WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-dimensional x-ray images

  1. X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J., E-mail: jlu@pppl.gov [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J. [Inrad Optics, 181 Legrand Avenue, Northvale, New Jersey 07647 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 μm validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten Lα1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 μm. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

  2. X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J.

    2014-11-01

    A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 μm validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten Lα1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 μm. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

  3. X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy with Two-Dimensional Knife-Edge Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Yong-Sung

    2012-04-01

    A novel scheme of X-ray differential phase imaging was implemented with an array source and a two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge (2DFK). A pinhole array lens was employed to manipulate the X-ray beam on the Fourier space. An emerging biaxial scanning procedure was also demonstrated with the periodic 2DFK. The differential phase images (DPIs) of the midrib in a leaf of a rose bush were visualized to verify the phase imaging of biological specimens by the proposed method. It also has features of depicting multiple-stack phase images, and rendering morphological DPIs, because it acquires pure phase information.

  4. Silicon strip detectors for two-dimensional soft X-ray imaging at normal incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rato Mendes, P. E-mail: rato@lip.pt; Abreu, M.C.; Baldazzi, G.; Bollini, D.; Cabal Rodriguez, A.E.; Dabrowski, W.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Giubellino, P.; Gombia, M.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Montano, L.M.; Prino, F.; Ramello, L.; Rodrigues, S.; Sitta, M.; Sousa, P.; Swientek, K.; Taibi, A.; Tuffanelli, A.; Wheadon, R.; Wiacek, P

    2003-08-21

    A simple prototype system for static two-dimensional soft X-ray imaging using silicon microstrip detectors irradiated at normal incidence is presented. Radiation sensors consist of single-sided silicon detectors made from 300 {mu}m thick wafers, read by RX64 ASICs. Data acquisition and control is performed by a Windows PC workstation running dedicated LabVIEW routines, connected to the sensors through a PCI-DIO-96 interface. Two-dimensional images are obtained by scanning a lead collimator with a thin slit perpendicular to the strip axis, along the whole detector size; the several strip profiles (slices) taken at each position are then put together to form a planar image. Preliminary results are presented, illustrating the high-resolution imaging capabilities of the system with soft X-rays.

  5. Observation of asymmetrically imploded core plasmas with a two-dimensional sampling image x-ray streak camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Lee, Myongdok; Mahigashi, Norimitsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    A shell target with a cone for guiding the heating beam has been proposed for the fast ignition scheme. Implosion of such target is no longer symmetric because of the cone. A fast two-dimensional x-ray imaging technique, two-dimensional (2D) sampling image x-ray streak camera was applied for the first time to observation of the dynamics of implosion and core plasma. X-ray emission image of the plasma was sampled with two-dimensionally distributed image sampling points, streaked with the tube, and the recorded signals were reconstructed as sequential 2D frame images. Shape and movement of the core plasma were clearly observed.

  6. Single-shot x-ray differential phase-contrast and diffraction imaging using two-dimensional transmission gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Harold H; Bennett, Eric E; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F; Pai, Vinay

    2010-06-15

    We describe an x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging method based on two-dimensional transmission gratings that are directly resolved by an x-ray camera. X-ray refraction and diffraction in the sample lead to variations of the positions and amplitudes of the grating fringes on the camera. These effects can be quantified through spatial harmonic analysis. The use of 2D gratings allows differential phase contrast in several directions to be obtained from a single image. When compared to previous grating-based interferometry methods, this approach obviates the need for multiple exposures and separate measurements for different directions and thereby accelerates imaging speed.

  7. Dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas observed by ultrafast two-dimensional x-ray imaging with animation display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heya, Manabu; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Kyoko; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Takabe, Hideaki; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Inst. of Laser Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    In order to observe time-resolved, two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of x rays emitted from core plasmas at the final stage of the implosion, we have developed a multi-imaging x-ray streak camera (MIXS) and a multi-channel MIXS (McMIXS) methods as new ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging techniques. The observed time-resolved 2D x-ray and electron-temperature images of core plasmas, which are sequentially changing with time, have been displayed by using an animation method. Temporal evolutions of nonuniform structures, including shape, size, and movement of core plasmas can be observed instinctively with the animated display. The ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging with the animation display is a new powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas. (author)

  8. Two-dimensional X-ray imaging using plastic scintillating fiber array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Due to its low cost,flexibility and convenience for long distance dala transfer,plastic scintillation fiber (PSF)have been increasingly used in building detectors or sensors for detecting various radiations and imaging.In this work,the performance of using PSF coupled with charge-coupled devices(CCD)to build are adetectors for 2D X-ray imaging is studied.We describe the experimental setup and show the obtained images from CCD.Modulation Transfer Function(MTF)of the PSF array is also presented and compared to earlier reports.

  9. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  10. A new method for information retrieval in two-dimensional grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Li; Gao Kun; Chen Jian; Ge Xin; Zhu Pei-Ping; Tian Yang-Chao; Wu Zi-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be an extremely powerful phase-sensitive imaging technique.By using two-dimensional (2D) gratings,the observable contrast is extended to two refraction directions.Recently,we have developed a novel reverse-projection (RP) method,which is capable of retrieving the object information efficiently with one-dimensional (1D) grating-based phase contrast imaging.In this contribution,we present its extension to the 2D grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging,named the two-dimensional reverseprojection (2D-RP) method,for information retrieval.The method takes into account the nonlinear contributions of two refraction directions and allows the retrieval of the absorption,the horizontal and the vertical refraction images.The obtained information can be used for the reconstruction of the three-dimensional phase gradient field,and for an improved phase map retrieval and reconstruction.Numerical experiments are carried out,and the results confirm the validity of the 2D-RP method.

  11. Toward two-dimensional nanometer resolution hard X-ray differential-interference-contrast imaging using modified photon sieves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Hailiang; Shi, Lina; Hua, Yilei; Liu, Ming

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, we report a significant step forward in the design of single-optical-element optics for two-dimensional (2D) hard X-ray differential-interference-contrast (DIC) imaging based on modified photon sieves (MPSs). MPSs were obtained by a modified optic, i.e., combining two overlaid binary gratings and a photon sieve through two logical XOR operations. The superior performance of MPSs was demonstrated. Compared to Fresnel zone plates-based DIC diffractive optical elements (DOEs), which help to improve contrast only in one direction, MPSs can provide better resolution and 2D DIC imaging. Compared to normal photon sieves, MPSs are capable of imaging at a significantly higher image contrast. We anticipate that MPSs can provide a complementary and versatile high-resolution nondestructive imaging tool for ultra-large-scale integrated circuits at 45 nm node and below.

  12. Two-dimensional imaging detectors for structural biology with X-ray lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Peter

    2014-07-17

    Our ability to harness the advances in microelectronics over the past decade(s) for X-ray detection has resulted in significant improvements in the state of the art. Biology with X-ray free-electron lasers present daunting detector challenges: all of the photons arrive at the same time, and individual high peak power pulses must be read out shot-by-shot. Direct X-ray detection in silicon pixel detectors--monolithic or hybrid--are the standard for XFELs today. For structural biology, improvements are needed for today's 10-100 Hz XFELs, and further improvements are required for tomorrow's 10+ kHz XFELs. This article will discuss detector challenges, why they arise and ways to overcome them, along with the current state of the art. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital Slot Radiography Based On A Linear X-Ray Image Intensifier And Two-Dimensional Image Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerlage, M. J. M.; Levels, H. P. L.; Mulder, H.

    1986-06-01

    Apart from providing the inherent benefits of digital imaging, a digital chest system should preferably be superior to large-size film with respect to diagnostic quality. Systems, demonstrated until now, tend to fail in that respect. Here we describe a system -under development- that combines the advantages of film (e.g. high resolution), area detectors (wide sensor dynamic range) and slit detectors (efficient reduction of scattered radiation, high contrast resolution and instantaneous image availibility). Thereby the system is low-dose, compact and operating at standard X-ray tube loading.

  14. Composite x-ray image assembly for large-field digital mammography with one- and two-dimensional positioning of a focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halama, G.; McAdoo, J.; Liu, H.

    1998-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel large-field digital mammography technique, a 1024 x 1024 pixel Loral charge-coupled device (CCD) focal plane array (FPA) was positioned in a mammographic field with one- and two-dimensional scan sequences to obtain 950 x 1800 pixel and 3600 x 3600 pixel composite images, respectively. These experiments verify that precise positioning of FPAs produced seamless composites and that the CCD mosaic concept has potential for high-resolution, large-field imaging. The proposed CCD mosaic concept resembles a checkerboard pattern with spacing left between the CCDs for the driver and readout electronics. To obtain a complete x-ray image, the mosaic must be repositioned four times, with an x-ray exposure at each position. To reduce the patient dose, a lead shield with appropriately patterned holes is placed between the x-ray source and the patient. The high-precision motorized translation stages and the fiber-coupled-scintillating-screen-CCD sensor assembly were placed in the position usually occupied by the film cassette. Because of the high mechanical precision, seamless composites were constructed from the subimages. This paper discusses the positioning, image alignment procedure, and composite image results. The paper only addresses the formation of a seamless composite image from subimages and will not consider the effects of the lead shield, multiple CCDs, or the speed of motion.

  15. Two-dimensional micro-beam imaging of trace elements in a single plankton measured by a synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezoe, Masako; Sasaki, Miho; Hokura, Akiko; Nakai, Izumi [Tokyo Univ. of Science, Faculty of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Terada, Yasuko [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Inst., Mikazuki, Hyogo (Japan); Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Tukamoto, Katsumi [Tokyo Univ., Ocean Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hagiwara, Atsushi [Nagasaki Univ., Graduate School of Science and Technology, Bunkyou, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    Two-dimensional imaging and a quantitative analysis of trace elements in rotifer, Brachionus plicatilis, belonging to zooplankton, were carried out by a synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis (SR-XRF). The XRF imaging revealed that female rotifers accumulated Fe and Zn in the digestive organ and Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ca in the sexual organs, while the Mn level was high in the head. From a quantitative analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), we found that rotifers eat the chlorella and accumulate the above elements in the body. The result of quantitative analyses of Mn, Cu, and Zn by SR-XRF in a single sample is in fair agreement with the average values determined by ICP-MS analyses, which were obtained by measuring a large number of rotifers, digested by nitric acid. The present study has demonstrated that SR-XRF is an effective tool for the trace element analysis of a single individual of rotifer. (author)

  16. Design and experimental study of a two-dimensional position sensitive X-ray detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A prototype of a two-dimensional position sensitive X-ray detector was designed and constructed for small angle X-ray scattering experiments at BSFR (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility). The detector is based on MWPC with cathode strip readout, and has a sensitive area of 200 mmx200 mm. The spatial resolution (FWHM) of about 210 μm along the anode wire direction was obtained from the 55Fe X-ray test of the detector.

  17. Numerical design of X-ray tabletop Talbot interferometer using polycapillary optics as two-dimensional gratings with high aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weiyuan; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Li, Fangzuo; Jiang, Bowen; Ding, Xunliang

    2015-12-01

    The polycapillary optics was proposed to be used as two-dimensional X-ray gratings with high aspect ratios for high energy X-rays. The X-ray Talbot interferometer was designed numerically using the polycapillary X-ray gratings and a conventional X-ray source. The simulation showed that it was available to get a high-aspect-ratio pattern of the polycapillary X-ray gratings for higher energies than 60 keV. Moreover, this design of polycapillary gratings decreased the requirement for high power of the X-ray source. The polycapillary X-ray gratings had potential applications in X-ray imaging technology for medical fields, industrial nondestructive tests, public security, physical science, chemical analysis, life science, nanoscience biology and energy science.

  18. Two-dimensional X-ray focusing by off-axis grazing incidence phase Fresnel zone plate on the laboratory X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Fakhrtdinov, Rashid; Irzhak, Dmitry; Firsov, Alexander; Firsov, Anatoly; Svintsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexey; Roshchupkin, Dmitry

    2017-02-01

    The results of studying a two-dimensional X-ray focusing by an off-axis grazing incidence phase Fresnel zone plate on the laboratory X-ray source are presented. This optics enables obtaining a focal spot of 2 μm on the laboratory X-ray source with a focusing efficiency of 30% at a high signal/noise ratio.

  19. X-ray backscatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  20. Two-dimensional in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors using the speckle scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongchang, E-mail: hongchang.wang@diamond.ac.uk; Kashyap, Yogesh; Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-06

    The two-dimensional slope error of an X-ray mirror has been retrieved by employing the speckle scanning technique, which will be valuable at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes. In situ metrology overcomes many of the limitations of existing metrology techniques and is capable of exceeding the performance of present-day optics. A novel technique for precisely characterizing an X-ray bimorph mirror and deducing its two-dimensional (2D) slope error map is presented. This technique has also been used to perform fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using the derived 2D piezo response functions. The measured focused beam size was significantly reduced after the optimization, and the slope error map was then verified by using geometrical optics to simulate the focused beam profile. This proposed technique is expected to be valuable for in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes.

  1. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Matthias; Carlson, David B; Hunter, Mark S; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Chu, Kaiqin; Graf, Alexander T; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Padeste, Celestino; Pardini, Tommaso; Pedrini, Bill; Segelke, Brent; Seibert, M Marvin; Spence, John C H; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Lane, Stephen M; Li, Xiao-Dan; Schertler, Gebhard; Boutet, Sebastien; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E

    2014-03-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  2. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Soft X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  4. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  5. Two-dimensional in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors using the speckle scanning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Laundy, David; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-07-01

    In situ metrology overcomes many of the limitations of existing metrology techniques and is capable of exceeding the performance of present-day optics. A novel technique for precisely characterizing an X-ray bimorph mirror and deducing its two-dimensional (2D) slope error map is presented. This technique has also been used to perform fast optimization of a bimorph mirror using the derived 2D piezo response functions. The measured focused beam size was significantly reduced after the optimization, and the slope error map was then verified by using geometrical optics to simulate the focused beam profile. This proposed technique is expected to be valuable for in situ metrology of X-ray mirrors at synchrotron radiation facilities and in astronomical telescopes.

  6. High-speed, two-dimensional synchrotron white-beam x-ray radiography of spray breakup and atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Benjamin R; Radke, Christopher D; Reuter, Benjamin J; Kastengren, Alan L; Gord, James R; Meyer, Terrence R

    2017-01-23

    High-speed, two-dimensional synchrotron x-ray radiography and phase-contrast imaging are demonstrated in propulsion sprays. Measurements are performed at the 7-BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source user facility at Argonne National Laboratory using a recently developed broadband x-ray white beam. This novel enhancement allows for high speed, high fidelity x-ray imaging for the community at large. Quantitative path-integrated liquid distributions and spatio-temporal dynamics of the sprays were imaged with a LuAG:Ce scintillator optically coupled to a high-speed CMOS camera. Images are collected with a microscope objective at frame rates of 20 kHz and with a macro lens at 120 kHz, achieving spatial resolutions of 12 μm and 65 μm, respectively. Imaging with and without potassium iodide (KI) as a contrast-enhancing agent is compared, and the effects of broadband attenuation and spatial beam characteristics are determined through modeling and experimental calibration. In addition, phase contrast is used to differentiate liquid streams with varying concentrations of KI. The experimental approach is applied to different spray conditions, including quantitative measurements of mass distribution during primary atomization and qualitative visualization of turbulent binary fluid mixing.

  7. On three-dimensional reconstruction of a neutron/x-ray source from very few two-dimensional projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volegov, P. L., E-mail: volegov@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Simpson, R.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2015-11-28

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the source of neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the stagnation phase of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Very few two-dimensional projections of neutron images are available to reconstruct the three-dimensional neutron source. In this paper, we present a technique that has been developed for the 3D reconstruction of neutron and x-ray sources from a minimal number of 2D projections. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from experimental data collected at Omega.

  8. X-ray imaging for security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. Paul

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray screening of luggage by aviation security personnel may be badly hindered by the lack of visual cues to depth in an image that has been produced by transmitted radiation. Two-dimensional "shadowgraphs" with "organic" and "metallic" objects encoded using two different colors (usually orange and blue) are still in common use. In the context of luggage screening there are no reliable cues to depth present in individual shadowgraph X-ray images. Therefore, the screener is required to convert the 'zero depth resolution' shadowgraph into a three-dimensional mental picture to be able to interpret the relative spatial relationship of the objects under inspection. Consequently, additional cognitive processing is required e.g. integration, inference and memory. However, these processes can lead to serious misinterpretations of the actual physical structure being examined. This paper describes the development of a stereoscopic imaging technique enabling the screener to utilise binocular stereopsis and kinetic depth to enhance their interpretation of the actual nature of the objects under examination. Further work has led to the development of a technique to combine parallax data (to calculate the thickness of a target material) with the results of a basis material subtraction technique to approximate the target's effective atomic number and density. This has been achieved in preliminary experiments with a novel spatially interleaved dual-energy sensor which reduces the number of scintillation elements required by 50% in comparison to conventional sensor configurations.

  9. Two-dimensional resonant magnetic soft X-ray scattering set-up for extreme sample environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, Stefan; Mocuta, Cristian; Merlet, Frederic; Barbier, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    The newly built MagSAXS (magnetic small-angle X-ray scattering) set-up dedicated to the direct two-dimensional measurement of magnetic scattering using polarized synchrotron radiation in extreme sample environments is presented. Pure optical transport of the image is used to record the magnetic scattering with a two-dimensional CCD visible-light camera. The set-up is able to probe magnetic correlation lengths from the micrometer down to the nanometer scale. A detailed layout is presented along with preliminary results obtained at several beamlines at Synchrotron SOLEIL. The presented examples underline the wide range of possible applications spanning from correlation lengths determination to Fourier transform holography.

  10. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberger, J. E-mail: joerg.freudenberger@med.siemens.de; Hell, E.; Knuepfer, W

    2001-06-21

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  11. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  12. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; Coppi, Paolo; Wu, Kinwah; Siegmund, Oswald

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  13. An Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Bellazini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Ramsey, Brian; O'Dell, Steve; Elsner, Ronald; Pavlov, George; Matt, Giorgio; Kaspi, Victoria; Tennant, Allyn; hide

    2008-01-01

    Technical progress both in x-ray optics and in polarization-sensitive x-ray detectors, which our groups have pioneered, enables a scientifically powerful---yet inexpensive---dedicated mission for imaging x-ray polarimetry. Such a mission is sufficiently sensitive to measure x-ray (linear) polarization for a broad range of cosmic sources --particularly those involving neutron stars, stellar black holes, and supermassive black holes (active galactic nuclei). We describe the technical elements, discuss a mission concept, and synopsize the important physical and astrophysical questions such a mission would address.

  14. Cryogenic imaging x-ray spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco J.; van Baar, J.J.J.; de Boer, J.H.; Ridder, M.L.; Bruijn, M.P.; Germeau, A.; Hoevers, H.F.C.

    2005-01-01

    A micro-calorimeter array consisting of superconducting transition-edge sensors is under development for the X-ray imaging spectrometer on board of ESA's XEUS (X-ray Evolving Universe Spectroscopy) mission. An array of 32 /spl times/ 32 pixels with a pixel size of 250 micron square is envisaged. So

  15. Full-field transmission x-ray imaging with confocal polycapillary x-ray optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianxi; Macdonald, C A

    2013-02-07

    A transmission x-ray imaging setup based on a confocal combination of a polycapillary focusing x-ray optic followed by a polycapillary collimating x-ray optic was designed and demonstrated to have good resolution, better than the unmagnified pixel size and unlimited by the x-ray tube spot size. This imaging setup has potential application in x-ray imaging for small samples, for example, for histology specimens.

  16. Experimental x-ray ghost imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M

    2016-01-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard x-ray energy range. We used a synchrotron x-ray beam that was split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultra-fast imaging camera, we were able to image x-rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam was correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured on the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x-rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in non-destructive structural characterization using Free Electron Lasers.

  17. Experimental X-Ray Ghost Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Cantelli, Valentina; Paganin, David M.

    2016-09-01

    We report an experimental proof of principle for ghost imaging in the hard-x-ray energy range. We use a synchrotron x-ray beam that is split using a thin crystal in Laue diffraction geometry. With an ultrafast imaging camera, we are able to image x rays generated by isolated electron bunches. At this time scale, the shot noise of the synchrotron emission process is measurable as speckles, leading to speckle correlation between the two beams. The integrated transmitted intensity from a sample located in the first beam is correlated with the spatially resolved intensity measured in the second, empty, beam to retrieve the shadow of the sample. The demonstration of ghost imaging with hard x rays may open the way to protocols to reduce radiation damage in medical imaging and in nondestructive structural characterization using free electron lasers.

  18. Estimation of drug particle size in intact tablets by two dimensional X-ray diffractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Seema; Thakral, Naveen K; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2017-09-09

    The average grain size of a crystalline material can be determined from the γ-profile of Debye rings in two-dimensional X-ray diffraction (2D XRD) frames. Our objectives were to: (i) validate the method for organic powders and use it to determine the grain size in intact tablets, and (ii) demonstrate the pharmaceutical application of this technique by determining the grain size of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in marketed formulations. Six sieve fractions of sucrose were prepared and the particle size distribution was confirmed by laser diffraction. Their average grain size was determined from the 2D XRD frames by the γ-profile method. For particles size determined by the three methods were in good agreement. When these particles were compressed, there was no discernible change in the sucrose grain size in tablets. When the particles were > 250 μm, compression resulted in a mixture of large grains and fine powder. The grain size of acetaminophen in eleven marketed tablet formulations was determined to be either ∼ 35 μm or ∼ 80 μm. This non-destructive technique can therefore be potentially useful to estimate the grain size of crystalline formulation components in intact tablets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Speckle Scanning Based X-ray Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Berujon, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray near field speckle scanning concept is an approach recently introduced to obtain absorption, phase and darkfield images of a sample. In this paper, we demonstrate ways of recovering from a sample its ultra-small angle X-ray scattering distribution using numerical deconvolution, and the 2D phase gradient signal from random step scans, the latter being used to elude the flat field correction error. Each feature is explained theoretically and demonstrated experimentally at a synchrotron X-ray facility.

  20. Two-dimensional position-sensitive gaseous detectors for high-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Marmotti, M; Kampmann, R

    2002-01-01

    Two-dimensional position-sensitive gaseous detectors have been developed at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility (GeNF) for high-resolution neutron and X-ray diffractometry. They are multi-wire proportional counters with delay-line readout and sensitive areas of 300 mm x 300 mm or 500 mm x 500 mm. For detecting X-rays, neutrons and hard X-rays the counters are filled with Ar/CO sub 2 , sup 3 He/CF sub 4 and Xe/CO sub 2 , respectively. One neutron detector is used at the ARES diffractometer at GKSS, which is dedicated to the analysis of residual stresses. Further ones are used for analysing textures and residual stresses at the hard-X-ray beamline PETRA-2 at HASYLAB, and one detector is being developed for the neutron reflectometer REFSANS at the research reactor FRM-II in Munich, Germany. (orig.)

  1. High spatial resolution hard X-ray microscope using X-ray refractive lens and phase contrast imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kohmura, Y; Takeuchi, A; Takano, H; Suzuki, Y; Ishikawa, T; Ohigashi, T; Yokosuka, H

    2001-01-01

    A high spatial resolution X-ray microscope was constructed using an X-ray refractive lens as an objective. The spatial resolution was tested using 18 keV X-ray. A 0.4 mu m line and 0.4 mu m space tantalum test pattern was successfully resolved. Using the similar setup with the addition of a phase plate, a Zernike type phase-contrast microscopy experiment was carried out for the phase retrieval of the samples. Two-dimensional phase-contrast images were successfully taken for the first time in the hard X-ray region. Images of a gold mesh sample were analyzed and the validity of this method was indicated. An improvement of the lens, however, is required for the precise phase retrieval of the samples.

  2. Single Particle X-ray Diffractive Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogan, M J; Benner, W H; Boutet, S; Rohner, U; Frank, M; Seibert, M; Maia, F; Barty, A; Bajt, S; Riot, V; Woods, B; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Svenda, M; Marklund, E; Spiller, E; Hajdu, J; Chapman, H N

    2007-10-01

    In nanotechnology, strategies for the creation and manipulation of nanoparticles in the gas phase are critically important for surface modification and substrate-free characterization. Recent coherent diffractive imaging with intense femtosecond X-ray pulses has verified the capability of single-shot imaging of nanoscale objects at sub-optical resolutions beyond the radiation-induced damage threshold. By intercepting electrospray-generated particles with a single 15 femtosecond soft-X-ray pulse, we demonstrate diffractive imaging of a nanoscale specimen in free flight for the first time, an important step toward imaging uncrystallized biomolecules.

  3. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Vasan, S N Swetadri; Cartwright, A N; Titus, A H; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x- ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm(2) (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of- interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  4. Two dimensional extensible array configuration for EMCCD-based solid state x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Cartwright, A. N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic x-ray detector to be used for fluoroscopic and angiographic medical imaging. The heart of the detector is a 1024 ×1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2 (Model CCD201-20, e2v Technologies, Inc.), bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm thick micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a fiber optic taper (FOT). Our aim is to design an array of these detectors that could be extended to any arbitrary X × Y size in two dimensions to provide a larger field of view (FOV). A physical configuration for a 3×3 array is presented that includes two major sub-systems. First is an optical front end that includes (i) a phosphor to convert the x-ray photons into light photons, and (ii) a fused array of FOTs that focuses light photons from the phosphor onto an array of EMCCD's optically coupled using FOPs. Second is an electronic front end that includes (i) an FPGA board used for generating clocks and for data acquisition (ii) driver boards to drive and digitize the analog output from the EMCCDs, (iii) a power board, and (iv) headboards to hold the EMCCD's while they are connected to their respective driver board using flex cables. This configuration provides a larger FOV as well as region-of-interest (ROI) high-resolution imaging as required by modern neurovascular procedures.

  5. The X-ray imager on AXO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.; Westergaard, N. J.; Jonasson, P.; Reglero, V.; Eyles, C.

    2001-02-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20×40 cm 2 CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200 keV.

  6. Imaging in Hard X-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Li Ti Pei

    2002-01-01

    The energy range of hard X-rays is a key waveband to the study of high energy processes in celestial objects, but still remains poorly explored. In contrast to direct imaging methods used in the low energy X-ray and high energy gamma-ray bands, currently imaging in the hard X-ray band is mainly achieved through various modulation techniques. A new inversion technique, the direct demodulation method, has been developed since early 90s. With this technique, wide field and high resolution images can be derived from scanning data of a simple collimated detector. The feasibility of this technique has been confirmed by experiment, balloon-borne observation and analyzing simulated and real astronomical data. Based the development of methodology and instrumentation, a high energy astrophysics mission -- Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) has been proposed and selected in China for a four-year Phase-A study. The main scientific objectives are a full-sky hard X-ray (20-200 keV) imaging survey and high signal-to-noi...

  7. X-ray imaging: Perovskites target X-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Wolfgang; Brabec, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    Single crystals of perovskites are currently of interest to help fathom fundamental physical parameters limiting the performance of perovskite-based polycrystalline solar cells. Now, such perovskites offer a technology platform for optoelectronic devices, such as cheap and sensitive X-ray detectors.

  8. Imaging plates calibration to X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, A.; Andreoli, P.; Cipriani, M.; Claps, G.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; De Angelis, R.; Giulietti, D.; Ingenito, F.; Pacella, D.

    2016-05-01

    The growing interest for the Imaging Plates, due to their high sensitivity range and versatility, has induced, in the last years, to detailed characterizations of their response function in different energy ranges and kind of radiation/particles. A calibration of the Imaging Plates BAS-MS, BAS-SR, BAS-TR has been performed at the ENEA-Frascati labs by exploiting the X-ray fluorescence of different targets (Ca, Cu, Pb, Mo, I, Ta) and the radioactivity of a BaCs source, in order to cover the X-ray range between few keV to 80 keV.

  9. First X-ray fluorescence CT experimental results at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Biao; YANG Qun; XIE Hong-Lan; DU Guo-Hao; XIAO Wi-Qiao

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence CT is a non-destructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen. In this paper, the first experimental results of X-ray fluorescence CT obtained at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline (BL13W1) are described. The test samples were investigated and the 2D elemental image was reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. In the sample the element Cd was observed. Up to now, the X-ray fluorescence CT could be carried out at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline.

  10. The X-ray imager on AXO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    2001-01-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma-ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as the so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated....... Modular design and the low-power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: the X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X...... thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20 x 40cm(2) CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200keV....

  11. Healing X-ray scattering images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiliang Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray scattering images contain numerous gaps and defects arising from detector limitations and experimental configuration. We present a method to heal X-ray scattering images, filling gaps in the data and removing defects in a physically meaningful manner. Unlike generic inpainting methods, this method is closely tuned to the expected structure of reciprocal-space data. In particular, we exploit statistical tests and symmetry analysis to identify the structure of an image; we then copy, average and interpolate measured data into gaps in a way that respects the identified structure and symmetry. Importantly, the underlying analysis methods provide useful characterization of structures present in the image, including the identification of diffuse versus sharp features, anisotropy and symmetry. The presented method leverages known characteristics of reciprocal space, enabling physically reasonable reconstruction even with large image gaps. The method will correspondingly fail for images that violate these underlying assumptions. The method assumes point symmetry and is thus applicable to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS data, but only to a subset of wide-angle data. Our method succeeds in filling gaps and healing defects in experimental images, including extending data beyond the original detector borders.

  12. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  13. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2017-01-31

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  14. Evaluation of controlled-drift detectors in X-ray spectroscopic imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoldi, Andrea; Guazzoni, Chiara; Ozkan, Cigdem; Vedani, Giorgio; Hartmann, Robert; Bjeoumikhov, Aniouar

    2009-06-01

    A detector that looks promising for advanced imaging modalities--such as X-ray absorption contrast imaging, X-ray fluorescence imaging, and diffraction-enhanced imaging--is the controlled-drift detector (CDD). The CDD is a novel two-dimensional X-ray imager with energy resolving capability of spectroscopic quality. It is built on a fully depleted silicon wafer and features fast readout while being operated at or near room temperature. The use of CDDs in the aforementioned applications allows translating these techniques from synchrotron-based experiments to laboratory-size experiments using polychromatic X-ray generators. We have built a dedicated and versatile detection module based on a 36 mm2 CDD chip featuring pixels of 180 x 180 microm 2, and we evaluated the system performance in different X-ray imaging applications both with synchrotron-based experiments and in the laboratory environment.

  15. Enhanced dynamic range x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidekker, Mark A; Morrison, Logan Dain-Kelley; Sharma, Ajay; Burke, Emily

    2017-03-01

    X-ray images can suffer from excess contrast. Often, image exposure is chosen to visually optimize the region of interest, but at the expense of over- and underexposed regions elsewhere in the image. When image values are interpreted quantitatively as projected absorption, both over- and underexposure leads to the loss of quantitative information. We propose to combine multiple exposures into a composite that uses only pixels from those exposures in which they are neither under- nor overexposed. The composite image is created in analogy to visible-light high dynamic range photography. We present the mathematical framework for the recovery of absorbance from such composite images and demonstrate the method with biological and non-biological samples. We also show with an aluminum step-wedge that accurate recovery of step thickness from the absorbance values is possible, thereby highlighting the quantitative nature of the presented method. Due to the higher amount of detail encoded in an enhanced dynamic range x-ray image, we expect that the number of retaken images can be reduced, and patient exposure overall reduced. We also envision that the method can improve dual energy absorptiometry and even computed tomography by reducing the number of low-exposure ("photon-starved") projections.

  16. X-ray image quality in radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borcke, E.

    1987-01-01

    A proposal is worked out to express X-ray image quality by means of a meaningful and practically useful numerical system. Attenuations have been selected in such a manner that whole numbers of quality value figures ranging from -10 to +60 result in meaningful associations with radiological indications. Individual parameters are incorporated into the resulting values. A test body for determining information sensitivity figures is described that is practical easy built and inexpensive; its most important feature, however, is that it is reproducible and permits international comparisons. This test body provides a direct linking with the quality value figures.

  17. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  18. Digital X-ray Imaging in Dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    In dentistry, Radio Visio Graphy was introduced as a first electronic dental x-ray imaging modality in 1989. Thereafter, many types of direct digital radiographic systems have been produced in the last decade. They are based either on charge-coupled device (CCD) or on storage phosphor technology. In addition, new types of digital radiographic system using amorphous selenium, image intensifier etc. are under development. Advantages of digital radiographic system are elimination of chemical processing, reduction in radiation dose, image processing, computer storage, electronic transfer of images and so on. Image processing includes image enhancement, image reconstruction, digital subtraction, etc. Especially digital subtraction and reconstruction can be applied in many aspects of clinical practice and research. Electronic transfer of images enables filmless dental hospital and teleradiology/teledentistry system. Since the first image management and communications system (IMACS) for dentomaxillofacial radiology was reported in 1992, IMACS in dental hospital has been increasing. Meanwhile, researches about computer-assisted diagnosis, such as structural analysis of bone trabecular patterns of mandible, feature extraction, automated identification of normal landmarks on cephalometric radiograph and automated image analysis for caries or periodontitis, have been performed actively in the last decade. Further developments in digital radiographic imaging modalities, image transmission system, imaging processing and automated analysis software will change the traditional clinical dental practice in the 21st century.

  19. Image processing system for digital chest X-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocklin, M.; Gourlay, A.; Jackson, P.; Kaye, G.; Miessler, M. (I.B.M. U.K. Scientific Centre, Winchester (UK)); Kerr, I.; Lams, P. (Radiology Department, Brompton Hospital, London (UK))

    1984-01-01

    This paper investigates the requirements for image processing of digital chest X-ray images. These images are conventionally recorded on film and are characterised by large size, wide dynamic range and high resolution. X-ray detection systems are now becoming available for capturing these images directly in photoelectronic-digital form. The hardware and software facilities required for handling these images are described. These facilities include high resolution digital image displays, programmable video look up tables, image stores for image capture and processing and a full range of software tools for image manipulation. Examples are given of the applications of digital image processing techniques to this class of image.

  20. Anisotropic imaging performance in indirect x-ray imaging detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo; Kyprianou, Iacovos S; Sempau, Josep

    2006-08-01

    We report on the variability in imaging system performance due to oblique x-ray incidence, and the associated transport of quanta (both x rays and optical photons) through the phosphor, in columnar indirect digital detectors. The analysis uses MANTIS, a combined x-ray, electron, and optical Monte Carlo transport code freely available. We describe the main features of the simulation method and provide some validation of the phosphor screen models considered in this work. We report x-ray and electron three-dimensional energy deposition distributions and point-response functions (PRFs), including optical spread in columnar phosphor screens of thickness 100 and 500 microm, for 19, 39, 59, and 79 keV monoenergetic x-ray beams incident at 0 degrees, 10 degrees, and 15 degrees. In addition, we present pulse-height spectra for the same phosphor thickness, x-ray energies, and angles of incidence. Our results suggest that the PRF due to the phosphor blur is highly nonsymmetrical, and that the resolution properties of a columnar screen in a tomographic, or tomosynthetic imaging system varies significantly with the angle of x-ray incidence. Moreover, we find that the noise due to the variability in the number of light photons detected per primary x-ray interaction, summarized in the information or Swank factor, is somewhat independent of thickness and incidence angle of the x-ray beam. Our results also suggest that the anisotropy in the PRF is not less in screens with absorptive backings, while the noise introduced by variations in the gain and optical transport is larger. Predictions from MANTIS, after additional validation, can provide the needed understanding of the extent of such variations, and eventually, lead to the incorporation of the changes in imaging performance with incidence angle into the reconstruction algorithms for volumetric x-ray imaging systems.

  1. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  2. X-ray holographic microscopy: Improved images of zymogen granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, C.; Howells, M.; Kirz, J.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.

    1988-10-01

    Soft x-ray holography has long been considered as a technique for x-ray microscopy. It has been only recently, however, that sub-micron resolution has been obtained in x-ray holography. This paper will concentrate on recent progress we have made in obtaining reconstructed images of improved quality. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  3. The ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer: x-ray calorimeter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Dunn, J; Morris, K; Wang, E; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Bitter, M; Feder, R; Hill, K W; Johnson, D; Barnsley, R

    2010-10-01

    We describe the anticipated performance of an x-ray microcalorimeter instrument on ITER. As part of the core imaging x-ray spectrometer, the instrument will augment the imaging crystal spectrometers by providing a survey of the concentration of heavy ion plasma impurities in the core and possibly ion temperature values from the emission lines of different elemental ions located at various radial positions.

  4. X-ray diffraction imaging of material microstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Laszlo

    2016-10-20

    Various examples are provided for x-ray imaging of the microstructure of materials. In one example, a system for non-destructive material testing includes an x-ray source configured to generate a beam spot on a test item; a grid detector configured to receive x- rays diffracted from the test object; and a computing device configured to determine a microstructure image based at least in part upon a diffraction pattern of the x-rays diffracted from the test object. In another example, a method for determining a microstructure of a material includes illuminating a beam spot on the material with a beam of incident x-rays; detecting, with a grid detector, x-rays diffracted from the material; and determining, by a computing device, a microstructure image based at least in part upon a diffraction pattern of the x-rays diffracted from the material.

  5. X-Ray Phase Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    A. Yan, X. Wu, and H. Liu, Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison, Medical Physics 38: 5073-5080...2004. A new theory of phase-contrast x-ray imaging based on Wigner distributions. Medical Physics 31, 2378-2384. Wu X, Liu, H, Yan, A. 2005...Yan A., Wu X., Liu H. 2011. Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison, Medical Physics 38: 5073-5080

  6. X-ray imaging with the PILATUS 100k detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Martin; Bunk, O.; David, C.;

    2008-01-01

    We report on the application of the PILATUS 100K pixel detector for medical imaging. Experimental results are presented in the form of X-ray radiographs using standard X-ray absorption contrast and a recently developed phase contrast imaging method. The results obtained with the PILATUS detector...... are compared to results obtained with a conventional X-ray imaging system consisting of an X-ray scintillation screen, lens optics, and a charge coupled device. Finally, the results for both systems are discussed more quantitatively based on an image power spectrum analysis. Udgivelsesdato: April...

  7. Three-dimensional phase-contrast X-ray microtomography with scanning-imaging X-ray microscope optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2013-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) X-ray tomographic micro-imaging system has been developed. The optical system is based on a scanning-imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) optics, which is a hybrid system consisting of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. In the SIXM system, each 1D dataset of a two-dimensional (2D) image is recorded independently. An object is illuminated with a line-focused beam. Positional information of the region illuminated by the line-focused beam is recorded with the 1D imaging microscope optics as line-profile data. By scanning the object with the line focus, 2D image data are obtained. In the same manner as for a scanning microscope optics with a multi-pixel detector, imaging modes such as phase contrast and absorption contrast can be arbitrarily configured after the image data acquisition. By combining a tomographic scan method and the SIXM system, quantitative 3D imaging is performed. Results of a feasibility study of the SIXM for 3D imaging are shown.

  8. CMOS APS detector characterization for quantitative X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrizzi, Marco, E-mail: m.endrizzi@ucl.ac.uk [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Oliva, Piernicola [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, via Piandanna 4, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Golosio, Bruno [Sezione di Matematica, Fisica e Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Università di Sassari, via Piandanna 4, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, Sezione di Cagliari, 09042 Cagliari (Italy); Delogu, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi”, Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare INFN, sezione di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray Imaging detector based on CMOS Active Pixel Sensor and structured scintillator is characterized for quantitative X-ray imaging in the energy range 11–30 keV. Linearity, dark noise, spatial resolution and flat-field correction are the characteristics of the detector subject of investigation. The detector response, in terms of mean Analog-to-Digital Unit and noise, is modeled as a function of the energy and intensity of the X-rays. The model is directly tested using monochromatic X-ray beams and it is also indirectly validated by means of polychromatic X-ray-tube spectra. Such a characterization is suitable for quantitative X-ray imaging and the model can be used in simulation studies that take into account the actual performance of the detector.

  9. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  10. Quantitative phase imaging using hard x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.A.; Paganin, D.; Barnea, Z. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Cookson, D. F. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Gureyev, T.E. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics]|[CSIRO, Clayton, VIC (Australia). Div. of Forestry and Forest Products

    1997-06-01

    The quantitative imaging of a phase object using 16 keV x-rays is reported. The theoretical basis of the techniques is presented along with its implementation using a synchrotron x-ray source. It is found that the phase image is in quantitative agreement with independent measurements of the object. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping, E-mail: zhusp2009@gmail.com; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin [Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging of Ministry of Education and School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  12. Laboratory two-dimensional X-ray microdiffraction technique: a support for authentication of an unknown Ghirlandaio painting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempi, E.; Benedetti, D.; Massardi, A.; Zacco, A.; Borgese, L.; Depero, L. E.

    2008-07-01

    Europe has a very rich and diversified cultural heritage of art works, including buildings, monuments and objects of all sizes, involving a great variety of materials. The continuous discovery of new art works opens the problem of their authentication. Advanced analytical techniques can be fundamental to understand the way of life, the culture and the technical and intellectual know-how of the artists. Indeed, the authentication of an art work involves the identification of the used materials, their production techniques and procedures used for the work realization. It is possible to know the origin and provenance of materials, including the location of the natural sources. Advanced analytical techniques also help one to understand degradation processes, corrosion, weathering, and preservation-conservation protocols. In this paper we present a painting attributed to Domenico Ghirlandaio. Ghirlandaio is a well-known artist of fifteenth century who contributes to the apprenticeship of Michelangelo Buonarroti. The study of the pigments used in this painting, which belongs to a private collection, has been supported mainly by means of laboratory two-dimensional X-ray microdiffraction (μXRD2). The possibility to obtain information about not only the phase, but also microstructure allows one to extract interesting consideration and to obtain evidence of the painter’s style and intention.

  13. Material depth reconstruction method of multi-energy X-ray images using neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Kim, Dae-Seung; Kang, Sung-Won; Yi, Won-Jin

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of technology, multi-energy X-ray imaging is promising technique that can reduce the patient's dose and provide functional imaging. Two-dimensional photon-counting detector to provide multi-energy imaging is under development. In this work, we present a material decomposition method using multi-energy images. To acquire multi-energy images, Monte Carlo simulation was performed. The X-ray spectrum was modeled and ripple effect was considered. Using the dissimilar characteristics in energy-dependent X-ray attenuation of each material, multiple energy X-ray images were decomposed into material depth images. Feedforward neural network was used to fit multi-energy images to material depth images. In order to use the neural network, step wedge phantom images were used for training neuron. Finally, neural network decomposed multi-energy X-ray images into material depth image. To demonstrate the concept of this method, we applied it to simulated images of a 3D head phantom. The results show that neural network method performed effectively material depth reconstruction.

  14. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  15. A low cost X-ray imaging device based on BPW-34 Si-PIN photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emirhan, E.; Bayrak, A.; Yücel, E. Barlas; Yücel, M.; Ozben, C.S., E-mail: ozben@itu.edu.tr

    2016-05-21

    A low cost X-ray imaging device based on BPW-34 silicon PIN photodiode was designed and produced. X-rays were produced from a CEI OX/70-P dental tube using a custom made ±30 kV power supply. A charge sensitive preamplifier and a shaping amplifier were built for the amplification of small signals produced by photons in the depletion layer of Si-PIN photodiode. A two dimensional position control unit was used for moving the detector in small steps to measure the intensity of X-rays absorbed in the object to be imaged. An Aessent AES220B FPGA module was used for transferring the image data to a computer via USB. Images of various samples were obtained with acceptable image quality despite of the low cost of the device.

  16. Calibration of Cone Beam Rotational X-Ray Image Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUHengyong; MOUXuanqin; CAIYuanlong

    2004-01-01

    The real X-ray projection does not abide by Lambert-Beer Law, since the X-ray is polychromatic and the imaging chains are nonlinear. Based on the generating process of X-ray images, an equivalent nonlinear transform model is firstly proposed which considers all the nonlinear factors as one nonlinear transform. Then the 3D (three-dimensional) X-ray projection of cone beam is defined. The constraints of Radon transform, named H-L (Helgasson-ludwig) consistency conditions, are expanded to fan-beam. After that an algorithm is developed to calibrate Rotational X-ray image sequence (RXIS). The algorithm uses a set of exponential functions to approximate the nonlinear inverse transform. According to expanded H-L consistency conditions, finally a kind of nonlinear measure for RXIS is defined. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can decrease the nonlinear measure to below 0.01.

  17. Incoherent x-ray scattering in single molecule imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Slowik, Jan Malte; Dixit, Gopal; Jurek, Zoltan; Santra, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the structure of single proteins or other biomolecules with atomic resolution would be enormously beneficial to structural biology. X-ray free-electron lasers generate highly intense and ultrashort x-ray pulses, providing a route towards imaging of single molecules with atomic resolution. The information on molecular structure is encoded in the coherent x-ray scattering signal. In contrast to crystallography there are no Bragg reflections in single molecule imaging, which means the coherent scattering is not enhanced. Consequently, a background signal from incoherent scattering deteriorates the quality of the coherent scattering signal. This background signal cannot be easily eliminated because the spectrum of incoherently scattered photons cannot be resolved by usual scattering detectors. We present an ab initio study of incoherent x-ray scattering from individual carbon atoms, including the electronic radiation damage caused by a highly intense x-ray pulse. We find that the coherent scattering pa...

