describe the recipe of a soft tissue mimicking material (TMM). However some details of manufacture process are not clearly defined. The standardization of the phantom's preparation can produce a metrological impact on the results of the acoustic properties measured. In this direction, this paper presents a standard operating procedure (SOP) to prepare the agar TMM described on the IEC 60601-237.

  14. Pattern analysis of laser-tattoo interactions for picosecond- and nanosecond-domain 1,064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers in tissue-mimicking phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Keun Jae; Zheng, Zhenlong; Kwon, Tae Rin; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Hye Sun; Cho, Sung Bin

    2017-05-08

    During laser treatment for tattoo removal, pigment chromophores absorb laser energy, resulting in fragmentation of the ink particles via selective photothermolysis. The present study aimed to outline macroscopic laser-tattoo interactions in tissue-mimicking (TM) phantoms treated with picosecond- and nanosecond-domain lasers. Additionally, high-speed cinematographs were captured to visualize time-dependent tattoo-tissue interactions, from laser irradiation to the formation of photothermal and photoacoustic injury zones (PIZs). In all experimental settings using the nanosecond or picosecond laser, tattoo pigments fragmented into coarse particles after a single laser pulse, and further disintegrated into smaller particles that dispersed toward the boundaries of PIZs after repetitive delivery of laser energy. Particles fractured by picosecond treatment were more evenly dispersed throughout PIZs than those fractured by nanosecond treatment. Additionally, picosecond-then-picosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-picosecond treatment) induced greater disintegration of tattoo particles within PIZs than picosecond-then-nanosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-nanosecond treatment). High-speed cinematography recorded the formation of PIZs after repeated reflection and propagation of acoustic waves over hundreds of microseconds to a few milliseconds. The present data may be of use in predicting three-dimensional laser-tattoo interactions and associated reactions in surrounding tissue.

  15. Designing Two-Layer Optical Networks with Statistical Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, B.; Capone, A.; Carello, G.; Malucelli, F.; Fumagalli, M.; Pedrin Elli, E.

    The possibility of adding multi-protocol label switching (MPLS) support to transport networks is considered an important opportunity by telecom carriers that want to add packet services and applications to their networks. However, the question that arises is whether it is suitable to have MPLS nodes just at the edge of the network to collect packet traffic from users, or also to introduce MPLS facilities on a subset of the core nodes in order to exploit packet switching flexibility and multiplexing, thus providing induction of a better bandwidth allocation. In this article, we address this complex decisional problem with the support of a mathematical programming approach. We consider two-layer networks where MPLS is overlaid on top of transport networks-synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH) or wavelength division multiplexing (WDM)-depending on the required link speed. The discussions' decisions take into account the trade-off between the cost of adding MPLS support in the core nodes and the savings in the link bandwidth allocation due to the statistical multiplexing and the traffic grooming effects induced by MPLS nodes. The traffic matrix specifies for each point-to-point request a pair of values: a mean traffic value and an additional one. Using this traffic model, the effect of statistical multiplexing on a link allows the allocation of a capacity equal to the sum of all the mean values of the traffic demands routed on the link and only the highest additional one. The proposed approach is suitable to solve real instances in reasonable time.

  16. Characterization of a phantom setup for breast conserving cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Jacob T.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Collins, Jarrod A.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Miga, Michael I.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an anatomically and mechanically representative breast phantom for the validation of breast conserving surgical therapies, specifically, in this case, image guided surgeries. Using three patients scheduled for lumpectomy and four healthy volunteers in mock surgical presentations, the magnitude, direction, and location of breast deformations was analyzed. A phantom setup was then designed to approximate such deformations in a mock surgical environment. Specifically, commercially available and custom-built polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were used to mimic breast tissue during surgery. A custom designed deformation apparatus was then created to reproduce deformations seen in typical clinical setups of the pre- and intra-operative breast geometry. Quantitative analysis of the human subjects yielded a positive correlation between breast volume and amount of breast deformation. Phantom results reflected similar behavior with the custom-built PVA phantom outperforming the commercial phantom.

  17. Recipes to make organic phantoms for diffusive optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2013-04-10

    Three recipes are presented to make tissue constituent-equivalent phantoms of water and lipids. Different approaches to prepare the emulsion are proposed. Nature phantoms are made using no emulsifying agent, but just a professional disperser; instead Agar and Triton phantoms are made using agar or Triton X-100, respectively, as agents to emulsify water and lipids. Different water-to-lipid ratios ranging from 30% to 70% by mass were tested. A broadband time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy system was used to characterize the phantoms in terms of optical properties and composition. For some water/lipid ratios the emulsion fails or the phantom has limited lifetime, but in most cases the recipes provide phantoms with a high degree of homogeneity [coefficient of variation (CV) of 4.6% and 1.5% for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient, respectively] and good reproducibility (CV of 8.3% and 12.4% for absorption and reduced scattering coefficient, respectively).

  18. Copolymer-in-oil phantom materials for elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudry, J; Bastard, C; Miette, V; Willinger, R; Sandrin, L

    2009-07-01

    Phantoms that mimic mechanical and acoustic properties of soft biological tissues are essential to elasticity imaging investigation and to elastography device characterization. Several materials including agar/gelatin, polyvinyl alcohol and polyacrylamide gels have been used successfully in the past to produce tissue phantoms, as reported in the literature. However, it is difficult to find a phantom material with a wide range of stiffness, good stability over time and high resistance to rupture. We aim at developing and testing a new copolymer-in-oil phantom material for elastography. The phantom is composed of a mixture of copolymer, mineral oil and additives for acoustic scattering. The mechanical properties of phantoms were evaluated with a mechanical test instrument and an ultrasound-based elastography technique. The acoustic properties were investigated using a through-transmission water-substituting method. We showed that copolymer-in-oil phantoms are stable over time. Their mechanical and acoustic properties mimic those of most soft tissues: the Young's modulus ranges from 2.2-150 kPa, the attenuation coefficient from 0.4-4.0 dB.cm(-1) and the ultrasound speed from 1420-1464 m/s. Their density is equal to 0.90 +/- 0.04 g/cm3. The results suggest that copolymer-in-oil phantoms are attractive materials for elastography.

  19. The impact of anthropometric patient-phantom matching on organ dose: A hybrid phantom study for fluoroscopy guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Perry B.; Geyer, Amy; Borrego, David; Ficarrotta, Kayla; Johnson, Kevin; Bolch, Wesley E. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Radiology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32209 (United States); Department of Nuclear and Radiological/Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8300 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching for determining organ dose during fluoroscopy guided interventions. Methods: In this study, 27 CT datasets representing patients of different sizes and genders were contoured and converted into patient-specific computational models. Each model was matched, based on height and weight, to computational phantoms selected from the UF hybrid patient-dependent series. In order to investigate the influence of phantom type on patient organ dose, Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate two cardiac projections (PA/left lateral) and two abdominal projections (RAO/LPO). Organ dose conversion coefficients were then calculated for each patient-specific and patient-dependent phantom and also for a reference stylized and reference hybrid phantom. The coefficients were subsequently analyzed for any correlation between patient-specificity and the accuracy of the dose estimate. Accuracy was quantified by calculating an absolute percent difference using the patient-specific dose conversion coefficients as the reference. Results: Patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to heavy patients. In these cases, the improvement over using a reference stylized phantom ranged from approximately 50% to 120% for abdominal projections and for a reference hybrid phantom from 20% to 60% for all projections. For lighter individuals, patient-phantom matching was clearly superior to using a reference stylized phantom, but not significantly better than using a reference hybrid phantom for certain fields and projections. Conclusions: The results indicate two sources of error when patients are matched with phantoms: Anatomical error, which is inherent due to differences in organ size and location, and error attributed to differences in the total soft tissue attenuation. For small patients, differences in soft tissue attenuation are minimal and are exceeded by inherent anatomical differences

  20. Optical measurements of absorption changes in two-layered diffusive media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, Francesco [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering Center, Tufts University, 4 Colby Street, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Sassaroli, Angelo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering Center, Tufts University, 4 Colby Street, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Henry, Michael E [McLean Hospital and Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, 115 Mill Street, Belmont, MA 02478 (United States); Fantini, Sergio [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Bioengineering Center, Tufts University, 4 Colby Street, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2004-04-07

    We have used Monte Carlo simulations for a two-layered diffusive medium to investigate the effect of a superficial layer on the measurement of absorption variations from optical diffuse reflectance data processed by using: (a) a multidistance, frequency-domain method based on diffusion theory for a semi-infinite homogeneous medium; (b) a differential-pathlength-factor method based on a modified Lambert-Beer law for a homogeneous medium and (c) a two-distance, partial-pathlength method based on a modified Lambert-Beer law for a two-layered medium. Methods (a) and (b) lead to a single value for the absorption variation, whereas method (c) yields absorption variations for each layer. In the simulations, the optical coefficients of the medium were representative of those of biological tissue in the near-infrared. The thickness of the first layer was in the range 0.3-1.4 cm, and the source-detector distances were in the range 1-5 cm, which is typical of near-infrared diffuse reflectance measurements in tissue. The simulations have shown that (1) method (a) is mostly sensitive to absorption changes in the underlying layer, provided that the thickness of the superficial layer is {approx}0.6 cm or less; (2) method (b) is significantly affected by absorption changes in the superficial layer and (3) method (c) yields the absorption changes for both layers with a relatively good accuracy of {approx}4% for the superficial layer and {approx}10% for the underlying layer (provided that the absorption changes are less than 20-30% of the baseline value). We have applied all three methods of data analysis to near-infrared data collected on the forehead of a human subject during electroconvulsive therapy. Our results suggest that the multidistance method (a) and the two-distance partial-pathlength method (c) may better decouple the contributions to the optical signals that originate in deeper tissue (brain) from those that originate in more superficial tissue layers.

  1. Two-layer optical model of skin for early, non-invasive detection of wound development on the diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-02-01

    Foot ulceration is a debilitating comorbidity of diabetes that may result in loss of mobility and amputation. Optical detection of cutaneous tissue changes due to inflammation and necrosis at the preulcer site could constitute a preventative strategy. A commercial hyperspectral oximetry system was used to measure tissue oxygenation on the feet of diabetic patients. A previously developed predictive index was used to differentiate preulcer tissue from surrounding healthy tissue with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 80%. To improve prediction accuracy, an optical skin model was developed treating skin as a two-layer medium and explicitly accounting for (i) melanin content and thickness of the epidermis, (ii) blood content and hemoglobin saturation of the dermis, and (iii) tissue scattering in both layers. Using this forward model, an iterative inverse method was used to determine the skin properties from hyperspectral images of preulcerative areas. The use of this information in lowering the false positive rate was discussed.

  2. Adjustable fetal phantom for pulse oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubán, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2009-05-01

    As the measuring head of a fetal pulse oximeter must be attached to the head of the fetus inside the mother's uterus during labor, testing, and developing of fetal pulse oximeters in real environment have several difficulties. A fetal phantom could enable evaluation of pulse oximeters in a simulated environment without the restrictions and difficultness of medical experiments in the labor room. Based on anatomic data we developed an adjustable fetal head phantom with three different tissue layers and artificial arteries. The phantom consisted of two arteries with an inner diameter of 0.2 and 0.4 mm. An electronically controlled pump produced pulse waves in the arteries. With the phantom we investigated the sensitivity of a custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter at different pulsation intensity and artery diameters. The results showed that the oximeter was capable of identifying 4% and 2% changes in diameter between the diastolic and systolic point in arteries of over 0.2 and 0.4 mm inner diameter, respectively. As the structure of the phantom is based on reported anatomic values, the results predict that the investigated custom-designed wireless pulse oximeter has sufficient sensitivity to detect the pulse waves and to calculate the R rate on the fetal head.

  3. Non-Gaussian statistical properties of virtual breast phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Craig K.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Eckstein, Miguel P.; Boone, John M.

    2014-03-01

    Images derived from a "phantom" are useful for characterizing the performance of imaging systems. In particular, the modulation transfer properties of imaging detectors are traditionally assessed by physical phantoms consisting of an edge. More recently researchers have come to realize that quantifying the effects of object variability can also be accomplished with phantoms in modalities such as breast imaging where anatomical structure may be the principal limitation in performance. This has driven development of virtual phantoms that can be used in simulation environments. In breast imaging, several such phantoms have been proposed. In this work, we analyze non-Gaussian statistical properties of virtual phantoms, and compare them to similar statistics from a database of breast images. The virtual phantoms assessed consist of three classes. The first is known as clustered-blob lumpy backgrounds. The second class is "binarized" textures which typically apply some sort of threshold to a stochastic 3D texture intended to represent the distribution of adipose and glandular tissue in the breast. The third approach comes from efforts at the University of Pennsylvania to directly simulate the 3D anatomy of the breast. We use Laplacian fractional entropy (LFE) as a measure of the non-Gaussian statistical properties of each simulation. Our results show that the simulation approaches differ considerably in LFE with very low scores for the clustered-blob lumpy background to very high values for the UPenn phantom. These results suggest that LFE may have value in developing and tuning virtual phantom simulation procedures.

  4. Jamitons: Phantom Traffic Jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowszun, Jorj

    2013-01-01

    Traffic on motorways can slow down for no apparent reason. Sudden changes in speed by one or two drivers can create a chain reaction that causes a traffic jam for the vehicles that are following. This kind of phantom traffic jam is called a "jamiton" and the article discusses some of the ways in which traffic engineers produce…

  5. Jamitons: Phantom Traffic Jams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowszun, Jorj

    2013-01-01

    Traffic on motorways can slow down for no apparent reason. Sudden changes in speed by one or two drivers can create a chain reaction that causes a traffic jam for the vehicles that are following. This kind of phantom traffic jam is called a "jamiton" and the article discusses some of the ways in which traffic engineers produce…

  6. The Phantom brane revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    The Phantom brane is based on the normal branch of the DGP braneworld. It possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, but no big-rip future singularity. In this braneworld, the cosmological constant is dynamically screened at late times. Consequently it provides a good fit to SDSS DR11 measurements of H(z) at high redshifts. We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations on the brane. Perturbations of radiation, matter and the Weyl fluid are self-consistently evolved until the present epoch. We find that the late time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials φ, Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which φ = Ψ. On the Brane, by contrast, the ratio φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter dominated epoch (z ≤ 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large scale structure. The phantom brane also displays a pole in its equation of state, which provides a key test of this dark energy model.

  7. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation,...... appears to be similar to the phantom pain suffered by limb amputees. Patients should be informed about this potential complication before surgery.......Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...

  8. [Phantom holder of CT couch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruixia; Zhan, Hongyu; Wang, Di

    2014-03-01

    This article describes a phantom holder in CT couch which adjusted easily and accurately, installed easily. The holder mainly include removing and locking equipment between phantom holder and table top, move horizontally equipment between left and right, rotating equipment between left and right. After holder and table top fixed one part, holder with phantom can move horizontally, front and back, rotate between left and right in a small angle, in order to make operator test phantoms accurately and easily. At the same time, this phantom holder realized free adjustment after first adjustments, which shortened operator work time.

  9. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  10. Use of optical skin phantoms for calibration of dermatological lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Sekowska, A.; Marchwiński, M.; Galla, S.; Cenian, A.

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of dermatological diseases can be efficiently treated using laser heating. Nevertheless, before the new laser is introduced into clinical practice, its parameters and ability to interact with human skin have to be carefully examined. In order to do that optical skin phantoms can be used. Such phantoms closely imitate the scattering and absorption properties of real human skin tissue along with its thermal properties, such as capacitance and conductivity specific heat. We have fabricated a range of optical tissue phantoms based on polyvinylchloride-plastisol PVC-P with varying optical properties, including the absorption, scattering and density of the matrix material. We have utilized a pre-clinical dermatological laser system with a 975 nm diode laser module. A range of laser settings were tested, such as laser pulse duration, laser power and number of pulses. We have studied laser irradiation efficiency on fabricated optical tissue phantoms. Measurements of the temporal and spatial temperature distribution on the phantoms' surface were performed using thermographic imaging. The comparison of results between tissues' and phantoms' optical and thermal response prove that they can be used for approximate evaluation of laser heating efficiency. This study presents a viable approach for calibration of dermatological lasers which can be utilized in practice.

  11. The Phantom SPH code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel; Wurster, James; Nixon, Chris

    2016-05-01

    I will present the capabilities of the Phantom SPH code for global simulations of dust and gas in protoplanetary discs. I will present our new algorithms for simulating both small and large grains in discs, as well as our progress towards simulating evolving grain populations and coupling with radiation. Finally, I will discuss our recent applications to HL Tau and the physics of dust gap opening.

  12. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, Nadine N; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-01-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the unperfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid three-dimensional (3D) temperature mapping at 7T. The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature-sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA(-)) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2-4 minutes. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Color-matched esophagus phantom for fluorescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chenying; Hou, Vivian; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-02-01

    We developed a stable, reproducible three-dimensional optical phantom for the evaluation of a wide-field endoscopic molecular imaging system. This phantom mimicked a human esophagus structure with flexibility to demonstrate body movements. At the same time, realistic visual appearance and diffuse spectral reflectance properties of the tissue were simulated by a color matching methodology. A photostable dye-in-polymer technology was applied to represent biomarker probed "hot-spot" locations. Furthermore, fluorescent target quantification of the phantom was demonstrated using a 1.2mm ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope with concurrent fluorescence-reflectance imaging.

  14. SU-E-T-499: Comparison of Measured Tissue Phantom Ratios (TPR) Against Calculated From Percent Depth Doses (PDD) with and Without Peak Scatter Factor (PSF) in 6MV Open Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanasamy, G; Cruz, W; Gutierrez, Alonso; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Breton, C [Hospital Universitario de Canarias, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of measured tissue phantom ratios (TPR) values with TPR calculated from percentage depth dose (PDD) with and without peak scatter fraction (PSF) correction. Methods: For 6MV open beam, TPR and PDD values were measured using PTW Semiflex (31010) ionization field and reference chambers (0.125cc volume) in a PTW MP3-M water tank. PDD curves were measured at SSD of 100cm for 7 square fields from 3cm to 30cm. The TPR values were measured up to 22cm depth for the same fields by continuous water draining method with ionization chamber static at 100cm from source. A comparison study was performed between the (a) measured TPR, (b) TPR calculated from PDD without PSF, (c) TPR calculated from PDD with PSF and (d) clinical TPR from RadCalc (ver 6.2, Sun Nuclear Corp). Results: There is a field size, depth dependence on TPR values. For 10cmx10cm, the differences in surface dose (DDs), dose at 10cm depth (DD10) <0.5%; differences in dmax (Ddmax) <2mm for the 4 methods. The corresponding values for 30cmx30cm are DDs, DD10 <0.2% and Ddmax<3mm. Even though for 3cmx3cm field, DDs and DD10 <1% and Ddmax<1mm, the calculated TPR values with and without PSF correction differed by 2% at >20cm depth. In all field sizes at depths>28cm, (d) clinical TPR values are larger than that from (b) and (c) by >3%. Conclusion: Measured TPR in method (a) differ from calculated TPR in methods (b) and (c) to within 1% for depths < 28cm in all 7 fields in open 6MV beam. The dmax values are within 3mm of each other. The largest deviation of >3% was observed in clinical TPR values in method (d) for all fields at depths < 28cm.

  15. Validation study of the thorax phantom Lungman for optimization purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Pérez, Sunay; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Struelens, Lara; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-03-01

    This work aims to investigate the advantages and limitations of the Kyoto Kagaku thorax phantom Lungman for use in chest radiography optimization studies. First, patient survey data were gathered for chest posterior anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) examinations in a standard chest X-ray room over a period of one year, using a Caesium Iodide (CsI) based flat panel detector with automatic exposure control (AEC). Parameters surveyed included exposure index (EI), dose area product (DAP) and AEC exposure time. PA and LAT projections of the phantom were then compared to these values. Additionally, the equivalence in millimetres of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was established for the different regions of the Lungman phantom (lungs and mediastinum). Finally, a voxel model of the Lungman phantom was developed by the segmentation of a volumetric dataset of the phantom acquired using CT scanning. Subsequently, the model was used in Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE/penEasy code to calculate the energy deposited in the organs of the phantom. This enabled comparison of the phantom tissue-equivalent materials with materials defined by ICRP 89 in terms of energy deposition. For the survey data, close agreement was found between phantom and the median values for the patient data (deviations ranged from 4% to 31%, one outlier). The phantom lung region is equivalent to 89 mm to 106 mm of PMMA, depending on tube voltage. Energy deposited in the phantom material compared to those for ICRP defined material differed by at most 36% in AP irradiations and 49% in PA irradiations.

  16. Phantom stars and topology change

    CERN Document Server

    DeBenedictis, Andrew; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we consider time-dependent dark energy star models, with an evolving parameter $\\omega$ crossing the phantom divide, $\\omega=-1$. Once in the phantom regime, the null energy condition is violated, which physically implies that the negative radial pressure exceeds the energy density. Therefore, an enormous negative pressure in the center may, in principle, imply a topology change, consequently opening up a tunnel and converting the dark energy star into a wormhole. The criteria for this topology change are discussed, in particular, we consider the Morse Index analysis and a Casimir energy approach involving quasi-local energy difference calculations that may reflect or measure the occurrence of a topology change. We denote these exotic geometries consisting of dark energy stars (in the phantom regime) and phantom wormholes as phantom stars. The final product of this topological change, namely, phantom wormholes, have far-reaching physical and cosmological implications, as in addition to being use...

  17. Development of an autofluorescent probe for brain cancer: simulations and phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leh, B.; Charon, Y.; Duval, M.-A.; Jean, F.; Lefebvre, F.; Menard, L.; Vu Thi, M. H.; Siebert, R.

    2009-07-01

    Autofluorescence spectroscopy from brain tissue may help to discriminate cancerous from healthy tissue. The characteristics of our probe are studied on phantoms and confronted to Monte Carlo simulations. Geometrical origins of fluorescence light are evaluated.

  18. Investigations of Two-Layer Earth Parameters at Low Voltage: Measurements and Calculations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E. Ramdan; N. M. Nor; K. Ramar

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: The two-layer soil model at low magnitude voltage is assumed to be accurate for the measurement and calculation of the earth resistance of a combined grid-multiple rods electrode...

  19. The UF family of reference hybrid phantoms for computational radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD 20852 (United States); Lodwick, Daniel; Hurtado, Jorge; Pafundi, Deanna [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Williams, Jonathan L [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E [Departments of Nuclear and Radiological and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)], E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu

    2010-01-21

    Computational human phantoms are computer models used to obtain dose distributions within the human body exposed to internal or external radiation sources. In addition, they are increasingly used to develop detector efficiencies for in vivo whole-body counters. Two classes of computational human phantoms have been widely utilized for dosimetry calculation: stylized and voxel phantoms that describe human anatomy through mathematical surface equations and 3D voxel matrices, respectively. Stylized phantoms are flexible in that changes to organ position and shape are possible given avoidance of region overlap, while voxel phantoms are typically fixed to a given patient anatomy, yet can be proportionally scaled to match individuals of larger or smaller stature, but of equivalent organ anatomy. Voxel phantoms provide much better anatomical realism as compared to stylized phantoms which are intrinsically limited by mathematical surface equations. To address the drawbacks of these phantoms, hybrid phantoms based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces have been introduced wherein anthropomorphic flexibility and anatomic realism are both preserved. Researchers at the University of Florida have introduced a series of hybrid phantoms representing the ICRP Publication 89 reference newborn, 15 year, and adult male and female. In this study, six additional phantoms are added to the UF family of hybrid phantoms-those of the reference 1 year, 5 year and 10 year child. Head and torso CT images of patients whose ages were close to the targeted ages were obtained under approved protocols. Major organs and tissues were segmented from these images using an image processing software, 3D-DOCTOR(TM). NURBS and polygon mesh surfaces were then used to model individual organs and tissues after importing the segmented organ models to the 3D NURBS modeling software, Rhinoceros(TM). The phantoms were matched to four reference datasets: (1) standard anthropometric data, (2) reference

  20. Fabrication and characterization of phantoms made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Santiago-Alvarado, A.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Licona-Moran, B.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.

    2011-03-01

    The transparent elastomer Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) Sylgard 184 is increasingly used in optical applications, as in the manufacture of microlens, waveguides (optical fibers) and to elaborated phantoms (simulator of biological tissue); The wide range of applications is due to its excellent physic-chemical properties, its low cost, easy operation and null toxicity. This paper describes the manufacturing process and physic-chemical characterization of Phantoms prepared with PDMS as grid and doped with some elements present as Gliceryl, ink, glucose 10% and melanin provided by sigma aldrich. We made phantoms with different concentrations and elements; we measured their profiles, and thicknesses. Finally, we obtained their Raman Spectra. We present the experimental results obtained of the physic-chemical parameters of the phantoms and the conclusions.

  1. The Phantom of Liberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    One of the few things we have in common in contemporary society is the future of our children. But it seems that even the “we” of childhood, of learning and free play, has turned into a common ground for instrumentalization and competition. Today, the pedagogical paradox—Kant’s meditation...... on the paradox that the subject’s predisposition for freedom must be learned—is increasingly lost in governmental obsession about the efficiency of education and schooling. From another perspective, artists are addressing questions of childhood, play, and pedagogy. What ideological and moral transformations......? These are some of the questions addressed by The Phantom of Liberty, which sets out to reestablish a social and aesthetic dialogue between visual art and psychology, philosophy, pedagogy, and critical journalism....

  2. [Therapy of phantom limb pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Andreas; Zenz, Michael; Maier, Christoph

    2009-03-01

    About 80 % of all extremity amputations suffer from phantom limb pain following the operation. In this context, it is important to differentiate between painful phantom limb sensations, non-painful phantom limb sensations and residual limb pain. The pathophysiology of phantom limb pain is not fully understood. Current research findings ascribe a major pathophysiological role to cortical changes as well as a disturbed body perception. Peripheral and spinal mechanisms appear less relevant in the development of phantom limb pain. An essential part of the therapy is the pharmacological treatment with antidepressants, anticonvulsives and opioids. Another significant aspect of therapy is senso-motory training, important to mention here would be mirror therapy, lateralisation and motor imaging. In case of an elective amputation, an epidural or axiliar plexus catheter should be considered prior to the amputation. The perioperative treatment with ketamine is debated.

  3. Relative stopping power measurements to aid in the design of anthropomorphic phantoms for proton radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ryan L; Summers, Paige A; Neihart, James L; Blatnica, Anthony P; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael T; Followill, David S; Ibbott, Geoffrey S

    2014-03-06

    The delivery of accurate proton dose for clinical trials requires that the appropriate conversion function from Hounsfield unit (HU) to relative linear stopping power (RLSP) be used in proton treatment planning systems (TPS). One way of verifying that the TPS is calculating the correct dose is an end-to-end test using an anthropomorphic phantom containing tissue equivalent materials and dosimeters. Many of the phantoms in use for such end-to-end tests were originally designed using tissue-equivalent materials that had physical characteristics to match patient tissues when irradiated with megavoltage photon beams. The aim of this study was to measure the RLSP of materials used in the phantoms, as well as alternative materials to enable modifying phantoms for use at proton therapy centers. Samples of materials used and projected for use in the phantoms were measured and compared to the HU assigned by the treatment planning system. A percent difference in RLSP of 5% was used as the cutoff for materials deemed acceptable for use in proton therapy (i.e., proton equivalent). Until proper tissue-substitute materials are identified and incorporated, institutions that conduct end-to-end tests with the phantoms are instructed to override the TPS with the measured stopping powers we provide. To date, the RLSPs of 18 materials have been measured using a water phantom and/or multilayer ion chamber (MLIC). Nine materials were identified as acceptable for use in anthropomorphic phantoms. Some of the failing tissue substitute materials are still used in the current phantoms. Further investigation for additional appropriate tissue substitute materials in proton beams is ongoing. Until all anthropomorphic phantoms are constructed of appropriate materials, a unique HU-RLSP phantom has been developed to be used during site visits to verify the proton facility's treatment planning HU-RLSP calibration curve.

  4. Development of neonate phantom for estimating medical exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T. [Oita Univ. of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita (Japan); Mitarai, T.; Ono, K.; Hada, M.; Ninomiya, H.; Kato, Y. [Oita Prefectural Hospital, Oita (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The distribution and volume ratio of radiation sensitive organs such as red bone marrow are different between neonates and adults. In addition, the body sizes of neonates in NICU are smaller than normal neonates. Consequently, it is important to estimate a neonatal dose for X-ray examinations in NICU. However, there are few reports on quantitative estimates of measured or mathematically calculated doses for neonatal X-ray examinations. In order to estimate their dose, we made a physical neonatal phantom and estimated its dose using both measurement and calculation methods. In determining the phantom geometry, the body sizes were measured for neonates of NICU in Oita prefectural hospital. As body parameters, weights, heights and trunk sizes were obtained. The weight of phantom was determined to be 2000 g based on these data. The height of the phantom is 43.5 cm, and the trunk width is determined to be 9.5 cm. The whole shape was expressed with rectangular solids without bone region to avoid the difficulties on phantom construction and calculations. The height and other body size parameters were calculated as a function of body weight, which were determined as regression lines on these data. The weights of lungs were calculated using NIRS-M-115, and the positions were determined according to anatomical geometry. The components of the phantom were soft tissue and lung, and tough water and tough lung phantoms were selected as materials of the phantom. For the purpose of the dose measurement, the phantom was located in the incubator of NICU, and exposed under 4 kinds of the conditions of ordinary X-ray examination, which were for chest, combined abdomen-chest, abdomen and head radiographs using a portable X-ray machine. A film-badge was put on the center of exposed area for each examination, and measured entrance surface dose of the phantom. The glass dosimeters were also used. The measured doses of chest, combined abdomen-chest and abdomen were 0.1-0.12 mSv. The Monte

  5. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2009-07-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  6. Process analysis of two-layered tube hydroforming with analytical and experimental verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyedkashi, S. M. Hossein [The University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahizadeh R, Valiollah [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Xu, Haibin; Kim, Sang Yun; Moon, Young Hoon [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Two-layered tubular joints are suitable for special applications. Designing and manufacturing of two layered components require enough knowledge about the tube material behavior during the hydroforming process. In this paper, hydroforming of two-layered tubes is investigated analytically, and the results are verified experimentally. The aim of this study is to derive an analytical model which can be used in the process design. Fundamental equations are written for both of the outer and inner tubes, and the total forming pressure is obtained from these equations. Hydroforming experiments are carried out on two different combinations of materials for inner and outer tubes; case 1: copper/aluminum and case 2: carbon steel/stainless steel. It is observed that experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model obtained for estimation of forming pressure able to avoid wrinkling.

  7. Lie symmetry analysis and exact solutions of the quasigeostrophic two-layer problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihlo, Alexander; Popovych, Roman O.

    2011-03-01

    The quasigeostrophic two-layer model is of superior interest in dynamic meteorology since it is one of the easiest ways to study baroclinic processes in geophysical fluid dynamics. The complete set of point symmetries of the two-layer equations is determined. An optimal set of one- and two-dimensional inequivalent subalgebras of the maximal Lie invariance algebra is constructed. On the basis of these subalgebras, we exhaustively carry out group-invariant reduction and compute various classes of exact solutions. Wherever possible, reference to the physical meaning of the exact solutions is given. In particular, the well-known baroclinic Rossby wave solutions in the two-layer model are rediscovered.

  8. On stratification, barotropic tides, and secular changes in surface tidal elevations: Two-layer analytical models

    CERN Document Server

    Wetzel, Alfredo N; Cerovecki, Ivana; Hendershott, Myrl C; Karsten, Richard H; Miller, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    In this study the influence of stratification on surface tidal elevations in a two-layer analytical model is examined. The model assumes linearized, non-rotating, shallow-water dynamics in one dimension with astronomical forcing and allows for arbitrary topography. Both large scale (barotropic) and small scale (baroclinic) components of the surface tidal elevation are shown to be affected by stratification. It is also shown that the topography and basin boundaries affect the sensitivity of the barotropic surface tide to stratification significantly. In a companion paper it is shown that the barotropic tide in two-layer numerical models run in realistic global domains differs from its value in one-layer numerical models by amounts qualitatively consistent with analytic predictions from this paper. The analytical model also roughly predicts the sensitivity to perturbations in stratification in the two-layer domain model. Taken together, this paper and the companion paper therefore provide a framework to underst...

  9. Wave scattering by undulating bed topography in a two-layer ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. MAITI; B. N. MANDAL; U. BASU

    2009-01-01

    The problem of wave scattering by undulating bed topography in a two-layer ocean is investigated on the basis of linear theory. In a two-layer fluid with the upper layer having a free surface, there exist two modes of waves propagating at both the free surface of the upper layer and the interface between the two layers. Due to a wave train of a particular mode incident on an obstacle which is bottom-standing on the lower layer, reflected and transmitted waves of both modes are created by the obstacle. For small undulations on the bottom of the lower layer, a perturbation method is employed to obtain first-order reflection and transmission coefficients of both modes for incident wave trains of again both modes in terms of integrals involving the bed-shape function. For sinusoidal undulations, numerical results are presented graphically to illustrate the energy transfer between the waves of different modes by the undulating bed.

  10. THE WAVE-MAKING CHARACTERISTICS OF A MOVING BODY IN A TWO-LAYER FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wei

    2005-01-01

    The Wave-making characteristics of a moving body in a two-layer fluid with free surface is investigated numerically and experimentally. The numerical analysis is based on the modified layered boundary integral equation system. The wave characteristics on the free surface and interface generated by a moving sphere and an ellipsoid is numerically simulated in both finite depth and infinite depth of lower layer model. The numerical results of the sphere are compared with the analytical results for a dipole with the same velocity in a two-layer fluid of finite depth. The dependence of the wave systems and structures on the characteristic quantities is discussed. Three kinds of measurement techniques are used in model experiments on the internal waves generated by a sphere advancing in a two-layer fluid. The effects of the varying velocity and stratification on the wavelength, wave amplitudes and the maximum half angles of internal waves are analyzed qualitatively.

  11. Band splitting and relative spin alignment in two-layer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, A A

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the single-particle spectra of the low Hubbard zone in the two-layer correlated 2D-systems sharply differ in the case of different relative alignment of the layers spin systems. The behavior of the two-layer splitting in the Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8 sub + subdelta gives all reasons for the hypothesis on the possible rearrangement of the F sub z -> AF sub z alignment configuration, occurring simultaneously with the superconducting transition. The effects of the spin alignment on the magnetic excitations spectrum, as the way for studying the spin structure of the two-layer systems, are discussed by the example of homogenous solutions for the effective spin models

  12. Ultrasound evaluation of the cesarean scar: comparison between one- and two layer uterotomy closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, Julie; Madsen, Lene Duch; Uldbjerg, Niels

    Objectives: To compare the residual myometrial thickness and the size of the cesarean scar defect after one- and two layer uterotomy closure. Methods: From July 2010 a continuous two-layer uterotomy closure technique replaced a continuous one-layer technique after cesarean delivery...... at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Aarhus University Hospital. A total of 149 consecutively invited women (68 women with one-layer and 81 women with two-layer closure) had their cesarean scar examined with 2D transvaginal sonography (TVS) 6-16 months post partum. Inclusion criteria were non......-pregnant women with one previous elective cesarean, no post-partum uterine infection or uterine re-operation, and no type 1 diabetes. Scar defect width, depth, and residual myometrial thickness were measured on the sagittal plane, and scar defect length was measured on the transverse plane. Results: The median...

  13. Design of two-layer switching rule for stabilization of switched linear systems with mismatched switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan MA

    2014-01-01

    A two-layer switching architecture and a two-layer switching rule for stabilization of switched linear control systems are proposed, under which the mismatched switching between switched systems and their candidate hybrid controllers can be allowed. In the low layer, a state-dependent switching rule with a dwell time constraint to exponentially stabilize switched linear systems is given;in the high layer, supervisory conditions on the mismatched switching frequency and the mismatched switching ratio are presented, under which the closed-loop switched system is still exponentially stable in case of the candidate controller switches delay with respect to the subsystems. Different from the traditional switching rule, the two-layer switching architecture and switching rule have robustness, which in some extend permit mismatched switching between switched subsystems and their candidate controllers.

