WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-layer falling films

  1. Falling Liquid Films

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliadasis, S; Scheid, B

    2012-01-01

    This research monograph gives a detailed review of the state-of-the-art theoretical methodologies for the analysis of dissipative wave dynamics and pattern formation on the surface of a film falling down a planar, inclined substrate. This prototype is an open-flow hydrodynamic instability representing an excellent paradigm for the study of complexity in active nonlinear media with energy supply, dissipation and dispersion. Whenever possible, the link between theory and experiments is illustrated and the development of order-of-magnitude estimates and scaling arguments is used to facilitate the

  2. Falling films on flexible inclines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, O. K.; Craster, R. V.; Kumar, S.

    2007-11-01

    The nonlinear stability and dynamic behavior of falling fluid films is studied for flow over a flexible substrate. We use asymptotic methods to deduce governing equations valid in various limits. Long-wave theory is used to derive Benney-like coupled equations for the film thickness and substrate deflection. Weakly nonlinear equations are then derived from these equations that, in the limit of large wall damping and/or large wall tension, reduce to the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. These models break down when inertia becomes more significant, so we also use a long-wave approximation in conjunction with integral theory to derive three strongly coupled nonlinear evolution equations for the film thickness, substrate deflection, and film volumetric flow rate valid at higher Reynolds numbers. These equations, accounting for inertia, capillary, viscous, wall tension, and damping effects, are solved over a wide range of parameters. Our results suggest that decreasing wall damping and/or wall tension can promote the development of chaos in the weakly nonlinear regime and lead to severe substrate deformations in the strongly nonlinear regime; these can give rise to situations in which the free surface and underlying substrate come into contact in finite time.

  3. Determination of the Mass Absorption Coefficient in Two-Layer Ti/V and V/Ti Thin Film Systems by the X-Ray Fluorescence Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashin, N. I.; Chernyaeva, E. A.; Tumanova, A. N.; Gafarova, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new XRF procedure for the determination of the mass absorption coefficient in thin film Ti/V and V/Ti two-layer systems has been proposed. The procedure uses easy-to-make thin-film layers of sputtered titanium and vanadium on a polymer film substrate. Correction coefficients have been calculated that take into account attenuation of primary radiation of the X-ray tube, as well as attenuation of the spectral line of the bottom layer element in the top layer.

  4. Magnetooptic effects and Auger electron spectroscopy of two-layer NiFe-Dy and Fe-Dy films with nonuniform layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehdel'man, I.S.; Markov, V.V.; Khudyakov, A.E.; Ivantsov, R.D.; Bondarenko, G.V.; Ovchinnikov, S.G.; Kesler, V.G.; Parshin, A.S.; Ronzhin, I.P.

    2001-01-01

    Magneto-optical effects (magnetic circular dichroism and meridional Kerr effect) and element distribution with layer thickness in two-layer NiFe-Dy and Fe-Dy films, prepared by thermal sputtering of component in ultrahigh vacuum, are investigated. It is shown, that Dy in a two-layer film in the temperature range of 80-300 K makes constant contributions to both effects investigated which are approximately equal to the values of the effects observed in an isolated Dy film only at temperatures below the temperature T c of Dy transition into a ferromagnetic state (T c ∼ 100 K for the films under study). This behaviour of magneto-optical effects is assumed to be due to the influence of a NiFe layer spin system on magnetic state of a Dy layer, this influence is enhanced by the deep penetration of Ni and Fe ions into Dy layer as it follows from the data obtained using Auger electron spectroscopy [ru

  5. Assembly of 1D nanofibers into a 2D bi-layered composite nanofibrous film with different functionalities at the two layers via layer-by-layer electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijiao; Ma, Qianli; Dong, Xiangting; Li, Dan; Xi, Xue; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Liu, Guixia

    2016-12-21

    A two-dimensional (2D) bi-layered composite nanofibrous film assembled by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibers with trifunctionality of electrical conduction, magnetism and photoluminescence has been successfully fabricated by layer-by-layer electrospinning. The composite film consists of a polyaniline (PANI)/Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle (NP)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) tuned electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer on one side and a Tb(TTA) 3 (TPPO) 2 /polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) photoluminescent layer on the other side, and the two layers are tightly combined face-to-face together into the novel bi-layered composite film of trifunctionality. The brand-new film has totally different characteristics at the double layers. The electrical conductivity and magnetism of the electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer can be, respectively, tunable via modulating the PANI and Fe 3 O 4 NP contents, and the highest electrical conductivity can reach up to the order of 10 -2 S cm -1 , and predominant intense green emission at 545 nm is obviously observed in the photoluminescent layer under the excitation of 357 nm single-wavelength ultraviolet light. More importantly, the luminescence intensity of the photoluminescent layer remains almost unaffected by the electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer because the photoluminescent materials have been successfully isolated from dark-colored PANI and Fe 3 O 4 NPs. By comparing with the counterpart single-layered composite nanofibrous film, it is found that the bi-layered composite nanofibrous film has better performance. The novel bi-layered composite nanofibrous film with trifunctionality has potential in the fields of nanodevices, molecular electronics and biomedicine. Furthermore, the design conception and fabrication technique for the bi-layered multifunctional film provide a new and facile strategy towards other films of multifunctionality.

  6. Two layer powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, H.

    1979-01-01

    First, significance and advantages of sintered materials consisting of two layers are pointed out. By means of the two layer powder pressing technique metal powders are formed resulting in compacts with high accuracy of shape and mass. Attributes of basic powders, different filling methods and pressing techniques are discussed. The described technique is supposed to find further applications in the field of two layer compacts in the near future

  7. Instability of two-layer film flows due to the interacting effects of surfactants, inertia, and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogirou, Anna

    2018-03-01

    We consider a two-fluid shear flow where the interface between the two fluids is coated with an insoluble surfactant. An asymptotic model is derived in the thin-layer approximation, consisting of a set of nonlinear partial differential equations describing the evolution of the film and surfactant disturbances at the interface. The model includes important physical effects such as Marangoni forces (caused by the presence of surfactant), inertial forces arising in the thick fluid layer, as well as gravitational forces. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of density stratification or gravity—represented through the Bond number Bo—on the flow stability and the interplay between the different (de)stabilisation mechanisms. It is found that gravity can either stabilise or destabilise the interface (depending on fluid properties) but not always as intuitively anticipated. Different traveling-wave branches are presented for varying Bo, and the destabilising mechanism associated with the Marangoni forces is discussed.

  8. Falling film flow, heat transfer and breakdown on horizontal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.T.

    1980-11-01

    Knowledge of falling film flow and heat transfer characteristics on horizontal tubes is required in the assessment of certain CANDU reactor accident sequences for those CANDU reactors which use moderator dump as one of the shut-down mechanisms. In these reactors, subsequent cooling of the calandria tubes is provided by falling films produced by sprays. This report describes studies of falling film flow and heat transfer characteristics on horizontal tubes. Analyses using integral methods are given for laminar and turbulent flow, ignoring and accounting for momentum effects in the film. Preliminary experiments on film flow stability on horizontal tubes are described and various mechanisms of film breakdown are examined. The work described in this report shows that in LOCA with indefinitely delayed ECI in the NPD or Douglas Point (at 70 percent power) reactors, the falling films on the calandria tubes will not be disrupted by any of the mechanisms considered, provided that the pressure tubes do not sag onto the calandria tubes. However, should the pressure tubes sag onto the calandria tubes, film disruption will probably occur

  9. The resonance susceptibility of two-layer exchange-coupled ferromagnetic film with a combined uniaxial and cubic anisotropy in the layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shul’ga, N.V., E-mail: shulga@anrb.ru; Doroshenko, R.A.

    2016-12-01

    A numerical investigation of the resonance dynamic susceptibility of ferromagnetic exchange-coupled two-layer films with a combined cubic and uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of the layers has been performed. It has been found that the presence of cubic anisotropy leads to the fact that much of the off-diagonal components of the dynamic susceptibility are nonzero. The change of the ferromagnetic resonance frequencies and dynamic susceptibility upon the magnetization along the [100], [010], and [011] directions have been calculated. The evolution of the profile of the dynamic susceptibility occurring during the magnetization has been described. The impact of changes in the distribution of equilibrium and dynamic components of the magnetization on the dependences of the components of the dynamic susceptibility and the ferromagnetic resonance frequency on the external magnetic fields has been discussed. - Highlights: • The extremes in the dependences of integrated dynamic susceptibility components are observed at low fields. • Lower extremes can be observed at a shift of the localization of the lower FMR mode toward the interface between the layers. • The features of the distribution of the dynamic susceptibility over the thickness have been discussed. • The cubic anisotropy leads to the fact that the off-diagonal integrated dynamic susceptibility components are essential. • FMR signal can be excited in vicinity of the interlayer boundary.

  10. Falling film evaporators: organic solvent regeneration in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcin, I.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this work was to improve knowledge about working of falling film evaporators used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants for organic solvent regeneration. The first part deals with a non evaporation film. An original film thickness measuring technique was used; infrared thermography. It gave indications on hydrodynamics and wave amplitude and pointed out thermocapillary forces to be the cause of bad wetting of the heated wall. By another way we showed that a small slit spacing on the film distributor, an enhanced surface roughness and an important liquid flow rate favour a better wetting. The second part deals with evaporation of a binary solvent mixture. Experiments in an industrial evaporator corroborated the fact that it is essential for the efficiency of the apparatus to work at high flow rates. We propose an over-simple model which can be used to estimate performances of co-current falling film evaporators of the process [fr

  11. STUDI EKSPERIMENTAL FALLING FILM EVAPORATOR PADA EVAPORASI NIRA KENTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medya Ayunda Fitri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Falling film evaporator is a constructed equipment for concentrating dilute solution that are sensitive to heat flowing form a thin film. This research aims to study the evaporation of cane juice concentrated with air flow on falling film evaporator and knowing evaporation rate occured in falling film evaporator used. In the process, cane juice from plant pumped to the falling film evaporator that used in this experiment. This research used concentrated cane juice and air flow rate for variables of this experiment. Cane juice flow from top of evaporator through distributor to form thin film and air flow from the bottom of evaporator. After that, temperatur of pipe wall, inlet and outlet temperature of cane juice and air were measured. This experiment concluded that the highest concentration of outlet solution is 59 brix for liquid flow rate 154 l/h and air flow rate 10 m3/h, and the other hand inlet solution concentration 51 brix. Optimum evaporation rate is 35 kg/m2.h for 51 brix and air flow rate 10 m3/h.

  12. Studies of microstructured falling film reactor using Eddy diffusivity concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantu-Perez, A.; Al-Rawashdeh, M.I.M.; Hessel, V.; Gavriilidis, A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. This work introduces a model for the absorption of CO2 in a falling film microreactor that incorporates staggered herringbone structures. The effect of the herringbone structures was incorporated into the model via a position dependent eddy diffusivity obtained from turbulent theory

  13. An analysis of the falling film gas-liquid reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, E.J.; Ouwerkerk-Dijkers, van M.P.; Venkatesh, S.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model of the falling film reactor is developed to predict the conversion and temperature distribution in the reactor as a function of the gas and liquid flow rates, physical properties, the feed composition of the reactive gas and carrier gas and other parameters of the system.

  14. AGU Cinema: Festival of short science films at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Douglas A.

    2012-11-01

    New technologies have revolutionized the use of video as a means of science communication and have made it easier to create, distribute, and view. With video having become omnipresent in our culture, it sometime supplements or even replaces writing in many science and education applications. An inaugural science film festival sponsored by AGU at the 2012 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., in December will showcase short videos—30 minutes or less in length—developed to disseminate scientific results to various audiences and to enhance learning in the classroom. AGU Cinema will feature professionally produced, big budget films alongside low-budget videos aimed at niche audiences and made by amateurs. The latter category includes videos made by governmental agency scientists, educators, communications specialists within scientific organizations, and Fall Meeting oral and poster presenters.

  15. Development of Falling Film Heat Transfer Coefficient for Industrial Chemical Processes Evaporator Design

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil; Burhan, Muhammad; Ng, Kim Choon

    2018-01-01

    In falling film evaporators, the overall heat transfer coefficient is controlled by film thickness, velocity, liquid properties and the temperature differential across the film layer. This chapter presents the heat transfer behaviour for evaporative

  16. Introducing ultrasonic falling film evaporator for moderate temperature evaporation enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehbani, Maryam; Rahimi, Masoud

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, Ultrasonic Falling Film (USFF), as a novel technique has been proposed to increase the evaporation rate of moderate temperature liquid film. It is a proper method for some applications which cannot be performed at high temperature, such as foodstuff industry, due to their sensitivity to high temperatures. Evaporation rate of sodium chloride solution from an USFF on an inclined flat plate compared to that for Falling Film without ultrasonic irradiation (FF) at various temperatures was investigated. The results revealed that produced cavitation bubbles have different effects on evaporation rate at different temperatures. At lower temperatures, size fluctuation and collapse of bubbles and in consequence induced physical effects of cavitation bubbles resulted in more turbulency and evaporation rate enhancement. At higher temperatures, the behavior was different. Numerous created bubbles joined together and cover the plate surface, so not only decreased the ultrasound vibrations but also reduced the evaporation rate in comparison with FF. The highest evaporation rate enhancement of 353% was obtained at 40 °C at the lowest Reynolds number of 250. In addition, the results reveal that at temperature of 40 °C, USFF has the highest efficiency compared to FF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Stabilising falling liquid film flows using feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Alice B., E-mail: alice.thompson1@imperial.ac.uk; Gomes, Susana N.; Pavliotis, Grigorios A.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T. [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Falling liquid films become unstable due to inertial effects when the fluid layer is sufficiently thick or the slope sufficiently steep. This free surface flow of a single fluid layer has industrial applications including coating and heat transfer, which benefit from smooth and wavy interfaces, respectively. Here, we discuss how the dynamics of the system are altered by feedback controls based on observations of the interface height, and supplied to the system via the perpendicular injection and suction of fluid through the wall. In this study, we model the system using both Benney and weighted-residual models that account for the fluid injection through the wall. We find that feedback using injection and suction is a remarkably effective control mechanism: the controls can be used to drive the system towards arbitrary steady states and travelling waves, and the qualitative effects are independent of the details of the flow modelling. Furthermore, we show that the system can still be successfully controlled when the feedback is applied via a set of localised actuators and only a small number of system observations are available, and that this is possible using both static (where the controls are based on only the most recent set of observations) and dynamic (where the controls are based on an approximation of the system which evolves over time) control schemes. This study thus provides a solid theoretical foundation for future experimental realisations of the active feedback control of falling liquid films.

  18. The Marangoni convection induced by acetone desorption from the falling soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yong; Li, Zhangyun; Wang, Yongyi; Huang, Jiali

    2012-05-01

    By means of the falling soap film tunnel and the Schlieren optical method, the Marangoni convection were observed directly in the immediate interfacial neighborhood during the desorption process of acetone from the falling soap film. Moreover, the hydraulic characteristics of the falling soap film tunnel, the acetone concentration, the surface tension of the soap liquid and the mass transfer has been investigated in details through the experimental or theoretical method.

  19. Refrigerant falling film evaporation review: Description, fluid dynamics and heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Seara, José; Pardiñas, Ángel Á.

    2014-01-01

    Falling film horizontal tube evaporators for refrigeration equipment are an interesting alternative to pool boiling evaporators concerning operation costs, safety, thermodynamic efficiency, charge of refrigerant or size. Plenty of literature works studied falling film evaporation, but for its application in fields such as desalination and petrochemical industry or OTEC. This review focuses mainly on those works from the literature that analysed the main issues of falling film evaporation of refrigerants, to better understand heat transfer and fluid dynamics in such evaporators. First, falling film evaporation is described and compared to pool boiling, to define its main advantages and inconveniences. Then, the literature concerning film around the tubes and between them is analysed, as well as the phenomenon of film breakdown, which sharply deteriorates the heat transfer performance of falling film evaporators. After it, the results from those works that studied analytically and experimentally the heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) with different types of tubes and refrigerants are discussed. The review finishes with a brief summary of important parameters of falling film evaporation, which might be useful for the design of such equipment. - Highlights: •We defined falling film evaporation and compared it with pool boiling. •We reviewed works from the literature concerning refrigerant falling film evaporation. •We classified the ideas from the works attending to crucial aspects of the process. •We developed a summary of the main ideas which could be useful for design purpose

  20. Falling drops skating on a film of air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2012-02-01

    When a raindrop hits a window, the surface immediately becomes wet as the water spreads. Indeed, this common observation of a drop impacting a surface is ubiquitous in our everyday experience. I will show that the impact of a drop on a surface is a much richer, more complex phenomenon than our simple experience may suggests: To completely wet the surface the drop must first expel all the air beneath it; however, this does not happened instantaneously. Instead, a very thin film of air, only a few tens of nanometers thick, remains trapped between the falling drop and the surface as the fluid spreads. The thin film of air serves to lubricate the drop enabling the fluid to skate laterally outward at strikingly high velocities. Simultaneously, the wetting fluid spreads inward at a much slower velocity, trapping a bubble of air within the drop. However, these events occur at diminutive length scales and fleeting time scales; therefore, to visualize them we develop new imaging modalities that are sensitive to the behavior right at the surface and that have time resolution superior to even the very fastest cameras. These imaging techniques reveal that the ultimate wetting of the surface occurs through a completely new mechanism, the breakup of the thin film of air through a spinodal like dewetting process that breaks the cylindrical symmetry of the impact and drives an anomalously rapid spreading of a wetting front. These results are in accord with recent theoretical predictions and challenge the prevailing paradigm in which contact between the liquid and solid occurs immediately, and spreading is dominated by the dynamics of a single contact line.

  1. Analytical solution of velocity for ammonia-water horizontal falling-film flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Yide

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We built a new falling-film flow model that analyzed the film flow characteristics. • We have obtained a new formula of film thickness over the horizontal tube. • We derived analysis solution to analyze the effect of inertial force to velocity in the entrance region of liquid film. • It described the characters of the ammonia-waterfalling-film film over the horizontal tube. • It is good for falling-film absorption, generation and evaporation to optimizing the design parameters and further improving the capabilities. - Abstract: A new horizontal tube falling film velocity model was built and calculated to analyze the problem of film flow conditions. This model also analyzed the film thickness distribution in horizontal tube falling film flow and considered the effect of the inertial force on velocity. The film thickness and velocity profile can be obtained based on the principle of linear superposition, a method of separation of variables that introduces the effect of variable inertial force on the velocity profile in the process of falling-film absorption. The film flow condition and the film thickness distribution at different fluid Reynolds numbers (Re) and tube diameters were calculated and compared with the results of the Crank–Nicolson numerical solution under the same conditions. The results show that the film flow condition out of a horizontal tube and that the film thickness increases with the fluid Re. At a specific Re and suitable tube diameter, the horizontal tube reaches a more uniform film. Finally, the analysis results have similar trend with the experimental and numerical predicted data in literature.

  2. Design concept of cryogenic falling liquid film helium separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, M.; Yamanishi, T.; Bartlit, J.R.; Sherman, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    A design concept is developed for a cryogenic falling liquid film helium separator by clarifying the differences between this process and a cryogenic distillation column. The process characteristics are greatly improved by the idea of adding an H 2 gas flow to a point near the upper end of the packed section. The flow rate of tritium lost from the top is kept extremely low with an adequately short packed section, and the column pressure is reduced to 1 atm. The addition causes no appreciable increase in the protium percentage (approx. =1%) in the bottom liquid flow. A design procedure applying the Colburn-Hougen method is proposed for determining specifications of the refrigerated section. It is shown that the presence of noncondensible helium requires a significantly larger heat transfer area mainly because the mass transfer resistance increases enormously as the condensation of hydrogen isotopes proceeds. Control schemes are also proposed: The tritium concentration in the top gas is controlled by the H 2 gas flow rate. The pressure rise caused by an increase of the helium percentage within the refrigerated section, which cannot readily be eliminated by changing input specifications of the refrigerant gas, is avoided by increasing the top gas flow rate to release more helium from the top

  3. Study on Gas-liquid Falling Film Flow in Internal Heat Integrated Distillation Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong

    2017-10-01

    Gas-liquid internally heat integrated distillation column falling film flow with nonlinear characteristics, study on gas liquid falling film flow regulation control law, can reduce emissions of the distillation column, and it can improve the quality of products. According to the distribution of gas-liquid mass balance internally heat integrated distillation column independent region, distribution model of heat transfer coefficient of building internal heat integrated distillation tower is obtained liquid distillation falling film flow in the saturated vapour pressure of liquid water balance, using heat transfer equation and energy equation to balance the relationship between the circulating iterative gas-liquid falling film flow area, flow parameter information, at a given temperature, pressure conditions, gas-liquid flow falling film theory makes the optimal parameters to achieve the best fitting value with the measured values. The results show that the geometric gas-liquid internally heat integrated distillation column falling film flow heat exchange area and import column thermostat, the average temperature has significant. The positive correlation between the heat exchanger tube entrance due to temperature difference between inside and outside, the heat flux is larger, with the increase of internal heat integrated distillation column temperature, the slope decreases its temperature rise, which accurately describes the internal gas-liquid heat integrated distillation tower falling film flow regularity, take appropriate measures to promote the enhancement of heat transfer. It can enhance the overall efficiency of the heat exchanger.

  4. Experimental study of falling film evaporation in large scale rectangular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X.G.; Yang, Y.H.; Hu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper studies the falling film evaporation in large scale rectangular channel experimentally. • The effects of air flow rate, film temperature and film flow rate on falling film evaporation are analyzed. • Increasing the air flow rate is considered as an efficient method to enhance the evaporation rate. • A correlation including the wave effect for falling film evaporation is derived based on heat and mass transfer analogy. - Abstract: The falling film evaporation in a large scale rectangular channel is experimentally studied in this paper for the design and improvement of passive containment cooling system. The evaporation mass transfer coefficient h D is obtained by the evaporation rate and vapor partial pressure difference of film surface and air bulk. The experimental results indicate that increasing of air flow rate appears to enhance h D , while the film temperature and film flow rate have little effect on h D . Since the wave effect on evaporation is noticed in experiment, the evaporation mass transfer correlation including the wave effect is developed on the basis of heat and mass transfer analogy and experimental data

  5. The Effect of Roll Waves on the Hydrodynamics of Falling Films Observed in Vertical Column Absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    A thin falling film is well suited to simultaneous heat and mass transfer because of the small thermal resistance through the film and because of the large contact surface achievable at low flow rates. The film enters as a smooth laminar flow and quickly transitions into small-amplitude wavy flow. The waves grown in length and amplitude and are identified as roll waves. This flow regime is termed wavy-laminar flow, and modern heat and mass transfer equipment operate in this complicated transition regime. Research published in open literature has shown the mass flow rate in the rollwaves to be about 10 to 20 times greater than that in the laminar substrate. As the film fully develops, the waves grow in mass and the film substrate thins because fluid is swept from the substrate by the secondary flows of the roll wave. Many studies have been conducted to measure and correlate the film thickness of wavy-laminar flows. Literature data show that Nusselt's theory for smooth laminar flow can over predict the film thickness by as much as 20% for certain wavy-laminar flow conditions. The hydrodynamics of falling films were therefore studied to measure the film thickness of a free-surface falling film and to better understand the parameters that affect the variations of the film thickness. A flow loop was set up for measuring the thickness, wave amplitude,and frequency of a film during hydrodynamic flow. Decreasing the pipe diameter caused the amplitude of the wavy flow to diminish. Measurements monitored from stations along the falling film showed a thinning of film thickness. Fully developed flow required large starting lengths of about 0.5 m. The film thickness increases as the Reynolds number (Re) increases. Increasing the Kapitza number (Ka) causes a decrease in the film thickness. Regression analysis showed that the Re and Ka numbers described the data trends in wavy-laminar flow. Rather than correlating the Re number in discrete ranges of the Ka number as earlier

  6. Falling film evaporation on a tube bundle with plain and enhanced tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habert, M.

    2009-04-01

    The complexities of two-phase flow and evaporation on a tube bundle present important problems in the design of heat exchangers and the understanding of the physical phenomena taking place. The development of structured surfaces to enhance boiling heat transfer and thus reduce the size of evaporators adds another level of complexity to the modeling of such heat exchangers. Horizontal falling film evaporators have the potential to be widely used in large refrigeration systems and heat pumps, in the petrochemical industry and for sea water desalination units, but there is a need to improve the understanding of falling film evaporation mechanisms to provide accurate thermal design methods. The characterization of the effect of enhanced surfaces on the boiling phenomena occurring in falling film evaporators is thus expected to increase and optimize the performance of a tube bundle. In this work, the existing LTCM falling film facility was modified and instrumented to perform falling film evaporation measurements on single tube row and a small tube bundle. Four types of tubes were tested including: a plain tube, an enhanced condensing tube (Gewa-C+LW) and two enhanced boiling tubes (Turbo-EDE2 and Gewa-B4) to extend the existing database. The current investigation includes results for two refrigerants, R134a and R236fa, at a saturation temperature of T sat = 5 °C, liquid film Reynolds numbers ranging from 0 to 3000, at heat fluxes between 20 and 60 kW/m² in pool boiling and falling film configurations. Measurements of the local heat transfer coefficient were obtained and utilized to improve the current prediction methods. Finally, the understanding of the physical phenomena governing the falling film evaporation of liquid refrigerants has been improved. Furthermore, a method for predicting the onset of dry patch formation has been developed and a local heat transfer prediction method for falling film evaporation based on a large experimental database has been proposed

  7. TWO-LAYER PHASE COMPENSATING INTERFERENCE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiy V. Nikandrov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with creation of optical interferential coatings, giving the possibility to form the wave front without the change of energy characteristics of the incident and reflected radiation. Correction is achieved due to the layer, which thickness is a function of coordinate of an optical element surface. Selection technique is suggested for refractive index materials, forming two-layer interference coating that creates a coating with a constant coefficient of reflection on the surface of the optical element. By this procedure the change of coefficient of reflection for the optical element surface, arising because of the variable thickness is eliminated. Magnesium oxide and zirconium dioxide were used as the film-forming materials. The paper presents experimentally obtained thickness distribution of the layer, which is a part of the phase compensating coating. A new class of optical coatings proposed in the paper can find its application for correcting the form of a wave front.

  8. Film boiling heat transfer from a hot sphere falling in two-phase pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, K. H.; Kim, K. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to experimentally investigate film boiling heat trasfer from a hot sphere falling in steam-water two-phase pool, which is the key heat transfer mode in molten fuel and coolant mixing. To measure film boiling heat transfer coefficients on a spere falling in two-phase pool, a heated sphere with a thermocouple embedded at the center is dropped in a vertical tube filled with steam-water mixture. The present experiment is unique in making the heated sphere fall through the two-phase pool while the previous experiments were performed with stationary spheres in flowing fluid. The falling speed of the sphere is measured using a set of magnet pickup coils distributed along the tube. The ranges of the experimental conditions are: spere fall speed 0-0.5 m/s, average void fraction 0-25,% steam superficial velocity 0-0.25 m/s. The results show that the forced convection film boiling heat transfer coefficient decrease slightly as the steam superficial velocity (void fraction) is increased

  9. Liquid flow rate effects during partial evaporation in a falling film micro contactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moschou, P.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schaaf, van der J.; Schouten, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this study is the investigation of the effect of liquid flow rate on partial evaporation, enhanced by convective nitrogen flow, in a falling film micro contactor. Experiments are performed at different flow rates and for a certain heating liquid temperature. The temperatures of the gas

  10. Aspects of sorption processes in thermosiphon and in falling film arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kockum, Henrik

    1998-09-01

    A study concerning closure relations pertinent to the design of sorption equipment of absorption heat pumps has been undertaken. Specifically, thermosiphon and vertical falling film arrangements were studied. For the thermosiphon, experimental data on the void fraction, the friction and orifice pressure drops, and the heat transfer coefficient at sub-atmospheric pressures were obtained for vaporizing water and vaporizing water-sugar mixtures. Empirical correlations were produced for all quantities. Furthermore, a semi-theoretical model for the void fraction was derived; this model compared favourably to existing correlations. Sample thermosiphon correlations using a two-field two-phase flow model, including a heating condensate film, were performed. For the falling film, a penetration-type of turbulence model was developed. Experimental data found in the open literature were used in the derivation. Absorption calculations then indicated that the model is appropriate for wavy-laminar flows, but not for turbulent flows. Falling film calculation results compared favourably to existing film thickness and heat transfer correlations 121 refs, 28 figs, 14 tabs

  11. Fall

    OpenAIRE

    Odundo, Magdalene

    2008-01-01

    The monoprint Fall, created in the artist-in-residence studio at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New England, represents a transient yet vivid memory of the season spent walking and re-walking a trail I took to the studio on a daily basis. The work arose spontaneously from a direct and instinctive wish to replicate the ghost imprints left on the trail by the wet and dry weather of that autumn. It also represented a sensationally hopeful political transition of what seemed to be the growth of hope...

  12. Self-similarity of solitary waves on inertia-dominated falling liquid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denner, Fabian; Pradas, Marc; Charogiannis, Alexandros; Markides, Christos N; van Wachem, Berend G M; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-03-01

    We propose consistent scaling of solitary waves on inertia-dominated falling liquid films, which accurately accounts for the driving physical mechanisms and leads to a self-similar characterization of solitary waves. Direct numerical simulations of the entire two-phase system are conducted using a state-of-the-art finite volume framework for interfacial flows in an open domain that was previously validated against experimental film-flow data with excellent agreement. We present a detailed analysis of the wave shape and the dispersion of solitary waves on 34 different water films with Reynolds numbers Re=20-120 and surface tension coefficients σ=0.0512-0.072 N m(-1) on substrates with inclination angles β=19°-90°. Following a detailed analysis of these cases we formulate a consistent characterization of the shape and dispersion of solitary waves, based on a newly proposed scaling derived from the Nusselt flat film solution, that unveils a self-similarity as well as the driving mechanism of solitary waves on gravity-driven liquid films. Our results demonstrate that the shape of solitary waves, i.e., height and asymmetry of the wave, is predominantly influenced by the balance of inertia and surface tension. Furthermore, we find that the dispersion of solitary waves on the inertia-dominated falling liquid films considered in this study is governed by nonlinear effects and only driven by inertia, with surface tension and gravity having a negligible influence.

  13. Development of Falling Film Heat Transfer Coefficient for Industrial Chemical Processes Evaporator Design

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil

    2018-03-07

    In falling film evaporators, the overall heat transfer coefficient is controlled by film thickness, velocity, liquid properties and the temperature differential across the film layer. This chapter presents the heat transfer behaviour for evaporative film boiling on horizontal tubes, but working at low pressures of 0.93–3.60 kPa as well as seawater salinity of 15,000–90,000 mg/l or ppm. Owing to a dearth of literature on film-boiling at these conditions, the chapter is motivated by the importance of evaporative film-boiling in the process industries. It is observed that in addition to the above-mentioned parameters, evaporative heat transfer of seawater is affected by the emergence of micro-bubbles within the thin film layer, particularly when the liquid saturation temperatures drop below 25°C (3.1 kPa). Such micro-bubbles are generated near to the tube wall surfaces, and they enhanced the heat transfer by two or more folds when compared with the predictions of conventional evaporative film-boiling. The appearance of micro-bubbles is attributed to the rapid increase in the specific volume of vapour, i.e. dv/dT, at low saturation temperature conditions. A new correlation is thus proposed in this chapter and it shows good agreement to the measured data with an experimental uncertainty less than ±8%.

  14. Performance assessment of adding Cu-ultrafine particles into falling film desiccant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mulla Ali, A.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of dehumidification between air and liquid desiccant for the improvement of the efficiency of heating and cooling fluids in industrial applications was discussed. The use of solid/liquid desiccants has received much attention in recent years because liquid desiccants can take moisture from surrounding air at low temperature and then release the moisture at high temperature to provide a continuous process of dehumidification of air and regeneration of liquid desiccant. This process can be used with conventional vapor compression cycles. This paper presented a comparative numerical study between parallel and counter flow configurations that examined the effects of various parameters on heat and mass transfer for the dehumidification and cooling processes of air and regeneration rate of liquid desiccant. Ultrafine particles were added to the falling film desiccant to investigate heat and mass transfer enhancement for both parallel and counter flow channels. The Cu-volume fraction in the falling film desiccant and dispersion effect were the important parameters. A mathematical model was therefore developed to account for the addition of Cu-ultrafine particles into the film desiccant. The dehumidification and cooling rate processes were found to improve with an increase in the Cu-ultrafine particles and dispersion effect. The new hybrid AC system was shown to improve indoor air quality, reduce energy consumption, and be environmentally safe. It was concluded that although the volume fraction and dispersion factor improve the dehumidification and cooling processes of the air, the improvements are not significant due to the small thickness of the falling-film desiccant. The regeneration process did not improve for either controlling parameter because of the small thickness of the film desiccant. 14 refs., 10 figs

  15. Nonlinear periodic wavetrains in thin liquid films falling on a uniformly heated horizontal plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issokolo, Remi J. Noumana; Dikandé, Alain M.

    2018-05-01

    A thin liquid film falling on a uniformly heated horizontal plate spreads into fingering ripples that can display a complex dynamics ranging from continuous waves, nonlinear spatially localized periodic wave patterns (i.e., rivulet structures) to modulated nonlinear wavetrain structures. Some of these structures have been observed experimentally; however, conditions under which they form are still not well understood. In this work, we examine profiles of nonlinear wave patterns formed by a thin liquid film falling on a uniformly heated horizontal plate. For this purpose, the Benney model is considered assuming a uniform temperature distribution along the film propagation on the horizontal surface. It is shown that for strong surface tension but a relatively small Biot number, spatially localized periodic-wave structures can be analytically obtained by solving the governing equation under appropriate conditions. In the regime of weak nonlinearity, a multiple-scale expansion combined with the reductive perturbation method leads to a complex Ginzburg-Landau equation: the solutions of which are modulated periodic pulse trains which amplitude and width and period are expressed in terms of characteristic parameters of the model.

  16. Revision of the design model for a cryogenic falling liquid film helium separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Masahiro; Bartlit, J.R.; Sherman, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    The present paper reports revision of the design model previously developed by the authors for the cryogenic falling liquid film helium separator. The revised design procedure is composed of three steps : 1) calculation of distributions of phase flow rates, temperature and phase compositions within the refrigerated section and the packed section ; 2) calculation of more detailed distributions of these variables within the refrigerated section ; and 3) estimation of column dimensions and determination of operating conditions. It is assumed that the vacant refrigerated section has two theoretical stages for hydrogen isotope separation. The mixture within the refrigerated section is considered in step 2) as two component system of He-HD. (author)

  17. Experimental assessment of an absorption cooling system utilizing a falling film absorber and generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domínguez-Inzunza, L.A.; Hernández-Magallanes, J.A.; Soto, P.; Jiménez, C.; Gutiérrez-Urueta, G.; Rivera, W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new prototype of an absorption cooling system using NH_3/LiNO_3 was developed. • Falling films shell and tubes heat exchangers were used as absorber and generator. • Evaporator temperatures as low as 4 °C were achieved. • The COP varied between 0.27 and 0.62 depending on the system temperatures. • A flow recirculation in the absorber was implemented showing an increase in COP. - Abstract: This study presents the results of the evaluation of an ammonia/lithium nitrate absorption cooling system. The generator and the absorber are shell and tubes falling film heat exchangers while the rest of the components are compact plate heat exchangers. A parametric study was carried out in order to determine the coefficients of performance and cooling capacities at different operating conditions. Also, an analysis was carried out to determine the influence of the absorber solution recirculation on the system performance. The generator temperatures varied between 80 °C and 100 °C, while the cooling water temperatures varied from 20 °C to 34 °C. Cooling capacities up to 4.5 kW and evaporator temperatures as low as 4 °C were achieved with the system. The internal coefficients of performance varied between 0.3 and 0.62 depending on the system operating temperatures. The system also showed good stability and repeatability.

  18. Predicting the onset of nucleate boiling in wavy free-falling turbulent liquid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, W J; Mudawar, I [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA). School of Mechanical Engineering

    1989-02-01

    Experiments are performed to develop a fundamental understanding of boiling incipience in wavy free-falling turbulent liquid films. Incipience conditions are measured and correlated for water and a fluorocarbon (FC-72) liquid. Incipience in water films is influenced by turbulent eddies and, to a larger extent, by interfacial waves. A new approach to predicting incipience in water and other non-wetting fluids is presented. This approach utilizes physical parameters of commonly accepted incipience models and provides a means of correcting these models for the effects of turbulent eddies and roll waves. This study also demonstrates some unique incipience characteristics of fluorocarbon films. The weak surface tension forces of FC-72 allow droplets and liquid streams to break of the crests of incoming roll waves prior to, and during nucleate boiling. The low contact angle of FC-72 allows the liquid to penetrate deep inside wall cavities. Thus incipience from these flooded cavities requires much higher wall superheat than predicted from incipience models. (author).

  19. Predicting the onset of nucleate boiling in wavy free-falling turbulent liquid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, W.J.; Mudawar, I.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments are performed to develop a fundamental understanding of boiling incipience in wavy free-falling turbulent liquid films. Incipience conditions are measured and correlated for water and a fluorocarbon (FC-72) liquid. Incipience in water films is influenced by turbulent eddies and, to a larger extent, by interfacial waves. A new approach to predicting incipience in water and other non-wetting fluids is presented. This approach utilizes physical parameters of commonly accepted incipience models and provides a means of correcting these models for the effects of turbulent eddies and roll waves. This study also demonstrates some unique incipience characteristics of fluorocarbon films. The weak surface tension forces of FC-72 allow droplets and liquid streams to break of the crests of incoming roll waves prior to, and during nucleate boiling. The low contact angle of FC-72 allows the liquid to penetrate deep inside wall cavities. Thus incipience from these flooded cavities requires much higher wall superheat than predicted from incipience models. (author)

  20. Dry-out heat fluxes of falling film and low-mass flux upward-flow in heated tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Ueda, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Teruyuki; Miyota, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    Dry-out heat fluxes were investigated experimentally for a film flow falling down on the inner surface of vertical heated-tubes and for a low mass flux forced-upward flow in the tubes using R 113. This work followed the study on those for a two-phase natural circulation system. For the falling film boiling, flow state observation tests were also performed, where dry-patches appearing and disappearing repeatedly were observed near the exit end of the heated section at the dry-out heat flux conditions. Relation between the dry-out heat flux and the liquid film flow rate is analyzed. The dry-out heat fluxes of the low mass flux upflow are expressed well by the correlation proposed in the previous work. The relation for the falling film boiling shows a similar trend to that for the upflow boiling, however, the dry-out heat fluxes of the falling film are much lower, approximately one third, than those of the upward flow. (author)

  1. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF NEW POWER CYCLES AND ADVANCED FALLING FILM HEAT EXCHANGERS; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsalan Razani; Kwang J. Kim

    2001-01-01

    The final report for the DOE/UNM grant number DE-FG26-98FT40148 discusses the accomplishments of both the theoretical analysis of advanced power cycles and experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers. This final report also includes the progress report for the third year (period of October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001). Four new cycles were studied and two cycles were analyzed in detail based on the second law of thermodynamics. The first cycle uses a triple combined cycle, which consists of a topping cycle (Brayton/gas), an intermediate cycle (Rankine/steam), and a bottoming cycle (Rankine/ammonia). This cycle can produce high efficiency and reduces the irreversibility of the Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSC) of conventional combined power cycles. The effect of important system parameters on the irreversibility distribution of all components in the cycle under reasonable practical constraints was evaluated. The second cycle is a combined cycle, which consists of a topping cycle (Brayton/gas) and a bottoming cycle (Rankine/ammonia) with integrated compressor inlet air cooling. This innovative cycle can produce high power and efficiency. This cycle is also analyzed and optimized based on the second the second law to obtain the irreversibility distribution of all components in the cycle. The results of the studies have been published in peer reviewed journals and ASME conference proceeding. Experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers was conducted to find effective additives for steam condensation. Four additives have been selected and tested in a horizontal tube steam condensation facility. It has been observed that heat transfer additives have been shown to be an effective way to increase the efficiency of conventional tube bundle condenser heat exchangers. This increased condensation rate is due to the creation of a disturbance in the liquid condensate surround the film. The heat transfer through such a film has

  2. Synchronization of coupled metronomes on two layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Yi-Zhen; Wang, Xin-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Coupled metronomes serve as a paradigmatic model for exploring the collective behaviors of complex dynamical systems, as well as a classical setup for classroom demonstrations of synchronization phenomena. Whereas previous studies of metronome synchronization have been concentrating on symmetric coupling schemes, here we consider the asymmetric case by adopting the scheme of layered metronomes. Specifically, we place two metronomes on each layer, and couple two layers by placing one on top of the other. By varying the initial conditions of the metronomes and adjusting the friction between the two layers, a variety of synchronous patterns are observed in experiment, including the splay synchronization (SS) state, the generalized splay synchronization (GSS) state, the anti-phase synchronization (APS) state, the in-phase delay synchronization (IPDS) state, and the in-phase synchronization (IPS) state. In particular, the IPDS state, in which the metronomes on each layer are synchronized in phase but are of a constant phase delay to metronomes on the other layer, is observed for the first time. In addition, a new technique based on audio signals is proposed for pattern detection, which is more convenient and easier to apply than the existing acquisition techniques. Furthermore, a theoretical model is developed to explain the experimental observations, and is employed to explore the dynamical properties of the patterns, including the basin distributions and the pattern transitions. Our study sheds new lights on the collective behaviors of coupled metronomes, and the developed setup can be used in the classroom for demonstration purposes.

  3. A two-layer linear piezoelectric micromotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotian; Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Dong, Shuxiang

    2015-03-01

    A first bending (B1) mode two-layer piezoelectric ultrasonic linear micromotor has been developed for microoptics driving applications. The piezo-vibrator of the micromotor was composed of two small Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT-5) plates, with overall dimensions and mass of only 2.0 × 2.0 × 5.0 mm(3) and 0.2 g, respectively. The proposed micromotor could operate either in single-phase voltage (standing wave) mode or two-phase voltage (traveling wave) mode to drive a slider via friction force to provide bidirectional linear motion. A large thrust of up to 0.30 N, which corresponds to a high unit volume direct driving force of 15 mN/mm(3), and a linear movement velocity of up to 230 mm/s were obtained under an applied voltage of 80 Vpp at the B1 mode resonance frequency of 174 kHz.

  4. Simultaneous measurements of thickness and temperature profile in a wavy liquid film falling freely on a heating wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyu, T.; Mudawar, I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a technique for measuring the thickness of liquid films that was developed and tested. The feasibility of this technique was demonstrated in stagnant liquid films as well as in liquid jets. A procedure for in-situ calibration of the thickness probe was developed, allowing the adaptation of the probe to measurements of wavy liquid films. The thickness probe was constructed from a platinum-rhodium wire that was stretched across the film. A constant DC current was supplied through the probe wire, and film thickness was determined from variations in the probe voltage drop resulting from the large differences in the electrical resistances of the wetted and unwetted segments of the wire. Unlike electrical admittance thickness probes, the new probe did not require dissolving an electrolyte in the liquid, making the new probe well suited to studies involving sensible heating of a film of pure dielectric liquid that is in direct contact with a current- carrying wall. Also presented is a composite probe that facilitated simultaneous measurements of temperature profile across a wavy liquid film and film thickness. Experimental results demonstrate a strong influence of waviness on liquid temperature in a film of deionized water falling freely on the outside wall of a vertical, electrically heated tube for film Reynolds numbers smaller than 10,000

  5. Falling liquid film flow along cascade-typed first wall of laser-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, T.; Nakai, T.; Kawara, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To protect from high energy/particle fluxes caused by nuclear fusion reaction such as extremely high heat flux, X rays, Alpha particles and fuel debris to a first wall of an inertia fusion reactor, a 'cascade-typed' first wall with a falling liquid film flow is proposed as the 'liquid wall' concept which is one of the reactor chamber cooling and wall protection schemes: the reactor chamber can protect by using a liquid metal film flow (such as Li 17 Pb 83 ) over the wall. In order to investigate the feasibility of this concept, we conducted the numerical analyses by using the STREAM code and also conducted the flow visualization experiments. The numerical results suggested that the cascade structure design should be improved, so that we redesigned the cascade-typed first wall and performed the flow visualization as a POP (proof-of-principle) experiment. In the numerical analyses, the water is used as the working liquid and an acrylic plate as the wall. These selections are based on two reasons: (1) from the non-dimensional analysis approach, the Weber number (We=ρu 2 δ/σ: ρ is density, u is velocity, δ is film thickness, σ is surface tension coefficient) should be the same between the design (Li 17 Pb 83 flow) and the model experiment (water flow) because of the free-surface instability, (2) the SiC/SiC composite would be used as the wall material, so that the wall may have the less wettability: the acrylic plate has the similar feature. The redesigned cascade-typed first wall for one step (30 cm height corresponding to 4 Hz laser duration) consists of a liquid tank having a free-surface for keeping the constant water-head located at the backside of the first wall, and connects to a slit which is composed of two plates: one plate is the first wall, and the other is maintaining the liquid level. This design solved the trouble of the previous design. The test section for the flow visualization has the same structure and the same height as the reactor design

  6. Heat transfer for falling film evaporation of industrially relevant fluids up to very high Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdon, Mathias; Karlsson, Erik; Innings, Fredrik; Jongsma, Alfred; Vamling, Lennart

    2016-02-01

    In many industrial applications, falling film evaporation is an attractive technique for solvent removal due to high heat transfer and low residence times. Examples are the powder production in the dairy industry and in kraft pulp production process to remove water from so called black liquor. Common for both applications is that the fluids exhibit high viscosities in industrial practice. In this paper, results from experimental studies on both black liquor and a dairy product are reported for Prandtl numbers up to 800. The results are compared with several existing correlation in literature, and the need for a modified correlation is recognized especially to cover higher Prandtl-numbers. The following correlation for the turbulent flow region with 3 < Pr < 800 was derived from the data: {Nu}t = 0.0085 \\cdot Re^{0.2} \\cdot {Pr^{0.65}} The correlation has been compared to literature data from one additional study on two other fluids (propylene glycol and cyclohexanol) with fairly high Prandtl-numbers, from 40 to 58 and from 45 to 155 respectively and the agreement was within ±40 %.

  7. Heat transfer enhancement by additive in vertical falling film absorption of H2O/LiBr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Wenlong; Houda, Kouichi; Chen Zeshao; Akisawa, Atsushi; Hu Peng; Kashiwagi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    The enhancement effects of additive on vertical falling film of water into aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr) were studied by an experimental method. Based on the Navier-Stokes equations of falling film absorption, a new dimensionless parameter, surface renewal number Rn, was introduced, and a semi-empirical equation of enhancement factor of additive was obtained. It was shown that the absorption Marangoni number Ma, the surface Marangoni number M aA , and the surface renewal number Rn enhance the heat transfer of absorption, however the adsorption number Π and the Reynolds number Re weaken the heat transfer of absorption. It was proved that the semi-empirical equation agreed well with the experimental results by introduction of the parameters related to surface tension characters presented by the authors into the equation

  8. Decolorization of reactive textile dyes using water falling film dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojcinovic, Biljana P. [Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Center of Chemistry, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Roglic, Goran M. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 158, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Obradovic, Bratislav M., E-mail: obrat@ff.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kuraica, Milorad M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Kostic, Mirjana M. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Textile Engineering, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Nesic, Jelena; Manojlovic, Dragan D. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 158, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Decolorization of four reactive textile dyes using non-thermal plasma reactor. {yields} Influence of applied energy on decolorization. {yields} Effects of initial pH and addition of homogeneous catalysts. {yields} Toxicity evaluation using the brine shrimp as a test organism. - Abstract: Decolorization of reactive textile dyes Reactive Black 5, Reactive Blue 52, Reactive Yellow 125 and Reactive Green 15 was studied using advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in a non-thermal plasma reactor, based on coaxial water falling film dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). Used initial dye concentrations in the solution were 40.0 and 80.0 mg/L. The effects of different initial pH of dye solutions, and addition of homogeneous catalysts (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Fe{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+}) on the decolorization during subsequent recirculation of dye solution through the DBD reactor, i.e. applied energy density (45-315 kJ/L) were studied. Influence of residence time was investigated over a period of 24 h. Change of pH values and effect of pH adjustments of dye solution after each recirculation on the decolorization was also tested. It was found that the initial pH of dye solutions and pH adjustments of dye solution after each recirculation did not influence the decolorization. The most effective decolorization of 97% was obtained with addition of 10 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in a system of 80.0 mg/L Reactive Black 5 with applied energy density of 45 kJ/L, after residence time of 24 h from plasma treatment. Toxicity was evaluated using the brine shrimp Artemia salina as a test organism.

  9. Decolorization of reactive textile dyes using water falling film dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dojcinovic, Biljana P.; Roglic, Goran M.; Obradovic, Bratislav M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.; Kostic, Mirjana M.; Nesic, Jelena; Manojlovic, Dragan D.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Decolorization of four reactive textile dyes using non-thermal plasma reactor. → Influence of applied energy on decolorization. → Effects of initial pH and addition of homogeneous catalysts. → Toxicity evaluation using the brine shrimp as a test organism. - Abstract: Decolorization of reactive textile dyes Reactive Black 5, Reactive Blue 52, Reactive Yellow 125 and Reactive Green 15 was studied using advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in a non-thermal plasma reactor, based on coaxial water falling film dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). Used initial dye concentrations in the solution were 40.0 and 80.0 mg/L. The effects of different initial pH of dye solutions, and addition of homogeneous catalysts (H 2 O 2 , Fe 2+ and Cu 2+ ) on the decolorization during subsequent recirculation of dye solution through the DBD reactor, i.e. applied energy density (45-315 kJ/L) were studied. Influence of residence time was investigated over a period of 24 h. Change of pH values and effect of pH adjustments of dye solution after each recirculation on the decolorization was also tested. It was found that the initial pH of dye solutions and pH adjustments of dye solution after each recirculation did not influence the decolorization. The most effective decolorization of 97% was obtained with addition of 10 mM H 2 O 2 in a system of 80.0 mg/L Reactive Black 5 with applied energy density of 45 kJ/L, after residence time of 24 h from plasma treatment. Toxicity was evaluated using the brine shrimp Artemia salina as a test organism.

  10. Experimental study on flow characteristics of a vertically falling film flow of liquid metal NaK in a transverse magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengchen; Serizawa, Akimi

    2004-01-01

    Experimental study was carried out on the characteristics of a vertically falling film flow of liquid metal sodium-potassium alloy (NaK-78) in a vertical square duct in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The magnitude of the applied magnetic field was up to 0.7 T. The Reynolds number, defined by the hydraulic diameter based on the wetted perimeter length and the liquid average velocity, ranged from 8.0x10 3 to 3.0x10 4 . The free surfaces of the falling film flows in both a stainless steel and an acrylic resin channels were visualized. The instantaneous film thickness of the falling film flow in the acrylic resin channel was then measured by means of the ultrasonic transmission technique. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects on the characteristics of the falling film flow were investigated by the visualization and the statistical analysis of the measured film thickness. It was found that the falling liquid NaK film was thickened and the flow was stabilized remarkably by a strong transverse magnetic field. A bifurcation of the film was recovered by the applied magnetic field. The turbulence of the flow was substantially suppressed

  11. Statistical characteristics of falling-film flows: A synergistic approach at the crossroads of direct numerical simulations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charogiannis, Alexandros; Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Markides, Christos N.

    2017-12-01

    We scrutinize the statistical characteristics of liquid films flowing over an inclined planar surface based on film height and velocity measurements that are recovered simultaneously by application of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), respectively. Our experiments are complemented by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of liquid films simulated for different conditions so as to expand the parameter space of our investigation. Our statistical analysis builds upon a Reynolds-like decomposition of the time-varying flow rate that was presented in our previous research effort on falling films in [Charogiannis et al., Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 014002 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.014002], and which reveals that the dimensionless ratio of the unsteady term to the mean flow rate increases linearly with the product of the coefficients of variation of the film height and bulk velocity, as well as with the ratio of the Nusselt height to the mean film height, both at the same upstream PLIF/PTV measurement location. Based on relations that are derived to describe these results, a methodology for predicting the mass-transfer capability (through the mean and standard deviation of the bulk flow speed) of these flows is developed in terms of the mean and standard deviation of the film thickness and the mean flow rate, which are considerably easier to obtain experimentally than velocity profiles. The errors associated with these predictions are estimated at ≈1.5 % and 8% respectively in the experiments and at <1 % and <2 % respectively in the DNSs. Beyond the generation of these relations for the prediction of important film flow characteristics based on simple flow information, the data provided can be used to design improved heat- and mass-transfer equipment reactors or other process operation units which exploit film flows, but also to develop and validate multiphase flow models in other physical and technological settings.

  12. Numerical simulation of falling film flow boiling along a vertical wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaki Kino; Tomoaki Kunugi; Akimi Serizawa

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: When a dryout occurs in film flows with heating from the wall, the wall surface being cooled is no longer in intimate contact with the liquid film. Consequently, the heat transfer will dramatically reduce and the corresponding wall temperature will rise rapidly up to the melting temperature of the heat transfer plate or pipe. It is very important to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of liquid films flowing along a heating wall and the dryout phenomena of the liquid films associated with increasing heat flux in the high heat flux component devices for chemical and mechanical devices and nuclear reactor systems. Many studies have been conducted on the dryout phenomena and it has been shown that the dryout conditions are influenced by several different flow conditions, for instance, subcooled and saturated liquid films and so on. The dryout process of boiling liquid films is different between them: in the case of subcooled liquid films, the process is caused by the local surface-tension variation along the film. On the contrary, in the case of saturated liquid films the surface temperature of boiling films is maintained at a saturation temperature and there can be no variation of surface tension along the film. The process in the case of saturated liquid films is caused by the reduction of film flow rate due to the flow imbalance. This reduction of film flow rate is promoted by the evaporation and the liquid droplets arising from the film surface due to the burst of vapor bubbles. Therefore, it is very important to predict the sputtering rate of liquid droplets and to understand the behavior of vapor bubbles in film flow boiling. In the present study, numerical simulations based on the MARS (Multi-interface Advection and Reconstruction Solver) developed by one of the authors have been performed in order to understand the dryout of film flow boiling. The film flows along a vertical wall are focused in the present study

  13. Two-layer anti-reflection strategies for implant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Douglas J.; Smith, Tamara; Kato, Masakazu; Kimura, Shigeo; Enomoto, Tomoyuki

    2006-03-01

    A two-layer bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) concept in which a layer that develops slowly is coated on top of a bottom layer that develops more rapidly was demonstrated. Development rate control was achieved by selection of crosslinker amount and BARC curing conditions. A single-layer BARC was compared with the two-layer BARC concept. The single-layer BARC does not clear out of 200-nm deep vias. When the slower developing single-layer BARC was coated on top of the faster developing layer, the vias were cleared. Lithographic evaluation of the two-layer BARC concept shows the same resolution advantages as the single-layer system. Planarization properties of a two-layer BARC system are better than for a single-layer system, when comparing the same total nominal thicknesses.

  14. A new system for complete separation of 3He and T2 composed of a falling liquid film condenser and a cryogenic distillation column with a feedback stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Masahiro; Bartlit, J.R.; Sherman, R.H.

    1982-11-01

    A new system composed of a falling liquid film condenser and a cryogenic distillation column with a feedback stream, is developed for complete separation of 3 He and T 2 . For accomplishment of the separation, a sufficient flow rate of protium is added to the feed mixture. The resultant stream of 3 He, H 2 , HT and T 2 is fed to the falling liquid film condenser, and 3 He is removed almost completely. The H-T mixture from the bottom of the falling liquid film condenser is further processed by the cryogenic distillation column for complete separation of protium and tritium. The tritium recovery percentage of the system is 100%, and the two top streams can be transferred to a tritium waste treatment system. (author)

  15. Two-Layer Variable Infiltration Capacity Land Surface Representation for General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.