  18. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  19. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  20. Comparing neutron and X-ray images from NIF implosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson D.C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Directly laser driven and X-radiation driven DT filled capsules differ in the relationship between neutron and X-ray images. Shot N110217, a directly driven DT-filled glass micro-balloon provided the first neutron images at the National Ignition Facility. As seen in implosions on the Omega laser, the neutron image can be enclosed inside time integrated X-ray images. HYDRA simulations show the X-ray image is dominated by emission from the hot glass shell while the neutron image arises from the DT fuel it encloses. In the absence of mix or jetting, X-ray images of a cryogenically layered THD fuel capsule should be dominated by emission from the hydrogen rather than the cooler plastic shell that is separated from the hot core by cold DT fuel. This cool, dense DT, invisible in X-ray emission, shows itself by scattering hot core neutrons. Germanium X-ray emission spectra and Ross pair filtered X-ray energy resolved images suggest that germanium doped plastic emits in the torus shaped hot spot, probably reducing the neutron yield.

  1. Single-shot full strain tensor determination with microbeam X-ray Laue diffraction and a two-dimensional energy-dispersive detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, A; Kirchlechner, C; Keckes, J; Conka Nurdan, T; Send, S; Micha, J S; Ulrich, O; Hartmann, R; Strüder, L; Pietsch, U

    2017-06-01

    The full strain and stress tensor determination in a triaxially stressed single crystal using X-ray diffraction requires a series of lattice spacing measurements at different crystal orientations. This can be achieved using a tunable X-ray source. This article reports on a novel experimental procedure for single-shot full strain tensor determination using polychromatic synchrotron radiation with an energy range from 5 to 23 keV. Microbeam X-ray Laue diffraction patterns were collected from a copper micro-bending beam along the central axis (centroid of the cross section). Taking advantage of a two-dimensional energy-dispersive X-ray detector (pnCCD), the position and energy of the collected Laue spots were measured for multiple positions on the sample, allowing the measurement of variations in the local microstructure. At the same time, both the deviatoric and hydrostatic components of the elastic strain and stress tensors were calculated.

  2. Comment on "Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging"

    CERN Document Server

    Taibi, A; Tuffanelli, A; Gambaccini, M

    2002-01-01

    In the paper 'Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging' (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 466 (2001) 99) the infer, from simple approximations, that the use of HOPG monochromator has no advantage in mammography compared to existing systems. We show that in order to compare imaging properties of different X-ray sources it is necessary to evaluate the spectra after the attenuation of the tissue to be imaged. Indeed, quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources have the potential to enhance image contrast and to reduce patient dose.

  3. Comment on ``Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibi, A.; Baldelli, P.; Tuffanelli, A.; Gambaccini, M.

    2002-07-01

    In the paper "Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging" (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 466 (2001) 99) the authors infer, from simple approximations, that the use of HOPG monochromator has no advantage in mammography compared to existing systems. We show that in order to compare imaging properties of different X-ray sources it is necessary to evaluate the spectra after the attenuation of the tissue to be imaged. Indeed, quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources have the potential to enhance image contrast and to reduce patient dose.

  4. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H.; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O.

    2016-07-26

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible within situsample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifyingin situchamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  5. Utilizing broadband X-rays in a Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Wonsuk; Liu, Wenjun; Harder, Ross; Xu, Ruqing; Fuoss, Paul H; Hruszkewycz, Stephan O

    2016-09-01

    A method is presented to simplify Bragg coherent X-ray diffraction imaging studies of complex heterogeneous crystalline materials with a two-stage screening/imaging process that utilizes polychromatic and monochromatic coherent X-rays and is compatible with in situ sample environments. Coherent white-beam diffraction is used to identify an individual crystal particle or grain that displays desired properties within a larger population. A three-dimensional reciprocal-space map suitable for diffraction imaging is then measured for the Bragg peak of interest using a monochromatic beam energy scan that requires no sample motion, thus simplifying in situ chamber design. This approach was demonstrated with Au nanoparticles and will enable, for example, individual grains in a polycrystalline material of specific orientation to be selected, then imaged in three dimensions while under load.

  6. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  7. AXIOM: Advanced X-Ray Imaging Of the Magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembay, S.; Branduardi-Rayrnont, G.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S.; Owen, C. J.; Read, A. M.; Peacocke, L.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    AXIOM (Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere) is a concept mission which aims to explain how the Earth's magnetosphere responds to the changing impact of the solar wind using a unique method never attempted before; performing wide-field soft X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of the magnetosheath. magnetopause and bow shock at high spatial and temporal resolution. Global imaging of these regions is possible because of the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) process which produces elevated soft X-ray emission from the interaction of high charge-state solar wind ions with primarily neutral hydrogen in the Earth's exosphere and near-interplanetary space.

  8. Stimulated scintillation emission depletion X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhin, M S; Patton, G; Dujardin, C; Douissard, P-A; Lebugle, M; Novotny, L; Stampanoni, M

    2017-01-23

    X-ray microtomography is a widely applied tool for noninvasive structure investigations. The related detectors are usually based on a scintillator screen for the fast in situ conversion of an X-ray image into an optical image. Spatial resolution of the latter is fundamentally diffraction limited. In this work, we introduce stimulated scintillation emission depletion (SSED) X-ray imaging where, similar to stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, a depletion beam is applied to the scintillator screen to overcome the diffraction limit. The requirements for the X-ray source, the X-ray flux, the scintillator screen, and the STED beam were evaluated. Fundamental spatial resolution limits due to the spread of absorbed X-ray energy were estimated with Monte Carlo simulations. The SSED proof-of-concept experiments demonstrated 1) depletion of X-ray excited scintillation, 2) partial confinement of scintillating regions to sub-diffraction sized volumes, and 3) improvement of the imaging contrast by applying SSED.

  9. An X-ray imaging device based on a GEM detector with delay-line readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Li, Cheng; Sun, Yong-Jie; Shao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray imaging device based on a triple-GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) detector, a fast delay-line circuit with 700 MHz cut-off frequency and two dimensional readout strips with 150 μm width on the top and 250 μm width on the bottom, is designed and tested. The localization information is derived from the propagation time of the induced signals on the readout strips. This device has a good spatial resolution of 150 μm and works stably at an intensity of 105 Hz/mm2 with 8 keV X-rays.

  10. Characterizing Complexity of Containerized Cargo X-ray Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guangxing [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Harry [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Glenn, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Divin, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Birrer, Nat [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    X-ray imaging can be used to inspect cargos imported into the United States. In order to better understand the performance of X-ray inspection systems, the X-ray characteristics (density, complexity) of cargo need to be quantified. In this project, an image complexity measure called integrated power spectral density (IPSD) was studied using both DNDO engineered cargos and stream-of-commerce (SOC) cargos. A joint distribution of cargo density and complexity was obtained. A support vector machine was used to classify the SOC cargos into four categories to estimate the relative fractions.

  11. The effect of thin filament activation on the attachment of weak binding cross-bridges: A two-dimensional x-ray diffraction study on single muscle fibers.

    OpenAIRE

    Kraft, T; Xu, S.; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1999-01-01

    To study possible structural changes in weak cross-bridge attachment to actin upon activation of the thin filament, two-dimensional (2D) x-ray diffraction patterns of skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle were recorded at low and high calcium concentration in the presence of saturating concentrations of MgATPgammaS, a nucleotide analog for weak binding states. We also studied 2D x-ray diffraction patterns recorded under relaxing conditions at an ionic strength above and below 50 mM, because...

  12. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...

  13. GOES-12 Solar X-ray Imager Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GOES Solar X-ray Imager is integrated into the GOES-12 satellite, whose primary mission is to provide Earth-weather monitoring. The SXI is operated by NOAA's...

  14. Three-Dimensional Backscatter X-Ray Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the proposal is to design, develop and demonstrate a potentially portable Compton x-ray scatter 3D-imaging system by using specially...

  15. Development toward high-resolution X-ray phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Since the 1990s, the use of X-ray phase contrast has been extensively studied for imaging weakly absorbing objects consisting of low-Z elements such as biological soft tissues and polymers. The development of X-ray microscopy was also progressing during this time, although absorption contrast was only available. It was straightforward and important to develop phase-contrast X-ray microscopy. One characteristic in the development is that quantitative phase measurement is possible through the acquisition of phase-contrast images under a specific procedure, thanks to digital X-ray image detectors. Therefore, such a technique is called 'phase imaging' rather than phase-contrast imaging in this review. Highly sensitive three-dimensional phase imaging is feasible in combination with tomography. This article reviews the progress in X-ray phase imaging, especially with regards to X-ray microscopy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Digitization and DICOM Standardization of X-ray Image Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li; YANG Xuan-dong; LI Kai-yang

    2004-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has played an important role in hospital and developed rapidly in recent years. It is an important part of PACS architecture that X-ray video output connects with PACS. In this paper, a method to digitize the video signals of X-ray facility is introduced. By means of the video capture card, we can acquire digital medical images from X-ray facility. The American College of Radiology (ACR) and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) developed a standard for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), this DICOM standard introduces a rule of medical image conversion from conventional format to DICOM one. According to above-mentioned standard, X-ray video signals can be connected to PACS easily. This project has been applied in some hospitals successfully and there is satisfied result.

  17. A Comparison of X-Ray Image Segmentation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STOLOJESCU-CRISAN, C.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation operation has a great importance in most medical imaging applications, by extracting anatomical structures from medical images. There are many image segmentation techniques available in the literature, each of them having advantages and disadvantages. The extraction of bone contours from X-ray images has received a considerable amount of attention in the literature recently, because they represent a vital step in the computer analysis of this kind of images. The aim of X-ray segmentation is to subdivide the image in various portions, so that it can help doctors during the study of the bone structure, for the detection of fractures in bones, or for planning the treatment before surgery. The goal of this paper is to review the most important image segmentation methods starting from a data base composed by real X-ray images. We will discuss the principle and the mathematical model for each method, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses.

  18. Applications of Indirect Imaging techniques in X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Harlaftis, E T

    2000-01-01

    A review is given on aspects of indirect imaging techniques in X-ray binaries which are used as diagnostics tools for probing the X-ray dominated accretion disc physics. These techniques utilize observed properties such as the emission line profile variability, the time delays between simultaneous optical/X-ray light curves curves, the light curves of eclipsing systems and the pulsed emission from the compact object in order to reconstruct the accretion disc's line emissivity (Doppler tomography), the irradiated disc and heated secondary (echo mapping), the outer disc structure (modified eclipse mapping) and the accreting regions onto the compact object, respectively.

  19. Acoustically modulated x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Theron J; Bailat, Claude J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2004-11-07

    We report the use of ultrasonic radiation pressure with phase contrast x-ray imaging to give an image proportional to the space derivative of a conventional phase contrast image in the direction of propagation of an ultrasonic beam. Intense ultrasound is used to exert forces on objects within a body giving displacements of the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Subtraction of images made with and without the ultrasound field gives an image that removes low spatial frequency features and highlights high frequency features. The method acts as an acoustic 'contrast agent' for phase contrast x-ray imaging, which in soft tissue acts to highlight small density changes.

  20. Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwiatkowski, Kris K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapustinsky, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-02

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ({approx}> 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are (a) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  1. Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, C L; Kapustinsky, J S; Kwiatkowski, K; Luo, S-N

    2012-10-01

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays (> or approximately equal to 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  2. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki Hatsui

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors.

  3. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatsui, Takaki; Graafsma, Heinz

    2015-05-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivity and high peak signal. Similar performance improvements are sought in monolithic detectors. The monolithic approach also offers a lower noise floor, which is required for the detection of soft X-ray photons. The link between technology development and detector performance is described briefly in the context of potential future capabilities for X-ray imaging detectors.

  4. Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhehui; Kapustinsky, J S; Kwiatkowski, K; Luo, S -N

    2012-01-01

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ($\\gtrsim$ 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are a.) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and b.) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  5. Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhehui; Morris, C. L.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Luo, S.-N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

  6. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  7. [The application of X-ray imaging in forensic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučerová, Stěpánka; Safr, Miroslav; Ublová, Michaela; Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr

    2014-07-01

    X-ray is the most common, basic and essential imaging method used in forensic medicine. It serves to display and localize the foreign objects in the body and helps to detect various traumatic and pathological changes. X-ray imaging is valuable in anthropological assessment of an individual. X-ray allows non-invasive evaluation of important findings before the autopsy and thus selection of the optimal strategy for dissection. Basic indications for postmortem X-ray imaging in forensic medicine include gunshot and explosive fatalities (identification and localization of projectiles or other components of ammunition, visualization of secondary missiles), sharp force injuries (air embolism, identification of the weapon) and motor vehicle related deaths. The method is also helpful for complex injury evaluation in abused victims or in persons where abuse is suspected. Finally, X-ray imaging still remains the gold standard method for identification of unknown deceased. With time modern imaging methods, especially computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are more and more applied in forensic medicine. Their application extends possibilities of the visualization the bony structures toward a more detailed imaging of soft tissues and internal organs. The application of modern imaging methods in postmortem body investigation is known as digital or virtual autopsy. At present digital postmortem imaging is considered as a bloodless alternative to the conventional autopsy.

  8. Installation of soft X-ray array diagnostics and its application to tomography reconstruction using synthetic KSTAR X-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Juhyeok; Hong, Joohwan; Jang, Siwon; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Impurity and Edge Research Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati 00044 (Italy); Kim, Junghee [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Major of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Science Department, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Four-array system of soft X-ray diagnostics was installed on KSTAR tokamak. Each array has 32 viewing chords of two photo-diode array detectors with spatial resolution of 2 cm. To estimate signals from the soft X-ray radiation power, typical n{sub e}, T{sub e}, and argon impurity line radiation profiles in KSTAR are chosen. The photo-diodes were absolutely calibrated as a function of the incident photon energy in 2–40 keV range with a portable X-ray tube. Two-dimensional T{sub e} image properties by multi-energy method were simulated and visualized with six combinations of beryllium filter sets within the dynamic range of signal ratio.

  9. X-ray imaging detectors for synchrotron and XFEL sources

    OpenAIRE

    Takaki Hatsui; Heinz Graafsma

    2015-01-01

    Current trends for X-ray imaging detectors based on hybrid and monolithic detector technologies are reviewed. Hybrid detectors with photon-counting pixels have proven to be very powerful tools at synchrotrons. Recent developments continue to improve their performance, especially for higher spatial resolution at higher count rates with higher frame rates. Recent developments for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments provide high-frame-rate integrating detectors with both high sensitivit...

  10. Frontiers in imaging magnetism with polarized x-rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eFischer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although magnetic imaging with polarized x-rays is a rather young scientific discipline, the various types of established x-ray microscopes have already taken an important role in state-of-the-art characterization of the properties and behavior of spin textures in advanced materials. The opportunities ahead will be to obtain in a unique way indispensable multidimensional information of the structure, dynamics and composition of scientifically interesting and technologically relevant magnetic materials.

  11. Dilation x-ray imager a new∕faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Barrios, M A; Felker, B; Smith, R F; Collins, G W; Jones, O S; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Piston, K; Raman, K S; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2012-10-01

    As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for ∼7 × 10(18) neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  12. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  13. Fourier-transform Ghost Imaging with Hard X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hong; Han, Shensheng; Xie, Honglan; Du, Guohao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Zhu, Daming

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge gained through X-ray crystallography fostered structural determination of materials and greatly facilitated the development of modern science and technology in the past century. Atomic details of sample structures is achievable by X-ray crystallography, however, it is only applied to crystalline structures. Imaging techniques based on X-ray coherent diffraction or zone plates are capable of resolving the internal structure of non-crystalline materials at nanoscales, but it is still a challenge to achieve atomic resolution. Here we demonstrate a novel lensless Fourier-transform ghost imaging method with pseudo-thermal hard X-rays by measuring the second-order intensity correlation function of the light. We show that high resolution Fourier-transform diffraction pattern of a complex structure can be achieved at Fresnel region, and the amplitude and phase distributions of a sample in spatial domain can be retrieved successfully. The method of lensless X-ray Fourier-transform ghost imaging extends X-ray...

  14. Fourier-Transform Ghost Imaging with Hard X Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Lu, Ronghua; Han, Shensheng; Xie, Honglan; Du, Guohao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Zhu, Daming

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge gained through x-ray crystallography fostered structural determination of materials and greatly facilitated the development of modern science and technology in the past century. However, it is only applied to crystalline structures and cannot resolve noncrystalline materials. Here we demonstrate a novel lensless Fourier-transform ghost imaging method with pseudothermal hard x rays that extends x-ray crystallography to noncrystalline samples. By measuring the second-order intensity correlation function of the light, Fourier-transform diffraction pattern of a complex amplitude sample is achieved at the Fresnel region in our experiment and the amplitude and phase distributions of the sample in the spatial domain are retrieved successfully. For the first time, ghost imaging is experimentally realized with x rays. Since a highly coherent x-ray source is not required, the method can be implemented with laboratory x-ray sources and it also provides a potential solution for lensless diffraction imaging with fermions, such as neutrons and electrons where intensive coherent sources usually are not available.

  15. Refraction contrast in X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Keyrilaeinen, J; Suortti, P

    2002-01-01

    A two-crystal diffractometer in the non-dispersive configuration is used for measurement of the effects of refraction in weakly absorbing test objects. Characteristic K alpha sub 1 radiation from a fine-focus X-ray tube with Mo anode is used. The probing beam is about 70 mu m wide and 3 mm high. The sample is placed between the monochromator and analyzer, and it is scanned through the beam. The analyzer is tuned to reflect at the low-angle slope, at the top, or at the high-angle slope of the rocking curve, when the sample is not in the beam. Refraction changes the angle of incidence on the analyzer causing changes in intensity. The observed intensity distributions are exactly reproduced by a calculation, where only the effects of refraction are included. The effects of in-beam interference are negligible or very small, which is also verified by changing the distance between the object and the detector.

  16. Optimal material discrimination using spectral x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik, S J; Meyer, J; Watts, R

    2011-09-21

    Spectral x-ray imaging using novel photon counting x-ray detectors (PCDs) with energy resolving abilities is capable of providing energy-selective images. PCDs have energy thresholds, enabling the classification of photons into multiple energy bins. The extra energy information provided may allow materials such as iodine and calcium, or water and fat to be distinguishable. The information content of spectral x-ray images, however, depends on how the photons are grouped together. In this work, we present a model to optimize energy windows for maximum material discrimination. Multivariate statistics allows the confidence region of the correlated uncertainties to be mapped in the thickness space. Minimization of the uncertainties enables optimization of energy windows. Applications related to small animal imaging and breast imaging are considered.

  17. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertin, F., E-mail: fauzia.albertin@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Astolfo, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Stampanoni, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); ETHZ, Zürich (Switzerland); Peccenini, Eva [University of Ferrara (Italy); Technopole of Ferrara (Italy); Hwu, Y. [Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kaplan, F. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-01-30

    The heavy-element content of ink in ancient administrative documents makes it possible to detect the characters with different synchrotron imaging techniques, based on attenuation or refraction. This is the first step in the direction of non-interactive virtual X-ray reading. Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page ‘reading’. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project.

  18. Elemental x-ray imaging using Zernike phase contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi-Gang; Chen, Jian; Wali, Faiz; Bao, Yuan; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Tian, Yang-Chao; Gao, Kun

    2016-10-01

    We develop an element-specific x-ray microscopy method by using Zernike phase contrast imaging near absorption edges, where a real part of refractive index changes abruptly. In this method two phase contrast images are subtracted to obtain the target element: one is at the absorption edge of the target element and the other is near the absorption edge. The x-ray exposure required by this method is expected to be significantly lower than that of conventional absorption-based x-ray elemental imaging methods. Numerical calculations confirm the advantages of this highly efficient imaging method. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825801) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11505188, and 11305173).

  19. Energy weighted x-ray dark-field imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pelzer, Georg; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Kraus, Manuel; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, Andre; Wandner, Johannes; Weber, Thomas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Wong, Winnie S; Campbell, Michael; Meiser, Jan; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    The dark-field image obtained in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide information about the objects' microstructures on a scale smaller than the pixel size even with low geometric magnification. In this publication we demonstrate that the dark-field image quality can be enhanced with an energy-resolving pixel detector. Energy-resolved x-ray dark-field images were acquired with a 16-energy-channel photon-counting pixel detector with a 1 mm thick CdTe sensor in a Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometer. A method for contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) enhancement is proposed and validated experimentally. In measurements, a CNR improvement by a factor of 1.14 was obtained. This is equivalent to a possible radiation dose reduction of 23%.

  20. Imaging with parabolic refractive X-ray lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Benner, Boris

    2005-01-01

    When Wilhelm C. Roentgen discovered the x-ray radiation in 1895, he made use of its large penetration depth in matter to create projections of different opaque objects, and also of bones inside the body. The imaging of dense matter inside the body has rapidly found wide use in medicine and is nowadays an important diagnostic tool. But imaging with x-ray radiation is also used in research and technology. The development of 3 dimensional imaging by means of tomographic reconstruction in the lat...

  1. Ancient administrative handwritten documents: X-ray analysis and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertin, F.; Astolfo, A.; Stampanoni, M.; Peccenini, Eva; Hwu, Y.; Kaplan, F.; Margaritondo, G.

    2015-01-01

    Handwritten characters in administrative antique documents from three centuries have been detected using different synchrotron X-ray imaging techniques. Heavy elements in ancient inks, present even for everyday administrative manuscripts as shown by X-ray fluorescence spectra, produce attenuation contrast. In most cases the image quality is good enough for tomography reconstruction in view of future applications to virtual page-by-page ‘reading’. When attenuation is too low, differential phase contrast imaging can reveal the characters from refractive index effects. The results are potentially important for new information harvesting strategies, for example from the huge Archivio di Stato collection, objective of the Venice Time Machine project. PMID:25723946

  2. Chest X-ray imaging of patients with SARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆普选; 周伯平; 陈心春; 袁明远; 龚小龙; 杨根东; 刘锦清; 袁本通; 郑广平; 杨桂林; 王火生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the chest X-ray manifestations of SARS cases.Methods A retrospective study was conducted among 52 clinically confirmed SARS patients from February 9 to May 10, 2003. Chest X-ray scanning was performed at a interval of 1-3 days according to the requirements. The manifestations and special features of SARS in X-ray were analyzed. Results Small or large patchy shadows with intensive density in both lungs were observed in 31 cases, ground-glass like opacification in 16, small patchy shadows in one lung lobe or one lung segment in 18, nodular shadows in one lung segment in 1, and increased lung marking in lung interstitial tissues in 2. Rapidly changing consolidations revealed in chest X-ray images were found to be associated with SARS infections, and they were not affected by treatment with antibiotics.Conclusion Chest X-ray provides a sensitive and specific method for the diagnosis and treatment of SARS, and those present with symptoms and signs should undergo chest X-ray scanning every 1-3 days.

  3. XIPE: the x-ray imaging polarimetry explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffitta, P.; Bellazzini, R.; Bozzo, E.; Burwitz, V.; Castro-Tirado, A.; Costa, E.; Courvoisier, T.; Feng, H.; Gburek, S.; Goosmann, R.; Karas, V.; Matt, G.; Muleri, F.; Nandra, K.; Pearce, M.; Poutanen, J.; Reglero, V.; Sabau Maria, D.; Santangelo, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tenzer, C.; Vink, J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Zane, S.; Agudo, I.; Antonelli, A.; Attina, P.; Baldini, L.; Bykov, A.; Carpentiero, R.; Cavazzuti, E.; Churazov, E.; Del Monte, E.; De Martino, D.; Donnarumma, I.; Doroshenko, V.; Evangelista, Y.; Ferreira, I.; Gallo, E.; Grosso, N.; Kaaret, P.; Kuulkers, E.; Laranaga, J.; Latronico, L.; Lumb, D. H.; Macian, J.; Malzac, J.; Marin, F.; Massaro, E.; Minuti, M.; Mundell, C.; Ness, J. U.; Oosterbroek, T.; Paltani, S.; Pareschi, G.; Perna, R.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Pinazo, H. B.; Pinchera, M.; Rodriguez, J. P.; Roncadelli, M.; Santovincenzo, A.; Sazonov, S.; Sgro, C.; Spiga, D.; Svoboda, J.; Theobald, C.; Theodorou, T.; Turolla, R.; Wilhelmi de Ona, E.; Winter, B.; Akbar, A. M.; Allan, H.; Aloisio, R.; Altamirano, D.; Amati, L.; Amato, E.; Angelakis, E.; Arezu, J.; Atteia, J.-L.; Axelsson, M.; Bachetti, M.; Ballo, L.; Balman, S.; Bandiera, R.; Barcons, X.; Basso, S.; Baykal, A.; Becker, W.; Behar, E.; Beheshtipour, B.; Belmont, R.; Berger, E.; Bernardini, F.; Bianchi, S.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G.; Blasi, P.; Blay, P.; Bodaghee, A.; Boer, M.; Boettcher, M.; Bogdanov, S.; Bombaci, I.; Bonino, R.; Braga, J.; Brandt, W.; Brez, A.; Bucciantini, N.; Burderi, L.; Caiazzo, I.; Campana, R.

    2016-07-01

    XIPE, the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer, is a mission dedicated to X-ray Astronomy. At the time of writing XIPE is in a competitive phase A as fourth medium size mission of ESA (M4). It promises to reopen the polarimetry window in high energy Astrophysics after more than 4 decades thanks to a detector that efficiently exploits the photoelectric effect and to X-ray optics with large effective area. XIPE uniqueness is time-spectrally-spatially- resolved X-ray polarimetry as a breakthrough in high energy astrophysics and fundamental physics. Indeed the payload consists of three Gas Pixel Detectors at the focus of three X-ray optics with a total effective area larger than one XMM mirror but with a low weight. The payload is compatible with the fairing of the Vega launcher. XIPE is designed as an observatory for X-ray astronomers with 75 % of the time dedicated to a Guest Observer competitive program and it is organized as a consortium across Europe with main contributions from Italy, Germany, Spain, United Kingdom, Poland, Sweden.

  4. The CZT X-ray Imager on AXO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.; Westergaard, N. J.; Jonasson, P.; Reglero, V.; Eyles, C.; Neubert, T.

    2001-03-01

    DSRI has initiated a development program of CZT X-ray and gamma ray detectors employing strip readout techniques. A dramatic improvement of the energy response was found operating the detectors as so-called drift detectors. For the electronic readout, modern ASIC chips were investigated. Modular design and the low power electronics will make large area detectors using the drift strip method feasible. The performance of a prototype CZT system will be presented and discussed. One such detector system has been proposed for future space missions: The X-Ray Imager (XRI) on the Atmospheric X-ray Observatory (AXO), which is a mission proposed to the Danish Small Satellite Program and is dedicated to observations of X-ray generating processes in the Earth's atmosphere. Of special interest will be simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of sprites that are flashes appearing directly above an active thunderstorm system. Additional objective is a detailed mapping of the auroral X-ray and optical emission. XRI comprises a coded mask and a 20 cm × 40 cm CZT detector array covering an energy range from 5 to 200 keV.

  5. New developments of X-ray fluorescence imaging techniques in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Matsuno, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Yuki; Yamanashi, Masaki; Kometani, Noritsugu; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kato, Shuichi; Yamada, Takashi; Shoji, Takashi; Kawahara, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established analytical technique with a long research history. Many applications have been reported in various fields, such as in the environmental, archeological, biological, and forensic sciences as well as in industry. This is because XRF has a unique advantage of being a nondestructive analytical tool with good precision for quantitative analysis. Recent advances in XRF analysis have been realized by the development of new x-ray optics and x-ray detectors. Advanced x-ray focusing optics enables the making of a micro x-ray beam, leading to micro-XRF analysis and XRF imaging. A confocal micro-XRF technique has been applied for the visualization of elemental distributions inside the samples. This technique was applied for liquid samples and for monitoring chemical reactions such as the metal corrosion of steel samples in the NaCl solutions. In addition, a principal component analysis was applied for reducing the background intensity in XRF spectra obtained during XRF mapping, leading to improved spatial resolution of confocal micro-XRF images. In parallel, the authors have proposed a wavelength dispersive XRF (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer for a fast elemental imaging. A new two dimensional x-ray detector, the Pilatus detector was applied for WD-XRF imaging. Fast XRF imaging in 1 s or even less was demonstrated for Euro coins and industrial samples. In this review paper, these recent advances in laboratory-based XRF imaging, especially in a laboratory setting, will be introduced.

  6. Synchrotron x-ray ultrafast x-ray imaging on dynamic multiphase flow studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujie; Fezzaa, Kamel; Wang, Jin; Im, Kyoung-Su

    2007-03-01

    To overcome the long-exposure time of x-ray imaging for liquid systems. In the past year, we have developed the first ultrafast white-beam synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging technique in the world. With its unprecedented temporal (0.5 μs) and spatial resolutions (1 μm), this new technique has already shown great promises in the study of complex fluid mechanical systems. It can probe complex surface morphology and transient dynamics of these interfaces of fluid mechanical systems without the nuisance of multiple scattering. This technique is a big step forward in comparison to millisecond-temporal and micrometer-spatial imaging resolutions normally achieved at various synchrotron sources. With the development of this new technique, we can already carry out research in fluid mechanical systems in competition with world-leading research groups. Our study of the primary breakup process of a coaxial air-assisted liquid jet revealed that the dynamics is dominated by a ``liquid membrane breakup'' process instead of a simple ``ligament mediated breakup'' process owing to our far superior temporal and spatial resolutions. This observation will naturally lead to a cascade idea for the unified treatment of liquid jets, droplets, and liquid membranes breakup mechanism.

  7. Efficient x-ray image enhancement algorithm using image fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kuan; Wen, Yumei; Cai, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    Multiresolution Analysis (MRA) plays an important role in image and signal processing fields, and it can extract information at different scales. Image fusion is a process of combining two or more images into an image, which extracts features from source images and provides more information than one image. The research presented in this article is aimed at the development of an automated imaging enhancement system in digital radiography (DR) images, which can clearly display all the defects in one image and don't bring blocking effect. In terms of characteristic of the collected radiographic signals, in the proposed scheme the subsection of signals is mapped to 0-255 gray scale to form several gray images and then these images are fused to form a new enhanced image. This article focuses on comparing the discriminating power of several multiresolution images decomposing methods using contrast pyramid, wavelet, and ridgelet respectively. The algorithms are extensively tested and the results are compared with standard image enhancement algorithms. Tests indicate that the fused images present a more detailed representation of the x-ray image. Detection, recognition, and search tasks may therefore benefit from this.

  8. Reconstruction method for x-ray imaging capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Daniel; Lifshitz, Ronen; Bar-Ilan, Omer; Weiss, Noam; Shapiro, Yoel; Kimchy, Yoav

    2017-03-01

    A colon imaging capsule has been developed by Check-Cap Ltd (C-Scan® Cap). For the procedure, the patient swallows a small amount of standard iodinated contrast agent. To create images, three rotating X-ray beams are emitted towards the colon wall. Part of the X-ray photons are backscattered from the contrast medium and the colon. These photons are collected by an omnidirectional array of energy discriminating photon counting detectors (CdTe/CZT) within the capsule. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Compton backscattering photons pertain different energies and are counted separately by the detection electronics. The current work examines a new statistical approach for the algorithm that reconstructs the lining of the colon wall from the X-ray detector readings. The algorithm performs numerical optimization for finding the solution to the inverse problem applied to a physical forward model, reflecting the behavior of the system. The forward model that was employed, accounts for the following major factors: the two mechanisms of dependence between the distance to the colon wall and the number photons, directional scatter distributions, and relative orientations between beams and detectors. A calibration procedure has been put in place to adjust the coefficients of the forward model for the specific capsule geometry, radiation source characteristics, and the detector response. The performance of the algorithm was examined in phantom experiments and demonstrated high correlation between actual phantom shape and x-ray image reconstruction. Evaluation is underway to assess the algorithm performance in clinical setting.

  9. Spinal X-ray image analysis in scoliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sardjono, Tri Arief

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis new image analysis methods are discussed to determine the curvature of scoliotic patients characterised by the Cobb angle and to enhance the vertebral parts based on features from a frontal X-ray image. Chapter 1 provides some background information on scoliosis, how to diagnose it, t

  10. The High Energy X-ray Imager Technology (HEXITEC) for Solar Hard X-ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For current high resolution X-ray mirrors, the HPD is about 25 arcsec. Over a 6-m focal length this converts to 750 µm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 µm. Annother requirement are that the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage. For solar observations, the ability to handle high counting rates is also extremely desirable. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK has been developing the electronics for such a detector. Dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology, this Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), to create a fine (250 µm pitch) HXR detector. The NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterMSFC and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working with RAL over the past few years to develop these detectors to be used with HXR focusing telescopes. We present on recent results and capabilities as applied to solar observations.

  11. A novel approach for structure analysis of two-dimensional membrane protein crystals using x-ray powder diffraction data

    CERN Document Server

    Dilanian, Ruben A; Varghese, Jose N; Wilkins, Steve W; Oka, Toshihiko; Yagi, Naoto; Quiney, Harry M; Nugent, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    The application of powder diffraction methods in two-dimensional crystallography is regarded as intractable because of the uncertainties associated with overlapping reflections. Here, we report an approach that resolves these ambiguities and provides reliable low-resolution phase information directly from powder diffraction data. We apply our method to the recovery of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) molecule to a resolution of 7 angstroms using only powder diffraction data obtained from two-dimensional purple membrane (PM) crystals.

  12. [Lithium fluoride: not only dosimetry, but also X ray imaging?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfigli, F; Campurra, G; Montereali, R M; Vincenti, M A

    2011-01-01

    Lithium fluoride is a well known material used for dosimetry. In the last years it was proposed and tested also as imaging detector for X-ray microscopy. Optical microscopy represents the oldest and most used imaging technique for medicine and cell biology investigations; later other imaging techniques, including electron microscopy, were introduced. The recent technological developments in the soft X-ray field, concerning sources, optics and detectors, have been increased the interest of physicians and biologists for X-ray microscopy, mainly to obtain in vivo imaging of cells. An innovative imaging detector has been proposed and tested by researchers of C.R. ENEA Frascati, as handy, versatile and compact plate for soft X-ray imaging with very high spatial resolution, wide dynamic range, large field of view and easy to read by an optical microscope. Scientific and technological applications can be foreseen in several fields, as nanotechnologies, materials, photonics, life science and microscopy (including cell imaging, also in vivo).

  13. A new photoelectron imager for X-ray astronomical polarimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Monaca, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Costa, E; Soffitta, P.; Di Persio, G.; Manzan, M.; Martino, B.; Patria, G. [CNR, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Astrofisica Spaziale; Cappuccio, G. [CNR, Monterotondo (Italy). Ist. di Strutturistica Chimica]|[INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Zema, N. [CNR, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Struttura della Materia

    1998-04-01

    A new photoelectron imager for X-ray astronomical polarimetry (PIAP) has been developed and tested at the Frascati (Rome, Italy) National Laboratories of National Institute of Nuclear Physics (LNF-INFN). A charge-coupled device (CCD) is placed on one of the two conjugate foci of a Cassegrain reflective optics onto which are focused UV photons emitted by means of gas scintillation. This X-ray detector has been built to image the angular distribution of the photoelectron tracks, whose anisotropy measures the X-ray polarization. First tests, performed by using mixtures based on argon gas and benzene at low pressure, show events which are candidate tracks of photoelectrons and Auger electrons produced by a {sup 55}Fe source.

  14. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  15. The Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Ramsey, Brian; O’Dell, Stephen; Tennant, Allyn; Elsner, Ronald; Soffita, Paolo; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Kaspi, Victoria; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) is an exciting international collaboration for a scientific mission that dramatically brings together the unique talents of the partners to expand observation space by simultaneously adding polarization measurements to the array of source properties currently measured (energy, time, and location). IXPE uniquely brings to the table polarimetric imaging. IXPE will thus open new dimensions for understanding how X-ray emission is produced in astrophysical objects, especially systems under extreme physical conditions-such as neutron stars and black holes. Polarization singularly probes physical anisotropies-ordered magnetic fields, aspheric matter distributions, or general relativistic coupling to black-hole spin-that are not otherwise measurable. Hence, IXPE complements all other investigations in high-energy astrophysics by adding important and relatively unexplored information to the parameter space for studying cosmic X-ray sources and processes, as well as for using extreme astrophysical environments as laboratories for fundamental physics.

  16. Hard x-ray imaging polarimeter for PolariS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Kim, Juyong; Sadamoto, Masaaki; Yoshinaga, Keigo; Gunji, Shuichi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Kishimoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Dotani, Tadayasu; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Nakamori, Takeshi; Yoneyama, Tomokage; Ikeyama, Yuki; Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Hard X-ray imaging polarimeters are developed for the X-ray γ-ray polaeimtery satellite PolariS. The imaging polarimter is scattering type, in which anisotropy in the direction of Compton scattering is employed to measure the hard X-ray (10-80 keV) polarization, and is installed on the focal planes of hard X-ray telescopes. We have updated the design of the model so as to cover larger solid angles of scattering direction. We also examine the event selection algorithm to optimize the detection efficiency of recoiled electrons in plastic scintillators. We succeed in improving the efficiency by factor of about 3-4 from the previous algorithm and criteria for 18-30 keV incidence. For 23 keV X-ray incidence, the recoiled electron energy is about 1 keV. We measured the efficiency to detect recoiled electrons in this case, and found about half of the theoretical limit. The improvement in this efficiency directly leads to that in the detection efficiency. In other words, however, there is still a room for improvement. We examine various process in the detector, and estimate the major loss is primarily that of scintillation light in a plastic scintillator pillar with a very small cross section (2.68mm squared) and a long length (40mm). Nevertheless, the current model provides the MDP of 6% for 10mCrab sources, which are the targets of PolariS.

  17. Simultaneous dual-energy X-ray stereo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokso, Rajmund, E-mail: rajmund.mokso@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Swiss Light Source, CH 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Oberta, Peter [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Na Slovance 1999/2, Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Rigaku Innovative Technologies Europe s.r.o., Novodvorska 994, Praha 4 (Czech Republic)

    2015-06-26

    A Laue–Bragg geometry is introduced for splitting an X-ray beam and tuning each of the two branches to selected wavelength. Stereoscopic and dual-energy imaging was performed with this system. Dual-energy or K-edge imaging is used to enhance contrast between two or more materials in an object and is routinely realised by acquiring two separate X-ray images each at different X-ray wavelength. On a broadband synchrotron source an imaging system to acquire the two images simultaneously was realised. The single-shot approach allows dual-energy and stereo imaging to be applied to dynamic systems. Using a Laue–Bragg crystal splitting scheme, the X-ray beam was split into two and the two beam branches could be easily tuned to either the same or to two different wavelengths. Due to the crystals’ mutual position, the two beam branches intercept each other under a non-zero angle and create a stereoscopic setup.

  18. X-ray and visible light transmission as two-dimensional, full-field moisture-sensing techniques: A preliminary comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidwell, V.C.; Glass, R.J.

    1992-01-21

    Two independent high-resolution moisture-sensing techniques, x-ray absorption and light transmission, have been developed for use in two-dimensional, thin-slab experimental systems. The techniques yield full-field measurement capabilities with exceptional resolution of moisture content in time and space. These techniques represent powerful tools for the experimentalist to investigate processes governing unsaturated flow and transport through fractured and nonfractured porous media. Evaluation of these techniques has been accomplished by direct comparison of data obtained by means of the x-ray and light techniques as well as comparison with data collected by gravimetric and gamma-ray densitometry techniques. Results show excellent agreement between data collected by the four moisture-content measurement techniques. This program was established to support the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  19. Submicron hard X-ray fluorescence imaging of synthetic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Mark P., E-mail: mjensen@anl.gov [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Aryal, Baikuntha P. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gorman-Lewis, Drew [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Paunesku, Tatjana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Actinide elements are mapped with L-edge X-rays and better than 400 nm resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A typical detection limit was 2.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} moles Pu {mu}m{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XANES measurements provide chemical information in 0.1 {mu}m{sup 2} spots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selection of materials for encapsulation is important for avoiding interferences. - Abstract: Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) using hard X-rays focused into sub-micron spots is a powerful technique for elemental quantification and mapping, as well as microspectroscopic measurements such as {mu}-XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure). We have used XFM to image and simultaneously quantify the transuranic element plutonium at the L{sub 3} or L{sub 2}-edge as well as Th and lighter biologically essential elements in individual rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after exposure to the long-lived plutonium isotope {sup 242}Pu. Elemental maps demonstrate that plutonium localizes principally in the cytoplasm of the cells and avoids the cell nucleus, which is marked by the highest concentrations of phosphorus and zinc, under the conditions of our experiments. The minimum detection limit under typical acquisition conditions with an incident X-ray energy of 18 keV for an average 202 {mu}m{sup 2} cell is 1.4 fg Pu or 2.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} moles Pu {mu}m{sup -2}, which is similar to the detection limit of K-edge XFM of transition metals at 10 keV. Copper electron microscopy grids were used to avoid interference from gold X-ray emissions, but traces of strontium present in naturally occurring calcium can still interfere with plutonium detection using its L{sub {alpha}} X-ray emission.

  20. A multiplexed high-resolution imaging spectrometer for resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Tony; Chuang, Yi De; Voronov, Dmitriy L; Padmore, Howard A

    2014-07-01

    The optical design of a two-dimensional imaging soft X-ray spectrometer is described. A monochromator will produce a dispersed spectrum in a narrow vertical illuminated stripe (∼2 µm wide by ∼2 mm tall) on a sample. The spectrometer will use inelastically scattered X-rays to image the extended field on the sample in the incident photon energy direction (vertical), resolving the incident photon energy. At the same time it will image and disperse the scattered photons in the orthogonal (horizontal) direction, resolving the scattered photon energy. The principal challenge is to design a system that images from the flat-field illumination of the sample to the flat field of the detector and to achieve sufficiently high spectral resolution. This spectrometer provides a completely parallel resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurement at high spectral resolution (∼30,000) over the energy bandwidth (∼5 eV) of a soft X-ray absorption resonance.

  1. X-ray phase contrast imaging at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Ghazaly, M.; Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Kube, G.; Kunz, P.; Sharafutdinov, A.; Weber, T. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Experiments have been performed to explore the potential of the low emittance 855 MeV electron beam of the Mainz Microtron MAMI for imaging with coherent X-rays. Transition radiation from a micro-focused electron beam traversing a foil stack served as X-ray source with good transverse coherence. Refraction contrast radiographs of low absorbing materials, in particular polymer strings with diameters between 30 and 450 {mu}m, were taken with a polychromatic transition radiation X-ray source with a spectral distribution in the energy range between 8 and about 40 keV. The electron beam spot size had standard deviation {sigma}{sub h}=(8.6{+-}0.1) {mu}m in the horizontal and {sigma}{sub v}=(7.5{+-}0.1) {mu}m in the vertical direction. X-ray films were used as detectors. The source-to-detector distance amounted to 11.4 m. The objects were placed in a distance of up to 6m from the X-ray film. Holograms of strings were taken with a beam spot size {sigma}{sub v}=(0.50{+-}0.05) {mu}m in vertical direction, and a monochromatic X-ray beam of 6keV energy. A good longitudinal coherence has been obtained by the (111) reflection of a flat silicon single crystal in Bragg geometry. It has been demonstrated that a direct exposure CCD chip with a pixel size of 13 x 13 {mu}m{sup 2} provides a highly efficient on-line detector. Contrast images can easily be generated with a complete elimination of all parasitic background. The on-line capability allows a minimization of the beam spot size by observing the smallest visible interference fringe spacings or the number of visible fringes. It has been demonstrated that X-ray films are also very useful detectors. The main advantage in comparison with the direct exposure CCD chip is the resolution. For the Structurix D3 (Agfa) X-ray film the standard deviation of the resolution was measured to be {sigma}{sub f}=(1.2{+-}0.4) {mu}m, which is about a factor of 6 better than for the direct exposure CCD chip. With the small effective X-ray spot size

  2. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snigireva, I. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  3. Automatic Tongue Tracking in X-Ray Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Changwei; LI Rui; YU Lingyun; YU Jun; WANG Zengfu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging is an eff ective technique to obtain the continuous motions of the vocal tract during speech, and Active appearance model (AAM) is a useful tool to analyze the X-ray images. However, for the task of tongue tracking in X-ray images, the accuracy of AAM fit-ting is insufficient. AAM aims to minimize the residual er-ror between the model appearance and the input image. It often fails to accurately converge to the true landmarks. To improve the tracking accuracy, we propose a fitting method by combining Constrained local model (CLM) into AAM. In our method, we first combine the objective functions of AAM and CLM into a single ob jective function. Then, we pro ject out the texture variation and derive a gradi-ent based method to optimize the objective function. Our method eff ectively incorporates not only the shape prior and global texture, but also local texture around each land-mark. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method significantly reduces the fitting error. We also show that re-alistic 3D tongue animation can be created by using tongue tracking results of the X-ray images.