  14. Random Boundary Simulation of Pumping Groundwater on Two-layer Soft Soil Structure with Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on random theory,fluid dynamics,porous media and soil mechanics,the porosity and random characteristic of the two-layer soft soil in Wuhan region were studied in this paper.The random seepage coefficient on the two-layer soft soil was analyzed,and the seepage model and its random distribution function were given.The groundwater flow differential equations related to the two layer soft soil structure were also established.The evaluation procedure of effect boundary on the pumping water in deep foundation pit was put forward.Moreover,with an engineering example,the probability distribution on random boundary prediction for pumping water of foundation pit was computed.

  15. Dosimeter placement in the Rando phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, B.R.; Glaze, S.; North, L.B.; Bushong, S.C.

    1977-07-01

    Each section of the Alderson Rando phantom contains a tissue-equivalent plastic coating layer approximately 2 mm thick, applied to both faces. This compensates for material removed in the sawing process. Conventional use of thermoluminescent dosimeters positions them totally or partially within the coating layer. Analysis shows that, in the lung region, dosimeters placed in this layer received a dose averaging 39% lower than those placed at midsection. Where bony structures interfere, some dosimeters in the coating layer received an 18% higher dose than those at midsection. Therefore, positioning dosimeters at the center of a section is recommended.

  16. Lie symmetry analysis and exact solutions of the quasi-geostrophic two-layer problem

    CERN Document Server

    Bihlo, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The quasi-geostrophic two-layer model is of superior interest in dynamic meteorology since it is one of the easiest ways to study baroclinic processes in geophysical fluid dynamics. The complete set of point symmetries of the two-layer equations is determined. An optimal set of one- and two-dimensional inequivalent subalgebras of the maximum Lie invariance algebra is constructed. On the basis of these subalgebras we exhaustively carry out group-invariant reduction and compute various classes of exact solutions. Where possible, reference to the physical meaning of the exact solutions is given.

  17. Free surface simulation of a two-layer fluid by boundary element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weoncheol Koo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A two-layer fluid with free surface is simulated in the time domain by a two-dimensional potential-based Numerical Wave Tank (NWT. The developed NWT is based on the boundary element method and a leap-frog time integration scheme. A whole domain scheme including interaction terms between two layers is applied to solve the boundary integral equation. The time histories of surface elevations on both fluid layers in the respective wave modes are verified with analytic results. The amplitude ratios of upper to lower elevation for various density ratios and water depths are also compared.

  18. The Generalized Energy Equation and Instability in the Two-layer Barotropic Vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The linear two-layer barotropic primitive equations in cylindrical coordinates are used to derive a generalized energy equation, which is subsequently applied to explain the instability of the spiral wave in the model. In the two-layer model, there are not only the generalized barotropic instability and the super highspeed instability, but also some other new instabilities, which fall into the range of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the generalized baroclinic instability, when the upper and lower basic flows are different.They are perhaps the mechanisms of the generation of spiral cloud bands in tropical cyclones as well.

  19. Design and fabrication of a solid simplified head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Yukari; Imai, Daigo; Mizuno, Sho; Maki, Hiroshi; Shinozaki, Osamu; Yamada, Yukio

    1997-08-01

    Optical tomography aims to image the distribution of optical properties in human bodies by measuring transmitted light at skin surfaces. Pervious calculations and experiments have been mainly performed on phantoms with simple geometries such as slabs and cylinders, but for optical tomography it is inevitable to fully understand light propagation through and perform experiments using phantoms with complicated structures in three dimensions. Therefore, we need stable and realistic solid phantoms for experimental studies toward the goal of optical tomography. In this study, we have fabricated two types of solid phantoms which optically and anatomically simulate human heads. One has a shape and structures of a part of human head above eye plane, and the other has a more simplified shape of hemisphere. These phantoms consisted of five layers which corresponded to five tissue types in human head; i.e., skin, skull, clear CSF layer, gray matter and white matter. Size and optical properties were given according to those of human neonatal head. After taking original shapes from MRI images, prototypes of five layers were fabricated by a rapid prototyping based photolithography. Epoxy resin with titanium oxide particles as scatterers and green dye as absorber was cast into the molds of the prototypes to make optical phantoms. Absorbers simulating inhomogeneities were also embedded.

  20. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Odontalgia Atypical odontalgia, also known as atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a tooth or teeth, or in a site where teeth ...

  1. Phantom pain after eye amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-02-01

    To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation, orbital exenteration or secondary implantation of an orbital implant in the period between 1993 and 2003. A total of 267 patients were identified and invited to participate; of these, 173 agreed to participate. These patients' medical records were reviewed. A structured interview focusing on pain was conducted by a trained interviewer. Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19-88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2-46). Phantom pain was reported to be of three different qualities: (i) cutting, penetrating, gnawing or oppressive (n = 19); (ii) radiating, zapping or shooting (n = 8); (iii) superficial burning or stinging (n = 5); or a mixture of these different pain qualities (n = 7). The median intensity on a visual analogue scale, ranging from 0 to 100, was 36 (range: 1-89). One-third of the patients experienced phantom pain every day. Chilliness, windy weather and psychological stress/fatigue were the most commonly reported triggers for pain.   Phantom pain after eye amputation is relatively common. The pain appears to be similar to the phantom pain suffered by limb amputees. Patients should be informed about this potential complication before surgery. © 2010 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2010 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  2. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom.

  3. A two-layered approach to recognize high-level human activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Hu; G. Englebienne; B. Kröse

    2014-01-01

    Automated human activity recognition is an essential task for Human Robot Interaction (HRI). A successful activity recognition system enables an assistant robot to provide precise services. In this paper, we present a two-layered approach that can recognize sub-level activities and high-level activi

  4. Novel procedure to compute a contact zone magnitude of vibrations of two-layered uncoupled plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awrejcewicz J.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel iteration procedure for dynamical problems, where in each time step, a contacting plates' zone is improved, is proposed. Therefore, a zone and magnitude of a contact load are also improved. Investigations of boundary conditions' influence on externally driven vibrations of uncoupled two-layer plates, where for each of the layers, the Kirchhoff hypothesis holds, are carried out.

  5. Learning behavior and temporary minima of two-layer neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Anne J.; Hoen, Klaas; Hoen, Klaas; Wallinga, Hans

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the occurrence of temporary minima during training of a single-output, two-layer neural network, with learning according to the back-propagation algorithm. A new vector decomposition method is introduced, which simplifies the mathematical analysis of

  6. Bilateral telemanipulation With time delays: a two-layer approach combining passivity and transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Michel; Stramigioli, Stefano; Misra, Sarthak; Secchi, Cristian; Macchelli, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a two-layer approach is presented to guarantee the stable behavior of bilateral telemanipulation sys- tems in the presence of time-varying destabilizing factors such as hard contacts, relaxed user grasps, stiff control settings, and/or communication delays. The approach splits the con

  7. Coupling of Flexural and Longitudinal Damped Vibration in a Two-Layered Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pourroy

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In dynamics, the effect of varying the constitutive materials’ thickness of a two-layered beam is investigated. Resonance frequencies and damping variations are determined. It is shown that for specific thicknesses the coupling of longitudinal and flexural vibrations influences the global modal damping ratio significantly.

  8. OSL Based Anthropomorphic Phantom and Real-Time Organ Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Hintenlang, Ph.D

    2009-02-10

    The overall objective of this project was the development of a dosimetry system that provides the direct measurement of organ does in real-time with a sensitivity that makes it an effective tool for applications in a wide variety of health physics applications. The system included the development of a real-time readout system for fiber optic coupled (FOC) dosimeters that is integrated with a state-of-art anthropomorphic phantom to provide instantaneous measures of organ doses throughout the phantom. The small size of the FOC detectors and optical fibers allow the sensitive volume of the detector to be located at organ centroids (or multiple locations distributed through the organ) within a tissue equivalent, anthropomorphic phantom without perturbing the tissue equivalent features of the phantom. The developed phantom/dosimetry system can be used in any environment where personnel may be exposed to gamma or x-ray radiations to provide the most accurate determinations of organ and effective doses possible to date.

  9. A methodology for developing anisotropic AAA phantoms via additive manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Galarreta, Sergio; Antón, Raúl; Cazón, Aitor; Finol, Ender A

    2017-05-24

    An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent focal dilatation of the abdominal aorta at least 1.5 times its normal diameter. The criterion of maximum diameter is still used in clinical practice, although numerical studies have demonstrated the importance of biomechanical factors for rupture risk assessment. AAA phantoms could be used for experimental validation of the numerical studies and for pre-intervention testing of endovascular grafts. We have applied multi-material 3D printing technology to manufacture idealized AAA phantoms with anisotropic mechanical behavior. Different composites were fabricated and the phantom specimens were characterized by biaxial tensile tests while using a constitutive model to fit the experimental data. One composite was chosen to manufacture the phantom based on having the same mechanical properties as those reported in the literature for human AAA tissue; the strain energy and anisotropic index were compared to make this choice. The materials for the matrix and fibers of the selected composite are, respectively, the digital materials FLX9940 and FLX9960 developed by Stratasys. The fiber proportion for the composite is equal to 0.15. The differences between the composite behavior and the AAA tissue are small, with a small difference in the strain energy (0.4%) and a maximum difference of 12.4% in the peak Green strain ratio. This work represents a step forward in the application of 3D printing technology for the manufacturing of AAA phantoms with anisotropic mechanical behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Single-layer versus two-layer stamps for reduced pressure thermal nanoimprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenheim, Marc; Dhima, Khalid; Wang, Si; Steinberg, Christian; Scheer, Hella-Christin

    2015-11-01

    Low-pressure imprint is interesting to avoid stamp deformation, stamp failure as well as polymer recovery. When large-area stamps are prepared with a stepping procedure, low pressure is required to optimize the stitching. However, with low-pressure imprint, conformal contact between stamp and substrate is critical. Admittedly, the imprint pressure required for conformal contact depends on the stamp material and its thickness. To get an idea to which extent the imprint pressure can be reduced with a flexible stamp, we compared different stamp materials and stamp architectures, single-layer stamps and two-layer stamps. The two-layer stamps are replica stamps, where the structures were replicated in a thin layer of OrmoStamp, fixed by a backplane. On the background of plate theory, we deduce the pressure reduction compared to a Si stamp by calculating the respective pressure ratio, independent from geometries. In addition, temperature-induced issues are addressed which are of relevance for a thermal imprint process. These issues are related to the mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of the stamp and the substrate, and in case of a two-layer stamp, to the mismatch between the backplane material and the top layer. The latter results in temperature-induced stamp bending. On the basis of simple analytical calculations, the potential of single-layer stamps and two-layer stamps with respect to thermal imprint at reduced pressure is discussed and guidelines are provided to assess the imprint situation when replica stamps are used for imprint. The results demonstrate the attractiveness of two-layer stamps for reduced pressure nanoimprint, even in a temperature-based process.

  11. Biomedical phantoms. (Latest citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, construction, and evaluation of various anthropomorphic phantoms: mathematical or physical models or constructs simulating human tissue which are used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology. The radiation characteristics of phantom materials are addressed, simulating human body tissue, muscles, organs, bones, and skin. (Contains a minimum of 112 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Development of 5- and 10-year-old pediatric phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo Lima, V. J. de; Cassola, V. F.; Kramer, R.; Oliveira Lira, C. A. B. de; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W. [Department of Anatomy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Moraes Rego 1235, CEP 50670-901, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Department of Nuclear Energy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 1000, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 500, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil and Polytechnic School of Pernambuco, University of Pernambuco, Rua Benfica 455, CEP 50751-460, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is the development of reference pediatric phantoms for 5- and 10-year-old children to be used for the calculation of organ and tissue equivalent doses in radiation protection. Methods: The study proposes a method for developing anatomically highly sophisticated pediatric phantoms without using medical images. The 5- and 10-year-old male and female phantoms presented here were developed using 3D modeling software applied to anatomical information taken from atlases and textbooks. The method uses polygon mesh surfaces to model body contours, the shape of organs as well as their positions, and orientations in the human body. Organ and tissue masses comply with the corresponding data given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the 5- and 10-year-old reference children. Bones were segmented into cortical bone, spongiosa, medullary marrow, and cartilage to allow for the use of micro computer tomographic ({mu}CT) images of trabecular bone for skeletal dosimetry. Results: The four phantoms, a male and a female for each age, and their organs are presented in 3D images and their organ and tissue masses in tables which show the compliance of the ICRP reference values. Dosimetric data, calculated for the reference pediatric phantoms by Monte Carlo methods were compared with corresponding data from adult mesh phantoms and pediatric stylized phantoms. The comparisons show reasonable agreement if the anatomical differences between the phantoms are properly taken into account. Conclusions: Pediatric phantoms were developed without using medical images of patients or volunteers for the first time. The models are reference phantoms, suitable for regulatory dosimetry, however, the 3D modeling method can also be applied to medical images to develop patient-specific phantoms.

  13. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use.

  14. Generation of anatomically realistic numerical phantoms for optoacoustic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yang; Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Appleton, Catherine M.; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Because optoacoustic tomography (OAT) can provide functional information based on hemoglobin contrast, it is a promising imaging modality for breast cancer diagnosis. Developing an effective OAT breast imaging system requires balancing multiple design constraints, which can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, computer- simulation studies are often conducted to facilitate this task. However, most existing computer-simulation studies of OAT breast imaging employ simple phantoms such as spheres or cylinders that over-simplify the complex anatomical structures in breasts, thus limiting the value of these studies in guiding real-world system design. In this work, we propose a method to generate realistic numerical breast phantoms for OAT research based on clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The phantoms include a skin layer that defines breast-air boundary, major vessel branches that affect light absorption in the breast, and fatty tissue and fibroglandular tissue whose acoustical heterogeneity perturbs acoustic wave propagation. By assigning realistic optical and acoustic parameters to different tissue types, we establish both optic and acoustic breast phantoms, which will be exported into standard data formats for cross-platform usage.

  15. Waves induced by a submerged moving dipole in a two-layer fluid of finite depth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Wei; Dongqiang Lu; Shiqiang Dai

    2005-01-01

    The waves induced by a moving dipole in a twofluid system are analytically and experimentally investigated.The velocity potential of a dipole moving horizontally in the lower layer of a two-layer fluid with finite depth is derived by superposing Green's functions of sources (or sinks). The far-field waves are studied by using the method of stationary phase. The effects of two resulting modes, i.e. the surfaceand internal-wave modes, on both the surface divergence field and the interfacial elevation are analyzed. A laboratory study on the internal waves generated by a moving sphere in a two-layer fluid is conducted in a towing tank under the same conditions as in the theoretical approach. The qualitative consistency between the present theory and the laboratory study is examined and confirmed.

  16. Analysis of Two-Layered Random Interfaces for Two Dimensional Widom-Rowlinson's Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistical behaviors of two-layered random-phase interfaces in two-dimensional Widom-Rowlinson's model are investigated. The phase interfaces separate two coexisting phases of the lattice Widom-Rowlinson model; when the chemical potential μ of the model is large enough, the convergence of the probability distributions which describe the fluctuations of the phase interfaces is studied. In this paper, the backbones of interfaces are introduced in the model, and the corresponding polymer chains and cluster expansions are developed and analyzed for the polymer weights. And the existence of the free energy for two-layered random-phase interfaces of the two-dimensional Widom-Rowlinson model is given.

  17. Nonlinear dynamics at the interface of two-layer stratified flows over pronounced obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Cabeza, C; Bove, I; Freire, D; Marti, Arturo C; Sarasua, L G; Usera, G; Montagne, R; Araújo, M

    2008-01-01

    The flow of a two--layer stratified fluid over an abrupt topographic obstacle, simulating relevant situations in oceanographic problems, is investigated numerically and experimentally in a simplified two--dimensional situation. Experimental results and numerical simulations are presented at low Froude numbers in a two-layer stratified flow and for two abrupt obstacles, semi--cylindrical and prismatic. We find four different regimes of the flow immediately past the obstacles: sub-critical (I), internal hydraulic jump (II), Kelvin-Helmholtz at the interface (III) and shedding of billows (IV). The critical condition for delimiting the experiments is obtained using the hydraulic theory. Moreover, the dependence of the critical Froude number on the geometry of the obstacle are investigated. The transition from regime III to regime IV is explained with a theoretical stability analysis. The results from the stability analysis are confirmed with the DPIV measurements. In regime (IV), when the velocity upstream is lar...

  18. Nonstationary Axisymmetric Temperature Field in a Two-Layer Slab Under Mixed Heating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchin, I. N.; Timar, I.; Kolodii, Yu. A.

    2015-09-01

    With the use of the Laguerre and Hankel integral transforms, the solution of a two-dimensional initial-boundary-value heat conduction problem for a two-layer slab under mixed boundary conditions is constructed: one of the surfaces is heated by a heat flux distributed axisymmetrically in a circle of radius R and is cooled by the Newton law outside this circle. The solution of the problem is reduced to a sequence of infinite quasi-regular systems of algebraic equations. The results of numerical analysis of the temperature field in the two-layer slab made from an aluminum alloy and ceramicsare presented depending on the relative geometric properties of the components and cooling intensity.

  19. A Two-layer Model for the Simulation of the VARTM Process with Resin Distribution Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Wen-Bin

    2013-12-01

    Vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) is one of the important processes to fabricate high performance composites. In this process, resin is drawn into the mold to impregnate the fiber reinforcement to a form composite. A resin distribution layer with high permeability was often introduced on top of the fiber reinforcement to accelerate the filling speed. Due to the difference of the flow resistance in the resin distribution layer and the reinforcement as well as the resulting through thickness transverse flow, the filling flow field is intrinsically three-dimensional. This study developed a two-layer model with two-dimensional formulation to simulate the filling flow of the VARTM process with a resin distribution layer. Two-dimensional flow was considered in each layer and a transverse flow in the thickness direction was estimated between the two layers. Thermal analysis including the transverse convection was also performed to better simulate the temperature distribution.

  20. Estimation of apparent soil resistivity for two-layer soil structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassereddine, M.; Rizk, J.; Nagrial, M.; Hellany, A. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    High voltage (HV) earthing design is one of the key elements when it comes to safety compliance of a system. High voltage infrastructure exposes workers and people to unsafe conditions. The soil structure plays a vital role in determining the allowable and actual step/touch voltage. This paper presents vital information when working with two-layer soil structure. It shows the process as to when it is acceptable to use a single layer instead of a two-layer structure. It also discusses the simplification of the soil structure approach depending on the reflection coefficient. It introduces the reflection coefficient K interval which determines if single layer approach is acceptable. Multiple case studies are presented to address the new approach and its accuracy.

  1. TAILING WAVETRAIN GENERATION IN PRECURSOR SOLITON GENERATION IN TWO-LAYER FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zhaoting; Xu Hao; Samuel Shan-pu Shen

    2000-01-01

    A theory of tailing wavetrain generation for the precursor soliton generation in two-layer flow is presented by using averaged KdV equations(AKdV),which are derived by the authors in terms of Whitham's method of averaging[1,2].From the AKdV equations,group velocities of the tailing wavetrain generation are obtained by means of generating conditions of the tailing wavetrains,furthermore an analytical solution of the tailing wavetrain generation is found theoretically.A comparison between the theoretical and numerical results is carried out in the present paper,which shows that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the numerical ones,obtained from the fKdV equation in two-layer flow with the depth of unity in the rest.

  2. Asymptotic Modelling of Crystallisation in Two Layers Systems. Application to Methane Hydrate Formation in Batch Reactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Cournil, Michel; Herri, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    6 pages; This paper proposes to re-visit the problem of gas-liquid crystallization in the framework of a two-layer model and with the help of data coming from experiments on methane hydrate crystallization in a semi-batch reactor. Preliminary quantitative discussion of the order of magnitude of different effects makes possible realistic simplifications in the theoretical models. In particular, the role of the interfacial film is clearly defined. As previous authors did, we use a formulation i...

  3. Unidirectional light propagation through two-layer nanostructures based on optical near-field interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Naruse, Makoto; Ishii, Satoshi; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge; Hoga, Morihisa; Ohyagi, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Tsutomu; Tate, Naoya; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate direction-dependent polarization conversion efficiency, yielding unidirectional light transmission, through a two-layer nanostructure by using the angular spectrum representation of optical near-fields. The theory provides results that are consistent with electromagnetic numerical simulations. This study reveals that optical near-field interactions among nanostructured matter can provide unique optical properties, such as the unidirectionality observed here, and offers fundamental guiding principles for understanding and engineering nanostructures for realizing novel functionalities.

  4. Two-layer cold storage method for pancreas and islet cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasuhiro; Fujino

    2010-01-01

    The two-layer cold storage method (TLM) was f irst reported in 1988, consisting of a perfluorochemical (PFC) and initially Euro-Collins' solution, which was later replaced by University of Wisconsin solution (UW). PFC is a biologically inert liquid and acts as an oxygen-supplying agent. A pancreas preserved using the TLM is oxygenated through the PFC and substrates are supplied by the UW solution. This allows the pancreas preserved using the TLM to generate adenosine triphosphate during storage, prolonging ...

  5. SH-TM mathematical analogy for the two-layer case. A magnetotellurics application

    OpenAIRE

    J. Carcione; F. Poletto

    2017-01-01

    The same mathematical formalism of the wave equation can be used to describe anelastic and electromagnetic wave propagation. In this work, we obtain the mathematical analogy for the reflection/refraction (transmission) problem of two layers, considering the presence of anisotropy and attenuation -- viscosity in the viscoelastic case and resistivity in the electromagnetic case. The analogy is illustrated for SH (shear-horizontally polarised) and TM (transverse-magnetic) waves. In particular, w...

  6. On Theory of Dispersive Transport in a Two-Layer Polymer Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibatov, R. T.; Morozova, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    Dispersive transport of charge carriers in a two-layer polymer structure is modeled on the basis of the integrodifferential equation of hereditary diffusion. The model of multiple trapping in a bilayer is generalized to the case of an arbitrary density of localized states. With the help of an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm, curves of the transient current are calculated and their features are explained within the framework of a stochastic interpretation of the process.

  7. On two-layer models and the similarity functions for the PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An operational Planetary Boundary Layer model which employs similarity principles and two-layer patching to provide state-of-the-art parameterization for the PBL flow is used to study the popularly used similarity functions, A and B. The expected trends with stratification are shown. The effects of baroclinicity, secondary flow, humidity, latitude, surface roughness variation and choice of characteristic height scale are discussed.

  8. Two-layer cold storage method for pancreas and islet cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fujino, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The two-layer cold storage method (TLM) was first reported in 1988, consisting of a perfluorochemical (PFC) and initially Euro-Collins’ solution, which was later replaced by University of Wisconsin solution (UW). PFC is a biologically inert liquid and acts as an oxygen-supplying agent. A pancreas preserved using the TLM is oxygenated through the PFC and substrates are supplied by the UW solution. This allows the pancreas preserved using the TLM to generate adenosine triphosphate during storag...

  9. A Two Layer Approach to the Computability and Complexity of Real Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambov, Branimir Zdravkov

    2003-01-01

    We present a new model for computability and complexity of real functions together with an implementation that it based on it. The model uses a two-layer approach in which low-type basic objects perform the computation of a real function, but, whenever needed, can be complemented with higher type...... in computable analysis, while the efficiency of the implementation is not compromised by the need to create and maintain higher-type objects....

  10. Design of a novel digital phantom for EIT system calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    This paper presented the design method of a novel digital phantom for electrical impedance tomography system calibration. By current sensing, voltage generating circuitry and digital processing algorithms implemented in FPGA, the digital phantom can simulate different impedances of tissues. The hardware of the digital phantom mainly consists of current sensing section, voltage generating section, electrodes switching section and a FPGA. Concerning software, the CORDIC algorithm is implemented in the FPGA to realize direct digital synthesis (DDS) technique and related algorithms. Simulation results show that the suggested system exhibits sufficient accuracy in the frequency range 10 Hz to 2 MHz. With the advantages offered by digital techniques, our approach has the potential of speed, accuracy and flexibility of the EIT system calibration process.

  11. Phase transitions and kinetic properties of gold nanoparticles confined between two-layer graphene nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wu, Nanhua; Chen, Jionghua; Wang, Jinjian; Shao, Jingling; Zhu, Xiaolei; Lu, Xiaohua; Guo, Lucun

    2016-11-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors of gold nanoparticles confined between two-layer graphene nanosheets (two-layer-GNSs) are examined and investigated during heating and cooling processes via molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique. An EAM potential is applied to represent the gold-gold interactions while a Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential is used to describe the gold-GNS interactions. The MD melting temperature of 1345 K for bulk gold is close to the experimental value (1337 K), confirming that the EAM potential used to describe gold-gold interactions is reliable. On the other hand, the melting temperatures of gold clusters supported on graphite bilayer are corrected to the corresponding experimental values by adjusting the εAu-C value. Therefore, the subsequent results from current work are reliable. The gold nanoparticles confined within two-layer GNSs exhibit face center cubic structures, which is similar to those of free gold clusters and bulk gold. The melting points, heats of fusion, and heat capacities of the confined gold nanoparticles are predicted based on the plots of total energies against temperature. The density distribution perpendicular to GNS suggests that the freezing of confined gold nanoparticles starts from outermost layers. The confined gold clusters exhibit layering phenomenon even in liquid state. The transition of order-disorder in each layer is an essential characteristic in structure for the freezing phase transition of the confined gold clusters. Additionally, some vital kinetic data are obtained in terms of classical nucleation theory.

  12. Long-term persistence of oil from the Exxon Valdez spill in two-layer beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2010-02-01

    Oil spilled from the tanker Exxon Valdez in 1989 (refs 1, 2) persists in the subsurface of gravel beaches in Prince William Sound, Alaska. The contamination includes considerable amounts of chemicals that are harmful to the local fauna. However, remediation of the beaches was stopped in 1992, because it was assumed that the disappearance rate of oil was large enough to ensure a complete removal of oil within a few years. Here we present field data and numerical simulations of a two-layered beach with a small freshwater recharge in the contaminated area, where a high-permeability upper layer is underlain by a low-permeability lower layer. We find that the upper layer temporarily stored the oil, while it slowly and continuously filled the lower layer wherever the water table dropped below the interface of the two layers, as a result of low freshwater recharge from the land. Once the oil entered the lower layer, it became entrapped by capillary forces and persisted there in nearly anoxic conditions that are a result of the tidal hydraulics in the two-layered beaches. We suggest that similar dynamics could operate on tidal gravel beaches around the world, which are particularly common in mid- and high-latitude regions, with implications for locating spilled oil and for its biological remediation.

  13. Steady internal waves in an exponentially stratified two-layer fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Nikolay; Maltseva, Janna; Ivanova, Kseniya

    2016-04-01

    The problem on internal waves in a weakly stratified two-layered fluid is studied analytically. We suppose that the fluid possess exponential stratification in both the layers, and the fluid density has discontinuity jump at the interface. By that, we take into account the influence of weak continuous stratification outside of sharp pycnocline. The model equation of strongly nonlinear interfacial waves propagating along the pycnocline is considered. This equation extends approximate models [1-3] suggested for a two-layer fluid with one homogeneous layer. The derivation method uses asymptotic analysis of fully nonlinear Euler equations. The perturbation scheme involves the long wave procedure with a pair of the Boussinesq parameters. First of these parameters characterizes small density slope outside of pycnocline and the second one defines small density jump at the interface. Parametric range of solitary wave solutions is characterized, including extreme regimes such as plateau-shape solitary waves. This work was supported by RFBR (grant No 15-01-03942). References [1] N. Makarenko, J. Maltseva. Asymptotic models of internal stationary waves, J. Appl. Mech. Techn. Phys, 2008, 49(4), 646-654. [2] N. Makarenko, J. Maltseva. Phase velocity spectrum of internal waves in a weakly-stratified two-layer fluid, Fluid Dynamics, 2009, 44(2), 278-294. [3] N. Makarenko, J. Maltseva. An analytical model of large amplitude internal solitary waves, Extreme Ocean Waves, 2nd ed. Springer 2015, E.Pelinovsky and C.Kharif (Eds), 191-201.

  14. A two-layer flow model to represent ice-ocean interactions beneath Antarctic ice shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, V.; Payne, A. J.; Gregory, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a two-dimensional two-layer flow model that can calculate melt rates beneath ice shelves from ocean temperature and salinity fields at the shelf front. The cavity motion is split into two layers where the upper plume layer represents buoyant meltwater-rich water rising along the underside of the ice to the shelf front, while the lower layer represents the ambient water connected to the open ocean circulating beneath the plume. Conservation of momentum has been reduced to a frictional geostrophic balance, which when linearized provides algebraic equations for the plume velocity. The turbulent exchange of heat and salt between the two layers is modelled through an entrainment rate which is directed into the faster flowing layer. The numerical model is tested using an idealized geometry based on the dimensions of Pine Island Ice Shelf. We find that the spatial distribution of melt rates is fairly robust. The rates are at least 2.5 times higher than the mean in fast flowing regions corresponding to the steepest section of the underside of the ice shelf close to the grounding line and to the converged geostrophic flow along the rigid lateral boundary. Precise values depend on a combination of entrainment and plume drag coefficients. The flow of the ambient is slow and the spread of ocean scalar properties is dominated by diffusion.

  15. A two-layer flow model to represent ice-ocean interactions beneath Antarctic ice shelves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a two-dimensional two-layer flow model that can calculate melt rates beneath ice shelves from ocean temperature and salinity fields at the shelf front. The cavity motion is split into two layers where the upper plume layer represents buoyant meltwater-rich water rising along the underside of the ice to the shelf front, while the lower layer represents the ambient water connected to the open ocean circulating beneath the plume. Conservation of momentum has been reduced to a frictional geostrophic balance, which when linearized provides algebraic equations for the plume velocity. The turbulent exchange of heat and salt between the two layers is modelled through an entrainment rate which is directed into the faster flowing layer.

    The numerical model is tested using an idealized geometry based on the dimensions of Pine Island Ice Shelf. We find that the spatial distribution of melt rates is fairly robust. The rates are at least 2.5 times higher than the mean in fast flowing regions corresponding to the steepest section of the underside of the ice shelf close to the grounding line and to the converged geostrophic flow along the rigid lateral boundary. Precise values depend on a combination of entrainment and plume drag coefficients. The flow of the ambient is slow and the spread of ocean scalar properties is dominated by diffusion.

  16. A two-layer optimization model for high-speed railway line planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li WANG; Li-min JIA; Yong QIN; Jie XU; Wen-ring MO

    2011-01-01

    Line planning is the first important strategic element in the railway operation planning process,which will directly affect the successive planning to determine the efficiency of the whole railway system.A two-layer optimization model is proposed within a simulation framework to deal with the high-speed railway (HSR) line planning problem.In the model,the top layer aims at achieving an optimal stop-schedule set with the service frequencies,and is formulated as a nonlinear program,solved by genetic algorithm.The objective of top layer is to minimize the total operation cost and unserved passenger volume.Given a specific stop-schedule,the bottom layer focuses on weighted passenger flow assignment,formulated as a mixed integer program with the objective of maximizing the served passenger volume and minimizing the total travel time for all passengers.The case study on Taiwan HSR shows that the proposed two-layer model is better than the existing techniques.In addition,this model is also illustrated with the Beijing-Shanghai HSR in China.The result shows that the two-layer optimization model can reduce computation complexity and that an optimal set of stop-schedules can always be generated with less calculation time.

  17. Diffraction of Water Waves by A Vertically Floating Cylinder in A Two-Layer Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the diffraction of water waves by a vertically floating cylinder in a two-layer luid of a finite depth is studied. Analytical expressions for the hydrodynamic loads on the vertically floating cylinder are obtained by use of the method of eigenfunction expansions. The hydrodynamic loads on the vertically floating cylinder in a two-layer fluid include not only the surge, heave and pitch exciting forces due to the incident wave of the surface-wave mode, but also those due to the incident wave of the internal-wave mode. This is different from the case of a homogenous fluid. Some given examples show that, for a two-layer fluid system with a small density difference, the hydrodynamic loads for the surface-wave mode do not differ significantly from those due to surface waves in a single-layer fluid, but the hydrodynamic loads for the internal-wave mode are important over a wide range of frequencies. Moreover, also considered are the free surface and interface elevations generated by the diffraction wave due to the incident wave of the surface-wave and internal-wave modes, and transfer of energy between modes.

  18. Design of a head phantom produced on a 3D rapid prototyping printer and comparison with a RANDO and 3M lucite head phantom in eye dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael; Wartak, Andreas; Glanzer, Mathias; Dünkelmeyer, Martina; Hojreh, Azadeh; Hummel, Johann

    2017-02-13

    An anthropomorphic head phantom including eye inserts allowing placement of TLDs 3 mm below the cornea has been produced on a 3D printer using a photo-cured acrylic resin to best allow tissue equivalence. Thus Hp(3) can be determined in radiological and interventional photon radiation fields. Eye doses and doses to the forehead have been compared to an Alderson RANDO head and a 3M Lucite skull phantom in terms of surface dose per incident air kerma for frontal irradiation since the commercial phantoms do not allow placement of TLDs 3 mm below the corneal surface. A comparison of dose reduction factors (DRFs) of a common lead glasses model has also been performed. Eye dose per incident air kerma were comparable between all three phantoms (printed phantom: 1.40, standard error (SE) 0.04; RANDO: 1.36, SE 0.03; 3M: 1.37, SE 0.03). Doses to the forehead were identical to eye surface doses for the printed phantom and the RANDO head (ratio 1.00 SE 0.04, and 0.99 SE 0.03, respectively). In the 3M Lucite skull phantom dose on the forehead was 15% lower than dose to the eyes attributable to phantom properties. DRF of a sport frame style leaded glasses model with 0.75 mm lead equivalence measured were 6.8 SE 0.5, 9.3 SE 0.4 and 10.5 SE 0.5 for the RANDO head, the printed phantom, and the 3M Lucite head phantom, respectively, for frontal irradiation. A comparison of doses measured in 3 mm depth and on the surface of the eyes in the printed phantom revealed no difference larger than standard errors from TLD dosimetry. 3D printing offers an interesting opportunity for phantom design with increasing potential as printers allowing combinations of tissue substitutes will become available. Variations between phantoms may provide a useful indication of uncertainty budgets when using phantom measurements to estimate individual personnel doses.

  19. Construction tool and suitability of voxel phantom for skin dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: ptsiquei@ipen.b, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes a new software tool called 'SkinVop' which was developed to enable accurate voxel phantom skin dosimetry. A voxel phantom is a model used to describe human anatomy in a realistic way in radiation transport codes. This model is a three-dimensional representation of the human body in the form of an array of identification numbers that are arranged in a 3D matrix. Each entry in this array represents a voxel (volume element) directly associated to the units of picture resolution (pixel) of medical images. Currently, these voxel phantoms, in association with the transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), have provided subsidies to the planning systems used on the hospital routine, once they afford accurate and personalized estimative of dose distribution. However, these assessments are limited to geometric representations of organs and tissues in the voxel phantom, which do not discriminates some thin body structure, such as the skin. In this context, to enable accurate dosimetric skin dose assessment by the MCNP code, it was developed this new software tool that discriminates this region with thickness and localization in the voxel phantoms similar to the real. This methodology consists in manipulating the skin volume elements by segmenting and subdividing them in different thicknesses. A graphical user interface was designed to fulfill display the modified voxel model. This methodology is extremely useful once the skin dose is inaccurately assessed of current hospital system planning, justified justly by its small thickness. (author)

  20. A novel composite material specifically developed for ultrasound bone phantoms: cortical, trabecular and skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydra, A; Maev, R Gr

    2013-11-21

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, help in implementation, testing and calibrations. Phantoms are especially useful in developing new applications and training new doctors in medical schools. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc will require the phantom to be made of different physical properties. In this paper we introduce the properties of recently designed new materials for developing phantoms for ultrasonic human body investigation, which in today's market make up more than 30% in the world of phantoms. We developed a novel composite material which allows fabrication of various kinds of ultrasound bone phantoms to mimic most of the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to the ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain the physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time; moreover, these properties can be custom designed and created to suit specific needs. As a result, we introduce three examples of ultrasound phantoms that we manufactured in our laboratory: cortical, trabecular and skull bone phantoms. The paper also presents the results of a comparison study between the acoustical and physical properties of actual human bones (reported in the referenced literatures) and the phantoms manufactured by us.