    1994-01-01

    A simple two-layer variable infiltration capacity (VIC-2L) land surface model suitable for incorporation in general circulation models (GCMs) is described. The model consists of a two-layer characterization of the soil within a GCM grid cell, and uses an aerodynamic representation of latent and sensible heat fluxes at the land surface. The effects of GCM spatial subgrid variability of soil moisture and a hydrologically realistic runoff mechanism are represented in the soil layers. The model was tested using long-term hydrologic and climatalogical data for Kings Creek, Kansas to estimate and validate the hydrological parameters. Surface flux data from three First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiments (FIFE) intensive field compaigns in the summer and fall of 1987 in central Kansas, and from the Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observation Study (ABRACOS) in Brazil were used to validate the mode-simulated surface energy fluxes and surface temperature.

  16. Investigation of cascade-type falling liquid-film along first wall of laser-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, T.; Nakai, T.; Kawara, Z.; Norimatsu, T.; Kozaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    To protect the first wall of an inertia fusion reactor from extremely high heat flux, X-rays, alpha particles and fuel debris caused by a nuclear fusion reaction, a 'cascade-type' falling liquid-film flow is proposed as a 'liquid-wall' concept. The flow visualization experiment to investigate the feasibility of this liquid-wall concept has been conducted. The preliminary numerical simulation results suggest that the current cascade structure design should be improved because less thermal-mixing is expected. The cascade-type structure has, therefore, been redesigned. This new cascade-type first wall consists of a liquid reservoir which has a free-surface to maintain a constant water head in the rear, and connects to a slit composed of two plates, i.e., the first wall is connected to a slit which is partially made up of the first wall to begin with it. The numerical simulations were performed on the new cascade-type first wall and they show the stable liquid-film flow on it. Moreover, the POP (proof-of-principle) flow visualization experiments, which satisfy the Weber number coincident condition, are carried out using water as the working fluid. By comparing the numerical and experimental results, it was found that the liquid-film flow with 3-5 mm thickness could be stably established. According to these results for the new cascade-type first wall concept, it was confirmed that the coolant flow rate and the thickness of the liquid-film could be controlled if the Weber number coincident condition was satisfied

  17. A correlation for the quench front velocity in the rewetting of a rod by a falling film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiglia, F.; Olivieri, E.; Taibi, S.; Vella, G.

    1989-01-01

    In recent works the exact analytical solutions to the problem of the steady propagation of the quench front in the rewetting by a falling film of both hot vertical slabs and rods have been presented. These solutions furnish the temperature distribution in the solid and, in particular, the dimensioless sputtering temperature, in terms of the Biot number B and the dimensionless front velocity u. As it is well known, however, in practical applications it result more convenient to deal with an explicit - even if approximate - formula which gives the dimensionless rewetting velocity in terms of B and Θ. In view of this, in the present paper, an extension to the case of rods of a simple and reliable correlation for the prediction of the quench front velocity, already proposed for slabs, is presented. Also in this case, the correlation proves fairly satisfactory and confirms its validity in the full range of practical interest the operating parameters

  18. Photobleachable Diazonium Salt-Phenolic Resin Two-Layer Resist System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Shou-ichi; Iwayanagi, Takao; Hashimoto, Michiaki

    1988-01-01

    This article describes a new negative two-layer photoresist system formed by a simple, successive spin-coating method. An aqueous acetic acid solution of diazonium salt and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) is deposited so as to contact a phenolic resin film spin-coated on a silicon wafer. The diazonium salt diffuses into the phenolic resin layer after standing for several minutes. The residual solution on the phenolic resin film doped with diazonium salt is spun to form the diazonium salt-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) top layer. This forms a uniform two-layer resist without phase separation or striation. Upon UV exposure, the diazonium salt in the top layer bleaches to act as a CEL dye, while the diazonium salt in the bottom layer decomposes to cause insolubilization. Half μm line-and-space patterns are obtained with an i-line stepper using 4-diazo-N,N-dimethylaniline chloride zinc chloride double salt as the diazonium salt and a cresol novolac resin for the bottom polymer layer. The resist formation processes, insolubilization mechanism, and the resolution capability of the new two-layer resist are discussed.

  19. Modeling and Optimizing of Producing Recycled PET from Fabrics Waste via Falling Film-Rotating Disk Combined Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling and reusing of poly (ethylene terephthalate (PET fabrics waste are essential for reducing serious waste of resources and environmental pollution caused by low utilization rate. The liquid-phase polymerization method has advantages of short process flow, low energy consumption, and low production cost. However, unlike prepolymer, the material characteristics of PET fabrics waste (complex composition, high intrinsic viscosity, and large quality fluctuations make its recycling a technique challenge. In this study, the falling film-rotating disk combined reactor is proposed, and the continuous liquid-phase polymerization is modeled by optimizing and correcting existing models for the final stage of PET polymerization to improve the product quality in plant production. Through modeling and simulation, the weight analysis of indexes closely related to the product quality (intrinsic viscosity, carboxyl end group concentration, and diethylene glycol content was investigated to optimize the production process in order to obtain the desired polymer properties and meet specific product material characteristics. The model could be applied to other PET wastes (e.g., bottles and films and extended to investigate different aspects of the recycling process.

  20. Numerical simulation and experimental results of horizontal tube falling film generator working in a NH3-LiNO3 absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.V.; Garcia-Valladares, O.; Gomez, V.H.; Best, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the work made at the Centro de Investigacion en Energia in the development of an absorption refrigeration system for cooling and refrigeration applications with a capacity of 10 kW. The single effect unit utilizes ammonia-lithium nitrate as working pair and it is air cooled. The generator is a falling film type with horizontal tubes where the heating oil flows inside the tube bank and the ammonia-lithium nitrate solution flows as a falling film on the tube outside, where it is heated and ammonia vapor is generated. The generator consists of tree columns and four rows per column of horizontal tubes. The system was tested at controlled conditions with heating oil obtained from an electric resistance heating loop. A numerical model of the horizontal falling film generator was developed that divided the system into three different thermal elements: the flow inside the tube, the heat conduction in the tube wall and the falling film solution flow. The mathematical model was tested and validated with experimental data and a study of the influence of the heat transfer coefficient for ammonia-lithium nitrate solution in the numerical model was carried out. A comparison between experimental and numerical data for the heat flux in the system and the temperature profiles in the oil and solution flows shown a good degree of correlation.

  1. Investigation of cascade-typed falling liquid film flow along first wall of laser-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, Tomoaki; Nakai, Tadakatsu; Kawara, Zensaku

    2007-01-01

    To protect from high energy/particle fluxes caused by nuclear fusion reaction such as extremely high heat flux, X rays, Alpha particles and fuel debris to a first wall of an inertia fusion reactor, a ''cascade-typed'' falling liquid film flow is proposed as the ''liquid wall'' concept which is one of the reactor chamber cooling and wall protection schemes: the reactor chamber can protect by using a liquid metal film flow (such as Li 17 Pb 83 ) over the wall. In order to investigate the feasibility of this concept, we conducted the numerical analyses by using the commercial code (STREAM: unsteady three-dimensional general purpose thermofluid code) and also conducted the flow visualization experiments. The numerical results suggested that the cascade structure design should be improved, so that we redesigned the cascade-typed first wall and performed the flow visualization as a POP (proof-of-principle) experiment. In the numerical analyses, the water is used as the working liquid and an acrylic plate as the wall. These selections are based on two reasons: (1) from the non-dimensional analysis approach, the Weber number (We=ru 2 d/s: r is density, u is velocity, d is film thickness, s is surface tension coefficient) should be the same between the design (Li 17 Pb 83 flow) and the model experiment (water flow) because of the free-surface instability, (2) the SiC/SiC composite would be used as the wall material, so that the wall may have the less wettability: the acrylic plate has the similar feature. The redesigned cascade-typed first wall for one step (30 cm height corresponding to 4 Hz laser duration) consists of a liquid tank having a free-surface for keeping the constant waterhead located at the backside of the first wall, and connects to a slit which is composed of two plates: one plate is the first wall, and the other is maintaining the liquid level. This design solved the trouble of the previous design. The test section for the flow visualization has the same

  2. Testing water pollution in a two layer aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    García León, Manuel; Lin Ye, Jue

    2011-01-01

    Water bodies around urban areas may be polluted with chemical elements from urban or industrial activities. We study the case of underground water pollution. This is a serious problem, since under- ground water is high qualified drinkable water in a world where this natural resource is increasingly reduced. This study is focused on a two-layer aquifer. If the superficial layer is contaminated, the deeper layer could be spoiled as well. This contribution checks the equality of the mean or c...

  3. Degradation of nicotine in water solutions using a water falling film DBD plasma reactor: direct and indirect treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupež, Jelena; Kovačević, Vesna V.; Jović, Milica; Roglić, Goran M.; Natić, Maja M.; Kuraica, Milorad M.; Obradović, Bratislav M.; Dojčinović, Biljana P.

    2018-05-01

    Nicotine degradation efficiency in water solutions was studied using a water falling film dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. Two different treatments were applied: direct treatment, the recirculation of the solution through a DBD reactor, and indirect treatment, the bubbling of the gas from the DBD through the porous filter into the solution. In a separate experiment, samples spiked with nicotine in double distilled water (ddH2O) and tap water were studied and compared after both treatments. Furthermore, the effects of the homogeneous catalysts, namely, Fe2+ and H2O2, were tested in the direct treatment. Nicotine degradation efficiency was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. A degradation efficiency of 90% was achieved after the direct treatment catalyzed with Fe2+. In order to analyze the biodegradability, mineralization level, and toxicity of the obtained solutions, after all degradation procedures the values of the following parameters were determined: total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, biochemical oxygen demand, and the Artemia salina toxicity test. The results showed that an increase in biodegradability was obtained, after all treatments. A partial nicotine mineralization was achieved and the mortality of the A. salina organism decreased in the treated samples, all of which indicating the effective removal of nicotine and the creation of less toxic solutions. Nicotine degradation products were identified using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a linear ion trap Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer and a simple mechanism for oxidative degradation of nicotine in non-thermal plasma systems is proposed.

  4. The Impressionist Effect in Jean Epstein’s Film Discourse: ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Gómez Alonso

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to demonstrate how there is a parallelism between the figurative qualities of pictorial impressionism and the avant-garde aesthetics that Jean Epstein sets in his film The Fall of the House of Usher. In turn, it is a question of studying the process of adaptation of the literary universe of Edgar Allan Poe protected in the style of Gothic romanticism, with special emphasis on visual references. For this, it is a question of investigating how descriptive appreciations are conceived that concern an avant-garde visual representation. The methodology used for the analysis is based on using the aesthetic variables that allow to support how a model of different visual representation is created. Through the analysis of the images it is possible to study the traits that characterize the ascription to the Impressionist movement and the style that defines the author brand. To this end, it is intended to describe how a suitable targeting is recreated in the staging, in which different types of environments are recreated.

  5. Two-layer type filter for removal of radioactive iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taoki, M

    1976-04-16

    The object is to provide a filter for removing radioactive iodine, which is used for disposal of gaseous waste in an atomic power plant, to particularly hold a pressure loss lower. The filter according to the present invention comprises two layers, which are filled at a front stage with active carbon, which is small in pressure loss and has a good collective efficiency relative to iodine, and at a rear stage with silver zeolite, which has a good collective efficiency relative to both iodine and methyl iodine, whereby respective adsorbent are effectively utilized to minimize pressure loss even if a large quantity of air.

  6. Two-Layer Feedback Neural Networks with Associative Memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui-Kun, Wu; Hong, Zhao

    2008-01-01

    We construct a two-layer feedback neural network by a Monte Carlo based algorithm to store memories as fixed-point attractors or as limit-cycle attractors. Special attention is focused on comparing the dynamics of the network with limit-cycle attractors and with fixed-point attractors. It is found that the former has better retrieval property than the latter. Particularly, spurious memories may be suppressed completely when the memories are stored as a long-limit cycle. Potential application of limit-cycle-attractor networks is discussed briefly. (general)

  7. Two-layer type filter for removal of radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taoki, Masafumi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a filter for removing radioactive iodine, which is used for disposal of gaseous waste in an atomic power plant, to particularly hold a pressure loss lower. Structure: The filter according to the present invention comprises two layers, which are filled at a front stage with active carbon, which is small in pressure loss and has a good collective efficiency relative to iodine, and at a rear stage with silver zeolite, which has a good collective efficiency relative to both iodine and methyl iodine, whereby respective adsorbent are effectively utilized to minimize pressure loss even if a large quantity of air. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Heat transfer analysis and effects of feeding tubes arrangement, falling film behavior and backsplash on ice formation around horizontal tubes bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sait, Hani Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Ice shape around the tubes. • Effects of accumulation of ice around the tubes. • Effects of parallel and series tubes arrangements. • Effects of ice accumulated around the tube surfaces. • Effects of backsplash on ice formation. - Abstract: Excessive electrical load has recently get a lot of attention from electric companies specially in hot countries like Saudi Arabia, where air-conditioning load represents about 75% from the total electrical load. Energy storage by freezing is one of the methods that used to tackle this issue. Ice is formed around horizontal cold tubes that are subjected to falling film of water. Ice quantity is measured, photographed and studied. In this studied the coolant inside the tubes flows in series tube arrangement. The results are compared with previous study in which parallel arrangement was used. In addition the falling film behavior and the resulted backsplash are also investigated. A mathematical model to predict ice formation around the tube is proposed. Comparison of the results of the model with that of the experiments showed that the agreement between the two is acceptable. The results also show a quite reasonable quantity of ice is formed in a short time and the series arrangement is more efficient than parallel one. The falling film shapes and its backsplash has also affected the ice formation

  9. Spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2011-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and oxygen saturation using biomedical optics techniques has the potential to inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities are typically estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in superficial tissue such as the skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis. Furthermore, epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. This study describes a technique for decoupling the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. An artificial neural network was used to map input optical properties to spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance of two layer media. Then, iterative fitting was used to determine the optical properties from simulated spatial frequency domain diffuse reflectance. Additionally, an artificial neural network was trained to directly map spatial frequency domain reflectance to sets of optical properties of a two layer medium, thus bypassing the need for iteration. In both cases, the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis were determined independently. The accuracy and efficiency of the iterative fitting approach was compared with the direct neural network inversion.

  10. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development

  11. A two-layer model for buoyant inertial displacement flows in inclined pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etrati, Ali; Frigaard, Ian A.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the inertial flows found in buoyant miscible displacements using a two-layer model. From displacement flow experiments in inclined pipes, it has been observed that for significant ranges of Fr and Re cos β/Fr, a two-layer, stratified flow develops with the heavier fluid moving at the bottom of the pipe. Due to significant inertial effects, thin-film/lubrication models developed for laminar, viscous flows are not effective for predicting these flows. Here we develop a displacement model that addresses this shortcoming. The complete model for the displacement flow consists of mass and momentum equations for each fluid, resulting in a set of four non-linear equations. By integrating over each layer and eliminating the pressure gradient, we reduce the system to two equations for the area and mean velocity of the heavy fluid layer. The wall and interfacial stresses appear as source terms in the reduced system. The final system of equations is solved numerically using a robust, shock-capturing scheme. The equations are stabilized to remove non-physical instabilities. A linear stability analysis is able to predict the onset of instabilities at the interface and together with numerical solution, is used to study displacement effectiveness over different parametric regimes. Backflow and instability onset predictions are made for different viscosity ratios.

  12. Modelling the performance parameters of a horizontal falling film absorber with aqueous (lithium, potassium, sodium) nitrate solution using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, María E.; Hernández, José A.; Bourouis, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    An ANN (artificial neural network) model was developed to determine the efficiency parameters of a horizontal falling film absorber at operating conditions of interest for absorption cooling systems. The aqueous nitrate solution LiNO_3 + KNO_3 + NaNO_3 with salt mass percentages of 53%, 28% and 19%, respectively, was used as a working fluid. The authors created the ANN from the database they had compiled with the results of experiments that they had performed in a set-up designed and built for this purpose. The ANN structure consisted of 6 input variables: inlet solution and cooling water temperatures, cooling water and solution mass flow rates, absorber pressure and inlet solution concentration; 4 output variables which facilitated the assessment of the performance of the absorber: heat and mass transfer coefficients, absorption mass flux and the degree of subcooling of the solution leaving the absorber. The hidden layer contained 9 neurons which were determined by training and test procedures. The results showed that the deviation between the experimental data and the estimated values was well adjusted. This indicated that the ANN model was an effective tool for predicting the efficiency parameters of the absorber. The solution flow rate was also observed to be the most significant operating variable which affected the performance of the absorber. - Highlights: • An ANN was developed to predict the efficiency parameters of a falling film absorber. • The ANN was created using a database corresponding to a triple-effect absorption chiller. • The ANN predicts the efficiency parameters of falling film absorbers with r"2 > 0.95. • The solution flow rate is the variable that most affects the performance of the absorber.

  13. Effect of three-dimensional deformations on local heat transfer to a nonuniformly heated falling film of liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinnov, E.A.; Kabov, O.A.

    2004-01-01

    The experimental study on the heat transfer by the water film heated vertical flow is studied within the Reynolds number values from 1 to 45. The chart of the liquid film flow modes is plotted and the heat exchange areas are separated. The data on the dependence of the temperature of the heater walls and local heat flux at the heater symmetry axis on the longitudinal coordinate are obtained. The local heat exchange coefficients are measured. The comparison of the experimental data with the numerical calculations for the smooth film is carried out. The effect of the jet flow formation on the heat transfer to the liquid film is analyzed [ru

  14. Plume Splitting in a Two-layer Stratified Ambient Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yongxing; Flynn, Morris; Sutherland, Bruce

    2017-11-01

    A line-source plume descending into a two-layer stratified ambient fluid in a finite sized tank is studied experimentally. Although the total volume of ambient fluid is fixed, lower- and upper-layer fluids are respectively removed and added at a constant rate mimicking marine outfall through diffusers and natural and hybrid ventilated buildings. The influence of the plume on the ambient depends on the value of λ, defined as the ratio of the plume buoyancy to the buoyancy loss of the plume as it crosses the ambient interface. Similar to classical filling-box experiments, the plume can always reach the bottom of the tank if λ > 1 . By contrast, if λ < 1 , an intermediate layer eventually forms as a result of plume splitting. Eventually all of the plume fluid spreads within the intermediate layer. The starting time, tv, and the ending time, tt, of the transition process measured from experiments correlate with the value of λ. A three-layer ambient fluid is observed after transition, and the mean value of the measured densities of the intermediate layer fluid is well predicted using plume theory. Acknowledgments: Funding for this study was provided by NSERC.

  15. Migration of radionuclide through two-layered geologic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Takagi, Ikuji; Nakai, Kunihiro; Higashi, Kunio

    1984-01-01

    For the safety assessment of geologic disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, an analytical solution was obtained for one-dimensional migration of radionuclide through two-layered geologic media without dispersion. By applying it to geologic media composed of granite and soil layers, the effect of interlayer boundary on the discharge profile of radionuclides in decay chains into biological environment is examined. The time-space profiles of radionuclides in the vicinity of interlayer boundary are much complicated as shown in the results of calculation. Those profiles in case that the groundwater flows through granite followed by soil are quite different from those in case that the groundwater flows through soil followed by granite. Each of complicated dependence of profiles on time and space can be physically explained. The characteristic profiles in the vicinity of interlayer boundary have not been discussed previously. Recently, numerical computer codes has been developed to apply to much more realistic geologic situations. However, the numerical accuracies of the codes are necessary to be confirmed. This is achieved by comparing computational results with results from analytical solutions. The analytical solution presented will serve as a bench-mark for numerical accuracy. (author)

  16. In vivo spatial frequency domain spectroscopy of two layer media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nguyen, John Quan M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of tissue blood volume and local oxygen saturation can inform the assessment of tissue health, healing, and dysfunction. These quantities can be estimated from the contribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin to the absorption spectrum of the dermis. However, estimation of blood related absorption in skin can be confounded by the strong absorption of melanin in the epidermis and epidermal thickness and pigmentation varies with anatomic location, race, gender, and degree of disease progression. Therefore, a method is desired that decouples the effect of melanin absorption in the epidermis from blood absorption in the dermis for a large range of skin types and thicknesses. A previously developed inverse method based on a neural network forward model was applied to simulated spatial frequency domain reflectance of skin for multiple wavelengths in the near infrared. It is demonstrated that the optical thickness of the epidermis and absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the dermis can be determined independently and with minimal coupling. Then, the same inverse method was applied to reflectance measurements from a tissue simulating phantom and in vivo human skin. Oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentrations were estimated from the volar forearms of weakly and strongly pigmented subjects using a standard homogeneous model and the present two layer model.

  17. First passage time in a two-layer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Koplik, J.

    1995-01-01

    As a first step in the first passage problem for passive tracer in stratified porous media, we consider the case of a two-dimensional system consisting of two layers with different convection velocities. Using a lattice generating function formalism and a variety of analytic and numerical techniques, we calculate the asymptotic behavior of the first passage time probability distribution. We show analytically that the asymptotic distribution is a simple exponential in time for any choice of the velocities. The decay constant is given in terms of the largest eigenvalue of an operator related to a half-space Green's function. For the anti-symmetric case of opposite velocities in the layers, we show that the decay constant for system length L crosses over from L -2 behavior in the diffusive limit to L -1 behavior in the convective regime, where the crossover length L* is given in terms of the velocities. We also have formulated a general self-consistency relation, from which we have developed a recursive approach which is useful for studying the short-time behavior

  18. Generalization and capacity of extensively large two-layered perceptrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen-Zvi, Michal; Kanter, Ido; Engel, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The generalization ability and storage capacity of a treelike two-layered neural network with a number of hidden units scaling as the input dimension is examined. The mapping from the input to the hidden layer is via Boolean functions; the mapping from the hidden layer to the output is done by a perceptron. The analysis is within the replica framework where an order parameter characterizing the overlap between two networks in the combined space of Boolean functions and hidden-to-output couplings is introduced. The maximal capacity of such networks is found to scale linearly with the logarithm of the number of Boolean functions per hidden unit. The generalization process exhibits a first-order phase transition from poor to perfect learning for the case of discrete hidden-to-output couplings. The critical number of examples per input dimension, α c , at which the transition occurs, again scales linearly with the logarithm of the number of Boolean functions. In the case of continuous hidden-to-output couplings, the generalization error decreases according to the same power law as for the perceptron, with the prefactor being different

  19. Revisiting the two-layer hypothesis: coexistence of alternative functional rooting strategies in savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdo, Ricardo M

    2013-01-01

    The two-layer hypothesis of tree-grass coexistence posits that trees and grasses differ in rooting depth, with grasses exploiting soil moisture in shallow layers while trees have exclusive access to deep water. The lack of clear differences in maximum rooting depth between these two functional groups, however, has caused this model to fall out of favor. The alternative model, the demographic bottleneck hypothesis, suggests that trees and grasses occupy overlapping rooting niches, and that stochastic events such as fires and droughts result in episodic tree mortality at various life stages, thus preventing trees from otherwise displacing grasses, at least in mesic savannas. Two potential problems with this view are: 1) we lack data on functional rooting profiles in trees and grasses, and these profiles are not necessarily reflected by differences in maximum or physical rooting depth, and 2) subtle, difficult-to-detect differences in rooting profiles between the two functional groups may be sufficient to result in coexistence in many situations. To tackle this question, I coupled a plant uptake model with a soil moisture dynamics model to explore the environmental conditions under which functional rooting profiles with equal rooting depth but different depth distributions (i.e., shapes) can coexist when competing for water. I show that, as long as rainfall inputs are stochastic, coexistence based on rooting differences is viable under a wide range of conditions, even when these differences are subtle. The results also indicate that coexistence mechanisms based on rooting niche differentiation are more viable under some climatic and edaphic conditions than others. This suggests that the two-layer model is both viable and stochastic in nature, and that a full understanding of tree-grass coexistence and dynamics may require incorporating fine-scale rooting differences between these functional groups and realistic stochastic climate drivers into future models.

  20. Simulating nonlinear steady-state traveling waves on the falling liquid film entrained by a gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvelodub, O. Yu; Bocharov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    The article is devoted to the simulation of nonlinear waves on a liquid film flowing under gravity in the known stress field at the interface. The paper studies nonlinear waves on a liquid film, flowing under the action of gravity in a known stress field at the interface. In the case of small Reynolds numbers the problem is reduced to the consideration of solutions of the nonlinear integral-differential equation for film thickness deviation from the undisturbed level. The periodic and soliton steady-state traveling solutions of this equation have been numerically found. The analysis of branching of new families of steady-state traveling solutions has been performed. In particular, it is shown that this model equation has solutions in the form of solitons-humps.

  1. Simulating nonlinear steady-state traveling waves on the falling liquid film entrained by a gas flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tsvelodub, O

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the simulation of nonlinear waves on a liquid film flowing under gravity in the known stress field at the interface. In the case of small Reynolds numbers the problem is reduced to the consideration of solutions of the nonlinear integral-differential equation for film thickness deviation from the undisturbed level. Weakly nonlinear steady-state traveling solutions of the equation with wave numbers in a vicinity of neutral wave numbers are constructed analytically. The nature of the wave branching from the undisturbed solution is investigated. Steady-state traveling solutions, whose wave numbers within the instability area are far from neutral wave numbers, are found numerically. (paper)

  2. Nanotechnology as a way to overcome the rapid J{sub c} fall with HTS film thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetchnikov, V L; Flis, V S; Kalenyuk, A A; Kasatkin, A L; Rebikov, A I; Moskaliuk, V O; Pan, V M; Tretiatchenko, C G, E-mail: pan@imp.kiev.u [Institute for Metal Physics, 36 Vernadsky Blvd, Kiev 03142 (Ukraine)

    2010-06-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive study of a relation between the nanostructure and electromagnetic properties of the films prepared by pulse laser deposition on LaAlO{sub 3} substrates using YBCO targets with BaZrO{sub 3} additives. HREM studies revealed that depending on the deposition conditions BZO can precipitate as nanorods normal to the substrate or as BaYZr{sub x}O{sub y} nano-pancakes. BZO nanorods are formed at lower laser power and higher substrate temperature. Their lattice is rotated by 3-4{sup 0} to provide matching with matrix without dislocations. In a contrary, the nano-pancakes are surrounded with a great number of dislocations. Mechanisms of the nanostructure formation have been analyzed. Embedding of a proper kind of nanoparticles into HTS films leads not only to a certain increase of the critical current density J{sub c} but to a substantial weakening of its field and thickness dependences compared with pure YBCO films. Negative curvature of I-V-curves (in double-log scale) for YBCO (BZO) films is an evidence of strong pinning on extended defects, such as nanorods and threading dislocations, and/or collective vortex pinning.

  3. 1995 national heat transfer conference: Proceedings. Volume 12: Falling films; Fundamentals of subcooled flow boiling; Compact heat exchanger technology for the process industry; HTD-Volume 314

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sernas, V.; Boyd, R.D.; Jensen, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in the first section cover falling films and heat transfer. Papers in the second section address issues associated with heat exchangers, such as: plate-and-frame heat exchanger technology; thermal design issues; condensation; and single-phase flows. The papers in the third section deal with studies related to: the turbulent velocity field in a vertical annulus; the effects of curvature and a dissolved noncondensable gas on nucleate boiling heat transfer; the effects of flow obstruction on the onset of a Ledinegg-type flow instability; pool boiling from a large-diameter tube; and two-dimensional wall temperature distributions and convection in a single-sided heated vertical tube. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  4. Sono-photo-degradation of carbamazepine in a thin falling film reactor: Operation costs in pilot plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito, A J; Patterson, D A; Monteagudo, J M; Durán, A

    2017-01-01

    The photo-Fenton degradation of carbamazepine (CBZ) assisted with ultrasound radiation (US/UV/H 2 O 2 /Fe) was tested in a lab thin film reactor allowing high TOC removals (89% in 35min). The synergism between the UV process and the sonolytic one was quantified as 55.2%. To test the applicability of this reactor for industrial purposes, the sono-photo-degradation of CBZ was also tested in a thin film pilot plant reactor and compared with a 28L UV-C conventional pilot plant and with a solar Collector Parabolic Compound (CPC). At a pilot plant scale, a US/UV/H 2 O 2 /Fe process reaching 60% of mineralization would cost 2.1 and 3.8€/m 3 for the conventional and thin film plant respectively. The use of ultrasound (US) produces an extra generation of hydroxyl radicals, thus increasing the mineralization rate. In the solar process, electric consumption accounts for a maximum of 33% of total costs. Thus, for a TOC removal of 80%, the cost of this treatment is about 1.36€/m 3 . However, the efficiency of the solar installation decreases in cloudy days and cannot be used during night, so that a limited flow rate can be treated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of viscosity on the combined heat, mass and momentum transfer in laminar liquid falling films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermaier, M.; Ziegler, F.

    2018-04-01

    In this article we present a model describing a laminar film flow over a vertical isothermal plate whilst heat and mass transfer is occurring. We focus on a formulation where most common assumptions, such as constant property data and constant film thickness, have been cancelled. The hydrodynamic model results in longitudinal and transversal velocity components and their evolution in the entrance region. Heat and mass transfer occurs simultaneously and is modelled with respect to release of differential heat of solution as well as heat flow due to interdiffusion. The numerical solution is obtained by utilising a Newton-Raphson method to solve the finite difference formulation of the governing equations. Mass transfer across the film affects the development of both longitudinal and transversal velocity components. The hydrodynamics are modelled using a boundary layer approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The significance of simplifications on the hydrodynamic model are illustrated and discussed using a fully developed velocity profile (Nusselt flow) and a plug flow at the inlet for comparison. Even if a Nusselt profile is assumed, it develops further since mass is absorbed or desorbed. It is found that the onset of absorption occurs at shorter flow length when applying a plug flow at the inlet. If the film is initially in equilibrium, this results in a 9.3% increase in absorbed mass over a length of 0.03 m as compared with the Nusselt flow. A fluid with a viscosity five times the one of lithium bromide solution but sharing comparable properties apart from that, leads to lower overall heat and mass transfer rates. If the respective fluids are saturated at the inlet, the accumulated mass flux absorbed by lithium bromide solution is 2.2 times higher than the one absorbed by a high viscous fluid. However, when a plug flow is applied and the fluid is sub-cooled, ab initio the absorbed mass flux is slightly higher for a high viscous fluid. Assuming a sub

  6. Falling chains

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Chun Wa; Yasui, Kosuke

    2005-01-01

    The one-dimensional fall of a folded chain with one end suspended from a rigid support and a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied. Because their Lagrangians contain no explicit time dependence, the falling chains are conservative systems. Their equations of motion are shown to contain a term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred between subchains. We show that Cayley's 1857 energy nonconserving solution for a chain falling from a resting heap is inco...

  7. On nonlinear dynamics of a dipolar exciton BEC in two-layer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, O.L.; Kezerashvili, R.Ya.; Kolmakov, G.V.

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) of dipolar excitons in two-layer graphene is studied. It is demonstrated that a steady turbulent state is formed in this system. A comparison between the dynamics of the exciton BEC in two-layer graphene and those in GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum wells shows that turbulence is a general effect in a BEC.

  8. Dislocation Coupling-Induced Transition of Synchronization in Two-Layer Neuronal Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Hui-Xin; Ma Jun; Wang Chun-Ni; Jin Wu-Yin

    2014-01-01

    The mutual coupling between neurons in a realistic neuronal system is much complex, and a two-layer neuronal network is designed to investigate the transition of electric activities of neurons. The Hindmarsh—Rose neuron model is used to describe the local dynamics of each neuron, and neurons in the two-layer networks are coupled in dislocated type. The coupling intensity between two-layer networks, and the coupling ratio (Pro), which defines the percentage involved in the coupling in each layer, are changed to observe the synchronization transition of collective behaviors in the two-layer networks. It is found that the two-layer networks of neurons becomes synchronized with increasing the coupling intensity and coupling ratio (Pro) beyond certain thresholds. An ordered wave in the first layer is useful to wake up the rest state in the second layer, or suppress the spatiotemporal state in the second layer under coupling by generating target wave or spiral waves. And the scheme of dislocation coupling can be used to suppress spatiotemporal chaos and excite quiescent neurons. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. Biometrics encryption combining palmprint with two-layer error correction codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hengjian; Qiu, Jian; Dong, Jiwen; Feng, Guang

    2017-07-01

    To bridge the gap between the fuzziness of biometrics and the exactitude of cryptography, based on combining palmprint with two-layer error correction codes, a novel biometrics encryption method is proposed. Firstly, the randomly generated original keys are encoded by convolutional and cyclic two-layer coding. The first layer uses a convolution code to correct burst errors. The second layer uses cyclic code to correct random errors. Then, the palmprint features are extracted from the palmprint images. Next, they are fused together by XORing operation. The information is stored in a smart card. Finally, the original keys extraction process is the information in the smart card XOR the user's palmprint features and then decoded with convolutional and cyclic two-layer code. The experimental results and security analysis show that it can recover the original keys completely. The proposed method is more secure than a single password factor, and has higher accuracy than a single biometric factor.

  10. Band splitting and relative spin alignment in two-layer systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, A A

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the single-particle spectra of the low Hubbard zone in the two-layer correlated 2D-systems sharply differ in the case of different relative alignment of the layers spin systems. The behavior of the two-layer splitting in the Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub 8 sub + subdelta gives all reasons for the hypothesis on the possible rearrangement of the F sub z -> AF sub z alignment configuration, occurring simultaneously with the superconducting transition. The effects of the spin alignment on the magnetic excitations spectrum, as the way for studying the spin structure of the two-layer systems, are discussed by the example of homogenous solutions for the effective spin models

  11. Process analysis of two-layered tube hydroforming with analytical and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyedkashi, S. M. Hossein; Panahizadeh R, Valiollah; Xu, Haibin; Kim, Sang Yun; Moon, Young Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Two-layered tubular joints are suitable for special applications. Designing and manufacturing of two layered components require enough knowledge about the tube material behavior during the hydroforming process. In this paper, hydroforming of two-layered tubes is investigated analytically, and the results are verified experimentally. The aim of this study is to derive an analytical model which can be used in the process design. Fundamental equations are written for both of the outer and inner tubes, and the total forming pressure is obtained from these equations. Hydroforming experiments are carried out on two different combinations of materials for inner and outer tubes; case 1: copper/aluminum and case 2: carbon steel/stainless steel. It is observed that experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical model obtained for estimation of forming pressure able to avoid wrinkling.

  12. Ultrasound evaluation of the cesarean scar: comparison between one- and two layer uterotomy closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glavind, Julie; Madsen, Lene Duch; Uldbjerg, Niels

    Objectives: To compare the residual myometrial thickness and the size of the cesarean scar defect after one- and two layer uterotomy closure. Methods: From July 2010 a continuous two-layer uterotomy closure technique replaced a continuous one-layer technique after cesarean delivery...... at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Aarhus University Hospital. A total of 149 consecutively invited women (68 women with one-layer and 81 women with two-layer closure) had their cesarean scar examined with 2D transvaginal sonography (TVS) 6-16 months post partum. Inclusion criteria were non......-pregnant women with one previous elective cesarean, no post-partum uterine infection or uterine re-operation, and no type 1 diabetes. Scar defect width, depth, and residual myometrial thickness were measured on the sagittal plane, and scar defect length was measured on the transverse plane. Results: The median...

  13. Free surface simulation of a two-layer fluid by boundary element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weoncheol Koo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A two-layer fluid with free surface is simulated in the time domain by a two-dimensional potential-based Numerical Wave Tank (NWT. The developed NWT is based on the boundary element method and a leap-frog time integration scheme. A whole domain scheme including interaction terms between two layers is applied to solve the boundary integral equation. The time histories of surface elevations on both fluid layers in the respective wave modes are verified with analytic results. The amplitude ratios of upper to lower elevation for various density ratios and water depths are also compared.

  14. Three-dimensional flow in electromagnetically driven shallow two-layer fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, R.A.D.; Kamp, L.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; van Heijst, G.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments on a freely evolving dipolar vortex in a homogeneous shallow fluid layer have clearly shown the existence and evolution of complex three-dimensional 3D flow structures. The present contribution focuses on the 3D structures of a dipolar vortex evolving in a stable shallow two-layer

  15. Analysis of Steam Heating of a Two-Layer TBP/N-Paraffin/Nitric Acid Mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Hassan, N.M.; Rudisill, T.S.; Askew, N.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of steam heating of a two-layer tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/n-paraffin-nitric acid mixture.The purpose of this study is to determine if the degree of mixing provided by the steam jet or by bubbles generated by the TBP/nitric acid reaction is sufficient to prevent a runaway reaction

  16. Learning behavior and temporary minima of two-layer neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Anne J.; Hoen, Klaas; Hoen, Klaas; Wallinga, Hans

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the occurrence of temporary minima during training of a single-output, two-layer neural network, with learning according to the back-propagation algorithm. A new vector decomposition method is introduced, which simplifies the mathematical analysis of

  17. Spin transport in two-layer-CVD-hBN/graphene/hBN heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, M.; Omar, S.; Zihlmann, S.; Makk, P.; Li, Q. C.; Zhang, Y. F.; Schönenberger, C.; van Wees, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    We study room-temperature spin transport in graphene devices encapsulated between a layer-by-layer-stacked two-layer-thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) tunnel barrier, and a few-layer-thick exfoliated-hBN substrate. We find mobilities and spin-relaxation times comparable to that of SiO2 substrate-based graphene devices, and we obtain a similar order of magnitude of spin relaxation rates for both the Elliott-Yafet and D'Yakonov-Perel' mechanisms. The behavior of ferromagnet/two-layer-CVD-hBN/graphene/hBN contacts ranges from transparent to tunneling due to inhomogeneities in the CVD-hBN barriers. Surprisingly, we find both positive and negative spin polarizations for high-resistance two-layer-CVD-hBN barrier contacts with respect to the low-resistance contacts. Furthermore, we find that the differential spin-injection polarization of the high-resistance contacts can be modulated by dc bias from -0.3 to +0.3 V with no change in its sign, while its magnitude increases at higher negative bias. These features point to the distinctive spin-injection nature of the two-layer-CVD-hBN compared to the bilayer-exfoliated-hBN tunnel barriers.

  18. Direct force-reflecting two-layer approach for passive bilateral teleoperation with time delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, D.; Saccon, A.; Beerens, R.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a two-layer control architecture for bilateral teleoperation with communication delays. The controller is structured with an (inner) performance layer and an (outer) passivity layer. In the performance layer, any traditional controller for bilateral teleoperation can be implemented. The

  19. A two-layer architecture for force-reflecting bilateral teleoperation with time delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, D.J.F.; Saccon, A.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a two-layer control architecture for bilateral teleoperation with communication delays. The controller is structured with an (outer) performance layer and an (inner) passivity layer. In the performance layer, any traditional controller for bilateral teleoperation can be implemented. In

  20. Central-Upwind Schemes for Two-Layer Shallow Water Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Kurganov, Alexander; Petrova, Guergana

    2009-01-01

    We derive a second-order semidiscrete central-upwind scheme for one- and two-dimensional systems of two-layer shallow water equations. We prove that the presented scheme is well-balanced in the sense that stationary steady-state solutions

  1. Effect of anisotropy on the magnon energy gap in a two-layer ferromagnetic superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Rongke; Liang Jing; Li Qingfeng; Zhang Zhidong; Song Panpan; Hong Xiaomin

    2009-01-01

    The magnon energy bands or spectra in a two-layer ferromagnetic superlattice are studied. It is found that a modulated energy gap exists in the magnon energy band along K x direction perpendicular to the superlattice plane, which is different from the optical magnon gap at K x =0. The anisotropy, the spin quantum numbers and the interlayer exchange couplings all affect the magnon energy gap. If the anisotropy exists, there will be no acoustic energy branch in the system. There is a competition effect of the anisotropy and the spin quantum number on the magnon energy gap. The competition achieves a balance at the zero energy gap, at which the symmetry of the system is higher. The two energy spectra of the two-layer ferromagnetic superlattice are lowered with increasing temperature.

  2. Two layers LSTM with attention for multi-choice question answering in exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbin

    2018-03-01

    Question Answering in Exams is typical question answering task that aims to test how accurately the model could answer the questions in exams. In this paper, we use general deep learning model to solve the multi-choice question answering task. Our approach is to build distributed word embedding of question and answers instead of manually extracting features or linguistic tools, meanwhile, for improving the accuracy, the external corpus is introduced. The framework uses a two layers LSTM with attention which get a significant result. By contrast, we introduce the simple long short-term memory (QA-LSTM) model and QA-LSTM-CNN model and QA-LSTM with attention model as the reference. Experiment demonstrate superior performance of two layers LSTM with attention compared to other models in question answering task.

  3. Steady ablation on the surface of a two-layer composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wen-Shan [Chung Shan Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 90008-15-3, Lung-Tan, Tao-Yuan, 32526 Taiwan (China)

    2005-12-01

    Discovered is a quasi-steady ablation phenomenon on the surface of a two-layer composite which is formed by a layer of ablative material and another layer of non-ablative substrate. Theoretical exact solutions of quasi-steady ablation rate, the associated temperature distribution and end-of-ablation time of this two-layer composite are derived. A criterion for the occurrence of quasi-steady ablation is presented also. A one-dimensional transient numerical model is developed to perform a number of numerical experiments and hence to verify the correctness of the above theoretical solutions for the current quasi-steady ablation phenomenon. Based on the current results, a new method of measuring the ablation (or sublimation) heat is also proposed. (author)

  4. FDTD Investigation on Electromagnetic Scattering from Two-Layered Rough Surfaces under UPML Absorbing Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan, Li; Li-Xin, Guo; Hao, Zeng

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from one-dimensional two-layered rough surfaces is investigated by using finite-difference time-domain algorithm (FDTD). The uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) medium is adopted for truncation of FDTD lattices, in which the finite-difference equations can be used for the total computation domain by properly choosing the uniaxial parameters. The rough surfaces are characterized with Gaussian statistics for the height and the autocorrelation function. The angular distribution of bistatic scattering coefficient from single-layered perfect electric conducting and dielectric rough surface is calculated and it is in good agreement with the numerical result with the conventional method of moments. The influence of the relative permittivity, the incident angle, and the correlative length of two-layered rough surfaces on the bistatic scattering coefficient with different polarizations are presented and discussed in detail. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  5. Using nanofluids in enhancing the performance of a novel two-layer solar pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Nimr, Moh'd A.; Al-Dafaie, Ameer Mohammed Abbas

    2014-01-01

    A novel two-layer nanofluid solar pond is introduced. A mathematical model that describes the thermal performance of the pond has been developed and solved. The upper layer of the pond is made of mineral oil and the lower layer is made of nanofluid. Nanofluid is known to be an excellent solar radiation absorber, and this has been tested and verified using the mathematical model. Using nanofluid will increase the extinction coefficient of the lower layer and consequently will improve the thermal efficiency and the storage capacity of the pond. The effects of other parameters have been also investigated. - Highlights: • A novel two-layer solar pond is discussed. • Nanofluid as thermal energy storage is used in this pond. • A mathematical model is developed to predict the performance of the pond. • The mathematical model is solved using Green's function. • The pond is simulated for different values of governing parameter

  6. Distributed Coordination of Islanded Microgrid Clusters Using a Two-layer Intermittent Communication Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Lai, Jingang; Yu, Xinghuo

    2018-01-01

    information with its neighbors intermittently in a low-bandwidth communication manner. A two-layer sparse communication network is modeled by pinning one or some DGs (pinned DGs) from the lower network of each MG to constitute an upper network. Under this control framework, the tertiary level generates...... the frequency/voltage references based on the active/reactive power mismatch among MGs while the pinned DGs propagate these references to their neighbors in the secondary level, and the frequency/voltage nominal set-points for each DG in the primary level can be finally adjusted based on the frequency....../voltage errors. Stability analysis of the two-layer control system is given, and sufficient conditions on the upper bound of the sampling period ratio of the tertiary layer to the secondary layer are also derived. The proposed controllers are distributed, and thus allow different numbers of heterogeneous DGs...

  7. Estimation of apparent soil resistivity for two-layer soil structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassereddine, M.; Rizk, J.; Nagrial, M.; Hellany, A. [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    High voltage (HV) earthing design is one of the key elements when it comes to safety compliance of a system. High voltage infrastructure exposes workers and people to unsafe conditions. The soil structure plays a vital role in determining the allowable and actual step/touch voltage. This paper presents vital information when working with two-layer soil structure. It shows the process as to when it is acceptable to use a single layer instead of a two-layer structure. It also discusses the simplification of the soil structure approach depending on the reflection coefficient. It introduces the reflection coefficient K interval which determines if single layer approach is acceptable. Multiple case studies are presented to address the new approach and its accuracy.

  8. Forced Vibrations of a Two-Layer Orthotropic Shell with an Incomplete Contact Between Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghulghazaryan, L. G.; Khachatryan, L. V.

    2018-01-01

    Forced vibrations of a two-layer orthotropic shell, with incomplete contact conditions between layers, when the upper face of the shell is free and the lower one is subjected to a dynamic action are considered. By an asymptotic method, the solution of the corresponding dynamic equations and correlations of a 3D problem of elasticity theory is obtained. The amplitudes of forced vibrations are determined, and resonance conditions are established.

  9. TWO-LAYER SECURE PREVENTION MECHANISM FOR REDUCING E-COMMERCE SECURITY RISKS

    OpenAIRE

    Sen-Tarng Lai

    2015-01-01

    E-commerce is an important information system in the network and digital age. However, the network intrusion, malicious users, virus attack and system security vulnerabilities have continued to threaten the operation of the e-commerce, making e-commerce security encounter serious test. How to improve ecommerce security has become a topic worthy of further exploration. Combining routine security test and security event detection procedures, this paper proposes the Two-Layer Secure ...

  10. Particle-bearing currents in uniform density and two-layer fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Bruce R.; Gingras, Murray K.; Knudson, Calla; Steverango, Luke; Surma, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Lock-release gravity current experiments are performed to examine the evolution of a particle bearing flow that propagates either in a uniform-density fluid or in a two-layer fluid. In all cases, the current is composed of fresh water plus micrometer-scale particles, the ambient fluid is saline, and the current advances initially either over the surface as a hypopycnal current or at the interface of the two-layer fluid as a mesopycnal current. In most cases the tank is tilted so that the ambient fluid becomes deeper with distance from the lock. For hypopycnal currents advancing in a uniform density fluid, the current typically slows as particles rain out of the current. While the loss of particles alone from the current should increase the current's buoyancy and speed, in practice the current's speed decreases because the particles carry with them interstitial fluid from the current. Meanwhile, rather than settling on the sloping bottom of the tank, the particles form a hyperpycnal (turbidity) current that advances until enough particles rain out that the relatively less dense interstitial fluid returns to the surface, carrying some particles back upward. When a hypopycnal current runs over the surface of a two-layer fluid, the particles that rain out temporarily halt their descent as they reach the interface, eventually passing through it and again forming a hyperpycnal current. Dramatically, a mesopycnal current in a two-layer fluid first advances along the interface and then reverses direction as particles rain out below and fresh interstitial fluid rises above.

  11. Four-parametric two-layer algebraic model of transition boundary layer at a planar plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labusov, A.N.; Lapin, Yu.V.

    1996-01-01

    Consideration is given to four-parametric two-layer algebraic model of transition boundary layer on a plane plate, based on generalization of one-parametric algebraic Prandtl-Loitsjansky-Klauzer-3 model. The algebraic model uses Prandtl formulas for mixing path with Loitsjansky damping multiplier in the internal region and the relation for turbulent viscosity, based on universal scales of external region and named the Klauzer-3 formula. 12 refs., 10 figs

  12. Students fall for Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Kara

    2012-02-01

    From Boston to Beijing, thousands of students traveled to San Francisco for the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting. Of those who participated, 183 students were able to attend thanks to AGU's student travel grant program, which assists students with travel costs and seeks to enrich the meeting through ethnic and gender diversity. Students at Fall Meeting enjoyed a variety of programs and activities designed to help them better network with their peers, learn about new fields, and disseminate their research to the interested public. More than 800 students attended AGU's first annual student mixer, sharing drinks and ideas with fellow student members and future colleagues as well as forging new friendships and intellectual relationships.

  13. 1990 Fall Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David S.

    The AGU 1990 Fall Meeting, held in San Francisco December 3-7, continued the steady growth trend for the western meeting set over the last decade. About 5200 members registered for the meeting and 3836 papers were given. The scientific kickoff to the meeting was provided by a Union session on initial results of the current Magellan mission to Venus. The mission was also the focus of a public lecture and short film on highlights of the mission and an extensive Union poster session.

  14. Surface pressure drag for hydrostatic two-layer flow over axisymmetric mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutbecher, M.

    2000-07-01

    The effect of partial reflections on surface pressure drag is investigated for hydrostatic gravity waves in two-layer flow with piecewise constant buoyancy frequency. The variation of normalized surface pressure drag with interface height is analyzed for axisymmetric mountains. The results are compared with the familiar solution for infinitely long ridges. The drag for the two-layer flow is normalized with the drag of one-layer flow, which has the buoyancy frequency of the lower layer. An analytical expression for the normalized drag of axisymmetric mountains is derived from linear theory of steady flow. Additionally, two-layer flow over finite-height axisymmetric mountains is simulated numerically for flow with higher stability in the upper layer. The temporal evolution of the surface pressure drag is examined in a series of experiments with different interface and mountain heights. The focus is on the linear regime and the nonlinear regime of nonbreaking gravity waves. The dispersion of gravity waves in flow over isolated mountains prevents that the entire wave spectrum is in resonance at the same interface height, which is the case in hydrostatic flow over infinitely long ridges. In consequence, the oscillation of the normalized drag with interface height is smaller for axisymmetric mountains than for infinitely long ridges. However, even for a reflection coefficient as low as 1/3 the drag of an axisymmetric mountain can be amplified by 50% and reduced by 40%. The nonlinear drag becomes steady in the numerical experiments in which no wave breaking occurs. The steady state nonlinear drag agrees quite well with the prediction of linear theory if the linear drag is computed for a slightly lowered interface. (orig.)

  15. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the Canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. Bubbles containing reaction products enhance the rate of transfer of water from the aqueous layer to the organic layer. These bubbles are generated by the oxidation of TBP and its reaction products in the organic layer and by the oxidation of butanol in the aqueous layer. Butanol is formed by the hydrolysis of TBP in the organic layer. For aqueous-layer bubbling to occur, butanol must transfer into the aqueous layer. Consequently, the rate of oxidation and bubble generation in the aqueous layer strongly depends on the rate of transfer of butanol from the organic to the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments

  16. Combined conduction and radiation in a two-layer planar medium with flux boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.H.; Ozisik, M.N.

    1987-01-01

    The interaction of conduction and radiation is investigated under both transient and steady-state conditions for an absorbing, emitting, and isotropically scattering two-layer slab having opaque coverings at both boundaries. The slab is subjected to an externally applied constant heat flux at one boundary surface and dissipates heat by radiation into external ambients from both boundary surfaces. An analytic approach is applied to solve the radiation part of the problem, and a finite-difference scheme is used to solve the conduction part. The effects of the conduction-to-radiation parameter, the single scattering albedo, the optical thickness, and the surface emissivity on the temperature distribution are examined

  17. Theoretical properties of the global optimizer of two layer neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Boob, Digvijay; Lan, Guanghui

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of optimizing a two-layer artificial neural network that best fits a training dataset. We look at this problem in the setting where the number of parameters is greater than the number of sampled points. We show that for a wide class of differentiable activation functions (this class involves "almost" all functions which are not piecewise linear), we have that first-order optimal solutions satisfy global optimality provided the hidden layer is non-singular. ...

  18. The investigation of a two-layer fluid soliton pair using phase plane analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.; Moslehi-Fard, M.; Alinejad, H.; Mahmoodi, J.

    2004-01-01

    Nonlinear long waves theory in a two-layer fluid system has been studied. The dynamical equations according to the normalized heights in first order are obtained using the reductive perturbation method and the equations of shallow water in each fluid and taking boundary conditions appropriate into account. Conserve energy form by definition a independent variable is found. By definition a Lyapunov function, the condition for stability are shown. A new technique was used to prove stability as well as existence of soliton pair using phase plane analysis. (author)

  19. Validation of the Two-Layer Model for Correcting Clear Sky Reflectance Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Evans, K. Frank; Vamal, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    A two-layer model was developed in our earlier studies to estimate the clear sky reflectance enhancement near clouds. This simple model accounts for the radiative interaction between boundary layer clouds and molecular layer above, the major contribution to the reflectance enhancement near clouds for short wavelengths. We use LES/SHDOM simulated 3D radiation fields to valid the two-layer model for reflectance enhancement at 0.47 micrometer. We find: (a) The simple model captures the viewing angle dependence of the reflectance enhancement near cloud, suggesting the physics of this model is correct; and (b) The magnitude of the 2-layer modeled enhancement agree reasonably well with the "truth" with some expected underestimation. We further extend our model to include cloud-surface interaction using the Poisson model for broken clouds. We found that including cloud-surface interaction improves the correction, though it can introduced some over corrections for large cloud albedo, large cloud optical depth, large cloud fraction, large cloud aspect ratio. This over correction can be reduced by excluding scenes (10 km x 10km) with large cloud fraction for which the Poisson model is not designed for. Further research is underway to account for the contribution of cloud-aerosol radiative interaction to the enhancement.

  20. A Novel, Diazonium-Phenolic Resin Two-Layer Resist System Utilizing Photoinduced Interfacial Insolubilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Shou-ichi; Iwayanagi, Takao; Ueno, Takumi; Hashimoto, Michiaki; Nonogaki, Saburo

    1987-08-01

    This paper deals with a negative two-layer photoresist system utilizing a photoinduced insolubilization process at the interface. The bottom layer is a phenolic resin either with or without aromatic azide and the top layer is a photosensitive layer comprised of an aromatic diazonium compound and a water soluble polymer. Upon exposure to light, the diazo compound decomposes to cause insolubilization at the interface between the two layers. The system exhibits high contrast due to the combination of interfacial insolubilization and contrast enhancement by photobleaching of the diazonium compound. Patterns of 0.5 um lines and spaces are obtained using an i-line stepper and a resist system containing 4-diazo-N,N-dimethylaniline chloride zinc chloride in the top layer and 3-(4-azidostyry1)- 5,5-dimethyl- 2-cyclohexen-1-one in the bottom layer. Resists with varying spectral responses from mid-UV to g-line can be designed by selecting the kind of diazo compound used in the top layer.

  1. Development of a novel two-layer multiplate magnetorheological clutch for high-power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Daoming; Tian, Zuzhi; Meng, Qingrui; Hou, Youfu

    2013-01-01

    A novel magnetorheological (MR) clutch for high-power applications is designed, simulated and tested. The clutch is implemented in a two-layer multiplate transmission form and adopts a two-way liquid cooling method to improve the heat dissipation capability. In this paper, a brief introduction to the transmission form of the proposed MR clutch is given first. Then, theoretical analyses of the output torque, magnetic circuit and temperature characteristic are conducted and further design details are presented and discussed, followed by a magnetostatic simulation of the designed circuit. A prototype of the clutch was fabricated and several tests were carried out to evaluate the torque transmission, time response and steady slip power of the prototype. The results show that the proposed MR clutch can produce a maximum output torque of 1545 N m and possesses a high steady slip power of up to 35 kW. Therefore, the developed two-layer multiplate MR clutch is promising for applications in many high-power situations. (paper)

  2. A design method for two-layer beams consisting of normal and fibered high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskhakov, I.; Ribakov, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Two-layer fibered concrete beams can be analyzed using conventional methods for composite elements. The compressed zone of such beam section is made of high strength concrete (HSC), and the tensile one of normal strength concrete (NSC). The problems related to such type of beams are revealed and studied. An appropriate depth of each layer is prescribed. Compatibility conditions between HSC and NSC layers are found. It is based on the shear deformations equality on the layers border in a section with maximal depth of the compression zone. For the first time a rigorous definition of HSC is given using a comparative analysis of deformability and strength characteristics of different concrete classes. According to this definition, HSC has no download branch in the stress-strain diagram, the stress-strain function has minimum exponent, the ductility parameter is minimal and the concrete tensile strength remains constant with an increase in concrete compression strength. The application fields of two-layer concrete beams based on different static schemes and load conditions make known. It is known that the main disadvantage of HSCs is their low ductility. In order to overcome this problem, fibers are added to the HSC layer. Influence of different fiber volume ratios on structural ductility is discussed. An upper limit of the required fibers volume ratio is found based on compatibility equation of transverse tensile concrete deformations and deformations of fibers

  3. Photoacoustic investigation of the effective diffusivity of two-layer semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, J; Gurevich, Yu. G; Logvinov G, N; Rodriguez, P; Gonzalez de la Cruz, G. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-08-01

    In this work, the problem of the effective thermal diffusivity of two-layer systems is investigated using the photoacoustic spectroscopy. The experimental results are examined in terms of the effective thermal parameters of the composite system determined from an homogeneous material which produces the same physical response under an external perturbation in the detector device. It is shown, that the effective thermal conductivity is not symmetric under exchange of the two layers of the composite; i.e., the effective thermal parameters depend upon which layer is illuminated in the photoacoustic experiments. Particular emphasis is given to the characterization of the interface thermal conductivity between the layer-system. [Spanish] En el presente trabajo se utiliza la espectroscopia fotoacustica para medir la difusividad termica de un sistema de dos capas. Los resultados experimentales son analizados en terminos de los parametros termicos efectivos determinados a partir de un material homogeneo, el cual produce la misma respuesta fisica bajo una perturbacion externa. Se puso particular enfasis en la caracterizacion de los efectos de interfase en el flujo de calor en el sistema de dos capas. Los resultados experimentales se comparan con el modelo teorico propuesto en este trabajo.