  4. Effects of spatially heterogeneous porosity on matrix diffusion as investigated by X-ray absorption imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, Vincent C.; Meigs, Lucy C.; Christian-Frear, Tracy; Boney, Craig M.

    2000-03-01

    High-resolution X-ray absorption imaging was used to investigate the effects of spatially heterogeneous porosity on matrix diffusion. Experiments were performed on four, centimeter-scale slabs of Culebra dolomite taken from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. These tests involved the diffusion of potassium iodide into a single edge of each brine-saturated rock slab, while X-ray absorption imaging was used to measure the two-dimensional relative concentration distribution at different times during the experiment. X-ray imaging was also used to measure the heterogeneous, two-dimensional porosity distribution of each rock slab. The resulting high-resolution data provide unique insight into the spatially varying diffusion characteristics of each heterogeneous rock sample, which traditional methods such as through-diffusion experiments cannot. In these tests, significant variations in the diffusion coefficient were calculated over the relatively small length (centimeter) and time scales (months) investigated. Results also indicated that these variations were related to the heterogeneous porosity characteristics of each rock sample. Not only were the diffusion coefficients found to depend on the magnitude of the porosity but also on its spatial distribution. Specifically, the geometry, position, and orientation of the heterogeneous porosity features populating each rock slab appeared to influence the diffusion characteristics.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Su Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube emitter, and the transmitted X-ray image was of high resolution.

  6. Diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging of mammals crystalline lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, USP, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: antunes@if.usp.br; Hoennicke, M.G. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil); Safatle, A.M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, USP, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil); Moraes Barros, P.S. [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, USP, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Morelhao, S.L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, USP, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-08-15

    Crystalline lenses are transparent biological materials where the organization of the lens fibers can also be affected by changes at molecular level, and therefore the structure and morphology of the tissue can be correlated to the loss of transparency of the lens. In this work, internal structure of mammal lenses regarding the long-range ordering of the fibers are investigated by diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) radiography. Moreover, DEI and absorption X-ray synchrotron radiographs for healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are compared. Significant differences in healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are observed.

  7. Evaluating fracture healing using digital x-ray image analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-02

    Mar 2, 2011 ... Her research interests are in orthopaedic engineering and implants, X-ray techniques and digital image ... in the research setting, in order to design useful studies for quantitative evaluation of the .... These types of bending are ...

  8. Measuring one-dimensional and two-dimensional impurity density profiles on TEXTOR using combined charge exchange-beam emission spectroscopy and ultrasoft x-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, M.; Jakubowska, K.; Hellermann, M. von; Jaspers, R.; Donné, A. J. H.; Shmaenok, L.

    2004-10-01

    Two techniques are presented that allow us to measure impurity density profiles in the TEXTOR tokamak plasma. The one-dimensional profiles are gathered by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) in combination with beam emission spectroscopy (BES). Combining CXRS and BES eliminate the need for absolute calibration. For two-dimensional profiles an ultrasoft x-ray tomography system has been developed. The system is spectrally resolved and produces local emissivity profiles of several ionization stages of impurities. Both systems are presently being commissioned. They are complementary and give an insight into the impurity distribution and transport in plasmas.

  9. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods: basic physical principles and potential medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Qi, Zhihua; Li, Ke

    2010-01-01

    Phase sensitive imaging theoretically allows for a drastic reduction in x-ray dose while simultaneously achieving comparable or better spatial and contrast resolution compared to traditional x-ray absorption based imaging. Several techniques exist to extract the phase information from an x-ray signal, including x-ray interferometry, diffraction enhanced imaging, in-line holography, coded aperture x-ray imaging, and grating-based interferometry. The physics of each method is reviewed, along wi...

  10. X-ray imaging in advanced studies of ophthalmic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angélica M V; Barros, Paulo S M; Morelhão, Sérgio L

    2006-07-01

    Microscopic characterization of pathological tissues has one major intrinsic limitation, the small sampling areas with respect to the extension of the tissues. Mapping possible changes on vast tissues and correlating them with large ensembles of clinical cases is not a feasible procedure for studying most diseases, as for instance vision loss related diseases and, in particular, the cataract. Although intraocular lens implants are successful treatments, cataract still is a leading public-health issue that grows in importance as the population increases and life expectancy is extended worldwide. In this work we have exploited the radiation-tissue interaction properties of hard x-rays--very low absorption and scattering--to map distinct lesions on entire eye lenses. At the used synchrotron x-ray photon energy of 20 keV (wavelength lambda=0.062 nm), scattering and refraction are angular resolved effects. It allows the employed x-ray image technique to efficiently characterize two types of lesions in eye lenses under cataractogenesis: distributions of tiny scattering centers and extended areas of fiber cell compaction. The data collection procedure is relatively fast; allowing dozens of samples to be totally imaged (scattering, refraction, and mass absorption images) in a single day of synchrotron beam time. More than 60 cases of canine cataract, not correlated to specific causes, were investigated in this first application of x-rays to image entire lenses. Cortical opacity cases, or partial opacity, could be related to the presence of calcificated tissues at the cortical areas, clearly visible in the images, whose elemental contents were verified by micro x-ray fluorescence as very rich in calcium. Calcificated tissues were also observed at nuclear areas in some cases of hypermature cataract. Total opacity cases without distinguishable amount of scattering centers consist in 70% of the analyzed cases, where remarkable fissure marks owing to extended areas of fiber

  11. Recent developments in X-ray imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Moy, J P

    2000-01-01

    The replacement of the radiographic film in medical imaging has been the driving force in X-ray imaging developments. It requires a approx 40 cm wide detector to cover all examinations, an equivalent noise level of 1-5 X-ray quanta per pixel, and spatial resolution in the range 100-150 mu m. The need for entirely electronic imaging equipments has fostered the development of many X-ray detectors, most of them based on an array of amorphous silicon pixels, which is the only technology capable to achieve such large areas. Essentially, two concepts have been implemented: - intermediate conversion of X-rays to light by a scintillator, detected by an array of light sensitive pixels, comprising a photodiode and a switching device, either a TFT or a diode. - conversion into electron-hole pairs in a photoconductor, collected by an array of electrodes and switches. In both cases, charge amplifiers read the generated charges line by line. Scintillator and photoconductor-based systems are now close to production. They ac...

  12. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  13. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  14. Fast X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Liao, Qimei; Wang, Hongkai

    2014-06-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) opens new possibilities to perform molecular imaging with X-ray. However, challenges remain in dynamic XLCT imaging, where short scan time, good spatial resolution, and whole-body field of view should be considered simultaneously. In this paper, by the use of a single-view XLCT reconstruction method based on a compressive sensing (CS) technique, incorporating a cone beam XLCT imaging system, we implement fast 3-D XLCT imaging. To evaluate the performance of the method, two types of phantom experiments were performed based on a cone beam XLCT imaging system. In Case 1, one tube filled with the X-ray-excitable nanophosphor (Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+)) was immerged in different positions in the phantom to evaluate the effect of the source position on single-view XLCT reconstruction accuracy. In Case 2, two tubes filled with Gd 2O 3 :Eu (3+) were immerged in different heights in the phantom to evaluate the whole-body imaging performance of single-view XLCT reconstruction. The experimental results indicated that the tubes used in previous phantom experiments can be resolved from single-view XCLT reconstruction images. The location error is less than 1.2 mm. In addition, since only one view data are needed to implement 3-D XLCT imaging, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced (∼1 frame/s) compared with previous XLCT systems. Hence, the technique is suited for imaging the fast distribution of the X-ray-excitable nanophosphors within a biological object.

  15. Incoherent Diffractive Imaging via Intensity Correlations of Hard X Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Anton; Ayyer, Kartik; Chapman, Henry N.; Röhlsberger, Ralf; von Zanthier, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Established x-ray diffraction methods allow for high-resolution structure determination of crystals, crystallized protein structures, or even single molecules. While these techniques rely on coherent scattering, incoherent processes like fluorescence emission—often the predominant scattering mechanism—are generally considered detrimental for imaging applications. Here, we show that intensity correlations of incoherently scattered x-ray radiation can be used to image the full 3D arrangement of the scattering atoms with significantly higher resolution compared to conventional coherent diffraction imaging and crystallography, including additional three-dimensional information in Fourier space for a single sample orientation. We present a number of properties of incoherent diffractive imaging that are conceptually superior to those of coherent methods.

  16. Structured illumination for tomographic X-ray diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joel A; Hassan, Mehadi; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Brady, David

    2014-02-21

    Tomographic imaging of the molecular structure of an object is important for a variety of applications, ranging from medical and industrial radiography to security screening. X-ray diffraction imaging is the preeminent technique for performing molecular analysis of large volumes. Here we propose and demonstrate a new measurement architecture to improve the source and detector efficiency for diffraction imaging. In comparison with previous techniques, our approach reduces the required overall scan time by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which makes possible real-time scanning of a broad range of materials over a large volume using a table-top setup. This method, which relies on structuring spatially the illumination incident on an object moving relative to the X-ray source, is compatible with existing systems and has the potential to significantly enhance performance in an array of areas, such as medical diagnostic imaging and explosives detection.

  17. AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Sembay, S. F.; Eastwood, J. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Abbey, A.; Brown, P.; Carter, J. A.; Carr, C. M.; Forsyth, C.; Kataria, D.; Kemble, S.; Milan, S. E.; Owen, C. J.; Peacocke, L.; Read, A. M.; Coates, A. J.; Collier, M. R.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Fraser, G. W.; Jones, G. H.; Lallement, R.; Lester, M.; Porter, F. S.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Planetary plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in two complementary ways - by in situ measurements, or by remote sensing. While the former provide precise information about plasma behaviour, instabilities and dynamics on local scales, the latter offers the global view necessary to understand the overall interaction of the magnetospheric plasma with the solar wind. Some parts of the Earth's magnetosphere have been remotely sensed, but the majority remains unexplored by this type of measurements. Here we propose a novel and more elegant approach employing remote X-ray imaging techniques. which are now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge exchange X-ray emissions in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere. In this article we describe how an appropriately designed and located. X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock. with a temporal and spatial resolution sufficient to address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the Earth's magnetosphere on a global level. Global images of the dayside magnetospheric boundaries require vantage points well outside the magnetosphere. Our studies have led us to propose 'AXIOM: Advanced X-ray Imaging Of the Magnetosphere', a concept mission using a Vega launcher with a LISA Pathfinder-type Propulsion Module to place the spacecraft in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth - Moon Ll point. The model payload consists of an X-ray Wide Field Imager, capable of both imaging and spectroscopy, and an in situ plasma and magnetic field measurement package. This package comprises a Proton-Alpha Sensor, designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an Ion Composition Analyser, to characterize the minor ion populations in the solar wind that cause charge exchange emission, and a Magnetometer, designed to measure the strength and

  18. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%-5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm(2) CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%-5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R(2) > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%-5% gold solutions in a small animal sized water phantom has been demonstrated

  19. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@stanford.edu; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Ahmad, Moiz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo [Department of Medical Physics, Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo 060-8648, Japan and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Matsuo, Yuto [Department of Medical Physics, Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  20. A compact PC-based X-ray imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asimidis, A. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)]. E-mail: aasimid@cc.uoi.gr; Evangelou, I. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kokkas, P. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Manthos, N. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Triantis, F. [Physics Department, Laboratory B, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Speller, R.D. [Medical Physics and Bioengineering Department, University College London, 11-20 Capper Street, London WC1E 6JA (United Kingdom); Hall, G. [Physics Department, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Stelt, P.F. van der [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, NL 1066 EA Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-04-01

    A compact, portable PC-based X-ray imaging system has been developed based on a 2D silicon microstrip sensor and particle physics readout electronics. The sensor is housed in a specially built hybrid, which also hosts the front-end electronics. The control and the readout electronics used are based on the standard PCI and PMC architectures and were originally developed for High Energy Physics Experiments. The use of PCI based electronics and the development of the control software for the PC-Linux platform led to a compact, portable, low cost imaging system. The system was initially tested and evaluated with beta particles from a {sup 90}Sr radioactive source, gamma rays from an {sup 241}Am radioactive source and cosmic rays, and it displayed consistent response. It was then operated using a compact X-ray machine with Mo tube and images of various targets were reconstructed offline using the ROOT data analysis package.

  1. High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindlay, Jonathan

    We propose to design and build the first imaging hard X-ray detector system that incorporates 3D stacking of closely packed detector readouts in finely-spaced imaging arrays with their required data processing and control electronics. In virtually all imaging astronomical detectors, detector readout is done with flex connectors or connections that are not vertical but rather horizontal , requiring loss of focal plane area. For high resolution pixel detectors needed for high speed event-based X-ray imaging, from low energy applications (CMOS) with focusing X-ray telescopes, to hard X-ray applications with pixelated CZT for large area coded aperture telescopes, this new detector development offers great promise. We propose to extend our previous and current APRA supported ProtoEXIST program that has developed the first large area imaging CZT detectors and demonstrated their astrophysical capabilities on two successful balloon flight to a next generation High Resolution Energetic X-ray Imager (HREXI), which would incorporate microvia technology for the first time to connect the readout ASIC on each CZT crystal directly to its control and data processing system. This 3-dimensional stacking of detector and readout/control system means that large area (>2m2) imaging detector planes for a High Resolution Wide-field hard X-ray telescope can be built with initially greatly reduced detector gaps and ultimately with no gaps. This increases detector area, efficiency, and simplicity of detector integration. Thus higher sensitivity wide-field imagers will be possible at lower cost. HREXI will enable a post-Swift NASA mission such as the EREXS concept proposed to PCOS to be conducted as a future MIDEX mission. This mission would conduct a high resolution (<2 arcmin) , broad band (5 200 keV) hard X-ray survey of black holes on all scales with ~10X higher sensitivity than Swift. In the current era of Time Domain Astrophysics, such a survey capability, in conjunction with a n

  2. The Soft X-ray Imager on board EXIST

    CERN Document Server

    Natalucci, L; Panessa, F; Ubertini, P; Tagliaferri, G; Della Ceca, R; Ghisellini, G; Pareschi, G; Villa, G; Caraveo, P; Fiorini, M; Uslenghi, M; Grindlay, J E; Ramsey, B

    2010-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Imager (SXI) is one of the three instruments on board EXIST, a multi-wavelength observatory in charge of performing a global survey of the sky in hard X-rays searching for Super-massive Black Holes (Grindlay & Natalucci, these Proceedings). One of the primary objectives of EXIST is also to study with unprecedented sensitivity the most unknown high energy sources in the Universe, like high redshift GRBs, which will be pointed promptly by the Spacecraft by autonomous trigger based on hard X-ray localization on board. The presence of a soft X-ray telescope with an effective area of about 950cm2 in the energy band 0.2-3 keV and extended response up to 10 keV will allow to make broadband studies from 0.1 to 600 keV. In particular, investigations of the spectra components and states of AGNs and monitoring of variability of sources, study of the prompt and afterglow emission of GRBs since the early phases, which will help to constrain the emission models and finally, help the identification of sou...

  3. Distributed source x-ray tube technology for tomosynthesis imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, F.; Calderon-Colon, X.; Cheng, Y.; Englestad, K.; Lu, J.; Maltz, J.; Paidi, A.; Qian, X.; Spronk, D.; Sultana, S.; Yang, G.; Zhou, O.

    2010-04-01

    Tomosynthesis imaging requires projection images from different viewing angles. Conventional systems use a moving xray source to acquire the individual projections. Using a stationary distributed x-ray source with a number of sources that equals the number of required projections, this can be achieved without any mechanical motion. Advantages are a potentially faster image acquisition speed, higher spatial and temporal resolution and simple system design. We present distributed x-ray sources based on carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission cathodes. The field emission cathodes deliver the electrons required for x-ray production. CNT emitters feature a stable emission at high current density, a cold emission, excellent temporal control of the emitted electrons and good configurability. We discuss the use of stationary sources for two applications: (i) a linear tube for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (sDBT), and (ii) a square tube for on-board tomosynthesis image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Results from high energy distributed sources up to 160kVp are also presented.

  4. Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, W. L.; Voss, H. D.; Mobilia, J.; Datlowe, D. W.; Chinn, V. L.; Hilsenrath, M.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities sponsored by the Office of Naval Research for the Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE). The MAXIE instrument was developed as a joint activity of Lockheed, The Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Bergen, Norway. Lockheed was responsible for the overall management of the program, interfacing with the appropriate government agencies, the overall electrical and mechanical design, flight software, environmental testing, spacecraft integration activities, on orbit checkout, and data processing activities. The Magnetospheric Atmospheric X-ray Imaging Experiment (MAXIE), the ONR 401 experiment, is the first in a new class of satellite-borne remote sensing instruments. The primary innovation is the ability to obtain rapid, sequential, images with high sensitivity of the earth's X ray aurora from a low altitude polar orbiting satellite. These images can be used to identify dynamic temporal variations in the three-dimensional (energy and position) distribution of electron precipitation into the atmosphere. MAXIE was launched on the TIROS NOAA-13 satellite on 9 August 1993. The experiment performed well during its turn-on sequence; however, the spacecraft bus failed on 21 August 1993. New spacebased technologies successfully used in MAXIE were mixed-mode ASIC microcircuits, a zero torque scanning system with associated viscoelastic damping, a paraffin stow release mechanism, a parallel integrating PHA processor, a low noise Si(Li) sensor telescope, and an advanced thermal cooling system. MAXIE's on orbit operation, control of penetrating particle backgrounds, and scientific data indicated good overall performance.

  5. Water Window Ptychographic Imaging with Characterized Coherent X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Rose, Max; Dzhigaev, Dmitry; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Senkbeil, Tobias; von Gundlach, Andreas; Gorniak, Thomas; Shabalin, Anatoly; Viefhaus, Jens; Rosenhahn, Axel; Vartanyants, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We report on a ptychographical coherent diffractive imaging experiment in the water window with focused soft X-rays at $500~\\mathrm{eV}$. An X-ray beam with high degree of coherence was selected for ptychography at the P04 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron radiation source. We measured the beam coherence with the newly developed non-redundant array method. A pinhole $2.6~\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ in size selected the coherent part of the beam and was used for ptychographic measurements of a lithographically manufactured test sample and fossil diatom. The achieved resolution was $53~\\mathrm{nm}$ for the test sample and only limited by the size of the detector. The diatom was imaged at a resolution better than $90~\\mathrm{nm}$.

  6. A monochromatic x-ray imaging system for characterizing low-density foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanier, Nicholas E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taccetti, Jose M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamilton, Christopher E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    In High Energy Density (HED) laser experiments, targets often require small, low-density, foam components. However, their limited size can preclude single component characterization, forcing one to rely solely on less accurate bulk measurements. We have developed a monochromatic imaging a system to characterize both the density and uniformity of single component low-mass foams. This x-ray assembly is capable of determining line-averaged density variations near the 1% level, and provides statistically identical results to those obtained at the Brookhaven's NSLS. This system has the added benefit of providing two-dimensional density data, allowing an assessment of density uniformity.

  7. Study of X-ray Imaging of GEM Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xiao-mei; HU; Shou-yang; JIAN; Si-yu; ZHOU; Jing; LI; Xing-long; LIANG; Hao; ZHOU; Shu-hua

    2015-01-01

    A 10cm×10cm GEM detector made by 3GEM foils was used in the X-ray imaging experiment.2-D strips readout mode was used and each dimension has 256channels with a pitch of 400micrometer.APV25front-end readout chip was introduced in the detector,and the backplane connectors were improved in order to adapt the electronics with GEM detector.Since each

  8. Detectors for the future of X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslund, M; Fredenberg, E; Telman, M; Danielsson, M

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, developments in detectors for X-ray imaging have improved dose efficiency. This has been accomplished with for example, structured scintillators such as columnar CsI, or with direct detectors where the X rays are converted to electric charge carriers in a semiconductor. Scattered radiation remains a major noise source, and fairly inefficient anti-scatter grids are still a gold standard. Hence, any future development should include improved scatter rejection. In recent years, photon-counting detectors have generated significant interest by several companies as well as academic research groups. This method eliminates electronic noise, which is an advantage in low-dose applications. Moreover, energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors allow for further improvements by optimising the signal-to-quantum-noise ratio, anatomical background subtraction or quantitative analysis of object constituents. This paper reviews state-of-the-art photon-counting detectors, scatter control and their application in diagnostic X-ray medical imaging. In particular, spectral imaging with photon-counting detectors, pitfalls such as charge sharing and high rates and various proposals for mitigation are discussed.

  9. High-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer (HEXIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, James L.; Gruber, Duane E.; Heindl, William A.; Pelling, Michael R.; Peterson, Laurence E.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Skelton, Robert E.; Hink, Paul L.; Slavis, Kimberly R.; Binns, W. Robert

    1998-11-01

    HEXIS is a MIDEX-class mission concept for x-ray astronomy. Its objectives are to improve our knowledge of the high energy x-ray sky by increasing the number of sources above 20 keV to > 2,000, discovering transient sources such as x-ray novae and gamma-ray bursts, and making spectral and temporal studies of the sources. With mission life > 3 years, a 1-year all-sky survey sensitivity of approximately 0.3 mCrab, and continuous monitoring of the entire visible sky, HEXIS will provide unprecedented capabilities. Source positions will be determined to accuracies of a few arcmin or better. Spectra will be determined with an energy resolution of a few keV and source variability will be studied on time scales from CZT detectors operating from approximately 5 keV to 200 keV. Detector planes are built with 41 cm(superscript 2) CZT detector modules which employ crossed-strip readout to obtain a pixel size of 0.5 mm. Nine modules are grouped in a 369 cm(superscript 2) array for each imager. In the past 2 years significant progress has been made on techniques requires for HEXIS: position-sensitive CZT detectors and ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Scientific and technical details of HEXIS are presented together with result form tests of detectors and a coded mask imager.

  10. Possibility of single biomolecule imaging with coherent amplification of weak scattering x-ray photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintake, Tsumoru

    2008-10-01

    The number of photons produced by coherent x-ray scattering from a single biomolecule is very small because of its extremely small elastic-scattering cross section and low damage threshold. Even with a high x-ray flux of 3 x 10;{12} photons per 100-nm -diameter spot and an ultrashort pulse of 10 fs driven by a future x-ray free electron laser (x-ray FEL), it has been predicted that only a few 100 photons will be produced from the scattering of a single lysozyme molecule. In observations of scattered x rays on a detector, the transfer of energy from wave to matter is accompanied by the quantization of the photon energy. Unfortunately, x rays have a high photon energy of 12 keV at wavelengths of 1A , which is required for atomic resolution imaging. Therefore, the number of photoionization events is small, which limits the resolution of imaging of a single biomolecule. In this paper, I propose a method: instead of directly observing the photons scattered from the sample, we amplify the scattered waves by superimposing an intense coherent reference pump wave on it and record the resulting interference pattern on a planar x-ray detector. Using a nanosized gold particle as a reference pump wave source, we can collect 10;{4}-10;{5} photons in single shot imaging where the signal from a single biomolecule is amplified and recorded as two-dimensional diffraction intensity data. An iterative phase retrieval technique can be used to recover the phase information and reconstruct the image of the single biomolecule and the gold particle at the same time. In order to precisely reconstruct a faint image of the single biomolecule in Angstrom resolution, whose intensity is much lower than that of the bright gold particle, I propose a technique that combines iterative phase retrieval on the reference pump wave and the digital Fourier transform holography on the sample. By using a large number of holography data, the three-dimensional electron density map can be assembled.

  11. Progress in biomedical application of phase-contrast x-ray imaging and fluorescent x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Yoneyama, Akio; Hirai, Yasuharu; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Minami, Manabu; Kose, Katsumi; Akatsuka, Takao

    2006-08-01

    X-ray CT system with phase-contrast and fluorescent techniques are being developed for biomedical researches. We have applied these techniques for in-vivo and ex-vivo imaging. The phase-contrast x-ray CT enables to reveal the detailed morphological information of cancer lesion, and image quality of ex-vivo specimen was excellent comparing to 4.74T micro-MRI. Fluorescent x-ray CT could depict the functional information with high spatial resolution, and its image quality was almost the same as autoradiogram. Improvement of imaging system with much high-speed data acquisition will enable to use these techniques for new biomedical researches.

  12. Two-dimensional functional molecular nanoarchitectures - Complementary investigations with scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klappenberger, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Functional molecular nanoarchitectures (FMNs) are highly relevant for the development of future nanotechnology devices. Profound knowledge about the atomically controlled construction of such nanoscale assemblies is an indispensable requirement to render the implementation of such components into a real product successful. For exploiting their full potential the architectures’ functionalities have to be characterized in detail including the ways to tailor them. In recent years a plethora of sophisticated constructs were fabricated touching a wide range of research topics. The present review summarizes important achievements of bottom-up fabricated, molecular nanostructures created on single crystal metal surfaces under ultra-high vacuum conditions. This selection focuses on examples where self-assembly mechanisms played a central role for their construction. Such systems, though typically quite complex, can be comprehensively understood by the STM+XS approach combining scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with X-ray spectroscopy (XS) and being aided in the atomic interpretation by the appropriate theoretic analysis, often from density functional theory. The symbiosis of the techniques is especially fruitful because of the complementary character of the information accessed by the local microscopy and the space-averaging spectroscopy tools. STM delivers sub-molecular spatial-resolution, but suffers from limited sensitivity for the chemical and conformational states of the building-blocks. XS compensates these weaknesses with element- and moiety-specific data, which in turn would be hard to interpret with respect to structure formation without the topographic details revealed by STM. The united merit of this methodology allows detailed geometric information to be obtained and addresses both the electronic and chemical state of the complex organic species constituting such architectures. Thus, possible changes induced by the various processes such as surface

  13. IXPE - The Imaging X-Ray Polarimetry Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE) is a Small Explorer Mission that will be proposed in response to NASA's upcoming Announcement of Opportunity. IXPE will transform our understanding of the most energetic and exotic astrophysical objects, especially neutron stars and black holes, by measuring the linear polarization of astronomical objects as a function of energy, time and, where relevant, position. As the first dedicated polarimetry observatory IXPE will add a new dimension to the study of cosmic sources, enlarging the observational phase space and providing answers to fundamental questions. IXPE will feature x-ray optics fabricated at NASA/MSFC and gas pixel focal plane detectors provided by team members in Italy (INAF and INFN). This presentation will give an overview of the proposed IXPE mission, detailing the payload configuration, the expected sensitivity, and a typical observing program.

  14. XIPE: the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer

    CERN Document Server

    Soffitta, Paolo; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Braga, João; Costa, Enrico; Fraser, George W; Gburek, Szymon; Huovelin, Juhani; Matt, Giorgio; Pearce, Mark; Poutanen, Juri; Reglero, Victor; Santangelo, Andrea; Sunyaev, Rashid A; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Weisskopf, Martin; Aloisio, Roberto; Amato, Elena; Attiná, Primo; Axelsson, Magnus; Baldini, Luca; Basso, Stefano; Bianchi, Stefano; Blasi, Pasquale; Bregeon, Johan; Brez, Alessandro; Bucciantini, Niccoló; Burderi, Luciano; Burwitz, Vadim; Casella, Piergiorgio; Churazov, Eugene; Civitani, Marta; Covino, Stefano; da Silva, Rui Miguel Curado; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Dadina, Mauro; D'Amico, Flavio; De Rosa, Alessandra; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Di Persio, Giuseppe; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Dovciak, Michal; Elsner, Ronald; Eyles, Chris J; Fabian, Andrew C; Fabiani, Sergio; Feng, Hua; Giarrusso, Salvatore; Goosmann, René W; Grandi, Paola; Grosso, Nicolas; Israel, Gianluca; Jackson, Miranda; Kaaret, Philip; Karas, Vladimir; Kuss, Michael; Lai, Dong; La Rosa, Giovanni; Larsson, Josefin; Larsson, Stefan; Latronico, Luca; Maggio, Antonio; Maia, Jorge; Marin, Frédéric; Massai, Marco Maria; Mineo, Teresa; Minuti, Massimo; Moretti, Elena; Muleri, Fabio; O'Dell, Stephen L; Pareschi, Giovanni; Peres, Giovanni; Pesce, Melissa; Petrucci, Pierre-Olivier; Pinchera, Michele; Porquet, Delphine; Ramsey, Brian; Rea, Nanda; Reale, Fabio; Rodrigo, Juana Maria; Różańska, Agata; Rubini, Alda; Rudawy, Pawel; Ryde, Felix; Salvati, Marco; Júnior, Valdivino Alexandre de Santiago; Sazonov, Sergey; Sgró, Carmelo; Silver, Eric; Spandre, Gloria; Spiga, Daniele; Stella, Luigi; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamborra, Francesco; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Dias, Teresa Teixeira; van Adelsberg, Matthew; Wu, Kinwah; Zane, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry, sometimes alone, and sometimes coupled to spectral and temporal variability measurements and to imaging, allows a wealth of physical phenomena in astrophysics to be studied. X-ray polarimetry investigates the acceleration process, for example, including those typical of magnetic reconnection in solar flares, but also emission in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars and white dwarfs. It detects scattering in asymmetric structures such as accretion disks and columns, and in the so-called molecular torus and ionization cones. In addition, it allows fundamental physics in regimes of gravity and of magnetic field intensity not accessible to experiments on the Earth to be probed. Finally, models that describe fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity and the extension of the Standard Model) can be tested. We describe in this paper the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE), proposed in June 2012 to the first ESA call for a small mission with a launch in 2017 but not selected. XIPE ...

  15. The Advanced X-ray Imaging Satellite (AXIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Mushotzky, Richard

    2017-08-01

    The Advanced X-ray Imaging Satellite (AXIS) will follow in the footsteps of the spectacularly successful Chandra X-ray Observatory with similar or higher angular resolution and an order of magnitude more collecting area in the 0.3-10keV band. These capabilities will enable major advances in many of the most active areas of astrophysics, including (i) mapping event horizon scale structure in AGN accretion disks and the determination of supermassive black hole (SMBH) spins through monitoring of gravitationally-microlensed quasars; (ii) dramatically deepening our understanding of AGN feedback in galaxies and galaxy clusters out to high-z through the direct imaging of AGN winds and the interaction of jets with the hot interstellar/intracluster medium; (iii) understanding the fueling of AGN by probing hot flows inside of the SMBH sphere of influence; (iv) obtaining geometric distance measurements using dust scattering halos. With a nominal 2028 launch, AXIS will be enormously synergistic with LSST, ALMA, WFIRST and ATHENA, and will be a valuable precursor to Lynx. AXIS is enabled by breakthroughs in the construction of light-weight X-ray optics from mono-crystalline silicon blocks, building on recent developments in the semiconductor industry. Here, we describe the straw-man concept for AXIS, some of the high profile science that this observatory will address, and how you can become involved.

  16. A new method for determining the sensitivity of X-ray imaging observations and the X-ray number counts

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakakis, A; Laird, E S; Aird, J; Trichas, M

    2008-01-01

    We present a new method for determining the sensitivity of X-ray imaging observations, which correctly accounts for the observational biases that affect the probability of detecting a source of a given X-ray flux, without the need to perform a large number of time consuming simulations. We use this new technique to estimate the X-ray source counts in different spectral bands (0.5-2, 0.5-10, 2-10 and 5-10keV) by combining deep pencil-beam and shallow wide-area Chandra observations. The sample has a total of 6295 unique sources over an area of $\\rm 11.8deg^2$ and is the largest used to date to determine the X-ray number counts. We determine, for the first time, the break flux in the 5-10 keV band, in the case of a double power-law source count distribution. We also find an upturn in the 0.5-2keV counts at fluxes below about 6e-17erg/s/cm2. We show that this can be explained by the emergence of normal star-forming galaxies which dominate the X-ray population at faint fluxes. The fraction of the diffuse X-ray bac...

  17. Detection of soft X-rays from Alpha Lyrae and Eta Bootis with an imaging X-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topka, K.; Fabricant, D.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Gorenstein, P.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for observations of Alpha Lyr (Vega) and Eta Boo with an imaging X-ray telescope during two rocket flights. It is found that Vega and Eta Boo are soft X-ray sources with respective luminosities of approximately 3 x 10 to the 28th erg/s (0.15-0.8 keV) and 1 x 10 to the 29th erg/s (0.15-1.5 keV). Surface X-ray luminosities of about 640,000 erg/sq cm per sec for Vega and 300,000 erg/sq cm per sec for Eta Boo are estimated and shown to fall within the range of solar coronal X-ray emission. It is concluded that in view of the substantially larger surface areas of these stars, the relatively large total soft X-ray luminosity (as compared with that of the sun) can in both cases be understood as resulting from a moderately active corona, although the Vega observation is in severe conflict with simple models for X-ray emission from single main-sequence stars.

  18. Two dimensional estimates from ocean SAR images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Le Caillec

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images of the ocean yield a lot of information on the sea-state surface providing that the mapping process between the surface and the image is clearly defined. However it is well known that SAR images exhibit non-gaussian statistics and that the motion of the scatterers on the surface, while the image is being formed, may yield to nonlinearities. The detection and quantification of these nonlinearities are made possible by using Higher Order Spectra (HOS methods and more specifically, bispectrum estimation. The development of the latter method allowed us to find phase relations between different parts of the image and to recognise their level of coupling, i.e. if and how waves of different wavelengths interacted nonlinearly. This information is quite important as the usual models assume strong nonlinearities when the waves are propagating in the azimuthal direction (i.e. along the satellite track and almost no nonlinearities when propagating in the range direction. In this paper, the mapping of the ocean surface to the SAR image is reinterpreted and a specific model (i.e. a Second Order Volterra Model is introduced. The nonlinearities are thus explained as either produced by a nonlinear system or due to waves propagating into selected directions (azimuth or range and interacting during image formation. It is shown that quadratic nonlinearities occur for waves propagating near the range direction while for those travelling in the azimuthal direction the nonlinearities, when present, are mostly due to wave interactions but are almost completely removed by the filtering effect coming from the surface motion itself (azimuth cut-off. An inherent quadratic interaction filtering (azimuth high pass filter is also present. But some other effects, apparently nonlinear, are not detected with the methods described here, meaning that either the usual relation developed for the Ocean-to-SAR transform is somewhat incomplete

  19. Contrast imaging with a monochromatic x-ray scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Donald J.; Popovic, Kosta; Williams, Mark B.

    2008-03-01

    We are currently developing a monochromatic x-ray source for small animal tomographic imaging. This source consists of a conventional cone beam microfocus x-ray tube with a tungsten target coupled to a filter that uses Bragg diffraction to transmit only x-rays within a narrow energy range (~3 keV FWHM). A tissue-equivalent mouse phantom was used to a) evaluate how clearly CT imaging using the quasi-monoenergetic beam is able to differentiate tissue types compared to conventional polyenergetic CT, and b) to test the ability of the source and Bragg filter combination to perform dual energy, iodine contrast enhanced imaging. Single slice CT scans of the phantom were obtained both with polyenergetic (1.8 mm Al filtration) and quasi-monoenergetic beams. Region of interest analysis showed that pixel value variance was signifcantly reduced in the quasi-monochromatic case compared to the polyenergetic case, suggesting a reduction in the variance of the linear attenuation coefficients of the tissue equivalent materials due to the narrower energy spectrum. To test dual energy iodine K-edge imaging, vials containing solutions with a range of iodine contrasts were added to the phantom. Single-slice CT scans were obtained using spectra with maximum values at 30 and 35 keV, respectively. Analysis of the resulting difference images (35 keV image - 30 keV image) shows that the magnitude of the difference signal produced by iodine exceeds that of bone for iodine concentrations above ~20 mg/ml, and that of muscle and fat tissues for iodine concentrations above ~5 mg/ml.

  20. X-ray characterization of CMOS imaging detector with high resolution for fluoroscopic imaging application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Kim, Cho Rong; Jeon, Seongchae; Kim, Ryun Kyung; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Heo, Duchang; Lee, Tae-Bum; Shin, Min-Seok; Kim, Jong-Boo; Kwon, Oh-Kyung

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS)-based X-ray imaging detectors with high spatial resolution for medical imaging application. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS imaging sensor has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1 Poly 4 Metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 24×96 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 9.6 mm×2.4 mm. The 14.3-bit extend counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. Both thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screens were used as converters for incident X-rays to visible light photons. The optical property and X-ray imaging characterization such as X-ray to light response as a function of incident X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution and X-ray images of objects were measured under different X-ray energy conditions. The measured results suggest that our developed CMOS-based X-ray imaging detector has the potential for fluoroscopic imaging and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging applications.

  1. New contrasts for x-ray imaging and synergy with optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge

    2017-02-01

    Due to its penetrating power, fine resolution, unique contrast, high-speed, and cost-effectiveness, x-ray imaging is one of the earliest and most popular imaging modalities in biomedical applications. Current x-ray radiographs and CT images are mostly on gray-scale, since they reflect overall energy attenuation. Recent advances in x-ray detection, contrast agent, and image reconstruction technologies have changed our perception and expectation of x-ray imaging capabilities, and generated an increasing interest in imaging biological soft tissues in terms of energy-sensitive material decomposition, phase-contrast, small angle scattering (also referred to as dark-field), x-ray fluorescence and luminescence properties. These are especially relevant to preclinical and mesoscopic studies, and potentially mendable for hybridization with optical molecular tomography. In this article, we review new x-ray imaging techniques as related to optical imaging, suggest some combined x-ray and optical imaging schemes, and discuss our ideas on micro-modulated x-ray luminescence tomography (MXLT) and x-ray modulated opto-genetics (X-Optogenetics).

  2. Phase and Texture of Solution-Processed Copper Phthalocyanine Thin Films Investigated by Two-Dimensional Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Deng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The phase and texture of a newly developed solution-processed copper phthalocyanine (CuPc thin film have been investigated by two-dimensional grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. The results show that it has β phase crystalline structure, with crystallinity greater than 80%. The average size of the crystallites is found to be about 24 nm. There are two different arrangements of crystallites, with one dominating the diffraction pattern. Both of them have preferred orientation along the thin film normal. Based on the similarities to the vacuum deposited CuPc thin films, the new solution processing method is verified to offer a good alternative to vacuum process, for the fabrication of low cost small molecule based organic photovoltaics.

  3. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard W; Mane, Anil U; Elam, Jeffrey W; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew; Chollet, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  4. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Mane, Anil; Elam, Jeffrey; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  5. The effect of thin filament activation on the attachment of weak binding cross-bridges: A two-dimensional x-ray diffraction study on single muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, T; Xu, S; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1999-03-01

    To study possible structural changes in weak cross-bridge attachment to actin upon activation of the thin filament, two-dimensional (2D) x-ray diffraction patterns of skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle were recorded at low and high calcium concentration in the presence of saturating concentrations of MgATPgammaS, a nucleotide analog for weak binding states. We also studied 2D x-ray diffraction patterns recorded under relaxing conditions at an ionic strength above and below 50 mM, because it had been proposed from solution studies that reducing ionic strength below 50 mM also induces activation of the thin filament. For this project a novel preparation had to be established that allows recording of 2D x-ray diffraction patterns from single muscle fibers instead of natural fiber bundles. This was required to minimize substrate depletion or product accumulation within the fibers. When the calcium concentration was raised, the diffraction patterns recorded with MgATPgammaS revealed small changes in meridional reflections and layer line intensities that could be attributed in part to the effects of calcium binding to the thin filament (increase in I380, decrease in first actin layer line intensity, increase in I59) and in part to small structural changes of weakly attached cross-bridges (e.g., increase in I143 and I72). Calcium-induced small-scale structural rearrangements of cross-bridges weakly attached to actin in the presence of MgATPgammaS are consistent with our previous observation of reduced rate constants for attachment and detachment of cross-bridges with MgATPgammaS at high calcium. Yet, no evidence was found that weakly attached cross-bridges change their mode of attachment toward a stereospecific conformation when the actin filament is activated by adding calcium. Similarly, reducing ionic strength to less than 50 mM does not induce a transition from nonstereospecific to stereospecific attachment.

  6. Multidimensional Modeling of Type I X-ray Bursts. II. Two-Dimensional Convection in a Mixed H/He Accretor

    CERN Document Server

    Malone, C M; Nonaka, A; Almgren, A S; Bell, J B

    2014-01-01

    Type I X-ray Bursts (XRBs) are thermonuclear explosions of accreted material on the surfaces of a neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries. Prior to the ignition of a subsonic burning front, runaway burning at the base of the accreted layer drives convection that mixes fuel and heavy-element ashes. In this second paper in a series, we explore the behavior of this low Mach number convection in mixed hydrogen/helium layers on the surface of a neutron star using two-dimensional simulations with the Maestro code. Maestro takes advantage of the highly subsonic flow field by filtering dynamically unimportant sound waves while retaining local compressibility effects, such as those due to stratification and energy release from nuclear reactions. In these preliminary calculations, we find that the rp-process approximate network creates a convective region that is split into two layers. While this splitting appears artificial due to the approximations of the network regarding nuclear flow out of the breakout reaction 1...

  7. X-ray image enhancement via determinant based feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappenden, R; Hegarty, J; Broughton, R; Butler, A; Coope, I; Renaud, P

    2013-12-01

    Previous work has investigated the feasibility of using Eigenimage-based enhancement tools to highlight abnormalities on chest X-rays (Butler et al in J Med Imaging Radiat Oncol 52:244-253, 2008). While promising, this approach has been limited by computational restrictions of standard clinical workstations, and uncertainty regarding what constitutes an adequate sample size. This paper suggests an alternative mathematical model to the above referenced singular value decomposition method, which can significantly reduce both the required sample size and the time needed to perform analysis. Using this approach images can be efficiently separated into normal and abnormal parts, with the potential for rapid highlighting of pathology.

  8. Imaging Macromolecules with X-ray laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The short wavelength of X-rays allows us to resolve atoms, but in practise for biological materials the achievable resolution is limited by the destruction of the sample by the radiation that forms the image.  For over 100 years, the workaround to this problem of radiation damage has been to average signals from repeating copies of the object arranged in a large crystal.  It is now possible to overcome damage limits by using intense X-ray pulses that vaporise the sample, but which are short enough in duration to freeze any motion of the sample on the atomic scale.  With the advent of X-ray FELs we have been able to confirm this principle, and are now applying it to overcoming a major bottleneck for protein crystallography, which is the need for large well-diffracting crystals.  The intense pulses also open up opportunities to help solve the crystallographic phase problem.  In particular we have found that commonly-occurring disordered crystals that are usually not ...

  9. The Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As X-ray imaging detector

    CERN Document Server

    Pozela, K; Dileenas, A; Jasutis, V; Dapkus, L; Jucienee, V

    2001-01-01

    An X-ray imaging detector based on the graded-gap Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As structures with the CCD camera as an image read-out tool is investigated. High X-ray - light conversion efficiency and X-ray image spatial resolution better than 20 line/mm are obtained.

  10. 21 CFR 892.1630 - Electrostatic x-ray imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrostatic x-ray imaging system. 892.1630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1630 Electrostatic x-ray imaging system. (a) Identification. An electrostatic x-ray imaging system is a device intended for...

  11. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Image of Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    After barely 2 months in space, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) took this sturning image of the Crab Nebula, the spectacular remains of a stellar explosion, revealing something never seen before, a brilliant ring around the nebula's heart. The image shows the central pulsar surrounded by tilted rings of high-energy particles that appear to have been flung outward over a distance of more than a light-year from the pulsar. Perpendicular to the rings, jet-like structures produced by high-energy particles blast away from the pulsar. Hubble Space Telescope images have shown moving knots and wisps around the neutron star, and previous x-ray images have shown the outer parts of the jet and hinted at the ring structure. With CXO's exceptional resolution, the jet can be traced all the way in to the neutron star, and the ring pattern clearly appears. The image was made with CXO's Advanced Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) and High Energy Transmission Grating. The Crab Nebula, easily the most intensively studied object beyond our solar system, has been observed using virtually every astronomical instrument that could see that part of the sky

  12. Moving-Article X-Ray Imaging System and Method for 3-D Image Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray imaging system and method for a moving article are provided for an article moved along a linear direction of travel while the article is exposed to non-overlapping x-ray beams. A plurality of parallel linear sensor arrays are disposed in the x-ray beams after they pass through the article. More specifically, a first half of the plurality are disposed in a first of the x-ray beams while a second half of the plurality are disposed in a second of the x-ray beams. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays is oriented perpendicular to the linear direction of travel. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the first half is matched to a corresponding one of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the second half in terms of an angular position in the first of the x-ray beams and the second of the x-ray beams, respectively.