  1. Shear Wave Speed Measurements Using Crawling Wave Sonoelastography and Single Tracking Location Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging for Tissue Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormachea, Juvenal; Lavarello, Roberto J; McAleavey, Stephen A; Parker, Kevin J; Castaneda, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Elastography provides tissue stiffness information that attempts to characterize the elastic properties of tissue. However, there is still limited literature comparing elastographic modalities for tissue characterization. This study focuses on two quantitative techniques using different vibration sources that have not been compared to date: crawling wave sonoelastography (CWS) and single tracking location shear wave elasticity imaging (STL-SWEI). To understand each technique's performance, shear wave speed (SWS) was measured in homogeneous phantoms and ex vivo beef liver tissue. Then, the contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and lateral resolution were measured in an inclusion and two-layer phantoms. The SWS values obtained with both modalities were validated with mechanical measurements (MM) which serve as ground truth. The SWS results for the three different homogeneous phantoms (10%, 13%, and 16% gelatin concentrations) and ex vivo beef liver tissue showed good agreement between CWS, STL-SWEI, and MM as a function of frequency. For all gelatin phantoms, the maximum accuracy errors were 2.52% and 2.35% using CWS and STL-SWEI, respectively. For the ex vivo beef liver, the maximum accuracy errors were 9.40% and 7.93% using CWS and STL-SWEI, respectively. For lateral resolution, contrast, and CNR, both techniques obtained comparable measurements for vibration frequencies less than 300 Hz (CWS) and distances between the push beams ( ∆x ) between 3 mm and 5.31 mm (STL-SWEI). The results obtained in this study agree over an SWS range of 1-6 m/s. They are expected to agree in perfectly linear, homogeneous, and isotropic materials, but the SWS overlap is not guaranteed in all materials because each of the three methods have unique features.

  2. Development of polygonal-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms: Lymphatic node modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thang, Ngyen Tat; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Among radiosensitive organs/tissues considered in ICRP Publication 103, lymphatic nodes are many small size tissues and widely distributed in the ICRP reference phantoms. It is difficult to directly convert lymphatic nodes of ICRP reference voxel phantoms to polygonal surfaces. Furthermore, in the ICRP reference phantoms lymphatic nodes were manually drawn only in six lymphatic node regions and the reference number of lymphatic nodes reported in ICRP Publication 89 was not considered. To address aforementioned limitations, the present study developed a new lymphatic node modeling method for the polygonal-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms. By using the developed method, lymphatic nodes were modelled in the preliminary version of ICRP male polygonal-surface phantom. Then, lymphatic node dose values were calculated and compared with those of the ICRP reference male voxel phantom to validate the developed modeling method. The present study developed the new lymphatic node modeling method and successfully modeled lymphatic nodes in the preliminary version of the ICRP male polygonal-surface phantom. From the results, it was demonstrated that the developed modeling method can be used to model lymphatic nodes in polygonal-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms.

  3. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647.

  4. Hybrid computational phantoms of the male and female newborn patient: NURBS-based whole-body models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Lodwick, Daniel [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hasenauer, Deanna [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Williams, Jonathan L [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Lee, Choonik [MD Anderson Cancer Center-Orlando, Orlando, FL 32806 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2007-07-21

    phantom is performed in three steps: polygonization of the voxel phantom, organ modeling via NURBS surfaces and phantom voxelization. Two 3D graphic tools, 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and Rhinoceros(TM), were utilized to polygonize the newborn voxel phantom and generate NURBS surfaces, while an in-house MATLAB(TM) code was used to voxelize the resulting NURBS model into a final computational phantom ready for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations. A total of 126 anatomical organ and tissue models, including 38 skeletal sites and 31 cartilage sites, were described within the hybrid phantom using either NURBS or polygon surfaces. A male hybrid newborn phantom was constructed following the development of the female phantom through the replacement of female-specific organs with male-specific organs. The outer body contour and internal anatomy of the NURBS-based phantoms were adjusted to match anthropometric and reference newborn data reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in their Publication 89. The voxelization process was designed to accurately convert NURBS models to a voxel phantom with minimum volumetric change. A sensitivity study was additionally performed to better understand how the meshing tolerance and voxel resolution would affect volumetric changes between the hybrid-NURBS and hybrid-voxel phantoms. The male and female hybrid-NURBS phantoms were constructed in a manner so that all internal organs approached their ICRP reference masses to within 1%, with the exception of the skin (-6.5% relative error) and brain (-15.4% relative error). Both hybrid-voxel phantoms were constructed with an isotropic voxel resolution of 0.663 mm-equivalent to the ICRP 89 reference thickness of the newborn skin (dermis and epidermis). Hybrid-NURBS phantoms used to create their voxel counterpart retain the non-uniform scalability of stylized phantoms, while maintaining the anatomic realism of segmented voxel phantoms with respect to organ shape, depth and

  5. Hybrid computational phantoms of the male and female newborn patient: NURBS-based whole-body models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hasenauer, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L.; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-07-01

    phantom is performed in three steps: polygonization of the voxel phantom, organ modeling via NURBS surfaces and phantom voxelization. Two 3D graphic tools, 3D-DOCTOR™ and Rhinoceros™, were utilized to polygonize the newborn voxel phantom and generate NURBS surfaces, while an in-house MATLAB™ code was used to voxelize the resulting NURBS model into a final computational phantom ready for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations. A total of 126 anatomical organ and tissue models, including 38 skeletal sites and 31 cartilage sites, were described within the hybrid phantom using either NURBS or polygon surfaces. A male hybrid newborn phantom was constructed following the development of the female phantom through the replacement of female-specific organs with male-specific organs. The outer body contour and internal anatomy of the NURBS-based phantoms were adjusted to match anthropometric and reference newborn data reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection in their Publication 89. The voxelization process was designed to accurately convert NURBS models to a voxel phantom with minimum volumetric change. A sensitivity study was additionally performed to better understand how the meshing tolerance and voxel resolution would affect volumetric changes between the hybrid-NURBS and hybrid-voxel phantoms. The male and female hybrid-NURBS phantoms were constructed in a manner so that all internal organs approached their ICRP reference masses to within 1%, with the exception of the skin (-6.5% relative error) and brain (-15.4% relative error). Both hybrid-voxel phantoms were constructed with an isotropic voxel resolution of 0.663 mm—equivalent to the ICRP 89 reference thickness of the newborn skin (dermis and epidermis). Hybrid-NURBS phantoms used to create their voxel counterpart retain the non-uniform scalability of stylized phantoms, while maintaining the anatomic realism of segmented voxel phantoms with respect to organ shape, depth and

  6. Phantom pain : A sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, Susanne; Bosmans, JC; Van der Schans, CP; Geertzen, JHB; Dijkstra, PU

    2004-01-01

    Purpose : To analyse how decisions to dichotomise the frequency and impediment of phantom pain into absent and present influence the outcome of studies by performing a sensitivity analysis on an existing database. Method : Five hundred and thirty-six subjects were recruited from the database of an o

  7. A computational phantom of head and neck - SISCODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa; Trindade, Bruno Machado; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: larissa.thompson@ig.com.br; bmtrindade@yahoo.com; campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    A computational voxel model of a head and neck adult male was built through the SISCODES code, in order to complement and to optimize the radiotherapic treatment in head and neck cancer, in terms of dosimetric evaluation and prediction. This computational simulator object, namely computational phantom, is a useful tool for the elaboration and simulation of the three-dimensional radiation planning. The present phantom was assembled based on information generated by photographic images of the visible human project. The images were digitalized and converted one by one to a matrix of voxel, in which tissues and its respective chemical composition were identified, with the helping of a biomedical and nuclear data bank including in SISCODES. A computational simulation of an external beam mimicking a Co-60 irradiator was prepared, reproducing a radiation window equivalent to one found in a lateral irradiation of a nasopharyngeal tumour in situ. Absorbed dose evaluation in the internal regions of the phantom are presented and demonstrated through spatial dose distribution, superimposed with the 2D phantom sections. The present article illustrates the possibility of generating information of the spatial dose distribution including all adjacent tissues, far from tumour, improving the radiodosimetry and creating the possibility of investigating neurological deficits, dysphagia, and speaking and hearing alterations, non evaluated in the present stage of radiation therapy of head and neck. (author)

  8. Development of anthropomorphic hand phantoms for personal dosimetry in 90Y-Zevalin preparation and patient delivering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciolini, R; d'Errico, F; Traino, A C; Paternostro, E; Laganà, A; Romei, C; Pazzagli, F; Del Gratta, A

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent hand phantoms were achieved to measure the extremity dose involved in Zevalin (90)Y-labelling and patient delivering procedure for radioimmunotherapy treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The extremity doses to hands and wrists of operators were measured by using thermoluminescent detectors mounted on the developed phantoms. Measurements of chest- and lens-equivalent doses performed on a Rando phantom are also reported.

  9. Psychophysical correlates of phantom limb experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, J

    1992-01-01

    Phantom limb phenomena were correlated with psychophysiological measures of peripheral sympathetic nervous system activity measured at the amputation stump and contralateral limb. Amputees were assigned to one of three groups depending on whether they reported phantom limb pain, non-painful phantom limb sensations, or no phantom limb at all. Skin conductance and skin temperature were recorded continuously during two 30 minute sessions while subjects continuously monitored and rated the intens...

  10. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  11. FINITE ELEMENT FOR STRESS-STRAIN STATE MODELING OF TWO-LAYERED AXIALLY SYMMETRIC SHELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Kurochka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Computation of composite material designs requires application of numerical methods. The finiteelement method usage is connected with surface approximation problems. Application of volumetric and laminar elements leads to systems with large sizes and a great amount of computation. The objective of this paper is to present an equivalent two-layer mathematical model for evaluation of displacements and stresses of cross-ply laminated cone shells subjected to uniformly distributed load. An axially symmetric element for shell problems is described. Method. Axially symmetric finite element is proposed to be applied in calculations with use of correlation for the inner work of each layer separately. It gives the possibility to take into account geometric and physical nonlinearities and non-uniformity in the layers of the shell. Discrete mathematical model is created on the base of the finite-element method with the use of possible motions principle and Kirchhoff–Love assumptions. Hermite element is chosen as a finite one. Cone shell deflection is considered as the quantity sought for. Main Results. One-layered and two-layered cone shells have been considered for proposed mathematical model verification with known analytical and numerical analytical solutions, respectively. The axial displacements of the two-layered cone are measured with an error not exceeding 5.4 % for the number of finite elements equal to 30. The proposed mathematical model requires fewer nodes to define the finite element meshing of the system and much less computation time. Thereby time for finding solution decreases considerably. Practical Relevance. Proposed model is applicable for computation of multilayered designs under axially symmetric loads: composite high-pressure bottles, cylinder shaped fiberglass pipes, reservoirs for explosives and flammable materials, oil and gas storage tanks.

  12. Phantom Dark Energy and its Cosmological Consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, Mariusz P

    2016-01-01

    I discuss the dark energy characterized by the violation of the null energy condition ($\\varrho + p \\geq 0$), dubbed phantom. Amazingly, it is admitted by the current astronomical data from supernovae. We discuss both classical and quantum cosmological models with phantom as a source of matter and present the phenomenon called phantom duality.

  13. Phantom limb pain and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S M

    1998-11-01

    Postamputation phenomena, including painful and nonpainful phantom sensations occur following loss of limbs and other body parts. Peripheral and central nervous system mechanisms play a role in persistent phantom pain. Understanding the pathophysiology of this syndrome has improved in recent years. Comprehensive evaluation and a multimodality treatment approach comprise the current standard of care of the patient with phantom pain.

  14. PECULIARITIES OF LAMB WAVE PROPAGATION THROUGH TWO-LAYERED THIN PLATE MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Baev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of the plate wave propagation through two-layered thin plate have been analyzed and formulas for velocity determination of the quickest plate mode have been proposed.  The ascertained interaction makes it possible   to determine coating layer thickness in accordance with the given and known elastic parameters of contacting materials. On the basis of the developed methodology experiments have been carried out that revealed qualitative and quantitative correspondence  between theoretical and experimental data. The paper shows a principle possibility for assessment  of  material separation surface by time propagation data of the investigated mode .

  15. Determination of homeostatic elastic moduli in two layers of the esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Hans; Liao, Donghua; Fung, Yuan Cheng

    2008-01-01

    for determination of incremental moduli in circumferential, axial, and cross directions in the two layers. The experiments are inflation, axial stretching, circumferential bending, and axial bending. The analysis takes advantage of knowing the esophageal zero-stress state (an open sector with an opening angle of 59......The function of the esophagus is mechanical. To understand the function, it is necessary to know how the stress and strain in the esophagus can be computed, and how to determine the stress-strain relationship of the wall materials. The present article is devoted to the issue of determining...

  16. A novel two-layer compact electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structure and its applications in microwave circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Ning(杨宁); CHEN; Zhining; (陈志宁); WANG; Yunyi; (王蕴仪); Chia; M.; Y.; W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a novel two-layer electromagnetic bandgap (EBG) structure. The studies on the characteristics of the cell are carried out numerically and experimentally. A lumped-LC equivalent circuit extracted from the numerical simulation is used to model the bandgap characteristics of the proposed EBG structure. The influences of geometric parameters on the operation frequency and equivalent LC parameters are discussed. A meander line high performance bandstop filter and a notch type duplexer are designed and measured. These EBG structures are shown to have potential applications in microwave and RF systems.

  17. A Two-Layered Model for Dynamic Supply Chain Management Considering Transportation Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimizu, Yoshitaka; Harada, Kana; Ozawa, Chisato; Iwamura, Koji; Sugimura, Nobuhiro

    This research proposes a two-layered model for dynamic supply chain management considering transportation constraint. The model provides a method for suppliers to estimate suitable prices and delivery times of products based on not only production schedules but also transportation plans in consideration of constraints about shipping times and loading capacities for transportation. A prototype of dynamic supply chain simulation system was developed and some computational experiments were carried out in order to verify the effectiveness of the model. The prototype system is available to determine suitable shipping times and loading capacities of transportation vehicles.

  18. Flows induced by sorption on fibrous material in a two-layer oil-water system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplina, T. O.; Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Stepanova, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The processes of sorption on fibrous materials in the open elliptic cell filled with a two-layer oil-water liquid at rest are investigated experimentally. When the sorption efficiency dependent on the type of material proves to be reasonably high, large-scale flows are formed in the liquid. In this case, the uniformity of distribution of oil is violated and the free surface of the water is partially restored. The trajectories of motion of individual oil droplets on a released water surface are tracked, and the transfer rates are calculated in various phases of the process.

  19. SH-TM mathematical analogy for the two-layer case. A magnetotellurics application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Carcione

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The same mathematical formalism of the wave equation can be used to describe anelastic and electromagnetic wave propagation. In this work, we obtain the mathematical analogy for the reflection/refraction (transmission problem of two layers, considering the presence of anisotropy and attenuation -- viscosity in the viscoelastic case and resistivity in the electromagnetic case. The analogy is illustrated for SH (shear-horizontally polarised and TM (transverse-magnetic waves. In particular, we illustrate examples related to the magnetotelluric method applied to geothermal systems and consider the effects of anisotropy. The solution is tested with the classical solution for stratified isotropic media.

  20. Solitary SH waves in two-layered traction-free plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeran-Maigre, Irini; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    A solitary wave, resembling a soliton wave, is observed when analyzing the linear problem of polarized shear (SH) surface acoustic waves propagating in elastic orthotropic two-layered traction-free plates. The analysis is performed by applying a special complex formalism and the Modified Transfer Matrix (MTM) method. Conditions for the existence of solitary SH waves are obtained. Analytical expressions for the phase speed of the solitary wave are derived. To cite this article: I. Djeran-Maigre, S. Kuznetsov, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  1. Variations in backscatter observed in PMMA whole-body dosimetry slab phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwahn, Scott O; Gesell, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is a useful material for dosimetry phantoms in many ways including approximate tissue equivalence, stability, accessibility and ease of use. However, recent studies indicate that PMMA may have some unanticipated variation in backscatter from one phantom to another. While the reasons behind the variations have not been identified, it has been demonstrated that the backscatter from one phantom to another may vary by as much as 15%, resulting in a dosemeter response variation of as much as 5%. This unexpected contribution to uncertainty in delivered dose to a dosemeter may be quite large compared to the normally estimated uncertainty, potentially causing problems with calibration and performance testing. This paper includes data supporting the differences in backscatter among phantoms, and results from tests on the phantoms performed in an effort to identify possible causes.

  2. Measurement of a multi-layered tear film phantom using optical coherence tomography and statistical decision theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinxin; Yuan, Qun; Zhang, Buyun; Xu, Ke; Tankam, Patrice; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A; Hindman, Holly B; Aquavella, James V; Suleski, Thomas J; Rolland, Jannick P

    2014-12-01

    To extend our understanding of tear film dynamics for the management of dry eye disease, we propose a method to optically sense the tear film and estimate simultaneously the thicknesses of the lipid and aqueous layers. The proposed method, SDT-OCT, combines ultra-high axial resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and a robust estimator based on statistical decision theory (SDT) to achieve thickness measurements at the nanometer scale. Unlike conventional Fourier-domain OCT where peak detection of layers occurs in Fourier space, in SDT-OCT thickness is estimated using statistical decision theory directly on the raw spectra acquired with the OCT system. In this paper, we demonstrate in simulation that a customized OCT system tailored to ~1 µm axial point spread function (FWHM) in the corneal tissue, combined with the maximum-likelihood estimator, can estimate thicknesses of the nanometer-scale lipid and micron-scale aqueous layers of the tear film, simultaneously, with nanometer precision. This capability was validated in experiments using a physical phantom that consists of two layers of optical coatings that mimic the lipid and aqueous layers of the tear film.

  3. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees: an epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; Van Der Schans, CP

    2000-01-01

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time elapsed since the amputation. The purposes of this study were to determine prevalence and factors associated with phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees in The Netherlands. Addition...

  4. Theories of multiple equilibria and weather regimes : A critical reexamination. II - Baroclinic two-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehelsky, Priscilla; Tung, Ka Kit

    1987-01-01

    Previous results based on low- and intermediate-order truncations of the two-layer model suggest the existence of multiple equilibria and/or multiple weather regimes for the extratropical large-scale flow. The importance of the transient waves in the synoptic scales in organizing the large-scale flow and in the maintenance of weather regimes was emphasized. The result shows that multiple equilibria/weather regimes that are present in lower-order models examined disappear when a sufficient number of modes are kept in the spectral expansion of the solution to the governing partial differential equations. Much of the chaotic behavior of the large-scale flow that is present in intermediate-order models is now found to be spurious. Physical reasons for the drastic modification are offered. A peculiarity in the formulation of most existing two-layer models is noted that also tends to exaggerate the importance of baroclinic processes and increase the degree of unpredictability of the large-scale flow.

  5. Photoacoustic investigation of the effective diffusivity of two-layer semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, J; Gurevich, Yu. G; Logvinov G, N; Rodriguez, P; Gonzalez de la Cruz, G. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-08-01

    In this work, the problem of the effective thermal diffusivity of two-layer systems is investigated using the photoacoustic spectroscopy. The experimental results are examined in terms of the effective thermal parameters of the composite system determined from an homogeneous material which produces the same physical response under an external perturbation in the detector device. It is shown, that the effective thermal conductivity is not symmetric under exchange of the two layers of the composite; i.e., the effective thermal parameters depend upon which layer is illuminated in the photoacoustic experiments. Particular emphasis is given to the characterization of the interface thermal conductivity between the layer-system. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se utiliza la espectroscopia fotoacustica para medir la difusividad termica de un sistema de dos capas. Los resultados experimentales son analizados en terminos de los parametros termicos efectivos determinados a partir de un material homogeneo, el cual produce la misma respuesta fisica bajo una perturbacion externa. Se puso particular enfasis en la caracterizacion de los efectos de interfase en el flujo de calor en el sistema de dos capas. Los resultados experimentales se comparan con el modelo teorico propuesto en este trabajo.

  6. Modelling of fast jet formation under explosion collision of two-layer alumina/copper tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Balagansky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Under explosion collapse of two-layer tubes with an outer layer of high-modulus ceramics and an inner layer of copper, formation of a fast and dense copper jet is plausible. We have performed a numerical simulation of the explosion collapse of a two-layer alumina/copper tube using ANSYS AUTODYN software. The simulation was performed in a 2D-axis symmetry posting on an Eulerian mesh of 3900x1200 cells. The simulation results indicate two separate stages of the tube collapse process: the nonstationary and the stationary stage. At the initial stage, a non-stationary fragmented jet is moving with the velocity of leading elements up to 30 km/s. The collapse velocity of the tube to the symmetry axis is about 2 km/s, and the pressure in the contact zone exceeds 700 GPa. During the stationary stage, a dense jet is forming with the velocity of 20 km/s. Temperature of the dense jet is about 2000 K, jet failure occurs when the value of effective plastic deformation reaches 30.

  7. Validation of the Two-Layer Model for Correcting Clear Sky Reflectance Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Evans, K. Frank; Vamal, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    A two-layer model was developed in our earlier studies to estimate the clear sky reflectance enhancement near clouds. This simple model accounts for the radiative interaction between boundary layer clouds and molecular layer above, the major contribution to the reflectance enhancement near clouds for short wavelengths. We use LES/SHDOM simulated 3D radiation fields to valid the two-layer model for reflectance enhancement at 0.47 micrometer. We find: (a) The simple model captures the viewing angle dependence of the reflectance enhancement near cloud, suggesting the physics of this model is correct; and (b) The magnitude of the 2-layer modeled enhancement agree reasonably well with the "truth" with some expected underestimation. We further extend our model to include cloud-surface interaction using the Poisson model for broken clouds. We found that including cloud-surface interaction improves the correction, though it can introduced some over corrections for large cloud albedo, large cloud optical depth, large cloud fraction, large cloud aspect ratio. This over correction can be reduced by excluding scenes (10 km x 10km) with large cloud fraction for which the Poisson model is not designed for. Further research is underway to account for the contribution of cloud-aerosol radiative interaction to the enhancement.

  8. Risks of an epidemic in a two-layered railway-local area traveling network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhongyuan; Hui, Pakming; Lin, Haiqing; Liu, Zonghua

    2013-01-01

    In view of the huge investments into the construction of high speed rails systems in USA, Japan, and China, we present a two-layer traveling network model to study the risks that the railway network poses in case of an epidemic outbreak. The model consists of two layers with one layer representing the railway network and the other representing the local-area transportation subnetworks. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we also study a simplified model that focuses on how a major railway affects an epidemic. We assume that the individuals, when they travel, take on the shortest path to the destination and become non-travelers upon arrival. When an infection process co-evolves with the traveling dynamics, the railway serves to gather a crowd, transmit the disease, and spread infected agents to local area subnetworks. The railway leads to a faster initial increase in infected agents and a higher steady state infection, and thus poses risks; and frequent traveling leads to a more severe infection. These features revealed in simulations are in agreement with analytic results of a simplified version of the model.

  9. Traffic dynamics on two-layer complex networks with limited delivering capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinlong; Han, Weizhan; Guo, Qing; Wang, Zhenyong

    2016-08-01

    The traffic dynamics of multi-layer networks has attracted a great deal of interest since many real networks are comprised of two or more layers of subnetworks. Due to its low traffic capacity, the average delivery capacity allocation strategy is susceptible to congestion with the wildly used shortest path routing protocol on two-layer complex networks. In this paper, we introduce a delivery capacity allocation strategy into the traffic dynamics on two-layer complex networks and focus on its effect on the traffic capacity measured by the critical point Rc of phase transition from free flow to congestion. When the total nodes delivering capacity is fixed, the delivering capacity of each node in physical layer is assigned to the degree distributions of both the physical and logical layers. Simulation results show that the proposed strategy can bring much better traffic capacity than that with the average delivery capacity allocation strategy. Because of the significantly improved traffic performance, this work may be useful for optimal design of networked traffic dynamics.

  10. Investigations of Two-Layer Earth Parameters at Low Voltage: Measurements and Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ramdan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The two-layer soil model at low magnitude voltage is assumed to be accurate for the measurement and calculation of the earth resistance of a combined grid-multiple rods electrode. The aim of this study is to measure and calculate the earth resistance of a combined grid-multiple rods electrode buried in a two-layer soil and to confirm the simplicity and accuracy of the used formula. Approach: Soil resistivity was measured using Wenner four point method. Advanced earth resistivity measurement interpretation techniques which include graphical curve matching based on master curves and an advanced computer program based on a genetic algorithm are used in this study. Results: Based on the resistivity data, the earth resistance value was calculated using the formulas obtained from the literature. Measurements of the earth resistance of the earthing system were also conducted using the fall of potential method. Conclusion/Recommendations: A very good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated earth resistance values. This research is the first time ever conducted where the measured earth resistance values are compared directly with the calculated earth values.

  11. Numerical simulation and analysis of complex patterns in a two-layer coupled reaction diffusion system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新政; 白占国; 李燕; 贺亚峰; 赵昆

    2015-01-01

    The resonance interaction between two modes is investigated using a two-layer coupled Brusselator model. When two different wavelength modes satisfy resonance conditions, new modes will appear, and a variety of superlattice patterns can be obtained in a short wavelength mode subsystem. We find that even though the wavenumbers of two Turing modes are fixed, the parameter changes have infl uences on wave intensity and pattern selection. When a hexagon pattern occurs in the short wavelength mode layer and a stripe pattern appears in the long wavelength mode layer, the Hopf instability may happen in a nonlinearly coupled model, and twinkling-eye hexagon and travelling hexagon patterns will be obtained. The symmetries of patterns resulting from the coupled modes may be different from those of their parents, such as the cluster hexagon pattern and square pattern. With the increase of perturbation and coupling intensity, the nonlinear system will con-vert between a static pattern and a dynamic pattern when the Turing instability and Hopf instability happen in the nonlinear system. Besides the wavenumber ratio and intensity ratio of the two different wavelength Turing modes, perturbation and coupling intensity play an important role in the pattern formation and selection. According to the simulation results, we find that two modes with different symmetries can also be in the spatial resonance under certain conditions, and complex patterns appear in the two-layer coupled reaction diffusion systems.

  12. Analysis and Control of Two-Layer Frenkel-Kontorova Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Wen-Yan; QU Zhi-Hua; GUO Yi

    2011-01-01

    A one-dimensional two-layer Frenkel-Kontorova model is studied.Firstly,a feedback tracking control law is given.Then,the boundedness result for the error states of single particles of the model is derived using the Lyapunov Method.Especially,the motion of single particles can be approximated analytically for the case of sufficiently large targeted velocity.Simulations illustrate the accuracy of the derived results.Recently,the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model,which describes a chain of classical particles interacting with its nearest neighbors and subjected to a periodic one-site potential,has become a useful tool to study nanotribology.[1-6] There are several generalizations of the FK model that have been introduced with the hope of understanding friction dynamics at nanoscale.These models include a manylayer model with harmonic interactions,the FrenkelKontorova-Tomlinson model (FKT) and the singlelayer model with harmonic interactions.%A one-dimensional two-layer Frenkel-Kontorova model is studied. Firstly, a feedback tracking control law is given. Then, the boundedness result for the error states of single particles of the model is derived using the Lyapunov Method. Especially, the motion of single particles can be approximated analytically for the case of sufficiently large targeted velocity. Simulations illustrate the accuracy of the derived results.

  13. Reverse-feeding effect of epidemic by propagators in two-layered networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayu, Wu; Yanping, Zhao; Muhua, Zheng; Jie, Zhou; Zonghua, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Epidemic spreading has been studied for a long time and is currently focused on the spreading of multiple pathogens, especially in multiplex networks. However, little attention has been paid to the case where the mutual influence between different pathogens comes from a fraction of epidemic propagators, such as bisexual people in two separated groups of heterosexual and homosexual people. We here study this topic by presenting a network model of two layers connected by impulsive links, in contrast to the persistent links in each layer. We let each layer have a distinct pathogen and their interactive infection is implemented by a fraction of propagators jumping between the corresponding pairs of nodes in the two layers. By this model we show that (i) the propagators take the key role to transmit pathogens from one layer to the other, which significantly influences the stabilized epidemics; (ii) the epidemic thresholds will be changed by the propagators; and (iii) a reverse-feeding effect can be expected when the infective rate is smaller than its threshold of isolated spreading. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the numerical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11135001, 11375066, and 11405059) and the National Basic Key Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100).

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HEAD-CUT WITH A TWO-LAYERED BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Gully erosion is one of the main causes of top soil loss, land deterioration and sources of sediment deposition in streams. Headcut often occurs in the gully erosion process when erodability of the soil layers varies, and the gully cuts through a hard layer at a point. A scouring hole appears downstream of the head cut which migrates upstream due to strong erosion in the scour hole. This paper presents numerical analyses of turbulent flow and sediment transport processes of a head-cut associated with a two-layer soil stratigraphic formation. The flow in the scour hole is three-dimensional induced by the water jet from the brink of the top layer; the sediment transport model considers sediment entrainment by the impinging jet, erosion underneath the hard layer and the retreat of the brink of the hard layer. The 3D flow simulation in the scour hole and the scouring process was verified with physical model data. The two-layer head cut migration is simulated with different flow and soil parameters, the trends of the simulated results reasonably revealed contributions of these parameters to the scouring and migration process.

  15. Two-layer wireless distributed sensor/control network based on RF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Lin, Yuchi; Zhou, Jingjing; Dong, Guimei; Xia, Guisuo

    2006-11-01

    A project of embedded Wireless Distributed Sensor/Control Network (WDSCN) based on RF is presented after analyzing the disadvantages of traditional measure and control system. Because of high-cost and complexity, such wireless techniques as Bluetooth and WiFi can't meet the needs of WDSCN. The two-layer WDSCN is designed based on RF technique, which operates in the ISM free frequency channel with low power and high transmission speed. Also the network is low cost, portable and moveable, integrated with the technologies of computer network, sensor, microprocessor and wireless communications. The two-layer network topology is selected in the system; a simple but efficient self-organization net protocol is designed to fit the periodic data collection, event-driven and store-and-forward. Furthermore, adaptive frequency hopping technique is adopted for anti-jamming apparently. The problems about power reduction and synchronization of data in wireless system are solved efficiently. Based on the discussion above, a measure and control network is set up to control such typical instruments and sensors as temperature sensor and signal converter, collect data, and monitor environmental parameters around. This system works well in different rooms. Experiment results show that the system provides an efficient solution to WDSCN through wireless links, with high efficiency, low power, high stability, flexibility and wide working range.

  16. Development of skeletal system for mesh-type ICRP reference adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Wang, Zhao Jun; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Chung, Beom Sun; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-10-01

    The reference adult computational phantoms of the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) described in Publication 110 are voxel-type computational phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of adult male and female patients. The voxel resolutions of these phantoms are in the order of a few millimeters and smaller tissues such as the eye lens, the skin, and the walls of some organs cannot be properly defined in the phantoms, resulting in limitations in dose coefficient calculations for weakly penetrating radiations. In order to address the limitations of the ICRP-110 phantoms, an ICRP Task Group has been recently formulated and the voxel phantoms are now being converted to a high-quality mesh format. As a part of the conversion project, in the present study, the skeleton models, one of the most important and complex organs of the body, were constructed. The constructed skeleton models were then tested by calculating red bone marrow (RBM) and endosteum dose coefficients (DCs) for broad parallel beams of photons and electrons and comparing the calculated values with those of the original ICRP-110 phantoms. The results show that for the photon exposures, there is a generally good agreement in the DCs between the mesh-type phantoms and the original voxel-type ICRP-110 phantoms; that is, the dose discrepancies were less than 7% in all cases except for the 0.03 MeV cases, for which the maximum difference was 14%. On the other hand, for the electron exposures (⩽4 MeV), the DCs of the mesh-type phantoms deviate from those of the ICRP-110 phantoms by up to ~1600 times at 0.03 MeV, which is indeed due to the improvement of the skeletal anatomy of the developed skeleton mesh models.

  17. S values for 131I based on the ICRP adult voxel phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, Andre; Moroz, Brian E.; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-01-01

    To improve the estimates of organ doses from nuclear medicine procedures using 131I, the authors calculated a comprehensive set of 131I S values, defined as absorbed doses in target tissues per unit of nuclear transition in source regions, for different source and target combinations. The authors used the latest reference adult male and female voxel phantoms published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 110) and the 131I photon and electron spectra from the ICRP Publication 107 to perform Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations using MCNPX2.7 to compute the S values. For each phantom, the authors simulated 55 source regions with an assumed uniform distribution of 131I. They computed the S values for 42 target tissues directly, without calculating specific absorbed fractions. From these calculations, the authors derived a comprehensive set of S values for 131I for 55 source regions and 42 target tissues in the ICRP male and female voxel phantoms. Compared with the stylised phantoms from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that consist of 22 source regions and 24 target regions, the new data set includes 1662 additional S values corresponding to additional combinations of source–target tissues that are not available in the stylised phantoms. In a comparison of S values derived from the ICRP and ORNL phantoms, the authors found that the S values to the radiosensitive tissues in the ICRP phantoms were 1.1 (median, female) and 1.3 (median, male) times greater than the values based on the ORNL phantoms. However, for several source–target pairs, the difference was up to 10-fold. The new set of S values can be applied prospectively or retrospectively to the calculation of radiation doses in adults internally exposed to 131I, including nuclear medicine patients treated for thyroid cancer or hyperthyroidism. PMID:25829162

  18. Phantom limb syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Lama; Kanazi, Ghassan

    2007-06-01

    Phantom limb syndrome is a condition in which patients experience sensations, whether painful or otherwise, in a limb that does not exist. It has been reported to occur in 80-100% of amputees, and typically has a chronic course, often resistant to treatment. Risk factors include the presence of preoperative pain, traumatic amputation, and the type of anesthetic procedure used during amputation. Several pathophysiologic theories have been proposed, including spinal mechanisms, central sensitization, and somatosensory cortical rearrangements, and while recent studies have shed light on some interesting and significant data, a lot remains to be understood. Treatments include pharmacologic, mechanical, and behavioral modalities, but substantial efficacy in well-designed, randomized controlled trials has yet to be demonstrated. Phantom limb syndrome continues to be a difficult condition to both understand and treat.

  19. Complex Lagrangians and phantom cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianov, A A; Kamenshchik, A Yu

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by the generalization of quantum theory for the case of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians with PT symmetry, we show how a classical cosmological model describes a smooth transition from ordinary dark energy to the phantom one. The model is based on a classical complex Lagrangian of a scalar field. Specific symmetry properties analogous to PT in non-Hermitian quantum mechanics lead to purely real equation of motion.

  20. Photoacoustic perfusion measurements: a comparison with power Doppler in phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heres, H. M.; Arabul, M. Ü.; Tchang, B. C.; van de Vosse, F. N.; Rutten, M. C.; Lopata, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-based measurements using Doppler, contrast, and more recently photoacoustics (PA), have emerged as techniques for tissue perfusion measurements. In this study, the feasibility of in vitro perfusion measurements with a fully integrated, hand-held, photoacoustic probe was investigated and compared to Power Doppler (PD). Three cylindrical polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were made (diameter = 15 mm) containing 100, 200 and 400 parallel polysulfone tubes (diameter = 0.2 mm), resulting in a perfused cross-sectional area of 1.8, 3.6 and 7.1% respectively. Each phantom was perfused with porcine blood (15 mL/min). Cross-sectional PA images (λ = 805nm, frame rate = 10Hz) and PD images (PRF = 750Hz) were acquired with a MyLab One and MyLab 70 scanner (Esaote, NL), respectively. Data were averaged over 70 frames. The average PA signal intensity was calculated in a region-of-interest of 4 mm by 6 mm. The percentage of colored PD pixels was measured in the entire phantom region. The average signal intensity of the PA images increased linearly with perfusion density, being 0.54 (+/- 0.01), 0.56 (+/- 0.01), 0.58 (+/- 0.01) with an average background signal of 0.53 in the three phantoms, respectively. For PD, the percentage of colored pixels in the phantom area (1.5% (+/- 0.2%), 4.4% (+/- 0.2%), 13.7% (+/- 0.8%)) also increased linearly. The preliminary results suggest that PA, like PD, is capable of detecting an increase of blood volume in tissue. In the future, in vivo measurements will be explored, although validation will be more complex.