  4. Waves propagating over a two-layer porous barrier on a seabed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; Meng, Qing-rui; Lu, Dong-qiang

    2018-05-01

    A research of wave propagation over a two-layer porous barrier, each layer of which is with different values of porosity and friction, is conducted with a theoretical model in the frame of linear potential flow theory. The model is more appropriate when the seabed consists of two different properties, such as rocks and breakwaters. It is assumed that the fluid is inviscid and incompressible and the motion is irrotational. The wave numbers in the porous region are complex ones, which are related to the decaying and propagating behaviors of wave modes. With the aid of the eigenfunction expansions, a new inner product of the eigenfunctions in the two-layer porous region is proposed to simplify the calculation. The eigenfunctions, under this new definition, possess the orthogonality from which the expansion coefficients can be easily deduced. Selecting the optimum truncation of the series, we derive a closed system of simultaneous linear equations for the same number of the unknown reflection and transmission coefficients. The effects of several physical parameters, including the porosity, friction, width, and depth of the porous barrier, on the dispersion relation, reflection and transmission coefficients are discussed in detail through the graphical representations of the solutions. It is concluded that these parameters have certain impacts on the reflection and transmission energy.

  5. Modeling a two-layer flow system at the subarctic, subalpine tree line during snowmelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Erica E.; Woo, Ming-Ko

    2002-10-01

    In the subarctic it is common to encounter a two-layer flow system consisting of a porous organic cover overlying frozen or unfrozen mineral soils with much lower hydraulic conductivities. The "simple lumped reservoir parametric," or "semidistributed land-use-based runoff processes" (SLURP), model was adapted to simulate runoff generated by such a flow system from an upland shrub land to an open woodland downslope. A subalpine site in Wolf Creek, Yukon, Canada, was subdivided into two aggregated simulation areas (ASA), each being a unit characterized by a set of parameters. The model computes the vertical water balance and flow generation from several storages, and then routes the water out of the ASA. When applied to the 1999 snowmelt season, the model simulated the very low lateral flow and a large increase in storage in the mineral soil, as was observed in the field. The model was used to assess the sensitivity of the two-layer flow system under a range of temperature, snow cover, and frost conditions. Results show that within the range of possible climatic conditions, the hydrologic system is unlikely to yield significant runoff across the subalpine tree line, but if ground ice is abundant in the soil pores, percolation will be limited and fast flow from the surface layer is enhanced.

  6. Reverse-feeding effect of epidemic by propagators in two-layered networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayu, Wu; Yanping, Zhao; Muhua, Zheng; Jie, Zhou; Zonghua, Liu

    2016-02-01

    Epidemic spreading has been studied for a long time and is currently focused on the spreading of multiple pathogens, especially in multiplex networks. However, little attention has been paid to the case where the mutual influence between different pathogens comes from a fraction of epidemic propagators, such as bisexual people in two separated groups of heterosexual and homosexual people. We here study this topic by presenting a network model of two layers connected by impulsive links, in contrast to the persistent links in each layer. We let each layer have a distinct pathogen and their interactive infection is implemented by a fraction of propagators jumping between the corresponding pairs of nodes in the two layers. By this model we show that (i) the propagators take the key role to transmit pathogens from one layer to the other, which significantly influences the stabilized epidemics; (ii) the epidemic thresholds will be changed by the propagators; and (iii) a reverse-feeding effect can be expected when the infective rate is smaller than its threshold of isolated spreading. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the numerical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11135001, 11375066, and 11405059) and the National Basic Key Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100).

  7. Reverse-feeding effect of epidemic by propagators in two-layered networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dayu; Zhao Yanping; Zheng Muhua; Zhou Jie; Liu Zonghua

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic spreading has been studied for a long time and is currently focused on the spreading of multiple pathogens, especially in multiplex networks. However, little attention has been paid to the case where the mutual influence between different pathogens comes from a fraction of epidemic propagators, such as bisexual people in two separated groups of heterosexual and homosexual people. We here study this topic by presenting a network model of two layers connected by impulsive links, in contrast to the persistent links in each layer. We let each layer have a distinct pathogen and their interactive infection is implemented by a fraction of propagators jumping between the corresponding pairs of nodes in the two layers. By this model we show that (i) the propagators take the key role to transmit pathogens from one layer to the other, which significantly influences the stabilized epidemics; (ii) the epidemic thresholds will be changed by the propagators; and (iii) a reverse-feeding effect can be expected when the infective rate is smaller than its threshold of isolated spreading. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the numerical results. (paper)

  8. Modelling of fast jet formation under explosion collision of two-layer alumina/copper tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Balagansky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Under explosion collapse of two-layer tubes with an outer layer of high-modulus ceramics and an inner layer of copper, formation of a fast and dense copper jet is plausible. We have performed a numerical simulation of the explosion collapse of a two-layer alumina/copper tube using ANSYS AUTODYN software. The simulation was performed in a 2D-axis symmetry posting on an Eulerian mesh of 3900x1200 cells. The simulation results indicate two separate stages of the tube collapse process: the nonstationary and the stationary stage. At the initial stage, a non-stationary fragmented jet is moving with the velocity of leading elements up to 30 km/s. The collapse velocity of the tube to the symmetry axis is about 2 km/s, and the pressure in the contact zone exceeds 700 GPa. During the stationary stage, a dense jet is forming with the velocity of 20 km/s. Temperature of the dense jet is about 2000 K, jet failure occurs when the value of effective plastic deformation reaches 30.

  9. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a self-gravitating two-layer fluid sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Shigeru; Nakagawa, Yoshitsugu; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in a self-gravitating two-layer fluid sphere: an inner sphere and an outer layer. The density and the viscosity are assumed to be constant in each region. Analytic expressions of the dispersion relations are obtained in inviscid and viscid cases. This examination aims at the investigation of the Earth's core formation. The fluid sphere corresponds to the proto-Earth in the accretion stage. The instability is examined without rotation of the fluid sphere, while the proto-Earth is rotating. However, it is shown that the Coriolis force does not influence the conclusion in the Earth's core formation problem. 5 refs.; 10 figs

  10. Assessment of Speech in Primary Cleft Palate by Two-layer Closure (Conservative Management).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Harsha; Rao, Dayashankara; Sharma, Shailender; Gupta, Saurabh

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of the cleft palate has evolved over a long period of time. Various techniques of cleft palate repair that are practiced today are the results of principles learned through many years of modifications. The challenge in the art of modern palatoplasty is no longer successful closure of the cleft palate but an optimal speech outcome without compromising maxillofacial growth. Throughout these periods of evolution in the treatment of cleft palate, the effectiveness of various treatment protocols has been challenged by controversies concerning speech and maxillofacial growth. In this article we have evaluated the results of Pinto's modification of Wardill-Kilner palatoplasty without radical dissection of the levator veli palitini muscle on speech and post-op fistula in two different age groups in 20 patients. Preoperative and 6-month postoperative speech assessment values indicated that two-layer palatoplasty (modified Wardill-Kilner V-Y pushback technique) without an intravelar veloplasty technique was good for speech.

  11. Synthesis of PVA/PVP hydrogels having two-layer by radiation and their physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K.R.; Nho, Y.C.

    2003-01-01

    In these studies, two-layer hydrogels which consisted of polyurethane membrane and a mixture of polyvinyl alcohol(PVA)/poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone(PVP)/glycerin/chitosan were made for the wound dressing. Polyurethane was dissolved in solvent, the polyurethane solution was poured on the mould, and then dried to make the thin membrane. Hydrophilic polymer solutions were poured on the polyurethane membranes, they were exposed to gamma irradiation or two steps of 'freezing and thawing' and gamma irradiation doses to make the hydrogels. The physical properties such as gelation, water absorptivity, and gel strength were examined to evaluate the hydrogels for wound dressing. The physical properties of hydrogels such as gelation and gel strength was greatly improved when polyurethane membrane was used as a covering layer of hydrogel, and the evaporation speed of water in hydrogel was reduced

  12. Exposure buildup factors for a cobalt-60 point isotropic source for single and two layer slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarova, R.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure buildup factors for point isotropic cobalt-60 sources are calculated by the Monte Carlo method with statistical errors ranging from 1.5 to 7% for 1-5 mean free paths (mfp) thick water and iron single slabs and for 1 and 2 mfp iron layers followed by water layers 1-5 mfp thick. The computations take into account Compton scattering. The Monte Carlo data for single slab geometries are approximated by Geometric Progression formula. Kalos's formula using the calculated single slab buildup factors may be applied to reproduce the data for two-layered slabs. The presented results and discussion may help when choosing the manner in which the radiation field gamma irradiation units will be described. (author)

  13. A Two-Layer Least Squares Support Vector Machine Approach to Credit Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingli; Li, Jianping; Xu, Weixuan; Shi, Yong

    Least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) is a revised version of support vector machine (SVM) and has been proved to be a useful tool for pattern recognition. LS-SVM had excellent generalization performance and low computational cost. In this paper, we propose a new method called two-layer least squares support vector machine which combines kernel principle component analysis (KPCA) and linear programming form of least square support vector machine. With this method sparseness and robustness is obtained while solving large dimensional and large scale database. A U.S. commercial credit card database is used to test the efficiency of our method and the result proved to be a satisfactory one.

  14. Central-Upwind Schemes for Two-Layer Shallow Water Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Kurganov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    We derive a second-order semidiscrete central-upwind scheme for one- and two-dimensional systems of two-layer shallow water equations. We prove that the presented scheme is well-balanced in the sense that stationary steady-state solutions are exactly preserved by the scheme and positivity preserving; that is, the depth of each fluid layer is guaranteed to be nonnegative. We also propose a new technique for the treatment of the nonconservative products describing the momentum exchange between the layers. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated on a number of numerical examples, in which we successfully capture (quasi) steady-state solutions and propagating interfaces. © 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  15. Development of analytical theory of the physical libration for a two-layer Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Natalia; Barkin, Yurii; Gusev, Alexander; Ivanova, Tamara

    2010-05-01

    -project. Prognosis recommendations are made for the future experiment. The model of free rotation of the two-layer Moon is constructed, the periods of the free modes and of the librational motion of a pole are received, effects of influence of a lunar core on behavior of LPhL-harmonics caused by the solid-state rotation of the Moon are deduced. Computer simulating has revealed the sensitivity of the free libration periods to core's ellipticity and to core-mantle boundary dissipation parameters. Geometrical interpretation of the pole motion owing to the free libration is given. For the first time the theoretical model of tidal potential of the Moon is developed, on the basis of the model the analytical formulae for variations of the Stockes coefficients of the 2-nd order and of the speed of the Lunar rotation is received in dependence on time. For a two-layer structure of the Moon and the Mercury Cassini's law were stated at the first time: 1. a two-layer Moon keeps its own stationary rotation; 2. there is a splitting of Cassini nodes and angular momentums of Lunar mantle and core; 3. the same phenomenon will be observed for any two-layer planet (Mercury); 4. the differential rotation of a core and mantle is inherent to a planet as result of a generalized Cassini's Laws. Theoretical and practical methods of construction of the theory of rotation of the Earth have been successfully applied in the development of the theory of rotation of the Moon, in

  16. Two-Layer 16 Tesla Cosθ Dipole Design for the FCC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holik, Eddie Frank [Fermilab; Ambrosio, Giorgio [Fermilab; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab

    2018-02-13

    The Future Circular Collider or FCC is a study aimed at exploring the possibility to reach 100 TeV total collision energy which would require 16 tesla dipoles. Upon the conclusion of the High Luminosity Upgrade, the US LHC Accelerator Upgrade Pro-ject in collaboration with CERN will have extensive Nb3Sn magnet fabrication experience. This experience includes robust Nb3Sn conductor and insulation scheming, 2-layer cos2θ coil fabrication, and bladder-and-key structure and assembly. By making im-provements and modification to existing technology the feasibility of a two-layer 16 tesla dipole is investigated. Preliminary designs indicate that fields up to 16.6 tesla are feasible with conductor grading while satisfying the HE-LHC and FCC specifications. Key challenges include accommodating high-aspect ratio conductor, narrow wedge design, Nb3Sn conductor grading, and especially quench protection of a 16 tesla device.

  17. Two-layer fragile watermarking method secured with chaotic map for authentication of digital Holy Quran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed S; Kurniawan, Fajri; Khan, Muhammad Khurram; Alginahi, Yasser M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel watermarking method to facilitate the authentication and detection of the image forgery on the Quran images. Two layers of embedding scheme on wavelet and spatial domain are introduced to enhance the sensitivity of fragile watermarking and defend the attacks. Discrete wavelet transforms are applied to decompose the host image into wavelet prior to embedding the watermark in the wavelet domain. The watermarked wavelet coefficient is inverted back to spatial domain then the least significant bits is utilized to hide another watermark. A chaotic map is utilized to blur the watermark to make it secure against the local attack. The proposed method allows high watermark payloads, while preserving good image quality. Experiment results confirm that the proposed methods are fragile and have superior tampering detection even though the tampered area is very small.

  18. Modified two-layer social force model for emergency earthquake evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Qin, Xin; Liu, Baoxi

    2018-02-01

    Studies of crowd behavior with related research on computer simulation provide an effective basis for architectural design and effective crowd management. Based on low-density group organization patterns, a modified two-layer social force model is proposed in this paper to simulate and reproduce a group gathering process. First, this paper studies evacuation videos from the Luan'xian earthquake in 2012, and extends the study of group organization patterns to a higher density. Furthermore, taking full advantage of the strength in crowd gathering simulations, a new method on grouping and guidance is proposed while using crowd dynamics. Second, a real-life grouping situation in earthquake evacuation is simulated and reproduced. Comparing with the fundamental social force model and existing guided crowd model, the modified model reduces congestion time and truly reflects group behaviors. Furthermore, the experiment result also shows that a stable group pattern and a suitable leader could decrease collision and allow a safer evacuation process.

  19. Initial stresses in two-layer metal domes due to imperfections of their production and assemblage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebed Evgeniy Vasil’evich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of construction of two-layer metal domes is analyzed to illustrate the causes of initial stresses in the bars of their frames. It has been noticed that it is impossible to build such structures with ideal geometric parameters because of imperfections caused by objective reasons. These imperfections cause difficulties in the process of connection of the elements in the joints. The paper demonstrates the necessity of fitting operations during assemblage that involve force fitting and yield initial stresses due to imperfections. The authors propose a special method of computer modeling of enforced elimination of possible imperfections caused by assemblage process and further confirm the method by an analysis of a concrete metal dome.

  20. Cumulative second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in a two-layered solid plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Yanxun; Deng Mingxi

    2008-01-01

    The physical process of cumulative second-harmonic generation of Lamb waves propagating in a two-layered solid plate is presented by using the second-order perturbation and the technique of nonlinear reflection of acoustic waves at an interface. In general, the cumulative second-harmonic generation of a dispersive guided wave propagation does not occur. However, the present paper shows that the second-harmonic of Lamb wave propagation arising from the nonlinear interaction of the partial bulk acoustic waves and the restriction of the three boundaries of the solid plates does have a cumulative growth effect if some conditions are satisfied. Through boundary condition and initial condition of excitation, the analytical expression of cumulative second-harmonic of Lamb waves propagation is determined. Numerical results show the cumulative effect of Lamb waves on second-harmonic field patterns. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  1. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a self-gravitating two-layer viscous sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Puskar; Korenaga, Jun

    2018-03-01

    The dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the spherical geometry is of profound importance in the context of the Earth's core formation. Here we present a complete derivation of this dispersion relation for a self-gravitating two-layer viscous sphere. Such relation is, however, obtained through the solution of a complex transcendental equation, and it is difficult to gain physical insights directly from the transcendental equation itself. We thus also derive an empirical formula to compute the growth rate, by combining the Monte Carlo sampling of the relevant model parameter space with linear regression. Our analysis indicates that the growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instability is most sensitive to the viscosity of inner layer in a physical setting that is most relevant to the core formation.

  2. Three-Dimensional Computer-Assisted Two-Layer Elastic Models of the Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Koichi; Shigemura, Yuka; Otsuki, Yuki; Fuse, Asuka; Mitsuno, Daisuke

    2017-11-01

    To make three-dimensional computer-assisted elastic models for the face, we decided on five requirements: (1) an elastic texture like skin and subcutaneous tissue; (2) the ability to take pen marking for incisions; (3) the ability to be cut with a surgical knife; (4) the ability to keep stitches in place for a long time; and (5) a layered structure. After testing many elastic solvents, we have made realistic three-dimensional computer-assisted two-layer elastic models of the face and cleft lip from the computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging stereolithographic data. The surface layer is made of polyurethane and the inner layer is silicone. Using this elastic model, we taught residents and young doctors how to make several typical local flaps and to perform cheiloplasty. They could experience realistic simulated surgery and understand three-dimensional movement of the flaps.

  3. Analysis of data recorded by the LCTPC equipped with a two layer GEM-system

    CERN Document Server

    Ljunggren, M

    2012-01-01

    wire based readout. The prototype TPC is placed in a 1 Tesla magnet at DESY and tested using an electron beam. Analyses of data taken during two different measurement series, in 2009 and 2010, are presented here. The TPC was instrumented with a two layer GEM system and read out using modified electronics from the ALICE experiment, including the programmable charge sensitive preamp-shaper PCA16. The PCA16 chip has a number of programmable parameters which allows studies to determine the settings optimal to the final TPC. Here, the impact of the shaping time on the space resolution in the drift direction was studied. It was found that a shaping time of 60 ns is the b...

  4. A New, Two-layer Canopy Module For The Detailed Snow Model SNOWPACK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttevin, I.; Lehning, M.; Jonas, T.; Gustafsson, D.; Mölder, M.

    2014-12-01

    A new, two-layer canopy module with thermal inertia for the detailed snow model SNOWPACK is presented. Compared to the old, one-layered canopy formulation with no heat mass, this module now offers a level of physical detail consistent with the detailed snow and soil representation in SNOWPACK. The new canopy model is designed to reproduce the difference in thermal regimes between leafy and woody canopy elements and their impact on the underlying snowpack energy balance. The new model is validated against data from an Alpine and a boreal site. Comparisons of modelled sub-canopy thermal radiations to stand-scale observations at Alptal, Switzerland, demonstrate the improvements induced by our new parameterizations. The main effect is a more realistic simulation of the canopy night-time drop in temperatures. The lower drop is induced by both thermal inertia and the two-layer representation. A specific result is that such a performance cannot be achieved by a single-layered canopy model. The impact of the new parameterizations on the modelled dynamics of the sub-canopy snowpack is analysed and yields consistent results, but the frequent occurrence of mixed-precipitation events at Alptal prevents a conclusive assessment of model performances against snow data.Without specific tuning, the model is also able to reproduce the measured summertime tree trunk temperatures and biomass heat storage at the boreal site of Norunda, Sweden, with an increased accuracy in amplitude and phase. Overall, the SNOWPACK model with its enhanced canopy module constitutes a unique (in its physical process representation) atmosphere-to-soil-through-canopy-and-snow modelling chain.

  5. Precession of a two-layer Earth: contributions of the core and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenas, Tomás; Ferrándiz, José M.; Escapa, Alberto; Getino, Juan; Navarro, Juan F.

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's internal structure contributes to the precession rate in a small but non-negligible amount, given the current accuracy goals demanded by IAG/GGOS to the reference frames, namely 30 μas and 3 μas/yr. These contributions come from a variety of sources. One of those not yet accounted for in current IAU models is associated to the crossed effects of certain nutation-rising terms of a two-layer Earth model; intuitively, it gathers an 'indirect' effect of the core via the NDFW, or FCN, resonance as well as a 'direct' effect arising from terms that account for energy variations depending on the elasticity of the core. Similar order of magnitude reaches the direct effect of the departure of the Earth's rheology from linear elasticity. To compute those effects we work out the problem in a unified way within the Hamiltonian framework developed by Getino and Ferrándiz (2001). It allows a consistent treatment of the problem since all the perturbations are derived from the same tide generating expansion and the crossing effects are rigorously obtained through Hori's canonical perturbation method. The problem admits an asymptotic analytical solution. The Hamiltonian is constructed by considering a two-layer Earth model made up of an anelastic mantle and a fluid core, perturbed by the gravitational action of the Moon and the Sun. The former effects reach some tens of μas/yr in the longitude rate, hence above the target accuracy level. We outline their influence in the estimation of the Earth's dynamical ellipticity, a main parameter factorizing both precession and nutation.

  6. Quantification of the specific yield in a two-layer hard-rock aquifer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Véronique; Léonardi, Véronique; de Marsily, Ghislain; Lachassagne, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Hard rock aquifers (HRA) have long been considered to be two-layer systems, with a mostly capacitive layer just below the surface, the saprolite layer, and a mainly transmissive layer underneath, the fractured layer. Although this hydrogeological conceptual model is widely accepted today within the scientific community, it is difficult to quantify the respective storage properties of each layer with an equivalent porous medium model. Based on an HRA field site, this paper attempts to quantify in a distinct manner the respective values of the specific yield (Sy) in the saprolite and the fractured layer, with the help of a deterministic hydrogeological model. The study site is the Plancoët migmatitic aquifer located in north-western Brittany, France, with piezometric data from 36 observation wells surveyed every two weeks for eight years. Whereas most of the piezometers (26) are located where the water table lies within the saprolite, thus representing the specific yield of the unconfined layer (Sy1), 10 of them are representative of the unconfined fractured layer (Sy2), due to their position where the saprolite is eroded or unsaturated. The two-layer model, based on field observations of the layer geometry, runs with the MODFLOW code. 81 values of the Sy1/Sy2 parameter sets were tested manually, as an inverse calibration was not able to calibrate these parameters. In order to calibrate the storage properties, a new quality-of-fit criterion called ;AdVar; was also developed, equal to the mean squared deviation of the seasonal piezometric amplitude variation. Contrary to the variance, AdVar is able to select the best values for the specific yield in each layer. It is demonstrated that the saprolite layer is about 2.5 times more capacitive than the fractured layer, with Sy1 = 10% (7% < Sy1 < 15%) against Sy2 = 2% (1% < Sy2 < 3%), in this particular example.

  7. Two-layer radio frequency MEMS fractal capacitors in PolyMUMPS for S-band applications

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter, the authors fabricate for the first time MEMS fractal capacitors possessing two layers and compare their performance characteristics with the conventional parallel-plate capacitor and previously reported state-of-the-art single

  8. Self-aligned 0-level sealing of MEMS devices by a two layer thin film reflow process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusu, C.R.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gunn, R.; Witvrouw, A.

    2003-01-01

    Many micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) require a vacuum or controlled atmosphere encapsulation in order to ensure either a good performance or an acceptable lifetime of operation. Two approaches for wafer-scale zero-level packaging exist. The most popular approach is based on wafer bonding.

  9. Self-aligned 0-level sealing of MEMS devices by a two layer thin film reflow process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusu, C.R.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gunn, R.; Witvrouw, A.

    2004-01-01

    Many micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) require a vacuum or controlled atmosphere encapsulation in order to ensure either a good performance or an acceptable lifetime of operation. Two approaches for waferscale zero-level packaging exist. The most popular approach is based on wafer bonding.

  10. Fall Protection Introduction, #33462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-23

    The proper use of fall prevention and fall protection controls can reduce the risk of deaths and injuries caused by falls. This course, Fall Protection Introduction (#33462), is designed as an introduction to various types of recognized fall prevention and fall protection systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including guardrail systems, safety net systems, fall restraint systems, and fall arrest systems. Special emphasis is given to the components, inspection, care, and storage of personal fall arrest systems (PFASs). This course also presents controls for falling object hazards and emergency planning considerations for persons who have fallen.

  11. Experimental results of 2-propanol dehydrogenation with a falling-liquid film reactor for solar chemical heat pump; Solar chemical heat pump ni okeru ryuka ekimakushiki 2-propanol bunkai hanno jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, T; Tanaka, T; Ando, Y; Takashima, T [Electrotechnical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan); Koike, M; Kamoshida, J [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    A solar chemical heat pump is intended to attempt multi-purposed effective utilization of solar energy by raising low temperature solar heat of about 100 degC to 150 to 200 degC by utilizing chemical reactions. The chemical heat pump under the present study uses a 2-propanol (IPA)/acetone/hydrogen system which can utilize low-temperature solar heat and has large temperature rising degree. It was found from the result of experiments and analyses that IPA dehydrogenation reaction can improve more largely the heat utilization rate in using a falling-liquid film reactor than using a liquid phase suspended system. As an attempt to improve further the heat utilization rate, this paper reports the result of experimental discussions on inclination angles of a reaction vessel and feed liquid flow rate which would affect the fluid condition of the liquid film. As a result of the experiments, the initial deterioration in the catalyst has settled in about 15 hours, and its activity has decreased to about 60% of the initial activity. It was made clear that the influence of the inclination angle of the reaction vessel on the reaction is small. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of two-layered nanofibrous membrane for guided bone and tissue regeneration application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi Rad, Maryam; Nouri Khorasani, Saied; Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Foroughi, Mohammad Reza; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Saadatkish, Niloufar; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2017-11-01

    Membranes used in dentistry act as a barrier to prevent invasion of intruder cells to defected area and obtains spaces that are to be subsequently filled with new bone and provide required bone volume for implant therapy when there is insufficient volume of healthy bone at implant site. In this study a two-layered bioactive membrane were fabricated by electrospinning whereas one layer provides guided bone regeneration (GBR) and fabricated using poly glycerol sebacate (PGS)/polycaprolactone (PCL) and Beta tri-calcium phosphate (β-TCP) (5, 10 and 15%) and another one containing PCL/PGS and chitosan acts as guided tissue regeneration (GTR). The morphology, chemical, physical and mechanical characterizations of the membranes were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), tensile testing, then biodegradability and bioactivity properties were evaluated. In vitro cell culture study was also carried out to investigate proliferation and mineralization of cells on different membranes. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and SEM results indicated agglomeration of β-TCP nanoparticles in the structure of nanofibers containing 15% β-TCP. Moreover by addition of β-TCP from 5% to 15%, contact angle decreased due to hydrophilicity of nanoparticles and bioactivity was found to increase. Mechanical properties of the membrane increased by incorporation of 5% and 10% of β-TCP in the structure of nanofibers, while addition of 15% of β-TCP was found to deteriorate mechanical properties of nanofibers. Although the presence of 5% and 10% of nanoparticles in the nanofibers increased proliferation of cells on GBR layer, cell proliferation was observed to decrease by addition of 15% β-TCP in the structure of nanofibers which is likely due to agglomeration of nanoparticles in the nanofiber structure. Our overall results revealed PCL/PGS containing 10% β-TCP could be selected as the optimum GBR membrane

  13. Optical measurements of absorption changes in two-layered diffusive media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, Francesco; Sassaroli, Angelo; Henry, Michael E; Fantini, Sergio

    2004-01-01

    We have used Monte Carlo simulations for a two-layered diffusive medium to investigate the effect of a superficial layer on the measurement of absorption variations from optical diffuse reflectance data processed by using: (a) a multidistance, frequency-domain method based on diffusion theory for a semi-infinite homogeneous medium; (b) a differential-pathlength-factor method based on a modified Lambert-Beer law for a homogeneous medium and (c) a two-distance, partial-pathlength method based on a modified Lambert-Beer law for a two-layered medium. Methods (a) and (b) lead to a single value for the absorption variation, whereas method (c) yields absorption variations for each layer. In the simulations, the optical coefficients of the medium were representative of those of biological tissue in the near-infrared. The thickness of the first layer was in the range 0.3-1.4 cm, and the source-detector distances were in the range 1-5 cm, which is typical of near-infrared diffuse reflectance measurements in tissue. The simulations have shown that (1) method (a) is mostly sensitive to absorption changes in the underlying layer, provided that the thickness of the superficial layer is ∼0.6 cm or less; (2) method (b) is significantly affected by absorption changes in the superficial layer and (3) method (c) yields the absorption changes for both layers with a relatively good accuracy of ∼4% for the superficial layer and ∼10% for the underlying layer (provided that the absorption changes are less than 20-30% of the baseline value). We have applied all three methods of data analysis to near-infrared data collected on the forehead of a human subject during electroconvulsive therapy. Our results suggest that the multidistance method (a) and the two-distance partial-pathlength method (c) may better decouple the contributions to the optical signals that originate in deeper tissue (brain) from those that originate in more superficial tissue layers

  14. Experimental analysis of two-layered dissimilar metals by roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanghui; Li, Yugui; Li, Juan; Huang, Qingxue; Ma, Lifeng

    2018-02-01

    Rolling reduction and base layers thickness have important implications for rolling compounding. A two-layered 304 stainless steel/Q345R low alloyed steel was roll bonded. The roll bonding was performed at the three thickness reductions of 25%, 40% and 55% with base layers of various thicknesses (Q345R). The microstructures of the composite were investigated by the ultra-deep microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Simultaneously, the mechanical properties of the composite were experimentally measured and the tensile fracture surfaces were observed by SEM. The interfaces were successfully bonded without any cracking or voids, which indicated a good fabrication of the 304/Q345R composite. The rolling reduction rate and thinning increase of the substrate contributed to the bonding effects appearance of the roll bonded sheet. The Cr and Ni enriched diffusion layer was formed by the interface elements diffusion. The Cr and Ni diffusion led to the formation of ˜10 μm wide Cr and Ni layers on the carbon steel side.

  15. Geostrophic tripolar vortices in a two-layer fluid: Linear stability and nonlinear evolution of equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinaud, J. N.; Sokolovskiy, M. A.; Carton, X.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate equilibrium solutions for tripolar vortices in a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow. Two of the vortices are like-signed and lie in one layer. An opposite-signed vortex lies in the other layer. The families of equilibria can be spanned by the distance (called separation) between the two like-signed vortices. Two equilibrium configurations are possible when the opposite-signed vortex lies between the two other vortices. In the first configuration (called ordinary roundabout), the opposite signed vortex is equidistant to the two other vortices. In the second configuration (eccentric roundabouts), the distances are unequal. We determine the equilibria numerically and describe their characteristics for various internal deformation radii. The two branches of equilibria can co-exist and intersect for small deformation radii. Then, the eccentric roundabouts are stable while unstable ordinary roundabouts can be found. Indeed, ordinary roundabouts exist at smaller separations than eccentric roundabouts do, thus inducing stronger vortex interactions. However, for larger deformation radii, eccentric roundabouts can also be unstable. Then, the two branches of equilibria do not cross. The branch of eccentric roundabouts only exists for large separations. Near the end of the branch of eccentric roundabouts (at the smallest separation), one of the like-signed vortices exhibits a sharp inner corner where instabilities can be triggered. Finally, we investigate the nonlinear evolution of a few selected cases of tripoles.

  16. Two-Layer Linear MPC Approach Aimed at Walking Beam Billets Reheating Furnace Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Zanoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of the control and optimization of a walking beam billets reheating furnace located in an Italian steel plant is analyzed. An ad hoc Advanced Process Control framework has been developed, based on a two-layer linear Model Predictive Control architecture. This control block optimizes the steady and transient states of the considered process. Two main problems have been addressed. First, in order to manage all process conditions, a tailored module defines the process variables set to be included in the control problem. In particular, a unified approach for the selection on the control inputs to be used for control objectives related to the process outputs is guaranteed. The impact of the proposed method on the controller formulation is also detailed. Second, an innovative mathematical approach for stoichiometric ratios constraints handling has been proposed, together with their introduction in the controller optimization problems. The designed control system has been installed on a real plant, replacing operators’ mental model in the conduction of local PID controllers. After two years from the first startup, a strong energy efficiency improvement has been observed.

  17. Polarization-selective infrared bandpass filter based on a two-layer subwavelength metallic grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohne, Andrew J.; Moon, Benjamin; Baumbauer, Carol L.; Gray, Tristan; Dilts, James; Shaw, Joseph A.; Dickensheets, David L.; Nakagawa, Wataru

    2017-08-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a polarization-selective infrared bandpass filter based on a two-layer subwavelength metallic grating for use in polarimetric imaging. Gold nanowires were deposited via physical vapor deposition (PVD) onto a silicon surface relief grating that was patterned using electron beam lithography (EBL) and fabricated using standard silicon processing techniques. Optical characterization with a broad-spectrum tungsten halogen light source and a grating spectrometer showed normalized peak TM transmission of 53% with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 122 nm, which was consistent with rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) simulations. Simulation results suggested that device operation relied on suppression of the TM transmission caused by surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation at the gold-silicon interface and an increase in TM transmission caused by a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonance in the cavity between the gratings. TE rejection occurred at the initial air/gold interface. We also present simulation results of an improved design based on a two-dielectric grating where two different SPP resonances allowed us to improve the shape of the passband by suppressing the side lobes. This newer design resulted in improved side-band performance and increased peak TM transmission.

  18. A Novel Approach to ECG Classification Based upon Two-Layered HMMs in Body Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach to ECG signal filtering and classification. Unlike the traditional techniques which aim at collecting and processing the ECG signals with the patient being still, lying in bed in hospitals, our proposed algorithm is intentionally designed for monitoring and classifying the patient’s ECG signals in the free-living environment. The patients are equipped with wearable ambulatory devices the whole day, which facilitates the real-time heart attack detection. In ECG preprocessing, an integral-coefficient-band-stop (ICBS filter is applied, which omits time-consuming floating-point computations. In addition, two-layered Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are applied to achieve ECG feature extraction and classification. The periodic ECG waveforms are segmented into ISO intervals, P subwave, QRS complex and T subwave respectively in the first HMM layer where expert-annotation assisted Baum-Welch algorithm is utilized in HMM modeling. Then the corresponding interval features are selected and applied to categorize the ECG into normal type or abnormal type (PVC, APC in the second HMM layer. For verifying the effectiveness of our algorithm on abnormal signal detection, we have developed an ECG body sensor network (BSN platform, whereby real-time ECG signals are collected, transmitted, displayed and the corresponding classification outcomes are deduced and shown on the BSN screen.

  19. A Two-Layer Method for Sedentary Behaviors Classification Using Smartphone and Bluetooth Beacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón, Jesús D; López, Diego M; Hofmann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Among the factors that outline the health of populations, person's lifestyle is the more important one. This work focuses on the caracterization and prevention of sedentary lifestyles. A sedentary behavior is defined as "any waking behavior characterized by an energy expenditure of 1.5 METs (Metabolic Equivalent) or less while in a sitting or reclining posture". To propose a method for sedentary behaviors classification using a smartphone and Bluetooth beacons considering different types of classification models: personal, hybrid or impersonal. Following the CRISP-DM methodology, a method based on a two-layer approach for the classification of sedentary behaviors is proposed. Using data collected from a smartphones' accelerometer, gyroscope and barometer; the first layer classifies between performing a sedentary behavior and not. The second layer of the method classifies the specific sedentary activity performed using only the smartphone's accelerometer and barometer data, but adding indoor location data, using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons. To improve the precision of the classification, both layers implemented the Random Forest algorithm and the personal model. This study presents the first available method for the automatic classification of specific sedentary behaviors. The layered classification approach has the potential to improve processing, memory and energy consumption of mobile devices and wearables used.

  20. A Novel Approach to ECG Classification Based upon Two-Layered HMMs in Body Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Zhang, Yinlong; Tan, Jindong; Li, Yang

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to ECG signal filtering and classification. Unlike the traditional techniques which aim at collecting and processing the ECG signals with the patient being still, lying in bed in hospitals, our proposed algorithm is intentionally designed for monitoring and classifying the patient's ECG signals in the free-living environment. The patients are equipped with wearable ambulatory devices the whole day, which facilitates the real-time heart attack detection. In ECG preprocessing, an integral-coefficient-band-stop (ICBS) filter is applied, which omits time-consuming floating-point computations. In addition, two-layered Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are applied to achieve ECG feature extraction and classification. The periodic ECG waveforms are segmented into ISO intervals, P subwave, QRS complex and T subwave respectively in the first HMM layer where expert-annotation assisted Baum-Welch algorithm is utilized in HMM modeling. Then the corresponding interval features are selected and applied to categorize the ECG into normal type or abnormal type (PVC, APC) in the second HMM layer. For verifying the effectiveness of our algorithm on abnormal signal detection, we have developed an ECG body sensor network (BSN) platform, whereby real-time ECG signals are collected, transmitted, displayed and the corresponding classification outcomes are deduced and shown on the BSN screen. PMID:24681668

  1. Characteristics of phonation onset in a two-layer vocal fold model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2009-02-01

    Characteristics of phonation onset were investigated in a two-layer body-cover continuum model of the vocal folds as a function of the biomechanical and geometric properties of the vocal folds. The analysis showed that an increase in either the body or cover stiffness generally increased the phonation threshold pressure and phonation onset frequency, although the effectiveness of varying body or cover stiffness as a pitch control mechanism varied depending on the body-cover stiffness ratio. Increasing body-cover stiffness ratio reduced the vibration amplitude of the body layer, and the vocal fold motion was gradually restricted to the medial surface, resulting in more effective flow modulation and higher sound production efficiency. The fluid-structure interaction induced synchronization of more than one group of eigenmodes so that two or more eigenmodes may be simultaneously destabilized toward phonation onset. At certain conditions, a slight change in vocal fold stiffness or geometry may cause phonation onset to occur as eigenmode synchronization due to a different pair of eigenmodes, leading to sudden changes in phonation onset frequency, vocal fold vibration pattern, and sound production efficiency. Although observed in a linear stability analysis, a similar mechanism may also play a role in register changes at finite-amplitude oscillations.

  2. Spin-Selective Transmission and Devisable Chirality in Two-Layer Metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhancheng; Liu, Wenwei; Cheng, Hua; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-08-15

    Chirality is a nearly ubiquitous natural phenomenon. Its minute presence in most naturally occurring materials makes it incredibly difficult to detect. Recent advances in metasurfaces indicate that they exhibit devisable chirality in novel forms; this finding offers an effective opening for studying chirality and its features in such nanostructures. These metasurfaces display vast possibilities for highly sensitive chirality discrimination in biological and chemical systems. Here, we show that two-layer metasurfaces based on twisted nanorods can generate giant spin-selective transmission and support engineered chirality in the near-infrared region. Two designed metasurfaces with opposite spin-selective transmission are proposed for treatment as enantiomers and can be used widely for spin selection and enhanced chiral sensing. Specifically, we demonstrate that the chirality in these proposed metasurfaces can be adjusted effectively by simply changing the orientation angle between the twisted nanorods. Our results offer simple and straightforward rules for chirality engineering in metasurfaces and suggest intriguing possibilities for the applications of such metasurfaces in spin optics and chiral sensing.

  3. Clustering Approaches for Pragmatic Two-Layer IoT Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sathish Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Connecting all devices through Internet is now practical due to Internet of Things. IoT assures numerous applications in everyday life of common people, government bodies, business, and society as a whole. Collaboration among the devices in IoT to bring various applications in the real world is a challenging task. In this context, we introduce an application-based two-layer architectural framework for IoT which consists of sensing layer and IoT layer. For any real-time application, sensing devices play an important role. Both these layers are required for accomplishing IoT-based applications. The success of any IoT-based application relies on efficient communication and utilization of the devices and data acquired by the devices at both layers. The grouping of these devices helps to achieve the same, which leads to formation of cluster of devices at various levels. The clustering helps not only in collaboration but also in prolonging overall network lifetime. In this paper, we propose two clustering algorithms based on heuristic and graph, respectively. The proposed clustering approaches are evaluated on IoT platform using standard parameters and compared with different approaches reported in literature.

  4. Inferring topologies via driving-based generalized synchronization of two-layer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingfei; Wu, Xiaoqun; Feng, Hui; Lu, Jun-an; Xu, Yuhua

    2016-05-01

    The interaction topology among the constituents of a complex network plays a crucial role in the network’s evolutionary mechanisms and functional behaviors. However, some network topologies are usually unknown or uncertain. Meanwhile, coupling delays are ubiquitous in various man-made and natural networks. Hence, it is necessary to gain knowledge of the whole or partial topology of a complex dynamical network by taking into consideration communication delay. In this paper, topology identification of complex dynamical networks is investigated via generalized synchronization of a two-layer network. Particularly, based on the LaSalle-type invariance principle of stochastic differential delay equations, an adaptive control technique is proposed by constructing an auxiliary layer and designing proper control input and updating laws so that the unknown topology can be recovered upon successful generalized synchronization. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The technique provides a certain theoretical basis for topology inference of complex networks. In particular, when the considered network is composed of systems with high-dimension or complicated dynamics, a simpler response layer can be constructed, which is conducive to circuit design. Moreover, it is practical to take into consideration perturbations caused by control input. Finally, the method is applicable to infer topology of a subnetwork embedded within a complex system and locate hidden sources. We hope the results can provide basic insight into further research endeavors on understanding practical and economical topology inference of networks.

  5. Data Hiding Based on a Two-Layer Turtle Shell Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Zhu Xie

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Data hiding is a technology that embeds data into a cover carrier in an imperceptible way while still allowing the hidden data to be extracted accurately from the stego-carrier, which is one important branch of computer science and has drawn attention of scholars in the last decade. Turtle shell-based (TSB schemes have become popular in recent years due to their higher embedding capacity (EC and better visual quality of the stego-image than most of the none magic matrices based (MMB schemes. This paper proposes a two-layer turtle shell matrix-based (TTSMB scheme for data hiding, in which an extra attribute presented by a 4-ary digit is assigned to each element of the turtle shell matrix with symmetrical distribution. Therefore, compared with the original TSB scheme, two more bits are embedded into each pixel pair to obtain a higher EC up to 2.5 bits per pixel (bpp. The experimental results reveal that under the condition of the same visual quality, the EC of the proposed scheme outperforms state-of-the-art data hiding schemes.

  6. A two-layer recurrent neural network for nonsmooth convex optimization problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sitian; Xue, Xiaoping

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a two-layer recurrent neural network is proposed to solve the nonsmooth convex optimization problem subject to convex inequality and linear equality constraints. Compared with existing neural network models, the proposed neural network has a low model complexity and avoids penalty parameters. It is proved that from any initial point, the state of the proposed neural network reaches the equality feasible region in finite time and stays there thereafter. Moreover, the state is unique if the initial point lies in the equality feasible region. The equilibrium point set of the proposed neural network is proved to be equivalent to the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality set of the original optimization problem. It is further proved that the equilibrium point of the proposed neural network is stable in the sense of Lyapunov. Moreover, from any initial point, the state is proved to be convergent to an equilibrium point of the proposed neural network. Finally, as applications, the proposed neural network is used to solve nonlinear convex programming with linear constraints and L1 -norm minimization problems.

  7. Persufflation Improves Pancreas Preservation When Compared With the Two-Layer Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W.E.; O'Brien, T.D.; Ferrer-Fabrega, J.; Avgoustiniatos, E.S.; Weegman, B.P.; Anazawa, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Kirchner, V.A.; Rizzari, M.D.; Murtaugh, M.P.; Suszynski, T.M.; Aasheim, T.; Kidder, L.S.; Hammer, B.E.; Stone, S.G.; Tempelman, L.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Hering, B.J.; Papas, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Islet transplantation is emerging as a promising treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes. It is important to maximize viable islet yield for each organ due to scarcity of suitable human donor pancreata, high cost, and the high dose of islets required for insulin independence. However, organ transport for 8 hours using the two-layer method (TLM) frequently results in lower islet yields. Since efficient oxygenation of the core of larger organs (eg, pig, human) in TLM has recently come under question, we investigated oxygen persufflation as an alternative way to supply the pancreas with oxygen during preservation. Porcine pancreata were procured from non–heart-beating donors and preserved by either TLM or persufflation for 24 hours and fixed. Biopsies were collected from several regions of the pancreas, sectioned, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated by a histologist. Persufflated tissues exhibited distended capillaries due to gas perfusion and significantly less autolysis/cell death than regions not exposed to persufflation or tissues exposed to TLM. The histology presented here suggests that after 24 hours of preservation, persufflation dramatically improves tissue health when compared with TLM. These results indicate the potential for persufflation to improve viable islet yields and extend the duration of preservation, allowing more donor organs to be utilized. PMID:20692396

  8. Two-layer tissue engineered urethra using oral epithelial and muscle derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Go; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamato, Masayuki; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kodama, Shohta

    2012-05-01

    We fabricated novel tissue engineered urethral grafts using autologously harvested oral cells. We report their viability in a canine model. Oral tissues were harvested by punch biopsy and divided into mucosal and muscle sections. Epithelial cells from mucosal sections were cultured as epithelial cell sheets. Simultaneously muscle derived cells were seeded on collagen mesh matrices to form muscle cell sheets. At 2 weeks the sheets were joined and tubularized to form 2-layer tissue engineered urethras, which were autologously grafted to surgically induced urethral defects in 10 dogs in the experimental group. Tissue engineered grafts were not applied to the induced urethral defect in control dogs. The dogs were followed 12 weeks postoperatively. Urethrogram and histological examination were done to evaluate the grafting outcome. We successfully fabricated 2-layer tissue engineered urethras in vitro and transplanted them in dogs in the experimental group. The 12-week complication-free rate was significantly higher in the experimental group than in controls. Urethrogram confirmed urethral patency without stricture in the complication-free group at 12 weeks. Histologically urethras in the transplant group showed a stratified epithelial layer overlying well differentiated submucosa. In contrast, urethras in controls showed severe fibrosis without epithelial layer formation. Two-layer tissue engineered urethras were engineered using cells harvested by minimally invasive oral punch biopsy. Results suggest that this technique can encourage regeneration of a functional urethra. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Design of a universal two-layered neural network derived from the PLI theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chia-Lun J.

    2004-05-01

    The if-and-only-if (IFF) condition that a set of M analog-to-digital vector-mapping relations can be learned by a one-layered-feed-forward neural network (OLNN) is that all the input analog vectors dichotomized by the i-th output bit must be positively, linearly independent, or PLI. If they are not PLI, then the OLNN just cannot learn no matter what learning rules is employed because the solution of the connection matrix does not exist mathematically. However, in this case, one can still design a parallel-cascaded, two-layered, perceptron (PCTLP) to acheive this general mapping goal. The design principle of this "universal" neural network is derived from the major mathematical properties of the PLI theory - changing the output bits of the dependent relations existing among the dichotomized input vectors to make the PLD relations PLI. Then with a vector concatenation technique, the required mapping can still be learned by this PCTLP system with very high efficiency. This paper will report in detail the mathematical derivation of the general design principle and the design procedures of the PCTLP neural network system. It then will be verified in general by a practical numerical example.

  10. A Two-Layer Gene Circuit for Decoupling Cell Growth from Metabolite Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Tat-Ming; Chng, Si Hui; Teo, Wei Suong; Cho, Han-Saem; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2016-08-01

    We present a synthetic gene circuit for decoupling cell growth from metabolite production through autonomous regulation of enzymatic pathways by integrated modules that sense nutrient and substrate. The two-layer circuit allows Escherichia coli to selectively utilize target substrates in a mixed pool; channel metabolic resources to growth by delaying enzymatic conversion until nutrient depletion; and activate, terminate, and re-activate conversion upon substrate availability. We developed two versions of controller, both of which have glucose nutrient sensors but differ in their substrate-sensing modules. One controller is specific for hydroxycinnamic acid and the other for oleic acid. Our hydroxycinnamic acid controller lowered metabolic stress 2-fold and increased the growth rate 2-fold and productivity 5-fold, whereas our oleic acid controller lowered metabolic stress 2-fold and increased the growth rate 1.3-fold and productivity 2.4-fold. These results demonstrate the potential for engineering strategies that decouple growth and production to make bio-based production more economical and sustainable. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Convergence of Extreme Value Statistics in a Two-Layer Quasi-Geostrophic Atmospheric Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Melinda Gálfi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We search for the signature of universal properties of extreme events, theoretically predicted for Axiom A flows, in a chaotic and high-dimensional dynamical system. We study the convergence of GEV (Generalized Extreme Value and GP (Generalized Pareto shape parameter estimates to the theoretical value, which is expressed in terms of the partial information dimensions of the attractor. We consider a two-layer quasi-geostrophic atmospheric model of the mid-latitudes, adopt two levels of forcing, and analyse the extremes of different types of physical observables (local energy, zonally averaged energy, and globally averaged energy. We find good agreement in the shape parameter estimates with the theory only in the case of more intense forcing, corresponding to a strong chaotic behaviour, for some observables (the local energy at every latitude. Due to the limited (though very large data size and to the presence of serial correlations, it is difficult to obtain robust statistics of extremes in the case of the other observables. In the case of weak forcing, which leads to weaker chaotic conditions with regime behaviour, we find, unsurprisingly, worse agreement with the theory developed for Axiom A flows.

  12. Display of the β-effect in the Black Sea Two-Layer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Pavlushin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The research is a continuation of a series of numerical experiments on modeling formation of wind currents and eddies in the Black Sea within the framework of a two-layer eddy-resolving model. The main attention is focused on studying the β-effect role. The stationary cyclonic wind is used as an external forcing and the bottom topography is not considered. It is shown that at the β-effect being taken into account, the Rossby waves propagating from east to west are observed both during the currents’ formation and at the statistical equilibrium mode when the mesoscale eddies are formed. In the integral flows’ field the waves are visually manifested in a form of the alternate large-scale cyclonic gyres and zones in which the meso-scale anti-cyclones are formed. This spatial pattern constantly propagates to the west that differs from the results of calculations using the constant Coriolis parameter when the spatially alternate cyclonic and anti-cyclonic vortices are formed, but hold a quasi-stationary position. The waves with the parameters of the Rossby wave first barotropic mode for the closed basin are most clearly pronounced. Interaction of the Rossby waves with large-scale circulation results in intensification of the of the currents’ hydrodynamic instability and in formation of the mesoscale eddies. Significant decrease of kinetic and available potential energy as compared to the values obtained at the constant Coriolis parameter is also a consequence of the eddy formation intensification.

  13. A two-layered forward model of tissue for electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, Rujuta; Saulnier, Gary J; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Newell, Jonathan C; Boverman, Gregory; Isaacson, David

    2009-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is being explored as a technique to detect breast cancer, exploiting the differences in admittivity between normal tissue and tumors. In this paper, the geometry is modeled as an infinite half space under a hand-held probe. A forward solution and a reconstruction algorithm for this geometry were developed previously by Mueller et al (1999 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 46 1379). In this paper, we present a different approach which uses the decomposition of the forward solution into its Fourier components to obtain the forward solution and the reconstructions. The two approaches are compared in terms of the forward solutions and the reconstructions of experimental tank data. We also introduce a two-layered model to incorporate the presence of the skin that surrounds the body area being imaged. We demonstrate an improvement in the reconstruction of a target in a layered medium using this layered model with finite difference simulated data. We then extend the application of our layered model to human subject data and estimate the skin and the tissue admittivities for data collected on the human abdomen using an ultrasound-like hand-held EIT probe. Lastly, we show that for this set of human subject data, the layered model yields an improvement in predicting the measured voltages of around 81% for the lowest temporal frequency (3 kHz) and around 61% for the highest temporal frequency (1 MHz) applied when compared to the homogeneous model

  14. Synthesis of PVA/PVP hydrogels having two layers by radiation and their physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nho, Y.C.; Park, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The radiation can induce chemical reaction to modify polymer under even the solid state or in the low temperature. The radiation crosslinking can be easily adjusted by controlling the radiation dose and is reproducible. The finished product contains no residuals of substances required to initiate the chemical crosslinking that can restrict the application possibilities. In these studies, two layer's hydrogel which consisted of urethane membrane and a mixture of polyvinyl alcohol/poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone /glycerin/chitosan was made by gamma-ray irradiation or two steps of 'freezing and thawing' and gamma-ray irradiation for wound dressing. The physical properties such as gelation, water absorptivity, and gel strength were examined to evaluate the hydrogels for wound dressing. Urethane was dissolved in solvent, the urethane solution was poured on the mould, and then dried to make the thin membrane. Hydrophilic polymer solutions were poured on the urethane membranes, they were exposed to gamma irradiation or 'freezing and thawing' and gamma irradiation doses of 25, 35, 50 and 60 kGy to evaluate the physical properties of hydrogels. The physical properties of hydrogels such as gelation and gel strength were improved, and the evaporation speed of water in hydrogel was low when urethane membrane was used

  15. Traffic Offloading in Unlicensed Spectrum for 5G Cellular Network: A Two-Layer Game Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Licensed Assisted Access (LAA is considered one of the latest groundbreaking innovations to provide high performance in future 5G. Coexistence schemes such as Listen Before Talk (LBT and Carrier Sensing and Adaptive Transmission (CSAT have been proven to be good methods to share spectrums, and they are WiFi friendly. In this paper, a modified LBT-based CSAT scheme is proposed which can effectively reduce the collision at the moment when Long Term Evolution (LTE starts to transmit data in CSAT mode. To make full use of the valuable spectrum resources, the throughput of both LAA and WiFi systems should be improved. Thus, a two-layer Coalition-Auction Game-based Transaction (CAGT mechanism is proposed in this paper to optimize the performance of the two systems. In the first layer, a coalition among Access Points (APs is built to balance the WiFi stations and maximize the WiFi throughput. The main idea of the devised coalition forming is to merge the light-loaded APs with heavy-loaded APs into a coalition; consequently, the data of the overloaded APs can be offloaded to the light-loaded APs. Next, an auction game between the LAA and WiFi systems is used to gain a win–win strategy, in which, LAA Base Station (BS is the auctioneer and AP coalitions are bidders. Thus, the throughput of both systems are improved. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme in this paper can improve the performance of both two systems effectively.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of two layered indium oxalates with 12-membered apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhenxia; Zhou Yaming; Weng Linhong; Zhang Haoyu; Zhao Dongyuan

    2003-01-01

    Two layered indium oxalates, In(C 2 O 4 ) 2.5 (C 3 N 2 H 12 )(H 2 O) 3 , I, and In(C 2 O 4 ) 1.5 (H 2 O) 3 , II, have been hydrothermally synthesized. In I, the linkage between indium and oxalate units gives rise to a sheet with a rectangular 12-membered aperture (six indium atoms and six oxalate units). Indium atom of II has an unusual pentagonal bipyramidal coordination arrangement. The connectivity between indium and oxalate units forms a neutral puckered layer with 12- (along a-axis) and eight-membered (along b-axis) apertures. Crystal data for these two indium oxalates are as follows: I, triclinic, space group: P-1 (No. 2), a=8.725(3) A, b=9.170(3) A, c=9.901(3) A, α=98.101(4) deg. , β=97.068(4) deg. , γ=102.403(4) deg. , V=756.3(4) A 3 , Z=2, M=463.0(5), ρ calc =2.042 g/cm 3 , R 1 =0.0377, wR 2 =0.0834. II, monoclinic, space group: P2 1 /c (No. 14), a=10.203(5) A, b=6.638(1) A, c=11.152(7) A, β=95.649(4) deg. , V=751.7(4)A 3 , Z=4, M=300.9(0), ρ calc =2.659 g/cm 3 , R 1 =0.0229, wR 2 =0.0488. TG analyses indicate the water molecules of I can be removed at 150 deg. C. The dehydrated product retains structural integrity

  17. Formulation of two-layer dissolving polymeric microneedle patches for insulin transdermal delivery in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Chi; Lin, Wei-Ming; Shu, Jwu-Ching; Tsai, Shau-Wei; Chen, Chih-Hao; Tsai, Meng-Tsan

    2017-01-01

    Dissolving microneedles (MNs) display high efficiency in delivering poorly permeable drugs and vaccines. Here, two-layer dissolving polymeric MN patches composed of gelatin and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were fabricated with a two-step casting and centrifuging process to localize the insulin in the needle and achieve efficient transdermal delivery of insulin. In vitro skin insertion capability was determined by staining with tissue-marking dye after insertion, and the real-time penetration depth was monitored using optical coherence tomography. Confocal microscopy images revealed that the rhodamine 6G and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled insulin (insulin-FITC) can gradually diffuse from the puncture sites to deeper tissue. Ex vivo drug-release profiles showed that 50% of the insulin was released and penetrated across the skin after 1 h, and the cumulative permeation reached 80% after 5 h. In vivo and pharmacodynamic studies were then conducted to estimate the feasibility of the administration of insulin-loaded dissolving MN patches on diabetic mice for glucose regulation. The total area above the glucose level versus time curve as an index of hypoglycemic effect was 128.4 ± 28.3 (% h) at 0.25 IU/kg. The relative pharmacologic availability and relative bioavailability (RBA) of insulin from MN patches were 95.6 and 85.7%, respectively. This study verified that the use of gelatin/CMC MN patches for insulin delivery achieved a satisfactory RBA compared to traditional hypodermic injection and presented a promising device to deliver poorly permeable protein drugs for diabetic therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 84-93, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Two-Layer Hierarchy Optimization Model for Communication Protocol in Railway Wireless Monitoring Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The wireless monitoring system is always destroyed by the insufficient energy of the sensors in railway. Hence, how to optimize the communication protocol and extend the system lifetime is crucial to ensure the stability of system. However, the existing studies focused primarily on cluster-based or multihop protocols individually, which are ineffective in coping with the complex communication scenarios in the railway wireless monitoring system (RWMS. This study proposes a hybrid protocol which combines the cluster-based and multihop protocols (CMCP to minimize and balance the energy consumption in different sections of the RWMS. In the first hierarchy, the total energy consumption is minimized by optimizing the cluster quantities in the cluster-based protocol and the number of hops and the corresponding hop distances in the multihop protocol. In the second hierarchy, the energy consumption is balanced through rotating the cluster head (CH in the subnetworks and further optimizing the hops and the corresponding hop distances in the backbone network. On this basis, the system lifetime is maximized with the minimum and balance energy consumption among the sensors. Furthermore, the hybrid particle swarm optimization and genetic algorithm (PSO-GA are adopted to optimize the energy consumption from the two-layer hierarchy. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed CMCP is verified in the simulation. The performances of the proposed CMCP in system lifetime, residual energy, and the corresponding variance are all superior to the LEACH protocol widely applied in the previous research. The effective protocol proposed in this study can facilitate the application of the wireless monitoring network in the railway system and enhance safety operation of the railway.