  13. Dark-field hyperspectral X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Christopher K; Jacques, Simon D M; Connolley, Thomas; Wilson, Matthew D; Veale, Matthew C; Seller, Paul; Cernik, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    In recent times, there has been a drive to develop non-destructive X-ray imaging techniques that provide chemical or physical insight. To date, these methods have generally been limited; either requiring raster scanning of pencil beams, using narrow bandwidth radiation and/or limited to small samples. We have developed a novel full-field radiographic imaging technique that enables the entire physio-chemical state of an object to be imaged in a single snapshot. The method is sensitive to emitted and scattered radiation, using a spectral imaging detector and polychromatic hard X-radiation, making it particularly useful for studying large dense samples for materials science and engineering applications. The method and its extension to three-dimensional imaging is validated with a series of test objects and demonstrated to directly image the crystallographic preferred orientation and formed precipitates across an aluminium alloy friction stir weld section.

  14. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  15. The imaging of nanostructures with novel x-ray methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Sebastian

    The use of x-rays to probe matter is an ever increasing popular technique due to their short wavelength that can achieve better than atomic resolution; chemical selectivity that permit the separation of material contributions; and tunable interaction strength allowing a wide class of materials to be probed including interfaced and bulk structures. As more powerful sources of x-rays have become available in the form of synchrotrons and linear accelerators, new and inventive experimental method have emerged to access the unknown. In this dissertation, three novel uses of x-rays are advanced to study a wide class materials. Since the next generation of x-ray sources will feature highly brilliant x-ray beams, they will enable the imaging of local nanoscale structures with unprecedented resolution. A general formalism to predict the achievable spatial resolution in coherent diffractive imaging (CDI), based solely on diffracted intensities, is provided. The coherent dose necessary to reach atomic resolution depends significantly on the atomic scale structure, where amorphous materials or disordered materials require less dose than crystalline materials. A reduction in dose can be larger than three-orders of magnitude as compared to the expected scaling for uniform density materials. Additionally, dose reduction for crystalline materials are predicted at certain resolutions based only on their unit cell dimensions and structure factors. An extension of dichroic coherent diffractive imaging of thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is made from a uniform case to one that contains charge contributions. With the use of linear polarized x-rays near resonant edges, the charge and magnetic scattering can be reconstructed. First, an approximate manual separation is made before reconstruction to obtain the magnetic domains of a Au patterned GdFe multilayer thin film. This is then compared to a direct reconstruction using the two coherent modes contributed by the right

  16. Long bone X-ray image stitching using Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lejing; Traub, Joerg; Heining, Sandro Michael; Benhimane, Selim; Euler, Ekkehard; Graumann, Rainer; Navab, Nassir

    2008-01-01

    X-ray images are widely used during surgery for long bone fracture fixation. Mobile C-arms provide X-ray images which are used to determine the quality of trauma reduction, i.e. the extremity length and mechanical axis of long bones. Standard X-ray images have a narrow field of view and can not visualize the entire long bone on a single image. In this paper, we propose a novel method to generate panoramic X-ray images in real time by using the previously introduced Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm. This advanced mobile C-arm system acquires registered X-ray and optical images by construction, which facilitates the generation of panoramic X-ray images based on first stitching the optical images and then embedding the X-ray images. We additionally introduce a method to reduce the parallax effect that leads to the blurring and measurement error on panoramic X-ray images. Visual marker tracking is employed to automatically stitch the sequence of video images and to rectify images. Our proposed method is suitable for intra-operative usage generating panoramic X-ray images, which enable metric measurements, with less radiation and without requirement of fronto-parallel setup and overlapping X-ray images. The results show that the panoramic X-ray images generated by our method are accurate enough (errors less than 1%) for metric measurements and suitable for many clinical applications in trauma reduction.

  17. The pin pixel detector--X-ray imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, J E; Derbyshire, G E; Duxbury, D M; Marsh, A S; Simmons, J E; Stephenson, R

    2002-01-01

    The development and testing of a soft X-ray gas pixel detector, which uses connector pins for the anodes is reported. Based on a commercial 100 pin connector block, a prototype detector of aperture 25.4 mm centre dot 25.4 mm can be economically fabricated. The individual pin anodes all show the expected characteristics of small gas detectors capable of counting rates reaching 1 MHz per pin. A 2-dimensional resistive divide readout system has been developed to permit the imaging properties of the detector to be explored in advance of true pixel readout electronics.

  18. Global X-ray Imaging of the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branduardi-Raymont, G.

    2012-04-01

    Plasma and magnetic field environments can be studied in situ, or by remote sensing. In situ measurements return precise information about plasma composition, instabilities and dynamics, but cannot provide the global view necessary to understand the overall behaviour and evolution of the plasma, which instead can be explored by remote imaging. We propose a new approach by remote global X-ray imaging, now possible thanks to the relatively recent discovery of solar wind charge-exchange X-ray emission; this has been found, by observatories such as XMM-Newton, to occur in the vicinity of the Earth's magnetosphere and to peak in the sub-solar magnetosheath, where both solar wind and neutral exospheric densities are high. We describe how an appropriately designed and located X-ray telescope, supported by simultaneous in situ measurements of the solar wind, can be used to image the Earth's dayside magnetosphere, magnetosheath and bow shock, with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to address key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with planetary magnetospheres. This medium-size mission incorporates a wide-field soft X-ray telescope, using micropore optics and CCD detectors, for imaging and spectroscopy, a proton and alpha particle sensor designed to measure the bulk properties of the solar wind, an ion composition analyser which aims to characterise the populations of minor ions in the solar wind, and a magnetometer for accurate measurements of the strength and direction of the magnetic field. Details of the mission profile will be presented, as well as simulations of the expected performance for possible mission configurations. The AXIOM Team: G. Branduardi-Raymont(1), S. F. Sembay(2), J. P. Eastwood(3), D. G. Sibeck(4), A. Abbey(2), P. Brown(3), J. A. Carter(2), C. M. Carr(3), C. Forsyth(1), D. Kataria(1), S. Milan(2), C. J. Owen(1), A. M. Read(2), C. S. Arridge(1), A. J. Coates(1), M. R. Collier(4), S. W. H. Cowley(2), G. Fraser(2), G

  19. Structure determination of spider silk from X-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Stephan; Zippelius, Annette [Universitaet Goettingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Meling, Martin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany); Glisovic, Anja; Salditt, Tim [Universitaet Goettingen, Institut fuer Roentgenphysik (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Spider silk consists of interconnected crystallites, which are typically aligned along the fiber axis. We present a method to systematically determine the structure of these crystallites. Hereby we introduce a model that calculates the scattering function G(q) which is fitted to the measured X-ray image (silk from nephila clavipes). With it, the crystallites' size, the constitution and dimensions of their unit cell, as well as their tilt with respect to the fiber axis is identified, and furthermore the effect of coherent scattering from different crystallites is investigated. The shown methods and the presented model can easily be generalized to a wide class of composite materials.

  20. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  1. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  2. Imaging properties and its improvements of scanning/imaging x-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Akihisa, E-mail: take@spring8.or.jp; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI / SPring-8), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    A scanning / imaging X-ray microscope (SIXM) system has been developed at SPring-8. The SIXM consists of a scanning X-ray microscope with a one-dimensional (1D) X-ray focusing device and an imaging (full-field) X-ray microscope with a 1D X-ray objective. The motivation of the SIXM system is to realize a quantitative and highly-sensitive multimodal 3D X-ray tomography by taking advantages of both the scanning X-ray microscope using multi-pixel detector and the imaging X-ray microscope. Data acquisition process of a 2D image is completely different between in the horizontal direction and in the vertical direction; a 1D signal is obtained with the linear-scanning while the other dimensional signal is obtained with the imaging optics. Such condition have caused a serious problem on the imaging properties that the imaging quality in the vertical direction has been much worse than that in the horizontal direction. In this paper, two approaches to solve this problem will be presented. One is introducing a Fourier transform method for phase retrieval from one phase derivative image, and the other to develop and employ a 1D diffuser to produce an asymmetrical coherent illumination.

  3. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-20

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  4. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  5. Two dimensional convolute integers for machine vision and image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas R.

    1988-01-01

    Machine vision and image recognition require sophisticated image processing prior to the application of Artificial Intelligence. Two Dimensional Convolute Integer Technology is an innovative mathematical approach for addressing machine vision and image recognition. This new technology generates a family of digital operators for addressing optical images and related two dimensional data sets. The operators are regression generated, integer valued, zero phase shifting, convoluting, frequency sensitive, two dimensional low pass, high pass and band pass filters that are mathematically equivalent to surface fitted partial derivatives. These operators are applied non-recursively either as classical convolutions (replacement point values), interstitial point generators (bandwidth broadening or resolution enhancement), or as missing value calculators (compensation for dead array element values). These operators show frequency sensitive feature selection scale invariant properties. Such tasks as boundary/edge enhancement and noise or small size pixel disturbance removal can readily be accomplished. For feature selection tight band pass operators are essential. Results from test cases are given.

  6. Ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging of nanoparticles using X-ray free-electron laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan

    2014-05-20

    Coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of single microscopic particles without the need for crystallization. The diffraction signal of small samples can be very weak, a difficulty that can not be countered by merely increasing the number of photons because the sample would be damaged by a high absorbed radiation dose. Traditional X-ray crystallography avoids this problem by bringing many sample particles into a periodic arrangement, which amplifies the individual signals while distributing the absorbed dose. Depending on the sample, however, crystallization can be very difficult or even impossible. This thesis presents algorithms for a new imaging approach using X-FEL radiation that works with single, non-crystalline sample particles. X-FELs can deliver X-rays with a peak brilliance many orders of magnitude higher than conventional X-ray sources, compensating for their weak interaction cross sections. At the same time, FELs can produce ultra-short pulses down to a few femtoseconds. In this way it is possible to perform ultra-fast imaging, essentially ''freezing'' the atomic positions in time and terminating the imaging process before the sample is destroyed by the absorbed radiation. This thesis primarily focuses on the three-dimensional reconstruction of single (and not necessarily crystalline) particles using coherent diffractive imaging at X-FELs: in order to extract three-dimensional information from scattering data, two-dimensional diffraction patterns from many different viewing angles must be combined. Therefore, the diffraction signal of many identical sample copies in random orientations is measured. The main result of this work is a globally optimal algorithm that can recover the sample orientations solely based on the diffraction signal, enabling three-dimensional imaging for arbitrary samples. The problem of finding three-dimensional orientations is

  7. Imaging bacterial spores by soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W. [Univ. of London, Surrey (United Kingdom); Judge, J. [Unilever plc, Sharnbrook (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Bacterial spores are able to survive dehydration, but neither the physiological nor structural basis of this have been fully elucidated. Furthermore, once hydrated, spores often require activation before they will germinate. Several treatments can be used to activate spores, but in the case of Bacillus subtlis the most effective is heat treatment. The physiological mechanism associated with activation is also not understood, but some workers suggest that the loss of calcium from the spores may be critical. However, just prior to germination, the spores change from being phase bright to phase dark when viewed by light microscopy. Imaging spores by soft x-ray microscopy is possible without fixation. Thus, in contrast to electron microscopy, it is possible to compare the structure of dehydrated and hydrated spores in a manner not possible previously. A further advantage is that it is possible to monitor individual spores by phase contrast light microscopy immediately prior to imaging with soft x-rays; whereas, with both electron microscopy and biochemical studies, it is a population of spores being studied without knowledge of the phase characteristics of individual spores. This study has therefore tried to compare dehydrated and hydrated spores and to determine if there is a mass loss from individual spores as they pass the transition from being phase bright to phase dark.

  8. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  9. Compression-induced crystallization of amorphous indomethacin in tablets: characterization of spatial heterogeneity by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Sarat; Stephenson, Gregory A; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2015-01-05

    Tablets of amorphous indomethacin were compressed at 10, 25, 50, or 100 MPa using either an unlubricated or a lubricated die and stored individually at 35 °C in sealed Mylar pouches. At selected time points, tablets were analyzed by two-dimensional X-ray diffractometry (2D-XRD), which enabled us to profile the extent of drug crystallization in tablets, in both the radial and axial directions. To evaluate the role of lubricant, magnesium stearate was used as "internal" and/or "external" lubricant. Indomethacin crystallization propensity increased as a function of compression pressure, with 100 MPa pressure causing crystallization immediately after compression (detected using synchrotron radiation). However, the drug crystallization was not uniform throughout the tablets. In unlubricated systems, pronounced crystallization at the radial surface could be attributed to die wall friction. The tablet core remained substantially amorphous, irrespective of the compression pressure. Lubrication of the die wall with magnesium stearate, as external lubricant, dramatically decreased drug crystallization at the radial surface. The spatial heterogeneity in drug crystallization, as a function of formulation composition and compression pressure, was systematically investigated. When formulating amorphous systems as tablets, the potential for compression induced crystallization warrants careful consideration. Very low levels of crystallization on the tablet surface, while profoundly affecting product performance (decrease in dissolution rate), may not be readily detected by conventional analytical techniques. Early detection of crystallization could be pivotal in the successful design of a dosage form where, in order to obtain the desired bioavailability, the drug may be in a high energy state. Specialized X-ray diffractometric techniques (2D; use of high intensity synchrotron radiation) enabled detection of very low levels of drug crystallization and revealed the heterogeneity in

  10. Materials characterization using micro-x-ray fluorescence elemental imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, G. J. (George J.); Miller, T. C. (Thomasin C.); Joseph, M. R. (Martha R.)

    2002-01-01

    Materials characterization continues to be a key challenge in a variety of programs. Although bulk elemental composition provides overall concentration of both major and trace elements, the distribution of these elements both on micro and macro scales can determine the performance and ultimately the physical properties of the materials. Hence elemental imaging can provide a new level of information for major and in some cases bulk trace concentrations of elements. Micro X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) offers unique capabilities in terms of elemental imaging. This approach is based on a meso scale level of resolution around 50 micrometer X-ray spot size. When coupled with a moveable stage, specimens several inches on a side can be imaged with surprising detail. In most instances, qualitative images are sufficient to illustrate the elemental heterogeneity. This information can then be used to determine if the material meets the desired physical characteristics and whether this is due to the observed heterogeneity or in spite of it. Several examples of elemental imaging will be presented. These will include the aging of polymers and the effects of residual organotin catalyst. The tin can be imaged using MXRF and has been show to be mobile within the polymeric material over time. Corrosion is a serious issue throughout the industrial world. A specific example of chloride attack on a metal, which creates problems in waste storage. Finally, MXRF used in high throughput screening in the development of novel peptide receptors will be shown. The advantage of MXRF is that no fluorescent tags need be added to the target molecules. This insures the unhindered interaction of the target molecules and allows for additional characterization using molecular spectroscopic techniques.

  11. Use of maximum entropy method with parallel processing machine. [for x-ray object image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lo I.; Bielefeld, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The maximum entropy method (MEM) and balanced correlation method were used to reconstruct the images of low-intensity X-ray objects obtained experimentally by means of a uniformly redundant array coded aperture system. The reconstructed images from MEM are clearly superior. However, the MEM algorithm is computationally more time-consuming because of its iterative nature. On the other hand, both the inherently two-dimensional character of images and the iterative computations of MEM suggest the use of parallel processing machines. Accordingly, computations were carried out on the massively parallel processor at Goddard Space Flight Center as well as on the serial processing machine VAX 8600, and the results are compared.

  12. Photoelectronic radiology 1983; X-ray imaging with the computer-assisted technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalaqui, Jean; Sylvestre, Jacques; Robillard, Pierre; Dussault, Robert

    The development of the discipline of radiology has continued to progress from initial images depicting the structure of organs, to the exploration of dynamic and physiologic phenomena, improvements in the power of X-ray generators and with the refinement of non-toxic contrast media. Until the early part of the 1970s, radiology consisted in extrapolations from a two-dimensional image of a three-dimensional organ, and advances in diagnostic quality related chiefly to improvements in spatial resolution of the flat image. With the advent of cross-sectional imaging using computer reconstruction the emphasis has shifted to contrast resolution, to the acquisition of "pure" images in the XY plane and to an area-related approach in diagnosis, rather than to the traditional organ-oriented method. This new trend has only been made possible because of the influence of recent developments in the digital and electronics industry. This history of diagnostic radiology up to 1972 is reviewed, followed by a discussion of the major areas of interaction between X-rays and the computer, as represented by the major leading edge technologies that have already received broad acceptance by the health care profession.

  13. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  14. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  15. X-ray imaging and detection using plastic scintillating fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Ikhlef, A; Beddar, A S

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of plastic scintillating fiber array in X-ray imaging with low-energy radiation. This array is coupled to a multichannel intensified photocathode and then to a CCD detector via a fiber optics taper. The length of the fiber array is experimentally optimized for the radiation used. We found here that the length of the fibers (interaction medium) does not contribute too much in the degradation of the spatial resolution under 10 keV irradiation along the axis of the fiber array. Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) measurements of the PSF array are compared to the optics MTF of the imaging system (without the sample) and that cross-talk in the fiber array is found to be negligible for a fiber array thickness of 20 mm.

  16. Images of the laser entrance hole from the static x-ray imager at NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M B; Jones, O S; Meezan, N B; Milovich, J L; Town, R P; Alvarez, S S; Beeler, R G; Bradley, D K; Celeste, J R; Dixit, S N; Edwards, M J; Haugh, M J; Kalantar, D H; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Michel, P; Moody, J D; Oberhelman, S K; Piston, K W; Pivovaroff, M J; Suter, L J; Teruya, A T; Thomas, C A; Vernon, S P; Warrick, A L; Widmann, K; Wood, R D; Young, B K

    2010-10-01

    The static x-ray imager at the National Ignition Facility is a pinhole camera using a CCD detector to obtain images of Hohlraum wall x-ray drive illumination patterns seen through the laser entrance hole (LEH). Carefully chosen filters, combined with the CCD response, allow recording images in the x-ray range of 3-5 keV with 60 μm spatial resolution. The routines used to obtain the apparent size of the backlit LEH and the location and intensity of beam spots are discussed and compared to predictions. A new soft x-ray channel centered at 870 eV (near the x-ray peak of a 300 eV temperature ignition Hohlraum) is discussed.

  17. Automatic medical X-ray image classification using annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Mueen, Ahmed; Seng, Woo Chaw

    2014-02-01

    The demand for automatically classification of medical X-ray images is rising faster than ever. In this paper, an approach is presented to gain high accuracy rate for those classes of medical database with high ratio of intraclass variability and interclass similarities. The classification framework was constructed via annotation using the following three techniques: annotation by binary classification, annotation by probabilistic latent semantic analysis, and annotation using top similar images. Next, final annotation was constructed by applying ranking similarity on annotated keywords made by each technique. The final annotation keywords were then divided into three levels according to the body region, specific bone structure in body region as well as imaging direction. Different weights were given to each level of the keywords; they are then used to calculate the weightage for each category of medical images based on their ground truth annotation. The weightage computed from the generated annotation of query image was compared with the weightage of each category of medical images, and then the query image would be assigned to the category with closest weightage to the query image. The average accuracy rate reported is 87.5 %.

  18. Development of x-ray microcalorimeter imaging spectrometers for the X-ray Surveyor mission concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Miniussi, Antoine R.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Smith, Stephen J.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Wakeham, Nicholas A.; Wassell, Edward J.; Yoon, Wonsik; Becker, Dan; Bennett, Douglas; Doriese, William B.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gard, Johnathan D.; Hilton, Gene C.; Mates, Benjamin; Morgan, Kelsey M.; Reintsema, Carl D.; Swetz, Daniel; Ullom, Joel N.; Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Irwin, Kent D.; Lee, Sang-Jun; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Four astrophysics missions are currently being studied by NASA as candidate large missions to be chosen in the 2020 astrophysics decadal survey.1 One of these missions is the "X-Ray Surveyor" (XRS), and possible configurations of this mission are currently under study by a science and technology definition team (STDT). One of the key instruments under study is an X-ray microcalorimeter, and the requirements for such an instrument are currently under discussion. In this paper we review some different detector options that exist for this instrument, and discuss what array formats might be possible. We have developed one design option that utilizes either transition-edge sensor (TES) or magnetically coupled calorimeters (MCC) in pixel array-sizes approaching 100 kilo-pixels. To reduce the number of sensors read out to a plausible scale, we have assumed detector geometries in which a thermal sensor such a TES or MCC can read out a sub-array of 20-25 individual 1" pixels. In this paper we describe the development status of these detectors, and also discuss the different options that exist for reading out the very large number of pixels.

  19. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascali, David, E-mail: davidmascali@lns.infn.it; Castro, Giuseppe; Celona, Luigi; Neri, Lorenzo; Gammino, Santo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Biri, Sándor; Rácz, Richárd; Pálinkás, József [Institute for Nuclear Research (Atomki), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Bem tér 18/c, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Caliri, Claudia [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dip.to di Fisica e Astronomia, via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Romano, Francesco Paolo [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); CNR, Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Torrisi, Giuseppe [INFN–Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, DIIES, Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma X-ray emission has been recently carried out at the ECRISs—Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources laboratory of Atomki based on a collaboration between the Debrecen and Catania ECR teams. In a first series, the X-ray spectroscopy was performed through silicon drift detectors and high purity germanium detectors, characterizing the volumetric plasma emission. The on-purpose developed collimation system was suitable for direct plasma density evaluation, performed “on-line” during beam extraction and charge state distribution characterization. A campaign for correlating the plasma density and temperature with the output charge states and the beam intensity for different pumping wave frequencies, different magnetic field profiles, and single-gas/gas-mixing configurations was carried out. The results reveal a surprisingly very good agreement between warm-electron density fluctuations, output beam currents, and the calculated electromagnetic modal density of the plasma chamber. A charge-coupled device camera coupled to a small pin-hole allowing X-ray imaging was installed and numerous X-ray photos were taken in order to study the peculiarities of the ECRIS plasma structure.

  20. The Two-Dimensional Spatial Distributions of the Globular Clusters and Low-Mass X-Ray Binaries of NGC4649

    CERN Document Server

    D'Abrusco, R; Mineo, S; Strader, J; Fragos, T; Kim, D W; Luo, B; Zezas, A

    2014-01-01

    We report significant anisotropies in the projected two-dimensional (2D) spatial distributions of Globular Clusters (GCs) of the giant Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC4649 (M60). Similar features are found in the 2D distribution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), both associated with GCs and in the stellar field. Deviations from azimuthal symmetry suggest an arc-like excess of GCs extending north at 4-15 kpc galactocentric radii in the eastern side of major axis of NGC4649. This feature is more prominent for red GCs, but still persists in the 2D distribution of blue GCs. High and low luminosity GCs also show some segregation along this arc, with high-luminosity GCs preferentially located in the southern end and low-luminosity GCs in the northern section of the arc. GC-LMXBs follow the anisotropy of red-GCs, where most of them reside; however, a significant overdensity of (high-luminosity) field LMXBs is present to the south of the GC arc. These results suggest that NGC4649 has experienced mergers and/or multiple ...

  1. Dynamic Granularity for X-Ray Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Bigman, Verle H.; Edens, Aaron D.; Schollmeier, Marius; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamic range and spatial resolution are correlated, because imaging units such as pixels or film grains can cover a wider dynamic range if they are larger, so that they can contain more electrons in a well or fluorescence centers in a grain. However, for systems that are subject to low photon flux, statistical noise influences the spatial resolution. Statistical noise is important for many experiments that rely on single shot X-ray imaging diagnostics. Detectors face a limited photon flux and often also a limited detection probability, where photons of higher energy may just penetrate the detector. The effective spatial resolution depends on detector efficiency, incident photon flux, detector cell size (grain/pixel), and the detector's inherent noise. We describe the combined influences with a ``dynamic granularity'' function, based on measurements of the grain size dependent distinguishability of grey levels. The dynamic granularity is unique to each imaging system, but allows us to quantify the performance of different detectors in a system. We have characterized a fast microchannel plate imaging detector and imaging plate with respect to dynamic granularity on the 6.151 keV crystal imaging system at the Z-Beamlet laser. Sandia Natl. Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Natl. Nucl. Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  2. XIPE: the X-ray imaging polarimetry explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffitta, Paolo; Barcons, Xavier; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Braga, João; Costa, Enrico; Fraser, George W.; Gburek, Szymon; Huovelin, Juhani; Matt, Giorgio; Pearce, Mark; Poutanen, Juri; Reglero, Victor; Santangelo, Andrea; Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Weisskopf, Martin; Aloisio, Roberto; Amato, Elena; Attiná, Primo; Axelsson, Magnus; Baldini, Luca; Basso, Stefano; Bianchi, Stefano; Blasi, Pasquale; Bregeon, Johan; Brez, Alessandro; Bucciantini, Niccoló; Burderi, Luciano; Burwitz, Vadim; Casella, Piergiorgio; Churazov, Eugene; Civitani, Marta; Covino, Stefano; Curado da Silva, Rui Miguel; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Dadina, Mauro; D'Amico, Flavio; De Rosa, Alessandra; Di Cosimo, Sergio; Di Persio, Giuseppe; Di Salvo, Tiziana; Dovciak, Michal; Elsner, Ronald; Eyles, Chris J.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fabiani, Sergio; Feng, Hua; Giarrusso, Salvatore; Goosmann, René W.; Grandi, Paola; Grosso, Nicolas; Israel, Gianluca; Jackson, Miranda; Kaaret, Philip; Karas, Vladimir; Kuss, Michael; Lai, Dong; Rosa, Giovanni La; Larsson, Josefin; Larsson, Stefan; Latronico, Luca; Maggio, Antonio; Maia, Jorge; Marin, Frédéric; Massai, Marco Maria; Mineo, Teresa; Minuti, Massimo; Moretti, Elena; Muleri, Fabio; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Pareschi, Giovanni; Peres, Giovanni; Pesce, Melissa; Petrucci, Pierre-Olivier; Pinchera, Michele; Porquet, Delphine; Ramsey, Brian; Rea, Nanda; Reale, Fabio; Rodrigo, Juana Maria; Różańska, Agata; Rubini, Alda; Rudawy, Pawel; Ryde, Felix; Salvati, Marco; de Santiago, Valdivino Alexandre; Sazonov, Sergey; Sgró, Carmelo; Silver, Eric; Spandre, Gloria; Spiga, Daniele; Stella, Luigi; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamborra, Francesco; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Teixeira Dias, Teresa; van Adelsberg, Matthew; Wu, Kinwah; Zane, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    Abstract X-ray polarimetry, sometimes alone, and sometimes coupled to spectral and temporal variability measurements and to imaging, allows a wealth of physical phenomena in astrophysics to be studied. X-ray polarimetry investigates the acceleration process, for example, including those typical of magnetic reconnection in solar flares, but also emission in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars and white dwarfs. It detects scattering in asymmetric structures such as accretion disks and columns, and in the so-called molecular torus and ionization cones. In addition, it allows fundamental physics in regimes of gravity and of magnetic field intensity not accessible to experiments on the Earth to be probed. Finally, models that describe fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity and the extension of the Standard Model) can be tested. We describe in this paper the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE), proposed in June 2012 to the first ESA call for a small mission with a launch in 2017. The proposal was, unfortunately, not selected. To be compliant with this schedule, we designed the payload mostly with existing items. The XIPE proposal takes advantage of the completed phase A of POLARIX for an ASI small mission program that was cancelled, but is different in many aspects: the detectors, the presence of a solar flare polarimeter and photometer and the use of a light platform derived by a mass production for a cluster of satellites. XIPE is composed of two out of the three existing JET-X telescopes with two Gas Pixel Detectors (GPD) filled with a He-DME mixture at their focus. Two additional GPDs filled with a 3-bar Ar-DME mixture always face the Sun to detect polarization from solar flares. The Minimum Detectable Polarization of a 1 mCrab source reaches 14 % in the 2-10 keV band in 105 s for pointed observations, and 0.6 % for an X10 class solar flare in the 15-35 keV energy band. The imaging capability is 24 arcsec Half Energy Width (HEW) in a Field of

  3. Single molecule imaging with longer x-ray laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Andrew V; Caleman, Carl; Quiney, Harry M

    2015-01-01

    In serial femtosecond crystallography, x-ray laser pulses do not need to outrun all radiation damage processes because Bragg diffraction exceeds the damage-induced background scattering for longer pulses ($\\sim$ 50--100 fs). This is due to a "self-gating pulse" effect whereby damage terminates Bragg diffraction prior to the pulse completing its passage through the sample, as if that diffraction were produced by a shorter pulse of equal fluence. We show here that a similar gating effect applies to single molecule diffraction with respect to spatially uncorrelated damage processes like ionization and ion diffusion. The effect is clearly seen in calculations of the diffraction contrast, by calculating the diffraction of average structure separately to the diffraction from statistical fluctuations of the structure due to damage ("damage noise"). Our results suggest that sub-nanometer single molecule imaging with longer pulses, like those produced at currently operating facilities, should not yet be ruled out. The...

  4. Structured scintillators for X-ray imaging with micrometre resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2009-01-01

    A 3D X-ray detector for imaging of 30–200 keV photons is described. It comprises a stack of semitransparent structured scintillators, where each scintillator is a regular array of waveguides in silicon, and with pores filled with CsI. The performance of the detector is described theoretically...... and explored in detail through simulations. The resolution of a single screen is shown to be determined only by the pitch, at least up to 100 keV. In comparison to conventional homogenous screens an improvement in efficiency by a factor 5–15 is obtainable. The cross-talk between screens in the 3D detector...... used regular scintillators with similar resolution an efficiency increase by a factor 4 has been found for the structured scintillator....

  5. Imaging properties of Wolter I type x-ray telescopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, W

    1977-03-01

    By ray-tracing methods we have investigated various configurations of Wolter I type x-ray telescopes. For the criterion of image quality the shape of the line spread function has been chosen. The angular resolution we find herewith in a large region of the basic parameters appears to be more than three times higher than results from the rms blur circle criterion. We have concluded that in most cases of practical interest the paraboloid-hyperboloid combination has to be preferred to the Schwarzschild system. In all cases it is possible to find a solution giving an extra improvement of the angular resolution with a factor between,2 and 4 when we describe the mirror shapes with polynomials.

  6. XIPE the X-Ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffitta, Paolo; Barcons, Xavier; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Braga, Joao; Costa, Enrico; Fraser, George W.; Gburek, Szymon; Huovelin, Juhani; Matt, Giorgio; Pearce, Mark; hide

    2013-01-01

    X-ray polarimetry, sometimes alone, and sometimes coupled to spectral and temporal variability measurements and to imaging, allows a wealth of physical phenomena in astrophysics to be studied. X-ray polarimetry investigates the acceleration process, for example, including those typical of magnetic reconnection in solar flares, but also emission in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars and white dwarfs. It detects scattering in asymmetric structures such as accretion disks and columns, and in the so-called molecular torus and ionization cones. In addition, it allows fundamental physics in regimes of gravity and of magnetic field intensity not accessible to experiments on the Earth to be probed. Finally, models that describe fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity and the extension of the Standard Model) can be tested. We describe in this paper the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE), proposed in June 2012 to the first ESA call for a small mission with a launch in 2017. The proposal was, unfortunately, not selected. To be compliant with this schedule, we designed the payload mostly with existing items. The XIPE proposal takes advantage of the completed phase A of POLARIX for an ASI small mission program that was cancelled, but is different in many aspects: the detectors, the presence of a solar flare polarimeter and photometer and the use of a light platform derived by a mass production for a cluster of satellites. XIPE is composed of two out of the three existing JET-X telescopes with two Gas Pixel Detectors (GPD) filled with a He-DME mixture at their focus. Two additional GPDs filled with a 3-bar Ar-DME mixture always face the Sun to detect polarization from solar flares. The Minimum Detectable Polarization of a 1 mCrab source reaches 14 in the 210 keV band in 105 s for pointed observations, and 0.6 for an X10 class solar flare in the 1535 keV energy band. The imaging capability is 24 arcsec Half Energy Width (HEW) in a Field of View of 14

  7. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    OpenAIRE

    Sorapong Aootaphao; Saowapak S. Thongvigitmanee; Jartuwat Rajruangrabin; Chalinee Thanasupsombat; Tanapon Srivongsa; Pairash Thajchayapong

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter ...

  8. The Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas E.; Bookbinder, Jay; Petre, Robert; Smith, Randall; Ptak, Andrew; Tananbaum, Harvey; Garcia, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Following recommendations from the 2010 "New Worlds, New Horizons" (NWNH) report, the Advanced X-ray Spectroscopy and Imaging Observatory (AXSIO) concept streamlines the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission to concentrate on the science objectives that are enabled by high-resolution spectroscopic capabilities. AXSIO will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin for tens of supermassive black holes (SMBH), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN during their peak activity, observe 5MBH out to redshift z=6, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, find the missing baryons in the cosmic web using background quasars, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes and supernovae inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. These measurements are enabled by a 0.9 sq m collecting area at 1.25 keV, a micro calorimeter array providing high-resolution spectroscopic imaging and a deployable high efficiency grating spectrometer. AXSIO delivers a 30-fold increase in effective area for high resolution spectroscopy. The key simplifications are guided by recommendations in the NWNH panel report include a reduction in focal length from 20m to 10m, eliminating the extendable optical bench, and a reduction in the instrument complement from six to two, avoiding a movable instrument platform. A focus on spectroscopic science allows the spatial resolution requirement to be relaxed to 10 arc sec (with a 5 arc sec goal). These simplifications decrease the total mission cost to under the $2B cost to NASA recommended by NWNH. AXSIO will be available to the entire astronomical community with observing allocations based on peer-review.

  9. Characterization of nanowires by coherent X-ray diffractive imaging and ptychography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhigaev, Dmitry

    2017-03-15

    single InP NW with a diameter of 100 nm. The measurement employed a nanofocused beam, which is characterized by transmission X-ray ptychography. It is shown that the separation of the object and probe functions is possible in the direct space after a 3D reconstruction. The influence of a catalyst particle at the tip of the NW on the strain distribution in InP part of the NW is revealed. The second part of the manuscript is dedicated to the development and application of two-dimensional X-ray Bragg ptychography (2D XBP) to studies of single NWs. This approach provides a larger field of view on the sample and the reliability of reconstruction results improves, due to the advantages of ptychography. The limitations of the technique are discussed by theoretical analysis and finite element method modeling (FEM). Successful experimental implementation is demonstrated on a single InGaN/GaN core-shell NW. The third part is devoted to 3D Bragg CXDI of strain evolution in a single GaN NW with respect to applied voltage bias. A complicated tilting and defect formation process in the NW was revealed from the evolution of the Bragg peak. This study gives an insight into piezoelectrical properties of the sample, which dramatically influence electron-hole pair recombination and may decrease the efficiency of optoelectronic devices based on GaN NWs.

  10. Carbon nanotube based X-ray sources: Applications in pre-clinical and medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yueh Z.; Burk, Laurel; Wang, Ko-Han; Cao, Guohua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2011-08-01

    Field emission offers an alternate method of electron production for Bremsstrahlung based X-ray tubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as very effective field emitters, allowing them to serve as electron sources for X-ray sources, with specific advantages over traditional thermionic tubes. CNT derived X-ray sources can create X-ray pulses of any duration and frequency, gate the X-ray pulse to any source and allow the placement of many sources in close proximity.We have constructed a number of micro-CT systems based on CNT X-ray sources for applications in small animal imaging, specifically focused on the imaging of the heart and lungs. This paper offers a review of the pre-clinical applications of the CNT based micro-CT that we have developed. We also discuss some of the current and potential clinical applications of the CNT X-ray sources.

  11. Coherent X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Chloroplasts from Cyanidioschyzon merolae by Using X-Ray Free Electron Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yuki; Inui, Yayoi; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is a lens-less technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with the dimensions of submicrometer to micrometer at a resolution of several tens of nanometers. We conducted cryogenic CXDI experiments at 66 K to visualize the internal structures of frozen-hydrated chloroplasts of Cyanidioschyzon merolae using X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) as a coherent X-ray source. Chloroplast dispersed specimen disks at a number density of 7/(10×10 µm(2)) were flash-cooled with liquid ethane without staining, sectioning or chemical labeling. Chloroplasts are destroyed at atomic level immediately after the diffraction by XFEL pulses. Thus, diffraction patterns with a good signal-to-noise ratio from single chloroplasts were selected from many diffraction patterns collected through scanning specimen disks to provide fresh specimens into the irradiation area. The electron density maps of single chloroplasts projected along the direction of the incident X-ray beam were reconstructed by using the iterative phase-retrieval method and multivariate analyses. The electron density map at a resolution of 70 nm appeared as a C-shape. In addition, the fluorescence image of proteins stained with Flamingo™ dye also appeared as a C-shape as did the autofluorescence from Chl. The similar images suggest that the thylakoid membranes with an abundance of proteins distribute along the outer membranes of chloroplasts. To confirm the present results statistically, a number of projection structures must be accumulated through high-throughput data collection in the near future. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of XFEL-CXDI experiments in the structural analyses of cellular organelles. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. In-line holography and coherent diffractive imaging with x-ray waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Caro, L.; Giannini, C.; Pelliccia, D.; Mocuta, C.; Metzger, T. H.; Guagliardi, A.; Cedola, A.; Burkeeva, I.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2008-02-01

    A Fresnel coherent diffraction imaging experiment with hard x rays is here presented, using two planar crossed waveguides as optical elements, leading to a virtual pointlike source. The coherent wave field obtained with this setup is used to illuminate a micrometric single object having the shape of a butterfly. A digital two-dimensional in-line holographic reconstruction of the unknown object at low resolution (200nm) has been obtained directly via fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the raw data. The object and its twin image are well separated because suitable geometrical conditions are satisfied. A good estimate of the incident wave field phase has been extracted directly from the FFT of the raw data. A partial object reconstruction with 50nm spatial resolution was achieved by fast iterative phase retrieval, the major limitation for a full reconstruction being the nonideal structure of the guided beam. The method offers a route for fast and reliable phase retrieval in x-ray coherent diffraction.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF RESTORATION METHODS OF X-RAY IMAGES WITH EMPHASIS ON MEDICAL PHOTOGRAMMETRIC USAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hosseinian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, various medical X-ray imaging methods such as digital radiography, computed tomography and fluoroscopy are used as important tools in diagnostic and operative processes especially in the computer and robotic assisted surgeries. The procedures of extracting information from these images require appropriate deblurring and denoising processes on the pre- and intra-operative images in order to obtain more accurate information. This issue becomes more considerable when the X-ray images are planned to be employed in the photogrammetric processes for 3D reconstruction from multi-view X-ray images since, accurate data should be extracted from images for 3D modelling and the quality of X-ray images affects directly on the results of the algorithms. For restoration of X-ray images, it is essential to consider the nature and characteristics of these kinds of images. X-ray images exhibit severe quantum noise due to limited X-ray photons involved. The assumptions of Gaussian modelling are not appropriate for photon-limited images such as X-ray images, because of the nature of signal-dependant quantum noise. These images are generally modelled by Poisson distribution which is the most common model for low-intensity imaging. In this paper, existing methods are evaluated. For this purpose, after demonstrating the properties of medical X-ray images, the more efficient and recommended methods for restoration of X-ray images would be described and assessed. After explaining these approaches, they are implemented on samples from different kinds of X-ray images. By considering the results, it is concluded that using PURE-LET, provides more effective and efficient denoising than other examined methods in this research.

  14. Assessment of Restoration Methods of X-Ray Images with Emphasis on Medical Photogrammetric Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinian, S.; Arefi, H.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, various medical X-ray imaging methods such as digital radiography, computed tomography and fluoroscopy are used as important tools in diagnostic and operative processes especially in the computer and robotic assisted surgeries. The procedures of extracting information from these images require appropriate deblurring and denoising processes on the pre- and intra-operative images in order to obtain more accurate information. This issue becomes more considerable when the X-ray images are planned to be employed in the photogrammetric processes for 3D reconstruction from multi-view X-ray images since, accurate data should be extracted from images for 3D modelling and the quality of X-ray images affects directly on the results of the algorithms. For restoration of X-ray images, it is essential to consider the nature and characteristics of these kinds of images. X-ray images exhibit severe quantum noise due to limited X-ray photons involved. The assumptions of Gaussian modelling are not appropriate for photon-limited images such as X-ray images, because of the nature of signal-dependant quantum noise. These images are generally modelled by Poisson distribution which is the most common model for low-intensity imaging. In this paper, existing methods are evaluated. For this purpose, after demonstrating the properties of medical X-ray images, the more efficient and recommended methods for restoration of X-ray images would be described and assessed. After explaining these approaches, they are implemented on samples from different kinds of X-ray images. By considering the results, it is concluded that using PURE-LET, provides more effective and efficient denoising than other examined methods in this research.

  15. Classifying and assembling two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns of a single particle to reconstruct the three-dimensional diffraction intensity function: resolution limit due to the quantum noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Taka, Junichiro; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A new two-step algorithm is developed for reconstructing the three-dimensional diffraction intensity of a globular biological macromolecule from many experimentally measured quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The first step is classification of the two-dimensional patterns into groups according to the similarity of direction of the incident X-rays with respect to the molecule and an averaging within each group to reduce the noise. The second step is detection of common intersecting circles between the signal-enhanced two-dimensional patterns to identify their mutual location in the three-dimensional wavenumber space. The newly developed algorithm enables one to detect a signal for classification in noisy experimental photon-count data with as low as ∼0.1 photons per effective pixel. The wavenumber of such a limiting pixel determines the attainable structural resolution. From this fact, the resolution limit due to the quantum noise attainable by this new method of analysis as well as two important experimental parameters, the number of two-dimensional patterns to be measured (the load for the detector) and the number of pairs of two-dimensional patterns to be analysed (the load for the computer), are derived as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule. PMID:22514069

  16. Analysis of cytochrome P450 CYP119 ligand-dependent conformational dynamics by two-dimensional NMR and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basudhar, Debashree; Madrona, Yarrow; Kandel, Sylvie; Lampe, Jed N; Nishida, Clinton R; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2015-04-17

    Defining the conformational states of cytochrome P450 active sites is critical for the design of agents that minimize drug-drug interactions, the development of isoform-specific P450 inhibitors, and the engineering of novel oxidative catalysts. We used two-dimensional (1)H,(15)N HSQC chemical shift perturbation mapping of (15)N-labeled Phe residues and x-ray crystallography to examine the ligand-dependent conformational dynamics of CYP119. Active site Phe residues were most affected by the binding of azole inhibitors and fatty acid substrates, in agreement with active site localization of the conformational changes. This was supported by crystallography, which revealed movement of the F-G loop with various azoles. Nevertheless, the NMR chemical shift perturbations caused by azoles and substrates were distinguishable. The absence of significant chemical shift perturbations with several azoles revealed binding of ligands to an open conformation similar to that of the ligand-free state. In contrast, 4-phenylimidazole caused pronounced NMR changes involving Phe-87, Phe-144, and Phe-153 that support the closed conformation found in the crystal structure. The same closed conformation is observed by NMR and crystallography with a para-fluoro substituent on the 4-phenylimidazole, but a para-chloro or bromo substituent engendered a second closed conformation. An open conformation is thus favored in solution with many azole ligands, but para-substituted phenylimidazoles give rise to two closed conformations that depend on the size of the para-substituent. The results suggest that ligands selectively stabilize discrete cytochrome P450 conformational states.

  17. Fourier domain image fusion for differential X-ray phase-contrast breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Eduardo; Sperl, Jonathan I; Bequé, Dirk; Benz, Tobias; Scherer, Kai; Herzen, Julia; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina; Grandl, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    X-Ray Phase-Contrast (XPC) imaging is a novel technology with a great potential for applications in clinical practice, with breast imaging being of special interest. This work introduces an intuitive methodology to combine and visualize relevant diagnostic features, present in the X-ray attenuation, phase shift and scattering information retrieved in XPC imaging, using a Fourier domain fusion algorithm. The method allows to present complementary information from the three acquired signals in one single image, minimizing the noise component and maintaining visual similarity to a conventional X-ray image, but with noticeable enhancement in diagnostic features, details and resolution. Radiologists experienced in mammography applied the image fusion method to XPC measurements of mastectomy samples and evaluated the feature content of each input and the fused image. This assessment validated that the combination of all the relevant diagnostic features, contained in the XPC images, was present in the fused image as well.

  18. X-ray phase imaging with a grating interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitkamp, Timm; Diaz, Ana; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Stampanoni, Marco; Cloetens, Peter; Ziegler, Eric

    2005-08-08

    Using a high-efficiency grating interferometer for hard X rays (10-30 keV) and a phase-stepping technique, separate radiographs of the phase and absorption profiles of bulk samples can be obtained from a single set of measurements. Tomographic reconstruction yields quantitative three-dimensional maps of the X-ray refractive index, with a spatial resolution down to a few microns. The method is mechanically robust, requires little spatial coherence and monochromaticity, and can be scaled up to large fields of view, with a detector of correspondingly moderate spatial resolution. These are important prerequisites for use with laboratory X-ray sources.

  19. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  20. Soft x-ray imaging by a commercial solid-state television camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Isao; Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Tanimoto, Mitsumori; Yano, Masaaki

    1987-04-01

    A commerical, solid-state television camera has been used to record images of soft x radiation (0.8-12 keV). The performance of the camera is theoretically analyzed and experimentally evaluated compared with an x-ray photographic film (Kodak direct exposure film). In the application, the camera has been used to provide image patterns of x rays from laser-produced plasmas. It is demonstrated that the camera has several advantages over x-ray photographic film.