  1. Artificial Human Phantoms: Human proxy in testing microwave apparatus that have electromagnetic interaction with the human body

    CERN Document Server

    Mobashsher, A T

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, an effort is made in this review to address different state-of-the-art artificial tissue emulating (ATE) materials and phantom types for various operating frequencies, and fabrication procedures in order to have a better understanding of the pros and cons of various ATE phantoms which leads us to develop superior version of artificial human body substitute for various applications.

  2. Development of PIMAL: Mathematical Phantom with Moving Arms and Legs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, Hatice [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, Keith F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The computational model of the human anatomy (phantom) has gone through many revisions since its initial development in the 1970s. The computational phantom model currently used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is based on a model published in 1974. Hence, the phantom model used by the NRC staff was missing some organs (e.g., neck, esophagus) and tissues. Further, locations of some organs were inappropriate (e.g., thyroid).Moreover, all the computational phantoms were assumed to be in the vertical-upright position. However, many occupational radiation exposures occur with the worker in other positions. In the first phase of this work, updates on the computational phantom models were reviewed and a revised phantom model, which includes the updates for the relevant organs and compositions, was identified. This revised model was adopted as the starting point for this development work, and hence a series of radiation transport computations, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5, was performed. The computational results were compared against values reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) in Publication 74. For some of the organs (e.g., thyroid), there were discrepancies between the computed values and the results reported in ICRP-74. The reasons behind these discrepancies have been investigated and are discussed in this report.Additionally, sensitivity computations were performed to determine the sensitivity of the organ doses for certain parameters, including composition and cross sections used in the simulations. To assess the dose for more realistic exposure configurations, the phantom model was revised to enable flexible positioning of the arms and legs. Furthermore, to reduce the user time for analyses, a graphical user interface (GUI) was developed. The GUI can be used to visualize the positioning of the arms and legs as desired posture is achieved to generate the input file, invoke the computations, and extract the organ dose

  3. Comparison of organic phantom recipes and characterization by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, G.; Pifferi, A.; Bargigia, I.; Farina, A.; Cubeddu, R.; Taroni, P.

    2013-06-01

    Three recipes for tissue constituent-equivalent phantoms of water and lipids are presented. Nature phantoms are made using no emulsifying agent, but just a professional disperser, instead Agar and Triton phantoms are made using agar or Triton X-100, respectively, as agents to emulsify water and lipids. Different water-to-lipid ratios ranging from 30 to 70 percent by mass are proposed and tested. Optical characterization by time-resolved spectroscopy was performed in terms of optical properties, homogeneity, reproducibility and composition retrieval.

  4. Mammographic density descriptors of novel phantom images: effect of clustered lumpy backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick C.; Ryan, Elaine

    2014-03-01

    Mammographic breast density (MBD) is a risk factor for breast cancer. Both qualitative and quantitative methods have been used to evaluate MBD. However as it is impossible to measure the actual weight or volume of fibroglandular tissue evident on a mammogram, therefore it is hard to know the true correlation between measured mammographic density and the fibroglandular tissue volume. A phantom system has been developed that represents glandular tissue within an adipose tissue structure. Although a previous study has found strong correlation between the synthesised glandular mass and several image descriptors, it is not known if the correlation is still present when a high level of background noise is introduced. The background noise is required to more realistically simulate clinical image appearance. The aim of this study is to investigate if the correlation between percentage density, integrated density, and standard deviation of mean grey value of the whole phantom and simulated glandular tissue mass is affected by background noise being added to the phantom images. For a set of one hundred phantom mammographic images, clustered lumpy backgrounds were synthesised and superimposed onto phantom images. The correlation between the synthesised glandular mass and the image descriptors were calculated. The results showed the correlation is strong and statistically significant for the above three descriptors with r is 0.7597, 0.8208, and 0.7167 respectively. This indicates these descriptors may be used to assess breast fibroglandular tissue content of the breast using mammographic images.

  5. Effect of surface topographic features on the optical properties of skin: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangli; Chen, Jianfeng; Zhao, Zuhua; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Erbao; Chu, Jiaru; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-10-01

    Tissue-simulating phantoms are used to validate and calibrate optical imaging systems and to understand light transport in biological tissue. Light propagation in a strongly turbid medium such as skin tissue experiences multiple scattering and diffuse reflection from the surface. Surface roughness introduces phase shifts and optical path length differences for light which is scattered within the skin tissue and reflected from the surface. In this paper, we study the effect of mismatched surface roughness on optical measurement and subsequent determination of optical properties of skin tissue. A series of phantoms with controlled surface features and optical properties corresponding to normal human skin are fabricated. The fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantoms with known surface roughness follows a standard soft lithography process. Surface roughness of skin-simulating phantoms are measured with Bruker stylus profiler. The diffuse reflectance of the phantom is validated by a UV/VIS spectrophotometer. The results show that surface texture and roughness have considerable influence on the optical characteristics of skin. This study suggests that surface roughness should be considered as an important contributing factor for the determination of tissue optical properties.

  6. Role of phantoms in progress of medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanada, Shuji [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Importance of phantoms in medical imaging was discussed from the aspect of quality control/assurance which consisting of accuracy management and performance assessment of the imaging apparatuses. Phantoms have played significant roles in progress of nuclear medicine. Medical images would be classified in the two: morphological ones as represented by X-ray CT and MRI and functional ones by PET and SPECT. The roles of phantoms played are those for evaluation of organ/tissue exposure dose due to the administered radiopharmaceuticals, for evaluation of accuracy management and performance assessment of apparatuses (I.e., homogeneity and stability of the sensitivity, linearity between measured value and radioactivity and assessment of spacial resolution in the reconstructed images), for evaluation of reconstructed images as quantitatively-assessed functional ones, for evaluation of cross calibration among multiple apparatuses and for validation of tracer kinetic model analysis. In summary, phantoms in medical imaging are useful in the assessment of accurate performance, in the assurance of reliability of results, in the comparison of quantitative repeated or inter-individual examination results and in the quantitative evaluation of the function of small structures like the basal ganglia and thalamus. (K.H.)

  7. MRXCAT: Realistic numerical phantoms for cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmann, Lukas; Santelli, Claudio; Segars, William P; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2014-08-20

    Computer simulations are important for validating novel image acquisition and reconstruction strategies. In cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), numerical simulations need to combine anatomical information and the effects of cardiac and/or respiratory motion. To this end, a framework for realistic CMR simulations is proposed and its use for image reconstruction from undersampled data is demonstrated. The extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) anatomical phantom framework with various motion options was used as a basis for the numerical phantoms. Different tissue, dynamic contrast and signal models, multiple receiver coils and noise are simulated. Arbitrary trajectories and undersampled acquisition can be selected. The utility of the framework is demonstrated for accelerated cine and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging using k-t PCA and k-t SPARSE. MRXCAT phantoms allow for realistic simulation of CMR including optional cardiac and respiratory motion. Example reconstructions from simulated undersampled k-t parallel imaging demonstrate the feasibility of simulated acquisition and reconstruction using the presented framework. Myocardial blood flow assessment from simulated myocardial perfusion images highlights the suitability of MRXCAT for quantitative post-processing simulation. The proposed MRXCAT phantom framework enables versatile and realistic simulations of CMR including breathhold and free-breathing acquisitions.

  8. Wave turbulence in a two-layer fluid: coupling between free surface and interface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Issenmann, Bruno; Falcon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study gravity-capillary wave turbulence on the interface between two immiscible fluids of close density with free upper surface. We locally measure the wave height at the interface between both fluids by means of a highly sensitive laser Doppler vibrometer. We show that the inertial range of the capillary wave turbulence regime is significantly extended when the upper fluid depth is increased: The crossover frequency between the gravity and capillary wave turbulence regimes is found to decrease whereas the dissipative cut-off frequency of the spectrum is found to increase. We explain most of these observations by the progressive decoupling between waves propagating at the interface and the ones at the free surface, using the full dispersion relation of gravity-capillary waves in a two-layer fluid of finite depths.s.

  9. Spin-3/2 Ising model AFM/AFM two-layer lattice with crystal field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erhan Albayrak; Ali Yigit

    2009-01-01

    The spin-3/2 Ising model is investigated for the case of antiferromagnetic (AFM/AFM) interactions on the two-layer Bethe lattice by using the exact recursion relations in the pairwise approach for given coordination numbers q = 3, 4 and 6 when the layers are under the influences of equal external magnetic and equal crystal fields. The ground state, (GS) phase diagrams are obtained on the different planes in detail and then the temperature-dependent phase diagrams of the system are calculated accordingly. It is observed that the system presents both second- and first-order phase transitions for all q, therefore, tricritical points. It is also found that the system exhibits double-critical end points and isolated points. The model aiso presents two Néel temperatures, T_N, and the existence of which leads to the reentrant behaviour.

  10. Two-layer interfacial flows beyond the Boussinesq approximation: a Hamiltonian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassa, R.; Falqui, G.; Ortenzi, G.

    2017-02-01

    The theory of integrable systems of Hamiltonian PDEs and their near-integrable deformations is used to study evolution equations resulting from vertical-averages of the Euler system for two-layer stratified flows in an infinite two-dimensional channel. The Hamiltonian structure of the averaged equations is obtained directly from that of the Euler equations through the process of Hamiltonian reduction. Long-wave asymptotics together with the Boussinesq approximation of neglecting the fluids’ inertia is then applied to reduce the leading order vertically averaged equations to the shallow-water Airy system, albeit in a non-trivial way. The full non-Boussinesq system for the dispersionless limit can then be viewed as a deformation of this well known equation. In a perturbative study of this deformation, a family of approximate constants of the motion are explicitly constructed and used to find local solutions of the evolution equations by means of hodograph-like formulae.

  11. Central-Upwind Schemes for Two-Layer Shallow Water Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Kurganov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    We derive a second-order semidiscrete central-upwind scheme for one- and two-dimensional systems of two-layer shallow water equations. We prove that the presented scheme is well-balanced in the sense that stationary steady-state solutions are exactly preserved by the scheme and positivity preserving; that is, the depth of each fluid layer is guaranteed to be nonnegative. We also propose a new technique for the treatment of the nonconservative products describing the momentum exchange between the layers. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated on a number of numerical examples, in which we successfully capture (quasi) steady-state solutions and propagating interfaces. © 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  12. Two-layer fragile watermarking method secured with chaotic map for authentication of digital Holy Quran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed S; Kurniawan, Fajri; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Alginahi, Yasser M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel watermarking method to facilitate the authentication and detection of the image forgery on the Quran images. Two layers of embedding scheme on wavelet and spatial domain are introduced to enhance the sensitivity of fragile watermarking and defend the attacks. Discrete wavelet transforms are applied to decompose the host image into wavelet prior to embedding the watermark in the wavelet domain. The watermarked wavelet coefficient is inverted back to spatial domain then the least significant bits is utilized to hide another watermark. A chaotic map is utilized to blur the watermark to make it secure against the local attack. The proposed method allows high watermark payloads, while preserving good image quality. Experiment results confirm that the proposed methods are fragile and have superior tampering detection even though the tampered area is very small.

  13. Transient response of a vertical electric dipole (VED) on a two-layer medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, S. Y.; Kong, J. A.

    The transient electromagnetic radiation by a vertical electric dipole on a two-layer medium is analyzed using the double deformation technique, which is a modal technique based on identification of singularities in the complex frequency and wavenumber planes. Previous application of the double deformation technique to the solution of this problem is incomplete in the early time response. In this paper it is shown that the existence of a pole locus on the negative imaginary frequency axis, which dominates the early time response, proves crucial in obtaining the solution for all times. A variety of combinations of parameters are used to illustrate the double deformation technique, and results will be compared with those obtained via explicit inversion, and a single deformation method.

  14. Two-Layer Coding Rate Optimization in Relay-Aided Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Fan

    2011-01-01

    We consider a three-node transmission system, where a source node conveys a data block to a destination node with the help of a half-duplex decode and-forward (DF) relay node. The whole data block is transmitted as a sequence of packets. For reliable transmission in the three-node system, a two......-layer coding scheme is proposed, where physical layer channel coding is utilized within each packet for error-correction and random network coding is applied on top of channel coding for network error-control. There is a natural tradeoff between the physical layer coding rate and the network coding rate given...... requirement. Numerical results are also provided to show the optimized physical layer coding and network coding rate pairs in different system scenarios....

  15. The peak effect (PE) region of the antiferromagnetic two layer Ising nanographene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Şarlı, Numan, E-mail: numansarli82@gmail.com [Institute of Science, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Akbudak, Salih [Department of Physics, Adiyaman University, 02100 Adiyaman (Turkey); Department of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Hacettepe University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Ellialtıoğlu, Mehmet Recai [Department of Physics Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the magnetic properties of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic two layer spin-1/2 Ising nanographene systems are investigated within the effective field theory. We find that the magnetizations and the hysteresis behaviors of the central graphene atoms are similar to those of the edge graphene atoms in the ferromagnetic case. But, they are quite different in the antiferromagnetic case. The antiferromagnetic central graphene atoms exhibit type II superconductivity and they have triple hysteresis loop. The peak effect (PE) region is observed on the hysteresis curves of the antiferromagnetic Ising nanographene system. Therefore, we suggest that there is a strong relationship between the antiferromagnetism and the peak effect. Our results are in agreement with some experimental works in recent literature.

  16. STRESS ANALYSIS AND BURST PRESSURE DETERMINATION OF TWO LAYER COMPOUND PRESSURE VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARERAM LOHAR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer pressure vessel is designed to work under high-pressure condition. This paper introduces the stress analysis and the burst pressure calculation of a two-layer shrink fitted pressure vessel. In the shrink-fitting problems, considering long hollow cylinders, the plane strain hypothesis can be regarded as more natural. Generally hoops stress distribution is non-linear and sharply reduced toward the outer surface. By shrink fitting concentric shells towards the inner shells are placed in residual compression so that the initial compressive hoop stress must be relieved by internal pressure before hoop tensile stress are developed. Therefore the maximum hoop stress will be reduced, resulting more burst pressure. The analytical results of stress distribution and burst pressure is calculated and validated by ANSYS Workbench results.

  17. Testing the Two-Layer Model for Correcting Clear Sky Reflectance near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Evans, Frank; Varnai, Tamas; Levy, Rob

    2015-01-01

    A two-layer model (2LM) was developed in our earlier studies to estimate the clear sky reflectance enhancement due to cloud-molecular radiative interaction at MODIS at 0.47 micrometers. Recently, we extended the model to include cloud-surface and cloud-aerosol radiative interactions. We use the LES/SHDOM simulated 3D true radiation fields to test the 2LM for reflectance enhancement at 0.47 micrometers. We find: The simple model captures the viewing angle dependence of the reflectance enhancement near cloud, suggesting the physics of this model is correct; the cloud-molecular interaction alone accounts for 70 percent of the enhancement; the cloud-surface interaction accounts for 16 percent of the enhancement; the cloud-aerosol interaction accounts for an additional 13 percent of the enhancement. We conclude that the 2LM is simple to apply and unbiased.

  18. Study of electronic and optical properties of two-layered hydrogenated aluminum nitrate nanosheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihzadeh, Somayeh; Shahtahmasebi, Nasser; Rezaee Roknabadi, Mahmood

    2017-09-01

    First principle calculations based on density functional theory using GW approximation and two particle Bethe-Salpeter equation with electron-hole effect were performed to investigate electronic structure and optical properties of two-layered hydrogenated AlN. According to many body green function due to decrease in dimension and considering electron-electron effect, direct (indirect) band gap change from 2 (1.01) eV to 4.83 (3.62) eV. The first peak in imaginary part of dielectric function was observed in parallel direction to a plane obtaining 3.4 was achieved by bound exciton states possess 1.39 eV. The first absorption peak was seen in two parallel and perpendicular directions to a plane which are in UV region.

  19. Initial stresses in two-layer metal domes due to imperfections of their production and assemblage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebed Evgeniy Vasil’evich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of construction of two-layer metal domes is analyzed to illustrate the causes of initial stresses in the bars of their frames. It has been noticed that it is impossible to build such structures with ideal geometric parameters because of imperfections caused by objective reasons. These imperfections cause difficulties in the process of connection of the elements in the joints. The paper demonstrates the necessity of fitting operations during assemblage that involve force fitting and yield initial stresses due to imperfections. The authors propose a special method of computer modeling of enforced elimination of possible imperfections caused by assemblage process and further confirm the method by an analysis of a concrete metal dome.

  20. Analysis of data recorded by the LCTPC equipped with a two layer GEM-system

    CERN Document Server

    Ljunggren, M

    2012-01-01

    wire based readout. The prototype TPC is placed in a 1 Tesla magnet at DESY and tested using an electron beam. Analyses of data taken during two different measurement series, in 2009 and 2010, are presented here. The TPC was instrumented with a two layer GEM system and read out using modified electronics from the ALICE experiment, including the programmable charge sensitive preamp-shaper PCA16. The PCA16 chip has a number of programmable parameters which allows studies to determine the settings optimal to the final TPC. Here, the impact of the shaping time on the space resolution in the drift direction was studied. It was found that a shaping time of 60 ns is the b...

  1. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON BEHAVIOR OF THE INTERFACIAL CRACK BETWEEN THE TWO LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena M Djoković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is considered a problem of the semi-infinite crack at the interface between the two elastic isotropic layers in conditions of the environmental temperature change. The energy release rate needed for the crack growth along the interface was determined, for the case when the two-layered sample is cooled from the temperature of the layers joining down to the room temperature. It was noticed that the energy release rate increases with the temperature difference increase. In the paper is also presented the distribution of stresses in layers as a function of the temperature and the layers' thickness variations. Analysis is limited to the case when the bimaterial sample is exposed to uniform temperature.

  2. High Performance Hybrid Two Layer Router Architecture for FPGAs Using Network On Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Ezhumalai, P; Arun, C; Sakthivel, P; Sridharan, D

    2010-01-01

    Networks on Chip is a recent solution paradigm adopted to increase the performance of Multicore designs. The key idea is to interconnect various computation modules (IP cores) in a network fashion and transport packets simultaneously across them, thereby gaining performance. In addition to improving performance by having multiple packets in flight, NoCs also present a host of other advantages including scalability, power efficiency, and component reuse through modular design. This work focuses on design and development of high performance communication architectures for FPGAs using NoCs Once completely developed, the above methodology could be used to augment the current FPGA design flow for implementing multicore SoC applications. We design and implement an NoC framework for FPGAs, MultiClock OnChip Network for Reconfigurable Systems (MoCReS). We propose a novel microarchitecture for a hybrid two layer router that supports both packetswitched communications, across its local and directional ports, as well as...

  3. The fuzzy coat of pathological human Tau fibrils is a two-layered polyelectrolyte brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Susanne; Medalsy, Izhar D; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Müller, Daniel J

    2013-01-22

    The structure and properties of amyloid-like Tau fibrils accumulating in neurodegenerative diseases have been debated for decades. Although the core of Tau fibrils assembles from short β-strands, the properties of the much longer unstructured Tau domains protruding from the fibril core remain largely obscure. Applying immunogold transmission EM, and force-volume atomic force microscopy (AFM), we imaged human Tau fibrils at high resolution and simultaneously mapped their mechanical and adhesive properties. Tau fibrils showed a ≈ 16-nm-thick fuzzy coat that resembles a two-layered polyelectrolyte brush, which is formed by the unstructured short C-terminal and long N-terminal Tau domains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the fuzzy coat are modulated by electrolytes and pH, and thus by the cellular environment. These unique properties of the fuzzy coat help in understanding how Tau fibrils disturb cellular interactions and accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles.

  4. Sparse/DCT (S/DCT) two-layered representation of prediction residuals for video coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Je-Won; Gabbouj, Moncef; Kuo, C-C Jay

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a cascaded sparse/DCT (S/DCT) two-layer representation of prediction residuals, and implement this idea on top of the state-of-the-art high efficiency video coding (HEVC) standard. First, a dictionary is adaptively trained to contain featured patterns of residual signals so that a high portion of energy in a structured residual can be efficiently coded via sparse coding. It is observed that the sparse representation alone is less effective in the R-D performance due to the side information overhead at higher bit rates. To overcome this problem, the DCT representation is cascaded at the second stage. It is applied to the remaining signal to improve coding efficiency. The two representations successfully complement each other. It is demonstrated by experimental results that the proposed algorithm outperforms the HEVC reference codec HM5.0 in the Common Test Condition.

  5. Development of an algebraic stress/two-layer model for calculating thrust chamber flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Huang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modeling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data, to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  6. Cumulative second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in a two-layered solid plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yan-Xun; Deng Ming-Xi

    2008-01-01

    The physical process of cumulative second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in a two-layered solid plate is presented by using the second-order perturbation and the technique of nonlinear reflection of acoustic waves at an interface.In general,the cumulative second-harmonic generation of a dispersive guided wave propagation does not occur.However,the present paper shows that the second-harmonic of Lamb wave propagation arising from the nonlinear interaction of the partial bulk acoustic waves and the restriction of the three boundaries of the solid plates does have a cumulative growth effect if some conditions are satisfied.Through boundary condition and initial condition of excitation,the analytical expression of cumulative second-harmonic of Lamb waves propagation is determined.Numerical results show the cumulative effect of Lamb waves on second-harmonic field patterns.

  7. Convergent flow in a two-layer system and mountain building

    CERN Document Server

    Perazzo, Carlos Alberto

    2009-01-01

    With the purpose of modelling the process of mountain building, we investigate the evolution of the ridge produced by the convergent motion of a system consisting of two layers of liquids that differ in density and viscosity to simulate the crust and the upper mantle that form a lithospheric plate. We assume that the motion is driven by basal traction. Assuming isostasy, we derive a nonlinear differential equation for the evolution of the thickness of the crust. We solve this equation numerically to obtain the profile of the range. We find an approximate self-similar solution that describes reasonably well the process and predicts simple scaling laws for the height and width of the range as well as the shape of the transversal profile. We compare the theoretical results with the profiles of real mountain belts and find and excellent agreement.

  8. TWO-LAYER SECURE PREVENTION MECHANISM FOR REDUCING E-COMMERCE SECURITY RISKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Tarng Lai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available E-commerce is an important information system in the network and digital age. However, the network intrusion, malicious users, virus attack and system security vulnerabilities have continued to threaten the operation of the e-commerce, making e-commerce security encounter serious test. How to improve ecommerce security has become a topic worthy of further exploration. Combining routine security test and security event detection procedures, this paper proposes the Two-Layer Secure Prevention Mechanism (TLSPM. Applying TLSPM, routine security test procedure can identify security vulnerability and defect, and develop repair operations. Security event detection procedure can timely detect security event, and assist follow repair. TLSPM can enhance the e-commerce security and effectively reduce the security risk of e-commerce critical data and asset.

  9. Calculation of AC loss in two-layer superconducting cable with equal currents in the layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Muzaffer

    2016-12-01

    A new method for calculating AC loss of two-layer SC power transmission cables using the commercial software Comsol Multiphysics, relying on the approach of the equal partition of current between the layers is proposed. Applying the method to calculate the AC-loss in a cable composed of two coaxial cylindrical SC tubes, the results are in good agreement with the analytical ones of duoblock model. Applying the method to calculate the AC-losses of a cable composed of a cylindrical copper former, surrounded by two coaxial cylindrical layers of superconducting tapes embedded in an insulating medium with tape-on-tape and tape-on-gap configurations are compared. A good agreement between the duoblock model and the numerical results for the tape-on-gap cable is observed.

  10. 2-DE combined with two-layer feature selection accurately establishes the origin of oolong tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Han-Ju; Chu, Yen-Wei; Chen, Chi-Wei; Juang, Yu-Min; Chien, Min-Wei; Liu, Chih-Wei; Wu, Chia-Chang; Tzen, Jason T C; Lai, Chien-Chen

    2016-11-15

    Taiwan is known for its high quality oolong tea. Because of high consumer demand, some tea manufactures mix lower quality leaves with genuine Taiwan oolong tea in order to increase profits. Robust scientific methods are, therefore, needed to verify the origin and quality of tea leaves. In this study, we investigated whether two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and nanoscale liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectroscopy (nano-LC/MS/MS) coupled with a two-layer feature selection mechanism comprising information gain attribute evaluation (IGAE) and support vector machine feature selection (SVM-FS) are useful in identifying characteristic proteins that can be used as markers of the original source of oolong tea. Samples in this study included oolong tea leaves from 23 different sources. We found that our method had an accuracy of 95.5% in correctly identifying the origin of the leaves. Overall, our method is a novel approach for determining the origin of oolong tea leaves.

  11. Some considerations on numerical schemes for treating hyperbolicity issues in two-layer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, L.; Carravetta, A.; Martino, R.; Papa, M. N.; Tai, Y.-C.

    2017-02-01

    Multi-layer depth-averaged models are widely employed in various hydraulic engineering applications. Yet, such models are not strictly hyperbolic. Their equation systems typically lose hyperbolicity when the relative velocities between layers become too large, which is associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities involving turbulent momentum exchanges between the layers. Focusing on the two-layer case, we present a numerical improvement that locally avoids the loss of hyperbolicity. The proposed modification introduces an additional momentum exchange between layers, whose value is iteratively calculated to be strictly sufficient to keep the system hyperbolic. The approach can be easily implemented in any finite volume scheme and there is no limitation concerning the density ratio between layers. Numerical examples, employing both HLL-type and Roe-type approximate Riemann solvers, are reported to validate the method and its key features.

  12. A TWO-LAYER RECURRENT NEURAL NETWORK BASED APPROACH FOR OVERLAY MULTICAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shidong; Zhang Shunyi; Zhou Jinquan; Qiu Gong'an

    2008-01-01

    Overlay multicast has become one of the most promising multicast solutions for IP network, and Neutral Network(NN) has been a good candidate for searching optimal solutions to the constrained shortest routing path in virtue of its powerful capacity for parallel computation. Though traditional Hopfield NN can tackle the optimization problem, it is incapable of dealing with large scale networks due to the large number of neurons. In this paper, a neural network for overlay multicast tree computation is presented to reliably implement routing algorithm in real time. The neural network is constructed as a two-layer recurrent architecture, which is comprised of Independent Variable Neurons (IDVN) and Dependent Variable Neurons (DVN), according to the independence of the decision variables associated with the edges in directed graph. Compared with the heuristic routing algorithms, it is characterized as shorter computational time, fewer neurons, and better precision.

  13. Two-layer networked learning control using self-learning fuzzy control algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Since the existing single-layer networked control systems have some inherent limitations and cannot effectively handle the problems associated with unreliable networks, a novel two-layer networked learning control system (NLCS) is proposed in this paper. Its lower layer has a number of local controllers that are operated independently, and its upper layer has a learning agent that communicates with the independent local controllers in the lower layer. To implement such a system, a packet-discard strategy is firstly developed to deal with network-induced delay and data packet loss. A cubic spline interpolator is then employed to compensate the lost data. Finally, the output of the learning agent based on a novel radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is used to update the parameters of fuzzy controllers. A nonlinear heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system is used to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed system.

  14. Artery buckling analysis using a two-layered wall model with collagen dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottahedi, Mohammad; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-07-01

    Artery buckling has been proposed as a possible cause for artery tortuosity associated with various vascular diseases. Since microstructure of arterial wall changes with aging and diseases, it is essential to establish the relationship between microscopic wall structure and artery buckling behavior. The objective of this study was to developed arterial buckling equations to incorporate the two-layered wall structure with dispersed collagen fiber distribution. Seven porcine carotid arteries were tested for buckling to determine their critical buckling pressures at different axial stretch ratios. The mechanical properties of these intact arteries and their intima-media layer were determined via pressurized inflation test. Collagen alignment was measured from histological sections and modeled by a modified von-Mises distribution. Buckling equations were developed accordingly using microstructure-motivated strain energy function. Our results demonstrated that collagen fibers disperse around two mean orientations symmetrically to the circumferential direction (39.02°±3.04°) in the adventitia layer; while aligning closely in the circumferential direction (2.06°±3.88°) in the media layer. The microstructure based two-layered model with collagen fiber dispersion described the buckling behavior of arteries well with the model predicted critical pressures match well with the experimental measurement. Parametric studies showed that with increasing fiber dispersion parameter, the predicted critical buckling pressure increases. These results validate the microstructure-based model equations for artery buckling and set a base for further studies to predict the stability of arteries due to microstructural changes associated with vascular diseases and aging.

  15. Quantification of the specific yield in a two-layer hard-rock aquifer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Véronique; Léonardi, Véronique; de Marsily, Ghislain; Lachassagne, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Hard rock aquifers (HRA) have long been considered to be two-layer systems, with a mostly capacitive layer just below the surface, the saprolite layer, and a mainly transmissive layer underneath, the fractured layer. Although this hydrogeological conceptual model is widely accepted today within the scientific community, it is difficult to quantify the respective storage properties of each layer with an equivalent porous medium model. Based on an HRA field site, this paper attempts to quantify in a distinct manner the respective values of the specific yield (Sy) in the saprolite and the fractured layer, with the help of a deterministic hydrogeological model. The study site is the Plancoët migmatitic aquifer located in north-western Brittany, France, with piezometric data from 36 observation wells surveyed every two weeks for eight years. Whereas most of the piezometers (26) are located where the water table lies within the saprolite, thus representing the specific yield of the unconfined layer (Sy1), 10 of them are representative of the unconfined fractured layer (Sy2), due to their position where the saprolite is eroded or unsaturated. The two-layer model, based on field observations of the layer geometry, runs with the MODFLOW code. 81 values of the Sy1/Sy2 parameter sets were tested manually, as an inverse calibration was not able to calibrate these parameters. In order to calibrate the storage properties, a new quality-of-fit criterion called ;AdVar; was also developed, equal to the mean squared deviation of the seasonal piezometric amplitude variation. Contrary to the variance, AdVar is able to select the best values for the specific yield in each layer. It is demonstrated that the saprolite layer is about 2.5 times more capacitive than the fractured layer, with Sy1 = 10% (7% < Sy1 < 15%) against Sy2 = 2% (1% < Sy2 < 3%), in this particular example.

  16. Phantom limb after stroke: an underreported phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniello, Daniel; Kluger, Benzi M; Sahlein, Daniel H; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2010-10-01

    The presence of a phantom limb (PL) resulting from a cerebral lesion has been reported to be a rare event. No prior study, however, has systematically investigated the prevalence of this syndrome in a group of post-stroke individuals. Fifty post-stroke individuals were examined with structured interview/questionnaire to establish the presence and perceptual characteristics of PLs. We document the presence of phantom experiences in over half of these individuals (n=27). We provide details of these phantom experiences and further characterize these symptoms in terms of temporal qualities, posture, kinesthesia, and associated features. Twenty-two participants reported postural phantoms, which were perceived as illusions of limb position that commonly manifested while lying in bed at night - a time when visual input is removed from multi-sensory integration. Fourteen participants reported kinesthetic phantoms, with illusory movements ranging from simple single joint sensations to complex goal-directed phantom movements. A striking syndrome of near total volitional control of phantom movements was reported in four participants who had immobile plegic hands. Reduplicative phantom percepts were reported by only one participant. Similarly, phantom pain was present in only one individual - the sole participant with a pre-stroke limb amputation. The results suggest that stroke results in phantom experiences more commonly than previously described in the literature. We speculate that subtotal deafferance or defective motor efference after stroke may manifest intermittently as a PL.

  17. Psychophysical correlates of phantom limb experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J

    1992-09-01

    Phantom limb phenomena were correlated with psychophysiological measures of peripheral sympathetic nervous system activity measured at the amputation stump and contralateral limb. Amputees were assigned to one of three groups depending on whether they reported phantom limb pain, non-painful phantom limb sensations, or no phantom limb at all. Skin conductance and skin temperature were recorded continuously during two 30 minute sessions while subjects continuously monitored and rated the intensity of any phantom limb sensation or pain they experienced. The results from both sessions showed that mean skin temperature was significantly lower at the stump than the contralateral limb in the groups with phantom limb pain and non-painful phantom limb sensations, but not among subjects with no phantom limb at all. In addition, stump skin conductance responses correlated significantly with the intensity of non-painful phantom limb paresthesiae but not other qualities of sensation or pain. Between-limb measures of pressure sensitivity were not significantly different in any group. The results suggest that the presence of a phantom limb, whether painful or painless, is related to the sympathetic-efferent outflow of cutaneous vasoconstrictor fibres in the stump and stump neuromas. The hypothesis of a sympathetic-efferent somatic-afferent mechanism involving both sudomotor and vasoconstrictor fibres is proposed to explain the relationship between stump skin conductance responses and non-painful phantom limb paresthesiae. It is suggested that increases in the intensity of phantom limb paresthesiae follow bursts of sympathetic activity due to neurotransmitter release onto apposing sprouts of large diameter primary afferents located in stump neuromas, and decreases correspond to periods of relative sympathetic inactivity. The results of the study agree with recent suggestions that phantom limb pain is not a unitary syndrome, but a symptom class with each class subserved by

  18. Single- and Two-Layer Coatings of Metal Blends onto Carbon Steel: Mechanical, Wear, and Friction Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Kumar, Aditya; Bhushan, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Single- and two-layer coatings were deposited onto carbon steel using a high-velocity oxy-fuel deposition gun. The two-layer coating consisted of a top layer of tungsten carbide cobalt/nickel alloy blend that provides wear resistance and a bottom layer of iron/molybdenum blend that provides corrosion resistance. The morphological changes in the single- and two-layer coatings were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The residual stresses formed on the surface of various coatings were determined from x-ray diffraction data. Nanomechanical properties were measured using the nanoindentation technique. Microhardness and fracture toughness were measured incorporating the microindentation tests. Macrowear and macrofriction characteristics were measured using the pin-on-disk testing apparatus. The goal of this study was to ensure that the mechanical properties, friction, and wear resistance of the two-layer coating are similar to that of the single-layer coating.

  19. Assessing the performance of vessel wall tracking algorithms: the importance of the test phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarine, K. V.; Kanber, B.; Panerai, R. B.

    2004-01-01

    There is widespread clinical interest in assessing the mechanical properties of tissues and vessel walls. This study investigated the importance of the test phantom in providing a realistic assessment of clinical wall tracking performance for a variety of ultrasound modalities. B-mode, colour Doppler and Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) cineloop images were acquired using a Philips HDI5000 scanner and L12-5 probe. In-vivo longitudinal sections of 30 common carotid arteries and in-vitro images of pulsatile flow of a blood mimicking fluid through walled and wall-less tissue and vessel mimicking flow phantoms were analysed. Vessel wall tracking performance was assessed for our new probabilistic B-mode algorithm (PROBAL), and 3 different techniques implemented by Philips Medical Systems, based on B-mode edge detection (LDOT), colour Doppler (CVIQ) and TDI (TDIAWM). Precision (standard deviation/mean) of the peak systole dilations for respective PROBAL, LDOT, CVIQ and TDIAWM techniques were: 15.4 +/- 8.4%, 23 +/- 12.7%, 10 +/- 10% and 10.3 +/- 8.1% for the common carotid arteries; 6.4%, 22%, 11.6% and 34.5% for the wall-less flow phantom, 5.3%, 9.8%, 23.4% and 2.7% for the C-flex walled phantom and 3.9%, 2.6%, 1% and 3.2% for the latex walled phantom. The test phantom design and construction had a significant effect on the measurement of wall tracking performance.

  20. Biologically relevant photoacoustic imaging phantoms with tunable optical and acoustic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2016-10-01

    Established medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography rely on well-validated tissue-simulating phantoms for standardized testing of device image quality. The availability of high-quality phantoms for optical-acoustic diagnostics such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) will facilitate standardization and clinical translation of these emerging approaches. Materials used in prior PAT phantoms do not provide a suitable combination of long-term stability and realistic acoustic and optical properties. Therefore, we have investigated the use of custom polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) formulations for imaging phantoms and identified a dual-plasticizer approach that provides biologically relevant ranges of relevant properties. Speed of sound and acoustic attenuation were determined over a frequency range of 4 to 9 MHz and optical absorption and scattering over a wavelength range of 400 to 1100 nm. We present characterization of several PVCP formulations, including one designed to mimic breast tissue. This material is used to construct a phantom comprised of an array of cylindrical, hemoglobin-filled inclusions for evaluation of penetration depth. Measurements with a custom near-infrared PAT imager provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons of phantom and tissue images. Results indicate that our PVCP material is uniquely suitable for PAT system image quality evaluation and may provide a practical tool for device validation and intercomparison.