  19. Analyzing surface features on icy satellites using a new two-layer analogue model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, K. M.; Leonard, E. J.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Yin, A.

    2017-12-01

    The appearance of similar surface morphologies across many icy satellites suggests potentially unified formation mechanisms. Constraining the processes that shape the surfaces of these icy worlds is fundamental to understanding their rheology and thermal evolution—factors that have implications for potential habitability. Analogue models have proven useful for investigating and quantifying surface structure formation on Earth, but have only been sparsely applied to icy bodies. In this study, we employ an innovative two-layer analogue model that simulates a warm, ductile ice layer overlain by brittle surface ice on satellites such as Europa and Enceladus. The top, brittle layer is composed of fine-grained sand while the ductile, lower viscosity layer is made of putty. These materials were chosen because they scale up reasonably to the conditions on Europa and Enceladus. Using this analogue model, we investigate the role of the ductile layer in forming contractional structures (e.g. folds) that would compensate for the over-abundance of extensional features observed on icy satellites. We do this by simulating different compressional scenarios in the analogue model and analyzing whether the resulting features resemble those on icy bodies. If the resulting structures are similar, then the model can be used to quantify the deformation by calculating strain. These values can then be scaled up to Europa or Enceladus and used to quantity the observed surface morphologies and the amount of extensional strain accommodated by certain features. This presentation will focus on the resulting surface morphologies and the calculated strain values from several analogue experiments. The methods and findings from this work can then be expanded and used to study other icy bodies, such as Triton, Miranda, Ariel, and Pluto.

  20. Absorption of water vapour in the falling film of water-(LiBr + LiI + LiNO{sub 3} + LiCl) in a vertical tube at air-cooling thermal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourouis, Mahmoud; Valles, Manel; Medrano, Marc; Coronas, Alberto [Centro de Innovacion Tecnologica en Revalorizacion Energetica y Refrigeracion, CREVER, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Autovia de Salou, s/n, 43006, Tarragona (Spain)

    2005-05-01

    In air-cooled water-LiBr absorption chillers the working conditions in the absorber and condenser are shifted to higher temperatures and concentrations, thereby increasing the risk of crystallisation. To develop this technology, two main problems are to be addressed: the availability of new salt mixtures with wider range of solubility than water-LiBr, and advanced absorber configurations that enable to carry out simultaneously an appropriate absorption process and an effective air-cooling. One way of improving the solubility of LiBr aqueous solutions is to add other salts to create multicomponent salt solutions. The aqueous solution of the quaternary salt system (LiBr + LiI + LiNO{sub 3} + LiCl) presents favourable properties required for air-cooled absorption systems: less corrosive and crystallisation temperature about 35 K lower than that of water-LiBr.This paper presents an experimental study on the absorption of water vapour over a wavy laminar falling film of an aqueous solution of (LiBr + LiI + LiNO{sub 3} + LiCl) on the inner wall of a water-cooled smooth vertical tube. Cooling water temperatures in the range 30-45 C were selected to simulate air-cooling thermal conditions. The results are compared with those obtained in the same experimental set-up with water-LiBr solutions.The control variables for the experimental study were: absorber pressure, solution Reynolds number, solution concentration and cooling water temperature. The parameters considered to assess the absorber performance were: absorber thermal load, mass absorption flux, degree of subcooling of the solution leaving the absorber, and the falling film heat transfer coefficient.The higher solubility of the multicomponent salt solution makes possible the operation of the absorber at higher salt concentration than with the conventional working fluid water-LiBr. The absorption fluxes achieved with water-(LiBr + LiI + LiNO{sub 3} + LiCl) at a concentration of 64.2 wt% are around 60 % higher than

  1. Dependences of optical properties of spherical two-layered nanoparticles on parameters of gold core and material shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovalov, V.K.; Astafyeva, L.G.; Zharov, V.P.

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of nonlinear dependences of optical properties of spherical two-layered gold core and some material shell nanoparticles (NPs) placed in water on parameters of core and shell was carried out on the basis of the extended Mie theory. Efficiency cross-sections of absorption, scattering and extinction of radiation with wavelength 532 nm by core–shell NPs in the ranges of core radii r 00 =5–40 nm and of relative NP radii r 1 /r 00 =1–8 were calculated (r 1 —radius of two-layered nanoparticle). Shell materials were used with optical indexes in the ranges of refraction n 1 =0.2–1.5 and absorption k 1 =0–3.5 for the presentation of optical properties of wide classes of shell materials (including dielectrics, metals, polymers, vapor shell around gold core). Results show nonlinear dependences of optical properties of two-layered NPs on optical indexes of shell material, core r 00 and relative NP r 1 /r 00 radii. Regions with sharp decrease and increase of absorption, scattering and extinction efficiency cross-sections with changing of core and shell parameters were investigated. These dependences should be taken into account for applications of two-layered NPs in laser nanomedicine and optical diagnostics of tissues. The results can be used for experimental investigation of shell formation on NP core and optical determination of geometrical parameters of core and shell of two-layered NPs. -- Highlights: • Absorption, scattering and extinction of two-layered nanoparticles are studied. • Shell materials change in wide regions of materials (metals, dielectrics, vapor). • Effect of sharp decrease and increase of optical characteristics is established. • Explanation of sharp decreasing and increasing optical characteristics is presented

  2. Randomized trial of four-layer and two-layer bandage systems in the management of chronic venous ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Christine J; McCullagh, Lynn; O'Connor, Theresa; Doherty, Debra C; Hourican, Catherine; Stevens, Julie; Mole, Trevor; Franks, Peter J

    2003-01-01

    To compare a four-layer bandage system with a two-layer system in the management of chronic venous leg ulceration, a prospective randomized open parallel groups trial was undertaken. In total, 112 patients newly presenting to leg ulcer services with chronic leg ulceration, screened to exclude the presence of arterial disease (ankle brachial pressure index ulceration other than venous disease, were entered into the trial. Patients were randomized to receive either four-layer (Profore) or two-layer (Surepress) high-compression elastic bandage systems. In all, 109 out of 112 patients had at least one follow-up. After 24 weeks, 50 out of 57 (88%) patients randomized to the four-layer bandage system with follow-up had ulcer closure (full epithelialization) compared with 40 out of 52 (77%) on the two-layer bandage, hazard ratio = 1.18 (95% confidence interval 0.69-2.02), p = 0.55. After 12 weeks, 40 out of 57 (70%) patients randomized to the four-layer bandage system with follow-up had ulcer closure compared with 30 out of 52 (58%) on the two-layer bandage, odds ratio = 4.23 (95% confidence interval 1.29-13.86), p = 0.02. Withdrawal rates were significantly greater on the two-layer bandage (30 out of 54; 56%) compared with the four-layer bandage system (8 out of 58; 14%), p bandaging system (15 out of 54; 28%) compared with four-layer bandaging (5 out of 54; 9%), p = 0.01. The higher mean cost of treatment in the two-layer bandaging system arm over 24 weeks ($1374 [ pound 916] vs. $1314 [ pound 876]) was explained by the increased mean number of bandage changes (1.5 vs. 1.1 per week) with the two-layer system. In conclusion, the four-layer bandage offers advantages over the two-layer bandage in terms of reduced withdrawal from treatment, fewer adverse incidents, and lower treatment cost.

  3. Study on solar chemical heat pump system. Basic experiment on falling film reaction for dehydrogenation of 2-propanol; Solar chemical heat pump no kenkyu. 2-propanol bunkai hanno ni okeru ryuka ekimakushiki hanno jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, T; Ando, Y; Tanaka, T; Takashima, T [Electrochemical Laboratory, Tsukuba (Japan); Nomura, T; Kamoshida, J [Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    An experiment and the examination were carried out in order to elucidate the optimum conditions in the falling liquid film reaction method, in the conversion of solar energy using the decomposition reaction of 2-propanol. The device for the experiment was constituted of a reaction container, tubular pump, cooling pipe, sampling container for effluent from the upper and lower part of the reaction container, and gas burette. Examined in the experiment were various factors such as a fibrous activated carbon (catalyst support), ratio for carrying catalyst, catalytic composition and heating temperature. In the experiment, with the temperature inside the reaction container fully stabilized under prescribed conditions, measurement was done for the hydrogen generation by the gas burette for 10 minutes as well as for the sampling of effluent. The experiment revealed that the heat utilization ratio reached the maximum of about 27% when the heating temperature was 90{degree}C using a catalyst with the ratio of RU and Pt 1 to 1 and the ratio for carrying catalyst 10wt%, so that a great improvement was obtained in the heat utilization ratio at a low temperature. Also obtained was a large inversion ratio of about 15%. 4 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Removal of alachlor, diuron and isoproturon in water in a falling film dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor combined with adsorption on activated carbon textile: Reaction mechanisms and oxidation by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanraes, Patrick; Wardenier, Niels; Surmont, Pieter; Lynen, Frederic; Nikiforov, Anton; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; Leys, Christophe; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2018-05-03

    A falling film dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor combined with adsorption on activated carbon textile material was optimized to minimize the formation of hazardous oxidation by-products from the treatment of persistent pesticides (alachlor, diuron and isoproturon) in water. The formation of by-products and the reaction mechanism was investigated by HPLC-TOF-MS. The maximum concentration of each by-product was at least two orders of magnitude below the initial pesticide concentration, during the first 10 min of treatment. After 30 min of treatment, the individual by-product concentrations had decreased to values of at least three orders of magnitude below the initial pesticide concentration. The proposed oxidation pathways revealed five main oxidation steps: dechlorination, dealkylation, hydroxylation, addition of a double-bonded oxygen and nitrification. The latter is one of the main oxidation mechanisms of diuron and isoproturon for air plasma treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of nitrificated intermediates is reported for the plasma treatment of non-phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fall Enrollment Report. 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes and analyzes fall enrollment in Iowa's community colleges. Each year, Iowa's 15 community colleges submit data on enrollment on the 10th business day of the fall semester. Some highlights from this report include: (1) Fall 2014 enrollment was 93,772 students--a decline of 0.49 percent from last fall; (2) Enrollment continues…

  6. Screen-Capturing System with Two-Layer Display for PowerPoint Presentation to Enhance Classroom Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yen-Shou; Tsai, Hung-Hsu; Yu, Pao-Ta

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new presentation system integrating a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation in a two-layer method, called the TL system, to promote learning in a physical classroom. With the TL system, teachers can readily control hints or annotations as a way of making them visible or invisible to students so as to reduce information load. In…

  7. [Single-layer colonic anastomoses using polyglyconate (Maxon) vs. two-layer anastomoses using chromic catgut and silk. Experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Osogobio, Sandra Minerva; Takahashi-Monroy, Takeshi; Velasco, Liliana; Gaxiola, Miguel; Sotres-Vega, Avelina; Santillán-Doherty, Patricio

    2006-01-01

    The safety of an intestinal anastomosis is usually measured by its complication rate, especially the incidence of anastomotic leakage. A wide variety of methods have been described to reestablish intestinal continuity including single-layer continuous or two-layer interrupted anastomosis. To evaluate if the single-layer continuous anastomosis using polygluconate is safer and reliable than two-layer interrupted anastomosis with chromic catgut and silk. A prospective, experimental, randomized and comparative analysis was conducted in 20 dogs. They were divided in two groups; group 1 underwent two-layer interrupted anastomosis and group 2 underwent sigle-layer continuous technique. Anastomoses were timed. Both groups were under observation. Anastomotic leakage, and other complications were evaluated. The animals were sacrified and the anastomosis was taken out together with 10 cm of colon on both sides of the anastomosis. Breaking strength, histologic evaluation and hydroxyproline determination were performed. Ten two-layer anastomosis and ten single-layer anastomosis were performed. A median of 25 minutes (range: 20-30 minutes) was required to construct the anastomoses in group 1 versus 20 minutes (range: 12-25 minutes) in group 2. All animals survived and no leakage was observed. Wound infection ocurred in four dogs (20%). Median breaking strength was 230 mm Hg in group 1 and 210 mm Hg in group 2. Hydroxyproline concentration was 8.94 mg/g in group 1 (range: 5.33-16.71) and 9.94 mg/g in group 2 (range: 2.96-21.87). There was no difference among groups about the inflammatory response evaluated by pathology. There was no statistical significance in any variable evaluated. CONCLUIONS: This study demonstrates that a single-layer continuous is similar in terms of safety to the two-layer technique, but because of its facility to perform, the single-layer technique could be superior.

  8. Preventing falls and fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfarsson, J; Robinson, B E

    1994-11-01

    One of four persons over age 65 in the community falls; those over age 75 in institutions fall more frequently. Falls, a complex phenomena suggesting present disease and predicting future disability, are caused by interactions between the environment and dynamic balance which is determined by the quality of sensory input, central processing, and motor responses. Clinical factors which predispose to falling often produce observable disturbances in gait and balance, making observation critical in assessment. Acute illness and drug therapy produce particularly preventable falls. Therapeutic exercise and environmental modification for safety are the clinical interventions most likely to successfully prevent fall-related injury.

  9. Falls in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Patricia N; Shumway-Cook, Anne; Bamer, Alyssa M; Johnson, Shana L; Amtmann, Dagmar; Kraft, George H

    2011-07-01

    To examine incidence, associated factors, and health care provider (HCP) response to falls in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cross-sectional retrospective design. Community setting. Four hundred seventy-four persons with MS. Mailed survey questionnaire examined incidence, risk factors, and HCP response to falls in persons with MS who were dwelling in the community. Univariate and multiple ordinal regression analysis identified variables associated with single and multiple falls. Falls, causes and perceived reasons for falls, and HCP response. A total of 265 participants (58.2%) reported one or more falls in the previous 6 months, and 58.5% of falls were medically injurious. Trips/slips while walking accounted for 48% of falls. Factors associated with falls included use of a cane or walker (odds ratio [OR] 2.62; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66-4.14), income falls; recommended strategies included safety strategies (53.2%), use of gait assistive devices (42.1%), exercise/balance training (22.2%), and home modifications (16.6%). Factors associated with falls in persons with MS are similar to those in other populations with neurologic diseases. Despite the high incidence of falls, fewer than 50% of people with MS receive information about prevention of falls from an HCP. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Study of structure and surface morphology of two-layer contact Ti/Al metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill D. Vanyukhin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ti/Al/Ni/Au metallization widely used in the technology of GaN base devices have a very important imperfection i.e. rough surface. There are different opinions about the causes of this imperfection: balling-up of molten aluminum or the appearance of intermetallic melt phases in the Au–Al system. To check the effect of the former cause, we have studied the formation of rough surface after annealing of Ti/Al metallization which is used as a basis of many metallization systems for GaN. The substrates were made from silicon wafers covered with Si3N4 films (0.15 μm. On these substrates we deposited the Ti(12 nm/Al(135 nm metallization system. After the deposition the substrates were annealed in nitrogen for 30 s at 850 °С. The as-annealed specimens were tested for metallization sheet resistivity, appearance and surface morphology. We have shown that during annealing of the Ti/Al metallization system, mutual diffusion of the metals and their active interaction with the formation of intermetallic phases occur. This makes the metallization system more resistant to subsequent annealing, oxidation and chemical etching. After annealing the surface of the Ti/Al metallization system becomes gently matted. However, large hemispherical convex areas (as in the Ti/Al/Ni/Au metallization system do not form. Thus, the hypothesis on the balling-up of molten aluminum on the surface of the Ti/Al metallization system has not been confirmed.

  11. Mean flow generated by an internal wave packet impinging on the interface between two layers of fluid with continuous density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, John P. [The University of New Hampshire, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kingsbury Hall, Durham, NH (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Internal waves propagating in an idealized two-layer atmosphere are studied numerically. The governing equations are the inviscid anelastic equations for a perfect gas atmosphere. The numerical formulation eliminates all variables in the linear terms except vertical velocity, which are then treated implicitly. Nonlinear terms are treated explicitly. The basic state is a two-layer flow with continuous density at the interface. Each layer has a unique constant for the Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency. Waves are forced at the bottom of the domain, are periodic in the horizontal direction, and form a finite wave packet in the vertical. The results show that the wave packet forms a mean flow that is confined to the interface region that persists long after the wave packet has moved away. Large-amplitude waves are forced to break beneath the interface. (orig.)

  12. Non-radiative recombination process in BGaAs/GaAs alloys: Two layer photothermal deflection model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilahi, S., E-mail: ilehi_soufiene@yahoo.fr [Université de Carthage, Unité de Recherche de caractérisation photothermique et modélisation, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs de Nabeul (IPEIN), 8000 Merazka, Nabeul (Tunisia); Baira, M.; Saidi, F. [Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoélectronique et Nanostructures, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir. Avenue de l’Environnement, Monastir 5019 (Tunisia); Yacoubi, N. [Université de Carthage, Unité de Recherche de caractérisation photothermique et modélisation, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieurs de Nabeul (IPEIN), 8000 Merazka, Nabeul (Tunisia); Auvray, L. [Laboratoire Multimateriaux et Interfaces, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, 43, Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Maaref, H. [Université de Monastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoélectronique et Nanostructures, Faculté des Sciences de Monastir. Avenue de l’Environnement, Monastir 5019 (Tunisia)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •We have developed a two layer photothermal deflection model. •We have determined the electronic properties of BGaAs/GaAs alloys. •We have studied the boron effect in the electronic parameters. -- Abstract: Photo-thermal deflection technique PTD is used to study the nonradiative recombination process in BGaAs/GaAs alloy with boron composition of 3% and 8% grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A two layer theoretical model has been developed taking into account both thermal and electronic contribution in the photothermal signal allowing to extract the electronic parameters namely electronic diffusivity, surface and interface recombination. It is found that the increase of boron composition alters the BGaAs epilayers transport properties.

  13. Preparation of Two-Layer Anion-Exchange Poly(ethersulfone Based Membrane: Effect of Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Zarybnicka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the surface modification of a commercial microfiltration poly(ethersulfone membrane by graft polymerization technique. Poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene-co-4-vinylbenzylchloride surface layer was covalently attached onto the poly(ethersulfone support layer to improve the membrane electrochemical properties. Followed by amination, a two-layer anion-exchange membrane was prepared. The effect of surface layer treatment using the extraction in various solvents on membrane morphological and electrochemical characteristics was studied. The membranes were tested from the point of view of water content, ion-exchange capacity, specific resistance, permselectivity, FT-IR spectroscopy, and SEM analysis. It was found that the two-layer anion-exchange membranes after the extraction using tetrahydrofuran or toluene exhibited smooth and porous surface layer, which resulted in improved ion-exchange capacity, electrical resistance, and permselectivity of the membranes.

  14. Reappraisal of criticality for two-layer flows and its role in the generation of internal solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Thomas J.; Donaldson, Neil M.

    2007-07-01

    A geometric view of criticality for two-layer flows is presented. Uniform flows are classified by diagrams in the momentum-massflux space for fixed Bernoulli energy, and cuspoidal curves on these diagrams correspond to critical uniform flows. Restriction of these surfaces to critical flow leads to new subsurfaces in energy-massflux space. While the connection between criticality and the generation of solitary waves is well known, we find that the nonlinear properties of these bifurcating solitary waves are also determined by the properties of the criticality surfaces. To be specific, the case of two layers with a rigid lid is considered, and application of the theory to other multilayer flows is sketched.

  15. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Home Improvements Prevent Falls Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... and ensure your safety. "Safe-ty-fy" Your Home Some Questions for Your Provider Will my medicines ...

  16. ATLAAS-P2P: a two layer network solution for easing the resource discovery process in unstructured networks

    OpenAIRE

    Baraglia, Ranieri; Dazzi, Patrizio; Mordacchini, Matteo; Ricci, Laura

    2013-01-01

    ATLAAS-P2P is a two-layered P2P architecture for developing systems providing resource aggregation and approximated discovery in P2P networks. Such systems allow users to search the desired resources by specifying their requirements in a flexible and easy way. From the point of view of resource providers, this system makes available an effective solution supporting providers in being reached by resource requests.

  17. Preparation, structures and magnetic properties of Dy/Zr and Ho/Zr two-layers and multi-layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luche, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The first part of the report is devoted to the description of the ultra-vacuum evaporation equipment, to the sample preparation conditions and to the characterization of the two-layers and multi-layers through reflection and glancing incidence X diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. In the second part, the magnetic properties of the samples are studied and relations between properties and structures are examined. 37 fig., 35 ref

  18. Distributed Processing System for Restoration of Electric Power Distribution Network Using Two-Layered Contract Net Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yu; Hamagami, Tomoki

    Distributed processing system for restoration of electric power distribution network using two-layered CNP is proposed. The goal of this study is to develop the restoration system which adjusts to the future power network with distributed generators. The state of the art of this study is that the two-layered CNP is applied for the distributed computing environment in practical use. The two-layered CNP has two classes of agents, named field agent and operating agent in the network. In order to avoid conflicts of tasks, operating agent controls privilege for managers to send the task announcement messages in CNP. This technique realizes the coordination between agents which work asynchronously in parallel with others. Moreover, this study implements the distributed processing system using a de-fact standard multi-agent framework, JADE(Java Agent DEvelopment framework). This study conducts the simulation experiments of power distribution network restoration and compares the proposed system with the previous system. We confirmed the results show effectiveness of the proposed system.

  19. Laboratory Research of the Two-Layer Liquid Dynamics at the Wind Surge in a Strait Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Dotsenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of laboratory experiments in a straight aerohydrocanal of the rectangular cross-section filled with the two-layer (fresh-salty liquid are represented. The disturbance generator is the air flow directed to the area above the canal. The cases of the two-layer liquid dynamics in the canal with the horizontal flat bottom and in the presence of the bottom obstacle of finite width are considered. It is shown that during the surge in the straight canal, one of the possible exchange mechanisms on the boundary of fresh and salty layers may consist in the salt water emissions (resulted from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability to the upper freshwater layer. The subsequent eviction can possibly be accompanied by occurrence of undulations at the interface. Besides, the evictions can be followed by formation of the oscillating layer, i.e. the layer with maximum density gradient the oscillations of which propagate to the overlying layers. Presence of the bottom obstacle complicates the structure of the two-layer liquid motions. In particular, it results in emergence of the mixed layers and transformation of the flow behind the obstacle into a turbulent one, formation of the wave-like disturbances over the obstacle, sharp change of the interface position and occurrence of large-scale vortices with the horizontal axes. It is revealed that the maximum peak of the flow velocity horizontal component is shifted upstream from the obstacle.

  20. Effect of Dental Restorative Material Type and Shade on Characteristics of Two-Layer Dental Composite Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Karimzadeh

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of shade and material type and shape in dental polymer composites on the hardness and shrinkage stress of bulk and two-layered restoration systems. For this purpose, some bulk and layered specimens from three different shades of dental materials were prepared and light-cured. The experiments were carried out on three types of materials: conventional restorative composite, nanohybrid composite and nanocomposite. Micro-indentation experiment was performed on the bulk and also on each layer of layered restoration specimens using a Vicker's indenter. The interface between the two layers was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results revealed significant differences between the values of hardness for different shades in the conventional composite and also in the nanohybrid composite. However, no statistically significant difference was observed between the hardness values for different shades in the nanocomposite samples. The layered restoration specimens of different restorative materials exhibited lower hardness values with respect to their bulk specimens. The reduction in the hardness value of the layered conventional composite samples was higher than those of the nanocomposite and nanohybrid composite specimens indicating more shrinkage stresses generated in the conventional composite restorations. According to the SEM images, a gap was observed between the two layers in the layered restorations.

  1. Falls in older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dieën, Jaap H.; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    Falls are common incidents, which can have major con-sequences. For example, falls and the interrelated category of accidents being struck by or against objects account for more than 40% of injuries and 30% of injury costs in the USA (Corso et al., 2006). Especially among older adults, falls occur

  2. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  3. Fall Prevention: Simple Tips to Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a gentle exercise that involves slow and graceful dance-like movements. Such activities reduce the risk of ... healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/fall-prevention/art-20047358 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  4. Spatial variability of steady-state infiltration into a two-layer soil system on burned hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, D.A.; Moody, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Rainfall-runoff simulations were conducted to estimate the characteristics of the steady-state infiltration rate into 1-m2 north- and south-facing hillslope plots burned by a wildfire in October 2003. Soil profiles in the plots consisted of a two-layer system composed of an ash on top of sandy mineral soil. Multiple rainfall rates (18.4-51.2 mm h-1) were used during 14 short-duration (30 min) and 2 long-duration simulations (2-4 h). Steady state was reached in 7-26 min. Observed spatially-averaged steady-state infiltration rates ranged from 18.2 to 23.8 mm h-1 for north-facing and from 17.9 to 36.0 mm h-1 for south-facing plots. Three different theoretical spatial distribution models of steady-state infiltration rate were fit to the measurements of rainfall rate and steady-state discharge to provided estimates of the spatial average (19.2-22.2 mm h-1) and the coefficient of variation (0.11-0.40) of infiltration rates, overland flow contributing area (74-90% of the plot area), and infiltration threshold (19.0-26 mm h-1). Tensiometer measurements indicated a downward moving pressure wave and suggest that infiltration-excess overland flow is the runoff process on these burned hillslope with a two-layer system. Moreover, the results indicate that the ash layer is wettable, may restrict water flow into the underlying layer, and increase the infiltration threshold; whereas, the underlying mineral soil, though coarser, limits the infiltration rate. These results of the spatial variability of steady-state infiltration can be used to develop physically-based rainfall-runoff models for burned areas with a two-layer soil system. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Optical characterization of two-layered turbid media for non-invasive, absolute oximetry in cerebral and extracerebral tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertan Hallacoglu

    Full Text Available We introduce a multi-distance, frequency-domain, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS method to measure the optical coefficients of two-layered media and the thickness of the top layer from diffuse reflectance measurements. This method features a direct solution based on diffusion theory and an inversion procedure based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. We have validated our method through Monte Carlo simulations, experiments on tissue-like phantoms, and measurements on the forehead of three human subjects. The Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements have shown that, in ideal two-layered samples, our method accurately recovers the top layer thickness (L, the absorption coefficient (µ a and the reduced scattering coefficient (µ' s of both layers with deviations that are typically less than 10% for all parameters. Our method is aimed at absolute measurements of hemoglobin concentration and saturation in cerebral and extracerebral tissue of adult human subjects, where the top layer (layer 1 represents extracerebral tissue (scalp, skull, dura mater, subarachnoid space, etc. and the bottom layer (layer 2 represents cerebral tissue. Human subject measurements have shown a significantly greater total hemoglobin concentration in cerebral tissue (82±14 µM with respect to extracerebral tissue (30±7 µM. By contrast, there was no significant difference between the hemoglobin saturation measured in cerebral tissue (56%±10% and extracerebral tissue (62%±6%. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an inversion procedure in the frequency domain with six unknown parameters with no other prior knowledge is used for the retrieval of the optical coefficients and top layer thickness with high accuracy on two-layered media. Our absolute measurements of cerebral hemoglobin concentration and saturation are based on the discrimination of extracerebral and cerebral tissue layers, and they can enhance the impact of NIRS for cerebral hemodynamics and

  6. Meteorite falls in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiri, Fouad; Ibhi, Abderrahmane; Saint-Gerant, Thierry; Medjkane, Mohand; Ouknine, Lahcen

    2017-10-01

    The study of meteorites provides insight into the earliest history of our solar system. From 1800, about the year meteorites were first recognized as objects falling from the sky, until December 2014, 158 observed meteorite falls were recorded in Africa. Their collected mass ranges from 1.4 g to 175 kg with the 1-10 kg cases predominant. The average rate of African falls is low with only one fall recovery per 1.35-year time interval (or 0.023 per year per million km2). This African collection is dominated by ordinary chondrites (78%) just like in the worldwide falls. The seventeen achondrites include three Martian meteorite falls (Nakhla of Egypt, Tissint of Morocco and Zagami of Nigeria). Observed Iron meteorite falls are relatively rare and represent only 5%. The falls' rate in Africa is variable in time and in space. The number of falls continues to grow since 1860, 80% of which were recovered during the period between 1910 and 2014. Most of these documented meteorite falls have been recovered from North-Western Africa, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa. They are concentrated in countries which have a large surface area and a large population with a uniform distribution. Other factors are also favorable for observing and collecting meteorite falls across the African territory, such as: a genuine meteorite education, a semi-arid to arid climate (clear sky throughout the year most of the time), croplands or sparse grasslands and possible access to the fall location with a low percentage of forest cover and dense road network.

  7. Preventing falls in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-27

    Essential facts Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals, usually affecting older patients. Every year, more than 240,000 falls are reported in acute hospitals and mental health trusts in England and Wales, equivalent to more than 600 a day, according to the Royal College of Physicians (RCP). But research shows that when nurses, doctors and therapists work together, falls can be reduced by 20-30%.

  8. A two layer chaotic encryption scheme of secure image transmission for DCT precoded OFDM-VLC transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongpeng; Chen, Fangni; Qiu, Weiwei; Chen, Shoufa; Ren, Dongxiao

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a two-layer image encryption scheme for a discrete cosine transform (DCT) precoded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) visible light communication (VLC) system is proposed. Firstly, in the proposed scheme the transmitted image is first encrypted by a chaos scrambling sequence,which is generated from the hybrid 4-D hyper- and Arnold map in the upper-layer. After that, the encrypted image is converted into digital QAM modulation signal, which is re-encrypted by chaos scrambling sequence based on Arnold map in physical layer to further enhance the security of the transmitted image. Moreover, DCT precoding is employed to improve BER performance of the proposed system and reduce the PAPR of OFDM signal. The BER and PAPR performances of the proposed system are evaluated by simulation experiments. The experiment results show that the proposed two-layer chaos scrambling schemes achieve image secure transmission for image-based OFDM VLC. Furthermore, DCT precoding can reduce the PAPR and improve the BER performance of OFDM-based VLC.

  9. Regional evapotranspiration estimation based on a two-layer remote-sensing scheme in Shahe River basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Jian; Wang, Huixiao

    2014-01-01

    Land surface evapotranspiration (ET) derived from remote sensing data has significant meaning for plant growth monitoring, crop yield assessment, disaster monitoring and understanding energy and water cycle in river basin area and surrounding regions. In the study, we developed a land surface ET remote sensing retrieval system to estimate the daily ET in Shahe river basin using the TM/ETM+ images. The system is based on the two-layer ET model and includes three parts: inversion of the evaporation ration using two-layer model, calculation of total daily net radiation, and estimation of daily ET based on evaporation fraction method. The results show that the average daily ET is about 2.28mm of the typical days in spring, and 2.97mm in summer, 1.59mm in autumn, and 0.5mm in winter. The ET in upstream areas covered by forest is higher than that in the downstream covered by settlement and farmland. In summer the difference of ET between the upper reaches and lower reaches is smaller compared to the other three seasons. The measurements by large aperture scintillometer and eddy correlation instrument were used for validation. By comparing the observed data with the estimated data, we found the estimation system had a high precision with the relative error between 0 and 16% (mean error of 11.1%), and the variance 0.77mm

  10. Preparation and evaluation of tamsulosin hydrochloride sustained-release pellets modified by two-layered membrane techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingmin Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop tamsulosin hydrochloride sustained-release pellets using two-layered membrane techniques. Centrifugal granulator and fluidized-bed coater were employed to prepare drug-loaded pellets and to employ two-layered membrane coating respectively. The prepared pellets were evaluated for physicochemical characterization, subjected to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and in vitro release of different pH. Different release models and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were utilized to analyze the release mechanism of Harnual® and home-made pellets. By comparing the dissolution profiles, the ratio and coating weight gain of Eudragit® NE30D and Eudragit® L30D55 which constitute the inside membrane were identified as 18:1 and 10%–11%. The coating amount of outside membrane containing Eudragit® L30D55 was determined to be 0.8%. The similarity factors (f2 of home-made capsule and commercially available product (Harnual® were above 50 in different dissolution media. DSC studies confirmed that drug and excipients had good compatibility and SEM photographs showed the similarities and differences of coating surface between Harnual® and self-made pellets before and after dissolution. According to Ritger-Peppas model, the two dosage form had different release mechanism.

  11. Equivalent circuit models of two-layer flexure beams with excitation by temperature, humidity, pressure, piezoelectric or piezomagnetic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Marschner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-layer flexure beams often serve as basic transducers in actuators and sensors. In this paper a generalized description of their stimuli-influenced mechanical behavior is derived. For small deflection angles this description includes a multi-port circuit or network representation with lumped elements for a beam part of finite length. A number of coupled finite beam parts model the dynamic behavior including the first natural frequencies of the beam. For piezoelectric and piezomagnetic interactions, reversible transducer models are developed. The piezomagnetic two-layer beam model is extended to include solenoid and planar coils. Linear network theory is applied in order to determine network parameters and to simplify the circuit representation. The resulting circuit model is the basis for a fast simulation of the dynamic system behavior with advanced circuit simulators and, thus, the optimization of the system. It is also a useful tool for understanding and explaining this multi-domain system through basic principles of general system theory.

  12. ATLAS-TPX: a two-layer pixel detector setup for neutron detection and radiation field characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, B.; Caicedo, I.; Pospisil, S.; Vykydal, Z.; Leroy, C.

    2016-01-01

    A two-layer pixel detector setup (ATLAS-TPX), designed for thermal and fast neutron detection and radiation field characterization is presented. It consists of two segmented silicon detectors (256 × 256 pixels, pixel pitch 55 μm, thicknesses 300 μm and 500 μm) facing each other. To enhance the neutron detection efficiency a set of converter layers is inserted in between these detectors. The pixelation and the two-layer design allow a discrimination of neutrons against γs by pattern recognition and against charged particles by using the coincidence and anticoincidence information. The neutron conversion and detection efficiencies are measured in a thermal neutron field and fast neutron fields with energies up to 600 MeV. A Geant4 simulation model is presented, which is validated against the measured detector responses. The reliability of the coincidence and anticoincidence technique is demonstrated and possible applications of the detector setup are briefly outlined.

  13. Falls and comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese Sara Høj; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Sahlberg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To compare nationwide time trends and mortality in hip and proximal humeral fractures; to explore associations between incidences of falls risk related comorbidities (FRICs) and incidence of fractures. METHODS: The study is a retrospective cohort study using nationwide Danish administrative....... CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the overall reduction in fractures can be explained by reduction in falls related comorbidity....

  14. An update on falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, B.R.; Steijns, J.A.G.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review: Falls among elderly persons create immense social problems because of their association with physical decline, serious psychosocial consequences, negative impact on the quality of life, and markedly reduced survival. In addition, falls pose high costs to the public health service.

  15. An update on falls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, B.R.; Steijns, J.A.G.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Falls among elderly persons create immense social problems because of their association with physical decline, serious psychosocial consequences, negative impact on the quality of life, and markedly reduced survival. In addition, falls pose high costs to the public health service.

  16. First Aid: Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Folleto de instructiones: Caídas (Falls) With all the running, climbing, and exploring kids do, it's no surprise that falls are common. Although many result in mild bumps, cuts, and bruises, some can cause serious injuries that need immediate medical attention. What to Do ...

  17. The spin-3/2 Ising model AFM/AFM two-layer lattice with crystal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yigit, A.; Albayrak, E.

    2010-01-01

    The spin-3/2 Ising model is investigated for the case of antiferromagnetic (AFM/AFM) interactions on the two-layer Bethe lattice by using the exact recursion relations in a pairwise approach for given coordination numbers q=3, 4 and 6 when the layers are under the influences of equal external magnetic and equal crystal fields. The ground state (GS) phase diagrams are obtained on the different planes in detail and then the temperature dependent phase diagrams of the system are calculated accordingly. It is observed that the system presents both second- and first-order phase transitions for all q, therefore, tricritical points. It was also found that the system exhibits double-critical end points and isolated points. The model also presents two Neel temperatures, TN, and the existence of which leads to the reentrant behavior.

  18. Two-layer radio frequency MEMS fractal capacitors in PolyMUMPS for S-band applications

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2012-07-23

    In this Letter, the authors fabricate for the first time MEMS fractal capacitors possessing two layers and compare their performance characteristics with the conventional parallel-plate capacitor and previously reported state-of-the-art single-layer MEMS fractal capacitors. Explicitly, a capacitor with a woven structure and another with an interleaved configuration were fabricated in the standard PolyMUMPS surface micromachining process and tested at S-band frequencies. The self-resonant frequencies of the fabricated capacitors were close to 10GHz, which is better than that of the parallel-plate capacitor, which measured only 5.5GHz. Further, the presented capacitors provided a higher capacitance when compared with the state-of-the-art-reported MEMS fractal capacitors created using a single layer at the expense of a lower quality factor. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  19. Two-layer optical model of skin for early, non-invasive detection of wound development on the diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudovsky, Dmitry; Nouvong, Aksone; Schomacker, Kevin; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-02-01

    Foot ulceration is a debilitating comorbidity of diabetes that may result in loss of mobility and amputation. Optical detection of cutaneous tissue changes due to inflammation and necrosis at the preulcer site could constitute a preventative strategy. A commercial hyperspectral oximetry system was used to measure tissue oxygenation on the feet of diabetic patients. A previously developed predictive index was used to differentiate preulcer tissue from surrounding healthy tissue with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 80%. To improve prediction accuracy, an optical skin model was developed treating skin as a two-layer medium and explicitly accounting for (i) melanin content and thickness of the epidermis, (ii) blood content and hemoglobin saturation of the dermis, and (iii) tissue scattering in both layers. Using this forward model, an iterative inverse method was used to determine the skin properties from hyperspectral images of preulcerative areas. The use of this information in lowering the false positive rate was discussed.

  20. Improved lumped models for transient combined convective and radiative cooling of a two-layer spherical fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Alice Cunha da; Su, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a fourth generation thermal nuclear reactor, graphite-moderated and helium cooled. The HTGRs have important characteristics making essential the study of these reactors, as well as its fuel element. Examples of these are: high thermal efficiency,low operating costs and construction, passive safety attributes that allow implication of the respective plants. The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a HTGR with spherical fuel elements that named the reactor. This fuel element is composed by a particulate region with spherical inclusions, the fuel UO2 particles, dispersed in a graphite matrix and a convective heat transfer by Helium happens on the outer surface of the fuel element. In this work, the transient heat conduction in a spherical fuel element of a pebble-bed high temperature reactor was studied in a transient situation of combined convective and radiative cooling. Improved lumped parameter model was developed for the transient heat conduction in the two-layer composite sphere subjected to combined convective and radiative cooling. The improved lumped model was obtained through two-point Hermite approximations for integrals. Transient combined convective and radiative cooling of the two-layer spherical fuel element was analyzed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed lumped model, with respect to die rent values of the Biot number, the radiation-conduction parameter, the dimensionless thermal contact resistance, the dimensionless inner diameter and coating thickness, and the dimensionless thermal conductivity. It was shown by comparison with numerical solution of the original distributed parameter model that the improved lumped model, with H2,1/H1,1/H0,0 approximation yielded significant improvement of average temperature prediction over the classical lumped model. (author)

  1. Geriatric fall-related injuries.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The majority of geriatric fall-related injuries were due to fall from the same level at home. Assessment of risk fac- tors for falls including home hazards is essential for prevention of geriatric fall-related injuries. Keywords: Accidental fall, geriatrics, injury, trauma registry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v16i2.24.

  2. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  3. Catapults fall short

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Marcus

    2018-01-01

    In reply to the news story "UK Catapults fall short, claims review of technology centres", which describes an independent review that criticized the management of the UK's network of technology innovation centres.

  4. Survival of falling robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-01-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  5. Survival of falling robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jonathan M.; Arkin, Ronald C.

    1992-02-01

    As mobile robots are used in more uncertain and dangerous environments, it will become important to design them so that they can survive falls. In this paper, we examine a number of mechanisms and strategies that animals use to withstand these potentially catastrophic events and extend them to the design of robots. A brief survey of several aspects of how common cats survive falls provides an understanding of the issues involved in preventing traumatic injury during a falling event. After outlining situations in which robots might fall, a number of factors affecting their survival are described. From this background, several robot design guidelines are derived. These include recommendations for the physical structure of the robot as well as requirements for the robot control architecture. A control architecture is proposed based on reactive control techniques and action-oriented perception that is geared to support this form of survival behavior.

  6. Changing the thickness of two layers: i-ZnO nanorods, p-Cu2O and its influence on the carriers transport mechanism of the p-Cu2O/i-ZnO nanorods/n-IGZO heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Nguyen Huu; Trinh, Le Thi Tuyet; Phung, Pham Kim; Loan, Phan Thi Kieu; Tuan, Dao Anh; Truong, Nguyen Huu; Tran, Cao Vinh; Hung, Le Vu Tuan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two layers: i-ZnO nanorods and p-Cu2O were fabricated by electrochemical deposition. The fabricating process was the initial formation of ZnO nanorods layer on the n-IGZO thin film which was prepared by sputtering method, then a p-Cu2O layer was deposited on top of rods to form the p-Cu2O/i-ZnO nanorods/n-ZnO heterojunction. The XRD, SEM, UV-VIS, I-V characteristics methods were used to define structure, optical and electrical properties of these heterojunction layers. The fabricating conditions and thickness of the Cu2O layers significantly affected to the formation, microstructure, electrical and optical properties of the junction. The length of i-ZnO nanorods layer in the structure of the heterojunction has strongly affected to the carriers transport mechanism and performance of this heterojunction.

  7. Ellipsometric investigations of pyrolytically deposited thin indium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, U.

    1980-01-01

    Ellipsometric measurements have been carried out of thin indium oxide films deposited pyrolytically on glass substrates. It was found that the roughness of the films affected the measuring results. Therefore, only after applying a two-layer model a reasonable interpretation of the measuring results became possible

  8. Thin and Broadband Two-Layer Microwave Absorber in 4-12 GHz with Developed Flaky Cobalt Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Neeraj; Singh, Jaydeep; Puthucheri, Smitha; Singh, Dharmendra

    2018-03-01

    Microwave absorbing materials (MAMs) in the frequency range of 2.0-18.0 GHz are essential for the stealth and communication applications. Researchers came up with effective MAMs for the higher frequency regions, i.e., 8.0-18.0 GHz, while absorbers with comparable properties in the lower frequency band are still not in the limelight. Designing a MAM for the lower frequency range is a critical task. It is known that the factors governing the absorption in this frequency predominantly depend on the permeability and conductivity of the material, whereas the shape anisotropy of the particles can initiate different absorption mechanisms like multiple internal reflections, phase cancellations, surface charge polarization and enhanced conductivity that can promote the microwave absorption towards lower frequencies. But the material alone may not serve the purpose of getting broad absorption bandwidth. With the effective use of advanced electromagnetic technique like multi-layering this problem may be solved. Therefore, in this paper, a material with shape anisotropy (cobalt flakes with high shape anisotropy) has been prepared and a two-layer structure is developed which gives the absorption bandwidth in 4.17-12.05 GHz at a coating thickness of 2.66 mm.

  9. TargetCrys: protein crystallization prediction by fusing multi-view features with two-layered SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Han, Ke; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing-Yu; Shen, Hong-Bin; Yu, Dong-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The accurate prediction of whether a protein will crystallize plays a crucial role in improving the success rate of protein crystallization projects. A common critical problem in the development of machine-learning-based protein crystallization predictors is how to effectively utilize protein features extracted from different views. In this study, we aimed to improve the efficiency of fusing multi-view protein features by proposing a new two-layered SVM (2L-SVM) which switches the feature-level fusion problem to a decision-level fusion problem: the SVMs in the 1st layer of the 2L-SVM are trained on each of the multi-view feature sets; then, the outputs of the 1st layer SVMs, which are the "intermediate" decisions made based on the respective feature sets, are further ensembled by a 2nd layer SVM. Based on the proposed 2L-SVM, we implemented a sequence-based protein crystallization predictor called TargetCrys. Experimental results on several benchmark datasets demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed 2L-SVM for fusing multi-view features. We also compared TargetCrys with existing sequence-based protein crystallization predictors and demonstrated that the proposed TargetCrys outperformed most of the existing predictors and is competitive with the state-of-the-art predictors. The TargetCrys webserver and datasets used in this study are freely available for academic use at: http://csbio.njust.edu.cn/bioinf/TargetCrys .

  10. Quasi-two-layer morphodynamic model for bedload-dominated problems: bed slope-induced morphological diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2018-02-01

    We derive a two-layer depth-averaged model of sediment transport and morphological evolution for application to bedload-dominated problems. The near-bed transport region is represented by the lower (bedload) layer which has an arbitrarily constant, vanishing thickness (of approx. 10 times the sediment particle diameter), and whose average sediment concentration is free to vary. Sediment is allowed to enter the upper layer, and hence the total load may also be simulated, provided that concentrations of suspended sediment remain low. The model conforms with established theories of bedload, and is validated satisfactorily against empirical expressions for sediment transport rates and the morphodynamic experiment of a migrating mining pit by Lee et al. (1993 J. Hydraul. Eng. 119 , 64-80 (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1993)119:1(64))). Investigation into the effect of a local bed gradient on bedload leads to derivation of an analytical, physically meaningful expression for morphological diffusion induced by a non-zero local bed slope. Incorporation of the proposed morphological diffusion into a conventional morphodynamic model (defined as a coupling between the shallow water equations, Exner equation and an empirical formula for bedload) improves model predictions when applied to the evolution of a mining pit, without the need either to resort to special numerical treatment of the equations or to use additional tuning parameters.

  11. Forced phase-locked states and information retrieval in a two-layer network of oscillatory neurons with directional connectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazantsev, Victor; Pimashkin, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    We propose two-layer architecture of associative memory oscillatory network with directional interlayer connectivity. The network is capable to store information in the form of phase-locked (in-phase and antiphase) oscillatory patterns. The first (input) layer takes an input pattern to be recognized and their units are unidirectionally connected with all units of the second (control) layer. The connection strengths are weighted using the Hebbian rule. The output (retrieved) patterns appear as forced-phase locked states of the control layer. The conditions are found and analytically expressed for pattern retrieval in response on incoming stimulus. It is shown that the system is capable to recover patterns with a certain level of distortions or noises in their profiles. The architecture is implemented with the Kuramoto phase model and using synaptically coupled neural oscillators with spikes. It is found that the spiking model is capable to retrieve patterns using the spiking phase that translates memorized patterns into the spiking phase shifts at different time scales

  12. Inverse estimation for temperatures of outer surface and geometry of inner surface of furnace with two layer walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Su, C.-R.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an inverse analysis to estimate the boundary thermal behavior of a furnace with two layer walls. The unknown temperature distribution of the outer surface and the geometry of the inner surface were estimated from the temperatures of a small number of measured points within the furnace wall. The present approach rearranged the matrix forms of the governing differential equations and then combined the reversed matrix method, the linear least squares error method and the concept of virtual area to determine the unknown boundary conditions of the furnace system. The dimensionless temperature data obtained from the direct problem were used to simulate the temperature measurements. The influence of temperature measurement errors upon the precision of the estimated results was also investigated. The advantage of this approach is that the unknown condition can be directly solved by only one calculation process without initially guessed temperatures, and the iteration process of the traditional method can be avoided in the analysis of the heat transfer. Therefore, the calculation in this work is more rapid and exact than the traditional method. The result showed that the estimation error of the geometry increased with increasing distance between measured points and inner surface and in preset error, and with decreasing number of measured points. However, the geometry of the furnace inner surface could be successfully estimated by only the temperatures of a small number of measured points within and near the outer surface under reasonable preset error

  13. Experimental study of core bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR based on a two-layer block model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huhu, E-mail: huhuwang@tamu.edu; Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu; Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis, E-mail: elvisdom@tamu.edu

    2016-09-15

    Bypass flow in a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) plays an important role in determining the coolant distribution in the core region. Efficient removal of heat from the core relies on the majority of coolant passing through the coolant channels instead of the bypass gaps. Consequently, the bypass flow fraction and its flow characteristic are important in the design process of the prismatic VHTR. The objective of this study is to experimentally investigate the flow behavior including the turbulence characteristics inside the bypass gaps using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), bypass fraction and pressure drops in the system. The experiment facility constructed at Texas A&M University is a scaled model consisting of two layers of fuel blocks. The distributions of the mean streamwise velocity, turbulence intensity and turbulence kinetic energy within the bypass gap at two different elevations under different Reynolds number were investigated. Uncertainties in the bypass flow fraction estimation were evaluated. The velocity and turbulence study in this work is considered to be unique, and may serve as a benchmark for the related numerical calculations.

  14. Quasi-two-layer morphodynamic model for bedload-dominated problems: bed slope-induced morphological diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.

    2018-02-01

    We derive a two-layer depth-averaged model of sediment transport and morphological evolution for application to bedload-dominated problems. The near-bed transport region is represented by the lower (bedload) layer which has an arbitrarily constant, vanishing thickness (of approx. 10 times the sediment particle diameter), and whose average sediment concentration is free to vary. Sediment is allowed to enter the upper layer, and hence the total load may also be simulated, provided that concentrations of suspended sediment remain low. The model conforms with established theories of bedload, and is validated satisfactorily against empirical expressions for sediment transport rates and the morphodynamic experiment of a migrating mining pit by Lee et al. (1993 J. Hydraul. Eng. 119, 64-80 (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(1993)119:1(64))). Investigation into the effect of a local bed gradient on bedload leads to derivation of an analytical, physically meaningful expression for morphological diffusion induced by a non-zero local bed slope. Incorporation of the proposed morphological diffusion into a conventional morphodynamic model (defined as a coupling between the shallow water equations, Exner equation and an empirical formula for bedload) improves model predictions when applied to the evolution of a mining pit, without the need either to resort to special numerical treatment of the equations or to use additional tuning parameters.

  15. The neurobiology of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Alfonso; Plotnik, Meir; Bove, Francesco; Berardelli, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    Falling is a major clinical problem; especially, in elderly population as it often leads to fractures, immobilization, poor quality of life and life-span reduction. Given the growing body of evidences on the physiopathology of balance disorders in humans, in recent years the approach of research on falls has completely changed and new instruments and new definitions have been formulated. Among them, the definition of "idiopathic faller" (i.e. no overt cause for falling in a given subject) represented a milestone in building the "science of falling". This review deals with the new determinants of the neurobiology of falling: (1) the role of motor impairment and particularly of those "mild parkinsonian signs" frequently detectable in elderly subjects, (2) the role of executive and attentive resources when coping with obstacles, (3) the role of vascular lesions in "highest level gait disorder" (a condition tightly connected with senile gait, cautious gait and frailty), (4) the role of the failure of automaticity or inter-limbs coordination/symmetry during walking and such approach would definitely help the development of screening instrument for subjects at risk (still lacking in present days). This translational approach will lead to the development of specific therapeutic interventions.

  16. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    moves from low preparation temperature to high preparation temperature. The amorphous .... nm and the interac- tion between the pi-electron clouds of the two layers re- .... sp2 configuration forms to minimize stress and making. C900 films ...

  17. Fall Prevention Hits Stumbling Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Charlotte

    2018-03-01

    Implementation of efforts to screen older people for fall risk-and to intervene before falls occur-have been scattershot at best. Ongoing studies of fall prevention called STRIDE (Strategies to Reduce Injuries and Develop Confidence in Elders) might change that. The studies look at whether clinicians can implement a fall-prevention program across rural, urban, and suburban treatment settings.

  18. An analytical model for solute transport through a GCL-based two-layered liner considering biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, C.; Xie, H.J.; Wang, Y.Z.; Chen, Y.M.; Jiang, Y.S.; Tang, X.W.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model for solute advection and dispersion in a two-layered liner consisting of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and a soil liner (SL) considering the effect of biodegradation was proposed. The analytical solution was derived by Laplace transformation and was validated over a range of parameters using the finite-layer method based software Pollute v7.0. Results show that if the half-life of the solute in GCL is larger than 1 year, the degradation in GCL can be neglected for solute transport in GCL/SL. When the half-life of GCL is less than 1 year, neglecting the effect of degradation in GCL on solute migration will result in a large difference of relative base concentration of GCL/SL (e.g., 32% for the case with half-life of 0.01 year). The 100-year solute base concentration can be reduced by a factor of 2.2 when the hydraulic conductivity of the SL was reduced by an order of magnitude. The 100-year base concentration was reduced by a factor of 155 when the half life of the contaminant in the SL was reduced by an order of magnitude. The effect of degradation is more important in approving the groundwater protection level than the hydraulic conductivity. The analytical solution can be used for experimental data fitting, verification of complicated numerical models and preliminary design of landfill liner systems. - Highlights: •Degradation of contaminants was considered in modeling solute transport in GCL/SL. •Analytical solutions were derived for assessment of GCL/SL with degradation. •Degradation in GCL can be ignored as half-life is larger than 1 year. •Base concentration is more sensitive to half-life of SL than to permeability of SL

  19. An analytical model for solute transport through a GCL-based two-layered liner considering biodegradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, C. [Institute of Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xie, H.J., E-mail: xiehaijian@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Soft Soils and Geoenvironmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wang, Y.Z.; Chen, Y.M.; Jiang, Y.S.; Tang, X.W. [MOE Key Laboratory of Soft Soils and Geoenvironmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model for solute advection and dispersion in a two-layered liner consisting of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and a soil liner (SL) considering the effect of biodegradation was proposed. The analytical solution was derived by Laplace transformation and was validated over a range of parameters using the finite-layer method based software Pollute v7.0. Results show that if the half-life of the solute in GCL is larger than 1 year, the degradation in GCL can be neglected for solute transport in GCL/SL. When the half-life of GCL is less than 1 year, neglecting the effect of degradation in GCL on solute migration will result in a large difference of relative base concentration of GCL/SL (e.g., 32% for the case with half-life of 0.01 year). The 100-year solute base concentration can be reduced by a factor of 2.2 when the hydraulic conductivity of the SL was reduced by an order of magnitude. The 100-year base concentration was reduced by a factor of 155 when the half life of the contaminant in the SL was reduced by an order of magnitude. The effect of degradation is more important in approving the groundwater protection level than the hydraulic conductivity. The analytical solution can be used for experimental data fitting, verification of complicated numerical models and preliminary design of landfill liner systems. - Highlights: •Degradation of contaminants was considered in modeling solute transport in GCL/SL. •Analytical solutions were derived for assessment of GCL/SL with degradation. •Degradation in GCL can be ignored as half-life is larger than 1 year. •Base concentration is more sensitive to half-life of SL than to permeability of SL.