  1. Soft x-ray imaging by a commercial solid-state television camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, I.; Koyama, K.; Tanimoto, M.; Yano, M.

    1987-04-01

    A commerical, solid-state television camera has been used to record images of soft x radiation (0.8--12 keV). The performance of the camera is theoretically analyzed and experimentally evaluated compared with an x-ray photographic film (Kodak direct exposure film). In the application, the camera has been used to provide image patterns of x rays from laser-produced plasmas. It is demonstrated that the camera has several advantages over x-ray photographic film.

  2. X-MIME: An Imaging X-ray Spectrometer for Detailed Study of Jupiter's Icy Moons and the Planet's X-ray Aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Such maps would provide important constraints on formation and evolution scenarios for the surfaces of these moons. Here we describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIMO mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. Comparison with X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajima, Toshio; Kagawa, Yoshihiro; Katsuta, Shizutomo.

    1987-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) have been performed in 169 consecutive patients with central nervous system diseases. The findings from the two methods were compared for the capacity to defect lesions. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive than or equivalent to X-ray CT in detecting lesions - especially detecting. Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, spinal cord injury, and pituitary adenoma - in 158 patients (94 %). In six patients (10 %), lesion detection was possible only by MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging was inferior to X-ray CT in 11 patients (7 %) in detecting calcified lesions, meningioma, and cavernous hemangioma. (Namekawa, K.).

  4. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe E-mail: philippe.duvauchelle@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-09-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests.

  5. Medical X-Ray Image Enhancement Based on Kramer's PDE Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Fei Zhao; Qing-Wei Gao; De-Xiang Zhang; Yi-Xiang Lu

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present an application of a novel enhancement technique for enhancing medical images generated from X-rays. The method presented in this study is based on a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) model, Kramer's PDE model. The usefulness of this method is investigated by experimental results. We apply this method to a medical X-ray image. For comparison, the X-ray image is also processed using classic Perona-Malik PDE model and Catte PDE model. Although the Perona-Malik model and Catte PDE model could also enhance the image, the quality of the enhanced images is considerably inferior compared with the enhanced image using Kramer's PDE model. The study suggests that the Kramer's PDE model is capable of enhancing medical X-ray images, which will make the X-ray images more reliable.

  6. High-resolution X-ray imaging in fast ignition experiment using Gekko and LFEX lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We improved diagnostic instruments to measure X-ray images in a hard X-ray harsh environment and succeeded in obtaining clear images with X-ray framing camera and X-ray streak camera in fast ignition experiment conducted in 2011 (FG-02 Experimental Campaign. We found that high-energy X-ray signals could be used as an indicator of the LFEX laser injection time relative to the imploded core. The LFEX laser injection time was estimated with better than 10 ps accuracy. Time-resolved 2D X-ray images suggested that shapes and motions of imploded core plasmas were improved by changing the configuration of the implosion lasers.

  7. Low Power X-Ray Photon Resolving Imaging Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Instruments employing X-ray detection are countless, in different sectors from medicine to industry and from basic to applied science. Given this importance, and...

  8. Dosimetry in x-ray-based breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dance, David R.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    The estimation of the mean glandular dose to the breast (MGD) for x-ray based imaging modalities forms an essential part of quality control and is needed for risk estimation and for system design and optimisation. This review considers the development of methods for estimating the MGD for mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and dedicated breast CT (DBCT). Almost all of the methodology used employs Monte Carlo calculated conversion factors to relate the measurable quantity, generally the incident air kerma, to the MGD. After a review of the size and composition of the female breast, the various mathematical models used are discussed, with particular emphasis on models for mammography. These range from simple geometrical shapes, to the more recent complex models based on patient DBCT examinations. The possibility of patient-specific dose estimates is considered as well as special diagnostic views and the effect of breast implants. Calculations using the complex models show that the MGD for mammography is overestimated by about 30% when the simple models are used. The design and uses of breast-simulating test phantoms for measuring incident air kerma are outlined and comparisons made between patient and phantom-based dose estimates. The most widely used national and international dosimetry protocols for mammography are based on different simple geometrical models of the breast, and harmonisation of these protocols using more complex breast models is desirable.

  9. Federated repositories of X-ray diffraction images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulakis, Steve; Schmidberger, Jason; Bate, Mark A; DeGori, Ross; Beitz, Anthony; Keong, Cyrus; Cameron, Bob; McGowan, Sheena; Porter, Corrine J; Harrison, Andrew; Hunter, Jane; Martin, Jennifer L; Kobe, Bostjan; Dobson, Renwick C J; Parker, Michael W; Whisstock, James C; Gray, Joan; Treloar, Andrew; Groenewegen, David; Dickson, Neil; Buckle, Ashley M

    2008-07-01

    There is a pressing need for the archiving and curation of raw X-ray diffraction data. This information is critical for validation, methods development and improvement of archived structures. However, the relatively large size of these data sets has presented challenges for storage in a single worldwide repository such as the Protein Data Bank archive. This problem can be avoided by using a federated approach, where each institution utilizes its institutional repository for storage, with a discovery service overlaid. Institutional repositories are relatively stable and adequately funded, ensuring persistence. Here, a simple repository solution is described, utilizing Fedora open-source database software and data-annotation and deposition tools that can be deployed at any site cheaply and easily. Data sets and associated metadata from federated repositories are given a unique and persistent handle, providing a simple mechanism for search and retrieval via web interfaces. In addition to ensuring that valuable data is not lost, the provision of raw data has several uses for the crystallographic community. Most importantly, structure determination can only be truly repeated or verified when the raw data are available. Moreover, the availability of raw data is extremely useful for the development of improved methods of image analysis and data processing.

  10. X-ray image segmentation for vertebral mobility analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjelloun, Mohammed; Mahmoudi, Said [Computer Science Department, Faculty of Engineering of Mons, Mons (Belgium)

    2008-04-15

    The goal of this work is to extract the parameters determining vertebral motion and its variation during flexion-extension movements using a computer vision tool for estimating and analyzing vertebral mobility. To compute vertebral body motion parameters we propose a comparative study between two segmentation methods proposed and applied to lateral X-ray images of the cervical spine. The two vertebra contour detection methods include (1) a discrete dynamic contour model (DDCM) and (2) a template matching process associated with a polar signature system. These two methods not only enable vertebra segmentation but also extract parameters that can be used to evaluate vertebral mobility. Lateral cervical spine views including 100 views in flexion, extension and neutral orientations were available for evaluation. Vertebral body motion was evaluated by human observers and using automatic methods. The results provided by the automated approaches were consistent with manual measures obtained by 15 human observers. The automated techniques provide acceptable results for the assessment of vertebral body mobility in flexion and extension on lateral views of the cervical spine. (orig.)

  11. X-ray examination apparatus with an imaging arrangement having a plurality of image sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slump, Cornelis H.; Harms, M.O.

    1999-01-01

    An imaging arrangement including a multi-sensor for use in an x-ray examination apparatus is described that combines a plurality of partially overlapping sub-images, resulting in an increased effective sensor area when compared to a single sensor-image. Thus an imaging arrangement is provided suitab

  12. X-ray examination apparatus with an imaging arrangement having a plurality of image sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slump, Cornelis H.

    1995-01-01

    An imaging arrangement including a multi-sensor for use in an x-ray examination apparatus is described that combines a plurality of partially overlapping sub-images, resulting in an increased effective sensor area when compared to a single sensor-image. Thus an imaging arrangement is provided suitab

  13. Energy-resolved X-ray detectors: the future of diagnostic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacella D

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Danilo Pacella ENEA-Frascati, Rome, Italy Abstract: This paper presents recent progress in the field of X-ray detectors, which could play a role in medical imaging in the near future, with special attention to the new generation of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (C-MOS imagers, working in photon counting, that opened the way to the energy-resolved X-ray imaging. A brief description of the detectors used so far in medical imaging (photographic films, imaging plates, flat panel detectors, together with the most relevant imaging quality parameters, shows differences between, and advantages of these new C-MOS imagers. X-ray energy-resolved imaging is very attractive not only for the increase of contrast but even for the capability of detecting the nature and composition of the material or tissue to be investigated. Since the X-ray absorption coefficients of the different parts or organs of the patient (object are strongly dependent on the X-ray photon energy, this multienergy ("colored" X-ray imaging could increase enormously the probing capabilities. While dual-energy imaging is now a reality in medical practice, multienergy is still in its early stage, but a promising research activity. Based on this new technique of color X-ray imaging, the entire scheme of source–object–detector could be revised in the future, optimizing spectrum and detector to the nature and composition of the target to be investigated. In this view, a transition to a set of monoenergetic X-ray lines, suitably chosen in energy and intensity, could be envisaged, instead of the present continuous spectra. Keywords: X-ray detectors, X-ray medical imaging, C-MOS imagers, dual and multienergy CT

  14. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with tabletop synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kneip, S; Dollar, F; Bloom, M S; Chvykov, V; Kalintchenko, G; Krushelnick, K; Maksimchuk, A; Mangles, S P D; Matsuoka, T; Najmudin, Z; Palmer, C A J; Schreiber, J; Schumaker, W; Thomas, A G R; Yanovsky, V

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1896, x-rays have had a profound impact on science, medicine and technology. Here we show that the x-rays from a novel tabletop source of bright coherent synchrotron radiation can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens, yielding superior image quality and avoiding the need for scarce or expensive conventional sources.

  15. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT images with X-ray CT. Effects of registration errors between X-ray CT and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Murase, Kenya [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Higashino, Hiroshi [Ehime Prefectural Imabari Hospital (Japan); Mochizuki, Teruhito [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). School of Medicine; Motomura, Nobutoku [Toshiba Corp., Otawara, Tochigi (Japan). Medical Engineering Lab.

    2002-09-01

    Attenuation correction with an X-ray CT image is a new method to correct attenuation on SPECT imaging, but the effect of the registration errors between CT and SPECT images is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of the registration errors on myocardial SPECT, analyzing data from a phantom and a human volunteer. Registerion (fusion) of the X-ray CT and SPECT images was done with standard packaged software in three dimensional fashion, by using linked transaxial, coronal and sagittal images. In the phantom study, and X-ray CT image was shifted 1 to 3 pixels on the x, y and z axes, and rotated 6 degrees clockwise. Attenuation correction maps generated from each misaligned X-ray CT image were used to reconstruct misaligned SPECT images of the phantom filled with {sup 201}Tl. In a human volunteer, X-ray CT was acquired in different conditions (during inspiration vs. expiration). CT values were transferred to an attenuation constant by using straight lines; an attenuation constant of 0/cm in the air (CT value=-1,000 HU) and that of 0.150/cm in water (CT value=0 HU). For comparison, attenuation correction with transmission CT (TCT) data and an external {gamma}-ray source ({sup 99m}Tc) was also applied to reconstruct SPECT images. Simulated breast attenuation with a breast attachment, and inferior wall attenuation were properly corrected by means of the attenuation correction map generated from X-ray CT. As pixel shift increased, deviation of the SPECT images increased in misaligned images in the phantom study. In the human study, SPECT images were affected by the scan conditions of the X-ray CT. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT with an X-ray CT image is a simple and potentially beneficial method for clinical use, but accurate registration of the X-ray CT to SPECT image is essential for satisfactory attenuation correction. (author)

  16. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy-imaging fast spin dynamics inmagnetic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Peter; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke L.; Chao, Weilun; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy combines 15nm spatial resolution with 70ps time resolution and elemental sensitivity. Fresnel zone plates are used as X-ray optics and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism serves as magnetic contrast mechanism. Thus scientifically interesting and technologically relevant low dimensional nanomagnetic systems can be imaged at fundamental length and ultrafast time scales in a unique way. Studies include magnetization reversal in magnetic multilayers, nanopatterned systems, vortex dynamics in nanoelements and spin current induced phenomena.

  17. Analysis of Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis Gel Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes and proposes solutions to some of the currently most important problems in pattern recognition and image analysis of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE) images. 2DGE is the leading technique to separate individual proteins in biological samples with many biological...... the methods developed in the literature specifically for matching protein spot patterns, the focus is on a method based on neighbourhood relations. These methods are applied to a range of 2DGE protein spot data in a comparative study. The point pattern matching requires segmentation of the gel images...... and since the correct image segmentation can be difficult, a new alternative approach, exploiting prior knowledge from a reference gel about the protein locations to segment an incoming gel image, is proposed....

  18. X-ray synchrotron dual energy imaging for material specific study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B.; Agrawal, A. K.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Gadkari, S. C.

    2017-05-01

    X-ray imaging techniques, in general, are used to study the internal structures of an object non-destructively such as anatomy, imperfections, cracks and voids whereas insensitive to spatial distribution of different element or elemental compositions of the object. With the development of advance bright X-ray synchrotron sources and accurate energy tunability using high resolution crystal monochromator, detection of elemental distribution in an object became possible. Quantitative small concentrations with enhance contrast can be detected fast in X-ray synchrotron based dual energy imaging, in comparison to conventional X-ray lab based techniques. We report here the experimental setup, image acquisition and image processing for the dual energy X-ray imaging (DEI) technique to retrieve the spatial distribution of different elements in the object.

  19. Chest X Ray?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are ...

  20. X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  1. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Davis, D S; Perlman, E S; Wise, M; Canizares, C R; Harris, D E

    2001-01-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton mo...

  2. Long Bone X-ray Image Stitching Using C-arm Motion Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lejing; Traub, Joerg; Heining, Sandro Michael; Benhimane, Selim; Euler, Ekkehard; Graumann, Rainer; Navab, Nassir

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to generate panoramic X-ray images intra-operatively by using the previously introduced camera augmented mobile C-arm by Navab et al. [1]. This advanced mobile C-arm system acquires registered X-ray and optical images by construction, which facilitates the generation of panoramic X-ray images based on the motion estimation of the X-ray source. Visual marker tracking is employed to estimate the camera motion and this estimated motion is also applied to the X-ray source. Our proposed method is suitable and practical for intra-operative usage generating panoramic X-ray images without the requirement of a fronto-parallel setup and overlapping X-ray images. The results show that the panoramic X-ray images generated by our method are accurate enough (errors less than 1%) for metric measurements and promise suitability for intra-operative clinical applications in trauma surgery.

  3. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... real time volumetric imaging system, which employs a wide transmit beam and receive mode parallel processing to increase image frame rate. Depth-of-field comparisons were made from simulated on-axis and off-axis beamplots at ranges from 30 to 160 mm for both coaxial and offset transmit and receive...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  4. MeV X-ray imaging using plastic scintillating fiber area detectors: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shi-Biao; Ma, Qingli; Yin, Zejie; Zhu, Daming

    2008-02-01

    Due to their low cost, flexibility, and convenience for long distance data transfer, plastic scintillating fibers (PSFs) have been increasingly used in building detectors or sensors for detecting various radiations and imaging. In this work, the possibility of using PSF coupled with charge-coupled devices (CCD) to build area detectors for X-ray imaging is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation. The focus is on X-ray imaging with energy from a few 100 keV to about 20 MeV. It is found that the efficiency of PSF in detecting X-ray in this energy range is low. The performance can be improved by coating a PSF with X-ray absorption layers and the MTF of the system is presented. It seems possible to build such area detectors with PSFs for imaging hard X-rays under certain environment.

  5. Chemical imaging analysis of the brain with X-ray methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collingwood, Joanna F.; Adams, Freddy

    2017-04-01

    Cells employ various metal and metalloid ions to augment the structure and the function of proteins and to assist with vital biological processes. In the brain they mediate biochemical processes, and disrupted metabolism of metals may be a contributing factor in neurodegenerative disorders. In this tutorial review we will discuss the particular role of X-ray methods for elemental imaging analysis of accumulated metal species and metal-containing compounds in biological materials, in the context of post-mortem brain tissue. X-rays have the advantage that they have a short wavelength and can penetrate through a thick biological sample. Many of the X-ray microscopy techniques that provide the greatest sensitivity and specificity for trace metal concentrations in biological materials are emerging at synchrotron X-ray facilities. Here, the extremely high flux available across a wide range of soft and hard X-rays, combined with state-of-the-art focusing techniques and ultra-sensitive detectors, makes it viable to undertake direct imaging of a number of elements in brain tissue. The different methods for synchrotron imaging of metals in brain tissues at regional, cellular, and sub-cellular spatial resolution are discussed. Methods covered include X-ray fluorescence for elemental imaging, X-ray absorption spectrometry for speciation imaging, X-ray diffraction for structural imaging, phase contrast for enhanced contrast imaging and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy for spectromicroscopy. Two- and three-dimensional (confocal and tomographic) imaging methods are considered as well as the correlation of X-ray microscopy with other imaging tools.

  6. Profile reconstruction of grazing-incidence X-ray mirrors from intra-focal X-ray full imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Spiga, D; Bavdaz, M; Burwitz, V; Civitani, M; Citterio, O; Ghigo, M; Hartner, G; Menz, B; Pareschi, G; Proserpio, L; Salmaso, B; Tagliaferri, G; Wille, E

    2015-01-01

    The optics of a number of future X-ray telescopes will have very long focal lengths (10 - 20 m), and will consist of a number of nested/stacked thin, grazing-incidence mirrors. The optical quality characterization of a real mirror can be obtained via profile metrology, and the Point Spread Function of the mirror can be derived via one of the standard computation methods. However, in practical cases it can be difficult to access the optical surfaces of densely stacked mirror shells, after they have been assembled, using the widespread metrological tools. For this reason, the assessment of the imaging resolution of a system of mirrors is better obtained via a direct, full-illumination test in X-rays. If the focus cannot be reached, an intra-focus test can be performed, and the image can be compared with the simulation results based on the metrology, if available. However, until today no quantitative information was extracted from a full-illumination, intra-focal exposure. In this work we show that, if the detec...

  7. Imaging Polarimetry of Six X-Ray Selected Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, K. K.; Ramsey, B. D.; Austin, R. A.; Soundararajaperumal, S.

    1998-01-01

    Results of broad band V-filter linear optical polarization measurements of six X-ray selected B L Lac objects (XBLs) are presented. Four of these B L Lac objects (MS0737.9+7441, MS0950.9+4929, MS1458.8+2249 and MS 1534.2+0148) had not been measured before in this band. We have detected strong optical polarization in three B L Lac objects. Analysis of radio through X-ray spectra of these sources confirms that these objects are indeed XBLS. We have also detected several new polarized sources in the fields of these B L Lacs.

  8. First Images from HERO: A Hard-X-Ray Focusing Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Benson, Carl M.; Dietz, Kurtis L.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Engelhaupt, Darell E.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; ODell, Stephen L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope that utilizes grazing incidence optics. Termed HERO, for High-Energy Replicated Optics, the instrument will provide unprecented sensitivity in the hard-x-ray region and will achieve milliCrab-level sensitivity in a typical 3-hour balloon-flight observation and 50 microCrab sensitivity on ultra-long-duration flights. A recent proof-of-concept flight, featuring a small number of mirror shells captured the first focused hard-x-ray images of galactic x-ray sources. Full details of the payload, its expected future performance and its recent measurements are provided.

  9. Automated analysis of hot spot X-ray images at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S. F., E-mail: khan9@llnl.gov; Izumi, N.; Glenn, S.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Springer, P.; Bradley, D. K.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    At the National Ignition Facility, the symmetry of the hot spot of imploding capsules is diagnosed by imaging the emitted x-rays using gated cameras and image plates. The symmetry of an implosion is an important factor in the yield generated from the resulting fusion process. The x-ray images are analyzed by decomposing the image intensity contours into Fourier and Legendre modes. This paper focuses on the additional protocols for the time-integrated shape analysis from image plates. For implosions with temperatures above ∼4 keV, the hard x-ray background can be utilized to infer the temperature of the hot spot.

  10. Tissue Visualization Using X-Ray Dark-Field Imaging towards Pathological Goal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masami; Chikaura, Yoshinori; Endo, Tokiko; Gupta, Rajiv; Huo, Qingkai; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ichihara, Shu; Mori, Kensaku; Nakao, Yuki; Ohura, Norihiko; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Wu, Yanlin; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Xiaowei, Zhang

    2013-03-01

    In XDFI (x-ray dark-field imaging) LAA (Laue-case angle analyzer) simultaneously provides two x-ray images; one corresponds to a FD forward diffracted beam and a separate D diffracted beam. When this is applied to biomedical specimens x-ray images are very high contrast and very high spatial resolution. We constructed XDFI system at the vertical wiggler beamline BL-14C in KEK Photon Factory and performed imaging experiment of breast tissues and an excised human femoral artery. In this paper, we discuss a tissue visualization and pathological goal using 2D, 3D-CT and 2.5D image (tomosynthesis) with XDFI.

  11. Coherent diffraction imaging analysis of shape-controlled nanoparticles with focused hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of the coherent diffraction imaging analysis of nanoparticles using focused hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses, allowing us to analyze the size distribution of particles as well as the electron density projection of individual particles. We measured 1000 single-shot coherent X-ray diffraction patterns of shape-controlled Ag nanocubes and Au/Ag nanoboxes and estimated the edge length from the speckle size of the coherent diffraction patterns. We then reconstructed the two-dimensional electron density projection with sub-10 nm resolution from selected coherent diffraction patterns. This method enables the simultaneous analysis of the size distribution of synthesized nanoparticles and the structures of particles at nanoscale resolution to address correlations between individual structures of components and the statistical properties in heterogeneous systems such as nanoparticles and cells.

  12. A Novel Feature Extraction Scheme for Medical X-Ray Images

    OpenAIRE

    Prachi.G.Bhende; Dr.A.N.Cheeran

    2016-01-01

    X-ray images are gray scale images with almost the same textural characteristic. Conventional texture or color features cannot be used for appropriate categorization in medical x-ray image archives. This paper presents a novel combination of methods like GLCM, LBP and HOG for extracting distinctive invariant features from Xray images belonging to IRMA (Image Retrieval in Medical applications) database that can be used to perform reliable matching between different views of an obje...

  13. X-ray Phase Contrast Allows Three Dimensional, Quantitative Imaging of Hydrogel Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Larson, Jeffery C.; Jiang, Bin; Zhong, Zhong; Anastasio, Mark A.; Brey, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional imaging techniques are needed for the evaluation and assessment of biomaterials used for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Hydrogels are a particularly popular class of materials for medical applications but are difficult to image in tissue using most available imaging modalities. Imaging techniques based on X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) have shown promise for tissue engineering applications due to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray...

  14. Measurement of the electron and ion temperatures by the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on joint Texas experimental tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Jin, W.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Wang, S. Y.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been developed on joint Texas experimental tokamak for the measurement of electron and ion temperatures from the Kα spectra of helium-like argon and its satellite lines. A two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter has been applied to detect the spectra. The electron and ion temperatures have been obtained from the Voigt fitting with the spectra of helium-like argon ions. The profiles of electron and ion temperatures show the dependence on electron density in ohmic plasmas.

  15. Lung mass, right upper lung - chest x-ray (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest x-ray of a person with a lung mass. This is a front view, where the lungs are the two dark areas and the heart ... ray shows a mass in the right upper lung, indicated with the arrow (seen on the left ...

  16. Microscopic identification of Chinese medicinal materials based on X-ray phase contrast imaging: from qualitative to quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y.; Liang, Z.; Tan, H.; Ni, L.; Zhao, Z.; Xiao, T.; Xu, H.

    2016-07-01

    Although a variety of methods, ranging from simple morphological examination to physical and chemical analysis, and DNA molecular biology, exist for authenticating Chinese medicinal materials(CMMs), no methods can achieve both the source species identification and quality evaluation of CMMs simultaneously. Furthermore, the methods that are currently available for the identification of CMMs, including both optical and electronic microscopy, usually entail strict requirements for sample preparation or testing environment, such as the slicing of super-thin sections, or processing with specific chemical reagents. These treatments not only damage the CMMs but may also cause some of the original microstructures to be missed. Additionally, they may even yield false results. Owing to the unique penetrating character of X-rays, X-ray phase contrast imaging(XPCI) can be used to realize the inner microstructures of CMMs through nondestructive imaging. With the higher flux and luminance of the third generation of synchrotron radiation facility, XPCI can provides clearer and finer microstructures of CMMs, which are mainly composed of C, H, O, and N elements, with better spatial and density resolutions. For more than ten years, the X-ray imaging group at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics has investigated the microstructures of CMMs by XPCI and they have established and developed a quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT for investigating the characteristic microstructures of CMMs. During this period, a variety of typical CMMs have been investigated, from two-dimensional (2D) radiography to three-dimensional (3D) micro-CT, from qualitative to quantitative. Taken together, these results verify that quantitative X-ray phase contrast micro-CT is a practical tool for the microscopic investigation of CMMs. Additionally, further efforts are being made to find the relationship between the microstructures' quantitative factors and active chemical components. At present

  17. An image processing system for digital chest X-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocklin, M; Gourlay, A; Jackson, P; Kaye, G; Miessler, M; Kerr, I; Lams, P

    1984-01-01

    This paper investigates the requirements for image processing of digital chest X-ray images. These images are conventionally recorded on film and are characterised by large size, wide dynamic range and high resolution. X-ray detection systems are now becoming available for capturing these images directly in photoelectronic-digital form. In this report, the hardware and software facilities required for handling these images are described. These facilities include high resolution digital image displays, programmable video look up tables, image stores for image capture and processing and a full range of software tools for image manipulation. Examples are given of the application of digital image processing techniques to this class of image.

  18. Lead foil in dental X-ray film: Backscattering rejection or image intensifier?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hönnicke, M.G., E-mail: marcelo.honnicke@unila.edu.br [Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana, Foz do Iguaçu (Brazil); Delben, G.J. [Faculdade de Tecnologia Tupy, Curitiba (Brazil); Godoi, W.C. [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, Curitiba (Brazil); Swinka-Filho, V. [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento – LACTEC, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2014-11-01

    Dental X-ray films are still largely used due to sterilization issues, simplicity and, mainly, economic reasons. These films almost always are double coated (double emulsion) and have a lead foil in contact with the film for X-ray backscattering rejection. Herein we explore the use of the lead foil as an image intensifier. In these studies, spatial resolution was investigated when images were acquired on the dental X-ray films with and without the lead foil. Also, the lead foil was subjected to atomic analysis (fluorescent measurements) and structure analysis (X-ray diffraction). We determined that the use of the lead foil reduces the exposure time, however, does not affect the spatial resolution on the acquired images. This suggests that the fluorescent radiation spread is smaller than the grain sizes of the dental X-ray films.

  19. High-Resolution X-ray Imaging of the Colliding Wind Shock in WR147

    CERN Document Server

    Pittard, J M; Williams, P M; Pollock, A M T; Skinner, S L; Corcoran, M F; Moffat, A F J

    2002-01-01

    We analyze new high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the Wolf-Rayet binary system WR147. This system contains a WN8 star with an early-type companion located 0.6'' to its north, and is the only known early-type binary with a separation on the sky large enough for the wind-wind collision between the stars to currently be resolved at X-ray energies. The 5 ksec Chandra HRC-I image provides the first direct evidence for spatially extended X-ray emission in an early-type binary system. The X-ray emission peaks close to the position of the radio bow shock and north of the WN8 star. A deeper X-ray image is needed to accurately determine the degree of spatial extension, to exactly align the X-ray and optical/radio frames, and to determine whether part of the detected X-ray emission arises in the individual stellar winds. Simulated X-ray images of the wind-wind collision have a FWHM consistent with the data, and maximum likelihood fits suggest that a deeper observation may also constrain the inclination and wind mom...

  20. Quantitative Imaging of Cell-Permeable Magnetic Resonance Contrast Agents Using X-Ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Endres

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III–diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III–1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8–amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylaminostilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF. Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 103 better than 153Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T1 analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination.

  1. Comment on 'Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taibi, A. E-mail: taibi@fe.infn.it; Baldelli, P.; Tuffanelli, A.; Gambaccini, M

    2002-07-21

    In the paper 'Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging' (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 466 (2001) 99) the authors infer, from simple approximations, that the use of HOPG monochromator has no advantage in mammography compared to existing systems. We show that in order to compare imaging properties of different X-ray sources it is necessary to evaluate the spectra after the attenuation of the tissue to be imaged. Indeed, quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources have the potential to enhance image contrast and to reduce patient dose.

  2. X-ray imaging microscopy at 25 keV with Fresnel zone plate optics

    CERN Document Server

    Awaji, M; Takeuchi, A; Takano, H; Kamijo, N; Tamura, S; Yasumoto, M

    2001-01-01

    X-ray imaging microscopy with a sputtered-sliced Fresnel zone plate (SS-FZP) has been developed at an X-ray energy of 25 keV. Objects were imaged in transmission with the SS-FZP as an objective with a magnification of 10.2 times, and detected with a X-ray image sensor. The performance of the imaging microscope has been tested with a gold mesh and a resolution test pattern at an undulator beamline 47XU of SPring-8. The resolution test patterns up to 0.5 mu m line-and-space structures have been resolved.

  3. X-ray beam splitting design for concurrent imaging at hard X-ray FELs and synchrotron facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberta, P., E-mail: peter.oberta@rigaku.com [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, Praha 8, CZ-18221 (Czech Republic); Rigaku, Novodvorská 994, Praha 4, CZ-14221 (Czech Republic); Mokso, R. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-11-21

    A new configuration of diffractive–refractive optics for beam splitting is investigated. The set-up can be applied to perform imaging with two beams simultaneously. It brings advantages toward dynamic studies using image guided diffraction or fluorescence spectroscopy. The optimal energy range of operation for the beam-splitter is between 7 keV and 24 keV, reaching best efficiency at an energy of 10 keV. Due to the long focusing distances (several tens of meters) created by the diffractive–refractive optics and the higher refraction efficiency in the softer energy range, the presented set-ups are ideal for hard X-ray FEL sources.

  4. A High-Resolution X-Ray Image of the Jet in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, H. L.; Miller, B. P.; Davis, D. S.; Perlman, E. S.; Wise, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Harris, D. E.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first high-resolution X-ray image of the jet in M87 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level, but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core, and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A, are consistent with a simple power law (Sν~ν-α) with α=1.46+/-0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton models as the dominant X-ray emission mechanism. The core flux is significantly larger than expected from an advective accretion flow, and the spectrum is much steeper, indicating that the core emission may be due to synchrotron emission from a small-scale jet. The spectral energy distributions of the knots are well fitted by synchrotron models. The spectral indices in the X-ray band, however, are comparable to that expected in the Kardashev-Pacholczyk synchrotron model but are much flatter than expected in the pitch-angle isotropization model of Jaffe and Perola. The break frequencies derived from both models drop by factors of 10-100 with distance from the core.

  5. A High Resolution X-ray Image of the Jet in M 87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B. P.; Marshall, H. L.; Davis, D. S.; Perlman, E. S.; Wise, M.; Canizares, C. R.; Harris, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    We present the first high resolution X-ray image of the jet in M 87 using the Chandra X-ray Observatory. There is clear structure in the jet and almost all of the optically bright knots are detected individually. The unresolved core is the brightest X-ray feature but is only 2-3 times brighter than knot A (12.3" from the core) and the inner knot HST-1 (1.0" from the core). The X-ray and optical positions of the knots are consistent at the 0.1" level but the X-ray emission from the brightest knot (A) is marginally upstream of the optical emission peak. Detailed Gaussian fits to the X-ray jet one-dimensional profile show distinct X-ray emission that is not associated with specific optical features. The X-ray/optical flux ratio decreases systematically from the core and X-ray emission is not clearly detected beyond 20" from the core. The X-ray spectra of the core and the two brightest knots, HST-1 and A1, are consistent with a simple power law with alpha = 1.46 +/- 0.05, practically ruling out inverse Compton models as the dominant X-ray emission mechanism. The core flux is significantly larger than expected from an advective accretion flow and the spectrum is much steeper, indicating that the core emission may be due to synchrotron emission from a small scale jet. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the knots are well fit by synchrotron models. The spectral indices in the X-ray band, however are comparable to that expected in the Kardashev-Pacholczyk synchrotron model but are much flatter than expected in the pitch angle isotropization model of Jaffe and Perola. The break frequencies derived from both models drop by factors of 10-100 with distance from the core.

  6. A Spatially Resolved X-ray Image of a Star Like the Sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J H; Kürster, M

    1993-10-08

    Observations made with the x-ray satellite ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) have produced the first spatially resolved x-ray image of a corona around a star like our sun. The star is the secondary in the eclipsing binary system alpha Coronae Borealis (CrB), which consists of one star of spectral type A0V and one of type G5V. The x-ray light curve of alpha CrB shows a total x-ray eclipse during secondary optical minimum, with the G star behind the A star. The totality of the eclipse demonstrates that the A-type component in alpha CrB is x-ray dark and that the x-ray flux arises exclusively from the later-type companion. The x-ray eclipse ingress and egress are highly asymmetric compared with the optical eclipse, indicating a highly asymmetric x-ray intensity distribution on the surface of the G star. From a detailed modeling of the ingress and egress of the x-ray light curve, an eclipse map of the G star was constructed by a method based on an optimization by simulated annealing.

  7. Development of macropore arrays in silicon and related technologies for X-ray imaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Badel, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    Digital devices have started to replace photographic film inX-ray imaging applications. As compared to photographic films,these devices are more convenient to obtain images and tohandle, treat and store these images. The goal of the presentstudy is to develop macropore arrays and related silicontechnologies in order to fabricate X-ray imaging detectors formedical applications, and in particular for dentistry. Althougha few detectors are already available on the market, theirperformances, such...

  8. Exploration of computerized image processing in underexposed and overexposed X-rays of bones and joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhao-chen; ZHANG You-jun; FENG Cheng-qiang; ZHU Yuan-zhong; YAN Shi-yi; LIU Yu-jin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effective computerized image processing of underexposed and overexposed X-rays of bones and joints. Methods: Ninety-nine conventional X-ray images (82 were overexposed and 17 were underexposed),scanned by an UMAX Astra 4000U Scanner, were converted into digital images on the basis of their analog images. A computerized imaging processing program consisting of five functional modules such as Contrast Stretch, Fast Flourier Transform (FFT), Image Smoothing Modules, Inverse Fast Flourier Transform (IFFT) and Nonlinear Transform performed image contrast stretch and smoothing. Three senior doctors from hospital image sections made their evaluation of all the processed images. Results: Of 82 overexposed films, 71 met the clinical requirements after image processing, and 11 were unable to be applied to clinical diagnosis, accounting for 87% and 13% respectively. Of the other 17 underexposed X-ray images, 11 met the clinical requirements while 6 were not, making a percentage of 64 and 35. Conclusion: Image contrast stretch and smoothing processing are significantly effective on conventional X-ray images which were inappropriately exposed, and can avoid more X-ray radiation caused by handling of radiological photograph again. This method can decrease hospital cost and provide acute and effective X-ray examinations for the treatment and cure for critical patients.

  9. 2D-3D image registration in diagnostic and interventional X-Ray imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bom, I.M.J. van der

    2010-01-01

    Clinical procedures that are conventionally guided by 2D x-ray imaging, may benefit from the additional spatial information provided by 3D image data. For instance, guidance of minimally invasive procedures with CT or MRI data provides 3D spatial information and visualization of structures that are

  10. Differential X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a grating interferometer using a laboratory X-ray micro-focus tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Jung, Chang-Won [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Young-Jo; Kwon, Young-Man [Jeonbuk Technopark, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mi-Ran; Cho, Seung-Ryong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chon, Kwon-Su [Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide images with much greater soft-tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based images. In this paper, we describe differential X-ray phase-contrast images of insect specimens that were obtained using a grating-based Talbot interferometer and a laboratory X-ray source with a spot size of a few tens of micrometers. We developed the interferometer on the basis of the wavelength, periods, and height of the gratings; the field of view depends on the size of the grating, considering the refractive index of the specimen. The phase-contrast images were acquired using phase-stepping methods. The phase contrast imaging provided a significantly enhanced soft-tissue contrast compared with the attenuation data. The contour of the sample was clearly visible because the refraction from the edges of the object was strong in the differential phase-contrast image. Our results demonstrate that a grating-based Talbot interferometer with a conventional X-ray tube may be attractive as an X-ray imaging system for generating phase images. X-ray phase imaging obviously has sufficient potential and is expected to soon be a great tool for medical diagnostics.

  11. Study on image processing of panoramic X-ray using deviation improvement software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Gon; Lee, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Pyo; Park, Yong-Pil; Cheon, Min-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of panoramic X-ray device is getting wider. Panoramic X-ray has low resolution than general X-ray device and it occurs to distortion by deviation of image synthesis. Due to structural problems, it has been used restrictively to identify of tooth structure, not for whole head. Therefore, it designed and produced panoramic X-ray device which is possible to diagnostic coverage can be extended and had to be adjusted interval control between X-ray generator and image processing for whole of Maxillofacia's diagnosis. Produced panoramic X-ray device is composed basically of short image synthesis. In addition, it was confirmed the results by used the device which was applied deviation of the brightness of the image, filter to improve the location of the deviation and interpolation method. In this study, it was used 13 images including the front. It occurs to brightness deviation, position deviation, and geometric correction when synthesis of image, but it had been solved by deviation improvement software and a change of CCD camera's scan line which is used for image acquisition. Therefore, it confirmed expansion possibility of utilization range to commonly used panoramic X-ray device.

  12. Simultaneous x-ray fluorescence and K-edge CT imaging with photon-counting detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Li, Ruizhe; Zhang, Siyuan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-10-01

    Rapid development of the X-ray phonon-counting detection technology brings tremendous research and application opportunities. In addition to improvements in conventional X-ray imaging performance such as radiation dose utilization and beam hardening correction, photon-counting detectors allows significantly more efficient X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and K-edge imaging, and promises a great potential of X-ray functional, cellular and molecular imaging. XRF is the characteristic emission of secondary X-ray photons from a material excited by initial X-rays. The phenomenon is widely used for chemical and elemental analysis. K-edge imaging identifies a material based on its chemically-specific absorption discontinuity over X-ray photon energy. In this paper, we try to combine XRF and K-edge signals from the contrast agents (e.g., iodine, gadolinium, gold nanoparticles) to simultaneously realize XFCT and K-edge CT imaging for superior image performance. As a prerequisite for this dual-modality imaging, the accurate energy calibration of multi-energy-bin photon-counting detectors is critically important. With the measured XRF data of different materials, we characterize the energy response function of a CZT detector for energy calibration and spectrum reconstruction, which can effectively improve the energy resolution and decrease the inconsistence of the photon counting detectors. Then, a simultaneous K-edge and X-ray fluorescence CT imaging (SKYFI) experimental setup is designed which includes a cone-beam X-ray tube, two separate photon counting detector arrays, a pin-hole collimator and a rotation stage. With a phantom containing gold nanoparticles the two types of XFCT and K-edge CT datasets are collected simultaneously. Then, XFCT and K-edge CT images are synergistically reconstructed in a same framework. Simulation results are presented and quantitative analyzed and compared with the separate XFCT and K-edge CT results.

  13. Two-dimensional fruit ripeness estimation using thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Intaravanne, Yuttana

    2013-06-01

    Some green fruits do not change their color from green to yellow when being ripe. As a result, ripeness estimation via color and fluorescent analytical approaches cannot be applied. In this article, we propose and show for the first time how a thermal imaging camera can be used to two-dimensionally classify fruits into different ripeness levels. Our key idea relies on the fact that the mature fruits have higher heat capacity than the immature ones and therefore the change in surface temperature overtime is slower. Our experimental proof of concept using a thermal imaging camera shows a promising result in non-destructively identifying three different ripeness levels of mangoes Mangifera indica L.

  14. The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) for the ASTRO-H Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Enoto, Teruaki; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Harayama, Atsushi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuta, Junichiro; Kawaharada, Madoka; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, François; Limousin, Olivier; Makishima, Kazuo; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Kunishiro; Nakamori, Takeshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Saito, Shinya; Sato, Rie; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shinichiro; Terada, Yukikatsu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Shin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    The 6th Japanese X-ray satellite, ASTRO-H, is scheduled for launch in 2015. The hard X-ray focusing imaging system will observe astronomical objects with the sensitivity for detecting point sources with a brightness of 1/100,000 times fainter than the Crab nebula at > 10 keV. The Hard X-ray Imager (HXI) is a focal plane detector 12 m below the hard X-ray telescope (HXT) covering the energy range from 5 to 80 keV. The HXI is composed of a stacked Si/CdTe semiconductor detector module and surrounding BGO scintillators. The latter work as active shields for efficient reduction of background events caused by cosmic-ray particles, cosmic X-ray background, and in-orbit radiation activation. In this paper, we describe the detector system, and present current status of flight model development, and performance of HXI using an engineering model of HXI.

  15. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Kilkenny, J D; Conder, A; Cerjan, C; Hagmann, C; Hey, D; Izumi, N; Moody, J; Teruya, A; Celeste, J; Kimbrough, J; Khater, H; Eckart, M J; Ayers, J

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 10(17) neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  16. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.

    2010-01-18

    Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures and their fast dynamics is scientifically interesting and technologically of highest relevance. The combination of circularly polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect at characteristic X-ray absorption edges, with a high resolution soft X-ray microscope utilizing Fresnel zone plate optics allows to study in a unique way the stochastical behavior in the magnetization reversal process of thin films and the ultrafast dynamics of magnetic vortices and domain walls in confined ferromagnetic structures. Future sources of fsec short and high intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of magnetic imaging down to fundamental magnetic length and time scales.

  17. Radiation hardening of gated x-ray imagers for the National Ignition Facility (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Conder, A.; Cerjan, C.; Hagmann, C.; Hey, D.; Izumi, N.; Moody, J.; Teruya, A.; Celeste, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Khater, H.; Eckart, M. J.; Ayers, J.

    2010-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility will soon be producing x-ray flux and neutron yields higher than any produced in laser driven implosion experiments in the past. Even a non-igniting capsule will require x-ray imaging of near burning plasmas at 1017 neutrons, requiring x-ray recording systems to work in more hostile conditions than we have encountered in past laser facilities. We will present modeling, experimental data and design concepts for x-ray imaging with electronic recording systems for this environment (ARIANE). A novel instrument, active readout in a nuclear environment, is described which uses the time-of-flight difference between the gated x-ray signal and the neutron which induces a background signal to increase the yield at which gated cameras can be used.

  18. Soft X-ray Images of Krypton Gas-Puff Z-Pinches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孟通; 蒯斌; 曾正中; 吕敏; 王奎禄; 邱爱慈; 张美; 罗建辉

    2002-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out on Qiang-guang Ⅰ generator to study the dynamics of krypton gas-puff Z-pinches. The generator was operated at a peak current of 1.5 MA with a rise-time of 80 ns. The specific linear mass of gas liner was about 20 μg/cm in these experiments. In the diagnostic system, a four-frame x-ray framing camera and a pinhole camera were employed. A novel feature of this camera is that it can give time-resolved x-ray images with four frames and energy-resolved x-ray images with two different filters and an array of 8 pinholes integrated into one compact assemble. As a typical experimental result, an averaged radial imploding velocity of 157 km/s over 14 ns near the late phase of implosion was measured from the time-resolved x-ray images. From the time-integrated x-ray image an averaged radial convergence of 0.072 times of the original size was measured. An averaged radial expansion velocity was 130 km/s and the maximum radial convergence of 0.04 times of the original size were measured from the time-resolved x-ray images. The dominant axial wavelengths of instabilities in the plasma were between 1 and 2 mm. The change in average photons energy was observed from energy spectrum- and time-resolved x-ray images.

  19. Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2011-03-23

    We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

  20. Novelty detection of foreign objects in food using multi-modal X-ray imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Emerson, Monica Jane; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a method for novelty detection of foreign objects in food products using grating-based multimodal X-ray imaging. With this imaging technique three modalities are available with pixel correspondence, enhancing organic materials such as wood chips, insects and soft...... plastics not detectable by conventional X-ray absorption radiography. We conduct experiments, where several food products are imaged with common foreign objects typically found in the food processing industry. To evaluate the benefit from using this multi-contrast X-ray technique over conventional X...

  1. A fast method for spine localization in x-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Detection of spines in medical images are important tasks in medical applications. These tasks are relatively easy for CT/MR images because the bones are easily distinguishable from other tissues. However, they are difficult for x-ray images due to bone and soft tissue overlapping. This paper illustrates a method for detecting the medial axis of spine in x-ray images. Given an initial point on the spine in the x-ray image manually or automatically, the method iteratively searches for good feature points on the spine to locate the medial axis. As a result, the effort of determining the relevant medical information, such as Cobb's angle, can be minimized. The proposed method is fast and efficient. In average it took less than 1 second for localizing the spine on a 3000×1000 gray scale x-ray image.