  1. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C.; Pelissari, Pedro I. B. G. B.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Pavan, Theo Z.

    2017-01-01

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  2. A novel phantom system facilitating better descriptors of density within mammographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Brennan, Patrick C.; Nickson, Carolyn; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Al Mousa, Dana; Ryan, Elaine

    2013-03-01

    High mammographic density is a risk factor for breast cancer. As it is impossible to measure actual weight or volume of fibroglandular tissue evident within a mammogram, it is hard to know the correlation between measured mammographic density and the actual fibroglandular tissue volume. The aim of this study is to develop a phantom that represents glandular tissue within an adipose tissue structure so that correlations between image feature descriptors and the synthesised glandular structure can be accurately quantified. In this phantom study, ten different weights of fine steel wool were put into gelatine to simulate breast structure. Image feature descriptors are investigated for both the whole phantom image and the simulated density. Descriptors included actual area and percentage area of density, mean pixel intensity for the whole image and dense area, standard deviation of mean intensity, and integrated pixel density which is the production of area and mean intensity. The results show high level correlation between steel-wool weight and percentage density measured on images (r = 0.8421), and the integrated pixel density of dense area (r = 0.8760). The correlation is significant for mean intensity standard deviation for the whole phantom (r = 0.8043). This phantom study may help identify more accurate descriptors of mammographic density, thus facilitating better assessments of fibroglandular tissue appearances.

  3. Use of VAP3D software in the construction of pathological anthropomorphic phantoms for dosimetric evaluations; Uso do software VAP3D na construcao de fantomas antropomorficos patologicos para avaliacoes dosimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Lindeval Fernandes de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEM/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper performs a new type of dosimetric evaluation, where it was used a phantom of pathological voxels (representative phantom of sick person). The software VAP3D (Visualization and Analysis of Phantoms 3D) were used for, from a healthy phantom (phantom representative of healthy person), to introduce three dimensional regions to simulate tumors. It was used the Monte Carlo ESGnrc code to simulate the X ray photon transport, his interaction with matter and evaluation of absorbed dose in organs and tissues from thorax region of the healthy phantom and his pathological version. This is a computer model of typical exposure for programming the treatments in radiodiagnostic

  4. Exact solution of phantom dark energy model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wen-Fu; Shui Zheng-Wei; Tang Bin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the phantom dark energy model derived from the scalar field with a negative kinetic term. By assuming a particular relation between the time derivative of the phantom field and the Hubble function, an exact solution of the model is constructed. Absence of the 'big rip' singularity is shown explicitly. We then derive special features of phantom dark energy model and show that its predictions are consistent with all astrophysical observations.

  5. Neutron dosimetry in solid water phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites-Rengifo, Jorge Luis, E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Calzada de la Cruz 118 Sur, Tepic Nayarit, Mexico and Instituto Tecnico Superior de Radiologia, ITEC, Calle Leon 129, Tepic Nayarit (Mexico); Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene, E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Apdo. postal 336, 98000, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The neutron spectra, the Kerma and the absorbed dose due to neutrons were estimated along the incoming beam in a solid water phantom. Calculations were carried out with the MCNP5 code, where the bunker, the phantom and the model of the15 MV LINAC head were modeled. As the incoming beam goes into the phantom the neutron spectrum is modified and the dosimetric values are reduced.

  6. Validation of Cooper's ligament thickness in software breast phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperavage, Adam J.; Imran, Abdullah-Al-Zubaer; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew; Pokrajac, David D.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropomorphic breast phantoms are important tools for a wide range of tasks including pre-clinical validation of novel imaging techniques. In order to improve the realism in the phantoms, assessment of simulated anatomical structures is crucial. Thickness of simulated Cooper's ligaments influences the percentage of dense tissue, as well as qualitative and quantitative properties of simulated images. We introduce three methods (2-dimensional watershed, 3-dimensional watershed, and facet counting) to assess the thickness of the simulated Cooper's ligaments in the breast phantoms. For the validation of simulated phantoms, the thickness of ligaments has been measured and compared with the input thickness values. These included a total of 64 phantoms with nominal ligament thicknesses of 200, 400, 600, and 800 μm. The 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional watershed transformations were performed to obtain the median skeleton of the ligaments. In the 2-dimensional watershed, the median skeleton was found cross-section by cross-section, while the skeleton was found for the entire 3-dimensional space in the 3-dimensional watershed. The thickness was calculated by taking the ratio of the total volume of ligaments and the volume of median skeleton. In the facet counting method, the ligament thickness was estimated as a ratio between estimated ligaments' volume and average ligaments' surface area. We demonstrated that the 2-dimensional watershed technique overestimates the ligament thickness. Good agreement was found between the facet counting technique and the 3-dimensional watershed for assessing thickness. The proposed techniques are applicable for ligaments' thickness estimation on clinical breast images, provided segmentation of Cooper's ligaments has been performed.

  7. Galileons, phantom and the Fate of Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Shahalam, M; Myrzakulov, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study cosmological dynamics of phantom as well as non-phantom fields with linear potential in presence of Galileon correction $(\\partial_\\mu\\phi \\partial^\\mu\\phi) \\Box \\phi$. We show that the Big Crunch singularity is delayed compared to the standard case; the delay crucially depends upon the strength of Galileon correction. As for the phantom Galileon, $\\rho_{\\phi}$ is shown to grow more slowly compared to the standard phantom delaying the approach to singularity. In case, $V\\sim \\phi^n, n>4$, Big Rip is also delayed, similar phenomenon is shown to take place for potentials steeper than the exponential.

  8. Do Phantom Cuntz-Krieger Algebras Exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arklint, Sara E.

    2013-01-01

    If phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras do not exist, then purely infinite Cuntz-Krieger algebras can be characterized by outer properties. In this survey paper, a summary of the known results on non-existence of phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras is given......If phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras do not exist, then purely infinite Cuntz-Krieger algebras can be characterized by outer properties. In this survey paper, a summary of the known results on non-existence of phantom Cuntz-Krieger algebras is given...

  9. Storage capacity and learning algorithms for two-layer neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A.; Köhler, H. M.; Tschepke, F.; Vollmayr, H.; Zippelius, A.

    1992-05-01

    A two-layer feedforward network of McCulloch-Pitts neurons with N inputs and K hidden units is analyzed for N-->∞ and K finite with respect to its ability to implement p=αN random input-output relations. Special emphasis is put on the case where all hidden units are coupled to the output with the same strength (committee machine) and the receptive fields of the hidden units either enclose all input units (fully connected) or are nonoverlapping (tree structure). The storage capacity is determined generalizing Gardner's treatment [J. Phys. A 21, 257 (1988); Europhys. Lett. 4, 481 (1987)] of the single-layer perceptron. For the treelike architecture, a replica-symmetric calculation yields αc~ √K for a large number K of hidden units. This result violates an upper bound derived by Mitchison and Durbin [Biol. Cybern. 60, 345 (1989)]. One-step replica-symmetry breaking gives lower values of αc. In the fully connected committee machine there are in general correlations among different hidden units. As the limit of capacity is approached, the hidden units are anticorrelated: One hidden unit attempts to learn those patterns which have not been learned by the others. These correlations decrease as 1/K, so that for K-->∞ the capacity per synapse is the same as for the tree architecture, whereas for small K we find a considerable enhancement for the storage per synapse. Numerical simulations were performed to explicitly construct solutions for the tree as well as the fully connected architecture. A learning algorithm is suggested. It is based on the least-action algorithm, which is modified to take advantage of the two-layer structure. The numerical simulations yield capacities p that are slightly more than twice the number of degrees of freedom, while the fully connected net can store relatively more patterns than the tree. Various generalizations are discussed. Variable weights from hidden to output give the same results for the storage capacity as does the committee

  10. Dynamic CT head phantom for perfusion and angiography studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K.; Blazeski, A.; Dannecker, K.; Lee, Q. Y.; Holscher, C.; Donahue, C.; van Kampen, W.

    2010-03-01

    Contrast imaging is a compelling enhancement for the portable, flat panel-based brain CT scanner currently under development at Xoran. Due to the relative low temporal resolution of flat panel detectors, enabling tomographic imaging on such platform requires optimizing the imaging and injection protocols. A dynamic CT head phantom was designed to facilitate this task. The Dynamic Perfusion and Angiography Model (PAM), mimics tissue attenuation in CT images, provides physiological timing for angiography and perfusion studies, and moves fluid with properties similar to those of blood. The design consists of an arterial system, which contains bifurcating vessels that feed into perfusion chambers, mimicking blood flow through capillaries and smaller vessels, and a venous system, which is symmetrical to the arterial side and drains the perfusion chambers. The variation of geometry and flow rate in the phantom provides the physiological total time that fluid spends in the head, and the difference in material densities correlates to CT numbers for biological tissues. This paper discusses the design of Dynamic PAM and shows experimental results demonstrating its ability to realistically simulate blood flow. Results of dynamic imaging studies of the phantom are also presented.

  11. Do you believe in phantoms?

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    “Phantoms” are tools that simulate a therapy’s response by mimicking the conditions of the human body. They are required in hadron therapy in order to optimise and verify the therapy before performing it on the patient. The better the phantom, the more accurate the treatment plan and the more effective the therapy. In the framework of the EU-funded project ENTERVISION*, a team of CERN researchers has designed an innovative piece of equipment able to evaluate radiobiology-related parameters in a very accurate way.   The ENTERVISION phantom being tested at HIT. A key challenge in hadron therapy – i.e. the medical use of hadrons to treat cancer – is to evaluate the biological effect of the delivered radiation. This can be achieved by using accurate dosimetry techniques to study the biological response in terms of the dose deposited and other physical parameters of the beam, such as the Linear Energy Transfer (LET). The job of the “phan...

  12. Transorbital therapy delivery: phantom testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Martha-Conley; Atuegwu, Nkiruka; Mawn, Louise; Galloway, Robert L.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a combined image-guided and minimally invasive system for the delivery of therapy to the back of the eye. It is composed of a short 4.5 mm diameter endoscope with a magnetic tracker embedded in the tip. In previous work we have defined an optimized fiducial placement for accurate guidance to the back of the eye and are now moving to system testing. The fundamental difficulty in testing performance is establishing a target in a manner which closely mimics the physiological task. We have to have a penetrable material which obscures line of sight, similar to the orbital fat. In addition we need to have some independent measure of knowing when a target has been reached to compare to the ideal performance. Lastly, the target cannot be rigidly attached to the skull phantom since the optic nerve lies buried in the orbital fat. We have developed a skull phantom with white cloth stellate balls supporting a correctly sized globe. Placed in the white balls are red, blue, orange and yellow balls. One of the colored balls has been soaked in barium to make it bright on CT. The user guides the tracked endoscope to the target as defined by the images and tells us its color. We record task accuracy and time to target. We have tested this with 28 residents, fellows and attending physicians. Each physician performs the task twice guided and twice unguided. Results will be presented.

  13. The phantom limb in dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Mulder and colleagues [Mulder, T., Hochstenbach, J., Dijkstra, P. U., Geertzen, J. H. B. (2008). Born to adapt, but not in your dreams. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1266-1271.] report that a majority of amputees continue to experience a normally-limbed body during their night dreams. They interprete this observation as a failure of the body schema to adapt to the new body shape. The present note does not question this interpretation, but points to the already existing literature on the phenomenology of the phantom limb in dreams. A summary of published investigations is complemented by a note on phantom phenomena in the dreams of paraplegic patients and persons born without a limb. Integration of the available data allows the recommendation for prospective studies to consider dream content in more detail. For instance, "adaptation" to the loss of a limb can also manifest itself by seeing oneself surrounded by amputees. Such projective types of anosognosia ("transitivism") in nocturnal dreams should also be experimentally induced in normally-limbed individuals, and some relevant techniques are mentioned.

  14. Thermal properties of composite two-layer systems with a fractal inclusion structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Salgado, J. J.; Dossetti, V.; Bonilla-Capilla, B.; Carrillo, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the thermal transport properties of platelike composite two-layer samples made of polyester resin and magnetite inclusions. By means of photoacoustic spectroscopy and thermal relaxation, their effective thermal diffusivity and conductivity were experimentally measured. The composite layers were prepared under the action of a static magnetic field, resulting in anisotropic (fractal) inclusion structures with the formation of chain-like magnetite aggregates parallel to the faces of the layers. In one kind of the bilayers, a composite layer was formed on top of a resin layer while their relative thickness was varied. These samples can be described by known models. In contrast, bilayers with the same concentration of inclusions and the same thickness on both sides, where only the angle between their inclusion structures was systematically varied, show a nontrivial behaviour of their thermal conductivity as a function of this angle. Through a multifractal and lacunarity analysis, we explain the observed thermal response in terms of the complexity of the interface between the layers.

  15. Two layer asymptotic model for the wave propagation in the presence of vorticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakova, M. Yu; Noble, P.

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we consider the system of two layers of the immiscible constant density fluids which are modeled by the full Euler equations. The domain of the flow is infinite in the horizontal directions and delimited above by a free surface. Bottom topography is taken into account. This is a simple model of the wave propagation in the ocean where the upper layer corresponds to the (thin) layer of fluid above the thermocline whereas the lower layer is under the thermocline. Though even this simple framework is computationally too expensive and mathematically too complicated to describe efficiently propagation of waves in the ocean. Modeling assumption such as shallowness, vanishing vorticity and hydrostatic pressure are usually made to get the bi-layer shallow water models that are mathematically more manageable. Though, they cannot describe correctly the propagation of both internal and free surface waves and dispersive/non hydrostatic must be added. Our goal is to consider the regime of medium to large vorticities in shallow water flow. We present the derivation of the model for internal and surface wave propagation in the case of constant and general vorticities in each layer. The model reduces to the classical Green-Naghdi equations in the case of vanishing vorticities.

  16. Two-layer interfacial flows beyond the Boussinesq approximation: a Hamiltonian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Camassa, R; Ortenzi, G

    2015-01-01

    The theory of integrable systems of Hamiltonian PDEs and their near-integrable deformations is used to study evolution equations resulting from vertical-averages of the Euler system for two-layer stratified flows in an infinite 2D channel. The Hamiltonian structure of the averaged equations is obtained directly from that of the Euler equations through the process of Hamiltonian reduction. Long-wave asymptotics together with the Boussinesq approximation of neglecting the fluids' inertia is then applied to reduce the leading order vertically averaged equations to the shallow-water Airy system, and thence, in a non-trivial way, to the dispersionless non-linear Schr\\"odinger equation. The full non-Boussinesq system for the dispersionless limit can then be viewed as a deformation of this well known equation. In a perturbative study of this deformation, it is shown that at first order the deformed system possesses an infinite sequence of constants of the motion, thus casting this system within the framework of comp...

  17. Method of the Moulding Sands Binding Power Assessment in Two-Layer Moulds Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available More and more foundry plants applying moulding sands with water-glass or its substitutes for obtaining the high-quality casting surface at the smallest costs, consider the possibility of implementing two-layer moulds, in which e.g. the facing sand is a sand with an organic binder (no-bake type and the backing sand is a sand with inorganic binder. Both kinds of sands must have the same chemical reaction. The most often applied system is the moulding sand on the water-glass or geopolymer bases - as the backing sand and the moulding sand from the group of self-hardening sands with a resol resin - as the facing sand. Investigations were performed for the system: moulding sand with inorganic GEOPOL binder or moulding sand with water glass (as a backing sand and moulding sand, no-bake type, with a resol resin originated from various producers: Rezolit AM, Estrofen, Avenol NB 700 (as a facing sand. The LUZ apparatus, produced by Multiserw Morek, was adapted for investigations. A special partition with cuts was mounted in the attachment for making test specimens for measuring the tensile strength. This partition allowed a simultaneous compaction of two kinds of moulding sands. After 24 hours of hardening the highest values were obtained for the system: Geopol binder - Avenol resin.

  18. Display of the β-effect in the Black Sea Two-Layer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Pavlushin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The research is a continuation of a series of numerical experiments on modeling formation of wind currents and eddies in the Black Sea within the framework of a two-layer eddy-resolving model. The main attention is focused on studying the β-effect role. The stationary cyclonic wind is used as an external forcing and the bottom topography is not considered. It is shown that at the β-effect being taken into account, the Rossby waves propagating from east to west are observed both during the currents’ formation and at the statistical equilibrium mode when the mesoscale eddies are formed. In the integral flows’ field the waves are visually manifested in a form of the alternate large-scale cyclonic gyres and zones in which the meso-scale anti-cyclones are formed. This spatial pattern constantly propagates to the west that differs from the results of calculations using the constant Coriolis parameter when the spatially alternate cyclonic and anti-cyclonic vortices are formed, but hold a quasi-stationary position. The waves with the parameters of the Rossby wave first barotropic mode for the closed basin are most clearly pronounced. Interaction of the Rossby waves with large-scale circulation results in intensification of the of the currents’ hydrodynamic instability and in formation of the mesoscale eddies. Significant decrease of kinetic and available potential energy as compared to the values obtained at the constant Coriolis parameter is also a consequence of the eddy formation intensification.

  19. Inferring topologies via driving-based generalized synchronization of two-layer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingfei; Wu, Xiaoqun; Feng, Hui; Lu, Jun-an; Xu, Yuhua

    2016-05-01

    The interaction topology among the constituents of a complex network plays a crucial role in the network’s evolutionary mechanisms and functional behaviors. However, some network topologies are usually unknown or uncertain. Meanwhile, coupling delays are ubiquitous in various man-made and natural networks. Hence, it is necessary to gain knowledge of the whole or partial topology of a complex dynamical network by taking into consideration communication delay. In this paper, topology identification of complex dynamical networks is investigated via generalized synchronization of a two-layer network. Particularly, based on the LaSalle-type invariance principle of stochastic differential delay equations, an adaptive control technique is proposed by constructing an auxiliary layer and designing proper control input and updating laws so that the unknown topology can be recovered upon successful generalized synchronization. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The technique provides a certain theoretical basis for topology inference of complex networks. In particular, when the considered network is composed of systems with high-dimension or complicated dynamics, a simpler response layer can be constructed, which is conducive to circuit design. Moreover, it is practical to take into consideration perturbations caused by control input. Finally, the method is applicable to infer topology of a subnetwork embedded within a complex system and locate hidden sources. We hope the results can provide basic insight into further research endeavors on understanding practical and economical topology inference of networks.

  20. Extreme events statistics in a two-layer quasi-geostrophic atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfi, Vera Melinda; Bodai, Tamas; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Extreme events statistics provides a theoretical framework to analyze and predict extreme events based on the convergence of the distribution of the extremes to some limiting distribution. In this work we analyze the convergence of the distribution of extreme events to the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution and to the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD), using a two-layer quasi-geostrophic atmospheric model, and compare our results with theoretical findings from the field of extreme value theory for dynamical systems. We study the behavior of the GEV shape parameter by increasing the block size and of the GPD shape parameter by increasing the threshold, and compare the inferred parameters with a theoretical shape parameter that depends only on the geometrical properties of the attractor. The main objective is to find out whether this theoretical shape parameter can be used to evaluate extreme event analysis based on model output. For this, we perform very long simulations. We run our system with two different levels of forcing determined by two different meridional temperature gradients, one inducing a medium level of chaos and the other one a high level of chaos. We analyze in both cases extremes of energy variables.

  1. Deposition, Heat Treatment And Characterization of Two Layer Bioactive Coatings on Cylindrical PEEK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, John W; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-09-15

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) rods were coated via ion beam asssited deposition (IBAD) at room temperature. The coating consists of a two-layer design of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as a heat-protection layer, and hydroxyapatite (HA) as a top layer to increase bioactivity. A rotating substrate holder was designed to deposit an even coating on the cylindrical surface of PEEK rods; the uniformity is verified by cross-sectional measurements using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Deposition is followed by heat treatment of the coating using microwave annealing and autoclaving. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a dense, uniform columnar grain structure in the YSZ layer that is well bonded to the PEEK substrate, while the calcium phosphate layer was amorphous and pore-free in its as-deposited state. Subsequent heat treatment via microwave energy introduced HA crystallization in the calcium phosphate layer and additional autoclaving further expanded the crystallization of the HA layer. Chemical composition evaluation of the coating indicated the Ca/P ratios of the HA layer to be near that of stoichiometric HA, with minor variations through the HA layer thickness. The adhesion strength of as-deposited HA/YSZ coatings on smooth, polished PEEK surfaces was mostly unaffected by microwave heat treatment, but decreased with additional autoclave treatment. Increasing surface roughness showed improvement of bond strength.

  2. A novel approach to ECG classification based upon two-layered HMMs in body sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Zhang, Yinlong; Tan, Jindong; Li, Yang

    2014-03-27

    This paper presents a novel approach to ECG signal filtering and classification. Unlike the traditional techniques which aim at collecting and processing the ECG signals with the patient being still, lying in bed in hospitals, our proposed algorithm is intentionally designed for monitoring and classifying the patient's ECG signals in the free-living environment. The patients are equipped with wearable ambulatory devices the whole day, which facilitates the real-time heart attack detection. In ECG preprocessing, an integral-coefficient-band-stop (ICBS) filter is applied, which omits time-consuming floating-point computations. In addition, two-layered Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are applied to achieve ECG feature extraction and classification. The periodic ECG waveforms are segmented into ISO intervals, P subwave, QRS complex and T subwave respectively in the first HMM layer where expert-annotation assisted Baum-Welch algorithm is utilized in HMM modeling. Then the corresponding interval features are selected and applied to categorize the ECG into normal type or abnormal type (PVC, APC) in the second HMM layer. For verifying the effectiveness of our algorithm on abnormal signal detection, we have developed an ECG body sensor network (BSN) platform, whereby real-time ECG signals are collected, transmitted, displayed and the corresponding classification outcomes are deduced and shown on the BSN screen.

  3. Dynamics and flow-coupling in two-layer turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yi-Chao

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the dynamics and flow-coupling of convective turbulent flows in a cylindrical Rayleigh-Benard convection cell with two immiscible fluids, water and fluorinert FC-77 electronic liquid (FC77). It is found that one large-scale circulation (LSC) roll exists in each of the fluid layers, and that their circulation planes have two preferred azimuthal orientations separated by $\\sim\\pi$. A surprising finding of the study is that cessations/reversals of the LSC in FC77 of the two-layer system occur much more frequently than they do in single-layer turbulent RBC, and that a cessation is most likely to result in a flow reversal of the LSC, which is in sharp contrast with the uniform distribution of the orientational angular change of the LSC before and after cessations in single-layer turbulent RBC. This implies that the dynamics governing cessations and reversals in the two systems are very different. Two coupling modes, thermal coupling (flow directions of the two LSCs are o...

  4. MHD two-layered unsteady fluid flow and heat transfer through a horizontal channel between

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju T. Linga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD two-layered fluids flow and heat transfer in a horizontal channel between two parallel plates in the presence of an applied magnetic and electric field is investigated, when the whole system is rotated about an axis perpendicular to the flow. The flow is driven by a constant uniform pressure gradient in the channel bounded by two parallel insulating plates, when both fluids are considered as electrically conducting, incompressible with variable properties, viz. different viscosities, thermal and electrical conductivities. The transport properties of the two fluids are taken to be constant and the bounding plates are maintained at constant and equal temperatures. The governing partial differential equations are then reduced to the ordinary linear differential equations using two-term series. Closed form solutions for primary and secondary velocity, also temperature distributions are obtained in both the fluid regions of the channel. Profiles of these solutions are plotted to discuss the effects of the flow and heat transfer characteristics, and their dependence on the governing parameters involved, such as the Hartmann number, rotation parameter, ratios of the viscosities, heights, electrical and thermal conductivities

  5. A Two-Layer Method for Sedentary Behaviors Classification Using Smartphone and Bluetooth Beacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón, Jesús D; López, Diego M; Hofmann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Among the factors that outline the health of populations, person's lifestyle is the more important one. This work focuses on the caracterization and prevention of sedentary lifestyles. A sedentary behavior is defined as "any waking behavior characterized by an energy expenditure of 1.5 METs (Metabolic Equivalent) or less while in a sitting or reclining posture". To propose a method for sedentary behaviors classification using a smartphone and Bluetooth beacons considering different types of classification models: personal, hybrid or impersonal. Following the CRISP-DM methodology, a method based on a two-layer approach for the classification of sedentary behaviors is proposed. Using data collected from a smartphones' accelerometer, gyroscope and barometer; the first layer classifies between performing a sedentary behavior and not. The second layer of the method classifies the specific sedentary activity performed using only the smartphone's accelerometer and barometer data, but adding indoor location data, using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons. To improve the precision of the classification, both layers implemented the Random Forest algorithm and the personal model. This study presents the first available method for the automatic classification of specific sedentary behaviors. The layered classification approach has the potential to improve processing, memory and energy consumption of mobile devices and wearables used.

  6. Long-time Behavior of a Two-layer Model of Baroclinic Quasi-geostrophic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Farhat, Aseel; Titi, Edriss S; Ziane, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    We study a viscous two-layer quasi-geostrophic beta-plane model that is forced by imposition of a spatially uniform vertical shear in the eastward (zonal) component of the layer flows, or equivalently a spatially uniform north-south temperature gradient. We prove that the model is linearly unstable, but that non-linear solutions are bounded in time by a bound which is independent of the initial data and is determined only by the physical parameters of the model. We further prove, using arguments first presented in the study of the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, the existence of an absorbing ball in appropriate function spaces, and in fact the existence of a compact finite-dimensional attractor, and provide upper bounds for the fractal and Hausdorff dimensions of the attractor. Finally, we show the existence of an inertial manifold for the dynamical system generated by the model's solution operator. Our results provide rigorous justification for observations made by Panetta based on long-time numerical integra...

  7. A two-layer $\\alpha\\omega$ dynamo model, and its implications for 1-D dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Roald, C B

    1999-01-01

    I will discuss an attempt at representing an interface dynamo in a simplified, essentially 1D framework. The operation of the dynamo is broken up into two 1D layers, one containing the $\\alpha$ effect and the other containing the $\\omega$ effect, and these two layers are allowed to communicate with each other by the simplest possible representation of diffusion, an analogue of Newton's law of cooling. Dynamical back-reaction of the magnetic field on them with diagrams I computed for a comparable purely 1D model. The bifurcation structure shows remarkable similarity, but a couple of subtle changes imply dramatically different physical behaviour for the model. In particular, the solar-like dynamo mode found in the 1-layer model is not stable in the 2-layer version; instead there is an (apparent) homoclinic bifurcation and a sequence of periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic modes. I argue that the fragility of these models makes them effectively useless as predictors or interpreters of more complex dynamos.

  8. Two-Layer Linear MPC Approach Aimed at Walking Beam Billets Reheating Furnace Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Zanoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of the control and optimization of a walking beam billets reheating furnace located in an Italian steel plant is analyzed. An ad hoc Advanced Process Control framework has been developed, based on a two-layer linear Model Predictive Control architecture. This control block optimizes the steady and transient states of the considered process. Two main problems have been addressed. First, in order to manage all process conditions, a tailored module defines the process variables set to be included in the control problem. In particular, a unified approach for the selection on the control inputs to be used for control objectives related to the process outputs is guaranteed. The impact of the proposed method on the controller formulation is also detailed. Second, an innovative mathematical approach for stoichiometric ratios constraints handling has been proposed, together with their introduction in the controller optimization problems. The designed control system has been installed on a real plant, replacing operators’ mental model in the conduction of local PID controllers. After two years from the first startup, a strong energy efficiency improvement has been observed.

  9. A global-scale two-layer transient groundwater model: Development and application to groundwater depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Inge E. M.; van Beek, Rens L. P. H.; Gleeson, Tom; Moosdorf, Nils; Schmitz, Oliver; Sutanudjaja, Edwin H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater is the world's largest accessible source of freshwater to satisfy human water needs. Moreover, groundwater buffers variable precipitation rates over time, thereby effectively sustaining river flows in times of droughts and evaporation in areas with shallow water tables. In this study, building on previous work, we simulate groundwater head fluctuations and groundwater storage changes in both confined and unconfined aquifer systems using a global-scale high-resolution (5‧) groundwater model by deriving new estimates of the distribution and thickness of confining layers. Inclusion of confined aquifer systems (estimated 6-20% of the total aquifer area) improves estimates of timing and amplitude of groundwater head fluctuations and changes groundwater flow paths and groundwater-surface water interaction rates. Groundwater flow paths within confining layers are shorter than paths in the underlying aquifer, while flows within the confined aquifer can get disconnected from the local drainage system due to the low conductivity of the confining layer. Lateral groundwater flows between basins are significant in the model, especially for areas with (partially) confined aquifers were long flow paths crossing catchment boundaries are simulated, thereby supporting water budgets of neighboring catchments or aquifer systems. The developed two-layer transient groundwater model is used to identify hot-spots of groundwater depletion. Global groundwater depletion is estimated as 7013 km3 (137 km3y-1) over 1960-2010, which is consistent with estimates of previous studies.

  10. A Novel Approach to ECG Classification Based upon Two-Layered HMMs in Body Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach to ECG signal filtering and classification. Unlike the traditional techniques which aim at collecting and processing the ECG signals with the patient being still, lying in bed in hospitals, our proposed algorithm is intentionally designed for monitoring and classifying the patient’s ECG signals in the free-living environment. The patients are equipped with wearable ambulatory devices the whole day, which facilitates the real-time heart attack detection. In ECG preprocessing, an integral-coefficient-band-stop (ICBS filter is applied, which omits time-consuming floating-point computations. In addition, two-layered Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are applied to achieve ECG feature extraction and classification. The periodic ECG waveforms are segmented into ISO intervals, P subwave, QRS complex and T subwave respectively in the first HMM layer where expert-annotation assisted Baum-Welch algorithm is utilized in HMM modeling. Then the corresponding interval features are selected and applied to categorize the ECG into normal type or abnormal type (PVC, APC in the second HMM layer. For verifying the effectiveness of our algorithm on abnormal signal detection, we have developed an ECG body sensor network (BSN platform, whereby real-time ECG signals are collected, transmitted, displayed and the corresponding classification outcomes are deduced and shown on the BSN screen.

  11. A two-layer recurrent neural network for nonsmooth convex optimization problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sitian; Xue, Xiaoping

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a two-layer recurrent neural network is proposed to solve the nonsmooth convex optimization problem subject to convex inequality and linear equality constraints. Compared with existing neural network models, the proposed neural network has a low model complexity and avoids penalty parameters. It is proved that from any initial point, the state of the proposed neural network reaches the equality feasible region in finite time and stays there thereafter. Moreover, the state is unique if the initial point lies in the equality feasible region. The equilibrium point set of the proposed neural network is proved to be equivalent to the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality set of the original optimization problem. It is further proved that the equilibrium point of the proposed neural network is stable in the sense of Lyapunov. Moreover, from any initial point, the state is proved to be convergent to an equilibrium point of the proposed neural network. Finally, as applications, the proposed neural network is used to solve nonlinear convex programming with linear constraints and L1 -norm minimization problems.

  12. Convergence of Extreme Value Statistics in a Two-Layer Quasi-Geostrophic Atmospheric Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Melinda Gálfi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We search for the signature of universal properties of extreme events, theoretically predicted for Axiom A flows, in a chaotic and high-dimensional dynamical system. We study the convergence of GEV (Generalized Extreme Value and GP (Generalized Pareto shape parameter estimates to the theoretical value, which is expressed in terms of the partial information dimensions of the attractor. We consider a two-layer quasi-geostrophic atmospheric model of the mid-latitudes, adopt two levels of forcing, and analyse the extremes of different types of physical observables (local energy, zonally averaged energy, and globally averaged energy. We find good agreement in the shape parameter estimates with the theory only in the case of more intense forcing, corresponding to a strong chaotic behaviour, for some observables (the local energy at every latitude. Due to the limited (though very large data size and to the presence of serial correlations, it is difficult to obtain robust statistics of extremes in the case of the other observables. In the case of weak forcing, which leads to weaker chaotic conditions with regime behaviour, we find, unsurprisingly, worse agreement with the theory developed for Axiom A flows.

  13. Critical properties of XY model on two-layer Villain-ferromagnetic lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yi; R. Quartu; Liu Xiao-Yan; Han Ru-Qi; Horiguchi Tsuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    We investigate phase transitions of the XY model on a two-layer square lattice which consists of a Villain plane(J) and a ferromagnetic plane (I), using Monte Carlo simulations and a histogram method. Depending on the values of interaction parameters (I, J), the system presents three phases: namely, a Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) phase in which the two planes are critical for I predominant over J, a chiral phase in which the two planes have a chiral order for J predominant over I and a new phase in which only the Villain plane has a chiral order and the ferromagnetic plane is paramagnetic with a small value of chirality. We clarify the nature of phase transitions by using a finite size scaling method. We find three different kinds of transitions according to the values of (I, J): the KT transition, the Ising transition and an XY-Ising transition with v = 0.849(3). It turns out that the Ising or XY-Ising transition is associated with the disappearance of the chiral order in the Villain plane.

  14. Powerful Amplification Cascades of FRET-Based Two-Layer Nonenzymatic Nucleic Acid Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Ke; Huang, Jin; Yang, Xiaohai; Yang, Yanjing; Ying, Le; Wang, He; Xie, Nuli; Ou, Min; Wang, Kemin

    2016-06-07

    Nucleic acid circuits have played important roles in biological engineering and have increasingly attracted researchers' attention. They are primarily based on nucleic acid hybridizations and strand displacement reactions between nucleic acid probes of different lengths. Signal amplification schemes that do not rely on protein enzyme show great potential in analytical applications. While the single amplification circuit often achieves linear amplification that may not meet the need for detection of target in a very small amount, it is very necessary to construct cascade circuits that allow for larger amplification of inputs. Herein, we have successfully engineered powerful amplification cascades of FRET-based two-layer nonenzymatic nucleic acid circuits, in which the outputs of catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) activate hybridization chain reactions (HCR) circuits to induce repeated hybridization, allowing real-time monitoring of self-assembly process by FRET signal. The cascades can yield 50000-fold signal amplification with the help of the well-designed and high-quality nucleic acid circuit amplifiers. Subsequently, with coupling of structure-switching aptamer, as low as 200 pM adenosine is detected in buffer, as well as in human serum. To our knowledge, we have for the first time realized real-time monitoring adaptation of HCR to CHA circuits and achieved amplified detection of nucleic acids and small molecules with relatively high sensitivity.

  15. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; van der Schans, CP

    2000-01-01

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time elap

  16. Optical properties of mouse biotissues and their optical phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainov, A. D.; Mokeeva, A. M.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Agrba, P. D.; Kirillin, M. Yu.

    2013-08-01

    Based on spectrophotometric measurements in the range of 700-1100 nm performed with the use of an integrating sphere, we have obtained absorption and scattering spectra of internal organs of mouse, as well as of aqueous solutions of India ink and Lipofundin, which are basic model media for creating optical phantoms of biological tissues. To retrieve the spectra of optical characteristics, we have used original formulas that relate the parameters of the medium with measured spectrophotometric characteristics and that are constructed based on classical analytical models of propagation of light in turbid media. As a result of comparison of spectra of biotissues and model media, we have developed a mixture of Lipofundin and India ink serving as mouse optical phantoms for problems of optical medical diagnostics.

  17. Unifying phantom inflation with late-time acceleration: scalar phantom-non-phantom transition model and generalized holographic dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, S; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2005-01-01

    The unifying approach to early-time and late-time universe based on phantom cosmology is proposed. We consider gravity-scalar system which contains usual potential and scalar coupling function in front of kinetic term. As a result, the possibility of phantom-non-phantom transition appears in such a way that universe could have effectively phantom equation of state at early time as well as at late time. In fact, the oscillating universe may have several phantom and non-phantom phases. As a second model we suggest generalized holographic dark energy where infrared cutoff is identified with combination of FRW parameters: Hubble constant, particle and future horizons, cosmological constant and universe life-time (if finite). Depending on the specific choice of the model the number of interesting effects occur: the possibility to solve the coincidence problem, crossing of phantom divide and unification of early-time inflationary and late-time accelerating phantom universe. The bound for holographic entropy which d...