  20. Testing the Two-Layer Model for Correcting Near Cloud Reflectance Enhancement Using LES SHDOM Simulated Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Levy, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A transition zone exists between cloudy skies and clear sky; such that, clouds scatter solar radiation into clear-sky regions. From a satellite perspective, it appears that clouds enhance the radiation nearby. We seek a simple method to estimate this enhancement, since it is so computationally expensive to account for all three-dimensional (3-D) scattering processes. In previous studies, we developed a simple two-layer model (2LM) that estimated the radiation scattered via cloud-molecular interactions. Here we have developed a new model to account for cloud-surface interaction (CSI). We test the models by comparing to calculations provided by full 3-D radiative transfer simulations of realistic cloud scenes. For these scenes, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-like radiance fields were computed from the Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method (SHDOM), based on a large number of cumulus fields simulated by the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) large eddy simulation (LES) model. We find that the original 2LM model that estimates cloud-air molecule interactions accounts for 64 of the total reflectance enhancement and the new model (2LM+CSI) that also includes cloud-surface interactions accounts for nearly 80. We discuss the possibility of accounting for cloud-aerosol radiative interactions in 3-D cloud-induced reflectance enhancement, which may explain the remaining 20 of enhancements. Because these are simple models, these corrections can be applied to global satellite observations (e.g., MODIS) and help to reduce biases in aerosol and other clear-sky retrievals.

  1. Fear of falling as seen in the Multidisciplinary falls consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaxatte, C; Nguyen, T; Chourabi, F; Salleron, J; Pardessus, V; Delabrière, I; Thévenon, A; Puisieux, F

    2011-06-01

    Fear of falling may be as debilitating as the fall itself, leading to a restriction in activities and even a loss of autonomy. The main objective was to evaluate the prevalence of the fear of falling among elderly fallers. The secondary objectives were to determine the factors associated with the fear of falling and evaluate the impact of this fear on the activity "getting out of the house". Prospective study conducted between 1995 and 2006 in which fallers and patients at high risk for falling were seen at baseline by the multidisciplinary falls consultation team (including a geriatrician, a neurologist and a physical medicine and rehabilitation physician) and then, again 6 month later, by the same geriatrician. The fear of falling was evaluated with a yes/no question: "are you afraid of falling?". Out of 635 patients with a mean age of 80.6 years, 502 patients (78%) expressed a fear of falling. Patients with fear of falling were not older than those who did not report this fear, but the former were mostly women (Pfear of falling were not going out alone as much as the fearless group (31% vs 53%, Pfearful group admitted to avoiding going out because they were afraid of falling. The strong prevalence of the fear of falling observed in this population and its consequences in terms of restricted activities justifies systematically screening for it in fallers or patients at risk for falling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Women's perspectives on falls and fall prevention during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Dorothy; Naninni, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injury in women. During pregnancy, even a minor fall can result in adverse consequences. Evidence to inform effective and developmentally appropriate pregnancy fall prevention programs is lacking. Early research on pregnancy fall prevention suggests that exercise may reduce falls. However, acceptability and effectiveness of pregnancy fall prevention programs are untested. To better understand postpartum women's perspective and preferences on fall prevention strategies during pregnancy to formulate an intervention. Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 31 postpartum women using descriptive qualitative methodology. Discussion of falls during pregnancy and fall prevention strategies was guided by a focus group protocol and enhanced by 1- to 3-minute videos on proposed interventions. Focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo 10 software. Emerging themes were environmental circumstances and physical changes of pregnancy leading to a fall, prevention strategies, barriers, safety concerns, and marketing a fall prevention program. Wet surfaces and inappropriate footwear commonly contributed to falls. Women preferred direct provider counseling and programs including yoga and Pilates. Fall prevention strategies tailored to pregnant women are needed. Perspectives of postpartum women support fall prevention through provider counseling and individual or supervised exercise programs.

  3. Fall Back Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppe, J.; Borm, P.E.M.; Hendrickx, R.L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Fall back equilibrium is a refinement of the Nash equilibrium concept. In the underly- ing thought experiment each player faces the possibility that, after all players decided on their action, his chosen action turns out to be blocked. Therefore, each player has to decide beforehand on a back-up

  4. Production of Steel Casts in Two-Layer Moulds with Alkaline Binders Part 2. Facing sand with the alkaline organic binder REZOLIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper constitutes the second part of the article concerning the implementation of the two-layer mould technology for steel casts inZ.M. POMET. The results of the laboratory examinations of the backing sand with the inorganic binder RUDAL were presented in thefirst part of the paper. Whereas in the second part the results of the laboratory testing of the facing sand with the alkaline resin REZOLITare given. The technology of two-layer moulds was already implemented in Z.M. POMET within the target project. Examples of castingsmade in this technology are shown in the final part of this paper.

  5. Falls following discharge after an in-hospital fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessler Lori A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are among the most common adverse events reported in hospitalized patients. While there is a growing body of literature on fall prevention in the hospital, the data examining the fall rate and risk factors for falls in the immediate post-hospitalization period has not been well described. The objectives of the present study were to determine the fall rate of in-hospital fallers at home and to explore the risk factors for falls during the immediate post-hospitalization period. Methods We identified patients who sustained a fall on one of 16 medical/surgical nursing units during an inpatient admission to an urban community teaching hospital. After discharge, falls were ascertained using weekly telephone surveillance for 4 weeks post-discharge. Patients were followed until death, loss to follow up or end of study (four weeks. Time spent rehospitalized or institutionalized was censored in rate calculations. Results Of 95 hospitalized patients who fell during recruitment, 65 (68% met inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. These subjects contributed 1498 person-days to the study (mean duration of follow-up = 23 days. Seventy-five percent were African-American and 43% were women. Sixteen patients (25% had multiple falls during hospitalization and 23 patients (35% suffered a fall-related injury during hospitalization. Nineteen patients (29% experienced 38 falls at their homes, yielding a fall rate of 25.4/1,000 person-days (95% CI: 17.3-33.4. Twenty-three patients (35% were readmitted and 3(5% died. One patient experienced a hip fracture. In exploratory univariate analysis, persons who were likely to fall at home were those who sustained multiple falls in the hospital (p = 0.008. Conclusion Patients who fall during hospitalization, especially on more than one occasion, are at high risk for falling at home following hospital discharge. Interventions to reduce falls would be appropriate to test in this high-risk population.

  6. Diagnosis and Tests: Evaluating a Fall or Risk of Falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a physical therapist, who can evaluate your fall risk. If your healthcare provider concludes that you are ... to check for things that can impact your fall risk, such as electrolyte balance and the possibility of ...

  7. Falling and fall risk in adult patients with severe haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Hanna; Schmolders, Jan; Koob, Sebastian; Bornemann, Rahel; Goldmann, Georg; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pennekamp, Peter; Strauss, Andreas C

    2017-05-10

    The objective of this study was to define fall rates and to identify possible fall risk factors in adult patients with severe haemophilia. 147 patients with severe haemophilia A and B were evaluated using a standardized test battery consisting of demographic, medical and clinical variables and fall evaluation. 41 (27.9 %) patients reported a fall in the past 12 months, 22 (53.7 %) of them more than once. Young age, subjective gait insecurity and a higher number of artificial joints seem to be risk factors for falling. Falls seem to be a common phenomenon in patients with severe haemophilia. Fall risk screening and fall prevention should be implemented into daily practice.

  8. The clinical practice guideline for falls and fall risk

    OpenAIRE

    Vance, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Falling is a significant cause of injury and death in frail older adults. Residents in long-term care (LTC) facilities fall for a variety of reasons and are more likely to endure injuries after a fall than those in the community The American Medical Directors Association (AMDA) Clinical Practice Guideline is written to give LTC staff an understanding of risk factors for falls and provide guidance for a systematic approach to patient assessment and selection of appropriate interventions. It is...

  9. Urban fall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia de Almeida Valsecchi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the repercussion of falls in the elderly peoplewho live in the city of São Paulo and address - though synthetically- some questions regarding the city and its relation to aging and thequality of life of the elderly. Methods: This is a qualitative study. As fordata collection, “in-depth individual interviews” were applied. Selectionof subjects was guided by a procedure named as “network”. Results:Ten interviews were performed, nine with elderly individuals who werevictims of falls and one with a public authority representative. Dataresulting from interviews confirmed that significant changes occurin live of the elderly, who are victims of what has been called “urbantraps”, and that, by extrapolating mobility and dependence contexts,invade feelings, emotions and desires. The inappropriate environmentprovided by the city of São Paulo is confirmed by absence of adequateurban planning and lack of commitment of public authorities. It alsorevealed that the particular way of being old and living an elderlylife, in addition to right to citizenship, is reflected by major or lesserdifficulties imposed to the elderly to fight for their rights and have theirpublic space respected. Conclusion: The city of São Paulo is not anideal locus for an older person to live in. To the traps that are found inpublic places one can add those that are found in private places andthat contribute to the hard experience of falls among the elderly, anexperience that is sometimes fatal. In Brazil, the attention is basicallyfocused on the consequences of falls and not on prevention, by meansof urban planning that should meet the needs of the most vulnerablegroups - the physically disabled and the elderly.

  10. Using a two-layered sphere model to investigate the impact of gas vacuoles on the inherent optical properties of Microcystis aeruginosa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matthews, MW

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-layered sphere model is used to investigate the impact of gas vacuoles on the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of the cyanophyte Microcystis aeruginosa. Enclosing a vacuole-like particle within a chromatoplasm shell layer significantly...

  11. Fall prevention in older persons

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weak muscles, poor vision, psychotropic medications ... with increased risk of falls.[3]. Building on the .... [8] First eye cataract surgery has ... of users of bifocals in which half the subjects .... falls of providing single lens distance vision glasses.

  12. Fall prevention walker during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kian Sek; E, Chun Zhi; Saim, Hashim; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Khialdin, Safinaz Binti Mohd; Isa, Hazlita; Awad, M. I.; Soon, Chin Fhong

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes on the design of a walker for the prevention of falling among elderlies or patients during rehabilitation whenever they use a walker to assist them. Fall happens due to impaired balance or gait problem. The assistive device is designed by applying stability concept and an accelerometric fall detection system is included. The accelerometric fall detection system acts as an alerting device that acquires body accelerometric data and detect fall. Recorded accelerometric data could be useful for further assessment. Structural strength of the walker was verified via iterations of simulation using finite element analysis, before being fabricated. Experiments were conducted to identify the fall patterns using accelerometric data. The design process and detection of fall pattern demonstrates the design of a walker that could support the user without fail and alerts the helper, thus salvaging the users from injuries due to fall and unattended situation.

  13. Preventing Falls and Related Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... slowed reflexes. Drinking alcoholic beverages also increases the risk of falling. Alcohol slows reflexes and response time; causes dizziness, sleepiness, or lightheadedness; alters balance; and encourages risky behaviors that can lead to falls. The Force and Direction of a Fall The ...

  14. Childhood Falls With Occipital Impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, Norrell; van Rijn, Rick R.; Starling, Suzanne P.

    2017-01-01

    Falls are commonly reported in children who present with both accidental and inflicted brain injuries. Short falls rarely result in serious or life-threatening injuries. Our purpose is to describe a series of cases of short falls with occipital impact leading to subdural hemorrhage (SDH). We present

  15. The falls and the fear of falling among elderly institutionalized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Almeida

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study it is intended to characterize the history of falls and to evaluate the fear to fall in aged institutionalized. The sample is composed for 113 institutionalized aged people, 32 men and 81 women with a average 82,96 ± 7,03 age of years. The data had been collected by means of a questionnaire and statistical analyzed (descriptive statistics, parametric tests - Test T and Anova - Test U-Mann Whitney, and Test of Kruskal-Wallis – and the Test of Tukey. The results point in the direction of that the women present a bigger number of falls (24.8% and greater fear to fall (Med=55. The falls had occurred in its majority in the context of the room of the institutions. It was verified that people who had at least a fall experience present greater fear to fall comparatively (Med=55 with that they had not the same had no incident of fall in period of time (Med=77. Our results come to strengthen the hypothesis of the changeable sex to be able to be considered a factor of fall risk. Aged that they present a history of falls seems to be more vulnerable to develop the fear to fall.

  16. Mitigating fall risk: A community fall reduction program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso, Humberto; McCaffrey, Ruth G; Taylor, David W M

    One fourth of all American's over 65 years of age fall each year. Falls are a common and often devastating event that can pose a serious health risk for older adults. Healthcare providers are often unable to spend the time required to assist older adults with fall risk issues. Without a team approach to fall prevention the system remains focused on fragmented levels of health promotion and risk prevention. The specific aim of this project was to engage older adults from the community in a fall risk assessment program, using the Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths & Injuries (STEADI) program, and provide feedback on individual participants' risks that participants could share with their primary care physician. Older adults who attended the risk screening were taking medications that are known to increase falls. They mentioned that their health care providers do not screen for falls and appreciated a community based screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Falls and cerebellar ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Damulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the main causes of falls. Whatever their cause is, falls may lead to severe maladjustment in everyday life. In nearly 1 out of 10 cases, they are accompanied by severe injuries, including fractures (most commonly those of the proximal femur and humerus, hands, pelvic bones, and vertebrae, subdural hematoma, and severe soft tissue and head injuries. This process is emphasized to be multifactorial. Particular emphasis is laid on the involvement of the cerebellum and its associations, which may be accompanied by falls. This is clinically manifested mainly by gait disorders. Walking is a result of an interaction of three related functions (locomotion, maintenance of balance and adaptive reactions. In addition to synergies related to locomotion and balance maintenance, standing at rest and walking are influenced bythe following factors: postural and environmental information (proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual, the capacity to interpret and integrate this information, the ability of the musculoskeletal system to make movements, and the capability to optimally modulate these movements in view of the specific situation and the ability to choose and adapt synergy in terms of external factors and the capacities and purposes of an individual. The clinical signs of damage to the cerebellum and its associations are considered in detail. These structures are emphasized to be involved not only in movements, but also in cognitive functions. The major symptoms that permit cerebellar dysfunction to be diagnosed are given. Symptoms in cerebellar injuries are generally most pronounced when suddenly changing the direction of movements or attempting to start walking immediately after a dramatic rise. The magnitude of ataxia also increases in a patient who tries to decrease the step size. Falling tendencies or bending to one side (in other symptoms characteristic of cerebellar diseases suggest injury of the corresponding

  18. United We Fall

    OpenAIRE

    Whiles, Annie; Pearson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Standpoint is pleased to present new drawings, objects and film by Mark Pearson and Annie Whiles. The artists share an interest in the emblematic: re-negotiating visual structures that signify affiliation and commemoration. Things such as crests, mascots, badges and motifs that reflect activities, rituals and artifacts that might be attached to a clubhouse or headquarters, church or local pub.\\ud \\ud As both artists move their ‘HQ’ into the gallery you will be invited to contemplate works tha...

  19. New horizons in fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Stephen R; Close, Jacqueline C T

    2018-04-25

    Falls pose a major threat to the well-being and quality of life of older people. Falls can result in fractures and other injuries, disability and fear and can trigger a decline in physical function and loss of autonomy. This article synthesises recent published findings on fall risk and mobility assessments and fall prevention interventions and considers how this field of research may evolve in the future. Fall risk topics include the utility of remote monitoring using wearable sensors and recent work investigating brain activation and gait adaptability. New approaches for exercise for fall prevention including dual-task training, cognitive-motor training with exergames and reactive step training are discussed. Additional fall prevention strategies considered include the prevention of falls in older people with dementia and Parkinson's disease, drugs for fall prevention and safe flooring for preventing fall-related injuries. The review discusses how these new initiatives and technologies have potential for effective fall prevention and improved quality of life. It concludes by emphasising the need for a continued focus on translation of evidence into practice including robust effectiveness evaluations of so that resources can be appropriately targeted into the future.

  20. [Can falls be prevented?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubousset, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Most recommendations and measures intended to prevent falls focus on the elderly (see HAS guideline of April 2009) but, in our opinion, this isfar too late: prevention must begin much earlier, not only by identifying persons at risk, but also by providing personalized lifestyle advice adapted to each individual's biomechanical, somatic, neurological and biological characteristics. The first preventive measure is to identify a possible deterioration of balance, starting with a physical examination at the age of 45 and repeated regularly throughout life. Extrinsic preventive measures focusing on the domestic and external environments are clearly necessary. But what is most important is to detect and, if necessary, correct any degradation of intrinsic (intracorporeal or somatic) factors starting at the age of 45 years; these include vision, vestibular function and balance, proprioception, and psychological and neurological status. Chronic illnesses and their treatments must also be taken into account: treatment must be limited to indispensable drugs; sedative psychotropics must be avoided if possible; and polymedication must be tightly controlled, as it is a major risk factor for falls. Prevention also requires a diet sufficiently rich in protein, calcium and vitamin D3 (to prevent osteoporosis), and regular daily exercise adapted to the individual, if possible associated with a simultaneous cognitive task. The last key point is the absolute need for thorough functional rehabilitation after any accidental or medical trauma, regardless of age, with the aim of restoring functional status to that existing prior to the accident.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, and photocatalytic activity of a new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase, Li2CaTa2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Zhenhua; Tang Kaibin; Shao Qian; Li Guocan; Zeng Suyuan; Zheng Huagui

    2008-01-01

    A new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 has been synthesized for the first time. The detailed structure determination of Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 performed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron microscopy (ED) shows that it crystallizes in the space group Fmmm [a∼5.5153(1), b∼5.4646(1), c∼18.2375(3)A]. UV-visible diffuse reflection spectrum of the prepared Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 indicates that it had absorption in the UV region. The photocatalytic activity of the Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 powders was evaluated by degradation of RhB molecules in water under ultra visible light irradiation. The results showed that Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 has high photocatalytic activity at room temperature. Therefore, the preparation and properties studies of Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 with a two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper structure suggest potential future applications in photocatalysis. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of a two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 A new two-layer Ruddlesden-Popper phase Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 has been synthesized for the first time. Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 crystallizes in the space group Fmmm determined by powder X-ray and electron diffraction. UV-visible diffuse reflection spectra and the photocatalytic degradation of RhB molecules in water under ultra visible light irradiation show that Li 2 CaTa 2 O 7 is a potential material in photocatalysis

  2. Discrete ordinates solution of coupled conductive radiative heat transfer in a two-layer slab with Fresnel interfaces subject to diffuse and obliquely collimated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muresan, Cristian; Vaillon, Rodolphe; Menezo, Christophe; Morlot, Rodolphe

    2004-01-01

    The coupled conductive radiative heat transfer in a two-layer slab with Fresnel interfaces subject to diffuse and obliquely collimated irradiation is solved. The collimated and diffuse components problems are treated separately. The solution for diffuse radiation is obtained by using a composite discrete ordinates method and includes the development of adaptive directional quadratures to overcome the difficulties usually encountered at the interfaces. The complete radiation numerical model is validated against the predictions obtained by using the Monte Carlo method

  3. High-Sensitive Two-Layer Photoresistors Based on p-Cd x Hg1- x Te with a Converted Near-Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailov, N. D.; Talipov, N. Kh.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    The results of an experimental study of photoelectric characteristics of two-layer photoresistors based on p-Cd x Hg1- x Te (x = 0.24-0.28) with a thin near-surface layer of n-type obtained by treatment in atmospheric gas plasma are presented. It is shown that the presence of a potential barrier between the p- and n-regions causes high photosensitivity and speed of operation of such photoresistors at T = 77 K

  4. A two-layer application of the MAGIC model to predict the effects of land use scenarios and reductions in deposition on acid sensitive soils in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Helliwell

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-layer application of the catchment-based soil and surface water acidification model, MAGIC, was applied to 21 sites in the UK Acid Waters Monitoring Network (AWAMN, and the results were compared with those from a one-layer application of the model. The two-layer model represented typical soil properties more accurately by segregating the organic and mineral horizons into two separate soil compartments. Reductions in sulphur (S emissions associated with the Second S Protocol and different forestry (land use scenarios were modelled, and their effects on soil acidification evaluated. Soil acidification was assessed in terms of base saturation and critical loads for the molar ratio of base cations (CA2+ + MG 2+ + K+ to aluminium (Al in soil solution. The results of the two-layer application indicate that base saturation of the organic compartment was very responsive to changes in land use and deposition compared with the mineral soil. With the two- layer model, the organic soil compartment was particularly sensitive to acid deposition, which resulted in the critical load being predicted to be exceeded at eight sites in 1997 and two sites in 2010. These results indicate that further reductions in S deposition are necessary to raise the base cation (BC:Al ratio above the threshold which is harmful to tree roots. At forested sites BC:Al ratios were generally well below the threshold designated for soil critical loads in Europe and forecasts indicate that forest replanting can adversely affect the acid status of sensitive term objectives of protecting and sustaining soil and water quality. Policy formulation must seek to protect the most sensitive environmental receptor, in this case organic soils. It is clear, therefore, that simply securing protection of surface waters, via the critical loads approach, may not ensure adequate protection of low base status organic soils from the effects of acidification.

  5. High-Sensitive Two-Layer Photoresistors Based on p-Cd x Hg1-x Te with a Converted Near-Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismailov, N. D.; Talipov, N. Kh.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.

    2018-04-01

    The results of an experimental study of photoelectric characteristics of two-layer photoresistors based on p-Cd x Hg1-x Te (x = 0.24-0.28) with a thin near-surface layer of n-type obtained by treatment in atmospheric gas plasma are presented. It is shown that the presence of a potential barrier between the p- and n-regions causes high photosensitivity and speed of operation of such photoresistors at T = 77 K

  6. Issues in Geriatric Care: Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dipesh; Ackermann, Richard J

    2018-05-01

    One in three older adults falls each year. There are approximately 2.5 million falls among older adults treated in emergency departments. Falls account for 87% of all fractures in this age group. The biggest risk factor for falling is a history of falls. Other risk factors include frailty, sedative and anticholinergic drugs, polypharmacy, and a variety of medical conditions. Current recommendations are that all patients age 65 years and older should be asked about falls each year. Patients also can be screened for fall risk with a variety of approaches including questionnaires and the Timed Up & Go test. For patients who have fallen or are at risk, care should focus on correcting reversible home environmental factors that predispose to falls, minimizing the use of drugs with sedating properties, addressing vision conditions, recommending physical exercise (including balance, strength, and gait training), and managing postural hypotension as well as foot conditions and footwear. In addition, vitamin D and calcium supplementation should be considered. For patients needing anticoagulation for medical reasons, an assessment must balance fall risk (and thus bleeding from a fall) versus the risk of discontinuing anticoagulation (eg, sustaining an embolic stroke from atrial fibrillation). Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  7. Activist or Terrorist? Negotiating Discourses of Eco-Terror in "If a Tree Falls"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jade

    2018-01-01

    Environmentalist voices like the Earth Liberation Front have been labeled "eco-terrorists." The 2011 documentary film "If a Tree Falls" explores how "eco-terrorism" troubles the unstable border between activism and terrorism. This essay offers a textual analysis of the film's negotiation of the activism/terrorism…

  8. Electromagnetic field analyses of two-layer power transmission cables consisting of coated conductors with magnetic and non-magnetic substrates and AC losses in their superconductor layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahata, Masaaki; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic field analyses were undertaken using two representative cross sections of two-layer cables consisting of coated conductors with magnetic and non-magnetic substrates. The following two arrangements were used for the coated conductors between the inner and outer layers: (1) tape-on-tape and (2) alternate. The calculated magnetic flux profile around each coated conductor was visualized. In the case of the non-magnetic substrate, the magnetic field to which coated conductors in the outer layer are exposed contains more perpendicular component to the conductor wide face (perpendicular field component) when compared to that in the inner layer. On the other hand, for the tape-on-tape arrangement of coated conductors with a magnetic substrate, the reverse is true. In the case of the alternate arrangement of the coated conductor with a magnetic substrate, the magnetic field to which the coated conductors in the inner and outer layers are exposed experiences a small perpendicular field component. When using a non-magnetic substrate, the AC loss in the superconductor layer of the coated conductors in the two-layer cables is dominated by that in the outer layer, whereas the reverse is true in the case of a magnetic substrate. When comparing the AC losses in superconductor layers of coated conductors with non-magnetic and magnetic substrates in two-layer cables, the latter is larger than the former, but the influence of the magnetism of substrates on AC losses in superconductor layers is not remarkable

  9. Ratiometric glucose sensing based on fluorescent oxygen films and glucose oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Fengyu Su; Liqiang Zhang; Xiangxing Kong; Fred Lee; Yanqing Tian; Deirdre R. Meldrum

    2017-01-01

    A new two-layer sensor film was constructed for sensing glucose based on glucose oxidase and oxygen sensing material. The first layer of film containing the oxygen sensor and intra-reference material was polymerized, then the second layer of glucose oxidase and glutaraldehyde was formed on the oxygen sensor layer. The two-layer sensor film has a resolution up to 0.05 mM and a detection range from 0 to 5 mM to glucose. The effects of pH and temperature on the sensing performance were systemati...

  10. NMR imaging of water uptake in multilayer polymeric films : stressing the role of mechanical stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baukh, V.; Huinink, H.P.; Adan, O.C.G.; Erich, S.J.F.; Ven, van der L.G.J.

    2010-01-01

    The penetration of water into two-layer polymeric films of a hydrophilic base layer and hydrophobic top layer plays an important role in their performance. Little is known about the coupled effects of water uptake and stress in such films. To study such interactive phenomena, time-dependent

  11. Fall prevention in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Hauge, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    that the number of hospitalization after a fall injury will become an even greater task for the Danish hospitals, The aim of the study was to show if there is a relationship between physically frail elderly nursing home resident’s subjective evaluation of fall-risk and an objective evaluation of their balance....... Further, to suggest tools for fall prevention in nursing home settings on the basis of the results of this study and the literature. A quantitative method inspired by the survey method was used to give an overview of fall patterns, subjective and objective evaluations of fallrisk. Participants were 16...... physically frail elderly nursing home residents from three different nursing homes. Measures: a small staff-questionnaire about incidences and places where the participants had falling-episodes during a 12 month period, The Falls Effi cacy Scale Swedish version (FES(S)) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) Results...

  12. Film Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Larry M.; Atwater, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Reviews four Human Sexuality films and videos. These are: "Personal Decisions" (Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 1985); "The Touch Film" (Sterling Production, 1986); "Rethinking Rape" (Film Distribution Center, 1985); "Not A Love Story" (National Film Board of Canada, 1981). (AEM)

  13. A piece of paper falling faster than free fall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, F; Rivera, R

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls with acceleration g. To test if the paper falls behind the book in a nearly free fall motion or if it is dragged by the book, we designed a version of this experiment that includes a ball and a piece of paper over a book that is forced to fall using elastic cords. We recorded a video of our experiment using a high-speed video camera at 300 frames per second that shows that the book and the paper fall faster than the ball, which falls well behind the book with an acceleration approximately equal to g. Our experiment shows that the piece of paper is dragged behind the book and therefore the paper and book demonstration should not be used to show that all objects fall with acceleration g independently of their mass.

  14. A piece of paper falling faster than free fall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, F; Rivera, R, E-mail: fvera@ucv.cl [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de ValparaIso, Av. Universidad 330, Curauma, ValparaIso (Chile)

    2011-09-15

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls with acceleration g. To test if the paper falls behind the book in a nearly free fall motion or if it is dragged by the book, we designed a version of this experiment that includes a ball and a piece of paper over a book that is forced to fall using elastic cords. We recorded a video of our experiment using a high-speed video camera at 300 frames per second that shows that the book and the paper fall faster than the ball, which falls well behind the book with an acceleration approximately equal to g. Our experiment shows that the piece of paper is dragged behind the book and therefore the paper and book demonstration should not be used to show that all objects fall with acceleration g independently of their mass.

  15. Monolithic growth of partly cured polydimethylsiloxane thin film layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2014-01-01

    at different curing times. The monolithic films are investigated by rheology, scanning electron microscope, mechanical testing, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The morphology, mechanical and dielectric properties, as well...... to enable interlayer crosslinking reactions either by application of an adhesion promoter or by ensuring that there are reactive, complementary sites available on the two surfaces. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used polymer for DEAPs. In this work, two-layered PDMS films are adhered together...... as thermal stabilities of the bilayer elastomer films are observed to change with the curing time of the monolayers before lamination. The objective of this work is to create adhesion of two layers without destroying the original viscoelastic properties of the PDMS films, and hence enable, for example...

  16. Thermal diffusivity of diamond films using a laser pulse technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albin, S.; Winfree, W.P.; Crews, B.S.

    1990-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process. A laser pulse technique was developed to measure the thermal diffusivity of diamond films deposited on a silicon substrate. The effective thermal diffusivity of a diamond film on silicon was measured by observing the phase and amplitude of the cyclic thermal waves generated by laser pulses. An analytical model is presented to calculate the effective inplane (face-parallel) diffusivity of a two-layer system. The model is used to reduce the effective thermal diffusivity of the diamond/silicon sample to a value for the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of the diamond film

  17. Preventing Falls in Older Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Lainie Van Voast; Mire, L Glen

    2017-08-15

    The American Geriatrics Society and British Geriatrics Society recommend that all adults older than 65 years be screened annually for a history of falls or balance impairment. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and American Academy of Family Physicians recommend exercise or physical therapy and vitamin D supplementation to prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults who are at increased risk of falls. Although the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and American Academy of Family Physicians do not recommend routine multifactorial intervention to prevent falls in all community-dwelling older adults, they state that it may be appropriate in individual cases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed an algorithm to aid in the implementation of the American Geriatrics Society/British Geriatrics Society guideline. The algorithm suggests assessment and multifactorial intervention for those who have had two or more falls or one fall-related injury. Multifactorial interventions should include exercise, particularly balance, strength, and gait training; vitamin D supplementation with or without calcium; management of medications, especially psychoactive medications; home environment modification; and management of postural hypotension, vision problems, foot problems, and footwear. These interventions effectively decrease falls in the community, hospital, and nursing home settings. Fall prevention is reimbursed as part of the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit.

  18. Fall prevention in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-05-01

    Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a

  19. Influence of the solid-gas interface on the effective thermal parameters of a two-layer structure in photoacoustic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, N Munoz; Perez, L MartInez; Garibay-Febles, V; Lozada-Cassou, M

    2004-01-01

    From the theoretical point of view, the influence of the solid-gas interface on the effective thermal parameters in a two-layer structure of the photoacoustic technique is discussed. It is shown that the effective thermal parameters depend strongly upon the thermal resistance value associated with the solid-gas interface. New expressions for the effective thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in the low frequency limit are obtained. In the high frequency limit, the 'resonant' behaviour of the effective thermal diffusivity is maintained and a new complex dependence on frequency of the effective thermal conductivity is shown

  20. Geriatric fall-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefny, Ashraf F; Abbas, Alaa K; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2016-06-01

    Falls are the leading cause of geriatric injury. We aimed to study the anatomical distribution, severity, and outcome of geriatric fall-related injuries in order to give recommendations regarding their prevention. All injured patients with an age ≥ 60 years who were admitted to Al-Ain Hospital or died in the Emergency Department due to falls were prospectively studied over a four year period. We studied 92 patients. Fifty six of them (60.9%) were females. The mean (standard deviation) of age was 72.2 (9.6) years. Seventy three (89%) of all incidents occurred at home. Eighty three patients (90.2%) fell on the same level. The median (range) ISS was 4 (1-16) and the median GCS (range) was 15 (12-15). The lower limb was the most common injured body region (63%). There were no statistical significant differences between males and females regarding age, ISS, and hospital stay (p = 0.85, p = 0.57, and p = 0.35 respectively). The majority of geriatric fall-related injuries were due to fall from the same level at home. Assessment of risk factors for falls including home hazards is essential for prevention of geriatric fall-related injuries.

  1. Cowlitz Falls fish passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system

  2. Community College Estimated Growth: Fall 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippe, Kent; Mullin, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    A survey from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) found that enrollment growth in fall 2010 slowed its pace at community colleges, increasing 3.2% from the previous year. This contrasts with more dramatic increases in recent years: more than 11% between fall 2008 and fall 2009, and nearly 17% between fall 2007 and fall 2009,…

  3. Efficient calculation of potential distribution in two-layer earth; Niso kozo daichikei ni okeru denki tansa no tame no koritsuteki den`i keisan shuho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, M; Okamoto, Y [Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Endo, M; Noguchi, K [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Teramachi, Y; Akabane, H [University of Industrial Technology, Kanagawa (Japan); Agu, M [Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    An efficient calculation method of potential distribution in the presence of an embedded body in multi-layer earth has been proposed by expanding the method of image with a consideration of multiple reflection between the ground surface and each underground boundary. For this method, when solving boundary integral equation with the potential of embedded body surface as only one unknown, i.e., when obtaining discretization equation, ordinary boundary element program developed for analyzing the finite closed region can be used. As an example, numerical calculation was conducted for the two-layer earth. The analysis expression of potential distribution in the case of the certain embedded body in two-layer earth has never published. Accordingly, the calculated results were compared with those by the integral equation method. As a result, it was concluded that the primary potential obtained from the present method agreed well with that obtained from the integral equation method. However, there was a disregarded difference in the secondary potential. For confirming the effectiveness, it was necessary to compare with another numerical calculation method, such as finite element method. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  4. A two-layered diffusion model traces the dynamics of information processing in the valuation-and-choice circuit of decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piu, Pietro; Fargnoli, Francesco; Innocenti, Alessandro; Rufa, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    A circuit of evaluation and selection of the alternatives is considered a reliable model in neurobiology. The prominent contributions of the literature to this topic are reported. In this study, valuation and choice of a decisional process during Two-Alternative Forced-Choice (TAFC) task are represented as a two-layered network of computational cells, where information accrual and processing progress in nonlinear diffusion dynamics. The evolution of the response-to-stimulus map is thus modeled by two linked diffusive modules (2LDM) representing the neuronal populations involved in the valuation-and-decision circuit of decision making. Diffusion models are naturally appropriate for describing accumulation of evidence over the time. This allows the computation of the response times (RTs) in valuation and choice, under the hypothesis of ex-Wald distribution. A nonlinear transfer function integrates the activities of the two layers. The input-output map based on the infomax principle makes the 2LDM consistent with the reinforcement learning approach. Results from simulated likelihood time series indicate that 2LDM may account for the activity-dependent modulatory component of effective connectivity between the neuronal populations. Rhythmic fluctuations of the estimate gain functions in the delta-beta bands also support the compatibility of 2LDM with the neurobiology of DM.

  5. Rehabilitation after falls and fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionyssiotis, Y; Dontas, I A; Economopoulos, D; Lyritis, G P

    2008-01-01

    Falls are one of the most common geriatric problems threatening the independence of older persons. Elderly patients tend to fall more often and have a greater tendency to fracture their bones. Fractures occur particularly in osteoporotic people due to increased bone fragility, resulting in considerable reduction of quality of life, morbidity, and mortality. This article provides information for the rehabilitation of osteoporotic fractures pertaining to the rehabilitation of the fractured patient, based on personal experience and literature. It also outlines a suggested effective and efficient clinical strategy approach for preventing falls in individual patients.

  6. Falls: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and relationship to fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Sarah D; Miller, Ram R

    2008-12-01

    Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury and disability. Most falls result from an interaction between individual characteristics that increase an individual's propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, comorbidities such as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and dementia, psychotropic medications, and certain types of footwear. Fewer studies have focused on acute precipitating factors, but environmental and situational factors are clearly important to fall risk. Approximately 30% of falls result in an injury that requires medical attention, with fractures occurring in approximately 10%. In addition to the risk factors for falls, the fall descent, fall impact, and bone strength are all important determinants of whether a fall will result in a fracture. In recent years, numerous studies have been directed toward the development of effective fall and fall-related fracture prevention interventions.

  7. Free Falling in Stratified Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Try; Vincent, Lionel; Kanso, Eva

    2017-11-01

    Leaves falling in air and discs falling in water are examples of unsteady descents due to complex interaction between gravitational and aerodynamic forces. Understanding these descent modes is relevant to many branches of engineering and science such as estimating the behavior of re-entry space vehicles to studying biomechanics of seed dispersion. For regularly shaped objects falling in homogenous fluids, the motion is relatively well understood. However, less is known about how density stratification of the fluid medium affects the falling behavior. Here, we experimentally investigate the descent of discs in both pure water and in stable linearly stratified fluids for Froude numbers Fr 1 and Reynolds numbers Re between 1000 -2000. We found that stable stratification (1) enhances the radial dispersion of the disc at landing, (2) increases the descent time, (3) decreases the inclination (or nutation) angle, and (4) decreases the fluttering amplitude while falling. We conclude by commenting on how the corresponding information can be used as a predictive model for objects free falling in stratified fluids.

  8. Epidemiology of falls in older age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Nancye May

    2011-03-01

    Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of population aging. The magnitude of the problem is described in terms of the classification of falls and measurement of outcomes, including fall incidence rates across settings, sociodemographic determinants, international trends, and costs of falls and fall-related injuries. Finally, public health approaches to minimize falls risk and consequent demand on health care resources are suggested.

  9. Falls and patient safety for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovitch, Sharon A

    2006-10-01

    The risk of falling increases with age. Falls in the elderly have been found to raise mortality and morbidity rates and are a leading cause of premature admission to long-term care facilities. Attention to known intrinsic and extrinsic factors that predispose to falling is important in community dwelling and institutionalized older adults. New government guidelines for long-term care facilities have helped focus attention on the safety aspect of fall risk and information about the physical and psychological impact of falling is increasing. Implementation of fall prevention protocols, including the use of fall risk assessment tools, may help reduce the incidence of falls and resultant complications.

  10. Fall prevention in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-01-01

    Summary Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment

  11. Nonlinear thermo-optical properties of two-layered spherical system of gold nanoparticle core and water vapor shell during initial stage of shell expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astafyeva Liudmila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nonlinear thermo-optical properties of two-layered spherical system of gold nanoparticle core and water vapor shell, created under laser heating of nanoparticle in water, were theoretically investigated. Vapor shell expansion leads to decreasing up to one to two orders of magnitude in comparison with initial values of scattering and extinction of the radiation with wavelengths 532 and 633 nm by system while shell radius is increased up to value of about two radii of nanoparticle. Subsequent increasing of shell radius more than two radii of nanoparticle leads to rise of scattering and extinction properties of system over initial values. The significant decrease of radiation scattering and extinction by system of nanoparticle-vapor shell can be used for experimental detection of the energy threshold of vapor shell formation and investigation of the first stages of its expansion. PACS: 42.62.BE. 78.67. BF

  12. Label-free logic modules and two-layer cascade based on stem-loop probes containing a G-quadruplex domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yahui; Cheng, Junjie; Wang, Jine; Zhou, Xiaodong; Hu, Jiming; Pei, Renjun

    2014-09-01

    A simple, versatile, and label-free DNA computing strategy was designed by using toehold-mediated strand displacement and stem-loop probes. A full set of logic gates (YES, NOT, OR, NAND, AND, INHIBIT, NOR, XOR, XNOR) and a two-layer logic cascade were constructed. The probes contain a G-quadruplex domain, which was blocked or unfolded through inputs initiating strand displacement and the obviously distinguishable light-up fluorescent signal of G-quadruplex/NMM complex was used as the output readout. The inputs are the disease-specific nucleotide sequences with potential for clinic diagnosis. The developed versatile computing system based on our label-free and modular strategy might be adapted in multi-target diagnosis through DNA hybridization and aptamer-target interaction. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Ratiometric glucose sensing based on fluorescent oxygen films and glucose oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyu Su

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A new two-layer sensor film was constructed for sensing glucose based on glucose oxidase and oxygen sensing material. The first layer of film containing the oxygen sensor and intra-reference material was polymerized, then the second layer of glucose oxidase and glutaraldehyde was formed on the oxygen sensor layer. The two-layer sensor film has a resolution up to 0.05 mM and a detection range from 0 to 5 mM to glucose. The effects of pH and temperature on the sensing performance were systematically investigated. The selective detection of glucose among other monosaccharides, such as fructose, mannose and galactose indicated that the sensing film has excellent selectivity. The prepared sensor was successfully applied for glucose sample detection of glucose concentration in artificial tears. Keywords: Glucose sensor, Glucose oxidase, Fluorescence, Oxygen film, Diabetes

  14. Catching a Falling Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    . Comets are another important source of meteoroids and perhaps the most spectacular. After many visits near the Sun, a comet "dirty-snowball" nucleus of ice and dust decays and fragments, leaving a trail of meteoroids along its orbit. Some "meteoroid streams" cross the earth's orbit and when our planet passes through them, some of these particles will enter the atmosphere. The outcome is a meteor shower - the most famous being the "Perseids" in the month of August [2] and the "Leonids" in November. Thus, although meteors are referred to as "shooting" or "falling stars" in many languages, they are of a very different nature. More information The research presented in this paper is published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science, Vol. 39, Nr. 4, p. 1, 2004 ("Spectroscopic anatomy of a meteor trail cross section with the ESO Very Large Telescope", by P. Jenniskens et al.). Notes [1] The team is composed of Peter Jenniskens (SETI Institute, USA), Emmanuël Jehin (ESO), Remi Cabanac (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile), Christophe Laux (Ecole Centrale de Paris, France), and Iain Boyd (University of Michigan, USA). [2] The maximum of the Perseids is expected on August 12 after sunset and should be easily seen.

  15. Falls in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Yvette Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Falls in Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are common. 50 % of moderately affected PD patients sustained two or more falls during a prospective follow-up of 6 months. During a 3 month period 40 % of HD patients reported one or more fall. Many falls resulted in minor injuries and 42 % of

  16. A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls…

  17. Patient centered fall risk awareness perspectives: clinical correlates and fall risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Background While objective measures to assess risk of falls in older adults have been established; the value of patient self-reports in the context of falls is not known. Objectives To identify clinical correlates of patient centered fall risk awareness, and their validity for predicting falls. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting and Participants 316 non-demented and ambulatory community-dwelling older adults (mean age 78 years, 55% women). Measurements Fall risk awareness was assessed with a two-item questionnaire, which asked participants about overall likelihood and personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. Incident falls were recorded over study follow-up. Results Fifty-three participants (16.8%) responded positively to the first fall risk awareness question about being likely to have a fall in the next 12 months, and 100 (31.6%) reported being at personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. There was only fair correlation (kappa 0.370) between responses on the two questions. Prior falls and depressive symptoms were associated with positive responses on both fall risk awareness questions. Age and other established fall risk factors were not associated with responses on both fall risk awareness questions. The fall risk awareness questionnaire did not predict incident falls or injurious falls. Conclusion Fall risk awareness is low in older adults. While patient centered fall risk awareness is not predictive of falls, subjective risk perceptions should be considered when designing fall preventive strategies as they may influence participation and behaviors. PMID:27801936

  18. Falls prevention for the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Lühmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention.Research questions: The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years, living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Methods: Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT, the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed.Results: Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the

  19. Falls: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Relationship to Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Sarah D.; Miller, Ram

    2008-01-01

    Falls are common in the elderly, and frequently result in injury, disability, and institutionalization. Although the causes of falls are complex, most falls result from an interaction between individual characteristics that increase an individual's propensity to fall and acute mediating risk factors that provide the opportunity to fall. Predisposing risk factors include age-associated changes in strength and balance, age-associated comorbidities such as osteoarthritis, visual impairment and d...

  20. Estimation of available water capacity components of two-layered soils using crop model inversion: Effect of crop type and water regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelash, K.; Buis, Samuel; Sekhar, M.; Ruiz, Laurent; Kumar Tomer, Sat; Guérif, Martine

    2017-03-01

    Characterization of the soil water reservoir is critical for understanding the interactions between crops and their environment and the impacts of land use and environmental changes on the hydrology of agricultural catchments especially in tropical context. Recent studies have shown that inversion of crop models is a powerful tool for retrieving information on root zone properties. Increasing availability of remotely sensed soil and vegetation observations makes it well suited for large scale applications. The potential of this methodology has however never been properly evaluated on extensive experimental datasets and previous studies suggested that the quality of estimation of soil hydraulic properties may vary depending on agro-environmental situations. The objective of this study was to evaluate this approach on an extensive field experiment. The dataset covered four crops (sunflower, sorghum, turmeric, maize) grown on different soils and several years in South India. The components of AWC (available water capacity) namely soil water content at field capacity and wilting point, and soil depth of two-layered soils were estimated by inversion of the crop model STICS with the GLUE (generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation) approach using observations of surface soil moisture (SSM; typically from 0 to 10 cm deep) and leaf area index (LAI), which are attainable from radar remote sensing in tropical regions with frequent cloudy conditions. The results showed that the quality of parameter estimation largely depends on the hydric regime and its interaction with crop type. A mean relative absolute error of 5% for field capacity of surface layer, 10% for field capacity of root zone, 15% for wilting point of surface layer and root zone, and 20% for soil depth can be obtained in favorable conditions. A few observations of SSM (during wet and dry soil moisture periods) and LAI (within water stress periods) were sufficient to significantly improve the estimation of AWC

  1. Development and feasibility of falls prevention advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten-Krouwel, Diny; Schuurmans, Marieke; Emmelot-Vonk, Mariëlle; Pel-Littel, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the feasibility of nursing falls prevention advice and factors influencing feasibility. The frequency and seriousness of falls in hospitalised patients are underestimated, and such falls should be preventable because of the presence of professionals. A best practice-based falls prevention advice was developed to decrease the incidence of secondary falls and the incidence of primary falls in the long term and to increase the knowledge of nurses about falls prevention and the seriousness of falls. A descriptive, explorative study. Feasibility of the advice for 30 patients was assessed 82 times (theoretically, three times per patient) by observation and by interviewing nurses, patients and their families. The falls prevention advice was used in 48% of the assessments. There was a difference in use between interventions. Interventions that required more knowledge, communication and extra activities were implemented the least. The absence of materials and knowledge about falls prevention were important determinants of the non-implementation of certain interventions. Before falls prevention advice is implemented, it is important to educate nurses about falls, communication skills and implementation of the advice. The falls prevention advice might help nurses to prevent falls and increase their knowledge about falls prevention. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret…

  3. Trapping fall armyworm in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is a noctuid pest of row and vegetable crops throughout the Americas. It has recently invaded Africa and has been identified from almost all sub-Saharan countries. There is a strong expectation of significant damage to African maize crop yield and a high likel...

  4. Nuclear fall-out shelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    An underground nuclear fall-out shelter has a plastics shell which, apart from service and access openings, is waterproof and provided, if desired, with a concrete roof. The shelter has an access opening, an air system, lighting, water storage, sanitation and sewage facilities. (author)

  5. Falling-sphere radioactive viscometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R. de.

    1987-01-01

    In this work the falling sphere viscometric method was studies experimentally using a sphere tagged with 198 Au radiosotopo, the objective being the demosntration of the advantages of this technique in relation to the traditional method. The utilisation of the falling radioactive sphere permits the point-point monitoring of sphere position as a function of count rate. The fall tube wall and end effects were determined by this technique. Tests were performed with spheres of different diameters in four tubes. The application of this technique demosntrated the wall and end effects in sphere speed. The case of sphere fall in the steady slow regime allowed the determination of the terminal velocity, showing the increase of botton end effect as the sphere approaches the tube base. In the case the transient slow regime, the sphere was initially in a state of respose near the top surface. The data obtained show the influence of the free surface and wall on the sphere acceleration. These experimental data were applied to the Basset equation on order to verify the behaviour of the terms in this equation. (author) [pt

  6. Exercises to help prevent falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help prevent falls because it can: Make your muscles stronger and more flexible Improve your balance Increase how ... To make your calves and ankle muscles stronger: Hold on to a solid ... of a chair. Stand with your back straight and slightly bend ...

  7. Finding Rising and Falling Words

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong Kim Sang, E.

    2016-01-01

    We examine two different methods for finding rising words (among which neologisms) and falling words (among which archaisms) in decades of magazine texts (millions of words) and in years of tweets (billions of words): one based on correlation coefficients of relative frequencies and time, and one

  8. AAAI 1993 Fall Symposium Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Levinson, Robert; Epstein, Susan; Terveen, Loren; Bonasso, R. Peter; Miller, David P.; Bowyer, Kevin; Hall, Lawrence

    1994-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1993 Fall Symposium Series on October 22-24 in Raleigh, North Carolina. This article contains summaries of the six symposia that were conducted: Automated Deduction in Nonstandard Logics; Games: Planning and Learning; Human-Computer Collaboration: Reconciling Theory, Synthesizing Practice; Instantiating Intelligent Agents; and Machine Learning and Computer Vision: What, Why, and How?

  9. Person-Centered Fall Risk Awareness Perspectives: Clinical Correlates and Fall Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe

    2016-12-01

    To identify clinical correlates of person-centered fall risk awareness and their validity for predicting falls. Prospective cohort study. Community. Ambulatory community-dwelling older adults without dementia (N = 316; mean age 78, 55% female). Fall risk awareness was assessed using a two-item questionnaire that asked participants about overall likelihood of someone in their age group having a fall and their own personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. Incident falls were recorded over study follow-up. Fifty-three participants (16.8%) responded positively to the first fall risk awareness question about being likely to have a fall in the next 12 months, and 100 (31.6%) reported being at personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. There was only fair correlation (κ = 0.370) between responses on the two questions. Prior falls and depressive symptoms were associated with positive responses on both fall risk awareness questions. Age and other established fall risk factors were not associated with responses on either fall risk awareness question. The fall risk awareness questionnaire did not predict incident falls or injurious falls. Fall risk awareness is low in older adults. Although person-centered fall risk awareness is not predictive of falls, subjective risk perceptions should be considered when designing fall preventive strategies because they may influence participation and behaviors. © 2016, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Rapid radiations of both kiwifruit hybrid lineages and their parents shed light on a two-layer mode of species diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifei; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Qiong; Song, Chi; Zhong, Caihong; Zhang, Xudong; Wang, Ying; Yao, Xiaohong; Wang, Zupeng; Zeng, Shaohua; Wang, Ying; Guo, Yangtao; Wang, Shuaibin; Li, Xinwei; Li, Li; Liu, Chunyan; McCann, Honour C; He, Weiming; Niu, Yan; Chen, Min; Du, Liuwen; Gong, Junjie; Datson, Paul M; Hilario, Elena; Huang, Hongwen

    2017-07-01

    Reticulate speciation caused by interspecific hybridization is now recognized as an important mechanism in the creation of biological diversity. However, depicting the patterns of phylogenetic networks for lineages that have undergone interspecific gene flow is challenging. Here we sequenced 25 taxa representing natural diversity in the genus Actinidia with an average mapping depth of 26× on the reference genome to reconstruct their reticulate history. We found evidence, including significant gene tree discordance, cytonuclear conflicts, and changes in genome-wide heterozygosity across taxa, collectively supporting extensive reticulation in the genus. Furthermore, at least two separate parental species pairs were involved in the repeated origin of the hybrid lineages, in some of which a further phase of syngameon was triggered. On the basis of the elucidated hybridization relationships, we obtained a highly resolved backbone phylogeny consisting of taxa exhibiting no evidence of hybrid origin. The backbone taxa have distinct demographic histories and are the product of recent rounds of rapid radiations via sorting of ancestral variation under variable climatic and ecological conditions. Our results suggest a mode for consecutive plant diversification through two layers of radiations, consisting of the rapid evolution of backbone lineages and the formation of hybrid swarms derived from these lineages. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Centrifugal Separation Device Based on Two-Layer Laminar Flow in Microchannels for High-Throughput and Continuous Blood Cell/Plasma Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taizo Kobayashi,; Taisuke Funamoto,; Makoto Hosaka,; Satoshi Konishi,

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a novel type of centrifugation device that is based on the two-layer laminar flow in micro flow channels for continuous blood cell/plasma separation. We propose to rotate the flow channels which are arranged along the circumference around the rotational axis. Downsizing the channel width reduced both the cell sedimentation time and the required centrifugal force, because the channel width corresponds to the centrifugal sedimentation length. First, plasma and cells were continuously extracted from pig blood in each of the branch channels using a milled acrylic prototype device (channel width = 800 μm, volume = 150 μl). Next, the relationship between the channel width (125, 250, and 500 μm) and the sedimentation time taken for various centrifugal forces (2.3, 9, 36, and 145 G) was evaluated using the downsized microchannels fabricated by hot-embossing and thermal bonding technologies. Using downsized microchannels with a width of 125 μm successfully reduced the sedimentation time to 85 s as compared to the sedimentation time of 270 s for a channel of a width of 500 μm, when a centrifugal force of 2.3 G was applied. The use of the proposed device did not result in obvious hemolysis at the centrifugal forces lower than 335 G.

  12. Production of Steel Casts in Two-Layer Moulds with Alkaline Binders Part 1. Backing sand with the alkaline inorganic binder RUDAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Steel casts in Z.N. POMET were produced in moulds made of the moulding sand Floster. This sand did not have good knocking outproperties, required a significant binder addition (4.5-5.0 parts by weight, and the casting surface quality gave rise to clients objections.Therefore a decision of implementing two-layer moulds, in which the facing sand would consist of the moulding sand with an alkalineorganic binder while the backing sand would be made of the moulding sand with an inorganic binder also of an alkaline character - wasundertaken. The fraction of this last binder in the moulding sand mass would be smaller than that of the binder used up to now (waterglass. The application of two moulding sands of the same chemical character (highly alkaline should facilitate the reclamation processand improve the obtained reclaimed material quality, due to which it would be possible to increase the reclaim fraction in the mouldingsand (up to now it was 50%. The results of the laboratory investigations of sands with the RUDAL binder are presented in the paper.

  13. A New Solution for the Compression of a Two-Layer Strip and Its Application to Analysis of Bonding by Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Alexandrov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a theoretical study on the compression of a two-layer strip of strain-hardening rigid-plastic materials between rigid platens. Semianalytical solutions are obtained for stress and velocity fields in each layer. Special attention is devoted to the conditions corresponding to the beginning of cold bond formation between the layers. Depending on input parameters various general deformation patterns are possible. In particular, there exists such a range of process parameters that the soft metal layer yields while the hard metal layer is rigid at the beginning of the process. As the deformation proceeds, yielding also starts in the hard metal layer and the entire strip becomes plastic. This is a typical deformation pattern adopted in describing the process of joining by rolling. However, at a certain range of input parameters plastic deformation of the entire strip begins at the initial instant. Moreover, it is possible that only the hard metal layer yields while the soft metal layer does not. This deformation pattern takes place when the thickness of the soft metal layer is much smaller than that of the hard metal layer.