  2. 3D Image Reconstruction from X-Ray Measurements with Overlap

    CERN Document Server

    Klodt, Maria

    2016-01-01

    3D image reconstruction from a set of X-ray projections is an important image reconstruction problem, with applications in medical imaging, industrial inspection and airport security. The innovation of X-ray emitter arrays allows for a novel type of X-ray scanners with multiple simultaneously emitting sources. However, two or more sources emitting at the same time can yield measurements from overlapping rays, imposing a new type of image reconstruction problem based on nonlinear constraints. Using traditional linear reconstruction methods, respective scanner geometries have to be implemented such that no rays overlap, which severely restricts the scanner design. We derive a new type of 3D image reconstruction model with nonlinear constraints, based on measurements with overlapping X-rays. Further, we show that the arising optimization problem is partially convex, and present an algorithm to solve it. Experiments show highly improved image reconstruction results from both simulated and real-world measurements.

  3. Bendable X-ray Optics for High Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; Kilaru, K.; Atkins, C.; Broadway, D.

    2014-01-01

    Current state-of the-art for x-ray optics fabrication calls for either the polishing of massive substrates into high-angular-resolution mirrors or the replication of thin, lower-resolution, mirrors from perfectly figured mandrels. Future X-ray Missions will require a change in this optics fabrication paradigm in order to achieve sub-arcsecond resolution in light-weight optics. One possible approach to this is to start with perfectly flat, light-weight surface, bend it into a perfect cone, form the desired mirror figure by material deposition, and insert the resulting mirror into a telescope structure. Such an approach is currently being investigated at MSFC, and a status report will be presented detailing the results of finite element analyses, bending tests and differential deposition experiments.

  4. Development of a two-dimensional imaging GEM detector using the resistive anode readout method with $6\\times6$ cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Chuan-Xing; Dong, Jing; Zhao, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Qi, Hui-Rong; Ou-Yang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of the resistive anode readout method on a two dimensional imaging GEM detector. The resistive anode consists $6\\times6$ cells with the cell size $6~\\mathrm{mm}\\times6~\\mathrm{mm}$. New electronics and DAQ system are used to process the signals from 49 readout channels. The detector has been tested by using the X-ray tube (8~keV). The spatial resolution of the detector is about $103.46~\\mathrm{{\\mu}m}$ with the signal part $66.41~\\mathrm{{\\mu}m}$. The nonlinearity of the detector is less than $0.5\\%$. A good two dimensional imaging capability is achieved as well. The performances of the detector show the prospect of the resistive anode readout method for the large readout area imaging detectors.

  5. X-ray imaging using the thermoluminescent properties of commercial Al2O3 ceramic plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Kawaji, Yasuyuki; Yanagisawa, Shin; Otsubo, Keisuke; Koba, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Matsumoto, Kazuki; Ushiba, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    This research demonstrated that commercially available alumina is well-suited for use in large area X-ray detectors. We discovered a new radiation imaging device that has a high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, large imaging area, repeatable results, and low operating costs. The high thermoluminescent (TL) properties of Al2O3 ceramic plates make them useful for X-ray imaging devices.

  6. First experience with x-ray dark-field radiography for human chest imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Peter B.; Willer, Konstantin; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Gromann, Lukas B.; De Marco, Fabio; Scherer, Kai H.; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Münzel, Daniela; Renz, Martin; Renger, Bernhard C.; Fischer, Florian; Braun, Christian; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schröter, Tobias; Mohr, Jürgen; Yaroshenko, Andre; Maack, Hanns-Ingo; Pralow, Thomas; van der Heijden, Hendrik; Proksa, Roland; Köhler, Thomas; Wieberneit, Nataly; Rindt, Karsten; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of an experimental X-ray dark-field radiography system for chest imaging in humans and to compare with conventional diagnostic imaging. Materials and Methods: The study was institutional review board (IRB) approved. A single human cadaver (52 years, female, height: 173 cm, weight: 84 kg, chest circumference: 97 cm) was imaged within 24 hours post mortem on the experimental x-ray dark-field system. In addition, the cadaver was imaged on a clinical CT system to obtain a reference scan. The grating-based dark-field radiography setup was equipped with a set of three gratings to enable grating-based dark-field contrast x-ray imaging. The prototype operates at an acceleration voltage of up to 70 kVp and with a field-of-view large enough for clinical chest x-ray (>35 x 35 cm2). Results: It was feasible to extract x-ray dark-field signal of the whole human thorax, clearly demonstrating that human x-ray dark-field chest radiography is feasible. Lung tissue produced strong scattering, reflected in a pronounced x-ray dark-field signal. The ribcage and the backbone are less prominent than the lung but are also distinguishable. Finally, the soft tissue is not present in the dark-field radiography. The regions of the lungs affected by edema, as verified by CT, showed less dark-field signal compared to healthy lung tissue. Conclusion: Our results reveal the current status of translating dark-field imaging from a micro (small animal) scale to a macro (patient) scale. The performance of the experimental x-ray dark-field radiography setup offers, for the first time, obtaining multi-contrast chest x-ray images (attenuation and dark-field signal) from a human cadaver.

  7. A new X-ray pinhole camera for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.P., E-mail: romanop@lns.infn.it [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rizzo, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A new X-ray pinhole camera for the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution, was designed and developed. It consists of a back-illuminated and deep depleted CCD detector (composed of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a lateral size of 13 μm) coupled to a 70 μm laser-drilled pinhole-collimator, positioned between the sample under analysis and the CCD. The X-ray pinhole camera works in a coaxial geometry allowing a wide range of magnification values. The characteristic X-ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube working at a maximum power of 100 W (50 kV and 2 mA operating conditions). The spectroscopic capabilities of the X-ray pinhole camera were accurately investigated. Energy response and energy calibration of the CCD detector were determined by irradiating pure target-materials emitting characteristic X-rays in the energy working-domain of the system (between 3 keV and 30 keV). Measurements were performed by using a multi-frame acquisition in single-photon counting. The characteristic X-ray spectra were obtained by an automated processing of the acquired images. The energy resolution measured at the Fe–Kα line is 157 eV. The use of the X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D resolved elemental analysis was investigated by using reference-patterns of different materials and geometries. The possibility of the elemental mapping of samples up to an area of 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} was demonstrated. Finally, the spatial resolution of the pinhole camera was measured by analyzing the profile function of a sharp-edge. The spatial resolution determined at the magnification values of 3.2 × and 0.8 × (used as testing values) is about 90 μm and 190 μm respectively. - Highlights: • We developed an X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D X-ray fluorescence imaging. • X-ray spectra are obtained by a multi-frame acquisition in single photon mode. • The energy resolution in the X-ray

  8. Phase-contrast imaging of a soft biological object using X-pinch as X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Wang, X. X.; Zou, X. B.; Zeng, N. G.; He, L. Y.

    2008-07-01

    The X-ray emission from an X-pinch was measured with diamond photoconducting detectors and a pinhole camera, and the results show that the X-ray source of the X-pinch is extremely small in size and high in brightness. As such, the X-pinch could be considered as an X-ray point source having a high spatial coherence that is required by a simplified scheme of X-ray phase-contrast imaging. The X-pinch was used as X-ray source for the phase-contrast imaging of a weakly X-ray-absorbing mosquito and an image with high contrast was obtained.

  9. Image quality simulation and verification of x-ray volume imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Han; Schoumans, Nicole; Snoeren, Ruud

    2006-03-01

    Nowadays, 2D X-ray systems are used more and more for 3-dimensional rotational X-ray imaging (3D-RX) or volume imaging, such as 3D rotational angiography. However, it is not evident that the application of settings for optimal 2D images also guarantee optimal conditions for 3D-RX reconstruction results. In particular the search for a good compromise between patient dose and IQ may lead to different results in case of 3D imaging. For this purpose we developed an additional 3D-RX module for our full-scale image quality & patient dose (IQ&PD) simulation model, with specific calculations of patient dose under rotational conditions, and contrast, sharpness and noise of 3D images. The complete X-ray system from X-ray tube up to and including the display device is modelled in separate blocks for each distinguishable component or process. The model acts as a tool for X-ray system design, image quality optimisation and patient dose reduction. The model supports the decomposition of system level requirements, and takes inherently care of the prerequisite mutual coherence between component requirements. The short calculation times enable comprehensive multi-parameter optimisation studies. The 3D-RX IQ&PD performance is validated by comparing calculation results with actual measurements performed on volume images acquired with a state-of-the-art 3D-RX system. The measurements include RXDI dose index, signal and contrast based on Hounsfield units (H and ΔH), modulation transfer function (MTF), noise variance (σ2) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Further we developed a new 3D contrast-delta (3D-CΔ) phantom with details of varying size and contrast medium material and concentration. Simulation and measurement results show a significant correlation.

  10. Development and evaluation of a four-channel digital flash X-ray imaging system

    CERN Document Server

    Wang Yi; Du Hong Lian; Li Yuan Jing; Tian Hui

    2003-01-01

    A four-channel digital flash X-ray imaging system has been developed in our lab. The four flash X-ray heads and four detectors can be used to obtain four radiographic images at four time intervals of an explosion and ballistic trajectory. The cascaded imaging system mainly consists of three parts: (1) a phosphor screen to convert incident X-rays into visible photons; (2) a lens to efficiently collect visible photons emitted by the phosphor screen; and (3) a charge coupled device image sensor to obtain the visible light image. From the analysis of signal and noise propagation, the system is not X-ray quantum-limited, rather the system has secondary quantum sink at the light collecting stage. The construction of the system, theoretical and experimental analysis of performance are presented.

  11. Diffuse X-ray scattering near a two-dimensional solid-liquid phase transition at the n-hexane-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    According to experimental data on X-ray scattering and reflectometry with synchrotron radiation, a twodimensional crystallization phase transition in a monolayer of melissic acid at the n-hexane-water interface with a decrease in the temperature occurs after a wetting transition.

  12. Diffuse X-ray scattering near a two-dimensional solid–liquid phase transition at the n-hexane–water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation). Kapitza Inst. for Physical Problems

    2016-09-01

    According to experimental data on X-ray scattering and reflectometry with synchrotron radiation, a twodimensional crystallization phase transition in a monolayer of melissic acid at the n-hexane–water interface with a decrease in the temperature occurs after a wetting transition.

  13. Calibration of the linear response range of x-ray imaging plates and their reader based on image grayscale values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kuan; Xu, Tao; Zheng, Jianhua; Dong, Jianjun; Wei, Minxi; Li, Chaoguang; Cao, Zhurong; Du, Huabing; Yan, Ji; Yang, Guohong; Yi, Rongqing; Zhang, Jiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Liu, Shenye; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhiwen; Li, Jin; Chen, Yaohua; Lan, Ke; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2017-08-01

    X-ray imaging plates are one of the most important X-ray imaging detectors and are widely used in inertial-confinement fusion experiments. However, their linear response range, which is the foundation of their quantitative data analysis, has not been sufficiently deeply investigated. In this work, we develop an X-ray fluorescer calibration system and carefully explore the linear response range of X-ray imaging plates. For the first time, nearly the entire grayscale range of the X-ray imaging plate linear response—7819-64 879 in the range of 0-65 535—has been observed. Further, we discuss the uncertainties involved in the calibration process. This work demonstrates the excellent linear response qualities of X-ray imaging plates and provides a significant foundation for expanding their quantitative applied range.

  14. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray Panoramic dental x-ray uses a very small dose of ... x-ray , is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth ...

  15. The AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: X-ray image intensifiers for fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Blackburn, T J

    2000-01-01

    The x-ray image intensifier converts the transmitted x rays into a brightened, visible light image. Within an image intensifier, the input phosphor converts the x-ray photons to light photons, which are then converted to photoelectrons within the photocathode. The electrons are accelerated and focused by a series of electrodes striking the output phosphor, which converts the accelerated electrons into light photons that may be captured by various imaging devices. Through this process, several thousand light photons are produced for each x-ray photon reaching the input phosphor. Most modern image intensifiers use cesium iodide for the input phosphor because it has a high absorption efficiency and thus decreases patient dose. Image intensifiers come in various sizes, most having more than one input image size or magnification mode. Modern image intensifiers are specified by conversion factors, which is the measure of how efficiently an image intensifier converts x rays to light. Because of design restrictions, image intensifiers are subject to inherent and induced artifacts that contribute to image degradation. Both spatial and contrast resolution gradually decrease during the lifetime of the image intensifier because the brightness gain of an image intensifier decreases with time as the phosphor ages. A well-run quality control program for the image intensifier is needed to detect the inevitable changes in settings before they appear on clinical images.

  16. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Bech, Martin; Binderup, Tina;

    2013-01-01

    whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years) diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase...... was that the diagnostic sensitivity of the image analysis for detecting malignancy was 100% and the specificity was 87%. The positive predictive value was 91% for detecting malignancy and the negative predictive value was 100%. We conclude that x-ray phase-contrast imaging can accurately detect density variations...

  17. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Guillet, Serge; Busse, Armin; Bergan, Robert; Olson, William; Fox, Kay; Stewart, Nathaniel; Curtis, Robin; Miahnahri, Alireza Alan; Boutet, Sébastien, E-mail: sboutet@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Description of the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the femtosecond crystallography, high power density and extreme matter capabilities of the CXI instrument. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 µm focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pump–probe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter.

  18. New opportunities for 3D materials science of polycrystalline materials at the micrometre lengthscale by combined use of X-ray diffraction and X-ray imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, W.; King, A.; Reischig, P.

    2009-01-01

    Non-destructive, three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the grain structure in mono-phase polycrystalline materials is an open challenge in material science. Recent advances in synchrotron based X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer interesting possibilities for mapping 3D grain shapes...... and crystallographic orientations for certain categories of polycrystalline materials. Direct visualisation of the three-dimensional grain boundary network or of two-phase (duplex) grain structures by means of absorption and/or phase contrast techniques may be possible, but is restricted to specific material systems....... A recent extension of this methodology, termed X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT), combines the principles of X-ray diffraction imaging, three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (3DXRD) and image reconstruction from projections. DCT provides simultaneous access to 3D grain shape...

  19. An X-ray Imaging Survey of Quasar Jets -- Testing the Inverse Compton Model

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Schwartz, D A; Murphy, D W; Lovell, J E J; Worrall, D M; Birkinshaw, M; Perlman, E S; Godfrey, L; Jauncey, D L

    2011-01-01

    We present results from continued Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a flux-limited sample of flat spectrum radio-emitting quasars with jet-like extended structure. X-rays are detected from 24 of the 39 jets observed so far. We compute the distribution of alpha_rx, the spectral index between the X-ray and radio bands, showing that it is broad, extending at least from 0.8 to 1.2. While there is a general trend that the radio brightest jets are detected most often, it is clear that predicting the X-ray flux from the radio knot flux densities is risky so a shallow X-ray survey is the most effective means for finding jets that are X-ray bright. We test the model in which the X-rays result from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by relativistic electrons in the jet moving with high bulk Lorentz factor nearly along the line of sight. Depending on how the jet magnetic fields vary with z, the observed X-ray to radio flux ratios do not follow the redshift dependence exp...

  20. Image encryption using the two-dimensional logistic chaotic map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Yang, Gelan; Jin, Huixia; Noonan, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Chaos maps and chaotic systems have been proved to be useful and effective for cryptography. In our study, the two-dimensional logistic map with complicated basin structures and attractors are first used for image encryption. The proposed method adopts the classic framework of the permutation-substitution network in cryptography and thus ensures both confusion and diffusion properties for a secure cipher. The proposed method is able to encrypt an intelligible image into a random-like one from the statistical point of view and the human visual system point of view. Extensive simulation results using test images from the USC-SIPI image database demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method. Security analysis results of using both the conventional and the most recent tests show that the encryption quality of the proposed method reaches or excels the current state-of-the-art methods. Similar encryption ideas can be applied to digital data in other formats (e.g., digital audio and video). We also publish the cipher MATLAB open-source-code under the web page https://sites.google.com/site/tuftsyuewu/source-code.

  1. X-Ray Diffraction and Imaging Study of Imperfections of Crystallized Lysozyme with Coherent X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zheng-Wei; Chu, Y. S.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    Phase-sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging and high angular-resolution diffraction combined with phase contrast radiographic imaging are employed to characterize defects and perfection of a uniformly grown tetragonal lysozyme crystal in symmetric Laue case. The fill width at half-maximum (FWHM) of a 4 4 0 rocking curve measured from the original crystal is approximately 16.7 arcseconds, and defects, which include point defects, line defects, and microscopic domains, have been clearly observed in the diffraction images of the crystal. The observed line defects carry distinct dislocation features running approximately along the growth front, and they have been found to originate mostly at a central growth area and occasionally at outer growth regions. Individual point defects trapped at a crystal nucleus are resolved in the images of high sensitivity to defects. Slow dehydration has led to the broadening of the 4 4 0 rocking curve by a factor of approximately 2.4. A significant change of the defect structure and configuration with drying has been revealed, which suggests the dehydration induced migration and evolution of dislocations and lattice rearrangements to reduce overall strain energy. The sufficient details of the observed defects shed light upon perfection, nucleation and growth, and properties of protein crystals.

  2. Imaging Molecular Structure and Dynamics utilizing X-ray Free-Electron-Laser Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Imaging controlled molecules with ultrashort x- ray pulses from free-electron lasers enables the recording of “molecular movies”, i.e., snapshots of molecules at work, with spatial (picometer) and temporal (femtosecond) atomic resolution.

  3. eHXI: a permanently installed, hard x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döppner, T.; Bachmann, B.; Albert, F.; Bell, P.; Burns, S.; Celeste, J.; Chow, R.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Huntington, C. M.; Izumi, N.; LaCaille, G.; Landen, O. L.; Palmer, N.; Park, H.-S.; Thomas, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    We have designed and built a multi-pinhole imaging system for high energy x-rays (>= 50 keV) that is permanently installed in the equatorial plane outside of the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It records absolutely-calibrated, time-integrated x-ray images with the same line-of-sight as the multi-channel, spatially integrating hard x-ray detector FFLEX [McDonald et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 (2004) 3753], having a side view of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion targets. The equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) has recorded images on the majority of ICF implosion experiments since May 2011. eHXI provides valuable information on hot electron distribution in hohlraum experiments, target alignment, potential hohlraum drive asymmetries and serves as a long term reference for the FFLEX diagnostics.

  4. Image-based spectral distortion correction for photon-counting x-ray detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using an image-based method to correct for distortions induced by various artifacts in the x-ray spectrum recorded with photon-counting detectors for their application in breast computed tomography (CT).

  5. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics - Phase 2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcalorimeter x-ray instruments are non-dispersive, high spectral resolution, broad-band, high cadence imaging spectrometers. We have been developing these...

  6. Wide Field-of-View (FOV) Soft X-Ray Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Wide Field-of-View (FOV) Soft X-Ray Imager proposes to be a state-of-art instrument with applications for numerous heliospheric and planetary...

  7. X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of the Buzzard Coulee Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, D.; Samson, C.; Herd, R. K.; Fry, C.; McCausland, P. J. A.; Umoh, J.; Holdsworth, D. W.

    2012-03-01

    This abstract outlines research and some results of X-ray micro-computed tomography imaging of the Buzzard Coulee H4 chondrite. A comparison of bulk density results and an analysis of radio-density profile curves are discussed.

  8. Spherical-Wave Far-Field Interferometer for Hard X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Houxun; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Panna, Alireza; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    Low dose, high contrast x-ray imaging is of general interest in medical diagnostic applications. X-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometers using collimated synchrotron beams demonstrate the highest levels of phase contrast under a given exposure dose. However, common x-ray sources emit divergent cone beams. Here, we developed a spherical-wave inline Mach-Zehnder interferometer for phase contrast imaging over an extended area with a broadband and divergent source. The first tabletop system was tested in imaging experiments of a mammographic accreditation phantom and various biological specimens. The noise level of the phase contrast images at a clinical radiation dose corresponded to a 6 nano radian bending of the x-ray wavefront. Un-resolved structures with conventional radiography and near-field interferometer techniques became visible at a fraction of the radiation dose.

  9. Resolution enhancement in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging by overcoming instrumental noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Song, Changyong; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Sunam; Kang, Hyon Chol; Hwu, Yeukuang; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Liang, Keng San; Noh, Do Young

    2014-11-17

    We report that reference objects, strong scatterers neighboring weak phase objects, enhance the phase retrieval and spatial resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CDI). A CDI experiment with Au nano-particles exhibited that the reference objects amplified the signal-to-noise ratio in the diffraction intensity at large diffraction angles, which significantly enhanced the image resolution. The interference between the diffracted x-ray from reference objects and a specimen also improved the retrieval of the phase of the diffraction signal. The enhancement was applied to image NiO nano-particles and a mitochondrion and confirmed in a simulation with a bacteria phantom. We expect that the proposed method will be of great help in imaging weakly scattering soft matters using coherent x-ray sources including x-ray free electron lasers.

  10. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jung Su Kang; Je Hwang Ryu; Kyu Chang Park

    2012-01-01

    The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP) process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube em...

  12. X-ray phase imaging with a laboratory source using selective reflection from a mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Paganin, David M

    2013-04-22

    A novel approach for hard x-ray phase contrast imaging with a laboratory source is reported. The technique is based on total external reflection from the edge of a mirror, aligned to intercept only half of the incident beam. The mirror edge thus produces two beams. The refraction x-rays undergo when interacting with a sample placed before the mirror, causes relative intensity variations between direct and reflected beams. Quantitative phase contrast and pure absorption imaging are demonstrated using this method.

  13. Ptychographic coherent x-ray diffractive imaging in the water window

    OpenAIRE

    Giewekemeyer, K.; Beckers, M.; Gorniak, T.; Grunze, M.; Salditt, T.; Rosenhahn, A.

    2011-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffractive microscopy enables full reconstruction of the complex transmission function of an isolated object to diffraction-limited resolution without relying on any optical elements between the sample and detector. In combination with ptychography, also specimens of unlimited lateral extension can be imaged. Here we report on an application of ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging (PCDI) in the soft x-ray regime, more precisely in the so-called water wi...

  14. Image interpolation by two-dimensional parametric cubic convolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiazheng; Reichenbach, Stephen E

    2006-07-01

    Cubic convolution is a popular method for image interpolation. Traditionally, the piecewise-cubic kernel has been derived in one dimension with one parameter and applied to two-dimensional (2-D) images in a separable fashion. However, images typically are statistically nonseparable, which motivates this investigation of nonseparable cubic convolution. This paper derives two new nonseparable, 2-D cubic-convolution kernels. The first kernel, with three parameters (designated 2D-3PCC), is the most general 2-D, piecewise-cubic interpolator defined on [-2, 2] x [-2, 2] with constraints for biaxial symmetry, diagonal (or 90 degrees rotational) symmetry, continuity, and smoothness. The second kernel, with five parameters (designated 2D-5PCC), relaxes the constraint of diagonal symmetry, based on the observation that many images have rotationally asymmetric statistical properties. This paper also develops a closed-form solution for determining the optimal parameter values for parametric cubic-convolution kernels with respect to ensembles of scenes characterized by autocorrelation (or power spectrum). This solution establishes a practical foundation for adaptive interpolation based on local autocorrelation estimates. Quantitative fidelity analyses and visual experiments indicate that these new methods can outperform several popular interpolation methods. An analysis of the error budgets for reconstruction error associated with blurring and aliasing illustrates that the methods improve interpolation fidelity for images with aliased components. For images with little or no aliasing, the methods yield results similar to other popular methods. Both 2D-3PCC and 2D-5PCC are low-order polynomials with small spatial support and so are easy to implement and efficient to apply.

  15. Elemental mapping in a contemporary miniature by full-field X-ray fluorescence imaging with gaseous detector vs. scanning X-ray fluorescence imaging with polycapillary optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A. L. M.; Cirino, S.; Carvalho, M. L.; Manso, M.; Pessanha, S.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Carramate, L. F. N. D.; Santos, J. P.; Guerra, M.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2017-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray imaging can be used in several research fields and industrial applications. Elemental mapping through energy dispersive X-ray imaging technique has become a promising method to obtain positional distribution of specific elements in a non-destructive way. To obtain the elemental distribution of a sample it is necessary to use instruments capable of providing a precise positioning together with a good energy resolution. Polycapillary beams together with silicon drift chamber detectors are used in several commercial systems and are considered state-of-the-art spectrometers, however they are usually very costly. A new concept of large energy dispersive X-ray imaging systems based on gaseous radiation detectors emerged in the last years enabling a promising 2D elemental detection at a very reduced price. The main goal of this work is to analyze a contemporary Indian miniature with both X-ray fluorescence imaging systems, the one based on a gaseous detector 2D-THCOBRA and the state-of-the-art spectrometer M4 Tornado, from Bruker. The performance of both systems is compared and evaluated in the context of the sample's analysis.

  16. An active contour method for bone cement reconstruction from C-arm x-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Blake C; Otake, Yoshito; Armand, Mehran; Taylor, Russell H

    2012-04-01

    A novel algorithm is presented to segment and reconstruct injected bone cement from a sparse set of X-ray images acquired at arbitrary poses. The sparse X-ray multi-view active contour (SxMAC-pronounced "smack") can 1) reconstruct objects for which the background partially occludes the object in X-ray images, 2) use X-ray images acquired on a noncircular trajectory, and 3) incorporate prior computed tomography (CT) information. The algorithm's inputs are preprocessed X-ray images, their associated pose information, and prior CT, if available. The algorithm initiates automated reconstruction using visual hull computation from a sparse number of X-ray images. It then improves the accuracy of the reconstruction by optimizing a geodesic active contour. Experiments with mathematical phantoms demonstrate improvements over a conventional silhouette based approach, and a cadaver experiment demonstrates SxMAC's ability to reconstruct high contrast bone cement that has been injected into a femur and achieve sub-millimeter accuracy with four images.

  17. MMX-I: data-processing software for multimodal X-ray imaging and tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamaschi, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.bergamaschi@synchrotron-soleil.fr; Medjoubi, Kadda [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Messaoudi, Cédric; Marco, Sergio [Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91405 Orsay (France); Institut Curie, INSERM, PSL Reseach University, F-91405 Orsay (France); Somogyi, Andrea [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2016-04-12

    The MMX-I open-source software has been developed for processing and reconstruction of large multimodal X-ray imaging and tomography datasets. The recent version of MMX-I is optimized for scanning X-ray fluorescence, phase-, absorption- and dark-field contrast techniques. This, together with its implementation in Java, makes MMX-I a versatile and friendly user tool for X-ray imaging. A new multi-platform freeware has been developed for the processing and reconstruction of scanning multi-technique X-ray imaging and tomography datasets. The software platform aims to treat different scanning imaging techniques: X-ray fluorescence, phase, absorption and dark field and any of their combinations, thus providing an easy-to-use data processing tool for the X-ray imaging user community. A dedicated data input stream copes with the input and management of large datasets (several hundred GB) collected during a typical multi-technique fast scan at the Nanoscopium beamline and even on a standard PC. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first software tool that aims at treating all of the modalities of scanning multi-technique imaging and tomography experiments.

  18. Projection x-ray imaging with photon energy weighting: experimental evaluation with a prototype detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2009-08-21

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in x-ray imaging can be increased using a photon counting detector which could allow for rejecting electronics noise and for weighting x-ray photons according to their energies. This approach, however, was not feasible for a long time because photon counting x-ray detectors with very high count rates, good energy resolution and a large number of small pixels were required. These problems have been addressed with the advent of new detector materials, fast readout electronics and powerful computers. In this work, we report on the experimental evaluation of projection x-ray imaging with a photon counting cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector with energy resolving capabilities. The detector included two rows of pixels with 128 pixels per row with 0.9 x 0.9 mm(2) pixel size, and a 2 Mcount pixel(-1) s(-1) count rate. The x-ray tube operated at 120 kVp tube voltage with 2 mm Al-equivalent inherent filtration. The x-ray spectrum was split into five regions, and five independent x-ray images were acquired at a time. These five quasi-monochromatic x-ray images were used for x-ray energy weighting and material decomposition. A tissue-equivalent phantom was used including contrast elements simulating adipose, calcifications, iodine and air. X-ray energy weighting improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine by a factor of 1.32 and 1.36, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. Material decomposition was performed by dual energy subtraction. The low- and high-energy images were generated in the energy ranges of 25-60 keV and 60-120 keV, respectively, by combining five monochromatic image data into two. X-ray energy weighting was applied to low- and high-energy images prior to subtraction, and this improved the SNR of calcifications and iodine in dual energy subtracted images by a factor of 1.34 and 1.25, respectively, as compared to charge integrating. The detector energy resolution, spatial resolution, linearity, count rate, noise and

  19. Interferometric phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of VX2 rabbit cancer at 35keV X-ray energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Yoneyama, Akio; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Itai, Yuji

    2004-05-01

    Imaging of large objects at 17.7-keV low x-ray energy causes huge x-ray exposure to the objects even using interferometric phase-contrast x-ray CT (PCCT). Thus, we tried to obtain PCCT images at high x-ray energy of 35keV and examined the image quality using a formalin-fixed VX2 rabbit cancer specimen with 15-mm in diameter. The PCCT system consisted of an asymmetrically cut silicon (220) crystal, a monolithic x-ray interferometer, a phase-shifter, an object cell and an x-ray CCD camera. The PCCT at 35 keV clearly visualized various inner structures of VX2 rabbit cancer such as necrosis, cancer, the surrounding tumor vessels, and normal liver tissue. Besides, image-contrast was not degraded significantly. These results suggest that the PCCT at 35 KeV is sufficient to clearly depict the histopathological morphology of VX2 rabbit cancer specimen.

  20. Note: Dynamic strain field mapping with synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, L. [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Fan, D.; Luo, S. N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Bie, B. X. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Ran, X. X.; Qi, M. L., E-mail: qiml@whut.edu.cn [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Parab, N.; Sun, J. Z.; Liao, H. J.; Hudspeth, M. C.; Claus, B. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Fezzaa, K.; Sun, T. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Chen, W. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Material Science Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gong, X. L., E-mail: gongxl@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We present a dynamic strain field mapping method based on synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation (XDIC). Synchrotron X-ray sources are advantageous for imaging with exceptional spatial and temporal resolutions, and X-ray speckles can be produced either from surface roughness or internal inhomogeneities. Combining speckled X-ray imaging with DIC allows one to map strain fields with high resolutions. Based on experiments on void growth in Al and deformation of a granular material during Kolsky bar/gas gun loading at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID, we demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic XDIC. XDIC is particularly useful for dynamic, in-volume, measurements on opaque materials under high strain-rate, large, deformation.

  1. X-ray Absorption Imaging of High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Using Monochromatic Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, John J.; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Hechtfischer, Ulrich; Adler, Helmar G.

    2002-10-01

    We will report results from the imaging of Hg vapor in high-intensity discharge lamps using synchrotron radiation and digital detectors. These measurements extend previous work on x-ray absorption imaging in arc lamps using an x-ray tube and a passive phosphor image plate detector^i. The large x-ray flux obtained from the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory) combined with the electronic gating capabilities of an intensified charge-coupled device detector have allowed us to obtain time-resolved Hg distributions with high spatial resolution. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation improves the accuracy over what can be obtained with quasi-continuum radiation from an x-ray tube source. ^iJ. J. Curry, M. Sakai, and J. E. Lawler, Journal of Applied Physics 84, 3066 (1998).

  2. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigmentparticles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu Y. S.; Chen B.; Zhang F.; Berenguer F.; Bean R.; Kewish C.; Vila-Comamala J.; Rodenburg J.; Robinson I.

    2011-10-19

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  3. An Imaging and Spectral Study of Ten X-Ray Filaments around the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, F J; Lou, Y -Q

    2007-01-01

    We report the detection of 10 new X-ray filaments using the data from the {\\sl Chandra} X-ray satellite for the inner $6^{\\prime}$ ($\\sim 15$ parsec) around the Galactic center (GC). All these X-ray filaments are characterized by non-thermal energy spectra, and most of them have point-like features at their heads that point inward. Fitted with the simple absorbed power-law model, the measured X-ray flux from an individual filament in the 2-10 keV band is $\\sim 2.8\\times10^{-14}$ to $10^{-13}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and the absorption-corrected X-ray luminosity is $\\sim 10^{32}-10^{33}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ at a presumed distance of 8 kpc to the GC. We speculate the origin(s) of these filaments by morphologies and by comparing their X-ray images with the corresponding radio and infrared images. On the basis of combined information available, we suspect that these X-ray filaments might be pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) associated with pulsars of age $10^3 \\sim 3\\times 10^5$ yr. The fact that most of the filament tails po...

  4. Spatial harmonic imaging of X-ray scattering--initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Han; Bennett, Eric E; Hegedus, Monica M; Carroll, Stefanie C

    2008-08-01

    Coherent X-ray scattering is related to the electron density distribution by a Fourier transform, and therefore a window into the microscopic structures of biological samples. Current techniques of scattering rely on small-angle measurements from highly collimated X-ray beams produced from synchrotron light sources. Imaging of the distribution of scattering provides a new contrast mechanism which is different from absorption radiography, but is a lengthy process of raster or line scans of the beam over the object. Here, we describe an imaging technique in the spatial frequency domain capable of acquiring both the scattering and absorption distributions in a single exposure. We present first results obtained with conventional X-ray equipment. This method interposes a grid between the X-ray source and the imaged object, so that the grid-modulated image contains a primary image and a grid harmonic image. The ratio between the harmonic and primary images is shown to be a pure scattering image. It is the auto-correlation of the electron density distribution at a specific distance. We tested a number of samples at 60-200 nm autocorrelation distance, and found the scattering images to be distinct from the absorption images and reveal new features. This technique is simple to implement, and should help broaden the imaging applications of X-ray scattering.

  5. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction as a tool for the rapid, nondestructive detection of low calcite quantities in aragonitic corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smodej, Jörg; Reuning, Lars; Wollenberg, Uwe; Zinke, Jens; Pfeiffer, Miriam; Kukla, Peter A.

    2015-10-01

    Paleoclimate reconstructions based on reef corals require precise detection of diagenetic alteration. Secondary calcite can significantly affect paleotemperature reconstructions at very low amounts of ˜1%. X-ray powder diffraction is routinely used to detect diagenetic calcite in aragonitic corals. This procedure has its limitations as single powder samples might not represent the entire coral heterogeneity. A conventional and a 2-D X-ray diffractometer were calibrated with gravimetric powder standards of high and low magnesium calcite (0.3% to 25% calcite). Calcite contents convenient 1-D-XRD methods is the nondestructive and rapid detection of calcite with relatively high spatial resolution directly on coral slabs. The calcite detection performance of the 2-D-XRD setup was tested on thin sections from fossil Porites sp. samples that, based on powder XRD measurements, showed sampling. In this way, areas affected by diagenetic calcite can be avoided and alternative sampling tracks can be defined. Alternatively, individual sampling positions that show dubious proxy results can later be checked for the presence of calcite. The presented calibration and quantification method can be transferred to any 2-D X-ray diffractometer.

  6. Radiation exposure and image quality in x-Ray diagnostic radiology physical principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aichinger, Horst; Joite-Barfuß, Sigrid; Säbel, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The largest contribution to radiation exposure to the population as a whole arises from diagnostic X-rays. Protecting the patient from radiation is a major aim of modern health policy, and an understanding of the relationship between radiation dose and image quality is of pivotal importance in optimising medical diagnostic radiology. In this volume the data provided for exploring these concerns are partly based on X-ray spectra, measured on diagnostic X-ray tube assemblies, and are supplemented by the results of measurements on phantoms and simulation calculations.

  7. New BaBrCl: Eu~(2+) phosphors for X-ray image recording

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG YongSheng; MENG XianGuo; HE DaWei

    2009-01-01

    Photostimulated luminescence (PSL) is observed in BaBrCh Eu~(2+) after X-ray irradiation at room tem-perature. It is suggested by PSL stimulation spectrum and difference absorption spectrum (DAS) that F centers are formed upon X-ray irradiation and both spectra show two bands which are centered at about 550 nm and 675 nm respectively. This enables the use of semiconductor light-emitting diodes (LED) instead of gas lasers for photostimulation. The PSL intensity increases linearly with X-ray irra-diation dose increasing, and the conversion efficiency is 29% that for the standard commercial storage phosphor BaFBr:Eu from Fuji imaging plate.

  8. Subsurface imaging of two-dimensional materials at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinelli, Franco; Pingue, Pasqualantonio; Kay, Nicholas D.; Kolosov, Oleg V.

    2017-02-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) represents a powerful tool that, in the past 30 years, has allowed for the investigation of material surfaces in unprecedented ways at the nanoscale level. However, SPM has shown very little capability for depth penetration, which several nanotechnology applications require. Subsurface imaging has been achieved only in a few cases, when subsurface features influence the physical properties of the surface, such as the electronic states or the heat transfer. Ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM), an adaption of the contact mode atomic force microscopy, can dynamically measure the stiffness of the elastic contact between the probing tip and the sample surface. In particular, UFM has proven highly sensitive to the near-surface elastic field in non-homogeneous samples. In this paper, we present an investigation of two-dimensional (2D) materials, namely flakes of graphite and molybdenum disulphide placed on structured polymeric substrates. We show that UFM can non-destructively distinguish suspended and supported areas and localise defects, such as buckling or delamination of adjacent monolayers, generated by residual stress. Specifically, UFM can probe small variations in the local indentation induced by the mechanical interaction between the tip and the sample. Therefore, any change in the elastic modulus within the volume perturbed by the applied load or the flexural bending of the suspended areas can be detected and imaged. These investigation capabilities are very promising in order to study the buried interfaces of nanostructured 2D materials such as in graphene-based devices.

  9. Mathematical modeling of the neuron morphology using two dimensional images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajković, Katarina; Marić, Dušica L; Milošević, Nebojša T; Jeremic, Sanja; Arsenijević, Valentina Arsić; Rajković, Nemanja

    2016-02-01

    In this study mathematical analyses such as the analysis of area and length, fractal analysis and modified Sholl analysis were applied on two dimensional (2D) images of neurons from adult human dentate nucleus (DN). Using mathematical analyses main morphological properties were obtained including the size of neuron and soma, the length of all dendrites, the density of dendritic arborization, the position of the maximum density and the irregularity of dendrites. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for modeling the size of neurons and the length of all dendrites. However, the RSM model based on the second-order polynomial equation was only possible to apply to correlate changes in the size of the neuron with other properties of its morphology. Modeling data provided evidence that the size of DN neurons statistically depended on the size of the soma, the density of dendritic arborization and the irregularity of dendrites. The low value of mean relative percent deviation (MRPD) between the experimental data and the predicted neuron size obtained by RSM model showed that model was suitable for modeling the size of DN neurons. Therefore, RSM can be generally used for modeling neuron size from 2D images.

  10. Applications of the Generalized X-ray Diffraction Enhanced Imaging in the Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimenko, Anton; Hashimoto, Eiko; Ando, Masami; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    The X-ray Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) is the analyzer-based X-ray imaging technique which allows extraction of the "pure refraction" and "apparent absorption" contrasts from two images taken on the opposite sides of the rocking curve of the analyzing crystal. The refraction contrast obtained by this method shows many advantages over conventional absorption contrast. It was successfully applied in medicine, technique and other fields of science. However, information provided by the method is rather qualitative than quantitative. This happens because either side of the rocking curve of the analyzer is approximated as a straight line what limits the ranges of applicability and introduces additional error. One can easily overcome this problem considering the rocking curve as is instead of it's Taylor's expansion. This report is dedicated to the application of this idea in medical imaging and especially computed tomography based on the refraction contrast. The results obtained via both methods are presented and compared.

  11. Manufacturing and testing of X-ray imaging components with high precision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jia-sheng; WU Xü

    2005-01-01

    In the latest 20 years, X-ray imaging technology has developed rapidly in order to meet the needs of X-ray photo-etching,spatial exploration technology, high-energy physics, procedure diagnosis of ICF,etc. Since refractive indices of materials in the X-ray region are lower than 1, and X-ray is strongly absorbed by materials, the characteristics of X-ray increase greatly difficulty to obtain X-ray image. Conventional imaging methods are hardly suitable to X-ray range. In general, grazing reflective imaging and coding aperture imaging methods have been adopted more and more.We have designed a non-coaxial grazing reflective X-ray microscope which is composed of four spherical mirrors, in order to satisfy the requirement of the diagnosis of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The four mirrors have the same radius of curvature. The radius of each mirror is 29 000 mm and the aperture is 30 mm×15 mm. Allowable tolerance of the radius is ≤0.2% and one of surface roughness (rms) is ≤0.6 nm. Evidently it is very difficult to fabricate and test such mirrors. In order to obtain eligible mirrors, we choose 18 mirror roughcasts and array them on a round disk according to format. The combined manufacturing method can ensure high accordant quality. The fabricated mirrors are tested by both templet and double round aperture methods. Radius errors of the mirrors is about 53 mm. The surface roughness (rms) of the mirrors is inspected by the relative interferometric equipment (WYKO) and atomic force microscope. Before and after coating the measured surface roughness is averagely 0.52 nm and 0.4 nm, respectively.

  12. Preliminary results of absolute wavelength calibration of imaging X-ray crystal spectrometer on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Xiayun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wang, Fudi [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Jun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Lyu, Bo, E-mail: blu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Xu, Liqing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Shi, Yuejiang [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Minyou [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wan, Baonian [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The absolute wavelength calibration method for X-ray crystal spectrometer using X-ray fluorescence of the appropriate materials was first tested on EAST, and the preliminary experimental results were obtained. • The experimental results were thoroughly discussed and suggestion for further improvements of the experimental arrangement was proposed. • Rotation calibration of X-ray crystal spectrometer on EAST using MHD frequency was presented when the absolute wavelength calibration method is unavailable currently. - Abstract: Imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers (XCS) are currently operating on several major tokamaks to provide profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity. In order to acquire absolute rotation velocity, several indirect methods were pursued previously, however the direct and effective method is to use known X-ray lines for wavelength calibration. One way to produce standard spectral lines is X-ray fluorescence, which could be excited by X-rays from tokamak plasmas. As part of the upgrade of XCS system on EAST, wavelength calibration was studied using cadmium's L-shell lines, namely Lα{sub 1} line (3.9564 Å) and Lα{sub 2} line (3.9650 Å) as the reference wavelength. The Geant 4 code was used to optimize foil thickness to achieve a reasonable X-ray fluorescence intensity. The Cd foil was placed between the beryllium window and crystal and could be retracted to provide in situ wavelength calibration. The detailed arrangement and preliminary wavelength calibration results of imaging X-ray crystal spectrometer on EAST are presented, plus the calibration using MHD frequency.

  13. Automatic Defect Detection in X-Ray Images Using Image Data Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yuan; DU Dong; CAI Guorui; WANG Li; ZHANG Hua

    2006-01-01

    Automatic defect detection in X-ray images is currently a focus of much research at home and abroad. The technology requires computerized image processing, image analysis, and pattern recognition. This paper describes an image processing method for automatic defect detection using image data fusion which synthesizes several methods including edge extraction, wave profile analyses, segmentation with dynamic threshold, and weld district extraction. Test results show that defects that induce an abrupt change over a predefined extent of the image intensity can be segmented regardless of the number, location, shape, or size. Thus, the method is more robust and practical than the current methods using only one method.

  14. Approach of Image Stream Apply to X-ray Scan Imaging Equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Wei

    2013-01-01

    A thin beam of X-rays is scanned over the surface of the mass being examined as the material moved on the belt.Jumped spots arranged make up a scan line,and lines constituting the surface.The scan lines of data obtained sequentially,which is re-arranged form an image pixel data in the memory,constituting a digital image displayed on a display.