  18. Phantom pain and risk factors : A multivariate analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Stewart, R; van der Schans, CP

    2002-01-01

    Phantom pain has been given considerable attention in literature. Phantom Pain reduces quality of life, and patients suffering from phantom pain make heavy use of the medical system. Many risk factors have been identified for phantom Pain in univariate analyses, including phantom sensations, stump P

  19. Phantom pain and risk factors : A multivariate analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Stewart, R; van der Schans, CP

    2002-01-01

    Phantom pain has been given considerable attention in literature. Phantom Pain reduces quality of life, and patients suffering from phantom pain make heavy use of the medical system. Many risk factors have been identified for phantom Pain in univariate analyses, including phantom sensations, stump P

  20. Development of a patient-specific two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; Burkett, George W.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Chen, Lin; Stern, Robin L.; Boone, John M.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a technique for the construction of a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom specific to an individual patient's pendant breast anatomy. Three-dimensional breast images were acquired on a prototype dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) scanner as part of an ongoing IRB-approved clinical trial of bCT. The images from the breast of a patient were segmented into adipose and glandular tissue regions and divided into 1.59 mm thick breast sections to correspond to the thickness of polyethylene stock. A computer-controlled water-jet cutting machine was used to cut the outer breast edge and the internal regions corresponding to glandular tissue from the polyethylene. The stack of polyethylene breast segments was encased in a thermoplastic ‘skin’ and filled with water. Water-filled spaces modeled glandular tissue structures and the surrounding polyethylene modeled the adipose tissue compartment. Utility of the phantom was demonstrated by inserting 200 µm microcalcifications as well as by measuring point dose deposition during bCT scanning. Affine registration of the original patient images with bCT images of the phantom showed similar tissue distribution. Linear profiles through the registered images demonstrated a mean coefficient of determination (r2) between grayscale profiles of 0.881. The exponent of the power law describing the anatomical noise power spectrum was identical in the coronal images of the patient's breast and the phantom. Microcalcifications were visualized in the phantom at bCT scanning. The real-time air kerma rate was measured during bCT scanning and fluctuated with breast anatomy. On average, point dose deposition was 7.1% greater than the mean glandular dose. A technique to generate a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom from bCT images has been demonstrated. The phantom is the first, to our knowledge, to accurately model the uncompressed pendant breast and the glandular tissue

  1. Absorbed Dose Calculations Using Mesh-based Human Phantoms And Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Health risks attributable to the exposure to ionizing radiation are considered to be a function of the absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues. However, as human tissue cannot express itself in terms of equivalent dose, exposure models have to be used to determine the distribution of equivalent dose throughout the human body. An exposure model, be it physical or computational, consists of a representation of the human body, called phantom, plus a method for transporting ionizing radiation through the phantom and measuring or calculating the equivalent dose to organ and tissues of interest. The FASH2 (Female Adult meSH) and the MASH2 (Male Adult meSH) computational phantoms have been developed at the University of Pernambuco in Recife/Brazil based on polygon mesh surfaces using open source software tools and anatomical atlases. Representing standing adults, FASH2 and MASH2 have organ and tissue masses, body height and body mass adjusted to the anatomical data published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the reference male and female adult. For the purposes of absorbed dose calculations the phantoms have been coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, which can transport photons, electrons and positrons through arbitrary media. This paper reviews the development of the FASH2 and the MASH2 phantoms and presents dosimetric applications for X-ray diagnosis and for prostate brachytherapy.

  2. Generation of anatomically realistic numerical phantoms for photoacoustic and ultrasonic breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yang; Zhou, Weimin; Matthews, Thomas P; Appleton, Catherine M; Anastasio, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) and ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) are emerging modalities for breast imaging. As in all emerging imaging technologies, computer-simulation studies play a critically important role in developing and optimizing the designs of hardware and image reconstruction methods for PACT and USCT. Using computer-simulations, the parameters of an imaging system can be systematically and comprehensively explored in a way that is generally not possible through experimentation. When conducting such studies, numerical phantoms are employed to represent the physical properties of the patient or object to-be-imaged that influence the measured image data. It is highly desirable to utilize numerical phantoms that are realistic, especially when task-based measures of image quality are to be utilized to guide system design. However, most reported computer-simulation studies of PACT and USCT breast imaging employ simple numerical phantoms that oversimplify the complex anatomical structures in the human female breast. We develop and implement a methodology for generating anatomically realistic numerical breast phantoms from clinical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data. The phantoms will depict vascular structures and the volumetric distribution of different tissue types in the breast. By assigning optical and acoustic parameters to different tissue structures, both optical and acoustic breast phantoms will be established for use in PACT and USCT studies.

  3. Generation of anatomically realistic numerical phantoms for photoacoustic and ultrasonic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yang; Zhou, Weimin; Matthews, Thomas P.; Appleton, Catherine M.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-04-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) and ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) are emerging modalities for breast imaging. As in all emerging imaging technologies, computer-simulation studies play a critically important role in developing and optimizing the designs of hardware and image reconstruction methods for PACT and USCT. Using computer-simulations, the parameters of an imaging system can be systematically and comprehensively explored in a way that is generally not possible through experimentation. When conducting such studies, numerical phantoms are employed to represent the physical properties of the patient or object to-be-imaged that influence the measured image data. It is highly desirable to utilize numerical phantoms that are realistic, especially when task-based measures of image quality are to be utilized to guide system design. However, most reported computer-simulation studies of PACT and USCT breast imaging employ simple numerical phantoms that oversimplify the complex anatomical structures in the human female breast. We develop and implement a methodology for generating anatomically realistic numerical breast phantoms from clinical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data. The phantoms will depict vascular structures and the volumetric distribution of different tissue types in the breast. By assigning optical and acoustic parameters to different tissue structures, both optical and acoustic breast phantoms will be established for use in PACT and USCT studies.

  4. Characterization of a novel phantom for three-dimensional in vitro cell experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Michael B; Pelizzari, Charles A; Aydogan, Bulent; Reft, Chester S; Chmura, Steven J [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Vesper, Benjamin J; Radosevich, James A [Center for Molecular Biology of Oral Diseases, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Smith, Brett D; Stinauer, Michelle A [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Roeske, John C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2009-03-07

    A novel intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) phantom for use in three-dimensional in vitro cell experiments, based on a commercially available system (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA), was designed and fabricated. The water-equivalent plastic phantom can, with a set of water-equivalent plastic inserts, enclose 1-3 multi-well tissue culture plates. Dosimetry within the phantom was assessed using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and film. The phantom was loaded with three tissue culture plates, and an array of TLDs or a set of three films was placed underneath each plate within the phantom, and then irradiated using an IMRT plan created for it. Measured doses from each dosimeter were compared to those acquired from the treatment planning system. The percent differences between TLD measurements and the corresponding points in the treatment plan ranged from 1.3% to 2.9%, differences which did not show statistical significance. Average point-by-point percent dose differences for each film plane ranged from 1.6% to 3.1%. The percentage dose difference for which 95% of the points in the film matched those corresponding to the calculated dose plane to within 3.0% ranged from 2.8% to 4.2%. The good agreement between predicted and measured dose shows that the phantom is a useful and efficient tool for three-dimensional in vitro cell experiments. (note)

  5. Skin Dosimetry in Breast Teletherapy on a Phantom Anthropomorphic and Anthropometric Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista Nogueira, Luciana [Anatomy and Imaging Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Lemos Silva, Hugo Leonardo [Santa Casa Hospital, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper addresses the breast teletherapy dosimetry. The goal is to evaluate and compare absorbed doses in equivalent skin tissue, TE-skin, of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric breast phantom submitted to breast radiotherapy. The methodology involved the reproduction of a set of tomographic images of the phantom; the elaboration of conformational radiotherapy planning in the SOMAVISION and CadPlan (TPS) software; and the synthetic breast irradiation by parallel opposed fields in 3D conformal teletherapy at 6 MV linear accelerator Clinac-2100 C from VARIAN with prescribed dose (PD) of 180 cGy to the target volume (PTV), referent to the glandular tissue. Radiochromic films EBT2 were selected as dosimeters. Two independent calibration processes of films with solid water Gammex 457 plates and water filled box were produced. Curves of optical density (OD) versus absorbed dose were produced. Dosimeters were positioned in the external region of the breast phantom in contact with TE-skin, area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} each. The irradiation process was prepared in duplicate to check the reproducibility of the technique. The radiochromic films were scanned and their response in RGB (Red, Green, Blue) analyzed by the ImageJ software. The optical density was obtained and converted to dose based on the calibration curves. Thus, the spatial dose distribution in the skin was reproduced. The absorbed doses measured on the radiochromic films in TE-skin showed values between upper and lower quadrants at 9 o'clock in the range of 54% of PD, between the upper and lower quadrants 3 o'clock in the range of 72% and 6 o'clock at the lower quadrant in the range of 68 % of PD. The values are ±64% (p <0.05) according to the TPS. It is concluded that the depth dose measured in solid water plates or water box reproduce equivalent dose values for both calibration processes of the radiochromic films. It was observed that the skin received doses ranging from 50% to 78% of the

  6. On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Lee, Choonik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Lee, Jai-Ki [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-07

    Distributions of radiation absorbed dose within human anatomy have been estimated through Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques implemented for two different classes of computational anthropomorphic phantoms: (1) mathematical equation-based stylized phantoms and (2) tomographic image-based voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms constructed from tomographic images of real human anatomy have been actively developed since the late 1980s to overcome the anatomical approximations necessary with stylized phantoms, which themselves have been utilized since the mid 1960s. However, revisions of stylized phantoms have also been pursued in parallel to the development of voxel phantoms since voxel phantoms (1) are initially restricted to the individual-specific anatomy of the person originally imaged, (2) must be restructured on an organ-by-organ basis to conform to reference individual anatomy and (3) cannot easily represent very fine anatomical structures and tissue layers that are thinner than the voxel dimensions of the overall phantom. Although efforts have been made to improve the anatomic realism of stylized phantoms, most of these efforts have been limited to attempts to alter internal organ structures. Aside from the internal organs, the exterior shapes, and especially the arm structures, of stylized phantoms are also far from realistic descriptions of human anatomy, and may cause dosimetry errors in the calculation of organ-absorbed doses for external irradiation scenarios. The present study was intended to highlight the need to revise the existing arm structure within stylized phantoms by comparing organ doses of stylized adult phantoms with those from three adult voxel phantoms in the lateral photon irradiation geometry. The representative stylized phantom, the adult phantom of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) series and two adult male voxel phantoms, KTMAN-2 and VOXTISS8, were employed for Monte Carlo dose calculation, and data from another voxel phantom, VIP

  7. The dependencies of phase velocity and dispersion on volume fraction in cancellous-bone-mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Keith A

    2009-02-01

    Frequency-dependent phase velocity was measured in eight cancellous-bone-mimicking phantoms consisting of suspensions of randomly oriented nylon filaments (simulating trabeculae) in a soft-tissue-mimicking medium (simulating marrow). Trabecular thicknesses ranged from 152 to 356 mum. Volume fractions of nylon filament material ranged from 0% to 10%. Phase velocity varied approximately linearly with frequency over the range from 300 to 700 kHz. The increase in phase velocity (compared with phase velocity in a phantom containing no filaments) at 500 kHz was approximately proportional to volume fraction occupied by nylon filaments. The derivative of phase velocity with respect to frequency was negative and exhibited nonlinear, monotonically decreasing dependence on volume fraction. The dependencies of phase velocity and its derivative on volume fraction in these phantoms were similar to those reported in previous studies on (1) human cancellous bone and (2) phantoms consisting of parallel nylon wires immersed in water.

  8. Oscillating phantom in $F(R)$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the oscillating effective equation of state (EoS) of the universe around the phantom divide in the framework of $F(R)$ gravity. We illustrate the behavior of $F(R)$ with realizing multiple crossings of the phantom divide.

  9. Note on the Schwarzschild-phantom wormhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukmanova, R.; Khaibullina, A.; Izmailov, R.; Yanbekov, A.; Karimov, R.; Potapov, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown by Lobo, Parsaei and Riazi that phantom energy with ω =pr/ρ Katz and Bi čák. It turns out that, even though the interior mass is positive, the integral implies repulsive energy. This is consistent with the phantom nature of interior matter.

  10. Resin phantoms as skin simulating layers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, AE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available on the efficiency of Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) treatment. Two resin based solid phantoms were prepared to simulate two different skin types. Cells were prepared and PDT treatment were done on cells with and without the phantoms, by keeping the total dose delivered...

  11. THE SEMI-GEOSTROPHIC ADAPTATION PROCESS WITH TWO-LAYER BAROCLINIC MODEL IN LOW LATITUDE ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the adaptation process in low latitude atmosphere is discussed by means of a two-layer baroclinic model on the equator β plane, showing that the adaptation process in low latitude is mainly dominated by the internal inertial gravity waves. The initial ageostrophic energy is dispersed by the internal inertial gravity waves, and as a result, the geostrophic motion is obtained in zonal direction while the ageostrophic motion maintains in meridional direction, which can be called semi-geostrophic balance in barotropic model as well as semi-thermal-wind balance in baroclinic model. The vertical motion is determined both by the distribution of the initial vertical motion and that of the initial vertical motion tendency, but it is unrelated to the initial potential vorticity. Finally, the motion tends to be horizontal. The discussion of the physical mechanism of the semi-thermal-wind balance in low latitude atmosphere shows that the achievement of the semi-thermal-wind balance is due to the adjustment between the stream field and the temperature field through the horizontal convergence and divergence which is related to the vertical motion excited by the internal inertial gravity waves. The terminal adaptation state obtained shows that the adaptation direction between the mean temperature field and the shear flow field is determined by the ratio of the scale of the initial ageostrophic disturbance to the scale of one character scale related to the baroclinic Rossby radius of deformation. The shear stream field adapts to the mean temperature field when the ratio is greater than 1, and the mean temperature field adapts to the shear stream field when the ratio is smaller than 1.

  12. Convective instability in a two-layer system of reacting fluids with concentration-dependent diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitova, E. V.; Bratsun, D. A.; Kostarev, K. G.; Mizev, A. I.; Mosheva, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of convective instability in a two-layer system of miscible fluids placed in a narrow vertical gap has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The upper and lower layers are formed with aqueous solutions of acid and base, respectively. When the layers are brought into contact, the frontal neutralization reaction begins. We have found experimentally a new type of convective instability, which is characterized by the spatial localization and the periodicity of the structure observed for the first time in the miscible systems. We have tested a number of different acid-base systems and have found a similar patterning there. In our opinion, it may indicate that the discovered effect is of a general nature and should be taken into account in reaction-diffusion-convection problems as another tool with which the reaction can govern the movement of the reacting fluids. We have shown that, at least in one case (aqueous solutions of nitric acid and sodium hydroxide), a new type of instability called as the concentration-dependent diffusion convection is responsible for the onset of the fluid flow. It arises when the diffusion coefficients of species are different and depend on their concentrations. This type of instability can be attributed to a variety of double-diffusion convection. A mathematical model of the new phenomenon has been developed using the system of reaction-diffusion-convection equations written in the Hele-Shaw approximation. It is shown that the instability can be reproduced in the numerical experiment if only one takes into account the concentration dependence of the diffusion coefficients of the reagents. The dynamics of the base state, its linear stability and nonlinear development of the instability are presented. It is also shown that by varying the concentration of acid in the upper layer one can achieve the occurrence of chemo-convective solitary cell in the bulk of an almost immobile fluid. Good agreement between the

  13. Global chaotization of fluid particle trajectories in a sheared two-layer two-vortex flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhov, Evgeny A., E-mail: ryzhovea@poi.dvo.ru [Pacific Oceanological Institute of FEB RAS, 43, Baltiyskaya Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Koshel, Konstantin V., E-mail: kvkoshel@poi.dvo.ru [Pacific Oceanological Institute of FEB RAS, 43, Baltiyskaya Street, Vladivostok 690041 (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, 8, Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    In a two-layer quasi-geostrophic approximation, we study the irregular dynamics of fluid particles arising due to two interacting point vortices embedded in a deformation flow consisting of shear and rotational components. The two vortices are arranged within the bottom layer, but an emphasis is on the upper-layer fluid particle motion. Vortices moving in one layer induce stirring of passive scalars in the other layer. This is of interest since point vortices induce singular velocity fields in the layer they belong to; however, in the other layer, they induce regular velocity fields that generally result in a change in passive particle stirring. If the vortices are located at stagnation points, there are three different types of the fluid flow. We examine how properties of each flow configuration are modified if the vortices are displaced from the stagnation points and thus circulate in the immediate vicinity of these points. To that end, an analysis of the steady-state configurations is presented with an emphasis on the frequencies of fluid particle oscillations about the elliptic stagnation points. Asymptotic relations for the vortex and fluid particle zero–oscillation frequencies are derived in the vicinity of the corresponding elliptic points. By comparing the frequencies of fluid particles with the ones of the vortices, relations between the parameters that lead to enhanced stirring of fluid particles are established. It is also demonstrated that, if the central critical point is elliptic, then the fluid particle trajectories in its immediate vicinity are mostly stable making it harder for the vortex perturbation to induce stirring. Change in the type of the central point to a hyperbolic one enhances drastically the size of the chaotic dynamics region. Conditions on the type of the central critical point also ensue from the derived asymptotic relations.

  14. Kerr-Like Phantom Wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, Galaxia; García, Nadiezhda Motelongo

    2013-01-01

    In this work we study a Kerr-like wormhole with phantom matter as source. It has three parameters: mass, angular momentum and scalar field charge. This wormhole has a naked ring singularity, other wise it is regular everywhere. The mean feature of this wormhole is that the mouth of the throat lie on a sphere of the same radius as the ring singularity an avoids any observer to see or to reach the singularity, it behaves like an anti-horizon. We analyse the geodesics of the wormhole and find that an observer can go through the geodesics without troubles, but the equator presents an infinity potential barrier which avoids to reach the throat. From an analysis of the Riemann tensor we obtain that the tidal forces permits the wormhole to be traversable for an observer like a human being.

  15. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association.

  16. Novel organosilicon phantoms as testing material for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avigo, Cinzia; Armanetti, Paolo; Masciullo, Cecilia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Pini, Roberto; Cecchini, Marco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2016-03-01

    The contrast in photoacoustic (PA) imaging depends on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, as well as on his optical absorption and scatter properties. Thanks to these futures, this novel modality could offer additional specificity compared to conventional ultrasound techniques, being able to reveal the signal of absorbing materials and chomophores, e.g. endogenous molecules like haemoglobin or specific near infrared dyes or plasmonic contrast agents. The development of semi-quantitative protocols for the assessment of the contrast enhancement, is one of the key aspect of the ongoing research, that could open new routes to the use of PA imaging for a variety of applications in preclinical research of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this work, we designed and tested a tissue mimicking polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom for photoacoustic applications, with tailored biomechanical/optical and geometrical properties. In order to modulate the light fluence and penetration, that remains one of the major challenge for this technique, we added titanium dioxide and black ink, rendering the optical absorption and scattering coefficients similar to those of biological tissues. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues.

  17. An operational two-layer remote sensing model to estimate surface flux in regional scale: Physical background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Renhua; SUN; Xiaomin; WANG; Weimin; XU; Jinping; ZH

    2005-01-01

    Based on the improved interaction mechanism of two-layer model, this paper proposed Pixel Component Arranging and Comparing Algorithm (PCACA) and theoretically positioning algorithm, estimated the true temperature of mixed pixel in four extreme points in combination with the measurements of dry and wet points in calibration fields and improved the reliability of positioning dry and wet line. A new two-layer energy-separation algorithm was proposed,which was simple and direct without resistance network parameters for each pixel. We also proposed a new thought about the effect of advection. The albedo of mixed pixel was also separated with PCACA. In combination with two-layer energy-separation algorithm, the net radiation of mixed pixel was separated to overcome the uncertainty of conventional energy-separation algorithm using Beer's Law. Through the validation of retrieval result, this method is proved to be feasible and operational. At the same time, the uncertainty of this algorithm was objectively analyzed.

  18. Calibration of a prototype NIRS oximeter against two commercial devices on a blood-lipid phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Kleiser, Stefan; Wolf, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In a blood-lipid liquid phantom the prototype near-infrared spectroscopy oximeter OxyPrem was calibrated against the INVOS® 5100c adult sensor in respect to values of regional tissue oxygen haemoglobin saturation (rStO2) for possible inclusion in the randomised clinical trial - SafeBoosC. In addi......In a blood-lipid liquid phantom the prototype near-infrared spectroscopy oximeter OxyPrem was calibrated against the INVOS® 5100c adult sensor in respect to values of regional tissue oxygen haemoglobin saturation (rStO2) for possible inclusion in the randomised clinical trial - SafeBoos...

  19. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, J; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Soni...

  20. Multimodal, 3D pathology-mimicking bladder phantom for evaluation of cystoscopic technologies (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gennifer T.; Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and blue light cystoscopy (BLC) have shown significant potential as complementary technologies to traditional white light cystoscopy (WLC) for early bladder cancer detection. Three-dimensional (3D) organ-mimicking phantoms provide realistic imaging environments for testing new technology designs, the diagnostic potential of systems, and novel image processing algorithms prior to validation in real tissue. Importantly, the phantom should mimic features of healthy and diseased tissue as they appear under WLC, BLC, and OCT, which are sensitive to tissue color and structure, fluorescent contrast, and optical scattering of subsurface layers, respectively. We present a phantom posing the hollow shape of the bladder and fabricated using a combination of 3D-printing and spray-coating with Dragon Skin (DS) (Smooth-On Inc.), a highly elastic polymer to mimic the layered structure of the bladder. Optical scattering of DS was tuned by addition of titanium dioxide, resulting in scattering coefficients sufficient to cover the human bladder range (0.49 to 2.0 mm^-1). Mucosal vasculature and tissue coloration were mimicked with elastic cord and red dye, respectively. Urethral access was provided through a small hole excised from the base of the phantom. Inserted features of bladder pathology included altered tissue color (WLC), fluorescence emission (BLC), and variations in layered structure (OCT). The phantom surface and underlying material were assessed on the basis of elasticity, optical scattering, layer thicknesses, and qualitative image appearance. WLC, BLC, and OCT images of normal and cancerous features in the phantom qualitatively matched corresponding images from human bladders.

  1. Evaluation of dose conversion coefficients for an eight-year-old Iranian male phantom undergoing computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Hakimabad, Hashem Miri; Motavalli, Laleh Rafat

    2015-11-01

    In order to construct a library of Iranian pediatric voxel phantoms for radiological protection and dosimetry applications, an Iranian eight-year-old phantom was constructed from a series of CT images. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients to this phantom were calculated for head, chest, abdominopelvis and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans at tube voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kVp. To validate the results, the organ and effective dose conversion coefficients obtained were compared with those of the University of Florida eight-year-old voxel female phantom as a function of examination type and anatomical scan area. For a detailed study, depth distributions of organs together with the thickness of surrounding tissues located in the beam path, which are shielding the internal organs, were determined for these two voxel phantoms. The relation between the anatomical differences and the level of delivered dose was investigated and the discrepancies among the results justified.

  2. Development of an improved approach to radiation treatment therapy using high-definition patient-specific voxel phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, R.C.; Ryman, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Stallings, D.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    Through an internally funded project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a high-resolution phantom was developed based on the National Library of Medicine`s Visible Human Data. Special software was written using the interactive data language (IDL) visualization language to automatically segment and classify some of the organs and the skeleton of the Visible Male. A high definition phantom consisting of nine hundred 512 x 512 slices was constructed of the entire torso. Computed tomography (CT) images of a patient`s tumor near the spine were scaled and morphed into the phantom model to create a patient-specific phantom. Calculations of dose to the tumor and surrounding tissue were then performed using the patient-specific phantom.

  3. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  4. Preparing a voxel-simulator of Alderson Rando physical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boia, Leonardo S.; Martins, Maximiano C.; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: lboia@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ). Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salmon Junior, Helio A., E-mail: heliosalmon@coinet.com.br [COI - Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas, MD.X Barra Medical Center, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Soares, Alessandro F.N.S., E-mail: afacure@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Engenharia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    There are, nowadays, sorts of anthropomorphycal phantoms which are used for simulation of radiation transport by the matter and also the deposition of energy in such radiation in human tissues and organs, because an in-vitro dosimetry becomes very either complicated or even impossible in some cases. In the present work we prepared a computational phantom in voxels based on computational tomography of Rando-Alderson. This phantom is one of the most known human body simulators on the scope of ionizing radiation dosimetry, and it is used for radioprotection issues and dosimetry from radiotherapy and brachytherapy treatments as well. The preparation of a voxel simulator starts with the image acquisition by a tomograph found at COI/RJ (Clinicas Oncologicas Integradas). The images were generated with 1mm cuts and collected for analysis. After that step the images were processed in SAPDI (Sistema Automatizado de Processamento Digital de Imagem) in order to amplify the images regions intending to facilitate the task in their segmentation. SAPDI is based on parameters described by Hounsfield scale. After that, it has begun discretization of elements in IDs voxels using Scan2MCNP software - which converts images to a sequential text file containing the voxels' IDs ready to be introduced into MCNPX input; however, this set can be turned to a voxel's IDs matrix and used in other Monte Carlo codes, such as Geant4, PENELOPE and EGSnrc. Finished this step, the simulator is able to simulate with accurate geometry the physical phantom. It's possible to study a large number of cases by computational techniques of geometry's insertions of tumors and TLDs, which makes this simulator a research material useful for a lot of subjects. (author)

  5. Charged black holes in phantom cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Qadir, Asghar; Rashid, Muneer Ahmad [National University of Sciences and Technology, Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    2008-11-15

    In the classical relativistic regime, the accretion of phantom-like dark energy onto a stationary black hole reduces the mass of the black hole. We have investigated the accretion of phantom energy onto a stationary charged black hole and have determined the condition under which this accretion is possible. This condition restricts the mass-to-charge ratio in a narrow range. This condition also challenges the validity of the cosmic-censorship conjecture since a naked singularity is eventually produced due to accretion of phantom energy onto black hole. (orig.)

  6. Electromagnetic fields due to a horizontal electric dipole antenna laid on the surface of a two-layer medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    With applications to geophysical subsurface probings, electromagnetic fields due to a horizontal electric dipole laid on the surface of a two-layer medium are solved by a combination of analytic and numerical methods. Interference patterns are calculated for various layer thickness. The results are interpreted in terms of normal modes, and the accuracies of the methods are discussed.

  7. [Two-layer adhesive film Diplen-denta C--a new compound containing polymer base and active component Solcoseryl].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakarova, D S

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of the main components of a new effective long-lasting dosage form--biopolymer two-layer adhesive solcoseryl containing film Diplen-denta C--are presented. It has a potent wound-healing action on oral mucosa, retains therapeutic properties during long time, is self dissolving and can be easily fixed on oral mucous membrane.

  8. Screen-Capturing System with Two-Layer Display for PowerPoint Presentation to Enhance Classroom Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Shou; Tsai, Hung-Hsu; Yu, Pao-Ta

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new presentation system integrating a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation in a two-layer method, called the TL system, to promote learning in a physical classroom. With the TL system, teachers can readily control hints or annotations as a way of making them visible or invisible to students so as to reduce information load. In…

  9. Hamiltonian Particle-Mesh Method for Two-Layer Shallow-Water Equations Subject to the Rigid-Lid Approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotter, C.J.; Frank, J.E.; Reich, S.

    2004-01-01

    We develop a particle-mesh method for two-layer shallow-water equations subject to the rigid-lid approximation. The method is based on the recently proposed Hamiltonian particle-mesh (HPM) method and the interpretation of the rigid-lid approximation as a set of holonomic constraints. The suggested s

  10. I-125 seed dose estimates in heterogeneous phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, Isabela S.L.; Antunes, Paula C.G.; Cavalieri, Tassio A.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: isabela.slbranco@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the healing process involving tumors in a variety of diseases. Several studies are currently conducted to examine the heterogeneity effects of different tissues and organs in brachytherapy clinical situations and a great effort has been made to incorporate new methodologies to estimate doses with greater accuracy. The objective of this study is to contribute to the assessment of heterogeneous effects on dose due to I-125 brachytherapy source in the presence of different materials with different densities and chemical compositions. The study was performed in heterogeneous phantoms using materials that simulate human tissues. Among these is quoted: breast, fat, muscle, lungs (exhaled and inhaled) and bones with different densities. Monte Carlo simulations for dose calculation in these phantoms were held and subsequently validated. The model 6711 I-125 seed was considered because it is widely used as a brachytherapy permanent implant and the one used in clinics and hospitals in Brazil. Thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD-700 (LiF: Mg, Ti) were simulated for dose assess. Several tissue configurations and positioning of I-125 sources were studied by simulations for future dose measurements. The methodology of this study so far shall be suitable for accurate dosimetric evaluation for different types of brachytherapy treatments, contributing to brachytherapy planning systems complementation allowing a better assessment of the dose actually delivered to the patient. (author)

  11. Software phantom with realistic speckle modeling for validation of image analysis methods in echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yuen C.; Tenbrinck, Daniel; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2014-03-01

    Computer-assisted processing and interpretation of medical ultrasound images is one of the most challenging tasks within image analysis. Physical phenomena in ultrasonographic images, e.g., the characteristic speckle noise and shadowing effects, make the majority of standard methods from image analysis non optimal. Furthermore, validation of adapted computer vision methods proves to be difficult due to missing ground truth information. There is no widely accepted software phantom in the community and existing software phantoms are not exible enough to support the use of specific speckle models for different tissue types, e.g., muscle and fat tissue. In this work we propose an anatomical software phantom with a realistic speckle pattern simulation to _ll this gap and provide a exible tool for validation purposes in medical ultrasound image analysis. We discuss the generation of speckle patterns and perform statistical analysis of the simulated textures to obtain quantitative measures of the realism and accuracy regarding the resulting textures.

  12. Construction of realistic phantoms from patient images and a commercial three-dimensional printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Chen, Baiyu; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Alexander, Amy; Matsumoto, Jane; Morris, Jonathan; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to use three-dimensional (3-D) printing techniques to construct liver and brain phantoms having realistic pathologies, anatomic structures, and heterogeneous backgrounds. Patient liver and head computed tomography (CT) images were segmented into tissue, vessels, liver lesion, white and gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Stereolithography files of each object were created and imported into a commercial 3-D printer. Printing materials were assigned to each object after test scans, which showed that the printing materials had CT numbers ranging from 70 to 121 HU at 120 kV. Printed phantoms were scanned on a CT scanner and images were evaluated. CT images of the liver phantom had measured CT numbers of 77.8 and 96.6 HU for the lesion and background, and 137.5 to 428.4 HU for the vessels channels, which were filled with iodine solutions. The difference in CT numbers between lesions and background (18.8 HU) was representative of the low-contrast values needed for optimization tasks. The liver phantom background was evaluated with Haralick features and showed similar texture between patient and phantom images. CT images of the brain phantom had CT numbers of 125, 134, and 108 HU for white matter, gray matter, and CSF, respectively. The CT number differences were similar to those in patient images.

  13. Use of internal references for assessing CT density measurements of the pelvis as replacement for use of an external phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomsma, Martijn F.; Slouwerhof, Inge; Dalen, Jorn A. van [Isala Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Edens, Mireille A. [Isala Hospital, Department of Innovation and Science, Zwolle (Netherlands); Mueller, Dirk [Philips Healthcare systems, Hamburg (Germany); Milles, Julien [Philips Healthcare Benelux, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [AMC, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this research is to study the use of an internal reference standard for fat- and muscle as a replacement for an external reference standard with a phantom. By using a phantomless internal reference standard, Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements of various tissues can potentially be assessed in patients with a CT scan of the pelvis without an added phantom at time of CT acquisition. This paves the way for development of a tool for quantification of the change in tissue density in one patient over time and between patients. This could make every CT scan made without contrast available for research purposes. Fifty patients with unilateral metal-on-metal total hip replacements, scanned together with a calibration reference phantom used in bone mineral density measurements, were included in this study. On computed tomography scans of the pelvis without the use of intravenous iodine contrast, reference values for fat and muscle were measured in the phantom as well as within the patient's body. The conformity between the references was examined with the intra-class correlation coefficient. The mean HU (± SD) of reference values for fat for the internal- and phantom references were -91.5 (±7.0) and -90.9 (±7.8), respectively. For muscle, the mean HU (± SD) for the internal- and phantom references were 59.2 (±6.2) and 60.0 (±7.2), respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficients for fat and muscle were 0.90 and 0.84 respectively and show excellent agreement between the phantom and internal references. Internal references can be used with similar accuracy as references from an external phantom. There is no need to use an external phantom to asses CT density measurements of body tissue. (orig.)

  14. Biomedical phantoms. January 1977-January 1989 (Citations from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1977-January 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the design, development, construction, and evaluation of various anthropomorphic phantoms, used in radiotherapy and diagnostic radiology. The radiation characteristics of phantom materials are addressed, simulating human body tissue, muscles, organs, bones, and skin. (Contains 128 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  15. Design of a digital phantom population for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Michael; Du, Yong; Fung, George S. K.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Links, Jonathan M.; Frey, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Digital phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have become important tools for optimizing and evaluating instrumentation, acquisition and processing methods for myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). In this work, we designed a new adult digital phantom population and generated corresponding Tc-99m and Tl-201 projections for use in MPS research. The population is based on the three-dimensional XCAT phantom with organ parameters sampled from the Emory PET Torso Model Database. Phantoms included three variations each in body size, heart size, and subcutaneous adipose tissue level, for a total of 27 phantoms of each gender. The SimSET MC code and angular response functions were used to model interactions in the body and the collimator-detector system, respectively. We divided each phantom into seven organs, each simulated separately, allowing use of post-simulation summing to efficiently model uptake variations. Also, we adapted and used a criterion based on the relative Poisson effective count level to determine the required number of simulated photons for each simulated organ. This technique provided a quantitative estimate of the true noise in the simulated projection data, including residual MC simulation noise. Projections were generated in 1 keV wide energy windows from 48-184 keV assuming perfect energy resolution to permit study of the effects of window width, energy resolution, and crosstalk in the context of dual isotope MPS. We have developed a comprehensive method for efficiently simulating realistic projections for a realistic population of phantoms in the context of MPS imaging. The new phantom population and realistic database of simulated projections will be useful in performing mathematical and human observer studies to evaluate various acquisition and processing methods such as optimizing the energy window width, investigating the effect of energy resolution on image quality and evaluating compensation methods for degrading factors such as crosstalk in

  16. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E. [Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Centre for Advanced Medical Imaging (CAMI), St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Department of Medical Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  17. Can neural blocks prevent phantom limb pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Battista; D'Addabbo, Marco; Borghi, Raffaele

    2014-07-01

    Phantom limb syndrome (PLS) is a syndrome including stump pain, phantom limb pain and not-painful phantom sensations, which involves a large part of amputee patients and often has devastating effects on their quality of life. The efficacy of standard therapies is very poor. Nerve blocks have been investigated for the treatment and prevention of PLS. Epidural and peripheral blocks limited to the first three postamputation days can only reduce acute pain but cannot prevent the later development of PLS. Recent studies have shown that ambulatory prolonged peripheral nerve block (up to 30 days postamputation) may represent a new possible option to treat phantom pain and prevent the development of PLS and chronic pain.

  18. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashenok, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats - ICREA and Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-Par-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yurov, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-23

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time ('phantom energy' without 'Big Rip' singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time ('cosmological constant' with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  19. Custom molded thermal MRg-FUS phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Matthew D. C.; Snell, John W.; Hananel, Arik; Kassell, Neal F.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes a method for creating custom-molded thermal phantoms for use with MR-guided focused ultrasound systems. The method is defined here for intracranial applications, though it may be modified for other anatomical targets.