  14. Integration of Ground and Multi-Resolution Satellite Data for Predicting the Water Balance of a Mediterranean Two-Layer Agro-Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Battista

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of site water budget is important in Mediterranean areas, where it represents a crucial factor affecting the quantity and quality of traditional crop production. This is particularly the case for spatially fragmented, multi-layer agricultural ecosystems such as olive groves, which are traditional cultivations of the Mediterranean basin. The current paper aims at demonstrating the effectiveness of spatialized meteorological data and remote sensing techniques to estimate the actual evapotranspiration (ETA and the soil water content (SWC of an olive orchard in Central Italy. The relatively small size of this orchard (about 0.1 ha and its two-layer structure (i.e., olive trees and grasses require the integration of remotely sensed data with different spatial and temporal resolutions (Terra-MODIS, Landsat 8-OLI and Ikonos. These data are used to drive a recently proposed water balance method (NDVI-Cws and predict ETA and then site SWC, which are assessed through comparison with sap flow and soil wetness measurements taken in 2013. The results obtained indicate the importance of integrating satellite imageries having different spatio-temporal properties in order to properly characterize the examined olive orchard. More generally, the experimental evidences support the possibility of using widely available remotely sensed and ancillary datasets for the operational estimation of ETA and SWC in olive tree cultivation systems.

  15. Numerical modelling of two-layer shallow water flow in microtidal salt-wedge estuaries: Finite volume solver and field validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krvavica Nino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A finite volume model for two-layer shallow water flow in microtidal salt-wedge estuaries is presented in this work. The governing equations are a coupled system of shallow water equations with source terms accounting for irregular channel geometry and shear stress at the bed and interface between the layers. To solve this system we applied the Q-scheme of Roe with suitable treatment of source terms, coupling terms, and wet-dry fronts. The proposed numerical model is explicit in time, shock-capturing and it satisfies the extended conservation property for water at rest. The model was validated by comparing the steady-state solutions against a known arrested salt-wedge model and by comparing both steady-state and time-dependant solutions against field observations in Rječina Estuary in Croatia. When the interfacial friction factor λi was chosen correctly, the agreement between numerical results and field observations was satisfactory.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of a two-layered material produced by the E-beam surfacing of Ta and Nb on the titanium base after multiple rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataev, V. A.; Golkovski, M. G.; Samoylenko, V. V.; Ruktuev, A. A.; Polyakov, I. A.; Kuksanov, N. K.

    2018-04-01

    The study has been conducted in line with the current approach to investigation of materials obtained by considerably deep surface alloying of the titanium substrate with Ta, Nb, and Zr. The thickness of the resulting alloyed layer was equal to 2 mm. The coating was formed through weld deposition of a powder with the use of a high-voltage electron beam in the air. It has been lately demonstrated that manufactured such a way alloyed layers possess corrosion resistance which is significantly higher than the resistance of titanium substrates. It has already been shown that such two-layered materials are weldable. The study objective is to investigate the feasibility of rolling for necking the sheets with the Ti-Ta-Nb anticorrosion coating with further fourfold decrease in their thickness. The research is also aimed at investigation of the material properties after rolling. Anticorrosion layers were formed both on CP-titanium and on VT14 (Ti-4Al-3Mo-1 V) durable titanium alloy. The results of chemical composition determination, structure examination, X-ray phase analysis and mechanical properties observations (including bending properties of the alloyed layers) are presented in the paper. The combination of welding, rolling, and bending enables the manufacture of corrosion-resistant vessels and process pipes which are made from the developed material and find technological application.

  17. Determination of absorption changes from moments of distributions of times of flight of photons: optimization of measurement conditions for a two-layered tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Adam; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Elster, Clemens

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy allows for depth-selective determination of absorption changes in the adult human head that facilitates separation between cerebral and extra-cerebral responses to brain activation. The aim of the present work is to analyze which combinations of moments of measured distributions of times of flight (DTOF) of photons and source-detector separations are optimal for the reconstruction of absorption changes in a two-layered tissue model corresponding to extra- and intra-cerebral compartments. To this end we calculated the standard deviations of the derived absorption changes in both layers by considering photon noise and a linear relation between the absorption changes and the DTOF moments. The results show that the standard deviation of the absorption change in the deeper (superficial) layer increases (decreases) with the thickness of the superficial layer. It is confirmed that for the deeper layer the use of higher moments, in particular the variance of the DTOF, leads to an improvement. For example, when measurements at four different source-detector separations between 8 and 35 mm are available and a realistic thickness of the upper layer of 12 mm is assumed, the inclusion of the change in mean time of flight, in addition to the change in attenuation, leads to a reduction of the standard deviation of the absorption change in the deeper tissue layer by a factor of 2.5. A reduction by another 4% can be achieved by additionally including the change in variance.

  18. Intrinsic factors associated with pregnancy falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuefang; Yeoh, Han T

    2014-10-01

    Approximately 25% to 27% of women sustain a fall during pregnancy, and falls are associated with serious injuries and can affect pregnancy outcomes. The objective of the current study was to identify intrinsic factors associated with pregnancy that may contribute to women's increased risk of falls. A literature search (Medline and Pubmed) identified articles published between January 1980 and June 2013 that measured associations between pregnancy and fall risks, using an existing fall accident investigation framework. The results indicated that physiological, biomechanical, and psychological changes associated with pregnancy may influence the initiation, detection, and recovery phases of falls and increase the risk of falls in this population. Considering the logistic difficulties and ethnic concerns in recruiting pregnant women to participate in this investigation of fall risk factors, identification of these factors could establish effective fall prevention and intervention programs for pregnant women and improve birth outcomes. [Workplace Health Saf 2014;62(10):403-408.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Novel transparent and flexible nanocomposite film prepared from chrysotile nanofibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kun, E-mail: kliu@csu.edu.cn [School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zhu, Binnan; Feng, Qiming [School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Duan, Tao [Joint Laboratory for Extreme Conditions Matter Properties, Southwest University of Science and Technology and Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, chrysotile nanofibres, obtained from physicochemical dispersion of natural chrysotile, were used to prepare nanofibre sheets by vacuum filtration. As-prepared sheets were then impregnated by UV-curable resin and cured by ultraviolet light to fabricate the flexible and transparent nanocomposite films. Observed from SEM, the transparent films showed a smooth surface and a typical sandwich structure in cross section, viz. nanofibre sheet filled with resin was sandwiched by two layers of resin. XRD patterns indicated the amorphous nature of cured resin and characteristic crystallographic structure of chrysotile in nanocomposite films. Though the nanofibre sheets were white in colour, and nanofibre contents in nanocomposites were as much as 43.4 wt%, the nanocomposite films displayed an excellent optical transparency with about 85% light transmittance in the visible light range. Tensile tests showed that the addition of nanofibres resulted in a great improvement in mechanical strength of the nanocomposite films; with the increase of nanofibre contents, the modulus and tensile strength of nanocomposite films increased gradually. - Graphical abstract: Photos show the experimental phenomenon. The white nanofibre sheets can be written or printed like paper, and it's very interested that the handwriting is clearly visible from the front and back of the transparent films prepared from nanofibre sheets by vacuum impregnation and UV curing. This phenomenon can be attributed to the increase of transparency of film, which results from the replacement of air interstices in nanofibre sheet by resin with higher refractive index. Visible light can pass easily through the transparent film without obvious loss, but can be apparently adsorbed and scattered by ink particles that adhered to nanofibres and embedded in resin. - Highlights: • A flexible and transparent film is prepared from chrysotile nanofibres. • The nanofibre sheet is sandwiched by two

  20. Novel transparent and flexible nanocomposite film prepared from chrysotile nanofibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Kun; Zhu, Binnan; Feng, Qiming; Duan, Tao

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, chrysotile nanofibres, obtained from physicochemical dispersion of natural chrysotile, were used to prepare nanofibre sheets by vacuum filtration. As-prepared sheets were then impregnated by UV-curable resin and cured by ultraviolet light to fabricate the flexible and transparent nanocomposite films. Observed from SEM, the transparent films showed a smooth surface and a typical sandwich structure in cross section, viz. nanofibre sheet filled with resin was sandwiched by two layers of resin. XRD patterns indicated the amorphous nature of cured resin and characteristic crystallographic structure of chrysotile in nanocomposite films. Though the nanofibre sheets were white in colour, and nanofibre contents in nanocomposites were as much as 43.4 wt%, the nanocomposite films displayed an excellent optical transparency with about 85% light transmittance in the visible light range. Tensile tests showed that the addition of nanofibres resulted in a great improvement in mechanical strength of the nanocomposite films; with the increase of nanofibre contents, the modulus and tensile strength of nanocomposite films increased gradually. - Graphical abstract: Photos show the experimental phenomenon. The white nanofibre sheets can be written or printed like paper, and it's very interested that the handwriting is clearly visible from the front and back of the transparent films prepared from nanofibre sheets by vacuum impregnation and UV curing. This phenomenon can be attributed to the increase of transparency of film, which results from the replacement of air interstices in nanofibre sheet by resin with higher refractive index. Visible light can pass easily through the transparent film without obvious loss, but can be apparently adsorbed and scattered by ink particles that adhered to nanofibres and embedded in resin. - Highlights: • A flexible and transparent film is prepared from chrysotile nanofibres. • The nanofibre sheet is sandwiched by two

  1. Magnetic characterisation of longitudinal thin film media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dova, P.

    1998-09-01

    Magnetic characterisation techniques, as applied to longitudinal thin film media, have been investigated. These included the study of the differentials of the remanence curves, the delta-M plot and the examination of the critical volumes. Several thin film structures, which are currently used or are being considered for future media applications, have been examined using these techniques. Most of the films were Co-alloys with the exception of a set of Barium ferrite films. Both monolayer and multilayer structures were studied. It was found that the study of activation volumes provides a better insight into the reversal mechanisms of magnetic media, especially in the case of complex structures such as multilayer films and films with bicrystal microstructure. Furthermore, an evaluation study of different methods of determining critical volumes showed that the method using time dependence measurements and the micromagnetic approach is the most appropriate. The magnetic characteristics of the thin film media under investigation were correlated with their microstructure and, where possible, with their noise performance. Magnetic force microscopy was also used for acquiring quasi-domain images in the ac-demagnetised state. It was found that in all Co-alloy films the dominant intergranular coupling is magnetising in nature, the level of which is governed by the Cr content in the magnetic layer. In the case of laminated media it was found that when non-magnetic spacers are used, the nature of the interlayer coupling depends on the spacer thickness. In double layer structures with no spacer, the top layer replicates the crystallographic texture of the bottom layer, and the overall film properties are a combination of the two layers. In bicrystal films the coupling is determined by the Cr segregation in the grain boundaries. Furthermore, the presence of stacking faults in bicrystal films deteriorates their thermal stability, but can be prevented by improving the epitaxial

  2. Fall-related activity avoidance in relation to a history of falls or near falls, fear of falling and disease severity in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Manzur; Iwarsson, Susanne; Odin, Per; Nilsson, Maria H

    2016-06-02

    There is limited knowledge concerning fall-related activity avoidance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD); such knowledge would be of importance for the development of more efficient PD-care and rehabilitation. This study aimed to examine how fall-related activity avoidance relates to a history of self-reported falls/near falls and fear of falling (FOF) as well as to disease severity in people with PD. Data were collected from 251 (61 % men) participants with PD; their median (min-max) age and PD duration were 70 (45-93) and 8 (1-43) years, respectively. A self-administered postal survey preceded a home visit which included observations, clinical tests and interview-administered questionnaires. Fall-related activity avoidance was assessed using the modified Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (mSAFFE) as well as by using a dichotomous (Yes/No) question. Further dichotomous questions concerned: the presence of FOF and the history (past 6 months) of falls or near falls, followed by stating the number of incidents. Disease severity was assessed according to the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) stages. In the total sample (n = 251), 41 % of the participants reported fall-related activity avoidance; the median mSAFFE score was 22. In relation to a history of fall, the proportions of participants (p fall-related activity avoidance were: non-fallers (30 %), single fallers (50 %) and recurrent fallers, i.e. ≥ 2 falls (57 %). Among those that reported near falls (but no falls), 51 % (26 out of 51) reported fall-related activity avoidance. Of those that reported FOF, 70 % reported fall-related activity avoidance. Fall-related activity avoidance ranged from 24 % in the early PD-stage (HY I) to 74 % in the most severe stages (HY IV-V). Results indicate that fall-related activity avoidance may be related to a history of self-reported falls/near falls, FOF and disease severity in people with PD. Importantly, fall-related activity avoidance is

  3. Hydroxyapatite screen-printed thick films: optical and electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.C.; Rocha, H.H.B.; Freire, F.N.A.; Santos, M.R.P.; Saboia, K.D.A.; Goes, J.C.; Sombra, A.S.B.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we did a study on the structural and electrical properties of bioceramic hydroxiapatite (HA) thick films. The films were prepared in two layers using the screen-printing technique on Al 2 O 3 substrates. Mechanical alloying has been used successfully to produce nanocrystalline powders of hydroxyapatite to be used in the films. We also look for the effect of the grain size of the HA in the final properties of the film. The samples were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), infrared and Raman scattering spectroscopy and electrical measurements. We did a study of the dielectric permittivity and the loss of the films in the radio-frequency of the spectra. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the films indicate that all the peaks associated to HA phase is present in the films. One can notice that, for all the films there is a decrease of the DC (dielectric constant) with the increase of the frequency. The values of the dielectric constant of the films are in between 4 and 9 (at 1 kHz), as a function of the flux concentration. The loss is decreasing as we increase the frequency for all the films. These results strongly suggest that the screen-printing HA thick films are good candidates for applications in biocompatible coatings of implant materials

  4. Hydroxyapatite screen-printed thick films: optical and electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, C.C. [Laboratorio de Telecomunicaco-tilde es e Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais (LOCEM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Rocha, H.H.B. [Laboratorio de Telecomunicaco-tilde es e Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais (LOCEM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Freire, F.N.A. [Departamento de Quimica Orga-circumflex nica e Inorga-circumflex nica-UFC, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60455-760, Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Santos, M.R.P. [Laboratorio de Telecomunicaco-tilde es e Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais (LOCEM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Saboia, K.D.A. [Laboratorio de Telecomunicaco-tilde es e Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais (LOCEM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Goes, J.C. [Laboratorio de Telecomunicaco-tilde es e Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais (LOCEM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Sombra, A.S.B. [Laboratorio de Telecomunicaco-tilde es e Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais (LOCEM), Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)]. E-mail: sombra@fisica.ufc.br

    2005-07-15

    In this paper, we did a study on the structural and electrical properties of bioceramic hydroxiapatite (HA) thick films. The films were prepared in two layers using the screen-printing technique on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. Mechanical alloying has been used successfully to produce nanocrystalline powders of hydroxyapatite to be used in the films. We also look for the effect of the grain size of the HA in the final properties of the film. The samples were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), infrared and Raman scattering spectroscopy and electrical measurements. We did a study of the dielectric permittivity and the loss of the films in the radio-frequency of the spectra. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the films indicate that all the peaks associated to HA phase is present in the films. One can notice that, for all the films there is a decrease of the DC (dielectric constant) with the increase of the frequency. The values of the dielectric constant of the films are in between 4 and 9 (at 1 kHz), as a function of the flux concentration. The loss is decreasing as we increase the frequency for all the films. These results strongly suggest that the screen-printing HA thick films are good candidates for applications in biocompatible coatings of implant materials.

  5. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzukawa, Megumi; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Kumiko; Kim, Hunkyung; Suzuki, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST) to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotom...

  6. Fall Prevention in a Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, Monika; Freiberger, Ellen; Geilhof, Barbara; Salb, Johannes; Hentschke, Christian; Landendoerfer, Peter; Linde, Klause; Halle, Martin; Blank, Wolfgang A

    2016-05-27

    Falls and fall-related injuries are common in community-dwelling elderly people. Effective multifactorial fall prevention programs in the primary care setting may be a promising approach to reduce the incidence rate of falls. In a cluster randomized trial in 33 general practices 378 people living independently and at high risk of falling (65 to 94 years old; 285 women) were allocated to either a 16 week exercise-based fall prevention program including muscle strengthening and challenging balance training exercises, combined with a 12 week home-based exercise program (222 participants), or to usual care (156 participants). The main outcome was number of falls over a period of 12 months. Secondary outcomes were the number of fall-related injuries, physical function (Timed-Up-and-Go-Test, TUG, Chair-Stand-Test, CST, modified Romberg Test), and fear of falling. In the intervention group (n=222 patients in 17 general practices) 291 falls occurred, compared to 367 falls in the usual care group (n=156 patients in 16 general practices). We observed a lower incidence rate for falls in the intervention group (incidence rate ratio/IRR: 0.54; 95% confidence interval (CI): [0.35; 0.84], p=0.007) and for fall-related injuries (IRR: 0.66; [0.42; 0.94], p=0.033). Additionally, patients in the intervention group showed significant improvements in secondary endpoints (TUG: -2.39 s, [-3.91; -0.87], p=0.014; mRomberg: 1.70 s, [0.35; 3.04], p=0.037; fear of falling: -2.28 points, [-3.87; -0.69], p=0.022) compared to usual care. A complex falls prevention program in a primary care setting was effective in reducing falls and fall-related injuries in community dwelling older adults at risk.

  7. Thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strongin, M.; Miller, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    This article reviews the phenomena that occur in films from the point of view of a solid state physicist. Films form the basis for many established and developing technologies. Metal layers have always been important for optical coatings and as protective coatings. In the most sophisticated cases, films and their interaction on silicon surfaces form the basis of modern electronic technology. Films of silicon, GaAs and composites of these materials promise to lead to practical photovoltaic devices

  8. Second harmonic generation in anisotropic Langmuir-Blodgett films of N-docosyl-4-nitroaniline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, T.; Rosenkilde, S.; Ramanujam, P.S.

    1992-01-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of N-docosyl-4-nitroaniline have been made and their nonlinear optical properties studied by second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements. A significant enhancement of the intensity of the second harmonic of the 1.064-mu-m YAG was observed when a two layer Y-type film...... structure. Both of these observations are not common for Y-type LB films and the usual assumption of C(infinity nu) symmetry is therefore not valid. The results make us suggest that these LB films possess C(s) and C2-nu symmetry for mono- and multilayers, respectively. Theoretical expressions...

  9. Associated Factors for Falls, Recurrent Falls, and Injurious Falls in Aged Men Living in Taiwan Veterans Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Chiou Ku

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the advanced age, depression status, stroke, gouty arthritis, and cataract are independent variables for predicting falls; depression is the only clinical factor capable of predicting the recurrent falls. These variables were potential targets for effective prevention of falls.

  10. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimada Hiroyuki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotomous questions to screen for fall risks during movements and behaviours such as walking, transferring, and wandering. The history of falls and fall-related fractures during the previous year was reported by participants or determined from an interview with the participant's family and care staff. Results All SRRST items showed significant differences between the participants with and without falls and fall-related fractures. In multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, diseases, and behavioural variables, the SRRST score was independently associated with history of falls and fractures. Odds ratios for those in the high-risk SRRST group (≥ 5 points compared with the no risk SRRST group (0 point were 6.15 (p Conclusion These results suggest that subjective ratings by care staff can be utilized to determine the risks of falls and fall-related fractures in the frail elderly, however, these preliminary results require confirmation in further prospective research.

  11. Dynamic magnetic properties of the mixed spin-1 and spin-3/2 Ising system on a two-layer square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temizer, Ümüt

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic critical behavior of the mixed spin-1 and spin-3/2 Ising system on a bilayer square lattice is studied by using the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics for both ferromagnetic/ferromagnetic (FM/FM) and antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic (AFM/FM) interactions in the presence of a time-varying external magnetic field. The dynamic equations describing the time-dependencies of the average magnetizations are derived from the Master equation. The phases in the system are obtained by solving these dynamic equations. The temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations is investigated in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic phase transitions and to obtain the dynamic phase transition temperatures. The dynamic phase diagrams are constructed in seven different planes for both FM/FM and AFM/FM interactions and the effects of the related interaction parameters on the dynamic phase diagrams are examined. It is found that the dynamic phase diagrams display many dynamic critical points, such as tricritical point, triple point (TP), quadruple point (QP), double critical end point (B), multicritical point (A) and tetracritical point (M). Moreover, the reentrant behavior is observed for AFM/FM interaction in the system. - Highlights: • The mixed spin (1, 3/2) Ising system is studied on a two-layer square lattice. • The Glauber transition rates are employed to construct the dynamic equations. • The dynamic phase diagrams are presented in seven different planes. • The system displays many dynamic critical points. • The reentrant behavior is observed for AFM/FM interaction

  12. The hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations of the two-layered Shiraz aquifer in the northwest of Maharlou saline lake, south of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajabadi, Mehdi; Zare, Mohammad; Chitsazan, Manouchehr

    2018-03-01

    Maharlou saline lake is the outlet of Shiraz closed basin in southern Iran, surrounded by several disconnected alluvial fresh water aquifers. These aquifers in the west and northwest of the lake are recharged by karstic anticlines such as Kaftarak in the north and Barmshour in the south. Here groundwater salinity varies along the depth so that better quality water is located below brackish or saline waters. The aim of this study is to investigate the reason for the salinity anomaly and the origin of the fresher groundwater in lower depth. Hence, the change in groundwater salinity along depth has been investigated by means of a set of geoelectrical, hydrogeological, hydrogeochemical, and environmental isotopes data. The interpretation of geoelectrical profiles and hydrogeological data indicates that the aquifer in the southeast of Shiraz plain is a two-layer aquifer separated by a fine-grained (silt and clay) layer with an approximate thickness of 40 m at the depth of about 100-120 m. Hydrgeochemistry showed that the shallow aquifer is recharged by Kaftarak karstic anticline and is affected by the saline lake water. The lake water fraction varies in different parts from zero for shallow aquifer close to the karstic anticlines to ∼70 percent in the margin of the lake. The deep aquifer is protected from the intrusion of saline lake water due to the presence of the above-mentioned confining layer with lake water fraction of zero. The stable isotopes signatures also indicate that the 'fresh' groundwater belonging to the deep aquifer is not subject to severe evaporation or mixing which is typical of the karstic water of the area. It is concluded that the characteristics of the deep aquifer are similar to those of the karstic carbonate aquifer. This karstic aquifer is most probably the Barmshour carbonated anticline buried under the shallow aquifer in the southern part. It may also be the extension of the Kaftarak anticline in the northern part.

  13. Long-term effects of dietary supplementation with an essential oil mixture on the growth and laying performance of two layer strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah U. Çatli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One thousand two hundred 1-day-old Lohmann LSL white and Lohmann Brown layer chickens were fed diets supplemented with either an antibiotic growth promoter (AGP or an herbal essential oil mixture (EOM till 58 wk of age to reveal the long-term effects of those additives on growth, performance and wholesome egg quality parameters. The study was arranged in a 2x3 factorial design with two layer strains and three feed additive regimens. Thus, the layer birds of both strains were randomly assigned to the three dietary treatments, i.e., standard basal diet (control, control with AGP (specifically, avilamycin, 10 mg/kg diet and control with EOM (24 mg/kg diet. The data regarding egg production were recorded between 22 to 58 weeks of age. Neither the dietary treatments nor the bird strain influenced the body weight and mortality of the birds in both the growing and laying period. AGP or EOM supplementation to the laying hen diet significantly increased the egg production rate and egg weight as compared to the control  diet alone, but egg mass output, feed consumption, and feed conversion ratio were not effected  by the dietary treatments. Neither dietary treatment created any statistically significantly differences in egg quality parameters with the exception of Haugh unit. The research findings have confirmed the beneficial effects of supplementation with feed-grade EOM on the laying rate and egg weight of both white and brown layers. Indeed, EOM, being a novel feed additive natural origin, proved to be as efficacious as AGP in promoting egg yield.

  14. Supervised Learning of Two-Layer Perceptron under the Existence of External Noise — Learning Curve of Boolean Functions of Two Variables in Tree-Like Architecture —

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezu, Tatsuya; Kiyokawa, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the supervised batch learning of Boolean functions expressed by a two-layer perceptron with a tree-like structure. We adopt continuous weights (spherical model) and the Gibbs algorithm. We study the Parity and And machines and two types of noise, input and output noise, together with the noiseless case. We assume that only the teacher suffers from noise. By using the replica method, we derive the saddle point equations for order parameters under the replica symmetric (RS) ansatz. We study the critical value αC of the loading rate α above which the learning phase exists for cases with and without noise. We find that αC is nonzero for the Parity machine, while it is zero for the And machine. We derive the exponents barβ of order parameters expressed as (α - α C)bar{β} when α is near to αC. Furthermore, in the Parity machine, when noise exists, we find a spin glass solution, in which the overlap between the teacher and student vectors is zero but that between student vectors is nonzero. We perform Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations by simulated annealing and also by exchange Monte Carlo simulations in both machines. In the Parity machine, we study the de Almeida-Thouless stability, and by comparing theoretical and numerical results, we find that there exist parameter regions where the RS solution is unstable, and that the spin glass solution is metastable or unstable. We also study asymptotic learning behavior for large α and derive the exponents hat{β } of order parameters expressed as α - hat{β } when α is large in both machines. By simulated annealing simulations, we confirm these results and conclude that learning takes place for the input noise case with any noise amplitude and for the output noise case when the probability that the teacher's output is reversed is less than one-half.

  15. Nuclear films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, Peter.

    1985-01-01

    This booklet is a resource for the study of feature films that highlight the theme of nuclear war. It provides basic credits and brief indication of the theme, treatment, quality and particular notable aspects; and a series of questions raised by the film. Seventy feature films and thirty documentaries are examined

  16. A simple strategy for fall events detection

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-01-20

    The paper concerns the detection of fall events based on human silhouette shape variations. The detection of fall events is addressed from the statistical point of view as an anomaly detection problem. Specifically, the paper investigates the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart to detect fall events. Towards this end, a set of ratios for five partial occupancy areas of the human body for each frame are collected and used as the input data to MEWMA chart. The MEWMA fall detection scheme has been successfully applied to two publicly available fall detection databases, the UR fall detection dataset (URFD) and the fall detection dataset (FDD). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations.

  17. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Suzukawa, Megumi; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Kumiko; Kim, Hunkyung; Suzuki, Takao

    2011-08-12

    Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST) to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotomous questions to screen for fall risks during movements and behaviours such as walking, transferring, and wandering. The history of falls and fall-related fractures during the previous year was reported by participants or determined from an interview with the participant's family and care staff. All SRRST items showed significant differences between the participants with and without falls and fall-related fractures. In multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, diseases, and behavioural variables, the SRRST score was independently associated with history of falls and fractures. Odds ratios for those in the high-risk SRRST group (≥ 5 points) compared with the no risk SRRST group (0 point) were 6.15 (p fall, 15.04 (p falls, and 5.05 (p fall-related fractures. The results remained essentially unchanged in subgroup analysis accounting for locomotion status. These results suggest that subjective ratings by care staff can be utilized to determine the risks of falls and fall-related fractures in the frail elderly, however, these preliminary results require confirmation in further prospective research.

  18. Fall prevention in central coast community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Gina M; Kale, Helen L

    2018-04-19

    Fall injuries among people aged 65 years and over (older people) cause substantial health decline and cost to the health system. In 2009 in New South Wales, 25.6% of older people fell in the previous year, and 10.7% (32 000) were hospitalised. Pharmacists are trusted professionals, who interact extensively with older people and have potential to augment fall prevention in pharmacies. This brief report describes how professional development improved pharmacist's knowledge and confidence in fall prevention, encouraged implementation of fall prevention plans and facilitated the provision of brief fall prevention interventions for older clients, after identification of fall risk. In 2014, pharmacists from all Central Coast pharmacies (n = 76) were invited to free, continuing professional development (CPD) in fall prevention. It provided education and resources to identify clients' fall risk, conduct brief fall prevention interventions and implement fall prevention health promotion plans (FPHPP). Pharmacists completed written: Baseline and post-workshop questionnaires to assess changes in pharmacist's knowledge and confidence, and existing fall prevention in pharmacies. Logs of client fall risk and brief fall prevention interventions offered to clients. Four-month follow-up questionnaires to assess implementation of FPHPPs and pharmacy practice changes. Pharmacists representing 36% of pharmacies participated. At four-month follow-up, 67% had implemented FPHPPs, and 62% delivered brief interventions determined by client fall risk. Fall prevention in pharmacies can be augmented through locally provided CPD tailored for pharmacists. SO WHAT?: This model could increase fall prevention reach. It is transferable to settings where health professionals provide services to older adults and require reregistration through professional development. © 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association.

  19. Fall prevention in high-risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Kathleen M; Balch, Christine

    2014-12-01

    In the oncology population, disease process and treatment factors place patients at risk for falls. Fall bundles provide a framework for developing comprehensive fall programs in oncology. Small sample size of interventional studies and focus on ambulatory and geriatric populations limit the applicability of results. Additional research is needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Risk of Falling in Older Women

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Armas; Joan Lappe; Veronica J. Slavik; Kellan Slattery; Shih-Chuan Cheng; Davender S. Malik; John N. Mordeson

    2015-01-01

    We propose a weighted average approach to measure the risk of falling in older women. We consider four causal variables of falling, namely serum 25-OHD levels, medication use, fracture, and age. We use five methods to derive linear equations with these four factors as independent variables in the linear equations with risk of falling as the dependent variable.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.760 - Fall protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fall protection. 1926.760 Section 1926.760 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.760 Fall protection. (a... protection from fall hazards in accordance with paragraph (a)(1) of this section. (c) Controlled Decking Zone...

  2. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles, swivels...

  3. Falling into a black hole

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2007-01-01

    String theory tells us that quantum gravity has a dual description as a field theory (without gravity). We use the field theory dual to ask what happens to an object as it falls into the simplest black hole: the 2-charge extremal hole. In the field theory description the wavefunction of a particle is spread over a large number of `loops', and the particle has a well-defined position in space only if it has the same `position' on each loop. For the infalling particle we find one definition of ...

  4. The variability of meteoroid falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Herrera, V. M.; Cordero, G.

    2016-10-01

    We analysed a historical catalogue of meteoroid falling during the last 400 years. We report here for the first time the synchronization between observed meteors and solar barycentric parameters in 19.6 and 13.2 years periodicities using a new multiple cross wavelet. The group of moderated number of meteors is distributed around the positive phase of the solar barycentric periodicity of 13.2 years. While the group of severe number of meteors are distributed on the positive phase of the solar barycentric periodicity of 19.6 years. These periodicities could be associated with Jupiter periodicities. So understanding the modulation of meteoroid falling is important for determining the falling patterns of these objects and for knowing when it is more likely to expect the entry of one of these objects into the Earth's atmosphere, because bodies falling onto the Earth can cause damage from minor impacts to mass-extinctions events. One of the most extreme events was the formation of the Chicxulub impact crater 65,000,000 years ago that caused one of the five major mass extinctions in the last 500,000,000 years. During the 20th and 21st centuries, a series of events demonstrated the importance of collisions between planets and small bodies (comets and asteroids), which included our own planet. In the case of the Earth, we can cite three examples: Tunguska, Curuça and Chelyabinsk. These events invite us to think that perhaps the occurrence of this phenomenon might be more common than we realize, but the lack of communication or people in the area where they happened prevents us from having a complete record. Modern man has not witnessed the impact of large asteroids or comets on our planet, but it has been observed on other planetary bodies. The most spectacular of these events was the collision of fragments of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter in 1994. The total energy of the 21 impacts on Jupiter's atmosphere was estimated as the equivalent of tens of millions of

  5. Development of next generation code system as an engineering modeling language (5). Investigation on restructuring method of conventional codes into two-layer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji

    2006-10-01

    A proposed method for gradually restructuring to the two-level system of next generation analysis system by reusing the conventional analysis system, called 'incremental method', was applied and evaluated. The following functions were selected for the evaluation: Neutron diffusion calculation for the three-dimensional XYZ system based on finite differential method, and input utilities of the cross-section data file used in the conventional system. In order to evaluate the effect of the restructuring, 'Module Coupling Index (MCI)' and 'McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity (MCC)' were used for quantifying the quality of the modular design and the complexity of the program sequence of each module. Although MCIs of each module before restructuring were mainly 6 - 7 degrees, it was possible to reduce them to under 4 degrees in most module by restructuring with the incremental method. And, it is found that the modules under 4 degrees of MCI can be easily combined with different programming languages, which are necessary for building the two-layer system. In the meantime, MCCs in most module before restructuring were over 20 and some were over 50. The incremental method could reduce them to under 10 when C++ was used, and reduce them to under 20 when FORTRAN was used. It is correspondent to reduction of the error frequency occurred in its modification from 20 - 40% to 5 - 10%. The total number of MCC could be reduced to 1/3 when C++ was used, and to 1/2 when FORTRAN was used. By using the restructured functions in the present study and some previously developed functions, a reactor analysis tool was systematized and applied to criticality analysis of the Experimental Fast Reactor 'JOYO' MR-I. In addition, the following two functionality expansion tests were performed: To add cross section direct perturbation functionality, and to add control rod criticality position search functionality. In the tests, both the functionality expansions were carried out satisfying the condition

  6. A revised global ozone dry deposition estimate based on a new two-layer parameterisation for air-sea exchange and the multi-year MACC composition reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhar, Ashok K.; Woodhouse, Matthew T.; Galbally, Ian E.

    2018-03-01

    Dry deposition at the Earth's surface is an important sink of atmospheric ozone. Currently, dry deposition of ozone to the ocean surface in atmospheric chemistry models has the largest uncertainty compared to deposition to other surface types, with implications for global tropospheric ozone budget and associated radiative forcing. Most global models assume that the dominant term of surface resistance in the parameterisation of ozone dry deposition velocity at the oceanic surface is constant. There have been recent mechanistic parameterisations for air-sea exchange that account for the simultaneous waterside processes of ozone solubility, molecular diffusion, turbulent transfer, and first-order chemical reaction of ozone with dissolved iodide and other compounds, but there are questions about their performance and consistency. We present a new two-layer parameterisation scheme for the oceanic surface resistance by making the following realistic assumptions: (a) the thickness of the top water layer is of the order of a reaction-diffusion length scale (a few micrometres) within which ozone loss is dominated by chemical reaction and the influence of waterside turbulent transfer is negligible; (b) in the water layer below, both chemical reaction and waterside turbulent transfer act together and are accounted for; and (c) chemical reactivity is present through the depth of the oceanic mixing layer. The new parameterisation has been evaluated against dry deposition velocities from recent open-ocean measurements. It is found that the inclusion of only the aqueous iodide-ozone reaction satisfactorily describes the measurements. In order to better quantify the global dry deposition loss and its interannual variability, modelled 3-hourly ozone deposition velocities are combined with the 3-hourly MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) reanalysis ozone for the years 2003-2012. The resulting ozone dry deposition is found to be 98.4 ± 30.0 Tg O3 yr-1 for the ocean

  7. Risk of falls after withdrawal of fall-risk-increasing drugs: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Nathalie; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch; Pols, Huib A. P.; van der Cammen, Tischa J. M.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Falling in older persons is a frequent and serious clinical problem. Several drugs have been associated with increased fall risk. The objective of this study was to identify differences in the incidence of falls after withdrawal (discontinuation or dose reduction) of fall-risk-increasing drugs

  8. Increasing fall risk awareness using wearables: A fall risk awareness protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Asbjørn; Olofsen, Hans; Bremdal, Bernt Arild

    2016-10-01

    Each year about a third of elderly aged 65 or older experience a fall. Many of these falls may have been avoided if fall risk assessment and prevention tools where available in a daily living situation. We identify what kind of information is relevant for doing fall risk assessment and prevention using wearable sensors in a daily living environment by investigating current research, distinguishing between prospective and context-aware fall risk assessment and prevention. Based on our findings, we propose a fall risk awareness protocol as a fall prevention tool integrating both wearables and ambient sensing technology into a single platform. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Fall risk factors in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, P; Hildebrand, K

    2000-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, gait disturbance, and postural instability. Patients with PD suffer frequent falls, yet little research has been done to identify risks specific to PD patients. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with falls for PD patients through the collection of demographic, environmental, and medical information as well as fall diaries completed during a 3-month period. Patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic PD, with and without falls, were included in the study provided they could stand and walk and had no other condition that could predispose them to falls. Of the 118 participants, 59% reported one or more falls. A total of 237 falls were reported. Duration and severity of PD symptoms, particularly freezing, involuntary movements, and walking and postural difficulties, were significantly associated with an increased risk of falls. Other factors associated with falls were postural hypotension and daily intake of alcohol. Forty percent of falls resulted in injury, but serious injury was rare. The findings have implications for reducing the risk of falls through patient education.

  10. Intrinsic Risk Factors of Falls in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Amatullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are common geriatric problems. The risk factors of falls are the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Studies on falls are scarcely conducted in Indonesia, especially in Bandung. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the intrinsic risk factors of falls among elderly. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out from August to October 2013 at the Geriatric Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Fifty three participants were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria using consecutive sampling. The determined variables in this study were classification of the risk of falls, demographic profile, history of falls, disease, and medications. After the selection, the participants were tested by Timed up-and-go test (TUGT. Moreover, an interview and analysis of medical records were carried out to discover the risk factors of falls. The collected data were analyzed and presented in the form of percentages shown in tables. Results: From 53 patients, women (35.66% were considered to have higher risk of fall than men (18.34%. The majority of patients (66% with the risk of fall were from the age group 60–74 years. The major diseases suffered by patients were hypertension, osteoarthritis and diabetes mellitus. Drugs that were widely used were antihypertensive drugs; analgesic and antipyretic drugs and antidiabetic drugs. Conclusions: There are various intrinsic risk factors of falls in elderly and each of the elderly has more than one intrinsic risk factor of falls.

  11. Nurses' Perceptions of Implementing Fall Prevention Interventions to Mitigate Patient-Specific Fall Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Deleise S; Montie, Mary; Conlon, Paul; Reynolds, Margaret; Ripley, Robert; Titler, Marita G

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based (EB) fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risk factors are readily available but not routinely used in practice. Few studies have examined nurses' perceptions about both the use of these EB interventions and implementation strategies designed to promote their adoption. This article reports qualitative findings of nurses' perceptions about use of EB fall prevention interventions to mitigate patient-specific fall risks, and implementation strategies to promote use of these interventions. The findings revealed five major themes: before-study fall prevention practices, use of EB fall prevention interventions tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors, beneficial implementation strategies, overall impact on approach to fall prevention, and challenges These findings are useful to guide nurses' engagement and use of EB fall prevention practices tailored to patient-specific fall risk factors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Disease state fingerprint for fall risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Similä, Heidi; Immonen, Milla

    2014-01-01

    Fall prevention is an important and complex multifactorial challenge, since one third of people over 65 years old fall at least once every year. A novel application of Disease State Fingerprint (DSF) algorithm is presented for holistic visualization of fall risk factors and identifying persons with falls history or decreased level of physical functioning based on fall risk assessment data. The algorithm is tested with data from 42 older adults, that went through a comprehensive fall risk assessment. Within the study population the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale score, Berg Balance Scale (BBS) score and the number of drugs in use were the three most relevant variables, that differed between the fallers and non-fallers. This study showed that the DSF visualization is beneficial in inspection of an individual's significant fall risk factors, since people have problems in different areas and one single assessment scale is not enough to expose all the people at risk.

  13. Prevalence of falls in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Priscila Regina Rorato; de Oliveira, Ana Carolina Kovaleski; Kohler, Renan; Winter, Gabriele Regiane; Rodacki, Cintia; Krause, Maressa Priscila

    2015-01-01

    To verify prevalence of falls and fear of falling, and to compare functional fitness among elderly women fallers and non-fallers. Seventy-eight elderly women participated in this study. Cases of falls and the fear of falling were self-reported by the elderly women, while the functional fitness was measured by a set of functional tests. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe the sample. Independent t-test was used to compare functional fitness between groups. The prevalence of falls in this sample was 32.4%. Among women fallers, 40% self-reported a high fear of falling. It is recommended that functional and resistance exercises are included in the preventive strategies for reducing risk factors for falls and its determinants in elderly women. Level of Evidence II, Prognostic-Prospective Study.

  14. Falls and Fear of Falling After Stroke: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Hui-Ting; Nadarajah, Mohanasuntharaam; Hamzah, Norhamizan Binti; Varadan, Parimalaganthi; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-12-01

    Falls are common after stroke, with potentially serious consequences. Few investigations have included age-matched control participants to directly compare fall characteristics between older adults with and without stroke. Further, fear of falling, a significant psychological consequence of falls, has only been examined to a limited degree as a risk factor for future falls in a stroke population. To compare the fall history between older adults with and without a previous stroke and to identify the determinants of falls and fear of falling in older stroke survivors. Case-control observational study. Primary teaching hospital. Seventy-five patients with stroke (mean age ± standard deviation, 66 ± 7 years) and 50 age-matched control participants with no previous stroke were tested. Fall history, fear of falling, and physical, cognitive, and psychological function were assessed. A χ 2 test was performed to compare characteristics between groups, and logistic regression was performed to determine the risk factors for falls and fear of falling. Fall events in the past 12 months, Fall Efficacy Scale-International, Berg Balance Scale, Functional Ambulation Category, Fatigue Severity Scale, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, and Patient Healthy Questionnaire-9 were measured for all participants. Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment was used to quantify severity of stroke motor impairments. Twenty-three patients and 13 control participants reported at least one fall in the past 12 months (P = .58). Nine participants with stroke had recurrent falls (≥2 falls) compared with none of the control participants (P falling than did nonstroke control participants (P falls in the nonstroke group, whereas falls in the stroke group were not significantly associated with any measured outcomes. Fear of falling in the stroke group was associated with functional ambulation level and balance. Functional ambulation level alone explained 22% of variance in fear of falling in the stroke group

  15. Prediction of falls and/or near falls in people with mild Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Lindholm

    Full Text Available To determine factors associated with future falls and/or near falls in people with mild PD.The study included 141 participants with PD. Mean (SD age and PD-duration were 68 (9.7 and 4 years (3.9, respectively. Their median (q1-q3 UPDRS III score was 13 (8-18. Those >80 years of age, requiring support in standing or unable to understand instructions were excluded. Self-administered questionnaires targeted freezing of gait, turning hesitations, walking difficulties in daily life, fatigue, fear of falling, independence in activities of daily living, dyskinesia, demographics, falls/near falls history, balance problems while dual tasking and pain. Clinical assessments addressed functional balance performance, retropulsion, comfortable gait speed, motor symptoms and cognition. All falls and near falls were subsequently registered in a diary during a six-month period. Risk factors for prospective falls and/or near falls were determined using logistic regression.Sixty-three participants (45% experienced ≥ 1 fall and/or near fall. Three factors were independent predictors of falls and/or near falls: fear of falling (OR = 1.032, p<0.001 history of near falls (OR = 3.475, p = 0.009 and retropulsion (OR = 2.813, p = 0.035. The strongest contributing factor was fear of falling, followed by a history of near falls and retropulsion.Fear of falling seems to be an important issue to address already in mild PD as well as asking about prior near falls.

  16. Near-falls in people with Parkinson's disease: Circumstances, contributing factors and association with falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazibara, Tatjana; Kisic Tepavcevic, Darija; Svetel, Marina; Tomic, Aleksandra; Stankovic, Iva; Kostic, Vladimir S; Pekmezovic, Tatjana

    2017-10-01

    To describe circumstances of near-falls among persons with Parkinson's disease (PD), assess factors associated with near-falling and assess whether near-falls in the first 6 months are associated with falling in the latter 6 months over one year of follow-up. In the period August 2011-December 2012, 120 consecutive persons with PD, who denied having fallen in the past 6 months, were recruited at Clinical center of Serbia in Belgrade. Occurrence of falling and near-falls was followed for one year. A total of 31 persons with PD (25.8%) experienced near-falls, but did not fall. Of 42 fallers, 32 (76.2%) experienced near-falls. Tripping was the most common cause of near-falls among fallers, whereas postural instability was the most common in non-fallers. Regardless of falling experience, the most common manner to avoid fall was holding onto furniture or wall. After adjustment for multiple motor and non-motor PD features, more severe freezing of gait was associated with occurrence of near-falls over one year of follow-up (odds ratio [OR]=1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.16; p=0.043). Adjusted regression analysis did not show associations between near-falling in the first 6 months and falling in the latter 6 months of follow-up. Near-falls commonly occur in persons with PD. More severe freezing of gait appears to predispose near-falling. Fall prevention programs focusing on balance maintenance when experiencing freezing of gait could potentially be useful in reduction of near-falls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Film processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    The processing was made not only to show what are in the film but also to produce radiograph with high quality where the information gathered really presented level of the quality of the object inspected. Besides that, good procedure will make the film with good quality can keep the film in long time for reference. Here, more detailed on how the dark room functioned and its design. So, the good procedure while processed the film will be discussed detailed in this chapter from entering the dark room to exit from there.

  18. Demens Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Møller

    2012-01-01

    Vi vil skabe film til mennesker med demens – ikke film om demens sygdommen eller beretninger om livet og hverdagen med en kronisk lidelse. Filmene skal medvirke til at frembringe en behagelig stemning omkring og hos mennesker med demens, så hverdagen bliver så tryg som mulig. Filmene skal samtidig...... var at afgrænse og prioritere projektet, samt komme med anbefalinger omkring hvad der er vigtigt, i forbindelse med produktion af film målrettet mennesker med demens. Resultat af ekspertgruppen sammenfattes i denne rapport. Projektet gennemføres som et samarbejde mellem Retrospect Film...

  19. A study of the behavior of a cathode film formed in chromium plating with radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Katsuyoshi; Suzuki, Akihira; Doi, Kazuyuki; Arai, Katsutoshi

    1979-01-01

    The behavior and composition of a cathode film formed on a steel cathode during chromium plating were studied with radioactive tracers. A special cell with a rapid washing compartment was used for preventing the cathode film from dissolving in electrolyte after plating. The cathode film was composed of two layers. The outer layer facing to the electrolyte had a loose structure and contained more sulfuric anions than the inner layer, for sulfuric acid probably concentrated in the outer layer. This outer layer is called L-film in this paper. The L-film was easily dissolved in the electrolyte solution. The inner layer (called C-film, compact film) was stable against electrolytes and contained less anions than that of L-film. The C-film had a thickness equivalent to 5 mg/m 2 and the concentration of anions unaffected by the composition of electrolytes. The C-film was not reduced to metallic chromium, but it remained in the cathode film during and after plating. This suggests that chromic acid in the cathode film is not reduced to metallic chromium, that metallic chromium is deposited from chromium complexes reaching the cathode surface through the cathode film, and that the complexes do not play a role on the construction of the cathode film. (author)

  20. New methods for fall risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejupi, Andreas; Lord, Stephen R; Delbaere, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Accidental falls are the leading cause of injury-related death and hospitalization in old age, with over one-third of the older adults experiencing at least one fall or more each year. Because of limited healthcare resources, regular objective fall risk assessments are not possible in the community on a large scale. New methods for fall prediction are necessary to identify and monitor those older people at high risk of falling who would benefit from participating in falls prevention programmes. Technological advances have enabled less expensive ways to quantify physical fall risk in clinical practice and in the homes of older people. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that sensor-based fall risk assessments of postural sway, functional mobility, stepping and walking can discriminate between fallers and nonfallers. Recent research has used low-cost, portable and objective measuring instruments to assess fall risk in older people. Future use of these technologies holds promise for assessing fall risk accurately in an unobtrusive manner in clinical and daily life settings.

  1. [Falls of older individuals: medical assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Breucker, S; Nkodo Mekongo, Y P; Ibebeke, B; Pepersack, T

    2007-01-01

    Falls are one of the most common problems that threaten the independence of older individuals. They usually occur when impairments in multiple domains compromise the compensatory ability of the individual, as is the case for many geriatric syndromes. A number of the physical conditions and environmental situations predispose to falls. The medical risk factors of falls are reviewed. Falls in older individuals are rarely due to a single cause. Mechanisms that maintain postural stability are altered with aging (balance, gait speed, cardiovascular function). Female gender, past history of a fall, cognitive impairment, lower extremity weakness, balance problems, psychotropic drug use, arthritis, history of stroke, orthostatic hypotension, dizziness, and anemia represent the most frequent causes of risk of falls. Physical examination should focus upon the above mentioned risk factors and also on the presence of orthostatic hypotension, visual acuity, hearing assessment, examination of the extremities for deformities or neuropathies, and carotid sinus hypersensitivity which contributes to falls in people with unexplained falls. In conclusion, assessment of older individual at risk of falls or who fall present medical specificities. However, these latter specificities should be included in a comprehensive assessment which focus on intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Interventional strategies including comprehensive and interdisciplinary assessment lead to effective prevention.

  2. Internship Progress Summary: Fall 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ralph S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valencia, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-13

    This fall I had the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Technology Applications engineering group. I assisted two main projects during my appointment, both related to the Lab’s mission statement: “To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.” My first project, a thermal source transfer unit, involved skills such as mechanical design, heat transfer simulation, and design analysis. The goal was to create a container that could protect a heat source and regulate its temperature during transit. I generated several designs, performed heat transfer simulations, and chose a design for prototyping. The second project was a soil drying unit for use in post blast sample analysis. To ensure fast and accurate sample processing, agents in the field wanted a system that could process wet dirt and turn it into dry powder. We designed a system of commercially available parts, and we tested the systems to determine the best methods and processes.

  3. Voices Falling Through the Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Elliman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Where am I? Or as the young boy in Jules Verne’s Journey to the Centre of the Earth calls back to his distant-voiced companions: ‘Lost… in the most intense darkness.’ ‘Then I understood it,’ says the boy, Axel, ‘To make them hear me, all I had to do was to speak with my mouth close to the wall, which would serve to conduct my voice, as the wire conducts the electric fluid’ (Verne 1864. By timing their calls, the group of explorers work out that Axel is separated from them by a distance of four miles, held in a cavernous vertical gallery of smooth rock. Feeling his way down towards the others, the boy ends up falling, along with his voice, through the space. Losing consciousness he seems to give himself up to the space...

  4. Falls and Fall Prevention in Older Adults With Early-Stage Dementia: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Helen W; Harrison, Barbara E; Phongphanngam, Sutthida

    2017-05-01

    Older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early-stage dementia have an increased risk of falling, with risks to their health and quality of life. The purpose of the current integrative review was to evaluate evidence on fall risk and fall prevention in this population. Studies were included if they examined falls or fall risk factors in older adults with MCI or early-stage dementia, or reported interventions in this population; 40 studies met criteria. Evidence supports the increased risk of falls in individuals even in the early stages of dementia or MCI, and changes in gait, balance, and fear of falling that may be related to this increased fall risk. Interventions included exercise and multifactorial interventions that demonstrated some potential to reduce falls in this population. Few studies had strong designs to provide evidence for recommendations. Further study in this area is warranted. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(03):139-148.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Meanings of Falls and Prevention of Falls According to Rehabilitation Nurses: A Qualitative Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Amy; Pierce, Linda L; Gies, Cheryl; Steiner, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Guided by Friedemann's theoretical framework, this survey explored the meaning of a fall of an institutionalized older adult or fall prevention to rehabilitation registered nurses and whether the experience changed the nurse's practice. Qualitative, descriptive survey. A convenience sample of 742 rehabilitation nurses was asked to describe these experiences and the impact on their practice. Themes discovered related to the meaning of a fall include negative feelings (incongruence) and positive feelings (congruence). Themes related to the meaning of preventing a fall include positive feelings (congruence). Practice change themes emerged from both the experience of a fall and fall prevention. Practice change themes were drawn to Friedemann's (1995) process dimensions. Nurses' experiences and meanings of falls uncovered negative and positive feelings about these falls. New findings of this study were the positive feelings expressed by nurses, when there was no injury or when a fall was prevented. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  6. Characteristics and fall experiences of older adults with and without fear of falling outdoors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippendale, Tracy; Lee, Chang Dae

    2018-06-01

    Using a theoretical model that combines an ecological perspective and Bandura's theory of self-efficacy as a guide, we sought to compare experiences and characteristics of community dwelling older adults with and without concern about falling outdoors. A survey of randomly selected community dwelling older adults across NYC (N = 120) was conducted using the outdoor falls questionnaire. Descriptive quantitative analyses of participant characteristics were conducted for all participants and for those with and without concern about falling outside. Conventional content analysis using two coders was employed to examine outdoor fall experiences for each group. A mixed methods matrix was used to integrate qualitative and quantitative findings. Some participant characteristics were more common among those with a concern about falling outside such as decreased functional status, female gender, and number of prior outdoor falls. As per descriptions of outdoor fall experiences, participants with concern were more likely to report a fall while climbing stairs or stepping up a curb, describe an intrinsic factor as a cause of their fall, use an injury prevention strategy during the fall, sustain a moderate to severe injury, seek medical attention, have had an ambulance called, require help to get up, and describe implementation of a behavioral change after the fall. Differences exist in participant characteristics and outdoor fall experiences of those with and without concern about falling outside. The proposed model can be used to understand fear of falling outdoors and can help to inform the target population and content of intervention programs.

  7. Predicting Falls in People with Multiple Sclerosis: Fall History Is as Accurate as More Complex Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H. Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many people with MS fall, but the best method for identifying those at increased fall risk is not known. Objective. To compare how accurately fall history, questionnaires, and physical tests predict future falls and injurious falls in people with MS. Methods. 52 people with MS were asked if they had fallen in the past 2 months and the past year. Subjects were also assessed with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence, Falls Efficacy Scale-International, and Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 questionnaires, the Expanded Disability Status Scale, Timed 25-Foot Walk, and computerized dynamic posturography and recorded their falls daily for the following 6 months with calendars. The ability of baseline assessments to predict future falls was compared using receiver operator curves and logistic regression. Results. All tests individually provided similar fall prediction (area under the curve (AUC 0.60–0.75. A fall in the past year was the best predictor of falls (AUC 0.75, sensitivity 0.89, specificity 0.56 or injurious falls (AUC 0.69, sensitivity 0.96, specificity 0.41 in the following 6 months. Conclusion. Simply asking people with MS if they have fallen in the past year predicts future falls and injurious falls as well as more complex, expensive, or time-consuming approaches.

  8. Medication use and fall-risk assessment for falls in an acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ming-Huang; Lee, Hsin-Dai; Hwang, Hei-Fen; Wang, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Mau-Roung

    2015-07-01

    A nested case-control study was carried out to examine relationships of a fall-risk score and the use of single medications and polypharmacy with falls among hospitalized patients aged 50 years and older in Taiwan. There were 83 patients who experienced a fall during hospitalization in an acute-care hospital. Matched by age and sex, five control patients for each case were randomly selected from all other inpatients who had not experienced any fall at the time of the index fall. Patients who took tricyclic antidepressants, diuretics, and narcotics were 3.36-, 1.83- and 2.09-fold, respectively, more likely to experience a fall than their counterparts. Conversely, patients who took beta-blockers were 0.34-fold more likely than those who did not take them to experience a fall. Patients taking ≥6 medications were 3.08-fold more likely than those taking fewer medications to experience a fall, whereas those with anxiety were 4.72-fold more likely to experience a fall than those without. A high fall-risk score was not significantly associated with the occurrence of falls. Among older hospitalized patients, tricyclic antidepressants, diuretics, narcotics, and polypharmacy should be mindfully prescribed and reviewed on a regular basis. A fall-risk scale developed from community-dwelling older people might not accurately predict falls in hospitalized patients. Further research to validate the negative effect of beta-blocker use on falls is required. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Masculinity and preventing falls: insights from the fall experiences of men aged 70 years and over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, J L M; Lovarini, Meryl; Clemson, Lindy M; Jang, Haeyoung; Lord, Stephen R; Sherrington, Catherine; Willis, Karen

    2018-01-11

    To explore men's fall experiences through the lens of masculine identities so as to assist health professionals better engage men in fall prevention programs. Twenty-five men, aged 70-93 years who had experienced a recent fall, participated in a qualitative semi-structured interview. Men's willingness to engage in fall prevention programs taking account of individual contexts and expressions of masculinity, were conceptualised using constant comparative methods. Men's willingness to engage in fall prevention programs was related to their perceptions of the preventability of falls; personal relevance of falls; and age, health, and capability as well as problem-solving styles to prevent falls. Fall prevention advice was rarely given when men accessed the health system at the time of a fall. Contrary to dominant expectations about masculine identity, many men acknowledged fall vulnerability indicating they would attend or consider attending, a fall prevention program. Health professionals can better engage men by providing consistent messages that falls can be prevented; tailoring advice, understanding men are at different stages in their awareness of fall risk and preferences for action; and by being aware of their own assumptions that can act as barriers to speaking with men about fall prevention. Implications for rehabilitation Men accessing the health system at the time of the fall, and during rehabilitation following a fall represent prime opportunities for health professionals to speak with men about preventing falls and make appropriate referrals to community programs. Tailored advice will take account of individual men's perceptions of preventability; personal relevance; perceptions of age, health and capability; and problem-solving styles.