  15. Imaging performance and tests of soft x-ray telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiller, E.; McCorkle, R.; Wilczynski, J. (International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (USA). Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Golub, L.; Nystrom, G. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA)); Takacz, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Welch, C. (Lockheed Missile and Space Co., Las Cruces, NM (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Photos obtained during 5 min. of observation time from the flight of our 10 in. normal incidence soft x-ray ({lambda} = 63.5{Angstrom}) telescope on September 11, 1989 are analyzed and the data are compared to the results expected from tests of the mirror surfaces. These tests cover a range of spatial periods from 25 cm to 1{Angstrom}. The photos demonstrate a reduction in the scattering of the multilayer mirror compared to a single surface for scattering angles above 1 arcmin, corresponding to surface irregularities with spatial periods below 10 {mu}m. Our results are used to predict the possible performance of future flights. Sounding rocket observations might be able to reach a resolution around 0.1 arcsec. Higher resolutions will require flights of longer durations and improvements in mirror testing for the largest spatial periods. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Advances in data reduction of high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction data from two-dimensional detectors: a case study of schafarzikite (FeSb{sub 2}O{sub 4})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinrichsen, B [Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Dinnebier, R E [Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Rajiv, P [Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Hanfland, M [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Grzechnik, A [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Technologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Jansen, M [Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-06-28

    Methods have been developed to facilitate the data analysis of multiple two-dimensional powder diffraction images. These include, among others, automatic detection and calibration of Debye-Scherrer ellipses using pattern recognition techniques, and signal filtering employing established statistical procedures like fractile statistics. All algorithms are implemented in the freely available program package Powder3D developed for the evaluation and graphical presentation of large powder diffraction data sets. As a case study, we report the pressure dependence of the crystal structure of iron antimony oxide FeSb{sub 2}O{sub 4} (p{<=}21 GPa, T = 298 K) using high-resolution angle dispersive x-ray powder diffraction. FeSb{sub 2}O{sub 4} shows two phase transitions in the measured pressure range. The crystal structures of all modifications consist of frameworks of Fe{sup 2+}O{sub 6} octahedra and irregular Sb{sup 3+}O{sub 4} polyhedra. At ambient conditions, FeSb{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystallizes in space group P4{sub 2}/mbc (phase I). Between p = 3.2 GPa and 4.1 GPa it exhibits a displacive second order phase transition to a structure of space group P 2{sub 1}/c (phase II, a = 5.7792(4) A, b = 8.3134(9) A, c = 8.4545(11) A, {beta} = 91.879(10){sup 0}, at p = 4.2 GPa). A second phase transition occurs between p = 6.4 GPa and 7.4 GPa to a structure of space group P4{sub 2}/m (phase III, a = 7.8498(4) A, c = 5.7452(5) A, at p = 10.5 GPa). A nonlinear compression behaviour over the entire pressure range is observed, which can be described by three Vinet equations in the ranges from p = 0.52 GPa to p 3.12 GPa, p = 4.2 GPa to p = 6.3 GPa and from p = 7.5 GPa to p = 19.8 GPa. The extrapolated bulk moduli of the high-pressure phases were determined to K{sub 0} = 49(2) GPa for phase I, K{sub 0} = 27(3) GPa for phase II and K{sub 0} = 45(2) GPa for phase III. The crystal structures of all phases are refined against x-ray powder data measured at several pressures between p = 0.52 GPa

  17. Advances in data reduction of high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction data from two-dimensional detectors: a case study of schafarzikite (FeSb(2)O(4)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, B; Dinnebier, R E; Rajiv, P; Hanfland, M; Grzechnik, A; Jansen, M

    2006-06-28

    Methods have been developed to facilitate the data analysis of multiple two-dimensional powder diffraction images. These include, among others, automatic detection and calibration of Debye-Scherrer ellipses using pattern recognition techniques, and signal filtering employing established statistical procedures like fractile statistics.All algorithms are implemented in the freely available program package Powder3D developed for the evaluation and graphical presentation of large powder diffraction data sets.As a case study, we report the pressure dependence of the crystal structure of iron antimony oxide FeSb(2)O(4) (p≤21 GPa, T = 298 K) using high-resolution angle dispersive x-ray powder diffraction. FeSb(2)O(4) shows two phase transitions in the measured pressure range. The crystal structures of all modifications consist of frameworks of Fe(2+)O(6) octahedra and irregular Sb(3+)O(4) polyhedra. At ambient conditions, FeSb(2)O(4) crystallizes in space group P4(2)/mbc (phase I). Between p = 3.2 GPa and 4.1 GPa it exhibits a displacive second order phase transition to a structure of space group P 2(1)/c (phase II, a = 5.7792(4) Å, b = 8.3134(9) Å, c = 8.4545(11) Å, β = 91.879(10)°, at p = 4.2 GPa). A second phase transition occurs between p = 6.4 GPa and 7.4 GPa to a structure of space group P4(2)/m (phase III, a = 7.8498(4) Å, c = 5.7452(5) Å, at p = 10.5 GPa). A nonlinear compression behaviour over the entire pressure range is observed, which can be described by three Vinet equations in the ranges from p = 0.52 GPa to p = 3.12 GPa, p = 4.2 GPa to p = 6.3 GPa and from p = 7.5 GPa to p = 19.8 GPa. The extrapolated bulk moduli of the high-pressure phases were determined to K(0) = 49(2) GPa for phase I, K(0) = 27(3) GPa for phase II and K(0) = 45(2) GPa for phase III. The crystal structures of all phases are refined against x-ray powder data measured at several pressures between p = 0.52 GPa, and 10.5 GPa.

  18. X-ray dark-field imaging and its application. Laue case analyzer

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, M

    2003-01-01

    A system on X-ray dark-field imaging under development and its application is reported. That comprises an asymmetric monochromator and a Laue case analyzer that has a specified thickness for a given X-ray photon energy or wavelength and a sample locating inbetween these. This system uses Si 4,4,0 diffraction for both X-ray optics element in a parallel arrangement. In order to achieve the dark-field imaging condition the Si Laue analyzer should be 1.075 mm in thickness for the X-ray energy of 35 keV. Since this system is very simple one can expect a variety of applications including material science, biology, palaeontology and clinical medicine where a large view area with size of 100 mm x 100 mm is needed. (author)

  19. X-ray imaging and spectroscopy using low cost COTS CMOS sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, David W., E-mail: d.w.lane@cranfield.ac.uk [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Whilst commercial X-ray sensor arrays are capable of both imaging and spectroscopy they are currently expensive and this can limit their widespread use. This study examines the use of very low cost CMOS sensors for X-ray imaging and spectroscopy based on the commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology used in cellular telephones, PC multimedia and children's toys. Some examples of imaging using a 'webcam' and a modified OmniVision OV7411 sensor are presented, as well as a simple energy dispersive X-ray detector based on an OmniVision OV7221 sensor. In each case X-ray sensitivity was enabled by replacing the sensor's front glass window with a 5 {mu}m thick aluminium foil, with X-rays detected as an increase in a pixel's dark current due to the generation of additional electron-hole pairs within its active region. The exposure control and data processing requirements for imaging and spectroscopy are discussed. The modified OV7221 sensor was found to have a linear X-ray energy calibration and a resolution of approximately 510 eV.

  20. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  1. Resolving hot spot microstructure using x-ray penumbral imaging (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, B., E-mail: bachmann2@llnl.gov; Field, J.; Masters, N.; Pardini, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Döppner, T.; Izumi, N.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nagel, S.; Patel, P.; Spears, B.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T.; Reed, C.; Alexander, N.; Forsman, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We have developed and fielded x-ray penumbral imaging on the National Ignition Facility in order to enable sub-10 μm resolution imaging of stagnated plasma cores (hot spots) of spherically shock compressed spheres and shell implosion targets. By utilizing circular tungsten and tantalum apertures with diameters ranging from 20 μm to 2 mm, in combination with image plate and gated x-ray detectors as well as imaging magnifications ranging from 4 to 64, we have demonstrated high-resolution imaging of hot spot plasmas at x-ray energies above 5 keV. Here we give an overview of the experimental design criteria involved and demonstrate the most relevant influences on the reconstruction of x-ray penumbral images, as well as mitigation strategies of image degrading effects like over-exposed pixels, artifacts, and photon limited source emission. We describe experimental results showing the advantages of x-ray penumbral imaging over conventional Fraunhofer and photon limited pinhole imaging and showcase how internal hot spot microstructures can be resolved.

  2. Resolving hot spot microstructure using x-ray penumbral imaging (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, B.; Hilsabeck, T.; Field, J.; Masters, N.; Reed, C.; Pardini, T.; Rygg, J. R.; Alexander, N.; Benedetti, L. R.; Döppner, T.; Forsman, A.; Izumi, N.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Nagel, S.; Patel, P.; Spears, B.; Landen, O. L.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed and fielded x-ray penumbral imaging on the National Ignition Facility in order to enable sub-10 μm resolution imaging of stagnated plasma cores (hot spots) of spherically shock compressed spheres and shell implosion targets. By utilizing circular tungsten and tantalum apertures with diameters ranging from 20 μm to 2 mm, in combination with image plate and gated x-ray detectors as well as imaging magnifications ranging from 4 to 64, we have demonstrated high-resolution imaging of hot spot plasmas at x-ray energies above 5 keV. Here we give an overview of the experimental design criteria involved and demonstrate the most relevant influences on the reconstruction of x-ray penumbral images, as well as mitigation strategies of image degrading effects like over-exposed pixels, artifacts, and photon limited source emission. We describe experimental results showing the advantages of x-ray penumbral imaging over conventional Fraunhofer and photon limited pinhole imaging and showcase how internal hot spot microstructures can be resolved.

  3. Study of Scintillator thickness optimization of lens-coupled X-ray imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Chen, R.; Xiao, T.

    2016-03-01

    Lens-coupled X-ray in-direct imaging detectors are very popular for high-resolution X-ray imaging at the third generation synchrotron radiation facilities. This imaging system consists of a scintilator producing a visible-light image of X-ray beam, a microscope objective, a mirror reflecting at 90° and a CCD camera. When the thickness of the scintillator is matched with the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, the image quality of experimental results will be improved obviously. This paper used an imaging system at BL13W beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to study the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective with a real sample. By use of the matching relation between the scintillator thickness and the NA of the microscope objective, the optimal imaging results have been obtained.

  4. Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, A.; Shirani, B.; Jabbari, I.; Mokhtari, J.

    2014-08-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm.

  5. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of nanoparticles by velocity map imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostko, O.; Xu, B.; Jacobs, M. I.; Ahmed, M.

    2017-07-01

    Velocity map imaging (VMI), a technique traditionally used to study chemical dynamics in the gas phase, is applied here to study X-ray photoemission from aerosol nanoparticles. Soft X-rays from the Advanced Light Source synchrotron, probe a beam of nanoparticles, and the resulting photoelectrons are velocity mapped to obtain their kinetic energy distributions. A new design of the VMI spectrometer is described. The spectrometer is benchmarked by measuring vacuum ultraviolet photoemission from gas phase xenon and squalene nanoparticles followed by measurements using soft X-rays. It is demonstrated that the photoelectron distribution from X-ray irradiated squalene nanoparticles is dominated by secondary electrons. By scanning the photon energies and measuring the intensities of these secondary electrons, a near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum is obtained. The NEXAFS technique is used to obtain spectra of aqueous nanoparticles at the oxygen K edge. By varying the position of the aqueous nanoparticle beam relative to the incident X-ray beam, evidence is presented such that the VMI technique allows for NEXAFS spectroscopy of water in different physical states. Finally, we discuss the possibility of applying VMI methods to probe liquids and solids via X-ray spectroscopy.

  6. X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging of gold nanoparticle-loaded objects using 110 kVp x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Jones, Bernard L; K Siddiqi, Arsalan; Liu, Fang; Manohar, Nivedh; Cho, Sang Hyun [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)], E-mail: scho@gatech.edu

    2010-02-07

    A conventional x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) technique requires monochromatic synchrotron x-rays to simultaneously determine the spatial distribution and concentration of various elements such as metals in a sample. However, the synchrotron-based XFCT technique appears to be unsuitable for in vivo imaging under a typical laboratory setting. In this study we demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, the possibility of performing XFCT imaging of a small animal-sized object containing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) at relatively low concentrations using polychromatic diagnostic energy range x-rays. Specifically, we created a phantom made of polymethyl methacrylate plastic containing two cylindrical columns filled with saline solution at 1 and 2 wt% GNPs, respectively, mimicking tumors/organs within a small animal. XFCT scanning of the phantom was then performed using microfocus 110 kVp x-ray beam and cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector under a pencil beam geometry after proper filtering of the x-ray beam and collimation of the detector. The reconstructed images clearly identified the locations of the two GNP-filled columns with different contrast levels directly proportional to gold concentration levels. On the other hand, the current pencil-beam implementation of XFCT is not yet practical for routine in vivo imaging tasks with GNPs, especially in terms of scanning time. Nevertheless, with the use of multiple detectors and a limited number of projections, it may still be used to image some objects smaller than the current phantom size. The current investigation suggests several modification strategies of the current XFCT setup, such as the adoption of the quasi-monochromatic cone/fan x-ray beam and XFCT-specific spatial filters or pinhole detector collimators, in order to establish the ultimate feasibility of a bench-top XFCT system for GNP-based preclinical molecular imaging applications.

  7. X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging of gold nanoparticle-loaded objects using 110 kVp x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Jones, Bernard L; Siddiqi, Arsalan K; Liu, Fang; Manohar, Nivedh; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2010-02-07

    A conventional x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) technique requires monochromatic synchrotron x-rays to simultaneously determine the spatial distribution and concentration of various elements such as metals in a sample. However, the synchrotron-based XFCT technique appears to be unsuitable for in vivo imaging under a typical laboratory setting. In this study we demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, the possibility of performing XFCT imaging of a small animal-sized object containing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) at relatively low concentrations using polychromatic diagnostic energy range x-rays. Specifically, we created a phantom made of polymethyl methacrylate plastic containing two cylindrical columns filled with saline solution at 1 and 2 wt% GNPs, respectively, mimicking tumors/organs within a small animal. XFCT scanning of the phantom was then performed using microfocus 110 kVp x-ray beam and cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector under a pencil beam geometry after proper filtering of the x-ray beam and collimation of the detector. The reconstructed images clearly identified the locations of the two GNP-filled columns with different contrast levels directly proportional to gold concentration levels. On the other hand, the current pencil-beam implementation of XFCT is not yet practical for routine in vivo imaging tasks with GNPs, especially in terms of scanning time. Nevertheless, with the use of multiple detectors and a limited number of projections, it may still be used to image some objects smaller than the current phantom size. The current investigation suggests several modification strategies of the current XFCT setup, such as the adoption of the quasi-monochromatic cone/fan x-ray beam and XFCT-specific spatial filters or pinhole detector collimators, in order to establish the ultimate feasibility of a bench-top XFCT system for GNP-based preclinical molecular imaging applications.

  8. 'Taking X-ray phase contrast imaging into mainstream applications' and its satellite workshop 'Real and reciprocal space X-ray imaging'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, Alessandro; Robinson, Ian

    2014-03-06

    A double event, supported as part of the Royal Society scientific meetings, was organized in February 2013 in London and at Chicheley Hall in Buckinghamshire by Dr A. Olivo and Prof. I. Robinson. The theme that joined the two events was the use of X-ray phase in novel imaging approaches, as opposed to conventional methods based on X-ray attenuation. The event in London, led by Olivo, addressed the main roadblocks that X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) is encountering in terms of commercial translation, for clinical and industrial applications. The main driver behind this is the development of new approaches that enable XPCI, traditionally a synchrotron method, to be performed with conventional laboratory sources, thus opening the way to its deployment in clinics and industrial settings. The satellite meeting at Chicheley Hall, led by Robinson, focused on the new scientific developments that have recently emerged at specialized facilities such as third-generation synchrotrons and free-electron lasers, which enable the direct measurement of the phase shift induced by a sample from intensity measurements, typically in the far field. The two events were therefore highly complementary, in terms of covering both the more applied/translational and the blue-sky aspects of the use of phase in X-ray research. 

  9. Integration of flat panel X-ray detector for high resolution diagnostic medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Woo; Yun, Min-Seok; Kim, Yoon-Suk; Oh, Kyung-Min; Shin, Jung-Wook; Nam, Kyung-Tae; Nam, Sang-Hee

    2011-05-01

    In these days, flat panel X-ray image detectors have shown their potential for replacing traditional screen-film systems. To detect the X-ray photon energy, there are two main methods known as a direct method and an indirect method. The X-rays are converted immediately into electrical signal with the direct method. The indirect method has two conversion steps: the scintillator absorbs the X-rays and converts them to visible light. And then the visible light is converted to electrical signal (e.g. by photodiodes). In this work, the flat panel digital X-ray image detector based on direct method with a high atomic number material was designed and evaluated. The high atomic number material for X-ray conversion is deposited by a rubbing method with about 300 μm. The rubbing method is similar to the screen printing method. It consists of two elements: the screen and the squeegee. The method uses a proper stiff bar stretched tightly over a frame made of wood or metal. Proper tension is essential for proper laminated structure. The detector prototype has 139 μm pixel pitch, total 1280×1536 pixels and 86% fill factor. Twelve readout ICs are installed on digital X-ray detector and simultaneously operated to reach short readout time. The electronics integrated: the preamplifier to amplify generated signal, the Analog to Digital converter and the source of bias voltage (1 V/μm). The system board and interface use an NI-camera program. Finally, we achieved images from this flat panel X-ray image detector.

  10. The EOS 2D/3D X-ray imaging system

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Rita; McKenna, Claire; Wade, Rosalind Fay; Yang, Huiqin; Woolacott, Nerys; Sculpher, Mark

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the EOS® 2D/3D X-ray imaging system compared with standard X-ray for the diagnosis and monitoring of orthopaedic conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A decision analytic model was developed to quantify the long-term costs and health outcomes, expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) from the UK health service perspective. Input parameters were obtained from medical literature, previously developed cancer models and expert advice. Thresho...

  11. Nondestructive imaging of hidden figures on license plates by X-ray radiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Oc-Yeub; Kim, Sang-Hyeon; Lee, Joong; Park, Jong-Taek; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Hak-Soo; Huh, Il-Kwon; Kang, Hyung-Tae

    2009-07-01

    In this case, we investigated the modified license plates. The evidences had new embossing pressed serial numbers after erasing the original numbers on the license plates by hammering. The X-ray radiograph could visualize the hidden figures; those were virtually unseen by naked eyes or undetectable by ordinary photography. To reveal the erased figures, we performed image processing with computer software after X-ray radiographs. It proved to be an efficient nondestructive way to visualize the hidden original figures on metals.

  12. Expanded image database of pistachio x-ray images and classification by conventional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keagy, Pamela M.; Schatzki, Thomas F.; Le, Lan Chau; Casasent, David P.; Weber, David

    1996-12-01

    In order to develop sorting methods for insect damaged pistachio nuts, a large data set of pistachio x-ray images (6,759 nuts) was created. Both film and linescan sensor images were acquired, nuts dissected and internal conditions coded using the U.S. Grade standards and definitions for pistachios. A subset of 1199 good and 686 insect damaged nuts was used to calculate and test discriminant functions. Statistical parameters of image histograms were evaluated for inclusion by forward stepwise discrimination. Using three variables in the discriminant function, 89% of test set nuts were correctly identified. Comparable data for 6 human subjects ranged from 67 to 92%. If the loss of good nuts is held to 1% by requiring a high probability to discard a nut as insect damaged, approximately half of the insect damage present in clean pistachio nuts may be detected and removed by x-ray inspection.

  13. Cephalometric landmark detection in dental x-ray images using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hansang; Park, Minseok; Kim, Junmo

    2017-03-01

    In dental X-ray images, an accurate detection of cephalometric landmarks plays an important role in clinical diagnosis, treatment and surgical decisions for dental problems. In this work, we propose an end-to-end deep learning system for cephalometric landmark detection in dental X-ray images, using convolutional neural networks (CNN). For detecting 19 cephalometric landmarks in dental X-ray images, we develop a detection system using CNN-based coordinate-wise regression systems. By viewing x- and y-coordinates of all landmarks as 38 independent variables, multiple CNN-based regression systems are constructed to predict the coordinate variables from input X-ray images. First, each coordinate variable is normalized by the length of either height or width of an image. For each normalized coordinate variable, a CNN-based regression system is trained on training images and corresponding coordinate variable, which is a variable to be regressed. We train 38 regression systems with the same CNN structure on coordinate variables, respectively. Finally, we compute 38 coordinate variables with these trained systems from unseen images and extract 19 landmarks by pairing the regressed coordinates. In experiments, the public database from the Grand Challenges in Dental X-ray Image Analysis in ISBI 2015 was used and the proposed system showed promising performance by successfully locating the cephalometric landmarks within considerable margins from the ground truths.

  14. Energy-resolved X-ray detectors: the future of diagnostic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pacella D

    2015-01-01

    Danilo Pacella ENEA-Frascati, Rome, Italy Abstract: This paper presents recent progress in the field of X-ray detectors, which could play a role in medical imaging in the near future, with special attention to the new generation of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (C-MOS) imagers, working in photon counting, that opened the way to the energy-resolved X-ray imaging. A brief description of the detectors used so far in medical imaging (photographic films, imaging plates, flat panel detec...

  15. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Piston, K; Felker, B; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2014-11-01

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2-17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10(17). We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  16. X-ray image calibration and its application to clinical orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Steffen; Thelen, Benedikt; Ballestra, Steven; Nolte, Lutz-P; Büchler, Philippe; Zheng, Guoyan

    2014-07-01

    X-ray imaging is one of the most commonly used medical imaging modality. Albeit X-ray radiographs provide important clinical information for diagnosis, planning and post-operative follow-up, the challenging interpretation due to its 2D projection characteristics and the unknown magnification factor constrain the full benefit of X-ray imaging. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we proposed here an easy-to-use X-ray calibration object and developed an optimization method to robustly find correspondences between the 3D fiducials of the calibration object and their 2D projections. In this work we present all the details of this outlined concept. Moreover, we demonstrate the potential of using such a method to precisely extract information from calibrated X-ray radiographs for two different orthopedic applications: post-operative acetabular cup implant orientation measurement and 3D vertebral body displacement measurement during preoperative traction tests. In the first application, we have achieved a clinically acceptable accuracy of below 1° for both anteversion and inclination angles, where in the second application an average displacement of 8.06±3.71 mm was measured. The results of both applications indicate the importance of using X-ray calibration in the clinical routine. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A broadband x-ray imaging spectroscopy with high-angular resolution: the FORCE mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Okajima, Takashi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Matsumoto, Hironori; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Zhang, William W.

    2016-07-01

    We are proposing FORCE (Focusing On Relativistic universe and Cosmic Evolution) as a future Japan-lead Xray observatory to be launched in the mid 2020s. Hitomi (ASTRO-H) possesses a suite of sensitive instruments enabling the highest energy-resolution spectroscopy in soft X-ray band, a broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy in soft and hard X-ray bands, and further high energy coverage up to soft gamma-ray band. FORCE is the direct successor to the broadband X-ray imaging spectroscopy aspect of Hitomi (ASTRO-H) with significantly higher angular resolution. The current design of FORCE defines energy band pass of 1-80 keV with angular resolution of black holes" in various mass-scales: "buried supermassive black holes (SMBHs)" (> 104 M⊙) residing in the center of galaxies in a cosmological distance, "intermediate-mass black holes" (102-104 M⊙) acting as the possible seeds from which SMBHs grow, and "orphan stellar-mass black holes" (mirror and wide-band X-ray detector. The focal length is currently planned to be 10 m. The silicon mirror with multi-layer coating is our primary choice to achieve lightweight, good angular optics. The detector is a descendant of hard X-ray imager onboard Hitomi (ASTRO-H) replacing its silicon strip detector with SOI-CMOS silicon pixel detector, allowing an extension of the low energy threshold down to 1 keV or even less.

  18. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  19. Simulation of multispectral x-ray imaging scenarios by Wien shift optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydegaard, M.; Svanberg, S.

    2010-02-01

    The acquisition of multispectral x-ray images and the treatment of such data are essential for understanding many devices that we encounter in everyday life. Examples include computerized tomography in hospitals and scanners at airports. X-ray devices remain impractical for undergraduate laboratories because of their considerable cost and the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. One way to acquire spectral information and thus constituent-discriminating data in x-ray imaging is to alter the spectral contents of the illuminating x-ray source, which can be achieved by changing the x-ray tube voltage and thus energetically displacing the bremsstrahlung. A similar effect occurs in the emission from a black-body radiator in the optical and infrared regions when altering the temperature. We illustrate how to simulate the x-ray scenario with a webcam and an ordinary light bulb. Insight into how chemical and physical information regarding objects can be obtained in multispectral imaging supported by multivariate analysis is gained.

  20. In-laboratory diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging for articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehleman, Carol; Fogarty, Daniel; Reinhart, Benjamin; Tzvetkov, Tochko; Li, Jun; Nesch, Ivan

    2010-07-01

    The loss of articular cartilage characteristic of osteoarthritis can only be diagnosed by joint space narrowing when conventional radiography is used. This is due to the lack of X-ray contrast of soft tissues. Whereas conventional radiography harnesses the X-ray attenuation properties of tissues, Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI), a novel radiographic technique, allows the visualization of soft tissues simultaneous with calcified tissues by virtue of its ability to not only harness X-ray attenuation but also the X-ray refraction from tissue boundaries. Previously, DEI was dependent upon synchrotron X-rays, but more recently, the development of nonsynchrotron DEI units has been explored. These developments serve to elaborate the full potential of radiography. Here, we tested the potential of an in-laboratory DEI system, called Diffraction-Enhanced X-ray Imaging (DEXI), to render images of articular cartilage displaying varying degrees of degradation, ex vivo. DEXI allowed visualization of even early stages of cartilage degeneration such as surface fibrillation. This may be of eventual clinical significance for the diagnosis of early stages of degeneration, or at the very least, to visualize soft tissue degeneration simultaneous with bone changes.

  1. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: X-ray tube imaging performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, John A.; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A. [Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation.

  2. Quasi-stereoscopic imaging of the solar X-ray corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, David

    1994-01-01

    The first published three-dimensional images of the solar X-ray corona obtained by means of solar rotational parallax, are presented in stereographic form. Image pairs approximately 12 hours apart during times of stable coronal conditions were selected from the digitized images obtained with the Skylab X-ray Spectrographic Telescope. The image resolution limit is approximately 10 arc sec. Many coronal structures not visible in the separate images are clearly observed when the image pairs are viewed stereoscopically. This method gives a preview of the potential resources for solar research and forecasting of solar-geomagnetic interactions that could be provided by stereoscopic observations of the Sun using a small group of spacecraft. The method is also applicable to other X-ray, ultraviolet, or other wavebands in which the corona has extended, transparent structure.

  3. Fluid Dynamics (Science Press, Beijing, 2004).Design principles of a novel X-ray imaging system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyu Yu; Benkang Chang; Shiyun Wang; Qingbao Wang

    2006-01-01

    @@ A novel X-ray imaging system (NXRIS) and the design principles are given in this paper. Different from the existing digital X-ray imaging systems, the X-ray image intensifying system of NXRIS is a non-vacuum system composed of the intensifying screen and the brightness intensifier, and the brightness intensifier is named low light level image intensifier applied in military affairs. This structure makes NXRIS of big visual field (15 inch, even to larger) and low cost. When designing NXRIS, the spectral compatibility of the component devices and the relation between the visual field and the spatial resolution of the component devices are analyzed. The images produced by NXRIS are given and the image performance is good enough to be applied to security checking, non-destructive testing, and industry detection.

  4. Imaging nanoscale lattice variations by machine learning of x-ray diffraction microscopy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanait, Nouamane; Zhang, Zhan; Schlepütz, Christian M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel methodology based on machine learning to extract lattice variations in crystalline materials, at the nanoscale, from an x-ray Bragg diffraction-based imaging technique. By employing a full-field microscopy setup, we capture real space images of materials, with imaging contrast determined solely by the x-ray diffracted signal. The data sets that emanate from this imaging technique are a hybrid of real space information (image spatial support) and reciprocal lattice space information (image contrast), and are intrinsically multidimensional (5D). By a judicious application of established unsupervised machine learning techniques and multivariate analysis to this multidimensional data cube, we show how to extract features that can be ascribed physical interpretations in terms of common structural distortions, such as lattice tilts and dislocation arrays. We demonstrate this ‘big data’ approach to x-ray diffraction microscopy by identifying structural defects present in an epitaxial ferroelectric thin-film of lead zirconate titanate.

  5. Comparing natural and artificial carious lesions in human crowns by means of conventional hard x-ray micro-tomography and two-dimensional x-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Lea Maria; White, Shane N.; Deyhle, Hans; Dziadowiec, Iwona; Schulz, Georg; Thalmann, Peter; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Dental caries, one of the most prevalent infectious bacterial diseases in the world, is caused by specific types of acid-producing bacteria. Caries is a disease continuum resulting from the earliest loss of ions from apatite crystals through gross cavitation. Enamel dissolution starts when the pH-value drops below 5.5. Neutralizing the pH-value in the oral cavity opposes the process of demineralization, and so caries lesions occur in a dynamic cyclic de-mineralizing/remineralizing environment. Unfortunately, biomimetic regeneration of cavitated enamel is not yet possible, although remineralization of small carious lesions occurs under optimal conditions. Therefore, the development of methods that can regenerate carious lesions, and subsequently recover and retain teeth, is highly desirable. For the present proceedings we analyzed one naturally occurring sub-surface and one artificially produced lesion. For the characterization of artificial and natural lesions micro computed tomography is the method of choice when looking to determine three-dimensional mineral distribution and to quantify the degree of mineralization. In this pilot study we elucidate that the de-mineralized enamel in natural and artificially induced lesions shows comparable X-ray attenuation behavior, thereby implying that the study protocol employed herein seems to be appropriate. Once we know that the lesions are comparable, a series of well-reproducible in vitro experiments on enamel regeneration could be performed. In order to quantify further lesion morphology, the anisotropy of the enamel's nanostructure can be characterized by using spatially resolved, small-angle X-ray scattering. We wanted to demonstrate that the artificially induced defect fittingly resembles the natural carious lesion.

  6. X-ray diffraction imaging of metal–oxide epitaxial tunnel junctions made by optical lithography: use of focused and unfocused X-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocuta, Cristian; Barbier, Antoine; Stanescu, Stefan; Matzen, Sylvia; Moussy, Jean-Baptiste; Ziegler, Eric

    2013-01-01

    X-ray diffraction techniques are used in imaging mode in order to characterize micrometre-sized objects. The samples used as models are metal–oxide tunnel junctions made by optical lithography, with lateral sizes ranging from 150 µm down to 10 µm and various shapes: discs, squares and rectangles. Two approaches are described and compared, both using diffraction contrast: full-field imaging (topography) and raster imaging (scanning probe) using a micrometre-sized focused X-ray beam. It is shown that the full-field image gives access to macroscopic distortions (e.g. sample bending), while the local distortions, at the micrometre scale (e.g. tilts of the crystalline planes in the vicinity of the junction edges), can be accurately characterized only using focused X-ray beams. These local defects are dependent on the junction shape and larger by one order of magnitude than the macroscopic curvature of the sample. PMID:23412494

  7. Micro-imaging of buried layers and interfaces in ultrathin films by X-ray reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinxing; Hirano, Keiichi; Sakurai, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    X-ray reflectivity is a promising technique for characterizing buried layers and interfaces in ultrathin films because of its ability to probe the electron density profile along the depth in a non-destructive manner. While routine X-ray reflectivity assumes the in-plane uniformity of the sample to be measured, it is also quite important to see buried inhomogeneous/patterned layers and interfaces. The present paper describes the addition of spatial resolution and imaging capability to an X-ray reflectivity technique to visualize surfaces and buried interfaces. To visualize quite wide viewing area size quickly, the image reconstruction scheme has been employed instead of the scanning of microbeam. Though the mathematics is quite close to X-ray computer tomography, the technique gives the image contrast caused by the difference in reflectivity at each in-plane point in the thin film sample. By choosing a grazing angle, the image gives inhomogeneity of X-ray reflectivity at the specific wavevector transfer. With a collimated monochromatic synchrotron X-ray beam of 0.05 mm (H) × 8 mm (V), the intensity profiles of X-ray reflection projections have been taken at many different in-plane rotation angles, from 0° to 180°. We have succeeded in visualizing buried layers and interfaces of the 8 mm dia area with the spatial resolution of better than 20 μm. Because of the brilliance of synchrotron radiation, the typical measuring time is shorter than 1 min. Three analytical cases have been discussed: (i) imaging of a buried layer and an interface covered by a protection layer, (ii) distinguishing different local parts of different thicknesses in an ultrathin film, and (iii) selective imaging of a specific metal in the thin film form.

  8. Impact of ultrafast electronic damage in single particle x-ray imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Lorenz, U; Weckert, E; Vartanyants, I A

    2012-01-01

    In single particle coherent x-ray diffraction imaging experiments, performed at x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), samples are exposed to intense x-ray pulses to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns. The high intensity induces electronic dynamics on the femtosecond time scale in the system, which can reduce the contrast of the obtained diffraction patterns and adds an isotropic background. We quantify the degradation of the diffraction pattern from ultrafast electronic damage by performing simulations on a biological sample exposed to x-ray pulses with different parameters. We find that the contrast is substantially reduced and the background is considerably strong only if almost all electrons are removed from their parent atoms. This happens at fluences of at least one order of magnitude larger than provided at currently available XFEL sources.

  9. Impact of ultrafast electronic damage in single-particle x-ray imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, U.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Weckert, E.; Vartanyants, I. A.

    2012-11-01

    In single-particle coherent x-ray diffraction imaging experiments, performed at x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), samples are exposed to intense x-ray pulses to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns. The high intensity induces electronic dynamics on the femtosecond time scale in the system, which can reduce the contrast of the obtained diffraction patterns and adds an isotropic background. We quantify the degradation of the diffraction pattern from ultrafast electronic damage by performing simulations on a biological sample exposed to x-ray pulses with different parameters. We find that the contrast is substantially reduced and the background is considerably strong only if almost all electrons are removed from their parent atoms. This happens at fluences of at least one order of magnitude larger than provided at currently available XFEL sources.

  10. Soft x-ray source for nanostructure imaging using femtosecond-laser-irradiated clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Y.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Daito, I.; Ma, J.; Chen, L. M.; Homma, T.; Kawase, K.; Kameshima, T.; Kawachi, T.; Daido, H.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Kato, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2008-03-01

    The intense soft x-ray light source using the supersonic expansion of the mixed gas of He and CO2, when irradiated by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulse, is observed to enhance the radiation of soft x-rays from the CO2 clusters. Using this soft x-ray emissions, nanostructure images of 100-nm-thick Mo foils in a wide field of view (mm2 scale) with high spatial resolution (800nm ) are obtained with high dynamic range LiF crystal detectors. The local inhomogeneities of soft x-ray absorption by the nanometer-thick foils is measured with an accuracy of less than ±3%.

  11. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  12. Results from laboratory tests of the two-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D; Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

    2014-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of two dimensional time-encoded imaging. A prototype two-dimensional time encoded imaging system was designed and constructed. Results from imaging measurements of single and multiple point sources as well as extended source distributions are presented. Time encoded imaging has proven to be a simple method for achieving high resolution two-dimensional imaging with potential to be used in future arms control and treaty verification applications.

  13. The Study on the Attenuation of X-ray and Imaging Quality by Contents in Stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Kyung Rae; Ji, Youn Sang; Kim, Chang Bok; Choi, Seong Kwan; Moon, Sang In [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dieter, Kevin [Dept. of Physical Therapy, Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    This study examined the change in the attenuation of X-rays with the ROI (Region of Interest) in DR (Digital Radiography) according to the stomach contents by manufacturing a tissue equivalent material phantom to simulate real stomach tissue based on the assumption that there is some attenuation of X-rays and a difference in imaging quality according to the stomach contents. The transit dosage by the attenuation of X-rays decreased with increasing protein thickness, which altered the average ROI values in the film and DR images. A comparison of the change in average ROI values of the film and DR image showed that the image in film caused larger density changes with varying thickness of protein than the image by DR. The results indicate that NPO (nothing by mouth) is more important in film system than in DR system.

  14. Poisson noise reduction from X-ray images by region classification and response median filtering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THAKUR KIRTI; KADAM JITENDRA; SAPKAL ASHOK

    2017-06-01

    Medical imaging is perturbed with inherent noise such as speckle noise in ultrasound, Poisson noise in X-ray and Rician noise in MRI imaging. This paper focuses on X-ray image denoising problem. X-ray image quality could be improved by increasing dose value; however, this may result in cell death or similar kinds of issues. Therefore, image processing techniques are developed to minimise noise instead of increasing dose value for patient safety. In this paper, usage of modified Harris corner point detector to predict noisy pixels and responsive median filtering in spatial domain is proposed. Experimentation proved that the proposed work performs better than simple median filter and moving average (MA) filter. The results are very close to non-local means Poisson noise filter which is one of the current state-of-the-art methods. Benefits of the proposed work are simple noise prediction mechanism, good visual quality and less execution time.

  15. Intact Imaging of Human Heart Structure Using X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Gen; Hoshino, Masato; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kiyozo; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Yagi, Naoto; Okita, Yutaka; Tsukube, Takuro

    2017-02-01

    Structural examination of human heart specimens at the microscopic level is a prerequisite for understanding congenital heart diseases. It is desirable not to destroy or alter the properties of such specimens because of their scarcity. However, many of the currently available imaging techniques either destroy the specimen through sectioning or alter the chemical and mechanical properties of the specimen through staining and contrast agent injection. As a result, subsequent studies may not be possible. X-ray phase-contrast tomography is an imaging modality for biological soft tissues that does not destroy or alter the properties of the specimen. The feasibility of X-ray phase-contrast tomography for the structural examination of heart specimens was tested using infantile and fetal heart specimens without congenital diseases. X-ray phase-contrast tomography was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility using the Talbot grating interferometer at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 to visualize the structure of five non-pretreated whole heart specimens obtained by autopsy. High-resolution, three-dimensional images were obtained for all specimens. The images clearly showed the myocardial structure, coronary vessels, and conduction bundle. X-ray phase-contrast tomography allows high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of human heart specimens. Intact imaging using X-ray phase-contrast tomography can contribute to further structural investigation of heart specimens with congenital heart diseases.

  16. A dedicated endstation for waveguide-based X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalbfleisch, Sebastian

    2013-07-01

    X-ray microscopy has emerged as a powerful and versatile imaging technique in many fields of science over the last years, offering insights in opaque media at high spatial resolution. A major challenge remains the fabrication of suitable X-ray lenses, e.g., Fresnel zone plates or compound refractive lenses. In an alternative approach of a lensless imaging scheme the sample is illuminated by a coherent X-ray beam. The sample information is then reconstructed from the recorded diffraction signal by numerical iterative algorithms. Within this thesis the basics of lensless holographic imaging with X-Ray waveguides are summarised and extended to the concept of waveguide-based X-ray interferometry. The specific instrumentation required for the conceptual experiments of waveguidebased holographic imaging is explained and illustrated by the obtained results. Based on the results of these conceptual experiments a dedicated synchrotron endstation for waveguide-based holographic imaging was designed and built. The specifications and properties of the Kirkpatrick-Baez focussing mirrors and other mechanical and optical components are described in detail, along with the instrument control system and various available detectors. First commissioning results prove the imaging abilities of the presented endstation.

  17. Breast density mapping based upon system calibration, x-ray techniques, and FFDM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Smith, Andrew P.; Jing, Zhenxue; Wu, Tao

    2007-03-01

    Clinical studies have correlated a high breast density to a women's risk of breast cancer. A breast density measurement that can quantitatively depict the volume distribution and percentage of dense tissues in breasts would be very useful for risk factor assessment of breast cancer, and might be more predictive of risks than the common but subjective and coarse 4-point BIRADS scale. This paper proposes to use a neural-network mapping to compute the breast density information based upon system calibration data, x-ray techniques, and Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. The mapping consists of four modules, namely, system calibration, generator of beam quality, generator of normalized absorption, and a multi-layer feed-forward neural network. As the core of breast density mapping, the network accepts x-ray target/filter combination, normalized x-ray absorption, pixel-wise breast thickness map, and x-ray beam quality during image acquisition as input elements, and exports a pixel-wise breast density distribution and a single breast density percentage for the imaged breast. Training and testing data sets for the design and verification of the network were formulated from calibrated x-ray beam quality, imaging data with a step wedge phantom under a variety x-ray imaging techniques, and nominal breast densities of tissue equivalent materials. The network was trained using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm based back-propagation learning method. Various thickness and glandular density phantom studies were performed with clinical x-ray techniques. Preliminary results showed that the neural network mapping is promising in accurately computing glandular density distribution and breast density percentage.

  18. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  19. X-ray modulation transfer functions of photostimulable phosphor image plates and scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, John F; Holland, Glenn E; Hudson, Lawrence T; Henins, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The modulation transfer functions of two types of photostimulable phosphor image plates were determined in the 10 keV to 50 keV x-ray energy range using a resolution test pattern with up to 10 line pairs per mm (LP/mm) and a wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer. Techniques were developed for correcting for the partial transmittance of the high energy x rays through the lead bars of the resolution test pattern, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined from the measured change in contrast with LP/mm values. The MTF was convolved with the slit function of the image plate scanner, and the resulting point spread functions (PSFs) were in good agreement with the observed shapes and widths of x-ray spectral lines and with the PSF derived from edge spread functions. The shapes and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the PSF curves of the Fuji Superior Resolution (SR) and Fuji Maximum Sensitivity (MS) image plate detectors, consisting of the image plate and the scanner, determined by the three methods gave consistent results: The SR PSF is Gaussian with 0.13 mm FWHM, and the MS PSF is Lorentzian with 0.19 mm FWHM. These techniques result in the accurate determination of the spatial resolution achievable using image plate and scanner combinations and enable the optimization of spatial resolution for x-ray spectroscopy and radiography.

  20. Multiframe, Single Line-of-Sight X-Ray Imager for Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Kevin L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-28

    The purpose of this LDRD project was to demonstrate high spatial and temporal resolution x-ray imaging using optical detectors, and in particular the VISAR and OHRV diagnostics on the OMEGA laser. The x-ray source being imaged was a backlighter capsule being imploded by 39 beams of the OMEGA laser. In particular this approach utilized a semiconductor with the side facing the backlighter capsule coated with a thin aluminum layer to allow x rays to pass through the metal layer and then get absorbed in the semiconductor. The other side of the semiconductor was AR coated to allow the VISAR or OHRV probe beam to sample the phase change of the semiconductor as the x rays were absorbed in the semiconductor. This technique is capable of acquiring sub-picosecond 2-D or 1-D x-ray images, detector spatial resolution of better than 10 um and the ability to operate in a high neutron flux environment expected on ignition shots with burning plasmas. In addition to demonstrating this technique on the OMEGA laser, several designs were made to improve the phase sensitivity, temporal resolution and number of frames over the existing diagnostics currently implemented on the OMEGA laser. These designs included both 2-d imaging diagnostics as well as improved 1-D imaging diagnostics which were streaked in time.

  1. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Haugaard Jensen

    Full Text Available Invasive cancer causes a change in density in the affected tissue, which can be visualized by x-ray phase-contrast tomography. However, the diagnostic value of this method has so far not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the purpose of this study was, in a blinded manner, to investigate whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study was that the diagnostic sensitivity of the image analysis for detecting malignancy was 100% and the specificity was 87%. The positive predictive value was 91% for detecting malignancy and the negative predictive value was 100%. We conclude that x-ray phase-contrast imaging can accurately detect density variations to obtain information regarding lymph node involvement previously inaccessible with standard absorption x-ray imaging.

  2. Solar quiescent Active Region temperature distribution inferred from the Miniature Solar X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat soft X-ray spectra, Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) soft X-ray filter images and EUV measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. S.; Woods, T. N.; Caspi, A.; Mason, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Soft X-rays serve as an important diagnostic tool for hot (T > 106 K) solar coronal plasma elemental composition, elemental ionization states, density of emitting plasma and dynamical events triggered by magnetic field structures. Spectrally resolved, solar disc averaged, soft X-ray spectra from the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat combined with spatially resolved soft X-ray filter images from the Hinode X-ray Telescope (XRT) and complimentary EUV data can yield unique inferences of the quiescent (non-flaring) active regions' emitting plasma temperature distribution and chemical composition. This talk will discuss how the MinXSS spectra and Hinode XRT images from the sparsely measured 0.7 - 10 keV ( 0.124 - 1.77 nm) region, can augment estimations of active region temperature distribution and elemental abundance variations that are currently being assessed primarily from typical EUV and hard X-ray observations.

  3. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  4. SR biomedical imaging with phase-contrast and fluorescent x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Yoneyama, Akio; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Hirai, Yasuharu; Kuroe, Taichi; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hyodo, Kazuyaki; Dilmanian, F. A.; Akatsuka, Takao

    2004-10-01

    New synchrotron x-ray CT system with phase-contrast and fluorescent techniques are being developed for biomedical researches with the high-contrast and high-spatial resolution. We have applied these techniques for in-vivo and ex-vivo imaging. The phase-contrast x-ray CT (PCCT) was a highly sensitive imaging technique to depict the morphological information of the soft tissue in biological object, whereas fluorescent x-ray CT (FXCT) could depict the functional information concerning to specific heavy atomic number elements at very low content. Thus, the success of in-vivo imaging by PCCT and FXCT allows starting new approach to bio-imaging researches.

  5. Automatic pelvis segmentation from x-ray images of a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Okashi, Omar M.; Du, Hongbo; Al-Assam, Hisham

    2017-05-01

    The automatic detection and quantification of skeletal structures has a variety of different applications for biological research. Accurate segmentation of the pelvis from X-ray images of mice in a high-throughput project such as the Mouse Genomes Project not only saves time and cost but also helps achieving an unbiased quantitative analysis within the phenotyping pipeline. This paper proposes an automatic solution for pelvis segmentation based on structural and orientation properties of the pelvis in X-ray images. The solution consists of three stages including pre-processing image to extract pelvis area, initial pelvis mask preparation and final pelvis segmentation. Experimental results on a set of 100 X-ray images showed consistent performance of the algorithm. The automated solution overcomes the weaknesses of a manual annotation procedure where intra- and inter-observer variations cannot be avoided.