  20. Optical absorption and scattering properties of bulk porcine muscle phantoms from interstitial radiance measurements in 650-900 nm range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated the application of relative radiance-based continuous wave (cw) measurements for recovering absorption and scattering properties (the effective attenuation coefficient, the diffusion coefficient, the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient) of bulk porcine muscle phantoms in the 650-900 nm spectral range. Both the side-firing fiber (the detector) and the fiber with a spherical diffuser at the end (the source) were inserted interstitially at predetermined locations in the phantom. The porcine phantoms were prostate-shaped with ˜4 cm in diameter and ˜3 cm thickness and made from porcine loin or tenderloin muscles. The described method was previously validated using the diffusion approximation on simulated and experimental radiance data obtained for homogenous Intralipid-1% liquid phantom. The approach required performing measurements in two locations in the tissue with different distances to the source. Measurements were performed on 21 porcine phantoms. Spectral dependences of the effective attenuation and absorption coefficients for the loin phantom deviated from corresponding dependences for the tenderloin phantom for wavelengths tissues and organs for interstitial optical interrogation.

  1. Acupuncture treatment of phantom limb pain and phantom limb sensation in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Arwel

    2013-03-01

    A 45-year-old man presented with phantom limb pain and phantom limb sensation 12 weeks after an above-elbow amputation of his right arm. He underwent seven sessions of acupuncture at weekly intervals carried out by his general practitioner on his intact left arm, with complete relief of the phantom limb pain and considerable improvement of the phantom limb sensation of his right arm. This case demonstrates the possible benefits from the use of short acupuncture sessions for a potentially chronic condition undertaken within the constraints of a busy general medical practice.

  2. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  3. Phantom Limb Pain: Mechanisms and Treatment Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu Subedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neurons in the brain has been proposed in the generation of phantom pain. A wide variety of treatment approaches have been employed, but mechanism-based specific treatment guidelines are yet to evolve. Phantom limb pain is considered a neuropathic pain, and most treatment recommendations are based on recommendations for neuropathic pain syndromes. Mirror therapy, a relatively recently proposed therapy for phantom limb pain, has mixed results in randomized controlled trials. Most successful treatment outcomes include multidisciplinary measures. This paper attempts to review and summarize recent research relative to the proposed mechanisms of and treatments for phantom limb pain.

  4. Acoustic characterization of polyvinyl chloride and self-healing silicone as phantom materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry M.; Chen, Elvis C. S.

    2015-03-01

    Phantoms are physical constructs used in procedure planning, training, medical imaging research, and machine calibration. Depending on the application, the material a phantom is made out of is very important. With ultrasound imaging, phantom materials used need to have similar acoustic properties, specifically speed of sound and attenuation, as a specified tissue. Phantoms used with needle insertion require a material with a similar tensile strength as tissue and, if possible, the ability to self heal increasing its overall lifespan. Soft polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and silicone were tested as possible needle insertion phantom materials. Acoustic characteristics were determined using a time of flight technique, where a pulse was passed through a sample contained in a water bath. The speed of sound and attenuation were both determined manually and through spectral analysis. Soft PVC was determined to have a speed of sound of approximately 1395 m/s and attenuation of 0.441 dB/cm (at 1 MHz). For the silicone mixture, the respective speed of sound values was within a range of 964.7 m/s and 1250.0 m/s with an attenuation of 0.547 dB/cm (at 1 MHz).

  5. A new, open-source, multi-modality digital breast phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G.

    2016-03-01

    An anthropomorphic digital breast phantom has been developed with the goal of generating random voxelized breast models that capture the anatomic variability observed in vivo. This is a new phantom and is not based on existing digital breast phantoms or segmentation of patient images. It has been designed at the outset to be modality agnostic (i.e., suitable for use in modeling x-ray based imaging systems, magnetic resonance imaging, and potentially other imaging systems) and open source so that users may freely modify the phantom to suit a particular study. In this work we describe the modeling techniques that have been developed, the capabilities and novel features of this phantom, and study simulated images produced from it. Starting from a base quadric, a series of deformations are performed to create a breast with a particular volume and shape. Initial glandular compartments are generated using a Voronoi technique and a ductal tree structure with terminal duct lobular units is grown from the nipple into each compartment. An additional step involving the creation of fat and glandular lobules using a Perlin noise function is performed to create more realistic glandular/fat tissue interfaces and generate a Cooper's ligament network. A vascular tree is grown from the chest muscle into the breast tissue. Breast compression is performed using a neo-Hookean elasticity model. We show simulated mammographic and T1-weighted MRI images and study properties of these images.

  6. Fetal organ dosimetry for the Techa River and Ozyorsk offspring cohorts. Pt. 1. A Urals-based series of fetal computational phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Matthew R.; Bolch, Wesley E. [University of Florida, Advanced Laboratory for Radiation Dosimetry Studies (ALRADS), J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shagina, Natalia B.; Tolstykh, Evgenia I.; Degteva, Marina O. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Fell, Tim P. [Public Health England, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Health, Didcot, Chilton, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    The European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) project aims to improve understanding of cancer risks associated with chronic in utero radiation exposure. A comprehensive series of hybrid computational fetal phantoms was previously developed at the University of Florida in order to provide the SOLO project with the capability of computationally simulating and quantifying radiation exposures to individual fetal bones and soft tissue organs. To improve harmonization between the SOLO fetal biokinetic models and the computational phantoms, a subset of those phantoms was systematically modified to create a novel series of phantoms matching anatomical data representing Russian fetal biometry in the Southern Urals. Using previously established modeling techniques, eight computational Urals-based phantoms aged 8, 12, 18, 22, 26, 30, 34, and 38 weeks post-conception were constructed to match appropriate age-dependent femur lengths, biparietal diameters, individual bone masses and whole-body masses. Bone and soft tissue organ mass differences between the common ages of the subset of UF phantom series and the Urals-based phantom series illustrated the need for improved understanding of fetal bone densities as a critical parameter of computational phantom development. In anticipation for SOLO radiation dosimetry studies involving the developing fetus and pregnant female, the completed phantom series was successfully converted to a cuboidal voxel format easily interpreted by radiation transport software. (orig.)

  7. Development and Test of a GEM-Based TEPC System for In-Phantom Dose Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C-K Chris Wang

    2007-03-13

    The objectives of this project include: (1) to construct a minature tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) using a gas-electron-multiplier (GEM) foil, and (2) to conduct neutron and gamma-ray dose measurements with the detector embedded in a phantom

  8. ATLAS-TPX: a two-layer pixel detector setup for neutron detection and radiation field characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, B.; Caicedo, I.; Leroy, C.; Pospisil, S.; Vykydal, Z.

    2016-10-01

    A two-layer pixel detector setup (ATLAS-TPX), designed for thermal and fast neutron detection and radiation field characterization is presented. It consists of two segmented silicon detectors (256 × 256 pixels, pixel pitch 55 μm, thicknesses 300 μm and 500 μm) facing each other. To enhance the neutron detection efficiency a set of converter layers is inserted in between these detectors. The pixelation and the two-layer design allow a discrimination of neutrons against γs by pattern recognition and against charged particles by using the coincidence and anticoincidence information. The neutron conversion and detection efficiencies are measured in a thermal neutron field and fast neutron fields with energies up to 600 MeV. A Geant4 simulation model is presented, which is validated against the measured detector responses. The reliability of the coincidence and anticoincidence technique is demonstrated and possible applications of the detector setup are briefly outlined.

  9. Preparation of Two-Layer Anion-Exchange Poly(ethersulfone Based Membrane: Effect of Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Zarybnicka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the surface modification of a commercial microfiltration poly(ethersulfone membrane by graft polymerization technique. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene-co-4-vinylbenzylchloride surface layer was covalently attached onto the poly(ethersulfone support layer to improve the membrane electrochemical properties. Followed by amination, a two-layer anion-exchange membrane was prepared. The effect of surface layer treatment using the extraction in various solvents on membrane morphological and electrochemical characteristics was studied. The membranes were tested from the point of view of water content, ion-exchange capacity, specific resistance, permselectivity, FT-IR spectroscopy, and SEM analysis. It was found that the two-layer anion-exchange membranes after the extraction using tetrahydrofuran or toluene exhibited smooth and porous surface layer, which resulted in improved ion-exchange capacity, electrical resistance, and permselectivity of the membranes.

  10. Tensile Properties with or without Heat Dispersion of Automotive Needlepunched Carpets Made up of Two Layers of Different Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yunqing; GUO Zhiying; DONG Xianghuai; LI Dequn

    2008-01-01

    Tensile properties of automotive needlepunched carpets made up of two layers of different materials (a fabric layer and a foam layer) in their thermoforming temperatures ranges with or without heat dispersion were discussed. Effects of forming temperature, extensile speed and fiber orientation on the tensile properties were studied based on an orthogonal experiment design. The experimental results show that automotive carpets are rate-dependent anisotropic materials and more strongly depend on forming temperature than the extensile speed and fiber orientation. Furthermore,contributions of the fabric layer and the foam layer to the overall tensile performance were investigated by comparing the tensile results of single fabric layer with those of the overall carpet. Both the fabric layer and the foam layer show positive effects on the overall tensile strength which is the combination of the two layers' tensile strength and independent of temperature, extensile speed and fiber orientation.On the other hand, their influences on the overall deformation are relatively complicated.

  11. Two-layer critical dimensions and overlay process window characterization and improvement in full-chip computational lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, John L.; Liubich, Vlad; Gupta, Rachit

    2016-04-01

    Edge placement error (EPE) was a term initially introduced to describe the difference between predicted pattern contour edge and the design target for a single design layer. Strictly speaking, this quantity is not directly measurable in the fab. What is of vital importance is the relative edge placement errors between different design layers, and in the era of multipatterning, the different constituent mask sublayers for a single design layer. The critical dimensions (CD) and overlay between two layers can be measured in the fab, and there has always been a strong emphasis on control of overlay between design layers. The progress in this realm has been remarkable, accelerated in part at least by the proliferation of multipatterning, which reduces the available overlay budget by introducing a coupling of overlay and CD errors for the target layer. Computational lithography makes possible the full-chip assessment of two-layer edge to edge distances and two-layer contact overlap area. We will investigate examples of via-metal model-based analysis of CD and overlay errors. We will investigate both single patterning and double patterning. For single patterning, we show the advantage of contour-to-contour simulation over contour to target simulation, and how the addition of aberrations in the optical models can provide a more realistic CD-overlay process window (PW) for edge placement errors. For double patterning, the interaction of 4-layer CD and overlay errors is very complex, but we illustrate that not only can full-chip verification identify potential two-layer hotspots, the optical proximity correction engine can act to mitigate such hotspots and enlarge the joint CD-overlay PW.

  12. Dynamics of the outflow and its effect on the hydraulics of two-layer exchange flows in a channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports that an experimental study is conducted to examine the dynamics of the outflow in two-layer exchange flows in a channel connecting between two water bodies with a small density difference. The experiments reveal the generation of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities within the hydraulically sub-critical flow region of the channel. During maximal exchange, those KH instabilities develops into large-amplitude KH waves as they escape the channel exit into the reservoir. The propagation speed ...

  13. Deformable adult human phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: anthropometric data representing size distributions of adult worker populations and software algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Yong Hum; Xu, X George [Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Zhang Binquan; Zhang Juying; Caracappa, Peter F, E-mail: xug2@rpi.ed [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2010-07-07

    Computational phantoms representing workers and patients are essential in estimating organ doses from various occupational radiation exposures and medical procedures. Nearly all existing phantoms, however, were purposely designed to match internal and external anatomical features of the Reference Man as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). To reduce uncertainty in dose calculations caused by anatomical variations, a new generation of phantoms of varying organ and body sizes is needed. This paper presents detailed anatomical data in tables and graphs that are used to design such size-adjustable phantoms representing a range of adult individuals in terms of the body height, body weight and internal organ volume/mass. Two different sets of information are used to derive the phantom sets: (1) individual internal organ size and volume/mass distribution data derived from the recommendations of the ICRP in Publications 23 and 89 and (2) whole-body height and weight percentile data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999-2002). The NHANES height and weight data for 19 year old males and females are used to estimate the distributions of individuals' size, which is unknown, that corresponds to the ICRP organ and tissue distributions. This paper then demonstrates the usage of these anthropometric data in the development of deformable anatomical phantoms. A pair of phantoms-modeled entirely in mesh surfaces-of the adult male and female, RPI-adult male (AM) and RPI-adult female (AF) are used as the base for size-adjustable phantoms. To create percentile-specific phantoms from these two base phantoms, organ surface boundaries are carefully altered according to the tabulated anthropometric data. Software algorithms are developed to automatically match the organ volumes and masses with desired values. Finally, these mesh-based, percentile-specific phantoms are converted into voxel-based phantoms for Monte

  14. Preparation and fabrication of a full-scale, sagittal-sliced, 3D-printed, patient-specific radiotherapy phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Daniel F; Howell, Rebecca M

    2017-09-01

    Patient-specific 3D-printed phantoms have many potential applications, both research and clinical. However, they have been limited in size and complexity because of the small size of most commercially available 3D printers as well as material warping concerns. We aimed to overcome these limitations by developing and testing an effective 3D printing workflow to fabricate a large patient-specific radiotherapy phantom with minimal warping errors. In doing so, we produced a full-scale phantom of a real postmastectomy patient. We converted a patient's clinical CT DICOM data into a 3D model and then sliced the model into eleven 2.5-cm-thick sagittal slices. The slices were printed with a readily available thermoplastic material representing all body tissues at 100% infill, but with air cavities left open. Each slice was printed on an inexpensive and commercially available 3D printer. Once the printing was completed, the slices were placed together for imaging and verification. The original patient CT scan and the assembled phantom CT scan were registered together to assess overall accuracy. The materials for the completed phantom cost $524. The printed phantom agreed well with both its design and the actual patient. Individual slices differed from their designs by approximately 2%. Registered CT images of the assembled phantom and original patient showed excellent agreement. Three-dimensional printing the patient-specific phantom in sagittal slices allowed a large phantom to be fabricated with high accuracy. Our results demonstrate that our 3D printing workflow can be used to make large, accurate, patient-specific phantoms at 100% infill with minimal material warping error. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  16. Two-Layer Microstructures Fabricated by One-Step Anisotropic Wet Etching of Si in KOH Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anisotropic etching of silicon in potassium hydroxide (KOH is an important technology in micromachining. The residue deposition from KOH etching of Si is typically regarded as a disadvantage of this technology. In this report, we make use of this residue as a second masking layer to fabricate two-layer complex structures. Square patterns with size in the range of 15–150 μm and gap distance of 5 μm have been designed and tested. The residue masking layer appears when the substrate is over-etched in hydrofluoric acid (HF solution over a threshold. The two-layer structures of micropyramids surrounded by wall-like structures are obtained according to the two different masking layers of SiO2 and residue. The residue masking layer is stable and can survive over KOH etching for long time to achieve deep Si etching. The process parameters of etchant concentration, temperature, etching time and pattern size have been investigated. With well-controlled two-layer structures, useful structures could be designed for applications in plasmonic and microfluidic devices in the future.

  17. Laboratory Research of the Two-Layer Liquid Dynamics at the Wind Surge in a Strait Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Dotsenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of laboratory experiments in a straight aerohydrocanal of the rectangular cross-section filled with the two-layer (fresh-salty liquid are represented. The disturbance generator is the air flow directed to the area above the canal. The cases of the two-layer liquid dynamics in the canal with the horizontal flat bottom and in the presence of the bottom obstacle of finite width are considered. It is shown that during the surge in the straight canal, one of the possible exchange mechanisms on the boundary of fresh and salty layers may consist in the salt water emissions (resulted from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability to the upper freshwater layer. The subsequent eviction can possibly be accompanied by occurrence of undulations at the interface. Besides, the evictions can be followed by formation of the oscillating layer, i.e. the layer with maximum density gradient the oscillations of which propagate to the overlying layers. Presence of the bottom obstacle complicates the structure of the two-layer liquid motions. In particular, it results in emergence of the mixed layers and transformation of the flow behind the obstacle into a turbulent one, formation of the wave-like disturbances over the obstacle, sharp change of the interface position and occurrence of large-scale vortices with the horizontal axes. It is revealed that the maximum peak of the flow velocity horizontal component is shifted upstream from the obstacle.

  18. Distributed Processing System for Restoration of Electric Power Distribution Network Using Two-Layered Contract Net Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yu; Hamagami, Tomoki

    Distributed processing system for restoration of electric power distribution network using two-layered CNP is proposed. The goal of this study is to develop the restoration system which adjusts to the future power network with distributed generators. The state of the art of this study is that the two-layered CNP is applied for the distributed computing environment in practical use. The two-layered CNP has two classes of agents, named field agent and operating agent in the network. In order to avoid conflicts of tasks, operating agent controls privilege for managers to send the task announcement messages in CNP. This technique realizes the coordination between agents which work asynchronously in parallel with others. Moreover, this study implements the distributed processing system using a de-fact standard multi-agent framework, JADE(Java Agent DEvelopment framework). This study conducts the simulation experiments of power distribution network restoration and compares the proposed system with the previous system. We confirmed the results show effectiveness of the proposed system.

  19. Computer phantoms for simulating ultrasound B-mode and CFM images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Munk, Peter

    1997-01-01

    of spatial position, and can give an indication of sidelobe levels and focusing abilities. The second phantom contains a number of cysts and point tagets along with a homogeneous speckle pattern. This is used for investigating image contrast, and the system's ability to detect low-contrast objects. The third...... and moving scatterers. A model with stepwise movement of the scatterers in an artery with a parabolic flow profile surrounded by tissue is used. The signal from the scatterers is recorded between each movement and then they are propagatedfor the next image acquisition. The phantom can be used to study both...

  20. An MRI phantom using carrageenan gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Yamamoto, Naotake; Tanaka, Akio; Hiraki, Yoshio [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Uchida, Nobue; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a new solid type carrageenan gel phantom. The ingredients of the new gel are carrageenan, manganese chloride, sodium chloride, sodium azide, and water. The gel phantom has sufficient strength to form a torso without the use of a reinforcing agent. A phantom of a desired shape can be created by pouring a hot solution of carrageenan into a mold. The phantom can then be cut easily with a knife and trimmed into the desired shape. The recommended concentrations of the ingredients are; 5 wt% carrageenan, 0.2 mM MnCl{sub 2}, 0.19 wt% NaCl, 0.1 wt% NaN{sub 3}, with the remainder being water. T{sub 2} and T{sub 1} of this phantom at 1.5 T are 84.9 ms and 429 ms respectively. The conductivity and relative dielectric constant at 63.8 MHz are 0.769 S/m and 81.4 respectively. (author)

  1. Pharmacological interventions for phantom limb pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Jun; LIAN Yan-hong; XIE Kang-jie; CAI Shu-nü

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the mechanisms and current clinical application of pharmacological interventions for phantom limb pain.Data sources Both Chinese and English language literatures were searched using MEDLINE (1982-2011),Pubmed (1982-2011) and the Index of Chinese Language Literature (1982-2011).Study selection Data from published articles about pharmacological management of phantom limb pain in recent domestic and foreign literature were selected.Data extraction Data were mainly extracted from 96 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review.Results By reviewing the mechanisms and current clinical application of pharmacological interventions for phantom limb pain,including anticonvulsants,antidepressants,local anaesthetics,N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists,non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs,tramadol,opioids,calcitonin,capsaicin,beta-adrenergic blockers,clonidine,muscle relaxants,and emerging drugs,we examined the efficacy and safety of these medications,outlined the limitations and future directions.Conclusions Although there is lack of evidence-based consensus guidelines for the pharmacological management of phantom limb pain,we recommend tricyclic antidepressants,gabapentin,tramadol,opioids,local anaesthetics and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists as the rational options for the treatment of phantom limb pain.

  2. Multi-resolution voxel phantom modeling: a high-resolution eye model for computational dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracappa, Peter F.; Rhodes, Ashley; Fiedler, Derek

    2014-09-01

    Voxel models of the human body are commonly used for simulating radiation dose with a Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Due to memory limitations, the voxel resolution of these computational phantoms is typically too large to accurately represent the dimensions of small features such as the eye. Recently reduced recommended dose limits to the lens of the eye, which is a radiosensitive tissue with a significant concern for cataract formation, has lent increased importance to understanding the dose to this tissue. A high-resolution eye model is constructed using physiological data for the dimensions of radiosensitive tissues, and combined with an existing set of whole-body models to form a multi-resolution voxel phantom, which is used with the MCNPX code to calculate radiation dose from various exposure types. This phantom provides an accurate representation of the radiation transport through the structures of the eye. Two alternate methods of including a high-resolution eye model within an existing whole-body model are developed. The accuracy and performance of each method is compared against existing computational phantoms.

  3. An Eye Model for Computational Dosimetry Using A Multi-Scale Voxel Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracappa, Peter F.; Rhodes, Ashley; Fiedler, Derek

    2014-06-01

    The lens of the eye is a radiosensitive tissue with cataract formation being the major concern. Recently reduced recommended dose limits to the lens of the eye have made understanding the dose to this tissue of increased importance. Due to memory limitations, the voxel resolution of computational phantoms used for radiation dose calculations is too large to accurately represent the dimensions of the eye. A revised eye model is constructed using physiological data for the dimensions of radiosensitive tissues, and is then transformed into a high-resolution voxel model. This eye model is combined with an existing set of whole body models to form a multi-scale voxel phantom, which is used with the MCNPX code to calculate radiation dose from various exposure types. This phantom provides an accurate representation of the radiation transport through the structures of the eye. Two alternate methods of including a high-resolution eye model within an existing whole body model are developed. The accuracy and performance of each method is compared against existing computational phantoms.

  4. A second generation of physical anthropomorphic 3D breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Adam; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. P.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2014-03-01

    Previous fabrication of anthropomorphic breast phantoms has demonstrated their viability as a model for 2D (mammography) and 3D (tomosynthesis) breast imaging systems. Further development of these models will be essential for the evaluation of breast x-ray systems. There is also the potential to use them as the ground truth in virtual clinical trials. The first generation of phantoms was segmented from human subject dedicated breast computed tomography data and fabricated into physical models using highresolution 3D printing. Two variations were made. The first was a multi-material model (doublet) printed with two photopolymers to represent glandular and adipose tissues with the greatest physical contrast available, mimicking 75% and 35% glandular tissue. The second model was printed with a single 75% glandular equivalent photopolymer (singlet) to represent glandular tissue, which can be filled independently with an adipose-equivalent material such as oil. For this study, we have focused on improving the latter, the singlet phantom. First, the temporary oil filler has been replaced with a permanent adipose-equivalent urethane-based polymer. This offers more realistic contrast as compared to the multi-material approach at the expense of air bubbles and pockets that form during the filling process. Second, microcalcification clusters have been included in the singlet model via crushed eggshells, which have very similar chemical composition to calcifications in vivo. The results from these new prototypes demonstrate significant improvement over the first generation of anthropomorphic physical phantoms.

  5. Age-dependent organ and effective dose coefficients for external photons: a comparison of stylized and voxel-based paediatric phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E [Departments of Nuclear and Radiological and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2006-09-21

    This present study investigates the anatomical realism of conventional stylized models of children by comparing organ dose conversion coefficients for the ORNL paediatric phantom series with those determined in the UF (University of Florida) voxel paediatric phantoms. The latter includes whole-body models of a 9 month male, 4 year female, 8 year female, 11 year male and a 14 year male. Of these phantoms, the 1 year, 5 year and 10 year ORNL phantoms, and 9 month male, 4 year female and 11 year male UF voxel phantoms were selected for side-by-side comparisons under idealized external photon irradiation. Organ absorbed dose per unit air kerma (Gy/Gy) for various radiosensitive organs and tissues were calculated for monoenergetic photons over the energy range of 15 keV to 10 MeV and for six irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right lateral (RLAT), left lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). Differences in organ dose conversion coefficients for the gonads, bone marrow, colon, lung and stomach, to which prominent tissue weighting factors are assigned, were depicted and analysed. Two major causes of observed differences were suggested: differences in organ shape and position and the differences in tissue shielding by overlying tissue regions within the phantoms. Significant discrepancies caused by anatomical differences between the two types of phantoms are also reported for several organs, and in particular, the thyroid and urinary bladder. The results of this study suggest that the paediatric series of ORNL phantoms also have less realistic internal organ and body anatomy and that dose conversion coefficients from these stylized phantoms should be re-evaluated using paediatric voxel phantoms.

  6. Age-dependent organ and effective dose coefficients for external photons: a comparison of stylized and voxel-based paediatric phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-09-01

    This present study investigates the anatomical realism of conventional stylized models of children by comparing organ dose conversion coefficients for the ORNL paediatric phantom series with those determined in the UF (University of Florida) voxel paediatric phantoms. The latter includes whole-body models of a 9 month male, 4 year female, 8 year female, 11 year male and a 14 year male. Of these phantoms, the 1 year, 5 year and 10 year ORNL phantoms, and 9 month male, 4 year female and 11 year male UF voxel phantoms were selected for side-by-side comparisons under idealized external photon irradiation. Organ absorbed dose per unit air kerma (Gy/Gy) for various radiosensitive organs and tissues were calculated for monoenergetic photons over the energy range of 15 keV to 10 MeV and for six irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right lateral (RLAT), left lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). Differences in organ dose conversion coefficients for the gonads, bone marrow, colon, lung and stomach, to which prominent tissue weighting factors are assigned, were depicted and analysed. Two major causes of observed differences were suggested: differences in organ shape and position and the differences in tissue shielding by overlying tissue regions within the phantoms. Significant discrepancies caused by anatomical differences between the two types of phantoms are also reported for several organs, and in particular, the thyroid and urinary bladder. The results of this study suggest that the paediatric series of ORNL phantoms also have less realistic internal organ and body anatomy and that dose conversion coefficients from these stylized phantoms should be re-evaluated using paediatric voxel phantoms.

  7. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.

  8. Deformable adult human phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: anthropometric data representing size distributions of adult worker populations and software algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hum Na, Yong; Zhang, Binquan; Zhang, Juying; Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George

    2010-07-01

    Computational phantoms representing workers and patients are essential in estimating organ doses from various occupational radiation exposures and medical procedures. Nearly all existing phantoms, however, were purposely designed to match internal and external anatomical features of the Reference Man as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). To reduce uncertainty in dose calculations caused by anatomical variations, a new generation of phantoms of varying organ and body sizes is needed. This paper presents detailed anatomical data in tables and graphs that are used to design such size-adjustable phantoms representing a range of adult individuals in terms of the body height, body weight and internal organ volume/mass. Two different sets of information are used to derive the phantom sets: (1) individual internal organ size and volume/mass distribution data derived from the recommendations of the ICRP in Publications 23 and 89 and (2) whole-body height and weight percentile data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999-2002). The NHANES height and weight data for 19 year old males and females are used to estimate the distributions of individuals' size, which is unknown, that corresponds to the ICRP organ and tissue distributions. This paper then demonstrates the usage of these anthropometric data in the development of deformable anatomical phantoms. A pair of phantoms—modeled entirely in mesh surfaces—of the adult male and female, RPI-adult male (AM) and RPI-adult female (AF) are used as the base for size-adjustable phantoms. To create percentile-specific phantoms from these two base phantoms, organ surface boundaries are carefully altered according to the tabulated anthropometric data. Software algorithms are developed to automatically match the organ volumes and masses with desired values. Finally, these mesh-based, percentile-specific phantoms are converted into voxel-based phantoms for Monte

  9. Development of a skin phantom of the epidermis and evaluation by using fluorescence techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Thorsten; Beer, Sebastian; Maeder, Ulf; Burg, Jan M.; Schlupp, Peggy; Schmidts, Thomas; Runkel, Frank; Fiebich, Martin

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a skin phantom that resembles the epidermis including the lipid matrix of the stratum corneum and the dermis. The main intent was to achieve optical properties similar to skin tissue. Therefore, two compartments of the skin, dermis and epidermis, were examined regarding their optical properties. Based on these results, the skin phantom was designed using relevant skin components. The scattering coefficient was measured by using Reflectance-based Confocal Microscopy (RCM) and the fluorescence spectrum was detected via confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). Prospective, the skin phantom can be used to incorporate various fluorescing chemicals, such as fluorescent dyes and fluorescent-labeled drugs to perform calibration measurements in wide-field and laser-scanning microscopes to provide a basis for the quantification of skin penetration studies.

  10. Construction of 3-Dimensional Printed Ultrasound Phantoms With Wall-less Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitichev, Daniil I; Barburas, Anamaria; McPherson, Kirstie; Mari, Jean-Martial; West, Simeon J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound phantoms are invaluable as training tools for vascular access procedures. We developed ultrasound phantoms with wall-less vessels using 3-dimensional printed chambers. Agar was used as a soft tissue-mimicking material, and the wall-less vessels were created with rods that were retracted after the agar was set. The chambers had integrated luer connectors to allow for fluid injections with clinical syringes. Several variations on this design are presented, which include branched and stenotic vessels. The results show that 3-dimensional printing can be well suited to the construction of wall-less ultrasound phantoms, with designs that can be readily customized and shared electronically. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. Phantom evolving wormholes with big rip singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    We investigate a family of inhomogeneous and anisotropic gravitational fields exhibiting a future singularity at a finite value of the proper time. The studied spherically symmetric spacetimes are asymptotically Friedmann-Robertson-Walker at spatial infinity and describe wormhole configurations filled with two matter components: one inhomogeneous and anisotropic fluid and another isotropic and homogeneously distributed fluid, characterized by the supernegative equation of state \\omega=p/\\rho < -1. In previously constructed wormholes, the notion of the phantom energy was used in a more extended sense than in cosmology, where the phantom energy is considered a homogeneously distributed fluid. Specifically, for some static wormhole geometries the phantom matter was considered as an inhomogeneous and anisotropic fluid, with radial and lateral pressures satisfying the relations $p_{r}/\\rho<-1$ and $p_{_l} \

  12. Confronting Phantom Dark Energy with Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Pao-Yu; Chen, Pisin

    2012-01-01

    We confront two types of phantom dark energy potential with observational data. The models we consider are the power-law potential, $V\\propto {\\phi}^{\\mu}$, and the exponential potential, $V\\propto \\exp({\\lambda}{\\phi}/{M_P})$. We fit the models to the latest observations from SN-Ia, CMB and BAO, and obtain tight constraints on parameter spaces. Furthermore, we apply the goodness-of-fit and the information criteria to compare the fitting results from phantom models with that from the cosmological constant and the quintessence models presented in our previous work. The results show that the cosmological constant is statistically most preferred, while the phantom dark energy fits slightly better than the quintessence does.

  13. Cosmological perturbations in transient phantom inflation scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richarte, Martin G. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 19044, Curitiba (Brazil); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria 1428, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kremer, Gilberto M. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 19044, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    We present a model of inflation where the inflaton is accommodated as a phantom field which exhibits an initial transient pole behavior and then decays into a quintessence field which is responsible for a radiation era. We must stress that the present unified model only deals with a single field and that the transition between the two eras is achieved in a smooth way, so the model does not suffer from the eternal inflation issue. We explore the conditions for the crossing of the phantom divide line within the inflationary era along with the structural stability of several critical points. We study the behavior of the phantom field within the slow-climb approximation along with the necessary conditions to have sufficient inflation. We also examine the model at the level of classical perturbations within the Newtonian gauge and determine the behavior of the gravitational potential, contrast density and perturbed field near the inflation stage and the subsequent radiation era. (orig.)

  14. Photoacoustic investigation of a neonatal skull phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volinski, Bridget; Hariri, Ali; Fatima, Afreen; Xu, Qiuyun; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    There is a need for continued research into the diagnosis, prevention and cure of neonatal brain disease and disorders. These disorders lead to fatalities and developmental disorders in infants. Non-invasive imaging techniques are being researched for this purpose. However, the availability of neonatal skull samples for this work is very low. A phantom can be used to simulate the neonatal skull and brain to improve imaging techniques. This study selects a phantom of polyurethane and titanium dioxide and proves its value as a replacement for neonatal skull in research. The methods used for this proof are validation of choice against the literature, transmissivity and acoustic experimentation compared to existing literature, and finally photoacoustic evaluation of the final choice to show its usefulness as a neonatal skull phantom.

  15. Development of 5 and 10 years old infant phantoms based on polygonal meshes; Desenvolvimento de fantomas infantis de 5 e 10 anos de idade baseado em malhas poligonais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Vanildo Junior de Melo [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Anatomia; Kramer, Richard; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira; Khoury, Helen Jamil [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Vieira, Jose Wilson, E-mail: rkramer@uol.com.b [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco

    2011-10-26

    This paper focuses the development of reference infant phantoms of 5 and 10 years old to be used in calculation of equivalent doses in the area of radiological protection. The method uses tools developed for the modelling of 3D objects. The forms and positions are available in the literature. The mass values of each organ and tissue were adjusted according to the reference data published by the International Commission Radiological Protection. The results are presented in image of organs and tissues, and in tables. Dosimetric calculations show concordance with adult and infant phantoms, considering the differences among phantoms

  16. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: II. Dosimetric calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.; de Melo Lima, V. J.; Robson Brown, K.

    2010-01-01

    Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been developed in the first part of this study using 3D animation software and anatomical atlases to replace the image-based FAX06 and the MAX06 voxel phantoms. 3D modelling methods allow for phantom development independent from medical images of patients, volunteers or cadavers. The second part of this study investigates the dosimetric implications for organ and tissue equivalent doses due to the anatomical differences between the new and the old phantoms. These differences are mainly caused by the supine position of human bodies during scanning in order to acquire digital images for voxel phantom development. Compared to an upright standing person, in image-based voxel phantoms organs are often coronally shifted towards the head and sometimes the sagittal diameter of the trunk is reduced by a gravitational change of the fat distribution. In addition, volumes of adipose and muscle tissue shielding internal organs are sometimes too small, because adaptation of organ volumes to ICRP-based organ masses often occurs at the expense of general soft tissues, such as adipose, muscle or unspecified soft tissue. These effects have dosimetric consequences, especially for partial body exposure, such as in x-ray diagnosis, but also for whole body external exposure and for internal exposure. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, internal and external exposure to photons and electrons has been simulated with both pairs of phantoms. The results show differences between organ and tissue equivalent doses for the upright standing FASH/MASH and the image-based supine FAX06/MAX06 phantoms of up to 80% for external exposure and up to 100% for internal exposure. Similar differences were found for external exposure between FASH/MASH and REGINA/REX, the reference voxel phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Comparison of effective doses for external photon

  17. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: II. Dosimetric calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, R; Cassola, V F; Khoury, H J [Department of Nuclear Energy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Avenida Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, CEP 50740-540, Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J W [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); De Melo Lima, V J [Department of Anatomy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Robson Brown, K [Imaging Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rkramer@uol.com.br

    2010-01-07

    Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been developed in the first part of this study using 3D animation software and anatomical atlases to replace the image-based FAX06 and the MAX06 voxel phantoms. 3D modelling methods allow for phantom development independent from medical images of patients, volunteers or cadavers. The second part of this study investigates the dosimetric implications for organ and tissue equivalent doses due to the anatomical differences between the new and the old phantoms. These differences are mainly caused by the supine position of human bodies during scanning in order to acquire digital images for voxel phantom development. Compared to an upright standing person, in image-based voxel phantoms organs are often coronally shifted towards the head and sometimes the sagittal diameter of the trunk is reduced by a gravitational change of the fat distribution. In addition, volumes of adipose and muscle tissue shielding internal organs are sometimes too small, because adaptation of organ volumes to ICRP-based organ masses often occurs at the expense of general soft tissues, such as adipose, muscle or unspecified soft tissue. These effects have dosimetric consequences, especially for partial body exposure, such as in x-ray diagnosis, but also for whole body external exposure and for internal exposure. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, internal and external exposure to photons and electrons has been simulated with both pairs of phantoms. The results show differences between organ and tissue equivalent doses for the upright standing FASH/MASH and the image-based supine FAX06/MAX06 phantoms of up to 80% for external exposure and up to 100% for internal exposure. Similar differences were found for external exposure between FASH/MASH and REGINA/REX, the reference voxel phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Comparison of effective doses for external photon

  18. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-07-01

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor's trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  19. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Rulon [Henry Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland 20817 (United States); Liacouras, Peter [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20899 (United States); Thomas, Andrew [ATC Healthcare, Washington, District of Columbia 20006 (United States); Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B. [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor’s trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  20. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B

    2015-07-01

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor's trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  1. Dose evaluation of three-dimensional small animal phantom with film dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Div. of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung Woo [Radilogcial and Medico-Oncological Sciences, University of Sciences and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The weight of small animal dosimetry has been continuously increased in pre-clinical studies using radiation in small animals. In this study, three-dimensional(3D) small animal phantom was fabricated using 3D printer which has been continuously used and studied in the various fields. The absorbed dose of 3D animal phantom was evaluated by film dosimetry. Previously, the response of film was obtained from the materials used for production of 3D small animal phantom and compared with the bolus used as the tissue equivalent material in the radiotherapy. When irradiated with gamma rays from 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy, it was confirmed that there was a small difference of less than 1% except 0.5 Gy dose. And when small animal phantom was irradiated with 5 Gy, the difference between the irradiated dose and calculated dose from film was within 2%. Based on this study, it would be possible to increase the reliability of dose in pre-clinical studies using irradiation in small animals by evaluating dose of 3D small animal phantom.