  10. Geriatric falls: prevention strategies for the staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, R; Chester, F R; Pierce, L L; Salter, J P; Schreck, S; Radziewicz, R

    1993-09-01

    1. Multiple falls and injuries are more prevalent among elderly over the age of 75 and are the second leading cause of accidental death in the elderly. The risk for falling is noted to be significantly greater in the hospitalized elderly. 2. Review of retrospective quality improvement chart audits revealed that peak fall times were associated with the patient's need for toileting, rest, and obtaining nutrition and hydration. 3. The MetroHealth Falls Prevention Program is based on simple proactive measures to prevent falls in the elderly. 4. An effective falls prevention program has several implications for gerontological nursing practice, including less restraint use, increased patient autonomy, and decreased loss of self-esteem. There is also a sense of increased nursing control over patient safety and time management, as well as implications for further nursing research.

  11. IDENTIFYING ROOF FALL PREDICTORS USING FUZZY CLASSIFICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring involves placing geophones on the rock surfaces of a mine to record seismic activity. Classification of microseismic mine data can be used to predict seismic events in a mine to mitigate mining hazards, such as roof falls, where properly bolting and bracing the roof is often an insufficient method of preventing weak roofs from destabilizing. In this study, six months of recorded acoustic waveforms from microseismic monitoring in a Pennsylvania limestone mine were analyzed using classification techniques to predict roof falls. Fuzzy classification using features selected for computational ease was applied on the mine data. Both large roof fall events could be predicted using a Roof Fall Index (RFI) metric calculated from the results of the fuzzy classification. RFI was successfully used to resolve the two significant roof fall events and predicted both events by at least 15 hours before visual signs of the roof falls were evident.

  12. Experiments on melt droplets falling into a water pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okkonen, T.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data and analysis related to melt droplets falling into a water pool. A binary CaO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt mixture is used to study the influence of melt superheat and water subcooling on droplet deformation and fragmentation. For the conditions studied (We {<=} 1000), the surface tension of the melt droplet and the film boiling stability greatly affect the fragmentation behaviour. If the melt temperature is between the liquidus and solidus point (mushy zone) or if the film boiling is stable due to a relatively low subcooling, the droplet deformation and fragmentation are mitigated. This behaviour can be related to the effective Weber number (We) of the melt droplet upon entry into the water pool. Similar phenomena can be expected also for interactions of corium (UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}) and water, which are characterized by a potentially fast transformation of melt into the mushy zone and by particularly stable film boiling. (author)

  13. Gait, mobility, and falls in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwind, Yves Josef

    2012-01-01

    My doctoral thesis contributes to the understanding of gait, mobility, and falls in older people. All presented projects investigated the most prominent and sensitive markers for fall-related gait changes, that is gait velocity and gait variability. Based on the measurement of these spatio-temporal gait parameters, particularly when using a change-sensitive dual task paradigm, it is possible to make conclusions regarding walking, balance, activities of daily living, and falls in o...

  14. thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    microscopy (SEM) studies, respectively. The Fourier transform ... Thin films; chemical synthesis; hydrous tin oxide; FTIR; electrical properties. 1. Introduction ... dehydrogenation of organic compounds (Hattori et al 1987). .... SEM images of (a) bare stainless steel and (b) SnO2:H2O thin film on stainless steel substrate at a ...

  15. Into films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Ed S.; Doicaru, Miruna M.; Hakemulder, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Most film viewers know the experience of being deeply absorbed in the story of a popular film. It seems that at such moments they lose awareness of watching a movie. And yet it is highly unlikely that they completely ignore the fact that they watch a narrative and technological construction. Perh...

  16. Investigation of the falling water flow with evaporation for the passive containment cooling system and its scaling-down criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Li, Junming; Li, Le

    2018-02-01

    Falling water evaporation cooling could efficiently suppress the containment operation pressure during the nuclear accident, by continually removing the core decay heat to the atmospheric environment. In order to identify the process of large-scale falling water evaporation cooling, the water flow characteristics of falling film, film rupture and falling rivulet were deduced, on the basis of previous correlation studies. The influences of the contact angle, water temperature and water flow rates on water converge along the flow direction were then numerically obtained and results were compared with the data for AP1000 and CAP1400 nuclear power plants. By comparisons, it is concluded that the water coverage fraction of falling water could be enhanced by either reducing the surface contact angle or increasing the water temperature. The falling water flow with evaporation for AP1000 containment was then calculated and the feature of its water coverage fraction was analyzed. Finally, based on the phenomena identification of falling water flow for AP1000 containment evaporation cooling, the scaling-down is performed and the dimensionless criteria were obtained.

  17. Microwave properties of HTS films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, D.W.; Arendt, P.M.; Grey, E.R.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Bennett, B.L.; Foltyn, S.R.; Estler, R.C.; Wu, X.D.; Reeves, G.A.; Elliott, N.E.; Brown, D.R.; Portis, A.M.; Taber, R.C.; Mogrocampero, A.

    1990-01-01

    High-frequency applications of high- temperature superconductors generally fall into two categories: 1) devices that require low values (relative to Cu) of surface resistance R S in ambient surface magnetic fields H rf ; and 2) devices that require low R S in modest fields (H rf ∼ 250 Oe). Moreover, many applications can be realized with small- surface-area films (∼ 1 cm 2 ) whereas others require larger areas - radiofrequency (rf) cavities, for example. Regardless of the application, the potential of HTS films is predicted on satisfying one or both of the above-stated requirements. The authors have measured the surface resistance of small-area (1 cm 2 ) and large-area (6.5 cm 2 ) YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) films that have been laser ablated onto LaA ell O 3 substrates, large-area (5.1 cm 2 YBCO films that have been e-beam deposited onto LaA ell O 3 , and large-area (11.4 cm 2 ) T ell-based films that have been magnetron sputtered onto metallic substrates. The best R S values are obtained from the 1-cm 2 laser-ablated films; they are 40 μΩ and 340 μΩ at 4 K And 77 K, respectively (ω/2π = 10 GHz). Comparable values for Cu are 6 and 13 mΩ, respectively. Large-area T ell-based films yield typical R S values of 4 mΩ and 14 mΩ at 4 K and 77 K, respectively (ω/2π = 18 GHz). The dependence of R S on H rf for these films indicates that surface fields as large as 55 Oe can be achieved with R S increasing only by a factor of 10. This field dependence is associated with c-axis texturing

  18. Falls and fear of falling predict future falls and related injuries in ambulatory individuals with spinal cord injury: a longitudinal observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Jørgensen

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Ambulatory individuals have a high risk of falling and of fall-related injuries. Fall history, fear of falling and walking speed could predict recurrent falls and injurious falls. Further studies with larger samples are needed to validate these findings. [Jørgensen V, Butler Forslund E, Opheim A, Franzén E, Wahman K, Hultling C, Seiger Å, Ståhle A, Stanghelle JK, Roaldsen KS (2017 Falls and fear of falling predict future falls and related injuries in ambulatory individuals with spinal cord injury: a longitudinal observational study. Journal of Physiotherapy 63: 108–113

  19. Prevalence of falls in elderly women

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor,Priscila Regina Rorato; Oliveira,Ana Carolina Kovaleski de; Kohler,Renan; Winter,Gabriele Regiane; Rodacki,Cintia; Krause,Maressa Priscila

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify prevalence of falls and fear of falling, and to compare functional fitness among elderly women fallers and non-fallers. METHODS: Seventy-eight elderly women participated in this study. Cases of falls and the fear of falling were self-reported by the elderly women, while the functional fitness was measured by a set of functional tests. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe the sample. Independent t-test was used to compare functional fitness between groups. RES...

  20. Radar fall detection using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokanovic, Branka; Amin, Moeness; Ahmad, Fauzia; Boashash, Boualem

    2016-05-01

    Falls are a major cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries in people aged 65 years and older. Radar has the potential to become one of the leading technologies for fall detection, thereby enabling the elderly to live independently. Existing techniques for fall detection using radar are based on manual feature extraction and require significant parameter tuning in order to provide successful detections. In this paper, we employ principal component analysis for fall detection, wherein eigen images of observed motions are employed for classification. Using real data, we demonstrate that the PCA based technique provides performance improvement over the conventional feature extraction methods.

  1. Ageing vision and falls: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saftari, Liana Nafisa; Kwon, Oh-Sang

    2018-04-23

    Falls are the leading cause of accidental injury and death among older adults. One of three adults over the age of 65 years falls annually. As the size of elderly population increases, falls become a major concern for public health and there is a pressing need to understand the causes of falls thoroughly. While it is well documented that visual functions such as visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and stereo acuity are correlated with fall risks, little attention has been paid to the relationship between falls and the ability of the visual system to perceive motion in the environment. The omission of visual motion perception in the literature is a critical gap because it is an essential function in maintaining balance. In the present article, we first review existing studies regarding visual risk factors for falls and the effect of ageing vision on falls. We then present a group of phenomena such as vection and sensory reweighting that provide information on how visual motion signals are used to maintain balance. We suggest that the current list of visual risk factors for falls should be elaborated by taking into account the relationship between visual motion perception and balance control.

  2. The Fall 2000 and Fall 2001 SOHO-Ulysses Quadratures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    SOHO-Ulysses quadrature occurs when the SOHO-Sun-Ulysses included angle is 90 degrees. It is only at such times that the same plasma leaving the Sun in the direction of Ulysses can first be remotely analyzed with SOHO instruments and then later be sampled in situ by Ulysses instruments. The quadratures in December 2000 and 2001 are of special significance because Ulysses will be near the south and north heliographic poles, respectively, and the solar cycle will be near sunspot maximum. Quadrature geometry is sometimes confusing and observations are influenced by solar rotation. The Fall 2000 and 2001 quadratures are more complex than usual because Ulysses is not in a true polar orbit and the orbital speed of Ulysses about the Sun is becoming comparable to the speed of SOHO about the Sun. In 2000 Ulysses will always be slightly behind the pole but will appear to hang over the pole for over two months because it is moving around the Sun in the same direction as SOHO. In 2001 Ulysses will be slightly in front of the pole so that its footpoint will be directly observable. Detailed plots will be shown of the relative positions of SOHO and Ulysses will their relative positions. In neither case is true quadrature actually achieved, but this works to the observers advantage in 2001.

  3. Falls, a fear of falling and related factors in older adults with complex chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Choi, MoonKi; Kim, Chang Oh

    2017-12-01

    To identify factors influencing falls and the fear of falling among older adults with chronic diseases in Korea. The fear of falling and falls in older adults are significant health problems towards which healthcare providers should direct their attention. Further investigation is needed to improve nursing practice specifically decreasing risk of falls and the fear of falling in Korea. Descriptive, cross-sectional survey. A convenience sample of 108 patients was recruited at the geriatric outpatient department of a tertiary hospital in Seoul, Korea. Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, medication use, fall history, level of physical activity, activities of daily living, mobility, muscle strength, and a fear of falling were investigated. Student's t tests, chi-square tests and multiple linear regressions were used in statistical analysis. Thirty-six participants (33.3%) among 108 subjects reported experiencing ≥1 falls in the past year. Marital status and the use of antipsychotics were associated with falls, while other factors were not significantly related to falls. Only benign prostatic hypertrophy and polypharmacy were significantly related to the fear of falling in the analysis of the relationships between chronic disease, medication use and fear of falling. In the regression model, the number of comorbidities, level of physical activity, activities of daily living and mobility were predictors of a fear of falling. Medication use was marginally significant, in the model. Increasing physical activity, functional fitness and physical independence is important to decrease the fear of falling, and to encourage active and healthy lives in older adults. The findings from this study provide evidence for the development of nursing interventions for older adults. We recommend early screening for a fear of falling and nursing interventions to decrease the fear of falling through enhancing physical activity level and function. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Which Fall Ascertainment Method Captures Most Falls in Pre-Frail and Frail Seniors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teister, Corina J; Chocano-Bedoya, Patricia O; Orav, Endel J; Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Meyer, Ursina; Meyer, Otto W; Freystaetter, Gregor; Gagesch, Michael; Rizzoli, Rene; Egli, Andreas; Theiler, Robert; Kanis, John A; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A

    2018-06-15

    There is no consensus on most reliable falls ascertainment method. Therefore, we investigated which method captures most falls among pre-frail and frail seniors from two randomized controlled trials conducted in Zurich, Switzerland, a 18-month trial (2009-2010) including 200 community-dwelling pre-frail seniors with a prior fall and a 12-month trial (2005-2008) including 173 frail seniors with acute hip fracture. Both included the same fall ascertainment methods: monthly active-asking, daily self-report diary, and a call-in hotline. We compared number of falls reported and estimated overall and positive percent agreement between methods. Pre-frail seniors reported 499 falls (rate = 2.5/year) and frail seniors reported 205 falls (rate = 1.4/year). Most falls were reported by active-asking: 81% of falls in pre-frail, and 78% in frail seniors. Among pre-frail seniors, diaries captured additional 19% falls, while hotline added none. Among frail seniors, hotline added 16% falls, while diaries added 6%. The positive percent agreement between active-asking and diary was 100% among pre-frail and 88% among frail seniors. While monthly active-asking captures most falls in both groups, this method alone missed 19% of falls in pre-frail and 22% in frail seniors. Thus, a combination of active-asking and diaries for pre-frail, and active-asking and the hotline for frail seniors is warranted.

  5. Impact of Fall Prevention on Nurses and Care of Fall Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara; Pecanac, Kristen; Krupp, Anna; Liebzeit, Daniel; Mahoney, Jane

    2018-03-19

    Falls are common events for hospitalized older adults, resulting in negative outcomes both for patients and hospitals. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) has placed pressure on hospital administrators by identifying falls as a "never event", resulting in a zero falls goal for many hospitals. Staff nurses are responsible for providing direct care to patients and for meeting the hospital no falls goal. Little is known about the impact of "zero falls" on nurses, patients and the organization. A qualitative study, using Grounded Dimensional Analysis (GDA) was conducted to explore nurses' experiences with fall prevention in hospital settings and the impact of those experiences on how nurses provide care to fall risk patients. Twenty-seven registered nurses and certified nursing assistants participated in in-depth interviews. Open, axial and selective coding was used to analyze data. A conceptual model which illustrates the impact of intense messaging from nursing administration to prevent patient falls on nurses, actions nurses take to address the message and the consequences to nurses, older adult patients and to the organization was developed. Intense messaging from hospital administration to achieve zero falls resulted in nurses developing a fear of falls, protecting self and unit, and restricting fall risk patients as a way to stop messages and meet the hospital goal. Results of this study identify unintended consequences of fall prevention message on nurses and older adult patients. Further research is needed understand how nurse care for fall risk patients.

  6. How Do Community-Dwelling Persons with Alzheimer Disease Fall Falls in the FINALEX Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko M. Perttila

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: People with dementia are at high risk for falls. However, little is known of the features causing falls in Alzheimer disease (AD. Our aim was to investigate how participants with AD fall. Methods: In the FINALEX (Finnish Alzheimer Disease Exercise Trial study, participants’ (n = 194 falls were followed up for 1 year by diaries kept by their spouses. Results: The most common reason for falls (n = 355 was stumbling (n = 61. Of the falls, 123 led to injuries, 50 to emergency department visits, and 13 to fractures. The participants without falls (n = 103 were younger and had milder dementia than those with 1 (n = 34 or ≥2 falls (n = 57. Participants with a Mini Mental State Examination score of around 10 points were most prone to fall. In adjusted regression models, good nutritional status, good physical functioning, and use of antihypertensive medication (incident rate ratio [IRR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54–0.85 protected against falls, whereas fall history (IRR 2.71, 95% CI 2.13–3.44, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, higher number of drugs, drugs with anticholinergic properties, psychotropics, and opioids (IRR 4.27, 95% CI 2.92–6.24 were risk factors for falls. Conclusions: Our study provides a detailed account on how and why people with AD fall, suggesting several risk and protective factors.

  7. Is a fall just a fall : correlates of falling in healthy older persons. The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rekeneire, Nathalie; Visser, Marjolein; Peila, Rita; Nevitt, Michael C; Cauley, Jane A; Tylavsky, Frances A; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Harris, Tamara B

    OBJECTIVES: To identify factors associated with falling in well-functioning older people. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of report of falls over the past 12 months using baseline data from the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. SETTING: Clinic examinations in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, or

  8. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history as predictors of future falls in older women: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, A; Viljanen, A

    2010-01-01

    mobility limitation. Fall history was recalled for previous 12 months and dichotomized. The incidence of future falls over 12 months was followed up with fall calendars. RESULTS: During the fall follow-up, a total of 440 falls were reported by 201 participants. Among those with fall history, women...

  9. Electrical properties of ZnO thin films grown by MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagni, O. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Somhlahlo, N.N. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Weichsel, C. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Leitch, A.W.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)]. E-mail: andrew.leitch@nmmu.ac.za

    2006-04-01

    We report on the electrical characterization of ZnO films grown by MOCVD on glass and sapphire substrates. After correcting our temperature variable Hall measurements by applying the standard two-layer model, which takes into account an interfacial layer, scattering mechanisms in the ZnO films were studied as well as donor activation energies determined. ZnO films grown at different oxygen partial pressures indicated the importance of growth conditions on the defect structure by means of their conductivities and conductivity activation energies.

  10. Electrical properties of ZnO thin films grown by MOCVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagni, O.; Somhlahlo, N.N.; Weichsel, C.; Leitch, A.W.R.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the electrical characterization of ZnO films grown by MOCVD on glass and sapphire substrates. After correcting our temperature variable Hall measurements by applying the standard two-layer model, which takes into account an interfacial layer, scattering mechanisms in the ZnO films were studied as well as donor activation energies determined. ZnO films grown at different oxygen partial pressures indicated the importance of growth conditions on the defect structure by means of their conductivities and conductivity activation energies

  11. Approach to Fall in Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ilkin Naharci

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Falls are one of the geriatric syndromes which occur commonly and significantly increase morbidity and mortality rates in elderly. The incidence of falls increases with age. Falls usually occur when impairments in cognitive, behavioral, and executive function begin. The incidence of fall is between 30 and 40 percent of community-dwelling people and approximately 50 percent of individuals in the long-term care setting over the age of 65 years. Fracture (hip, arm, wrist, pelvis, head trauma or major lacerations, as defined serious wounding, occur 10-25% of elderly cases. Fall is overlooked in clinical examination due to various reasons; the patient never mentions the event to a doctor; there is no injury at the time of the fall; the doctor fails to ask the patient about a history of falls; or either doctor or patient erroneously believes that falls are an inevitable part of the aging process. Elderly give not usually any self-information about fall, for this reason, all older patients should be asked at least once per year about falls and should be assessed in terms of balance and gait disorders. There are many distinct causes for falls in old people. Falls in older individuals occur when a threat to the normal homeostatic mechanisms that maintain postural stability is superimposed on underlying age-related declines in balance, ambulation, and cardiovascular function. This factor may be an acute illness (eg, fever, water loss, arrhythmia, a new medication, an environmental stress (eg, unfamiliar surrounding, or an unsafe walking surface. The elderly person can not cope with happened additional stress. To prevent and decrease the frequency of falls, effective approaches are medical interventions, environmental modifications, education-exercise programs, and assisted device. Detection and amelioration of risk factors can significantly reduce the rate of future falls. The assessment of fall, causing mobility restriction, use of nursing home, and

  12. Anxiety disorders and falls among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, K L; Williams, L J; Brennan-Olsen, S L; Morse, A G; Kotowicz, M A; Nicholson, G C; Pasco, J A

    2016-11-15

    Falls are common among older adults and can lead to serious injuries, including fractures. We aimed to determine associations between anxiety disorders and falls in older adults. Participants were 487 men and 376 women aged ≥60 years enrolled in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, Australia. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Non-patient edition (SCID-I/NP), lifetime history of anxiety disorders was determined. Falls were determined by self-report. In men, a falls-risk score (Elderly Falls Screening Test (EFST)) was also calculated. Among fallers, 24 of 299 (8.0%) had a lifetime history of anxiety disorder compared to 36 of 634 (5.7%) non-fallers (p=0.014). Examination of the association between anxiety and falls suggested differential relationships for men and women. In men, following adjustment for psychotropic medications, mobility and blood pressure, lifetime anxiety disorder was associated with falling (OR 2.96; 95%CI 1.07-8.21) and with EFST score (OR 3.46; 95%CI 1.13-10.6). In women, an association between lifetime anxiety disorder and falls was explained by psychotropic medication use, poor mobility and socioeconomic status. Sub-group analyses involving types of anxiety and anxiety disorders over the past 12-months were not performed due to power limitations. Although anxiety disorders were independently associated with a 3-fold increase in likelihood of reported falls and high falls risk among men, an independent association was not detected among women. These results may aid in prevention of falls through specific interventions aimed at reducing anxiety, particularly in men. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Dance movement therapy and falls prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Maggi, Stefania; Schofield, Patricia; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-08-01

    Falls are a leading cause of morbidity, healthcare use and mortality. Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people and previous research has suggested that it may improve various health outcomes in this population, including balance, gait and muscle performance. A systematic review of the potential benefits of dance on falls and fear of falling is lacking. Thus, we conducted a systematic review considering all randomized controls trials (RCTs) investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. Major databases were searched from inception until 1 March 2017 and a total of 10 RCTs were identified, which included a total of 680 people (n=356 dance, n=324 control). Overall, the mean age of the samples was 69.4 years, and 75.2% were female. Across four RCTs, dance therapy reduced falls versus usual care in only one study. Dance therapy improved fear of falling in two out of three included RCTs. There were no serious adverse events reported in the RCTs. In summary, we found a paucity of studies investigating the effect of dance on falls and fear of falling and the evidence base is preliminary and equivocal. Given the heterogeneity of the included samples and interventions, in addition to the short-term follow-up, no firm conclusions can be drawn. However, dance appears to be safe and, given its popularity and demonstrated benefits on other health/wellbeing outcomes in older adults, it is important that future research considers its potential benefits on falls/fear of falling in older age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Controlled Topological Transitions in Thin-Film Phase Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Hennessy, Matthew G.; Burlakov, Victor M.; Goriely, Alain; Wagner, Barbara; Mü nch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. In this paper the evolution of a binary mixture in a thin-film geometry with a wall at the top and bottom is considered. By bringing the mixture into its miscibility gap so that no spinodal decomposition occurs in the bulk, a slight energetic bias of the walls toward each one of the constituents ensures the nucleation of thin boundary layers that grow until the constituents have moved into one of the two layers. These layers are separated by an interfacial region where the composition changes rapidly. Conditions that ensure the separation into two layers with a thin interfacial region are investigated based on a phase-field model. Using matched asymptotic expansions a corresponding sharp-interface problem for the location of the interface is established. It is then argued that this newly created two-layer system is not at its energetic minimum but destabilizes into a controlled self-replicating pattern of trapezoidal vertical stripes by minimizing the interfacial energy between the phases while conserving their area. A quantitative analysis of this mechanism is carried out via a thin-film model for the free interfaces, which is derived asymptotically from the sharp-interface model.

  15. Falling into Salvation in Cioran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Acquisto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While, at first glance, there seems to be very little room in the thought of E.M. Cioran for the notion of salvation, a closer look reveals that Cioran returns constantly to the vocabulary and the concept of redemption. This article teases out Cioran’s complex use of the topos of salvation throughout his works, with special emphasis on his middle period. I begin by tracing Cioran’s notion of humanity’s fall into time and language, from which he claims there can be no salvation in the traditional Christian sense. Nonetheless, he retains the concept, claiming at various points that there is a kind of salvation to be found in suicide, music, silence, and skepticism. Ultimately, however, each of these provides only false salvation, since the only permanent solution to the problem of existence for Cioran would be either to cease to exist or to lose our human nature in exchange for a plant-like life. Since this is impossible, we are left with our human means of seeking deliverance. While Cioran generally condemns human attempts at creation or procreation, he takes a different approach to the act of writing. In his reflections on writing we see that salvation for Cioran is always temporary, provisional, and threatened by our next bout of lucidity, but at the same time, eternally renewable with each new act of writing.

  16. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Nuclear winter or nuclear fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, André

    Climate is universal. If a major modern nuclear war (i.e., with a large number of small-yield weapons) were to happen, it is not even necessary to have a specific part of the world directly involved for there to be cause to worry about the consequences for its inhabitants and their future. Indeed, smoke from fires ignited by the nuclear explosions would be transported by winds all over the world, causing dark and cold. According to the first study, by Turco et al. [1983], air surface temperature over continental areas of the northern mid-latitudes (assumed to be the nuclear war theatre) would fall to winter levels even in summer (hence the term “nuclear winter”) and induce drastic climatic conditions for several months at least. The devastating effects of a nuclear war would thus last much longer than was assumed initially. Discussing to what extent these estimations of long-term impacts on climate are reliable is the purpose of this article.

  18. A Successful ED Fall Risk Program Using the KINDER 1 Fall RiskAssessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ann B; Valle-Ortiz, Marisol; Sansweet, Tracy

    2016-11-01

    Emergency nurses did not perform falls risk assessments routinely on our ED patients; the instrument used was aimed at inpatients. We identified a need to revise fall assessment practices specific to our emergency department. The purpose of the performance improvement project was to reduce ED falls and evaluate the use of an ED-specific fall risk tool, the KINDER 1 Fall Risk Assessment. The plan was to establish fall risk assessment practices at point of ED entry and to decrease total falls. We retrospectively reviewed ED fall data for each quarter of 2013, which included risk assessments scores, the total number of falls, and the circumstances of each fall. Using Kotter's framework to guide a successful change process, we implemented the KINDER 1 to assess fall risk. During the first 4 weeks of the project, 937 patients (27%) were identified as high risk for falls using the KINDER 1. During the subsequent 3 quarters, the total number of falls decreased; reported falls without injuries dropped from 0.21 to 0.07 per 1000 patients, and falls with injuries were reduced from 0.21 to 0.0 per 1000 patients. The results of this project represented a valuable step toward achieving our goal to keep ED patients safe from injuries as a result of falls. The findings add to the body of nursing knowledge on the application of clinical-based performance improvement projects to improve patient outcomes and to provide data on the use of the KINDER 1 tool, which has not been extensively tested. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Demens Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2012-01-01

    I forbindelse med opstarten af Demens Film projektet har der været nedsat en ekspertgruppe, som er kommet med en række anbefalinger omkring film til mennesker med demens. Anbefalingerne skal bruges i de næste faser af projektet. Deltagerne i ekspertgruppen var sammensat af en bred gruppe...... fagpersoner inde for forskellige fagområder. Læs mere om gruppens anbefalinger og sammensætning af ekspertgruppen i den kort rapport som er offentlig tilgængelig. Læs Ekspertgruppe anbefalingerne til Demens Film projekt....

  20. How Fast Does a Building Fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the time required for a tower block to collapse is calculated. The tower collapses progressively, with one floor falling onto the floor below, causing it to fall. The rate of collapse is found to be not much slower than freefall. The calculation is an engaging and relevant application of Newton's laws, suitable for undergraduate…

  1. Free Fall and the Equivalence Principle Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Free fall is commonly discussed as an example of the equivalence principle, in the context of a homogeneous gravitational field, which is a reasonable approximation for small test masses falling moderate distances. Newton's law of gravity provides a generalisation to larger distances, and also brings in an inhomogeneity in the gravitational field.…

  2. Falls from height: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Kasim; Sarihan, Mehmet Ediz; Colak, Cemil; Güven, Taner; Gür, Ali; Gürbüz, Sükrü

    2018-01-01

    Emergency services manage trauma patients frequently and falls from height comprise the main cause of emergency service admissions. In this study, we aimed to analyse the demographic characteristics of falls from height and their relationship to the mortality. A total of 460 patients, who admitted to the Emergency Department of Inonu University between November 2011 and November 2014 with a history of fall from height, were examined retrospectively. Demographic parameters, fall characteristics and their effect to mortality were evaluated statistically. The study comprised of 292 (63.5%) men and 168 (36.5%) women patients. The mean age of all patients was 27±24.99 years. Twenty-six (5.6%) patients died and the majority of them were in ≥62 years old group. The highest percentage of falls was at 0-5 years age group (28.3%). People fell mainly from 1.1-4 metres(m) level (46.1%). The causes of falls were ordered as unintentional (92.2%), workplace (8.1%) and suicidal (1.7%). Skin and soft tissue injuries (37.4%) were the main traumatic lesions. Age, fall height, fall place, lineer skull fracture, subarachnoidal hemorrhage, cervical fracture, thoracic vertebra fracture and trauma scores had statistically significant effect on mortality. The casualties died because of subarachnoid hemorrhage mostly.

  3. Fall prevention strategy in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muray, Mwali; Bélanger, Charles H; Razmak, Jamil

    2018-02-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to document the need for implementing a fall prevention strategy in an emergency department (ED). The paper also spells out the research process that led to approving an assessment tool for use in hospital outpatient services. Design/methodology/approach The fall risk assessment tool was based on the Morse Fall Scale. Gender mix and age above 65 and 80 years were assessed on six risk assessment variables using χ 2 analyses. A logistic regression analysis and model were used to test predictor strength and relationships among variables. Findings In total, 5,371 (56.5 percent) geriatric outpatients were deemed to be at fall risk during the study. Women have a higher falls incidence in young and old age categories. Being on medications for patients above 80 years exposed both genders to equal fall risks. Regression analysis explained 73-98 percent of the variance in the six-variable tool. Originality/value Canadian quality and safe healthcare accreditation standards require that hospital staff develop and adhere to fall prevention policies. Anticipated physiological falls can be prevented by healthcare interventions, particularly with older people known to bear higher risk factors. An aging population is increasing healthcare volumes and medical challenges. Precautionary measures for patients with a vulnerable cognitive and physical status are essential for quality care.

  4. Disproportion in the falling birth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R R

    1977-10-08

    Since 1962 there has been a disproportionately greater fall in the number of small (less than 1000 g) live births than total live births: this has applied to Sheffield and to England and Wales but more to the former. This may have affected falling neonatal mortality rates.

  5. Osteosarcopenic obesity and fall prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Cruz-Díaz, David; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2015-02-01

    Sarcopenia, obesity, and osteoporosis are three interrelated entities which may share common pathophysiological factors. In the last decades, overall survival has drastically increased. Postmenopausal women, due to their estrogen depletion, are at higher risk of developing any of these three conditions or the three, which is termed osteosarcopenic obesity. One of the most common health problems among these patients is the elevated risk of falls and fractures. Falls and fall-related injuries are one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in older adults, and have a significant impact on social, economical and health-related costs. Several extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors have been described that play a role in the etiology of falls. A therapeutic approach to osteosarcopenic obesity aimed at the prevention of falls must include several factors, and act on those risk elements which can be effectively modified. An adequate weight-loss diet and a good nutritional intake, with an appropriate amount of vitamin D and the right protein/carbohydrates ratio, may contribute to the prevention of falls. The recommendation of physical exercise, both traditional (resistance or aerobic training) and more recent varieties (Tai Chi, Pilates, body vibration), can improve balance and positively contribute to fall prevention, whether by itself or in combination with other therapeutic strategies. Finally, a pharmacological approach, especially one focused on hormone therapy, has shown to have a positive effect on postmenopausal women's balance, leading to a decreased risk of falls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nurses' Job Satisfaction and Patient Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia D. Alvarez, DNP, RN

    2007-09-01

    Results and Conclusion: No significant relationship was found between overall nurses' job satisfaction and patient fall rate. MD–RN interactions (r = .65 and decision-making (r = .57 were the job satisfaction subscales that showed a significant positive correlation with patient fall rate (p < .05. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  7. Risk factors for falls of older citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelens, C.; Hekman, E. E. G.; Verkerke, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fall prevention is a major issue in the ageing society. This study provides an overview of all risk factors for falls of older citizens. METHOD: A literature search was conducted to retrieve studies of the past 25 years. All participants from the studies lived in the community or

  8. On free fall of a relativistic particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, N.A.; Paramonova, N.N.; Shavokhina, N.S.

    2005-01-01

    The free fall of a relativistic particle is considered: the well-known fact of the light velocity constancy is taken into account in the Galilean problem about the movement of a particle from nongravitational forces and its fall onto the ground. The velocity hodograph and the world line of the particle are found

  9. Exploring Older Adult ED Fall Patients' Understanding of Their Fall: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Kalpana N; Taylor, Devon; Rizzo, Caroline T; Liu, Shan W

    2017-12-01

    We sought to understand older patients' perspectives about their fall, fall risk factors, and attitude toward emergency department (ED) fall-prevention interventions. We conducted semistructured interviews between July 2015 and January 2016 of community-dwelling, nondemented patients in the ED, who presented with a fall to an urban, teaching hospital. Interviews were halted once we achieve thematic saturation with the data coded and categorized into themes. Of the 63 patients interviewed, patients blamed falls on the environment, accidents, a medical condition, or themselves. Three major themes were generated: (1) patients blamed falls on a multitude of things but never acknowledged a possible multifactorial rationale, (2) patients have variable level of concerns regarding their current fall and future fall risk, and (3) patients demonstrated a range of receptiveness to ED interventions aimed at preventing falls but provided little input as to what those interventions should be. Many older patients who fall do not understand their fall risk. However, based on the responses provided, older adults tend to be more receptive to intervention and more concerned about their future fall risk, making the ED an appropriate setting for intervention.

  10. Characteristics of daily life gait in fall and non fall-prone stroke survivors and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirjam Pijnappels; Sjoerd M. Bruijn; Kimberley M. Schooten; Jaap H. van Dieën; Dr. H.M. Wittink; Michiel Punt

    2016-01-01

    Background: Falls in stroke survivors can lead to serious injuries and medical costs. Fall risk in older adults can be predicted based on gait characteristics measured in daily life. Given the different gait patterns that stroke survivors exhibit it is unclear whether a similar fall-prediction model

  11. [Fear of falling in a fall clinic for geriatric patients: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dautzenberg, P.LJ.; Buurman, B.H.; Loonen, A.J.; Wouters, C.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we want to determine how often fear of falling occurs in geriatric patients visiting a fall clinic and to study the characteristics of fear of falling and its consequences. DESIGN: Retrospective study of patient's records. METHOD: A random sample of 100 medical records

  12. Prospective study of falls and risk factors for falls in adults with advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol A

    2012-06-10

    Retrospective studies of inpatients with cancer suggest that a cancer diagnosis confers a high risk of falls. In adults with advanced cancer, we aimed to prospectively document the incidence of falls, identify the risk factors, and determine if falls in this population occur predominantly in older patients.

  13. Fall Detection Using Smartphone Audio Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheffena, Michael

    2016-07-01

    An automated fall detection system based on smartphone audio features is developed. The spectrogram, mel frequency cepstral coefficents (MFCCs), linear predictive coding (LPC), and matching pursuit (MP) features of different fall and no-fall sound events are extracted from experimental data. Based on the extracted audio features, four different machine learning classifiers: k-nearest neighbor classifier (k-NN), support vector machine (SVM), least squares method (LSM), and artificial neural network (ANN) are investigated for distinguishing between fall and no-fall events. For each audio feature, the performance of each classifier in terms of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and computational complexity is evaluated. The best performance is achieved using spectrogram features with ANN classifier with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy all above 98%. The classifier also has acceptable computational requirement for training and testing. The system is applicable in home environments where the phone is placed in the vicinity of the user.

  14. Analysis of the Deformability of Two-Layer Materials AZ31/Eutectic / Analiza Możliwości Odkształcania Plastycznego Materiału Dwuwarstwowego AZ31/Eutektyka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mola R.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper present the results of physical simulation of the deformation of the two-layered AZ31/eutectic material using the Gleeble 3800 metallurgical processes simulator. The eutectic layer was produced on the AZ31 substrate using thermochemical treatment. The specimens of AZ31 alloy were heat treated in contact with aluminium powder at 445°C in a vacuum furnace. Depending on the heating time, Al-enriched surface layers with a thickness of 400, 700 and 1100 μm were fabricated on a substrate which was characterized by an eutectic structure composed of the Mg17Al12 phase and a solid solution of aluminium in magnesium. In the study, physical simulation of the fabricated two-layered specimens with a varying thickness of the eutectic layer were deformed using the plane strain compression test at various values of strain rates. The testing results have revealed that it is possible to deform the two-layered AZ31/eutectic material at low strain rates and small deformation values.

  15. Effect of a Multidisciplinary Fall Risk Assessment on Falls Among Neurology Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunderfund, Andrea N. Leep; Sweeney, Cynthia M.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Johnson, LeAnn M.; Britton, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the addition of a physician assessment of patient fall risk at admission would reduce inpatient falls on a tertiary hospital neurology inpatient unit. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A physician fall risk assessment was added to the existing risk assessment process (clinical nurse evaluation and Hendrich II Fall Risk Model score with specific fall prevention measures for patients at risk). An order to select either “Patient is” or “Patient is not at high risk of falls by physician assessment” was added to the physician electronic admission order set. Nurses and physicians were instructed to reach consensus when assessments differed. Full implementation occurred in second-quarter 2008. Preimplementation (January 1, 2006, to March 31, 2008) and postimplementation (April 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009) rates of falls were compared on the neurology inpatient unit and on 6 other medical units that did not receive intervention. RESULTS: The rate of falls during the 7 quarters after full implementation was significantly lower than that during the 9 preceding quarters (4.12 vs 5.69 falls per 1000 patient-days; P=.04), whereas the rate of falls on other medical units did not significantly change (2.99 vs 3.33 falls per 1000 patient-days; P=.24, Poisson test). The consensus risk assessment at admission correctly identified patients at risk for falls (14/325 at-risk patients fell vs 0/147 low-risk patients; P=.01, χ2 test), but the Hendrich II Fall Risk Model score, nurse, and physician assessments individually did not. CONCLUSION: A multidisciplinary approach to fall risk assessment is feasible, correctly identifies patients at risk, and was associated with a reduction in inpatient falls. PMID:21193651

  16. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, Aisling M

    2011-12-19

    Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05) in older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05). Upon controlling for age and gender affects, logistic regression modelling revealed that increasing variability associated with the vigilance (top-down) aspect of sustained attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p < 0.01, OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03 - 1.26) in the previous year and was weakly correlated with reduced falls efficacy in non-fallers (p = 0.07). Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention

  17. Polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2004-05-25

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  18. Falls efficacy, postural balance, and risk for falls in older adults with falls-related emergency department visits: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pua, Yong-Hao; Ong, Peck-Hoon; Clark, Ross Allan; Matcher, David B; Lim, Edwin Choon-Wyn

    2017-12-21

    Risk for falls in older adults has been associated with falls efficacy (self-perceived confidence in performing daily physical activities) and postural balance, but available evidence is limited and mixed. We examined the interaction between falls efficacy and postural balance and its association with future falls. We also investigated the association between falls efficacy and gait decline. Falls efficacy, measured by the Modified Falls Efficacy Scale (MFES), and standing postural balance, measured using computerized posturography on a balance board, were obtained from 247 older adults with a falls-related emergency department visit. Six-month prospective fall rate and habitual gait speed at 6 months post baseline assessment were also measured. In multivariable proportional odds analyses adjusted for potential confounders, falls efficacy modified the association between postural balance and fall risk (interaction P = 0.014): increasing falls efficacy accentuated the increased fall risk related to poor postural balance. Low baseline falls efficacy was strongly predictive of worse gait speed (0.11 m/s [0.06 to 0.16] slower gait speed per IQR decrease in MFES; P falls efficacy but poor postural balance were at greater risk for falls than those with low falls efficacy; however, low baseline falls efficacy was strongly associated with worse gait function at follow-up. Further research into these subgroups of older adults is warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01713543 .

  19. Optimal fall indicators for slip induced falls on a cross-slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domone, Sarah; Lawrence, Daniel; Heller, Ben; Hendra, Tim; Mawson, Sue; Wheat, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Slip-induced falls are among the most common cause of major occupational injuries in the UK as well as being a major public health concern in the elderly population. This study aimed to determine the optimal fall indicators for fall detection models which could be used to reduce the detrimental consequences of falls. A total of 264 kinematic variables covering three-dimensional full body model translation and rotational measures were analysed during normal walking, successful recovery from slips and falls on a cross-slope. Large effect sizes were found for three kinematic variables which were able to distinguish falls from normal walking and successful recovery. Further work should consider other types of daily living activities as results show that the optimal kinematic fall indicators can vary considerably between movement types. Practitioner Summary: Fall detection models are used to minimise the adverse consequences of slip-induced falls, a major public health concern. Optimal fall indicators were derived from a comprehensive set of kinematic variables for slips on a cross-slope. Results suggest robust detection of falls is possible on a cross-slope but may be more difficult than level walking.

  20. Falls and fear of falling in vertigo and balance disorders: A controlled cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, Cornelia; Schniepp, Roman; Loidl, Verena; Wuehr, Max; Hesselbarth, Kristin; Jahn, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most prevalent symptoms in neurologic disorders. Although many of these patients suffer from postural instability and gait disturbances, there is only limited data on their risk of falling. We conducted a controlled cross-sectional study at the tertiary care outpatient clinic of the German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders using a self-administered questionnaire to assess falls, fall-related injuries, and fear of falling. The recruitment period was 6 months. A total of 569 patients (mean age 59.6 ± 17.1 years, 55% females) and 100 healthy participants were included (response rate > 90%). Dizzy patients with central balance disorders (Parkinsonian, cerebellar, and brainstem oculomotor syndromes) had the highest fall rates (> 50% recurrent fallers, odds ratio > 10). The rate of recurrent fallers was 30% in bilateral vestibular failure and peripheral neuropathy (odds ratio > 5). Patients with functional dizziness (somatoform or phobic vertigo) were concerned about falling but did not fall more often than healthy controls (odds ratio 0.87). Falls are common in patients presenting to a dizziness unit. Those with central syndromes are at risk of recurrent and injurious falling. Fall rates and fear of falling should be assessed in balance disorders and used to guide the regimen of rehabilitation therapy. The identification of risk factors would help provide protective measures to these groups of patients.

  1. Predictive value of stabilometry and fear of falling on falls in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hita-Contreras, F; Martínez-Amat, A; Lomas-Vega, R; Álvarez, P; Aránega, A; Martínez-López, E; Mendoza, N

    2013-10-01

    Falls are one of the leading causes of fractures and impaired quality of life in the elderly, and they are related to balance deficit and to fear of falls. The purpose of our study is to evaluate predictors of falls in the 50-65-year-old postmenopausal population. A prospective cohort study was conducted on 96 postmenopausal women. Fear of falling and postural stability were assessed by using the FES-I (Falls Efficacy Scale-International) and a force platform, respectively. Fall frequency was determined in the 12-month follow-up study period. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictive factors of falls. Fear of falls, the FES-I scale and four stabilometric parameters, specifically under eyes-closed condition, were significantly higher in the group of fallers. The root mean square amplitude in the medial-lateral direction with eyes closed (RMSXec) (odds ratio 5.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-15.5, p = 0.004) and FES-I (odds ratio 3.4, 95% CI 1.1-10.5, p = 0.026) were the best independent predictive factors of the risk of falling. RMSXec > 0.133 was the best predictive factor for falls in our group of 50-65-year-old postmenopausal women studied, and a FES-I score > 20 could predict falls in this population.

  2. New developments in radiochromic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    NIST has been a pioneer in the use of radiochromic film for medical dosimetry applications. Beginning in 1988 with experiments with 90 Sr/Y ophthalmic applicators, this work has continued into the present. A review of the latest applications is presented, which include high activity low-energy photon source dosimetry and ultra-high resolution film densitometry for dose enhancement near stents and microbeam radiation therapy dosimetry. An exciting recent development is the availability of a new radiochromic emulsion which has been developed for IMRT dosimetry. This emulsion is an order of magnitude more sensitive than was previously available. Measurements of the sensitivity and uniformity of samples of this new film are reported, using a spectrophotometer and two scanning laser densitometers. A unique feature of the new emulsion is that the peak of the absorbance spectrum falls at the wavelength of the HeNe lasers used in the densitometer, maximising sensitivity. When read at a wavelength of 633 nm, sensitivities on the order of 900 mAU Gy -1 were determined for this new film type, compared with about 40 mAU Gy -1 for type HS film, 20 mAU Gy -1 for type MD-55-2 film, and 3 mAU Gy -1 for type HD-810. Film uniformities were found to be good, on the order of 6% peak to peak. However, there is a strong polarisation effect in the samples examined, requiring care in film orientation during readout. (authors)

  3. Preclinical Alzheimer disease and risk of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Susan L; Roe, Catherine M; Grant, Elizabeth A; Hollingsworth, Holly; Benzinger, Tammie L; Fagan, Anne M; Buckles, Virginia D; Morris, John C

    2013-07-30

    We determined the rate of falls among cognitively normal, community-dwelling older adults, some of whom had presumptive preclinical Alzheimer disease (AD) as detected by in vivo imaging of fibrillar amyloid plaques using Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) and PET and/or by assays of CSF to identify Aβ₄₂, tau, and phosphorylated tau. We conducted a 12-month prospective cohort study to examine the cumulative incidence of falls. Participants were evaluated clinically and underwent PiB PET imaging and lumbar puncture. Falls were reported monthly using an individualized calendar journal returned by mail. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to test whether time to first fall was associated with each biomarker and the ratio of CSF tau/Aβ₄₂ and CSF phosphorylated tau/Aβ₄₂, after adjustment for common fall risk factors. The sample (n = 125) was predominately female (62.4%) and white (96%) with a mean age of 74.4 years. When controlled for ability to perform activities of daily living, higher levels of PiB retention (hazard ratio = 2.95 [95% confidence interval 1.01-6.45], p = 0.05) and of CSF biomarker ratios (p risk factor for falls in older adults. This study suggests that subtle noncognitive changes that predispose older adults to falls are associated with AD and may precede detectable cognitive changes.

  4. Pathogenesis and treatment of falls in elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquetti, Pietro; Apicella, Lorenzo; Mangone, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Falls in the elderly are a public health problem. Consequences of falls are increased risk of hospitalization, which results in an increase in health care costs. It is estimated that 33% of individuals older than 65 years undergoes falls. Causes of falls can be distinguished in intrinsic and extrinsic predisposing conditions. The intrinsic causes can be divided into age-related physiological changes and pathological predisposing conditions. The age-related physiological changes are sight disorders, hearing disorders, alterations in the Central Nervous System, balance deficits, musculoskeletal alterations. The pathological conditions can be Neurological, Cardiovascular, Endocrine, Psychiatric, Iatrogenic. Extrinsic causes of falling are environmental factors such as obstacles, inadequate footwear. The treatment of falls must be multidimensional and multidisciplinary. The best instrument in evaluating elderly at risk is Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). CGA allows better management resulting in reduced costs. The treatment should be primarily preventive acting on extrinsic causes; then treatment of chronic and acute diseases. Rehabilitation is fundamental, in order to improve residual capacity, motor skills, postural control, recovery of strength. There are two main types of exercises: aerobic and muscular strength training. Education of patient is a key-point, in particular through the Back School. In conclusion falls in the elderly are presented as a “geriatric syndrome”; through a multidimensional assessment, an integrated treatment and a rehabilitation program is possible to improve quality of life in elderly. PMID:25568657

  5. Neuropsychological Mechanisms for Falls in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu eLiu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Falls, a common cause of injury among older adults, have become increasingly prevalent. As the world’s population ages, the increase in – and the prevalence of – falls among older people makes this a serious and compelling societal and healthcare issue. Physical weakness is a critical predictor in falling. While considerable research has examined this relationship, comprehensive reviews of neuropsychological predictors of falls have been lacking. In this paper, we examine and discuss current studies of the neuropsychological predictors of falls in older adults, as related to sporting and non-sporting contexts. By integrating the existing evidence, we propose that brain aging is an important precursor of the increased risk of falls in older adults. Brain aging disrupts the neural integrity of motor outputs and reduces neuropsychological abilities. Older adults may shift from unconscious movement control to more conscious or attentive motor control. Increased understanding of the causes of falls will afford opportunities to reduce their incidence, reduce consequent injuries, improve overall well-being and quality of life, and possibly to prolong life.

  6. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min H; Shilling, Tracy; Miller, Kara A; Smith, Kristin; LaVictoire, Kayle

    2015-01-01

    Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of previous falls, gait, and balance with falls in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. At the baseline, demographics, health information, and the history of falls in the past year were obtained through interviewing. Participants performed tests including gait speed, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and short-version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Falls were tracked by mailing of monthly reports for 6 months. A "faller" was a person with ≥1 fall during follow-up. Univariate analyses, including independent sample t-tests and Fisher's exact tests, compared baseline demographics, gait speed, and balance between fallers and non-fallers. For univariate analyses, Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. Baseline variables with Pfalls with age as covariate. Sensitivity and specificity of each predictor of falls in the model were calculated. Significance level for the regression analysis was Pfalls. Baseline demographics, health information, history of falls, gaits speed, and balance tests did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. Forward logistic regression revealed that a history of falls was a significant predictor of falls in the final model (odds ratio =6.81; 95% confidence interval =1.594-29.074) (Pfalls were 74% and 69%, respectively. Current findings suggested that for community-dwelling older cancer survivors with mixed diagnoses, asking about the history of falls may help detect individuals at risk of falling.

  7. Falls and Fall-Related Injuries among Community-Dwelling Adults in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Verma

    Full Text Available Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injuries in the U.S.; however, national estimates for all community-dwelling adults are lacking. This study estimated the national incidence of falls and fall-related injuries among community-dwelling U.S. adults by age and gender and the trends in fall-related injuries across the adult life span.Nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS 2008 Balance and Dizziness supplement was used to develop national estimates of falls, and pooled data from the NHIS was used to calculate estimates of fall-related injuries in the U.S. and related trends from 2004-2013. Costs of unintentional fall-related injuries were extracted from the CDC's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System.Twelve percent of community-dwelling U.S. adults reported falling in the previous year for a total estimate of 80 million falls at a rate of 37.2 falls per 100 person-years. On average, 9.9 million fall-related injuries occurred each year with a rate of 4.38 fall-related injuries per 100 person-years. In the previous three months, 2.0% of older adults (65+, 1.1% of middle-aged adults (45-64 and 0.7% of young adults (18-44 reported a fall-related injury. Of all fall-related injuries among community-dwelling adults, 32.3% occurred among older adults, 35.3% among middle-aged adults and 32.3% among younger adults. The age-adjusted rate of fall-related injuries increased 4% per year among older women (95% CI 1%-7% from 2004 to 2013. Among U.S. adults, the total lifetime cost of annual unintentional fall-related injuries that resulted in a fatality, hospitalization or treatment in an emergency department was 111 billion U.S. dollars in 2010.Falls and fall-related injuries represent a significant health and safety problem for adults of all ages. The findings suggest that adult fall prevention efforts should consider the entire adult lifespan to ensure a greater public health benefit.

  8. Falls and Fall-Related Injuries among Community-Dwelling Adults in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh K.; Willetts, Joanna L.; Corns, Helen L.; Marucci-Wellman, Helen R.; Lombardi, David A.; Courtney, Theodore K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injuries in the U.S.; however, national estimates for all community-dwelling adults are lacking. This study estimated the national incidence of falls and fall-related injuries among community-dwelling U.S. adults by age and gender and the trends in fall-related injuries across the adult life span. Methods Nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2008 Balance and Dizziness supplement was used to develop national estimates of falls, and pooled data from the NHIS was used to calculate estimates of fall-related injuries in the U.S. and related trends from 2004–2013. Costs of unintentional fall-related injuries were extracted from the CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. Results Twelve percent of community-dwelling U.S. adults reported falling in the previous year for a total estimate of 80 million falls at a rate of 37.2 falls per 100 person-years. On average, 9.9 million fall-related injuries occurred each year with a rate of 4.38 fall-related injuries per 100 person-years. In the previous three months, 2.0% of older adults (65+), 1.1% of middle-aged adults (45–64) and 0.7% of young adults (18–44) reported a fall-related injury. Of all fall-related injuries among community-dwelling adults, 32.3% occurred among older adults, 35.3% among middle-aged adults and 32.3% among younger adults. The age-adjusted rate of fall-related injuries increased 4% per year among older women (95% CI 1%–7%) from 2004 to 2013. Among U.S. adults, the total lifetime cost of annual unintentional fall-related injuries that resulted in a fatality, hospitalization or treatment in an emergency department was 111 billion U.S. dollars in 2010. Conclusions Falls and fall-related injuries represent a significant health and safety problem for adults of all ages. The findings suggest that adult fall prevention efforts should consider the entire adult lifespan to ensure a

  9. Fall from heights: does height really matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizo, G; Sciarretta, J D; Gibson, S; Muertos, K; Romano, A; Davis, J; Pepe, A

    2018-06-01

    Fall from heights is high energy injuries and constitutes a fraction of all fall-related trauma evaluations while bearing an increase in morbidity and mortality. We hypothesize that despite advancements in trauma care, the overall survivability has not improved in this subset of trauma patients. All adult trauma patients treated after sustaining a fall from heights during a 40-month period were retrospectively reviewed. Admission demographics, clinical data, fall height (ft), injury patterns, ISS, GCS, length of stay, and mortality were reviewed. 116 patients sustained a fall from heights, 90.4% accidental. A mean age of 37± 14.7 years, 86% male, and a fall height of 19 ± 10 ft were encountered. Admission GCS was 13 ± 2 with ISS 10 ± 11. Overall LOS was 6.6 ± 14.9 days and an ICU LOS of 2.8 ± 8.9 days. Falls ≥ 25 ft.(16%) had lower GCS 10.4 ± 5.8, increased ISS 22.6 ± 13.8, a fall height 37.9 ± 13.1 ft and associated increased mortality (p < 0.001). Mortality was 5.2%, a mean distance fallen of 39 ± 22 ft. and an ISS of 31.5 ±16.5. Brain injury was the leading cause of death, 50% with open skull fractures. Level of height fallen is a good predictor of overall outcome and survival. Despite advances in trauma care, death rates remain unchanged. Safety awareness and injury prevention programs are needed to reduce the risk of high-level falls.

  10. Collective Fall Protection for Construction Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulowski, A. C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Construction safety regulations require protection of workers against falls from elevations. The collective fall protection systems, in most cases, allow workers to move freely without wearing individual fall protection gear. The collective systems which prevent falls are preferred over the fall arrest systems. The latter are employed only if prevention of falls is not feasible. Arresting a fall always carries with it a residual risk of injury to the fall victim. The collective fall arrest systems are employed primarily during construction of electricity or telecomm towers. The aim of this paper has been a review of the collective FPS employed in the construction industry.Las normas de seguridad en la construcción requieren de protección para los trabajadores contra las caídas desde altura. Los Sistemas de Protección contra Caídas (FPS, por sus siglas en inglés colectivos, en la mayoría de los casos, permiten que los trabajadores se muevan libremente sin usar un equipo de protección contra caídas individual. Los sistemas colectivos de prevención de caídas son preferibles a los sistemas de detención de caídas, estos últimos se emplean sólo si la prevención de las caídas no es factible. La detención de una caída siempre lleva consigo un riesgo residual de lesiones en la víctima accidentada. Los sistemas colectivos de detención de caídas se emplean principalmente en la construcción de torres de electricidad o telecomunicaciones. El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido la revisión de los sistemas colectivos de protección contra caídas empleados en la industria de la construcción.