  2. Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jina [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngkyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hunjoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inchoen St. Mary' s Hospital College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon 403-720 (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Sanghoon [Field Robot R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Ansan 426-910 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungkwang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-896 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hongseok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Youngnam, E-mail: ynkang33@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation treatment requires high accuracy to protect healthy organs and destroy the tumor. However, tumors located near the diaphragm constantly move during treatment. Respiration-gated radiotherapy has significant potential for the improvement of the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion, such as lung and liver tumors. To measure and minimize the effects of respiratory motion, a realistic deformable phantom is required for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a deformable moving lung (DML) phantom, such as simulation, tissue equivalence, and rate of deformation. The rate of change of the lung volume, target deformation, and respiratory signals were measured in this study; they were accurately measured using a realistic deformable phantom. The measured volume difference was 31%, which closely corresponds to the average difference in human respiration, and the target movement was − 30 to + 32 mm. The measured signals accurately described human respiratory signals. This DML phantom would be useful for the estimation of deformable image registration and in respiration-gated radiotherapy. This study shows that the developed DML phantom can exactly simulate the patient's respiratory signal and it acts as a deformable 4-dimensional simulation of a patient's lung with sufficient volume change.

  3. Speed of sound in rubber-based materials for ultrasonic phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarelli, A; Miloro, P; Verbeni, A; Carbone, M; Menciassi, A

    2016-12-01

    In this work we provide measurements of speed of sound (SoS) and acoustic impedance (Z) of some doped/non-doped rubber-based materials dedicated to the development of ultrasound phantoms. These data are expected to be useful for speeding-up the preparation of multi-organ phantoms which show similar echogenicity to real tissues. Different silicones (Ecoflex, Dragon-Skin Medium) and polyurethane rubbers with different liquid (glycerol, commercial detergent, N-propanol) and solid (aluminum oxide, graphene, steel, silicon powder) inclusions were prepared. SoS of materials under investigation was measured in an experimental setup and Z was obtained by multiplying the density and the SoS of each material. Finally, an anatomically realistic liver phantom has been fabricated selecting some of the tested materials. SoS and Z evaluation for different rubber materials and formulations are reported. The presence of liquid additives appears to increase the SoS, while solid inclusions generally reduce the SoS. The ultrasound images of realized custom fabricated heterogeneous liver phantom and a real liver show remarkable similarities. The development of new materials' formulations and the knowledge of acoustic properties, such as speed of sound and acoustic impedance, could improve and speed-up the development of phantoms for simulations of ultrasound medical procedures.

  4. The three dimensional map of dose components in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavarnegin Elham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution and construction of a convenient phantom is very important for boron neutron capture therapy planning validation. In this study we have simulated a head phantom, suggested for construction in boron neutron capture therapy facilities, and calculated all relevant dose components inside of it using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A “generic” epithermal neutron beam with a broad neutron spectrum, similar to beams used for neutron capture therapy clinical trials, was used. The calculated distributions of all relevant dose components in brain tissue equivalent were compared with those in water. The results show that water is a suitable dosimetry material and that the simulated head phantom is a suitable design for producing accurate three-dimensional maps of dose components at enough points inside of the phantom for boron neutron capture therapy dosimetry measurements and the use of these dose maps in beam development and benchmarking of computer-based treatment codes.

  5. [Phantom limb pain. Psychological treatment strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, M; Flor, H

    2013-04-01

    Similar to other pain syndromes phantom limb pain is characterized by learning and memory processes that maintain the pain and increase maladaptive plastic changes of the brain: therefore, psychological interventions that change maladaptive memory processes are useful. In addition to traditional psychological interventions, such as pain management training and biofeedback, more recent developments that involve sensory discrimination training, mirror treatment, graded motor imagery, prosthesis training and training in virtual reality are interesting. These interventions not only reduce phantom limb pain but also reverse the associated maladaptive brain changes.

  6. Structured movement representations of a phantom limb associated with phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osumi, Michihiro; Sumitani, Masahiko; Wake, Naoki; Sano, Yuko; Ichinose, Akimichi; Kumagaya, Shin-Ichiro; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo; Morioka, Shu

    2015-09-25

    The relation between phantom limb pain (PLP) and the movement representation of a phantom limb remains controversial in several areas of neurorehabilitation, although there are a few studies in which the representation of phantom limb movement was precisely evaluated. We evaluated the structured movement representation of a phantom limb objectively using a bimanual circle-line coordination task. We then investigated the relation between PLP and the structured movement representation. Nine patients with a brachial plexus avulsion injury were enrolled who perceived a phantom limb and had neuropathic pain. While blindfolded, the participants repeatedly drew vertical lines using the intact hand and intended to draw circles using the phantom limb simultaneously. "Drawing of circles" by the phantom limb resulted in an oval transfiguration of the vertical lines ("bimanual coupling" effect). We used an arbitrary ovalization index (OI) to quantify the oval transfiguration. When the OI neared 100%, the trajectory changed toward becoming more circular. A significant negative correlation was observed between the intensity of PLP and the OI (r=-0.66, pphantom limb are necessary for alleviating PLP.

  7. The level of detail required in a deformable phantom to accurately perform quality assurance of deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Daniel L.; Kim, Hojin; Chen, Josephine; Stathakis, Sotirios; Kirby, Neil

    2016-09-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to determine how detailed deformable image registration (DIR) phantoms need to adequately simulate human anatomy and accurately assess the quality of DIR algorithms. In particular, how many distinct tissues are required in a phantom to simulate complex human anatomy? Pelvis and head-and-neck patient CT images were used for this study as virtual phantoms. Two data sets from each site were analyzed. The virtual phantoms were warped to create two pairs consisting of undeformed and deformed images. Otsu’s method was employed to create additional segmented image pairs of n distinct soft tissue CT number ranges (fat, muscle, etc). A realistic noise image was added to each image. Deformations were applied in MIM Software (MIM) and Velocity deformable multi-pass (DMP) and compared with the known warping. Images with more simulated tissue levels exhibit more contrast, enabling more accurate results. Deformation error (magnitude of the vector difference between known and predicted deformation) was used as a metric to evaluate how many CT number gray levels are needed for a phantom to serve as a realistic patient proxy. Stabilization of the mean deformation error was reached by three soft tissue levels for Velocity DMP and MIM, though MIM exhibited a persisting difference in accuracy between the discrete images and the unprocessed image pair. A minimum detail of three levels allows a realistic patient proxy for use with Velocity and MIM deformation algorithms.

  8. Preparation of a skin equivalent phantom with interior micron-scale vessel structures for optical imaging experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Klämpfl, Florian; Knipfer, Christian; Riemann, Max; Kanawade, Rajesh; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-09-01

    A popular alternative of preparing multilayer or microfluidic chip based phantoms could have helped to simulate the subsurface vascular network, but brought inevitable problems. In this work, we describe the preparation method of a single layer skin equivalent tissue phantom containing interior vessel channels, which mimick the superficial microvascular structure. The fabrication method does not disturb the optical properties of the turbiding matrix material. The diameter of the channels reaches a value of 50 μm. The size, as well as the geometry of the generated vessel structures are investigated by using the SD-OCT system. Our preliminary results confirm that fabrication of such a phantom is achievable and reproducible. Prospectively, this phantom is used to calibrate the optical angiographic imaging approaches.

  9. Radiative transfer theory for passive microwave remote sensing of a two-layer random medium with cylindrical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, S. L.; Kong, J. A.; Tsang, L.

    1980-01-01

    A model of the vegetation layer as a two-layer random medium with a small correlation length l sub rho in the horizontal direction, and a large correlation length l sub z in the vertical direction, is presented for fields with cylindrical structures. As l sub z approaches infinity, closed form solutions are derived for the brightness temperatures; the kernels in the scattering terms of the radiative transfer equations result in delta functions showing that forward scattering is dominant over all other directions. The results are compared with the Gaussian quadrature method data for numerical solution of the radiative transfer equations.

  10. WAVES GENERATED BY A 3D MOVING BODY IN A TWO-LAYER FLUID OF FINITE DEPTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wei; YOU Yun-xiang; MIAO Guo-ping; ZHAO Feng; ZHANG Jun

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the waves generated by a 3-D body advancing beneath the free surface with constant speed in a two-layer fluid of finite depth. By applying Green's theorem, a layered integral equation system based on the Rankine source for the perturbed velocity potential generated by the moving body was derived with the potential flow theory. A four-node isoparametric element method was used to treat with the solution of the layered integral equation system. The surface and interface waves generated by a moving ball were calculated numerically. The results were compared with the analytical results for a moving source with constant velocity.

  11. Three-dimensional microwave imaging of realistic numerical breast phantoms via a multiple-frequency inverse scattering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Jacob D.; Kosmas, Panagiotis; Hagness, Susan C.; Van Veen, Barry D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Breast density measurement has the potential to play an important role in individualized breast cancer risk assessment and prevention decisions. Routine evaluation of breast density will require the availability of a low-cost, nonionizing, three-dimensional (3-D) tomographic imaging modality that exploits a strong properties contrast between dense fibroglandular tissue and less dense adipose tissue. The purpose of this computational study is to investigate the performance of 3-D tomography using low-power microwaves to reconstruct the spatial distribution of breast tissue dielectric properties and to evaluate the modality for application to breast density characterization. Methods: State-of-the-art 3-D numerical breast phantoms that are realistic in both structural and dielectric properties are employed. The test phantoms include one sample from each of four classes of mammographic breast density. Since the properties of these phantoms are known exactly, these testbeds serve as a rigorous benchmark for the imaging results. The distorted Born iterative imaging method is applied to simulated array measurements of the numerical phantoms. The forward solver in the imaging algorithm employs the finite-difference time-domain method of solving the time-domain Maxwell’s equations, and the dielectric profiles are estimated using an integral equation form of the Helmholtz wave equation. A multiple-frequency, bound-constrained, vector field inverse scattering solution is implemented that enables practical inversion of the large-scale 3-D problem. Knowledge of the frequency-dependent characteristic of breast tissues at microwave frequencies is exploited to obtain a parametric reconstruction of the dispersive dielectric profile of the interior of the breast. Imaging is performed on a high-resolution voxel basis and the solution is bounded by a known range of dielectric properties of the constituent breast tissues. The imaging method is validated using a breast

  12. PVAL breast phantom for dual energy calcification detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Velissarakos, K.; Gkremos, D.; Fountzoula, C.; Bakas, A.; Michail, C.; Kandarakis, I.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    Microcalcifications are the main indicator for breast cancer. Dual energy imaging can enhance the detectability of calcifications by suppressing the tissue background. Two digital images are obtained using two different spectra, for the low- and high-energy respectively, and a weighted subtracted image is produced. In this study, a dual energy method for the detection of the minimum breast microcalcification thickness was developed. The used integrated prototype system consisted of a modified tungsten anode X-ray tube combined with a high resolution CMOS sensor. The breast equivalent phantom used was an elastically compressible gel of polyvinyl alcohol (PVAL). Hydroxyapatite was used to simulate microcalcifications with thicknesses ranging from 50 to 500 μm. The custom made phantom was irradiated with 40kVp and 70kVp. Tungsten (W) anode spectra filtered with 100μm Cadmium and 1000pm Copper, for the low- and high-energy, respectively. Microcalcifications with thicknesses 300μm or higher can be detected with mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.62mGy.

  13. Phantom breast sensations are frequent after mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorthe Marie Helbo; Kehlet, Henrik; Gärtner, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Phantom breast sensation (PBS) following mastectomy has been recognized for many years. PBS is a feeling that the removed breast is still there. The reported prevalence and risk factors have not been established in large well-defined patient series. The purpose of this study was to examine...

  14. Note on the Schwarzschild-phantom wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Lukmanova, Regina; Izmailov, Ramil; Yanbekov, Almir; Karimov, Ramis; Potapov, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown by Lobo, Parsaei and Riazi (LPR) that phantom energy with $\\omega =p_{r}/\\rho <-1$ could support phantom wormholes. Several classes of such solutions have been derived by them. While the inner spacetime is represented by asymptotically flat phantom wormhole that have repulsive gravity, it is most likely to be unstable to perturbations. Hence, we consider a situation, where a phantom wormhole is somehow trapped inside a Schwarzschild sphere across a thin shell. Applying the method developed by Garcia, Lobo and Visser (GLV), we shall exemplify that the shell can possess zones of stability depending on certain constraints. It turns out that zones corresponding to "force" constraint are more restrictive than those from the "mass" constraint. We shall also enumerate the interior energy content by using the gravitational energy integral proposed by Lynden-Bell, Katz and Bi% \\v{c}\\'ak. It turns out that, even though the interior mass is positive, the integral implies repulsive energy. ...

  15. Phantom breast sensations are frequent after mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorthe Marie Helbo; Kehlet, Henrik; Gærtner, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Phantom breast sensation (PBS) following mastectomy has been recognized for many years. PBS is a feeling that the removed breast is still there. The reported prevalence and risk factors have not been established in large well-defined patient series. The purpose of this study was to examine...... the prevalence of PBS following mastectomy and associated risk factors....

  16. A precise CT phantom alignment procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, N J; Bushong, S C

    1980-01-01

    Two of the AAPM CT performance phantom inserts require precise alignment. We present a method for aligning an insert which makes use of the partial volume effect. We demonstrate that the procedure is sensitive to tilts of less than one degree and, using the slice thickness insert, allows reproducible positioning.

  17. Quasi-two-layer finite-volume scheme for modeling shallow water flows with the presence of external forces

    CERN Document Server

    Karelsky, K V; Slavin, A G

    2011-01-01

    The numerical method for study of hydrodynamic flows over an arbitrary bed profile in the presence of external force is proposed in this paper. This method takes into account the external force effect, it uses the quasi-two-layer model of hydrodynamic flows over a stepwise boundary with consideration of features of the flow near the step. A distinctive feature of the proposed method is the consideration of the properties of the process of the waterfall, namely the fluid flow on the step in which the fluid does not wet part of the vertical wall of the step. The presence of dry zones in the vertical part of the step indicates violation of the conditions of hydrostatic flow. The quasi-two-layer approach allows to determine the size of the dry zone of the vertical component of the step. Consequently it gives an opportunity to figure out the amount of kinetic energy dissipation. There are performed the numerical simulations based on the proposed algorithm of various physical phenomena, such as a breakdown of the r...

  18. Linear and nonlinear properties of reduced two-layer models for non-hydrostatic free-surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yefei; Cheung, Kwok Fai

    2016-11-01

    A two-layer model with uniform non-hydrostatic pressure in the bottom produces favorable dispersion properties for coastal wave transformation at the computational requirements of a one-layer model. We derive the nonlinear governing equations and the corresponding dispersion relation, shoaling gradient, and super- and sub-harmonics to understand the theoretical performance of this reduced model. With the layer interface near the bottom, the dispersion relation shows an extended applicable range into deeper water at the expense of a slight overestimation of the celerity in intermediate water depth. The shoaling gradient rapidly converges to the exact solution in the shallow and intermediate depth range. These complementary characteristics allow identification of an optimal interface position for both linear wave properties. The resulting model exhibits good nonlinear performance in shallow and intermediate water depth and produces super- and sub-harmonics comparable to a two-layer model. Numerical tests involving standing waves show the reduced model has smaller discretization errors in the dispersion relation comparing to a one-layer model. Case studies of regular wave transformation over a submerged bar and a uniform slope provide comparison with laboratory data and demonstrate the linear and nonlinear properties derived from the governing equations. The good shoaling and nonlinear properties give rise to accurate waveforms in both cases, while dispersion errors from the governing equations and numerical schemes accumulate over time leading to phase shifts of the modeled waves.

  19. Acoustic scattering by a two-layer cylindrical tube immersed in a fluid medium: Existence of a pseudo wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhanaoui, Abdelkader; Aassif, Elhoucein; Maze, Gérard; Décultot, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The present paper studies the acoustic signal backscattered by an air-filled copper–solid polymer two-layer cylindrical tube immersed in water. The work is done from the calculation of the backscattered pressure, an inverse Fourier Transform, which allows us to obtain an impulse signal. Smoothed pseudo Wigner–Ville and Concentrated spectrogram representations have been chosen to analyze the scattering phenomenon. For reduced frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 200, the resonance trajectories and time–frequency images have shown the presence of the guided waves. The bifurcation of the A0 wave into the A0(-) and the A0(+) waves has also been observed. The authors provide the phase and the group velocities of guided waves and investigate the differences between curves. The findings are then compared with those obtained for the copper and the solid polymer one-layer cylindrical tubes. Group velocity values have also been extracted from smoothed pseudo Wigner–Ville and Concentrated spectrogram time–frequency images. A good agreement with the theory has, therefore, been observed. The study of acoustic backscattering by a copper–solid polymer two-layer tube has revealed the interaction and the coupling of guided waves, specially the presence of a pseudo A1 wave; which is a very interesting, remarkable phenomenon.

  20. Modeling of PZT-induced Lamb wave propagation in structures by using a novel two-layer spectral finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaotong; Zhou, Li; Ouyang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel two-layer spectral finite element model, consisting of PZT wafer and host structure, to simulate PZT-induced Lamb wave propagation in beam-like and plate-like structures. Based on the idea of equal displacement on the interface between PZT wafer and host structure, the one-dimensional spectral beam element of PZT-host beam and two-dimensional spectral plate element of PZT-host plate are considered as one hybrid element, respectively. A novel approach is proposed by taking the coupling effect of piezoelectric transducers in the thickness direction into account. The dynamic equation of the two-layer spectral element is derived from Hamilton's principle. Validity of the developed spectral finite element is verified through numerical simulation. The result indicates that, compared with the conventional finite element method (FEM) based on elasticity, the proposed spectral finite element is proved to have a high accuracy in modeling Lamb wave propagation, meanwhile, significantly improve the calculation efficiency.

  1. A Numerical Study on Water Waves Generated by A Submerged Moving Body in A Two-Layer Fluid System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jia-Zhen; NG Chiu-On; ZHANG Dao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    This is a numerical study on the time development of surface waves generated by a submerged body moving steadily in a two-layer fluid system, in which a layer of water is underlain by a layer of viscous mud. The fully nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations are solved on FLUENT with the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) multiphase scheme in order to simulate the free surface waves as well as the water-mud interface waves as functions of time. The numerical model is validated by mimick-ing a reported experiment in a one-layer system before it is applied to a two-layer system, it is found that the presence of bottom mud in a water layer can lead to large viscous damping of the surface waves. For the investigation of the problem systematically, the effects of the Froude number and the mud layer thickness, density and viscosity relative to those of water are evaluated and discussed in detail.

  2. A two-layer structured PbI2 thin film for efficient planar perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Chao; Shi, Chengwu; Wu, Ni; Zhang, Jincheng; Wang, Mao

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a two-layer structured PbI2 thin film was constructed by the spin-coating procedure using a 0.80 M PbI2 solution in DMF and subsequent close-spaced vacuum thermal evaporation using PbI2 powder as a source. The bottom PbI2 thin film was compact with a sheet-like appearance, parallel to the FTO substrate, and can be easily converted to a compact perovskite thin film to suppress the charge recombination of the electrons of the TiO2 conduction band and the holes of the spiro-OMeTAD valence band. The top PbI2 thin film was porous with nano-sheet arrays, perpendicular to the FTO substrate, and can be easily converted to a porous perovskite thin film to improve the hole migration from the perovskite to spiro-OMeTAD and the charge separation at the perovskite/spiro-OMeTAD interface. The planar perovskite solar cells based on the two-layer structured PbI2 thin film exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 11.64%, along with an open-circuit voltage of 0.90 V, a short-circuit photocurrent density of 19.29 mA cm-2 and a fill factor of 0.67.

  3. Equivalent circuit models of two-layer flexure beams with excitation by temperature, humidity, pressure, piezoelectric or piezomagnetic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Marschner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-layer flexure beams often serve as basic transducers in actuators and sensors. In this paper a generalized description of their stimuli-influenced mechanical behavior is derived. For small deflection angles this description includes a multi-port circuit or network representation with lumped elements for a beam part of finite length. A number of coupled finite beam parts model the dynamic behavior including the first natural frequencies of the beam. For piezoelectric and piezomagnetic interactions, reversible transducer models are developed. The piezomagnetic two-layer beam model is extended to include solenoid and planar coils. Linear network theory is applied in order to determine network parameters and to simplify the circuit representation. The resulting circuit model is the basis for a fast simulation of the dynamic system behavior with advanced circuit simulators and, thus, the optimization of the system. It is also a useful tool for understanding and explaining this multi-domain system through basic principles of general system theory.

  4. Interaction of water waves with small undulations on a porous bed in a two-layer ice-covered fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Srikumar; Martha, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The scattering problem involving water waves by small undulation on the porous ocean-bed in a two-layer fluid, is investigated within the framework of the two-dimensional linear water wave theory where the upper layer is covered by a thin uniform sheet of ice modeled as a thin elastic plate. In such a two-layer fluid there exist waves with two different modes, one with a lower wave number propagate along the ice-cover whilst those with a higher wave number propagate along the interface. An incident wave of a particular wave number gets reflected and transmitted over the bottom undulation into waves of both modes. Perturbation analysis in conjunction with the Fourier transform technique is used to derive the first-order corrections of reflection and transmission coefficients for both the modes due to incident waves of two different modes. One special type of bottom topography is considered as an example to evaluate the related coefficients in detail. These coefficients are depicted in graphical forms to demonstrate the transformation of wave energy between the two modes and also to illustrate the effects of the ice sheet and the porosity of the undulating bed.

  5. A constructive algorithm to solve "convex recursive deletion" (CoRD) classification problems via two-layer perceptron networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, C; Molter, U; Shonkwiler, R

    2000-01-01

    A sufficient condition that a region be classifiable by a two-layer feedforward neural net (a two-layer perceptron) using threshold activation functions is that either it be a convex polytope or that intersected with the complement of a convex polytope in its interior, or that intersected with the complement of a convex polytope in its interior or ... recursively. These have been called convex recursive deletion (CoRD) regions.We give a simple algorithm for finding the weights and thresholds in both layers for a feedforward net that implements such a region. The results of this work help in understanding the relationship between the decision region of a perceptron and its corresponding geometry in input space. Our construction extends in a simple way to the case that the decision region is the disjoint union of CoRD regions (requiring three layers). Therefore this work also helps in understanding how many neurons are needed in the second layer of a general three-layer network. In the event that the decision region of a network is known and is the union of CoRD regions, our results enable the calculation of the weights and thresholds of the implementing network directly and rapidly without the need for thousands of backpropagation iterations.

  6. Transient flexural-and capillary-gravity waves due to disturbances in two-layer density-stratified fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Dong-qiang; SUN Cui-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Generation of the transient flexural-and capillary-gravity waves by impulsive disturbances in a two-layer fluid is investigated analytically.The upper fluid is covered by a thin elastic plate or by an inertial surface with the capillary effect.The density of each of the two immiscible layers is constant.The fluids are assumed to be inviscid and incompressible and the motion be irrotational.A point force on the surface and simple mass sources in the upper and lower fluid layers are considered.A linear system is established within the framework of potential theory.The integral solutions for the surface and interfacial waves are obtained by means of the Laplace-Fourier transform.A new representation for the dispersion relation of flexural-and capillary-gravity waves in a two-layer fluid is derived.The asymptotic representations of the wave motions are derived for large time with a fixed distance-to-time ratio with the Stokes and Scorer methods of stationary phase.It is shown that there are two different modes,namely the surface and interfacial wave modes.The wave systems observed depend on the relation between the observer's moving speed and the intrinsic minimal and maximal group velocities.

  7. Atypical supernumerary phantom limb and phantom limb pain in two patients with pontine hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Dong Hwan; Jeong, Yong Seol; Chon, Jinmann; Bark, Jihea

    2011-06-01

    Phantom limbs are usually observed after amputation of extremities. In patients after a stroke, a similar but rarely occurring phenomenon consisting of the patient experiencing the presence of an additional limb has been described. This phenomenon, generally called supernumerary phantom limb (SPL), may be caused by lesions in the right or left cerebral hemisphere, but has been predominantly reported in patients who have had a right hemispheric stroke. We report two cases of atypical SPL and phantom limb pain (PLP) after pontine hemorrhage. The patients were treated conservatively and their symptoms lasted more than 1 month. This is the first report of SPLs after left pontine hemorrhage, and phantom perception and pain lasted longer than those in previously observed cases. Our results indicate that SPL may be more common than reported; therefore, thorough examinations are essential for the care of stroke patients.

  8. Comparison study of reconstruction algorithms for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis using various breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-suk; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a recently developed system for three-dimensional imaging that offers the potential to reduce the false positives of mammography by preventing tissue overlap. Many qualitative evaluations of digital breast tomosynthesis were previously performed by using a phantom with an unrealistic model and with heterogeneous background and noise, which is not representative of real breasts. The purpose of the present work was to compare reconstruction algorithms for DBT by using various breast phantoms; validation was also performed by using patient images. DBT was performed by using a prototype unit that was optimized for very low exposures and rapid readout. Three algorithms were compared: a back-projection (BP) algorithm, a filtered BP (FBP) algorithm, and an iterative expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. To compare the algorithms, three types of breast phantoms (homogeneous background phantom, heterogeneous background phantom, and anthropomorphic breast phantom) were evaluated, and clinical images were also reconstructed by using the different reconstruction algorithms. The in-plane image quality was evaluated based on the line profile and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and out-of-plane artifacts were evaluated by means of the artifact spread function (ASF). Parenchymal texture features of contrast and homogeneity were computed based on reconstructed images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom. The clinical images were studied to validate the effect of reconstruction algorithms. The results showed that the CNRs of masses reconstructed by using the EM algorithm were slightly higher than those obtained by using the BP algorithm, whereas the FBP algorithm yielded much lower CNR due to its high fluctuations of background noise. The FBP algorithm provides the best conspicuity for larger calcifications by enhancing their contrast and sharpness more than the other algorithms; however, in the case of small-size and low

  9. Optical sensing of a pulsating liquid in a brain-mimicking phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllylä, Teemu; Popov, Alexey; Korhonen, Vesa; Bykov, Alexander; Kinnunen, Matti

    2013-06-01

    In study of the brain, oxygenation changes in the cerebral cortex are increasingly monitored using optical methods based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). When monitoring blood oxygenation in the cerebral cortex, at depth of approximately 15 mm - 20 mm from the skin surface, separation distance between source and detector becomes significant. Many studies show that by increasing the source-detector distance, illuminating light penetrates deeper into tissue. In this work, we use optical phantoms to determine experimentally the minimum source-detector distance between that allows sensing of the cerebral cortex, particularly the grey matter of the brain. A multilayered forehead phantom was fabricated and a silicon tube was added inside the phantom at depths of 15 mm and 19 mm, measured from the surface of the skin mimicking layer. This depth corresponds to the grey matter layer of the brain. The phantom's optical properties were specifically designed to mimic the optical properties of tissue layers of the forehead and to facilitate near-infrared sensing. Optical sensing of liquid movement within the tube was measured by varying the distance between the near-infrared light source and the detector. Based on our measurements, we can conclude that it is possible to sense pulsations from a grey matter mimicking layer of the brain using near-infrared spectroscopy at a source-detector distance of 3 - 4 cm.

  10. In-phantom spectra and dose distributions from a high-energy neutron therapy beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benck, S; Denis, J M; Meulders, J P; Nath, R; Pitcher, E J

    2002-01-01

    In radiotherapy with external beams, healthy tissues surrounding the target volumes are inevitably irradiated. In the case of neutron therapy, the estimation of dose to the organs surrounding the target volume is particularly challenging, because of the varying contributions from primary and secondary neutrons and photons of different energies. The neutron doses to tissues surrounding the target volume at the Louvain-la-Neuve (LLN) facility were investigated in this work. At LLN, primary neutrons have a broad spectrum with a mean energy of about 30 MeV. The transport of a 10x10 cm sup 2 beam through a water phantom was simulated by means of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Distributions of energy-differential values of neutron fluence, kerma and kerma equivalent were estimated at different locations in a water phantom. The evolution of neutron dose and dose equivalent inside the phantom was deduced. Measurements of absorbed dose and of dose equivalent were then carried out in a water phantom using an ionization ch...

  11. Study on Compression Induced Contrast in X-ray Mammograms Using Breast Mimicking Phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. M. Aowlad Hossain

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray mammography is commonly used to scan cancer or tumors in breast using low dose x-rays. But mammograms suffer from low contrast problem. The breast is compressed in mammography to reduce x-ray scattering effects. As tumors are stiffer than normal tissues, they undergo smaller deformation under compression. Therefore, image intensity at tumor region may change less than the background tissues. In this study, we try to find out compression induced contrast from multiple mammographic images of tumorous breast phantoms taken with different compressions. This is an extended work of our previous simulation study with experiment and more analysis. We have used FEM models for synthetic phantom and constructed a phantom using agar and n-propanol for simulation and experiment. The x-ray images of deformed phantoms have been obtained under three compression steps and a non-rigid registration technique has been applied to register these images. It is noticeably observed that the image intensity changes at tumor are less than those at surrounding which induce a detectable contrast. Addition of this compression induced contrast to the simulated and experimental images has improved their original contrast by a factor of about 1.4

  12. The UF family of hybrid phantoms of the developing human fetus for computational radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maynard, Matthew R; Geyer, John W; Bolch, Wesley [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Aris, John P [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shifrin, Roger Y, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2011-08-07

    Historically, the development of computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry has primarily been directed at capturing and representing adult and pediatric anatomy, with less emphasis devoted to models of the human fetus. As concern grows over possible radiation-induced cancers from medical and non-medical exposures of the pregnant female, the need to better quantify fetal radiation doses, particularly at the organ-level, also increases. Studies such as the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) hope to improve our understanding of cancer risks following chronic in utero radiation exposure. For projects such as SOLO, currently available fetal anatomic models do not provide sufficient anatomical detail for organ-level dose assessment. To address this need, two fetal hybrid computational phantoms were constructed using high-quality magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography image sets obtained for two well-preserved fetal specimens aged 11.5 and 21 weeks post-conception. Individual soft tissue organs, bone sites and outer body contours were segmented from these images using 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and then imported to the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros(TM) for further modeling and conversion of soft tissue organs, certain bone sites and outer body contours to deformable non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces. The two specimen-specific phantoms, along with a modified version of the 38 week UF hybrid newborn phantom, comprised a set of base phantoms from which a series of hybrid computational phantoms was derived for fetal ages 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 38 weeks post-conception. The methodology used to construct the series of phantoms accounted for the following age-dependent parameters: (1) variations in skeletal size and proportion, (2) bone-dependent variations in relative levels of bone growth, (3) variations in individual organ masses and total fetal masses and (4) statistical percentile variations

  13. The UF family of hybrid phantoms of the developing human fetus for computational radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Matthew R.; Geyer, John W.; Aris, John P.; Shifrin, Roger Y.; Bolch, Wesley

    2011-08-01

    Historically, the development of computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry has primarily been directed at capturing and representing adult and pediatric anatomy, with less emphasis devoted to models of the human fetus. As concern grows over possible radiation-induced cancers from medical and non-medical exposures of the pregnant female, the need to better quantify fetal radiation doses, particularly at the organ-level, also increases. Studies such as the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) hope to improve our understanding of cancer risks following chronic in utero radiation exposure. For projects such as SOLO, currently available fetal anatomic models do not provide sufficient anatomical detail for organ-level dose assessment. To address this need, two fetal hybrid computational phantoms were constructed using high-quality magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography image sets obtained for two well-preserved fetal specimens aged 11.5 and 21 weeks post-conception. Individual soft tissue organs, bone sites and outer body contours were segmented from these images using 3D-DOCTOR™ and then imported to the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros™ for further modeling and conversion of soft tissue organs, certain bone sites and outer body contours to deformable non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces. The two specimen-specific phantoms, along with a modified version of the 38 week UF hybrid newborn phantom, comprised a set of base phantoms from which a series of hybrid computational phantoms was derived for fetal ages 8, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 38 weeks post-conception. The methodology used to construct the series of phantoms accounted for the following age-dependent parameters: (1) variations in skeletal size and proportion, (2) bone-dependent variations in relative levels of bone growth, (3) variations in individual organ masses and total fetal masses and (4) statistical percentile variations in

  14. Phantom limb pain: a case of maladaptive CNS plasticity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flor, Herta; Nikolajsen, Lone; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2006-01-01

    Phantom pain refers to pain in a body part that has been amputated or deafferented. It has often been viewed as a type of mental disorder or has been assumed to stem from pathological alterations in the region of the amputation stump. In the past decade, evidence has accumulated that phantom pain...... studies and derive suggestions for innovative interventions aimed at alleviating phantom pain....

  15. Radiological response and dosimetry in physical phantom of head and neck for 3D conformational radiotherapy; Resposta radiologica e dosimetria em phantom fisico de cabeca e pescoco para radioterapia conformacional 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larissa

    2013-07-01

    Phantoms are tools for simulation of organs and tissues of the human body in radiology and radiotherapy. This thesis describes the development, validation and, most importantly, the use of a physical head and neck phantom in radiology and radiotherapy, with the purpose of evaluating dose distribution using Gafchromic EBT2 film in 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy. The work was divided in two stages, (1) development of new equivalent tissues and improvement of the physical phantom, and (2) use of the physical phantom in experimental dosimetry studies. In phase (1) parameters such as mass density, chemical composition of tissues, anatomical and biometric measurements were considered, as well as aspects of imaging by computed tomography (CT) and radiological response representation in Hounsfield Units (HU), which were compared with human data. Radiological experiments of in-phantom simulated brain pathologies were also conducted. All those results matched human-sourced data, therefore the physical phantom is a suitable simulator that may be used to enhance radiological protocols and education in medical imaging. The main objective in phase (2) was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution in a brain tumor simulator inserted inside the head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI), exposed to 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy, for internal dose assessment. Radiation planning was based on CT images of the physical phantom with a brain tumor simulator made with equivalent material. The treatment planning system (TPS), CAT3D software, used CT images and prescribed a dose of 200 cGy, distributed in three fields of radiation, in a T-shaped pattern. The TPS covered the planning treatment volume (PTV) with 97% of the prescribed dose. A solid water phantom and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film were used for calibration procedures, generating a dose response curve as a function of optical density (OD). After calibration and irradiation, the film

  16. Finite element modeling for volume phantom in Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Rybina

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Using surface phantom, "shadows" of currents, which flow below and under surface tomographic lays, include on this lay, that is cause of adding errors in reconstruction image. For processing modeling in studied object volume isotropic finite elements should be used. Cube is chosen for finite element modeling in this work. Cube is modeled as sum of six rectangular (in the base pyramids, each pyramid consists of four triangular pyramids (with rectangular triangle in the base and hypotenuse, which is equal to cube rib to provide its uniformity and electrical definition. In the case of modeling on frequencies higher than 100 kHz biological tissue resistivities are complex. In this case weight coefficient k will be complex in received cube electrical model (inverse conductivity matrix of the cube finite element.

  17. Motor control over the phantom limb in above-elbow amputees and its relationship with phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagné, M; Reilly, K T; Hétu, S; Mercier, C

    2009-08-04

    Recent evidence shows that the primary motor cortex continues to send motor commands when amputees execute phantom movements. These c