  11. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  12. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  13. The Association Between Fall Frequency, Injury Risk, and Characteristics of Falls in Older Residents of Long-Term Care: Do Recurrent Fallers Fall More Safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schooten, Kimberley S; Yang, Yijian; Feldman, Fabio; Leung, Ming; McKay, Heather; Sims-Gould, Joanie; Robinovitch, Stephen N

    2018-05-09

    Although a fall is a necessary prerequisite to a fall-related injury, previous studies suggest that frequent fallers are at lower injury risk for a given fall. We tested the hypotheses that differences in protective responses or the circumstances of falls underlie differences in injury risk with fall frequency. We analyzed video footage of 897 falls experienced by 220 long-term care residents (mean age 82 ± 9 years) to identify the cause of imbalance, activity leading to falling, direction of fall initiation, balance recovery and fall protective responses, and occurrence of impact to the head or hip. We further obtained injury information from the facilities' fall registration. We used generalized estimating equation models to examine the association between quartiles of fall frequency, injury risk, and fall characteristics. Residents with the highest fall frequency group (Q4; ≥5.6 falls/year) were less likely to sustain an injury per fall. They were less likely to fall during walking and more likely to fall during stand-to-sit transfers. Residents in the lowest fall frequency group (Q1; falls/year) were more likely to fall during walking, and walking was associated with an increased risk for injury. When compared to less frequent fallers, more frequent fallers had a lower risk for injury per fall. This appeared to be explained by differences in the circumstances of falls, and not by protective responses. Injury prevention strategies in long-term care should target both frequent and infrequent fallers, as the latter are more mobile and apt to sustain injury.

  14. Precisely locating the Klamath Falls, Oregon, earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, A.; Meagher, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Klamath Falls earthquakes on September 20, 1993, were the largest earthquakes centered in Oregon in more than 50 yrs. Only the magnitude 5.75 Milton-Freewater earthquake in 1936, which was centered near the Oregon-Washington border and felt in an area of about 190,000 sq km, compares in size with the recent Klamath Falls earthquakes. Although the 1993 earthquakes surprised many local residents, geologists have long recognized that strong earthquakes may occur along potentially active faults that pass through the Klamath Falls area. These faults are geologically related to similar faults in Oregon, Idaho, and Nevada that occasionally spawn strong earthquakes. 

  15. Radiolytic preparation of thin Au film directly on resin substrate using high-energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Yuji, E-mail: okubo@upst.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Seino, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kugai, Junichiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueno, Koji [Japan Electron Beam Irradiation Service Ltd., 5-3 Ozushima, Izumiohtsu, Osaka 595-0074 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takao A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    A novel method for preparing thin Au films directly on resin substrates using an electron beam was developed. The thin Au films were prepared on a resin substrate by the reduction of Au ions in an aqueous solution via irradiation with a high-energy electron beam (4.8 MeV). This reduction method required 7 s of the irradiation time of the electron beam. Furthermore, no reductant or catalyst was needed. As the concentration of Au ions in the precursor solution was increased, the amount of Au deposited on the resin substrate increased, too, and the structure of the prepared Au film changed. As a result, the film color changed as well. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscope images of the thus-prepared Au film indicated that the Au films were consisted of two layers: a particle layer and a bottom bulk layer. There was strong adhesion between the Au films and the underlying resin substrates. This was confirmed by the tape-peeling test and through ultrasonic cleaning. After both processes, Au remained on the resin substrates, while most of the particle-like moieties were removed. This indicated that the thin Au films prepared via irradiation with a high-energy electron beam adhered strongly to the resin substrates. - Highlights: • A thin gold (Au) film was formed by EBIRM for the first time. • The irradiation time of the electron beam was less than 10 s. • Thin Au films were obtained without reductant or catalyst. • Au films were consisted of two layers: a particle layer and a bottom bulk layer. • There was strong adhesion between the bottom bulk layer and the underlying resin substrates.

  16. Prevalence and cost of imaging in inpatient falls: the rising cost of falling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jessica Fields,1 Tahani Alturkistani,2 Neal Kumar,3 Arjun Kanuri,3 Deeb N Salem,1 Samson Munn,2 Deborah Blazey-Martin1 1Department of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Radiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 3Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Objective: To quantify the type, prevalence, and cost of imaging following inpatient falls, identify factors associated with post-fall imaging, and determine correlates of positive versus negative imaging. Design: Single-center retrospective cohort study of inpatient falls. Data were collected from the hospital's adverse event reporting system, DrQuality. Age, sex, date, time, and location of fall, clinical service, Morse Fall Scale/fall protocol, admitting diagnosis, and fall-related imaging studies were reviewed. Cost included professional and facilities fees for each study. Setting: Four hundred and fifteen bed urban academic hospital over 3 years (2008–2010. Patients: All adult inpatient falls during the study period were included. Falls experienced by patients aged <18 years, outpatient and emergency patients, visitors to the hospital, and staff were excluded. Measurements and main results: Five hundred and thirty inpatient falls occurred during the study period, average patient age 60.7 years (range 20–98. More than half of falls were men (55% and patients considered at risk of falls (56%. Falls were evenly distributed across morning (33%, evening (34%, and night (33% shifts. Of 530 falls, 178 (34% patients were imaged with 262 studies. Twenty percent of patients imaged had at least one positive imaging study attributed to the fall and 82% of studies were negative. Total cost of imaging was $160,897, 63% ($100,700 from head computed tomography (CT. Conclusion: Inpatient falls affect patients of both sexes, all ages, occur at any time of day and lead to expensive imaging, mainly from head CTs. Further study should be targeted toward

  17. Falls in institutions for older adults: characterization of fall occurrences and associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rosa Soares Lavareda Baixinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls are the main accident for older adults, with consequences on functionality. Older adults impose restrictions or have restrictions imposed on their activities for fear of new falls. This prospective longitudinal study was conducted with 104 institutionalized older adults during six months with the following goals: to determine the prevalence of falls, to characterize the falls according to place, time, resulting injuries, supervision of the older adult, action performed at the time of the fall, and to relate the occurrence of the fall to the risk of falling, medical diagnoses, number of medications in use, type of medication, degree of dependency, age, and gender. The prevalence of falls was 37.5%, and they happened mostly in the bedroom, while walking after getting up from the bed. Those under risk in the Morse Fall Scale (p=0.034 and on sedatives (p=0.007 face a higher prevalence of falls. This study enables the possibility of making suggestions for practice, training and investigation.

  18. Virtual obstacle crossing: Reliability and differences in stroke survivors who prospectively experienced falls or no falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Michiel; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Wittink, Harriet; van de Port, Ingrid G; Wubbels, Gijs; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2017-10-01

    Stroke survivors often fall during walking. To reduce fall risk, gait testing and training with avoidance of virtual obstacles is gaining popularity. However, it is unknown whether and how virtual obstacle crossing is associated with fall risk. The present study assessed whether obstacle crossing characteristics are reliable and assessed differences in stroke survivors who prospectively experienced falls or no falls. We recruited twenty-nine community dwelling chronic stroke survivors. Participants crossed five virtual obstacles with increasing lengths. After a break, the test was repeated to assess test-retest reliability. For each obstacle length and trial, we determined; success rate, leading limb preference, pre and post obstacle distance, margins of stability, toe clearance, and crossing step length and speed. Subsequently, fall incidence was monitored using a fall calendar and monthly phone calls over a six-month period. Test-retest reliability was poor, but improved with increasing obstacle-length. Twelve participants reported at least one fall. No association of fall incidence with any of the obstacle crossing characteristics was found. Given the absence of height of the virtual obstacles, obstacle avoidance may have been relatively easy, allowing participants to cross obstacles in multiple ways, increasing variability of crossing characteristics and reducing the association with fall risk. These finding cast some doubt on current protocols for testing and training of obstacle avoidance in stroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Sara Nicole; Zaluski, Neal; Petrie, Amanda; Arnold, Cathy; Basran, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate the concurrent validity of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm (FSRA). Method: A total of 29 older adults (mean age 77.7 [SD 4.0] y) residing in an independent-living senior's complex who met inclusion criteria completed a demographic questionnaire and the components of the FSRA and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). The FSRA consists of the Elderly Fall Screening Test (EFST) and the Multi-factor Falls Questionnaire (MFQ); it is designed to categorize individuals into low, moderate, or high fall-risk categories to determine appropriate management pathways. A predictive model for probability of fall risk, based on previous research, was used to determine concurrent validity of the FSRI. Results: The FSRA placed 79% of participants into the low-risk category, whereas the predictive model found the probability of fall risk to range from 0.04 to 0.74, with a mean of 0.35 (SD 0.25). No statistically significant correlation was found between the FSRA and the predictive model for probability of fall risk (Spearman's ρ=0.35, p=0.06). Conclusion: The FSRA lacks concurrent validity relative to to a previously established model of fall risk and appears to over-categorize individuals into the low-risk group. Further research on the FSRA as an adequate tool to screen community-dwelling older adults for fall risk is recommended. PMID:24381379

  20. Fall Risk, Supports and Services, and Falls Following a Nursing Home Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldin, Marwa; Hass, Zachary; Abrahamson, Kathleen; Arling, Greg

    2017-09-04

    Falls are a major source of morbidity and mortality among older adults; however, little is known regarding fall occurrence during a nursing home (NH) to community transition. This study sought to examine whether the presence of supports and services impacts the relationship between fall-related risk factors and fall occurrence post NH discharge. Participants in the Minnesota Return to Community Initiative who were assisted in achieving a community discharge (N = 1459) comprised the study sample. The main outcome was fall occurrence within 30 days of discharge. Factor analyses were used to estimate latent models from variables of interest. A structural equation model (SEM) was estimated to determine the relationship between the emerging latent variables and falls. Fifteen percent of participants fell within 30 days of NH discharge. Factor analysis of fall-related risk factors produced three latent variables: fall concerns/history; activities of daily living impairments; and use of high-risk medications. A supports/services latent variable also emerged that included caregiver support frequency, medication management assistance, durable medical equipment use, discharge location, and receipt of home health or skilled nursing services. In the SEM model, high-risk medications use and fall concerns/history had direct positive effects on falling. Receiving supports/services did not affect falling directly; however, it reduced the effect of high-risk medication use on falling (p risk of falling post NH discharge. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. SERS internship: Fall 1994 abstracts and research papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, B.

    1994-12-01

    This publication is a collection of articles generated as a result of the fall 1994 Science and Engineering Research Semester program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Research titles include: electrochemical cells in the reduction of hexavalent chromium; an automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams; the mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19; bolometer analysis comparisons; design and implementation of the LLNL Gigabit Testbed; in vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-Deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA Covalent Complexes; pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene; characterization of thin film multi-layers with magnetization curves and modeling of low angle X-ray diffraction data; total least squares; determining the water content of the Geysers Graywacke of northern California; a general approach to sharing data between scientific representations; nanomechanical properties of SiC thin films grown from C 60 precursors; advanced information technology, a tool set for building clean database applications; the design of an automated electrolytic enrichment procedure for tritium; fluvial terrace dating using in-situ cosmogenic 21 Ne; computer- aided mapping of stream channels beneath the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA; X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions. Separate entries have been put in the energy data base for articles from this report. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  2. SERS internship: Fall 1994 abstracts and research papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, B.

    1994-12-01

    This publication is a collection of articles generated as a result of the fall 1994 Science and Engineering Research Semester program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Research titles include: electrochemical cells in the reduction of hexavalent chromium; an automated system for studying the power distribution of electron beams; the mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19; bolometer analysis comparisons; design and implementation of the LLNL Gigabit Testbed; in vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-Deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA Covalent Complexes; pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene; characterization of thin film multi-layers with magnetization curves and modeling of low angle X-ray diffraction data; total least squares; determining the water content of the Geysers Graywacke of northern California; a general approach to sharing data between scientific representations; nanomechanical properties of SiC thin films grown from C{sub 60} precursors; advanced information technology, a tool set for building clean database applications; the design of an automated electrolytic enrichment procedure for tritium; fluvial terrace dating using in-situ cosmogenic {sup 21}Ne; computer- aided mapping of stream channels beneath the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA; X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions. Separate entries have been put in the energy data base for articles from this report. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Surface self-organization in multilayer film coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvalov, Gleb M.; Kostyrko, Sergey A.

    2017-12-01

    It is a recognized fact that during film deposition and subsequent thermal processing the film surface evolves into an undulating profile. Surface roughness affects many important aspects in the engineering application of thin film materials such as wetting, heat transfer, mechanical, electromagnetic and optical properties. To accurately control the morphological surface modifications at the micro- and nanoscale and improve manufacturing techniques, we design a mathematical model of the surface self-organization process in multilayer film materials. In this paper, we consider a solid film coating with an arbitrary number of layers under plane strain conditions. The film surface has a small initial perturbation described by a periodic function. It is assumed that the evolution of the surface relief is governed by surface and volume diffusion. Based on Gibbs thermodynamics and linear theory of elasticity, we present a procedure for constructing a governing equation that gives the amplitude change of the surface perturbation with time. A parametric study of the evolution equation leads to the definition of a critical undulation wavelength that stabilizes the surface. As a numerical result, the influence of geometrical and physical parameters on the morphological stability of an isotropic two-layered film coating is analyzed.

  4. Falls incidence underestimates the risk of fall-related injuries in older age groups : a comparison with the FARE (Falls risk by Exposure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etman, Astrid; Wijlhuizen, Gert Jan; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; Chorus, Astrid; Hopman-Rock, Marijke

    Background: up till now, the risk of falls has been expressed as falls incidence (i.e. the number of falls or fallers per 100 person-years). However, the risk of an accident or injury is the probability of having an accident or injury per unit of exposure. The FARE ( Falls risk by Exposure) is a

  5. Falls incidence underestimates the risk of fall-related injuries in older age groups: a comparison with the FARE (Falls risk by Exposure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etman, A.; Wijlhuizen, G.J.; van Heuvelen, M.J.G.; Chorus, A.M.J.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: up till now, the risk of falls has been expressed as falls incidence (i.e. the number of falls or fallers per 100 person-years). However, the risk of an accident or injury is the probability of having an accident or injury per unit of exposure. The FARE (Falls risk by Exposure) is a

  6. Falls incidence underestimates the risk of fall-related injuries in older age groups: A comparison with the FARE (Falls risk by exposure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etman, A.; Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Heuvelen, M.J.G. van; Chorus, A.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: up till now, the risk of falls has been expressed as falls incidence (i.e. the number of falls or fallers per 100 person-years). However, the risk of an accident or injury is the probability of having an accident or injury per unit of exposure. The FARE (Falls risk by Exposure) is a

  7. Forensic Physics 101: Falls from a height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2008-09-01

    The physics of falling from a height, a topic that could be included in a course on forensic physics or in an undergraduate class as an example of Newton's laws, is applied to a common forensic problem.

  8. Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out some of our online STEADI resources for older adults. These resources include: Stay Independent brochure What You Can Do to Prevent Falls brochure Check for Safety brochure Postural Hypotension brochure Chair Rise Exercise Related Pages Costs ...

  9. FEAR OF FALLING AMONG COMMUNITY DWELLING OLDER ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Dingová

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to describe experience with falls, fear of falling, perceptions of the consequences of falls and how the fear of falling affects daily life in community-dwelling older adults. Design: The study used a qualitative design to describe the lived experiences of community-dwelling older adults with the fear of falling. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted individually with six participants who reported the fear of falling. Results: Five main areas emerged from data analysis: development of the fear of falling, feared consequences of falling, activities curtailment, fall prevention behavior and meaning of social support in daily life. The fear of falling was described as a negative experience, directly linked to fall consequences such as physical injury, incapacitation, loss of autonomy, fear of dependence and experience of humiliating conditions. To maintain a certain level of independence in daily life, the participants chose to avoid falls by activity curtailment, organizing their lives more carefully and getting support from others. Conclusion: All participants identified that they had discovered their fear of falling after experiencing falls. The fear of falling was associated with feared consequences of a potential fall and had an impact on their daily life. The participant also mentioned other contributors to their fear of falling, including ill health and aging. Keywords: Fear of falling, older adults, perceived consequences of falls, daily life.

  10. Science Fiction on Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmester, David

    1985-01-01

    Reviews science fiction films used in a science fiction class. Discusses feature films, short science fiction films, short story adaptations, original science fiction pieces and factual science films that enrich literature. (EL)

  11. Fall risk in an active elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Uffe; Hoeck, Hans C.; Simonsen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    risk can be assessed by testing balance performance. In this study a test battery of physiological parameters related to balance and falls was designed to address fall risk in a community dwelling elderly population. RESULTS: Ninety-four elderly males and females between 70 and 80 years of age were...... assessment in which the physiological performance is evaluated in relation to the activity profile of the individual. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-null...

  12. On the Motion of Falling Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Razavi, Pedram

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the motion of falling leaves through modeling using papers and the corresponding data collected from more than four thousands experiments. Two series of experiments were designed in order to study the relationship between different parameters which can affect different paths of motion in leaves. In the first series of experiments, the shapes of the potential paths that falling papers can take were investigated as a whole. A new classification scheme was derived from th...

  13. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  14. Elderly outpatient profile and predictors of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Grace Angélica de Oliveira; Cintra, Fernanda Aparecida; Batista, Fernanda Sotelo; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Guariento, Maria Elena; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosario de; D'Elboux, Maria José

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES Falls are a serious public health problem and are one of the biggest reasons for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality among elderly people. Moreover, few studies on predictors of falls have been conducted in low and middle income countries. The aim here was to identify elderly outpatient profiles according to sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional variables and correlate them with occurrences of falls among these subjects. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional descriptive study forming part of the project "Quality of Life of Frail Elderly People", carried out in Campinas, Brazil. METHODS The subjects were 145 elderly individuals (76.3 ± 7.8 years old), of whom 65% were women, who were living in the city of Campinas or nearby and were attended at the geriatric outpatient clinic of a University Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional data, as well as fall occurrence data, were gathered. Cluster analyses and comparisons between groups were carried out. RESULTS Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups related to the study variables, and the determinants for this distinction were: gender, marital status, physical performance, handgrip strength and functional independence. These groups were compared according to occurrences of falls over the last year, and significant differences between them were found. CONCLUSIONS The results showed that greater occurrences of falls were associated with a profile of elderly people comprising female gender, single status, lower muscle strength and physical performance regarding balance and gait, and lower independence in motor tasks for activities of daily living.

  15. Falls and depression in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, Alin; Toubin, Sandrine; Mourey, France; D'Athis, Philippe; Manckoundia, Patrick; Pfitzenmeyer, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common risk factors for falls, but links between falls and depression are still unclear. Few studies have examined the relationship between depression and gait alteration, which may increase the risk of fall. This study aims to assess a possible relationship between depression, postural and gait abnormalities, and falls. We conducted a 1-year prospective study on patients >/=70 years who were admitted to a geriatric unit for 'spontaneous' unexplained falls. Patients were tested for depression using the 30-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Their motor performances were assessed using the Mini Motor Test (MMT), which is an easy direct-observation test, validated in France, for assessment of frail old people who present with severe postural and gait impairment. This scale is composed of 4 categories of items: (1) abilities in bed; (2) quality of the sitting position; (3) abilities in the standing position, and (4) quality of gait. Sixty-nine patients were included. Depression was found in 46 patients (66.7%). The MMT score was higher in the non-depressed fallers (NDF) group (GDS 10; p predispose to falls. In clinical practice, more attention should be given to old fallers concerning diagnosis and treatment of associated depression. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. The interplay between gait, falls and cognition: can cognitive therapy reduce fall risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev-Jacubovski, Orit; Herman, Talia; Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Mirelman, Anat; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we briefly summarize the incidence and significant consequences of falls among older adults, the insufficient effectiveness of commonly used multifactorial interventions and the evidence linking falls and cognitive function. Recent pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies that evaluated the effects of cognitive therapy on fall risk are reviewed. The results of this article illustrate the potential utility of multiple, diverse forms of cognitive therapy for reducing fall risk. The article also indicates that large-scale, randomized controlled trials are warranted and that additional research is needed to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the interplay between human mobility, fall risk and cognitive function. Nonetheless, we suggest that multimodality interventions that combine motor and cognitive therapy should, eventually, be incorporated into clinical practice to enable older adults and patients to move safer and with a reduced fall risk. PMID:21721921

  17. An outpatient multifactorial falls prevention intervention does not reduce falls in high-risk elderly Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Ane B; Andersen, Hanne E; Pedersen, Kirsten D

    2009-01-01

    , mean age 74, 73.7%women, who had visited the emergency department or had been hospitalized due to a fall. INTERVENTION: Identification of general medical, cardiovascular, and physical risk factors for falls and individual intervention in the intervention group. Participants in the control group....... Followup exceeded 90.0%. A total of 422 falls were registered in the intervention group, 398 in the control group. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no effect of the intervention on fall rates (relative risk=1.06, 95%confidence interval (CI)=0.75 -1.51), proportion with falls (odds ratio (OR)=1.20, 95......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of multifactorial fall prevention in community-dwelling people aged 65 and older in Denmark. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled clinical trial. SETTING: Geriatric outpatient clinic at Glostrup University Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred ninety-two elderly people...

  18. Fall predictors in older cancer patients: a multicenter prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Vande Walle, Nathalie; Kenis, Cindy; Heeren, Pieter; Van Puyvelde, Katrien; Decoster, Lore; Beyer, Ingo; Conings, Godelieve; Flamaing, Johan; Lobelle, Jean-Pierre; Wildiers, Hans; Milisen, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Background In the older population falls are a common problem and a major cause of morbidity, mortality and functional decline. The etiology is often multifactorial making the identification of fall predictors essential for preventive measures. Despite this knowledge, data on falls within the older cancer population are limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of falls within 2 to 3?months after cancer treatment decision and to identify predictors of falls (?1 fall)...

  19. FEAR OF FALLING AMONG COMMUNITY DWELLING OLDER ADULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Michaela Dingová; Eva Králová

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to describe experience with falls, fear of falling, perceptions of the consequences of falls and how the fear of falling affects daily life in community-dwelling older adults. Design: The study used a qualitative design to describe the lived experiences of community-dwelling older adults with the fear of falling. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted individually with six participants who reported the fear of falling. Results: Five main areas emerged...

  20. Structural, transport and microwave properties of 123/sapphire films: Thickness effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predtechensky, MR.; Smal, A.N.; Varlamov, Y.D. [Institute of Thermophysics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The effect of thickness and growth conditions on the structure and microwave properties has been investigated for the 123/sapphire films. It has been shown that in the conditions of epitaxial growth and Al atoms do not diffuse from substrate into the film and the films with thickness up to 100nm exhibit the excellent DC properties. The increase of thickness of GdBaCuO films causes the formation of extended line-mesh defects and the increase of the surface resistance (R{sub S}). The low value of surface resistance R{sub S}(75GHz,77K)=20 mOhm has been obtained for the two layer YBaCuO/CdBaCuO/sapphire films.

  1. On a two-layer Si_3N_4/SiO_2 dielectric mask for low-resistance ohmic contacts to AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, S. S.; Pavlov, A. Yu.; Pavlov, B. Yu.; Tomosh, K. N.; Fedorov, Yu. V.

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of a two-layer Si_3N_4/SiO_2 dielectric mask and features of its application in the technology of non-fired epitaxially grown ohmic contacts for high-power HEMTs on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures are described. The proposed Si_3N_4/SiO_2 mask allows the selective epitaxial growth of heavily doped ohmic contacts by nitride molecular-beam epitaxy and the fabrication of non-fired ohmic contacts with a resistance of 0.15–0.2 Ω mm and a smooth surface and edge morphology.

  2. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    OpenAIRE

    T. J. Garrett; C. Fallgatter; K. Shkurko; D. Howlett

    2012-01-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and asp...

  3. Falling and fall risk factors in adults with haemophilia: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammels, M; Vandesande, J; Vlaeyen, E; Peerlinck, K; Milisen, K

    2014-11-01

    Falls are a particular risk in persons with haemophilia (PWH) because of damaged joints, high risk of bleeding, possible impact on the musculoskeletal system and functioning and costs associated with treatment for these fall-related injuries. In addition, fall risk increases with age and PWH are increasingly entering the over 65 age group. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of falls during the past year and to explore which fall risk factors are present in community-dwelling PWH. Dutch speaking community-dwelling adults were included from the age of 40 years with severe or moderate haemophilia A or B, independent in their mobility and registered at the University Hospitals Leuven. They were asked to come to the haemophilia centre; otherwise a telephone survey was conducted. Demographic and social variables, medical variables, fall evaluation and clinical variables were queried. From the 89 PWH, 74 (83.1%) participated in the study. Twenty-four (32.4%) fell in the past year, and 10 of them (41.7%) more than once with an average of four falls. Living conditions, physical activity, avoidance of winter sports due to fear of falling, orthopaedic status, urinary incontinence and mobility impairments are potential fall risk factors in adult PWH. This exploratory study indicates that PWH are attentive to falling since they are at higher risk for falls and because of the serious consequences it might have. Screening and fall prevention should be stimulated in the daily practice of haemophilia care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Relationship Between Perceived Risk of Falling and Adoption of Precautions to Reduce Fall Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Susan J; Gildner, Paula L; Jones, Jennifer L; Bowling, James M; Casteel, Carri H

    2016-06-01

    To better understand the relationship between perceived risk of falling and awareness and adoption of four specific precautions that older adults have taken to reduce this risk. Cross-sectional. Data were collected in in-person interviews conducted in the homes of study participants. Interviews conducted between March 2011 and September 2013 and lasted an average of 60-90 minutes. A stratified sampling strategy designed to enroll an equal number of homebound and nonhomebound participants was used. All participants (N = 164) were recruited from central North Carolina. Participants were asked about 1-year fall history, perceived risk of falling, restriction of activities because of fear of falling, awareness of four recommended fall prevention behaviors (exercise, annual medication review, bathroom grab bars, safe footwear), and current practice of these behaviors. In bivariate analyses, individuals who were aware of two behaviors recommended to reduce the risk of falling (exercise, use of safe footwear) and had adopted these behaviors perceived their risk of falling as lower than individuals who were aware of the recommended behaviors but had not adopted them. Moreover, in multivariate analyses, individuals who did not know that exercise is recommended to reduce the risk of falling perceived their risk of falling as lower than those who were aware of this recommendation and had adopted it. Individuals were least likely to be aware that medication reviews and exercise are recommended to reduce fall risk. Awareness of behaviors recommended to reduce fall risk appears necessary for adoption of these behaviors to reduce perceived risk. Fall-prevention campaigns should emphasize behaviors where awareness is low. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. A Neutron-Diffraction Study of the Solid Layers at the Liquid Solid Boundary in 4He-Films Adsorbed on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Costa Carneiro, Kim; Passell, L.; Thomlinson, W.

    1981-01-01

    A neutron scattering study of the structure of 4He films adsorbed on graphite is reported. Diffraction from helium monolayers at a temperature of 1.2K shows the formation of an incommensurate, triangular-lattice solid of high density. As the coverage is increased above two layers, the diffraction...

  6. The Correlation Between Rates of Falling, Balance, Quality of Life and Fear of Falling in Patients With Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Azadeh

    2018-04-01

    Conclusion The findings of the present study demonstrated the correlation between balance, physical dimensions of quality of life and fear of falling in patients with stroke; however, the rate of falling has no association with fear of falling.

  7. The Neighborhood Environment: Perceived Fall Risk, Resources, and Strategies for Fall Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippendale, Tracy; Boltz, Marie

    2015-08-01

    To explore the experience of older adults in their neighborhood in relation to perceived fall risk, fear of falling (FOF), and resources/strategies for fall prevention. Fourteen older adults, 65 years of age and older from 3 urban senior centers, participated in this qualitative study. The semistructured interview guidelines and background questionnaire were developed by the researchers based on the literature and an existing measure of walkability. Both tools were refined based on pilot interviews with seniors. Collaizzi's phenomenological method was used for data analysis. Five themes emerged from the data: (a) The built environment contributes to perceived fall risk and FOF, (b) personal strategies used to adapt to perceived neighborhood fall risks-behavioral approaches, (c) resources for physical activity and safety, (d) barriers to physical activity and exercise, and (e) neighborhood features as a motivator. Urban-dwelling seniors perceive that neighborhood features contribute to or mitigate fall risk and FOF. Behavioral strategies are used by seniors to prevent outdoor falls. The findings can help clinicians develop targeted fall prevention interventions for well elders and help urban planners to design and retrofit urban environments to reduce fall risk. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Fall risk assessment: retrospective analysis of Morse Fall Scale scores in Portuguese hospitalized adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardo, Pedro Miguel Garcez; Simões, Cláudia Sofia Oliveira; Alvarelhão, José Joaquim Marques; Simões, João Filipe Fernandes Lindo; Melo, Elsa Maria de Oliveira Pinheiro de

    2016-08-01

    The Morse Fall Scale is used in several care settings for fall risk assessment and supports the implementation of preventive nursing interventions. Our work aims to analyze the Morse Fall Scale scores of Portuguese hospitalized adult patients in association with their characteristics, diagnoses and length of stay. Retrospective cohort analysis of Morse Fall Scale scores of 8356 patients hospitalized during 2012. Data were associated to age, gender, type of admission, specialty units, length of stay, patient discharge, and ICD-9 diagnosis. Elderly patients, female, with emergency service admission, at medical units and/or with longer length of stays were more frequently included in the risk group for falls. ICD-9 diagnosis may also be an important risk factor. More than a half of hospitalized patients had "medium" to "high" risk of falling during the length of stay, which determines the implementation and maintenance of protocoled preventive nursing interventions throughout hospitalization. There are several fall risk factors not assessed by Morse Fall Scale. There were no statistical differences in Morse Fall Scale score between the first and the last assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Coatings and Biodegradable and Bioasorbable Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-28

    Dielectric Spectroscopy ," Polymers for Biomedical Applications Symposium, ACS Fall 2006 Meeting, San Francisco, CA. 25 Novel Biodegradable Films Based on...groups upon cross-linking with HDI. The Figl2. Positron annihilation assessment hydroxyl groups are known to form fairly strong of free volume behavior of...1.26 e volume is accumulated upon cooling. Probing free- "A volume with positron life time spectroscopy 1.25 (PALS) showed that indeed, cross-linked

  10. La Rassegna Internazionale del film scientifico-didattico dell'Università di Padova (1956-1975)

    OpenAIRE

    Buzzo, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The first edition of the Rassegna Internazionale del film scientifico-didattico (International festival of scientific and educational film) held by Padua University takes place in the fall of 1956. It was conceived as an annual meeting, and it was developed in collaboration with the Venice International Film Festival. It was organized for eighteen editions up to 1975. For a week a year, the theater Ruzante (in Padua) opened its doors to the screenings of films in a competition (an average of ...

  11. Assessment of risk for falls in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanetić Kosana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly persons have higher risk for falls, compared to younger population. Although no single risk factor causes all falls, a great deal of risk factors to which an individual is exposed, i.e. osteoporosis, lack of physical activity, impaired vision, usage of drugs, living settings etc, can be treated. Objective: To investigate the risk for falls in elderly patients treated in Family medicine teaching center (ECPM, Primary Health Care Center Banja Luka. Method: This prospective study was conducted in June 2012. The study included 150 patients aged 65 years and older. Patients were chosen randomly. In study were included patients who have visited their family doctors on every of Mondays in June 2012. The Tinetti Gait and Balance Instrument was used to asses the risk for falls. Patients were examined to asses gait and balance according to Tinetti questionnaire, and supplementary questionnaire was created to record data about age, sex, chronic diseases and drugs that patients take. Results: The study included 91 (60.7% female and 59 (39.3% male patients. The average age of patients was 74.71 years. 77 (51.3% were aged 65 to 75 years and 73 (48.7% were more than 75 years old. Results of Tinetti Gait and Balance Instrument showed that the risk for falls was high in 55 (36.7%, moderate in 31 (20.7% and low in 64 (42.7% patients. Conclusion: Approximately, one third of investigated patients had high risk for falls, what indicates that family doctors should be more involved in fall prevention in elderly and in constant educating of older adults and their families.

  12. Risk of falling in a stroke unit after acute stroke: The Fall Study of Gothenburg (FallsGOT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Carina U; Kjellberg, Sigvar; Lernfelt, Bodil; Westerlind, Ellen; Cruce, Malin; Hansson, Per-Olof

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate incidence of falls and different baseline variables and their association with falling during hospitalization in a stroke unit among patients with acute stroke. Prospective observational study. A stroke unit at a university hospital. A consecutive sample of stroke patients, out of which 504 were included, while 101 declined participation. The patients were assessed a mean of 1.7 days after admission and 3.8 days after stroke onset. The primary end-point was any fall, from admission to the stroke unit to discharge. Factors associated with falling were analysed using univariable and multivariable Cox hazard regression analyses. Independent variables were related to function, activity and participation, as well as personal and environmental factors. In total, 65 patients (13%) fell at least once. Factors statistically significantly associated with falling in the multivariable analysis were male sex (hazard ratio (HR): 1.88, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-3.14, P = 0.015), use of a walking aid (HR: 2.11, 95% CI: 1.24-3.60, P = 0.006) and postural control as assessed with the modified version of the Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (SwePASS). No association was found with age, cognition or stroke severity, the HR for low SwePASS scores (⩽24) was 9.33 (95% CI: 2.19-39.78, P = 0.003) and for medium SwePASS scores (25-30) was 6.34 (95% CI: 1.46-27.51, P = 0.014), compared with high SwePASS scores (⩾31). Postural control, male sex and use of a walking aid are associated with falling during hospitalization after acute stroke.

  13. Electronic Out-fall Inspection Application - 12007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weymouth, A Kent III; Pham, Minh; Messick, Chuck [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In early 2009 an exciting opportunity was presented to the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) team at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS maintenance group was directed to maintain all Out-falls on Site, increasing their workload from 75 to 183 out-falls with no additional resources. The existing out-fall inspection system consisted of inspections performed manually and documented via paper trail. The inspections were closed out upon completion of activities and placed in file cabinets with no central location for tracking/trending maintenance activities. A platform for meeting new improvements required for documentation by the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) out-fall permits was needed to replace this current system that had been in place since the 1980's. This was accomplished by building a geographically aware electronic application that improved reliability of site out-fall maintenance and ensured consistent standards were maintained for environmental excellence and worker efficiency. Inspections are now performed via tablet and uploaded to a central point. Work orders are completed and closed either in the field using tablets (mobile application) or in their offices (via web portal) using PCs. And finally completed work orders are now stored in a central database allowing trending of maintenance activities. (authors)

  14. Stick balancing, falls and Dragon-Kings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, J. L.; Milton, J. G.

    2012-05-01

    The extent to which the occurrence of falls, the dominant feature of human attempts to balance a stick at their fingertip, can be predicted is examined in the context of the "Dragon-King" hypothesis. For skilled stick balancers, fluctuations in the controlled variable, namely the vertical displacement angle θ, exhibit power law behaviors. When stick balancing is made less stable by either decreasing the length of the stick or by requiring the subject to balance the stick on the surface of a table tennis racket, systematic departures from the power law behaviors are observed in the range of large θ. This observation raises the possibility that the presence of departures from the power law in the large length scale region, possibly Dragon-Kings, may identify situations in which the occurrence of a fall is more imminent. However, whether or not Dragon-Kings are observed, there is a Weibull-type survival function for stick falling. The possibility that increased risk of falling can, at least to some extent, be predicted from fluctuations in the controlled variable before the event occurs has important implications for the development of preventative strategies for the management of phenomena ranging from earthquakes to epileptic seizures to falls in the elderly.

  15. Detection and Prevention of Seniors Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubomír MACKŮ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of seniors’ security and safety, namely the security problems related to falls of independently living elderly citizens. The number of elderly people is growing very fast worldwide and very often they live unattended in their house or flat. In case of accidently falling down, they are often unable help themselves and stay on the floor for hours or even longer. This may lead even to the death if no help comes. Various possibilities of their fall detection are studied. We analyze the historical development, current capabilities and efficiency of different approaches and methods. We address the willingness and ability of seniors to actively use technology, detection limits, privacy, personal data security and other important factors. In addition, we discuss the challenges, current shortcomings, issues and trends in fall detection or operation reliability in real-life conditions. The main future goal would be to maintain the personal privacy and security of irrelevant information in modern fall detection systems.

  16. Elderly outpatient profile and predictors of falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Angélica de Oliveira Gomes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVESFalls are a serious public health problem and are one of the biggest reasons for hospitalization, morbidity and mortality among elderly people. Moreover, few studies on predictors of falls have been conducted in low and middle income countries. The aim here was to identify elderly outpatient profiles according to sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional variables and correlate them with occurrences of falls among these subjects.DESIGN AND SETTINGCross-sectional descriptive study forming part of the project “Quality of Life of Frail Elderly People”, carried out in Campinas, Brazil.METHODSThe subjects were 145 elderly individuals (76.3 ± 7.8 years old, of whom 65% were women, who were living in the city of Campinas or nearby and were attended at the geriatric outpatient clinic of a University Hospital. Sociodemographic, clinical, physical and functional data, as well as fall occurrence data, were gathered. Cluster analyses and comparisons between groups were carried out.RESULTSCluster analysis identified two distinct groups related to the study variables, and the determinants for this distinction were: gender, marital status, physical performance, handgrip strength and functional independence. These groups were compared according to occurrences of falls over the last year, and significant differences between them were found.CONCLUSIONSThe results showed that greater occurrences of falls were associated with a profile of elderly people comprising female gender, single status, lower muscle strength and physical performance regarding balance and gait, and lower independence in motor tasks for activities of daily living.

  17. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudelli, Bruno Alves; Silva, Marcelo Valerio Alabarce da; Akkari, Miguel; Santili, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%). Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%), and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%). In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  18. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alves Rudelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%. Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%, and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%. In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  19. Black Films and Film-Makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Lindsay, Ed.

    The development of black films and the attitudes of the film industry toward black films and black actors are some of the topics examined in this anthology of essays. Section 1, "Nigger to Supernigger," contains such articles as "The Death of Rastus: Negroes in American Films" by Thomas R. Cripps and "Folk Values in a New Medium" by Alain Locke…

  20. Inkjet-printing of indium tin oxide (ITO) films for transparent conducting electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Myun-sung; Jeong, Bong-yong; Moon, Jooho; Chun, Sang-Ki; Kim, Jihoon

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Inkjet printing of ITO films. → Ag-grid was inkjet-printed in between two ITO layers in order to improve the electrical property. → Ag-grid inserted ITO films with 2 mm Ag-grid pitch showed the sheet resistance less than 3.4 Ω/sq and the transmittance higher than 82%. - Abstract: Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films have been prepared by inkjet-printing using ITO nanoparticle inks. The electrical and optical properties of the ITO films were investigated in order to understand the effects of annealing temperatures under microwave. The decrease in the sheet resistance and resistivity of the inkjet-printed ITO films was observed as the annealing temperature increases. The film annealed at 400 deg. C showed the sheet resistance of 517 Ω/sq with the film thickness of ∼580 nm. The optical transmittance of the films remained constant regardless of their annealing temperatures. In order to further reduce the sheet resistance of the films, Ag-grid was printed in between two layers of inkjet-printed ITO. With 3 mm Ag-grid line-to-line pitch, the Ag-grid inserted ITO film has the sheet resistance of 3.4 Ω/sq and the transmittance of 84% after annealing at 200 deg. C under microwave.

  1. Older people's perception of and coping with falling, and their motivation for fall-prevention programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Dorte; Hendriksen, Carsten; Borup, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes.......This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes....

  2. Martial arts fall techniques decrease the impact forces at the hip during sideways falling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Falls to the side and those with impact on the hip are risky for hip fractures in the elderly. A previous study has indicated that martial arts (MA) fall techniques can reduce hip impact force, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the high impact forces at the hand used to break the

  3. Spinal sagittal contour affecting falls: cut-off value of the lumbar spine for falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Kasukawa, Yuji; Hongo, Michio; Shimada, Yoichi

    2013-06-01

    Spinal deformities reportedly affect postural instability or falls. To prevent falls in clinical settings, the determination of a cut-off angle of spinal sagittal contour associated with increase risk for falls would be useful for screening for high-risk fallers. The purpose of this study was to calculate the spinal sagittal contour angle associated with increased risk for falls during medical checkups in community dwelling elders. The subjects comprised 213 patients (57 men, 156 women) with a mean age of 70.1 years (range, 55-85 years). The upright and flexion/extension thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis angles, and the spinal inclination were evaluated with SpinalMouse(®). Postural instability was evaluated by stabilometry, using the total track length (LNG), enveloped areas (ENV), and track lengths in the lateral and anteroposterior directions (X LNG and Y LNG, respectively). The back extensor strength (BES) was measured using a strain-gauge dynamometer. The relationships among the parameters were analyzed statistically. Age, lumbar lordosis, spinal inclination, LNG, X LNG, Y LNG, and BES were significantly associated with falls (Pfalls about lumbar lordosis angles revealed that angles of 3° and less were significant for falls. The present findings suggest that increased age, spinal inclination, LNG, X LNG, Y LNG, and decreased BES and lumbar lordosis, are associated with falls. An angle of lumbar lordosis of 3° or less was associated with falls in these community-dwelling elders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Older persons afraid of falling reduce physical activity to prevent outdoor falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Jong, R. de; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective.: The aim of this study was to test the assumption that the level of outdoor physical activity mediates the relationship between fear of falling and actual outdoor falls according to the Task Difficulty Homeostasis Theory. Method.: A prospective follow-up study of 10 months conducted in

  5. Seniors Falls Investigative Methodology (SFIM): A Systems Approach to the Study of Falls in Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Aleksandra A.; Salmoni, Alan W.; Lewko, John H.; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

    2007-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of human factors and human error is lacking in current research on seniors' falls. Additional knowledge is needed to understand why seniors are falling. The purpose of this article is to describe the adapting of the Integrated Safety Investigation Methodology (ISIM) (used for investigating transportation and industrial…

  6. Temperature dependent electrical properties of polyaniline film grown on paper through aniline vapor polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, K.; Bera, A.; Saha, B.; Bhowmik, K. L.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Polyaniline thin film has been prepared on paper by aniline vapor deposition technique. Ferric chloride has been used as polymerizing agent in this approach. The prepared films were studied through electrical resistivity and optical properties measurements. The electrical resistivity of the polyaniline film shows significant temperature dependence. The resistance sharply falls with the increase in temperature. The optical absorbance measurements shows characteristics absorbance peak indicating the formation of conducting emeraldine salt form of polyaniline. The optical energy band gap of the film was calculated from the transmittance spectra. The optical energy band gap and electrical conductivity of the polyaniline film is well suited for their applications in electronic devices.

  7. Temperature dependent electrical properties of polyaniline film grown on paper through aniline vapor polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deb, K.; Bera, A.; Saha, B., E-mail: biswajit.physics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Jirania, West Tripura 799046 (India); Bhowmik, K. L. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Agartala, Jirania, West Tripura 799046 (India); Department of Chemistry, Bir Bikram Memorial College, Agartala, West Tripura 799004 (India); Chattopadhyay, K. K. [Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Polyaniline thin film has been prepared on paper by aniline vapor deposition technique. Ferric chloride has been used as polymerizing agent in this approach. The prepared films were studied through electrical resistivity and optical properties measurements. The electrical resistivity of the polyaniline film shows significant temperature dependence. The resistance sharply falls with the increase in temperature. The optical absorbance measurements shows characteristics absorbance peak indicating the formation of conducting emeraldine salt form of polyaniline. The optical energy band gap of the film was calculated from the transmittance spectra. The optical energy band gap and electrical conductivity of the polyaniline film is well suited for their applications in electronic devices.

  8. Temperature dependent electrical properties of polyaniline film grown on paper through aniline vapor polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, K.; Bhowmik, K. L.; Bera, A.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Saha, B.

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline thin film has been prepared on paper by aniline vapor deposition technique. Ferric chloride has been used as polymerizing agent in this approach. The prepared films were studied through electrical resistivity and optical properties measurements. The electrical resistivity of the polyaniline film shows significant temperature dependence. The resistance sharply falls with the increase in temperature. The optical absorbance measurements shows characteristics absorbance peak indicating the formation of conducting emeraldine salt form of polyaniline. The optical energy band gap of the film was calculated from the transmittance spectra. The optical energy band gap and electrical conductivity of the polyaniline film is well suited for their applications in electronic devices.

  9. Research on patient safety: falls and medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Sandra Dawn; Kogan, Polina

    2009-10-01

    Below you will find summaries of published research describing investigations into patient safety issues related to falls and medications. The first summary provides details on the incidence of falls associated with the use of walkers and canes. This is followed by a summary of a fall-prevention intervention study that evaluated the effectiveness of widespread dissemination of evidence-based strategies in a community in Connecticut. The third write up provides information on three classes of medications that are associated with a significant number of emergency room visits. The last summary describes a pharmacist-managed medication reconciliation intervention pilot program. For additional details about the study findings and interventions, we encourage readers to review the original articles.

  10. Falls in the elderly. I. Identification of risk factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, B.R.; Boers, I.M.; Cramer, M.; Westendorp, R.G.J.; Gerschlager, W.

    2001-01-01

    Falls severely threaten the health of elderly persons and pose high costs to the public health service. Unfortunately, falls are often regarded as unavoidable and untreatable features of aging. Therefore, many clinicians merely treat the physical injuries of a fall. However, falls and gait

  11. Association between obesity, risk of falls and fear of falling in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gonçalves Ricci Neri

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2017v19n4p450   The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between obesity, risk of falls and fear of falling in older women. Two hundred and twenty-six volunteers (68.05 ± 6.22 years, 68.06 ± 11.79 kg, 1.56 ± 0.06 m were classified as normal weight, overweight or obese, according to the body mass index. Risk of falls and fear of falling were evaluated using QuickScreen Clinical Falls Risk Assessment and Falls Efficiency Scale – International (FES-I, respectively. Comparisons between groups were conducted using Chi-square and ANOVA One-way tests. The significance level was set at p< 0.05. Obesity was associated with greater probability of falls (p< 0.001, which may be partly explained by decreased muscle strength (p< 0.001 and reaction time (p< 0.001. In addition, significant differences between groups was observed in FES-I score (p< 0.01, with obese women showing more pronounced fear of falling (30.10 ± 8.4 than normal weigh (25. 33 ± 7.11, p< 0.01 and overweight subjects (26.97 ± 7.05, p< 0.05. These findings corroborate previous evidence pointing obesity as a major risk factor for falls. Therefore, health professionals dealing with fall prevention should consider the effects of overweight.

  12. The Two-Layer Geodynamo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.

    2018-02-01

    A 2-D mean field geodynamo model with the algebraic form of nonlinearity is considered. The geostrophic alpha-effect and differential rotation are taken from the 3-D models of convection in the liquid core of the Earth. The analysis reveals that these both are located in different spatial areas, and their correlation is no more than ten percent. The model allows typical Z-distributions of the poloidal magnetic field to be generated within the Taylor cylinder. On the surface, this field configuration corresponds to the magnetic dipole. Because of the spatial homogeneity of the magnetic field in the cylinder, dissipation of the field is small, which causes its greater amplitude in this region. Owing to the simple form of alpha-effect quenching by the magnetic field, the model can be used to generate a magnetic field over geological times.

  13. Development of a slip sensor using separable bilayer with Ecoflex-NBR film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Joon; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2017-04-01

    Polymer film-type slip sensor is presented by using novel working principle rather than measuring micro-vibration. The sensor is comprised of bilayer with Ecoflex and NBR(acrylonitrile butadiene rubber) films divided by di-electric. When slip occur on surface, bilayer have relative displacement from each other because friction-induced vibration make a clearance between two layers. This displacement can be obtained by capacitance difference. CNT(carbon nanotube) was employed for electrode because of flexible and stretchable characteristics. Also normal and shear force can be decoupled by the working principle. To verify developed sensor, slip test apparatus was designed and experiments were conducted.

  14. Electrochemomechanical Behaviour of Bilayer and Trilayer Films with PEDOT and PPY Conducting Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zainudeen, Umer L.; Careem, M.A.; Skaarup, Steen

    2008-01-01

    a constant load of 1.5 g. The cyclic voltammograms as well as the UV-visible spectra of PEDOT and PPy are very different, pointing towards the possibility of being able to separate the two layers experimentally – even when combined in a single film. Bilayer results show combined characteristics of each...... layer is very thin compared to that of the PPy layer, and characterized using cyclic voltammetry, optical absorption spectroscopy and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) techniques. Actuators of bilayer and trilayer free standing films were characterized electromechanically under...

  15. Modification of structure and properties of tin – fullerite films irradiated by boron ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, L.V.

    2013-01-01

    By methods of raster electronic, atomic force and electronic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction the research of change of structure, phase composition and local electronic properties of the tin - fullerite films, subjected to implantation by B + ions (E = 80 keV, F = 5×10 17 ions/cm 2 ) are submitted. It is established, that as a result of boron ion implantation of two-layered tin - fullerite films, tin and fullerite interfusion on sues, that is the solid-phase interaction and as a result of which forms the heterophase with heterogeneous local electric properties. (authors)

  16. Falls and fear of falling predict future falls and related injuries in ambulatory individuals with spinal cord injury: a longitudinal observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Vivien; Butler Forslund, Emelie; Opheim, Arve; Franzén, Erika; Wahman, Kerstin; Hultling, Claes; Seiger, Åke; Ståhle, Agneta; Stanghelle, Johan K; Roaldsen, Kirsti S

    2017-04-01

    What is the 1-year incidence of falls and injurious falls in a representative cohort of community-dwelling ambulatory individuals with chronic spinal cord injury? What are the predictors of recurrent falls (more than two/year) and injurious falls in this population? One-year longitudinal observational multi-centre study. A representative sample of 68 (of 73 included) community-dwelling ambulatory individuals with traumatic SCI attending regular follow-up programs at rehabilitation centres. Primary outcome measures were incidence and predictors of recurrent falls (more than two/year) and injurious falls reported every 2 weeks for 1year. A total of 48% of participants reported recurrent falls. Of the 272 reported falls, 41% were injurious. Serious injuries were experienced by 4% of participants, all of whom were women. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that recurrent falls in the previous year (OR=111, 95% CI=8.6 to 1425), fear of falling (OR=6.1, 95% CI=1.43 to 26) and longer time taken to walk 10m (OR=1.3, 95% CI=1.0 to 1.7) were predictors of recurrent falls. Fear of falling (OR=4.3, 95% CI=1.3 to 14) and recurrent falls in the previous year (OR=4.2, 95% CI=1.2 to 14) were predictors of injurious falls. Ambulatory individuals have a high risk of falling and of fall-related injuries. Fall history, fear of falling and walking speed could predict recurrent falls and injurious falls. Further studies with larger samples are needed to validate these findings. [Jørgensen V, Butler Forslund E, Opheim A, Franzén E, Wahman K, Hultling C, Seiger Å, Ståhle A, Stanghelle JK, Roaldsen KS (2017) Falls and fear of falling predict future falls and related injuries in ambulatory individuals with spinal cord injury: a longitudinal observational study. Journal of Physiotherapy 63: 108-113]. Copyright © 2017 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Local optical spectroscopy of opaline photonic crystal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhia, T.; Baranchikov, A. E.; Gorelik, V. S.; Klimonsky, S. O.

    2017-09-01

    The homogeneity of opaline films obtained by vertical deposition of colloidal SiO2 microparticles has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local optical spectroscopy. It was found that the particle size distribution is narrowed during the deposition, the microstructure of the films improves, and the reflection peak in the first photonic stop band increases and narrows. These changes may be due to the fact that large microparticles, whose mass significantly exceeds the average mass, leave the solution in the course of time, falling on the bottom of the vessel under gravity. It is established that the microstructure of opaline films is improved with a decrease in thickness.

  18. Fall Risk Assessment Predicts Fall-Related Injury, Hip Fracture, and Head Injury in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Martin; Eriksson, Joel; Larsson, Berit; Odén, Anders; Johansson, Helena; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the role of a fall risk assessment, using the Downton Fall Risk Index (DFRI), in predicting fall-related injury, fall-related head injury and hip fracture, and death, in a large cohort of older women and men residing in Sweden. Cross sectional observational study. Sweden. Older adults (mean age 82.4 ± 7.8) who had a fall risk assessment using the DFRI at baseline (N = 128,596). Information on all fall-related injuries, all fall-related head injuries and hip fractures, and all-cause mortality was collected from the Swedish Patient Register and Cause of Death Register. The predictive role of DFRI was calculated using Poisson regression models with age, sex, height, weight, and comorbidities as covariates, taking time to outcome or end of study into account. During a median follow-up of 253 days (interquartile range 90-402 days) (>80,000 patient-years), 15,299 participants had a fall-related injury, 2,864 a head injury, and 2,557 a hip fracture, and 23,307 died. High fall risk (DFRI ≥3) independently predicted fall-related injury (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.39-1.49), hip fracture (HR = 1.51, 95% CI =1.38-1.66), head injury (HR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.03-1.22), and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.35-1.43). DFRI more strongly predicted head injury (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.21-1.36 vs HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.04-1.11) and hip fracture (HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.30-1.53 vs HR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.05-1.11) in 70-year old men than in 90-year old women (P Fall risk assessment using DFRI independently predicts fall-related injury, fall-related head injury and hip fracture, and all-cause mortality in older men and women, indicating its clinical usefulness to identify individuals who would benefit from interventions. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. [Risk factors for falls and survival after falling in elderly people in a community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryuichi; Takagi, Chika; Sakurai, Naoko; Hoshi, Tanji

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk factors associated with falls and to examine the effects of falls on survival of elderly people in a community. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 16,462 urban elderly dwellers aged 65 years or more in City A in September 2001. A follow-up survey was carried out in September 2004. We analyzed the data of 8,285 subjects who answered both questionnaires and had not relocated by August 2007. Baseline assessments of health and functioning were carried out in 2001. Falls experienced during the 1-year period before September 2004 were recorded, and the deaths were recorded until August 2007. Statistical analysis was performed using a logistic regression model and Cox's proportional hazards analysis. A total of 6,420 subjects (3,127 men and 3,293 women) who had provided complete answers about their falls were included in the analyses. Of these, 27.8% of women and 16.4% of men had experienced falls, while 6.2% of women and 2.1% of men had experienced falls that caused fractures. We found that the likelihood of fall, with or without fracture development, was greater in women than in men (P falls tended to increase with age in both women and men. Risk factors associated with falls, in addition to age and gender, were pain (odds ratio [OR], 1.75), lack of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL; OR, 1.45), poor self-rated health status (OR, 1.42), and presence of disease (OR, 1.35). Risk factors associated with falls that caused fracture were pain (OR, 1.85) and lack of IADL (OR, 1.61). Cox's proportional hazards analysis showed a significant increase in mortality in both men and women who had experienced falls than in those who had not (hazard ratio [HR], 1.94, 1.43). Aging, pain and disease, lack of IADL, and poor self-rated health status were all significant risk factors for falls in elderly people, and a fall was related to subsequent mortality.

  20. What are the Main Physical Functioning Factors Associated With Falls Among Older People With Different Perceived Fall Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Mirian N; Bilton, Tereza L; Dias, Rosangela C; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Perracini, Monica R

    2017-07-01

    Fall risk perceptions may influence the judgement over physical and functional competencies to avoid falls. However, few studies have explored the physical functioning characteristics associated with falls among older people with low perceived fall risk. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of falls and physical functioning factors associated with falling among community-dwelling older adults with low and high perceived fall risk. We conducted a cross-sectional population based study with 773 community-dwelling elders. Perceived fall risk was investigated using Falls Efficacy Scale International. We considered fallers those who reported at least one fall in the previous 12 months. Physical functioning measures used were grip strength, usual gait speed, sit-to-stand test, five step test, timed up and go test, one-legged stance test, anterior and lateral functional reach test. At least one fall was reported by 103 (30%) participants with low perceived fall risk and by 196 (46%) participants with high perceived fall risk. The odds of falling were lower among those with greater grip strength and with a greater stance time in one-legged test, and the odds of falling among elders with high perceived fall risk were higher among those who took more time in performing the five step test. We believe that our results highlight the need of not neglecting the risk of falls among active older adults with low perceived fall risk, particularly in those elders that show reduced stability in a small base of support and a lower leg strength. In addition, we suggest that elders with high perceived fall risk should be assessed using anticipatory postural adjustment tests. Particularly, our results may help physiotherapists to identify eligible elders with different perceptions of fall risk for tailored interventions aimed at reducing falls. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.