  6. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  7. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoennicke, M. G. [Universidade Federal da Integracao Latino-Americana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil); Manica, J. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil); Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Caixa Postal 19091, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Huang, X.-R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  8. Three-dimensional imaging of nanoscale materials by using coherent x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Jianwei

    2011-04-18

    X-ray crystallography is currently the primary methodology used to determine the 3D structure of materials and macromolecules. However, many nanostructures, disordered materials, biomaterials, hybrid materials and biological specimens are noncrystalline and, hence, their structures are not accessible by X-ray crystallography. Probing these structures therefore requires the employment of different approaches. A very promising technique currently under rapid development is X-ray diffraction microscopy (or lensless imaging), in which the coherent X-ray diffraction pattern of a noncrystalline specimen is measured and then directly phased to obtain a high-resolution image. Through the DOE support over the past three years, we have applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to quantitative imaging of GaN quantum dot particles, and revealed the internal GaN-Ga2O3 core shell structure in three dimensions. By exploiting the abrupt change in the scattering cross-section near electronic resonances, we carried out the first experimental demonstration of resonant X-ray diffraction microscopy for element specific imaging. We performed nondestructive and quantitative imaging of buried Bi structures inside a Si crystal by directly phasing coherent X-ray diffraction patterns acquired below and above the Bi M5 edge. We have also applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to nondestructive imaging of mineral crystals inside biological composite materials - intramuscular fish bone - at the nanometer scale resolution. We identified mineral crystals in collagen fibrils at different stages of mineralization and proposed a dynamic mechanism to account for the nucleation and growth of mineral crystals in the collagen matrix. In addition, we have also discovered a novel 3D imaging modality, denoted ankylography, which allows for complete 3D structure determination without the necessity of sample titling or scanning. We showed that when the diffraction pattern of a finite object is sampled at a

  9. Microfocus x-ray imaging of traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources for quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Oda, K.; Sato, Y.; Ito, H.; Masuda, S.; Yamada, T.; Matsumoto, M.; Murayama, H.; Takei, H. [Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University Kitasato 1-15-1, Minami-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan); Positron Medical Center, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Sakaecho 35-2, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-0015 (Japan); Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Kanagawa Industrial Technology Center (KITC) Shimoimazumi 705-1, Ebina-shi, Kanagawa 243-0435 (Japan); Japan Radioisotope Association (JRIA) Komagome 2-28-45, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8941 (Japan); Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University Kitasato 1-15-1, Minami-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to propose a microfocus x-ray imaging technique for observing the internal structure of small radioactive sources and evaluating geometrical errors quantitatively, and to apply this technique to traceable pointlike {sup 22}Na sources, which were designed for positron emission tomography calibration, for the purpose of quality control of the pointlike sources. Methods: A microfocus x-ray imaging system with a focus size of 0.001 mm was used to obtain projection x-ray images and x-ray CT images of five pointlike source samples, which were manufactured during 2009-2012. The obtained projection and tomographic images were used to observe the internal structure and evaluate geometrical errors quantitatively. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate the effect of possible geometrical errors on the intensity and uniformity of 0.511 MeV annihilation photon pairs emitted from the sources. Results: Geometrical errors were evaluated with sufficient precision using projection x-ray images. CT images were used for observing the internal structure intuitively. As a result, four of the five examined samples were within the tolerance to maintain the total uncertainty below {+-}0.5%, given the source radioactivity; however, one sample was found to be defective. Conclusions: This quality control procedure is crucial and offers an important basis for using the pointlike {sup 22}Na source as a basic calibration tool. The microfocus x-ray imaging approach is a promising technique for visual and quantitative evaluation of the internal geometry of small radioactive sources.

  10. X-ray phase computed tomography for nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutics: preliminary feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2011-03-01

    With the scientific progress in cancer biology, pharmacology and biomedical engineering, the nano-biotechnology based imaging probes and therapeutical agents (namely probes/agents) - a form of theranostics - are among the strategic solutions bearing the hope for the cure of cancer. The key feature distinguishing the nanoparticulated probes/agents from their conventional counterparts is their targeting capability. A large surface-to-volume ratio in nanoparticulated probes/agents enables the accommodation of multiple targeting, imaging and therapeutic components to cope with the intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity. Most nanoparticulated probes/agents are synthesized with low atomic number materials and thus their x-ray attenuation are very similar to biological tissues. However, their microscopic structures are very different, which may result in significant differences in their refractive properties. Recently, the investigation in the x-ray grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) CT has demonstrated its advantages in differentiating low-atomic materials over the conventional attenuation-based CT. We believe that a synergy of x-ray grating-based DPC CT and nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutic agents may play a significant role in extensive preclinical and clinical applications, or even become a modality for molecular imaging. Hence, we propose to image the refractive property of nanoparticulated imaging probes and therapeutical agents using x-ray grating-based DPC CT. In this work, we conduct a preliminary feasibility study with a focus to characterize the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and contrast-detail behavior of the x-ray grating-based DPC CT. The obtained data may be instructive to the architecture design and performance optimization of the x-ray grating-based DPC CT for imaging biomarker-targeted imaging probes and therapeutic agents, and even informative to the translation of preclinical research in theranostics into clinical applications.

  11. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    The practice of diagnostic x-ray imaging has been transformed with the emergence of digital detector technology. Although digital systems offer many practical advantages over conventional film-based systems, their spatial resolution performance can be a limitation. The authors present a Monte Carlo study to determine fundamental resolution limits caused by x-ray interactions in four converter materials: Amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium, cesium iodide, and lead iodide. The "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined for each material and compared in terms of the 50% MTF spatial frequency and Wagner's effective aperture for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. Several conclusions can be drawn from their Monte Carlo study. (i) In low-Z (a-Si) converters, reabsorption of Compton scatter x rays limits spatial resolution with a sharp MTF drop at very low spatial frequencies (x rays plays a dominant role, resulting in a mid-frequency (1-5 cycles/mm) MTF drop. (ii) Coherent scatter plays a minor role in the x-ray interaction MTF. (iii) The spread of energy due to secondary electron (e.g., photoelectrons) transport is significant only at very high spatial frequencies. (iv) Unlike the spread of optical light in phosphors, the spread of absorbed energy from x-ray interactions does not significantly degrade spatial resolution as converter thickness is increased. (v) The effective aperture results reported here represent fundamental spatial resolution limits of the materials tested and serve as target benchmarks for the design and development of future digital x-ray detectors.

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray is taken with the ... an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray is taken with the ... an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath the patient. top of page ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawer under the table holds the x-ray film or image recording plate . Sometimes the x-ray ... extended over the patient while an x-ray film holder or image recording plate is placed beneath ...

  15. High-resolution imaging X-ray detector. [using microchannel plates and electronic readout for spaceborne telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, E.; Henry, P.; Murray, S.; Van Speybroeck, L.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an X-ray detector using microchannel plates as a photocathode surface and imaging photoelectron multiplier, and a crossed wire grid as a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. The position resolution is 10 microns. The crossed wire grid consists of 100-micron-diam wires on 200-micron centers. Position sensing is accomplished by electronic interpolation to 1/20 of the wire spacing. The quantum efficiency of the microchannel plates varies from 29% at 0.28 keV to 5% at 3 keV. This detector will provide second-of-arc X-ray imaging in the focal plane of the 342.9-cm focal length grazing-incidence telescope being prepared for the HEAO-B observatory. By addition of suitable photocathodes, it can be used for single-photon imaging light detection in the UV, visible, and near-IR-ranges. In all cases, it gives a very low dark counting rate, allows timing of individual events to 1 microsec or less, and can handle counting rates up to 10,000 per sec.

  16. Spatially Resolved Spectra from a new X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurements of Ion and Electron Temperature Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitter, M; Stratton, B; Roquemore, A; Mastrovito, D; Lee, S; Bak, J; Moon, M; Nam, U; Smith, G; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Fraenkel, B

    2004-08-10

    A new type of high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is being developed to measure ion and electron temperature profiles in tokamak plasmas. The instrument is particularly valuable for diagnosing plasmas with purely Ohmic heating and rf heating, since it does not require the injection of a neutral beam - although it can also be used for the diagnosis of neutral-beam heated plasmas. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent quartz crystal and a two-dimensional position-sensitive detector. It records spectra of helium-like argon (or krypton) from multiple sightlines through the plasma and projects a de-magnified image of a large plasma cross-section onto the detector. The spatial resolution in the plasma is solely determined by the height of the crystal, its radius of curvature, and the Bragg angle. This new X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer may also be of interest for the diagnosis of ion temperature profiles in future large tokamaks, such as KSTAR and ITER, where the application of the presently used charge-exchange spectroscopy will be difficult, if the neutral beams do not penetrate to the plasma center. The paper presents the results from proof-of-principle experiments performed with a prototype instrument at Alcator C-Mod.

  17. Rapid, low dose X-ray diffractive imaging of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Michael W.M., E-mail: michael.jones@latrobe.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Dearnley, Megan K. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Riessen, Grant A. van [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Abbey, Brian [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Putkunz, Corey T. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Junker, Mark D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Vine, David J. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); McNulty, Ian [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Centre for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Nugent, Keith A. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Peele, Andrew G. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton 3168 (Australia); Tilley, Leann [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-08-01

    Phase-diverse X-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) provides a route to high sensitivity and spatial resolution with moderate radiation dose. It also provides a robust solution to the well-known phase-problem, making on-line image reconstruction feasible. Here we apply phase-diverse CDI to a cellular sample, obtaining images of an erythrocyte infected by the sexual stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, with a radiation dose significantly lower than the lowest dose previously reported for cellular imaging using CDI. The high sensitivity and resolution allow key biological features to be identified within intact cells, providing complementary information to optical and electron microscopy. This high throughput method could be used for fast tomographic imaging, or to generate multiple replicates in two-dimensions of hydrated biological systems without freezing or fixing. This work demonstrates that phase-diverse CDI is a valuable complementary imaging method for the biological sciences and ready for immediate application. - Highlights: • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy provides high-resolution and high-contrast images of intact biological samples. • Rapid nanoscale resolution imaging is demonstrated at orders of magnitude lower dose than previously possible. • Phase-diverse coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a robust technique for rapid, quantitative, and correlative X-ray phase imaging.

  18. A multi-cone x-ray imaging Bragg crystal spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Gao, Lan; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Apariccio, L.; Lazerson, S.; Pablant, N.

    2016-11-01

    This article describes a new x-ray imaging Bragg crystal spectrometer, which—in combination with a streak camera or a gated strip detector—can be used for time-resolved measurements of x-ray line spectra at the National Ignition Facility and other high power laser facilities. The main advantage of this instrument is that it produces perfect images of a point source for each wavelength in a selectable spectral range and that the detector plane can be perpendicular to the crystal surface or inclined by an arbitrary angle with respect to the crystal surface. These unique imaging properties are obtained by bending the x-ray diffracting crystal into a certain shape, which is generated by arranging multiple cones with different aperture angles on a common nodal line.

  19. The geometry of three-dimensional measurement from paired coplanar x-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Moffitt, F H; Curry, S

    1983-10-01

    This article outlines the geometric principles which underlie the process of making craniofacial measurements in three dimensions by combining information from pairs of coplanar x-ray images. The main focus is upon the rationale of the method rather than upon the computational details. We stress particularly the importance of having available accurate measurements as to the relative positions of the x-ray tubes and the film plane. The use of control arrays of radiopaque "points" whose projected images upon the film plane allow the retrospective calculation of the spatial relationship between the x-ray tubes and the film plane is explained. Finally, the question of correcting for movement of the subject between two films of an image pair is considered briefly.

  20. Single particle imaging with soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew V.; Andreasson, Jakob; Aquila, Andrew; Bajt, Saša; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Bucksbaum, Phillip; Caleman, Carl; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P.; Ekeberg, Tomas; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Farquar, George R.; Fleckenstein, Holger; Foucar, Lutz; Frank, Matthias; Gumprecht, Lars; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hantke, Max; Hartmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Hartmann, Robert; Hau-Riege, Stephan P.; Hauser, Günther; Holl, Peter; Hoemke, André; Jönsson, Olof; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Kiskinova, Maya; Krasniqi, Faton; Krzywinski, Jacek; Liang, Mengning; Loh, Ne-Te Duane; Lomb, Lukas; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Marchesini, Stefano; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Odic, Duško; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Reich, Christian; Rolles, Daniel; Rudek, Benedikt; Rudenko, Artem; Schmidt, Carlo; Schultz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Soltau, Heike; Starodub, Dmitri; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Strüder, Lothar; Svenda, Martin; Tobias, Herbert; Ullrich, Joachim; Weidenspointner, Georg; Westphal, Daniel; White, Thomas A.; Williams, Garth; Hajdu, Janos; Schlichting, Ilme; Bogan, Michael J.; Chapman, Henry N.

    2011-06-01

    Results of coherent diffractive imaging experiments performed with soft X-rays (1-2 keV) at the Linac Coherent Light Source are presented. Both organic and inorganic nano-sized objects were injected into the XFEL beam as an aerosol focused with an aerodynamic lens. The high intensity and femtosecond duration of X-ray pulses produced by the Linac Coherent Light Source allow structural information to be recorded by X-ray diffraction before the particle is destroyed. Images were formed by using iterative methods to phase single shot diffraction patterns. Strategies for improving the reconstruction methods have been developed. This technique opens up exciting opportunities for biological imaging, allowing structure determination without freezing, staining or crystallization.

  1. X-Ray image denoising with directional support value transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, S.; Hendriks, E.A.; Lei, B.; Hao, W.

    2009-01-01

    Under the support vector machine framework, the support value analysis-based image fusion has been studied, where the salient features of the original images are represented by their support values. The support value transform (SVT)-based image fusion approach have demonstrated some advantages over

  2. Design and image-quality performance of high resolution CMOS-based X-ray imaging detectors for digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Yun, S.; Cho, G.; Kim, H. K.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2012-04-01

    In digital X-ray imaging systems, X-ray imaging detectors based on scintillating screens with electronic devices such as charge-coupled devices (CCDs), thin-film transistors (TFT), complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) flat panel imagers have been introduced for general radiography, dental, mammography and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications. Recently, a large-area CMOS active-pixel sensor (APS) in combination with scintillation films has been widely used in a variety of digital X-ray imaging applications. We employed a scintillator-based CMOS APS image sensor for high-resolution mammography. In this work, both powder-type Gd2O2S:Tb and a columnar structured CsI:Tl scintillation screens with various thicknesses were fabricated and used as materials to convert X-ray into visible light. These scintillating screens were directly coupled to a CMOS flat panel imager with a 25 × 50 mm2 active area and a 48 μm pixel pitch for high spatial resolution acquisition. We used a W/Al mammographic X-ray source with a 30 kVp energy condition. The imaging characterization of the X-ray detector was measured and analyzed in terms of linearity in incident X-ray dose, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE).

  3. Visible emitting color centers in lithium fluoride for X-ray imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfigli, F., E-mail: francesca.bonfigli@enea.i [ENEA, C.R. Frascati, V. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Almaviva, S. [ENEA, C.R. Frascati, V. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Cedola, A. [Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, V. Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Rome (Italy); Franzini, I. [ENEA, C.R. Frascati, V. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Lagomarsino, S. [Istituto Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, V. Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Rome (Italy); Pelliccia, D. [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung, ANKA, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Herman-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Montereali, R.M. [ENEA, C.R. Frascati, V. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    Novel solid-state X-ray imaging detectors have been proposed, tested and they are currently under development for application in photonics, biological investigations and material science, as well as in the characterization of intense X-ray sources. Such as detectors are based on the photoluminescence (PL) of stable color centers (CCs) embedded in lithium fluoride (LiF) crystals and films and their readout process consists of detecting the visible PL of CCs under optical excitation. The improvements of the LiF-based detector sensitivity and response are particularly important in X-ray imaging experiments for reducing the irradiation doses and consequently the sample damage due to the radiation exposure, especially for biological specimens. The characterization of LiF samples colored with 8 keV X-rays from a compact table-top source through photoluminescence spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy will be presented and discussed in order to investigate the characteristics of these novel X-ray imaging detectors.

  4. Development of an X-ray imaging system with SOI pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Ryutaro, E-mail: ryunishi@post.kek.jp [School of High Energy Accelerator Science, SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies), Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Arai, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK-IPNS), Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hirano, Keiichi; Kishimoto, Shunji; Hashimoto, Ryo [Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK-IMSS), Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-09-21

    An X-ray imaging system employing pixel sensors in silicon-on-insulator technology is currently under development. The system consists of an SOI pixel detector (INTPIX4) and a DAQ system based on a multi-purpose readout board (SEABAS2). To correct a bottleneck in the total throughput of the DAQ of the first prototype, parallel processing of the data taking and storing processes and a FIFO buffer were implemented for the new DAQ release. Due to these upgrades, the DAQ throughput was improved from 6 Hz (41 Mbps) to 90 Hz (613 Mbps). The first X-ray imaging system with the new DAQ software release was tested using 33.3 keV and 9.5 keV mono X-rays for three-dimensional computerized tomography. The results of these tests are presented. - Highlights: • The X-ray imaging system employing the SOI pixel sensor is currently under development. • The DAQ of the first prototype has the bottleneck in the total throughput. • The new DAQ release solve the bottleneck by parallel processing and FIFO buffer. • The new DAQ release was tested using 33.3 keV and 9.5 keV mono X-rays.

  5. A new streaked soft x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstead, J; Moore, A S; Ahmed, M F; Morton, J; Guymer, T M; Soufli, R; Pardini, T; Hibbard, R L; Bailey, C G; Bell, P M; Hau-Riege, S; Bedzyk, M; Shoup, M J; Reagan, S; Agliata, T; Jungquist, R; Schmidt, D W; Kot, L B; Garbett, W J; Rubery, M S; Skidmore, J W; Gullikson, E; Salmassi, F

    2016-05-01

    A new streaked soft x-ray imager has been designed for use on high energy-density (HED) physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility based at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This streaked imager uses a slit aperture, single shallow angle reflection from a nickel mirror, and soft x-ray filtering to, when coupled to one of the NIF's x-ray streak cameras, record a 4× magnification, one-dimensional image of an x-ray source with a spatial resolution of less than 90 μm. The energy band pass produced depends upon the filter material used; for the first qualification shots, vanadium and silver-on-titanium filters were used to gate on photon energy ranges of approximately 300-510 eV and 200-400 eV, respectively. A two-channel version of the snout is available for x-ray sources up to 1 mm and a single-channel is available for larger sources up to 3 mm. Both the one and two-channel variants have been qualified on quartz wire and HED physics target shots.

  6. Development of X-ray dark-field imaging towards clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ANDO Masami; RUBENSTEIN Edward; ROBERSON Joseph; SHIMAO Daisuke; SUGIYAMA Hiroshi; TAKEDA Ken; UENO Ei; WADA Hiroshi; HASHIMOTO Eiko; HASHIZUME Hiroyuki; HYODO Kazuyuki; INOUE Hajime; ISHIKAWA Tetsuya; KUNISADA Toshiyuki; MAKSIMENKO Anton; PATTANASIRIWISAWA Wanwisa

    2004-01-01

    Review of X-ray dark-field imaging under development is presented. Its goal is its application to clinical diagnosis of organs that have been invisible by the ordinary techniques. In order to clinically visualize tissues in detail one needs high contrast and high spatial resolution say ~50 μm. This X-ray optics comprises a Bragg asymmetric monochro-collimator and a Bragg case or a Laue case filter with capability of analyzing angle in a parallel position. Their diffraction index is 4,4,0 and the X-ray energy 35 keV (λ= 0.0354 nm). The filter has 0.6 mm thickness in the Bragg case or 1.075 mm or 2.15 mm thickness in the Laue case. Under this condition only the refracted X-rays from object can transmit through the filter while the beam that may receive absorption and/or phase change will not. Soft tissues at human joints thus taken show high contrast images so that the DFI is promising for clinical diagnosis. Preliminary X-ray absorption images of another clinical candidates of ear bones are also shown.

  7. Hard x-ray imaging facility for space shuttle: A scientificq and conceptual engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, L.E.; Hudson, H.S.; Hurford, G.; Schneible, D.

    1976-11-01

    A shuttle-accommodated instrument for imaging hard X-rays in the study of nonthermal particles and high temperature particles in various solar and cosmic phenomena was defined and its feasibility demonstrated. The imaging system configuration is described as well as the electronics, aspect systems, mechanical and thermal properties and the ground support equipment.

  8. Region-Based 4D Tomographic Image Reconstruction: Application to Cardiac X-ray CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyndhoven, G. Van; Batenburg, K.J.; Sijbers, J.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful tool for noninvasive cardiac imaging. However, radiation dose is a major issue. In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that reduces the radiation dose without compromising image quality. This is achieved by exploiting prior knowledge

  9. Procedures for cryogenic X-ray ptychographic imaging of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, M.; Zhang, F.; Chen, B.; Bhartiya, A.; Cunnea, K.; Wagner, U.; Cacho-Nerin, F.; Schwenke, J.; Robinson, I. K.

    2017-01-01

    Biological sample-preparation procedures have been developed for imaging human chromosomes under cryogenic conditions. A new experimental setup, developed for imaging frozen samples using beamline I13 at Diamond Light Source, is described. This manuscript describes the equipment and experimental procedures as well as the authors’ first ptychographic reconstructions using X-rays.

  10. Procedures for cryogenic X-ray ptychographic imaging of biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, M; Zhang, F; Chen, B; Bhartiya, A; Cunnea, K; Wagner, U; Cacho-Nerin, F; Schwenke, J; Robinson, I K

    2017-03-01

    Biological sample-preparation procedures have been developed for imaging human chromosomes under cryogenic conditions. A new experimental setup, developed for imaging frozen samples using beamline I13 at Diamond Light Source, is described. This manuscript describes the equipment and experimental procedures as well as the authors' first ptychographic reconstructions using X-rays.

  11. Procedures for cryogenic X-ray ptychographic imaging of biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yusuf

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological sample-preparation procedures have been developed for imaging human chromosomes under cryogenic conditions. A new experimental setup, developed for imaging frozen samples using beamline I13 at Diamond Light Source, is described. This manuscript describes the equipment and experimental procedures as well as the authors' first ptychographic reconstructions using X-rays.

  12. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Chris [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2011-04-14

    This project helped pioneer the core capabilities of coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) using X rays at synchrotron light source facilities. We developed an apparatus that was used for CDI at the Advanced Light Source, and applied it to 2D and 3D imaging of nanostructures. We also explored a number of conceptual and computational issues on the reconstruction of CDI data.

  13. An investigation of infection control for x-ray cassettes in a diagnostic imaging department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Matthew [School of Allied Health Professions and Science, Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Science, University Campus Suffolk, Rope Walk, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP4 1LT (United Kingdom); Harvey, Jane M. [School of Allied Health Professions and Science, Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Science, University Campus Suffolk, Rope Walk, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP4 1LT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.harvey@ucs.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    Introduction: This research was conducted to investigate if X-ray cassettes could be a possible source of pathogens capable of causing nosocomial infections, and if they could be a possible vector for cross infection within the hospital environment. Method: The research involved the swabbing of X-ray cassettes in a Diagnostic Imaging Department of a large hospital in the east of England. Two areas of the Diagnostic Imaging Department were included in the study. Research concentrated on X-ray cassettes used for mobile radiography, accident and emergency and inpatient use. Forty cassettes were swabbed in total specifically for general levels of bacterial contamination, also for the presence or absence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A mapping exercise was completed following the location of an X-ray cassette typically used in mobile radiography. The exercise noted the level of direct contact with patient's skin and other possible routes of infection. Results: The results demonstrated that there were large levels of growth of samples taken from cassettes and developed in the Microbiology Department. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Micrococci, Diptheroids and species of Bacillus were all identified. The mapping exercise in which the journey of a 35/43 cm cassette used for mobile radiography was tracked found that contact with patient's skin and potential pathogens or routes of cross infection was a common occurrence whilst undertaking mobile radiography. Conclusion: The research has identified the presence of bacterial contamination on cassettes. The research established that X-ray cassettes/imaging plates are often exposed to pathogens and possible routes of cross infection; also that patient's skin often comes directly in contact with the X-ray cassette/imaging plate. The research also shows that as cassettes/imaging plates are a potential source of cross infection, the Diagnostic Imaging Department may be partly responsible

  14. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  15. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Haugaard; Bech, Martin; Binderup, Tina

    2013-01-01

    whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years) diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase......-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study...

  16. Knot detection in X-ray images of wood planks using dictionary learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Nils Mattias; Enescu, Alexandru; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a novel application of x-ray imaging of planks, for the purpose of detecting knots in high quality furniture wood. X-ray imaging allows the detection of knots invisible from the surface to conventional cameras. Our approach is based on texture analysis, or more specifically......, discriminative dictionary learning. Experiments show that the knot detection and segmentation can be accurately performed by our approach. This is a promising result and can be directly applied in industrial processing of furniture wood....

  17. Simulation study of phase retrieval for hard X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Bin; PENG; Xiang; TIAN; Jindong; NIU; Hanben; DIAO; Luh

    2005-01-01

    Two algorithms for the phase retrieval of hard X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging are presented. One is referred to as Iterative Angular Spectrum Algorithm (IASA) and the other is a hybrid algorithm that combines IASA with TIE (transport of intensity equation). The calculations of the algorithms are based on free space propagation of the angular spectrum. The new approaches are demonstrated with numerical simulations. Comparisons with other phase retrieval algorithms are also performed. It is shown that the phase retrieval method combining the IASA and TIE is a promising technique for the application of hard X-ray phase contrast imaging.

  18. Development of the super high angular resolution principle for X-ray imaging *

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhang; Shuang-Nan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Development of the Super High Angular Resolution Principle (SHARP)for coded-mask X-ray imaging is presented. We prove that SHARP can be considered as a generalized coded mask imaging method with a coding pattern comprised of diffraction-interference fringes in the mask pattern. The angular resolution of SHARP can be improved by detecting the fringes more precisely than the mask's element size,i.e. by using a detector with a pixel size smaller than the mask's element size. The proposed mission SHARP-X for solar X-ray observations is also briefly discussed.

  19. X-ray imaging with a silicon microstrip detector coupled to the RX64 ASIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldazzi, G.; Bollini, D.; Cabal Rodriguez, A.E.; Dabrowski, W.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Giubellino, P.; Gombia, M.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Montano Zetina, L.M.; Prino, F.; Ramello, L. E-mail: ramello@to.infn.it; Sitta, M.; Swientek, K.; Taibi, A.; Tuffanelli, A.; Wheadon, R.; Wiacek, P

    2003-08-21

    A single photon counting X-ray imaging system, with possible applications to dual energy mammography and angiography, is presented. A silicon microstrip detector with 100 {mu}m pitch strips is coupled to RX64 ASICs, each of them including 64 channels of preamplifier, shaper, discriminator and scaler. The system has low noise, good spatial resolution and high counting rate capability. Results on energy resolution have been obtained with a fluorescence source and quasi-monochromatic X-rays beams. Preliminary images obtained with an angiographic phantom are presented.

  20. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  1. Collagen imaged by Coherent X-ray Diffraction: towards a complementary tool to conventional scanning SAXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Bean, Richard J; Bozec, Laurent; Robinson, Ian K [London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN), University College London (UCL), London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); McCallion, Catriona; Wallace, Kris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (UCL), London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Hiller, Jen C; Terrill, Nicholas J, E-mail: f.berenguer@ucl.ac.u [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-01

    Third generation x-ray sources offer unique possibilities for exploiting coherence in the study of materials. New insights in the structure and dynamics of soft condensed matter and biological samples can be obtained by coherent x-ray diffraction (CXD). However, the experimental procedures for applying these methods to collagen tissues are still under development. We present here an investigation for the optimal procedure in order to obtain high quality CXD data from collagen tissues. Sample handling and preparation and adequate coherence defining apertures are among the more relevant factors to take into account. The impact of the results is also discussed, in particular in comparison with the information that can be extracted from conventional scanning small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Images of collagen tissues obtained by CXD reconstructions will give additional information about the local structure with higher resolution and will complement scanning SAXS images.

  2. Fine-pitch glass GEM for high-resolution X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, T.; Mitsuya, Y.; Toyokawa, H.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a fine-pitch glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM) for high-resolution X-ray imaging. The fine-pitch G-GEM is made of a 400 μm thick photo-etchable glass substrate with 150 μm pitch holes. It is fabricated using the same wet etching technique as that for the standard G-GEM. In this work, we present the experimental results obtained with a single fine-pitch G-GEM with a 50 × 50 mm2 effective area. We recorded an energy resolution of 16.2% and gas gain up to 5,500 when the detector was irradiated with 5.9 keV X-rays. We present a 50 × 50 mm2 X-ray radiograph image acquired with a scintillation gas and optical readout system.

  3. Fast frame rate rodent cardiac x-ray imaging using scintillator lens coupled to CMOS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi Lakshmi, B.; Sai Varsha, M. K. N.; Kumar, N. Ashwin; Dixit, Madhulika; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy

    2017-03-01

    Micro-Computed Tomography (MCT) systems for small animal imaging plays a critical role for monitoring disease progression and therapy evaluation. In this work, an in-house built micro-CT system equipped with a X-ray scintillator lens coupled to a commercial CMOS camera was used to test the feasibility of its application to Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA). Literature has reported such studies being done with clinical X-ray tubes that can be pulsed rapidly or with rotating gantry systems, thus increasing the cost and infrastructural requirements.The feasibility of DSA was evaluated by injected Iodinated contrast agent (ICA) through the tail vein of a mouse. Projection images of the heart were acquired pre and post contrast using the high frame rate X-ray detector and processing done to visualize transit of ICA through the heart.

  4. X-ray imaging with photon counting hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulos, S; Campbell, M; Snoeys, W; Heijne, Erik H M; Pernigotti, E; Raine, C; Smith, K; Watt, J; O'Shea, V; Ludwig, J; Schwarz, C

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor pixel detectors, originally developed for particle physics experiments, have been studied as X-ray imaging devices. The performance of devices using the OMEGA 3 read-out chip bump-bonded to pixellated silicon semiconductor detectors is characterised in terms of their signal-to-noise ratio when exposed to 60 kVp X-rays. Although parts of the devices achieve values of this ratio compatible with the noise being photon statistics limited, this is not found to hold for the whole pixel matrix, resulting in the global signal-to-noise ratio being compromised. First results are presented of X-ray images taken with a gallium arsenide pixel detector bump-bonded to a new read-out chip, (MEDIPIX), which is a single photon counting read-out chip incorporating a 15-bit counter in every pixel. (author)

  5. X-ray imaging with photon counting hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolopoulos, S.; Bates, R.; Campbell, M.; Snoeys, W.; Heijne, E.; Pernigotti, E.; Raine, C.; Smith, K. E-mail: k.smith@physics.gla.ac.uk; Watt, J.; O' Shea, V.; Ludwig, J.; Schwarz, C

    1999-09-11

    Semiconductor pixel detectors, originally developed for particle physics experiments, have been studied as X-ray imaging devices. The performance of devices using the {omega}3 read-out chip bump-bonded to pixellated silicon semiconductor detectors is characterised in terms of their signal-to-noise ratio when exposed to 60 kVp X-rays. Although parts of the devices achieve values of this ratio compatible with the noise being photon statistics limited, this is not found to hold for the whole pixel matrix, resulting in the global signal-to-noise ratio being compromised. First results are presented of X-ray images taken with a gallium arsenide pixel detector bump-bonded to a new read-out chip, (MEDIPIX), which is a single photon counting read-out chip incorporating a 15-bit counter in every pixel. (author)

  6. Infant Hip Joint Diagnostic Support System Based on Clinical Manifestations in X-ray Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda,Mitsugi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain X-ray radiography is frequently used for the diagnosis of developmental dislocation of the hip (DDH. The aim of this study was to construct a diagnostic support system for DDH based on clinical findings obtained from the X-ray images of 154 female infants with confirmed diagnoses made by orthopedists. The data for these subjects were divided into 2 groups. The Min-Max method of nonlinear analysis was applied to the data from Group 1 to construct the diagnostic support system based on the measurement of 4 items in X-ray images:the outward displacement rate, upward displacement rate, OE angle, and alpha angle. This system was then applied to the data from Group 2, and the results were compared between the 2 groups to verify the reliability of the system. We obtained good results that matched the confirmed diagnoses of orthopedists with an accuracy of 85.9%.

  7. Development of an X-ray imaging system with SOI pixel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Ryutaro; Arai, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Hirano, Keiichi; Kishimoto, Shunji; Hashimoto, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    An X-ray imaging system employing pixel sensors in silicon-on-insulator technology is currently under development. The system consists of an SOI pixel detector (INTPIX4) and a DAQ system based on a multi-purpose readout board (SEABAS2). To correct a bottleneck in the total throughput of the DAQ of the first prototype, parallel processing of the data taking and storing processes and a FIFO buffer were implemented for the new DAQ release. Due to these upgrades, the DAQ throughput was improved from 6 Hz (41 Mbps) to 90 Hz (613 Mbps). The first X-ray imaging system with the new DAQ software release was tested using 33.3 keV and 9.5 keV mono X-rays for three-dimensional computerized tomography. The results of these tests are presented.

  8. Probabilistic Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Reconstructions from X-Ray Images Spanning a Limited Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Ostermann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An important part of computed tomography is the calculation of a three-dimensional reconstruction of an object from series of X-ray images. Unfortunately, some applications do not provide sufficient X-ray images. Then, the reconstructed objects no longer truly represent the original. Inside of the volumes, the accuracy seems to vary unpredictably. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to evaluate any reconstruction, voxel by voxel. The evaluation is based on a sophisticated probabilistic handling of the measured X-rays, as well as the inclusion of a priori knowledge about the materials that the object receiving the X-ray examination consists of. For each voxel, the proposed method outputs a numerical value that represents the probability of existence of a predefined material at the position of the voxel while doing X-ray. Such a probabilistic quality measure was lacking so far. In our experiment, false reconstructed areas get detected by their low probability. In exact reconstructed areas, a high probability predominates. Receiver Operating Characteristics not only confirm the reliability of our quality measure but also demonstrate that existing methods are less suitable for evaluating a reconstruction.

  9. Demonstration of imaging X-ray Thomson scattering on OMEGA EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belancourt, Patrick X.; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul A.; Collins, Tim J. B.; Bonino, Mark J.; Kozlowski, Pawel M.; Regan, Sean P.; Drake, R. Paul

    2016-11-01

    Foams are a common material for high-energy-density physics experiments because of low, tunable densities, and being machinable. Simulating these experiments can be difficult because the equation of state is largely unknown for shocked foams. The focus of this experiment was to develop an x-ray scattering platform for measuring the equation of state of shocked foams on OMEGA EP. The foam used in this experiment is resorcinol formaldehyde with an initial density of 0.34 g/cm3. One long-pulse (10 ns) beam drives a shock into the foam, while the remaining three UV beams with a 2 ns square pulse irradiate a nickel foil to create the x-ray backlighter. The primary diagnostic for this platform, the imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer, spectrally resolves the scattered x-ray beam while imaging in one spatial dimension. Ray tracing analysis of the density profile gives a compression of 3 ± 1 with a shock speed of 39 ± 6 km/s. Analysis of the scattered x-ray spectra gives an upper bound temperature of 20 eV.

  10. A silicon strip detector coupled to the RX64 ASIC for X-ray diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldazzi, G.; Bollini, D.; Cabal Rodriguez, A.E.; Dabrowski, W.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Giubellino, P.; Gombia, M.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Montano, L.M.; Prino, F. E-mail: prino@to.infn.it; Ramello, L.; Sitta, M.; Swientek, K.; Taibi, A.; Tuffanelli, A.; Wheadon, R.; Wiacek, P

    2003-11-21

    First results from a silicon microstrip detector with 100 {mu}m pitch coupled to the RX64 ASIC are presented. The system is capable of single photon counting in digital X-ray imaging, with possible applications to dual energy mammography and angiography. The main features of the detecting system are low noise, good spatial resolution and high counting rate capability. The energy resolution and the conversion efficiency of the system are discussed, based on results obtained with fluorescence X-ray sources and quasi-monochromatic X-ray beams in the 8-36 keV energy range, with strips being either orthogonal or parallel to the incoming X-rays. We present also preliminary imaging results obtained with a plexiglass phantom with tiny cylindrical cavities filled with iodate solution, simulating patient vessels; in this case the X-ray beam has two components, respectively below and above the iodine K-edge at 33.17 keV.

  11. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kärtner, F.X., E-mail: franz.kaertner@cfel.de [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahr, F. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); Calendron, A.-L. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Çankaya, H. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Carbajo, S. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Chang, G.; Cirmi, G. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dörner, K. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dorda, U. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Fallahi, A. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hartin, A. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Hemmer, M. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is one of the main methods to determine atomic-resolution 3D images of the whole spectrum of molecules ranging from small inorganic clusters to large protein complexes consisting of hundred-thousands of atoms that constitute the macromolecular machinery of life. Life is not static, and unravelling the structure and dynamics of the most important reactions in chemistry and biology is essential to uncover their mechanism. Many of these reactions, including photosynthesis which drives our biosphere, are light induced and occur on ultrafast timescales. These have been studied with high time resolution primarily by optical spectroscopy, enabled by ultrafast laser technology, but they reduce the vast complexity of the process to a few reaction coordinates. In the AXSIS project at CFEL in Hamburg, funded by the European Research Council, we develop the new method of attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to give a full description of ultrafast processes atomically resolved in real space and on the electronic energy landscape, from co-measurement of X-ray and optical spectra, and X-ray diffraction. This technique will revolutionize our understanding of structure and function at the atomic and molecular level and thereby unravel fundamental processes in chemistry and biology like energy conversion processes. For that purpose, we develop a compact, fully coherent, THz-driven attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals. This highly synergistic project starts from a completely clean slate rather than conforming to the specifications of a large free-electron laser (FEL) user facility, to optimize the entire instrumentation towards fundamental measurements of the mechanism of light absorption and excitation energy transfer. A multidisciplinary team formed by laser

  12. AXSIS: Exploring the frontiers in attosecond X-ray science, imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärtner, F. X.; Ahr, F.; Calendron, A.-L.; Çankaya, H.; Carbajo, S.; Chang, G.; Cirmi, G.; Dörner, K.; Dorda, U.; Fallahi, A.; Hartin, A.; Hemmer, M.; Hobbs, R.; Hua, Y.; Huang, W. R.; Letrun, R.; Matlis, N.; Mazalova, V.; Mücke, O. D.; Nanni, E.; Putnam, W.; Ravi, K.; Reichert, F.; Sarrou, I.; Wu, X.; Yahaghi, A.; Ye, H.; Zapata, L.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Miller, R. J. D.; Berggren, K. K.; Graafsma, H.; Meents, A.; Assmann, R. W.; Chapman, H. N.; Fromme, P.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is one of the main methods to determine atomic-resolution 3D images of the whole spectrum of molecules ranging from small inorganic clusters to large protein complexes consisting of hundred-thousands of atoms that constitute the macromolecular machinery of life. Life is not static, and unravelling the structure and dynamics of the most important reactions in chemistry and biology is essential to uncover their mechanism. Many of these reactions, including photosynthesis which drives our biosphere, are light induced and occur on ultrafast timescales. These have been studied with high time resolution primarily by optical spectroscopy, enabled by ultrafast laser technology, but they reduce the vast complexity of the process to a few reaction coordinates. In the AXSIS project at CFEL in Hamburg, funded by the European Research Council, we develop the new method of attosecond serial X-ray crystallography and spectroscopy, to give a full description of ultrafast processes atomically resolved in real space and on the electronic energy landscape, from co-measurement of X-ray and optical spectra, and X-ray diffraction. This technique will revolutionize our understanding of structure and function at the atomic and molecular level and thereby unravel fundamental processes in chemistry and biology like energy conversion processes. For that purpose, we develop a compact, fully coherent, THz-driven attosecond X-ray source based on coherent inverse Compton scattering off a free-electron crystal, to outrun radiation damage effects due to the necessary high X-ray irradiance required to acquire diffraction signals. This highly synergistic project starts from a completely clean slate rather than conforming to the specifications of a large free-electron laser (FEL) user facility, to optimize the entire instrumentation towards fundamental measurements of the mechanism of light absorption and excitation energy transfer. A multidisciplinary team formed by laser

  13. Two-Dimensional MHD Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection Triggered by A Supernova Shock in Interstellar Medium, Generation of X-Ray Gas in Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tanuma, S; Kudoh, T; Shibata, K; Tanuma, Syuniti; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Kudoh, Takahiro; Shibata, Kazunari

    2001-01-01

    We examine the magnetic reconnection triggered by a supernova (or a point explosion) in interstellar medium, by performing two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical simulations with high spatial resolution. We found that the magnetic reconnection starts long after a supernova shock (fast-mode MHD shock) passes a current sheet. The current sheet evolves as follows: (i) Tearing-mode instability is excited by the supernova shock, and the current sheet becomes thin in its nonlinear stage. (ii) The current-sheet thinning is saturated when the current-sheet thickness becomes comparable to that of Sweet-Parker current sheet. After that, Sweet-Parker type reconnection starts, and the current-sheet length increases. (iii) ``Secondary tearing-mode instability'' occurs in the thin Sweet-Parker current sheet. (iv) As a result, further current-sheet thinning occurs and anomalous resistivity sets in, because gas density decreases in the current sheet. Petschek type reconnection starts and heats interste...

  14. Fast one-dimensional wave-front propagation for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Johannes; Malecki, Andreas; Sperl, Jonathan; Chabior, Michael; Schüttler, Markus; Bequé, Dirk; Cozzini, Cristina; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-10-01

    Numerical wave-optical simulations of X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging using grating interferometry require the oversampling of gratings and object structures in the range of few micrometers. Consequently, fields of view of few millimeters already use large amounts of a computer's main memory to store the propagating wave front, limiting the scope of the investigations to only small-scale problems. In this study, we apply an approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory to overcome these restrictions by dividing the two-dimensional wave front up into 1D lines, which are processed separately. The approach enables simulations with samples of clinically relevant dimensions by significantly reducing the memory footprint and the execution time and, thus, allows the qualitative comparison of different setup configurations. We analyze advantages as well as limitations and present the simulation of a virtual mammography phantom of several centimeters of size.

  15. Three-Dimensional Backscatter X-Ray Imaging System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA application requires a system that can generate 3D images of non-metallic material when access is limited to one side of the material. The objective of this...

  16. Characterization of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for high-resolution spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering measurements in shock-compressed experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Lee, H. J.; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    We have proposed, designed and built a dual-channel x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) for spectrally- and spatially-resolved x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) measurements in the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) end station at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This spectrometer employs two spherically-bent germanium (Ge) 220 crystals, which are combined to form a large aperture dispersive element with a spectral bandwidth of 300 eV that enables both the elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering peaks to be simultaneously measured. The apparatus and its characterization are described. A resolving power of 1900 was demonstrated and a spatial resolution of 12 μm was achieved in calibration tests. For XRTS measurements, a narrow-bandwidth (ΔE/Ecarbon plasma produced in shock-compressed samples of different forms of carbon. Preliminary results of the scattering experiments from Pyrolytic Graphite samples that illustrate the utility of the instrument are presented.

  17. Continuous Shape Estimation of Continuum Robots Using X-ray Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobaton, Edgar J; Fu, Jinghua; Torres, Luis G; Alterovitz, Ron

    2013-05-06

    We present a new method for continuously and accurately estimating the shape of a continuum robot during a medical procedure using a small number of X-ray projection images (e.g., radiographs or fluoroscopy images). Continuum robots have curvilinear structure, enabling them to maneuver through constrained spaces by bending around obstacles. Accurately estimating the robot's shape continuously over time is crucial for the success of procedures that require avoidance of anatomical obstacles and sensitive tissues. Online shape estimation of a continuum robot is complicated by uncertainty in its kinematic model, movement of the robot during the procedure, noise in X-ray images, and the clinical need to minimize the number of X-ray images acquired. Our new method integrates kinematics models of the robot with data extracted from an optimally selected set of X-ray projection images. Our method represents the shape of the continuum robot over time as a deformable surface which can be described as a linear combination of time and space basis functions. We take advantage of probabilistic priors and numeric optimization to select optimal camera configurations, thus minimizing the expected shape estimation error. We evaluate our method using simulated concentric tube robot procedures and demonstrate that obtaining between 3 and 10 images from viewpoints selected by our method enables online shape estimation with errors significantly lower than using the kinematic model alone or using randomly spaced viewpoints.

  18. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorapong Aootaphao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain.

  19. First indirect x-ray imaging tests with an 88-mm diameter single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Macrander, A. T. [Argonne

    2017-02-01

    Using the 1-BM-C beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), we have performed the initial indirect x - ray imaging point-spread-function (PSF) test of a unique 88-mm diameter YAG:Ce single crystal of only 100 - micron thickness. The crystal was bonded to a fiber optic plat e (FOP) for mechanical support and to allow the option for FO coupling to a large format camera. This configuration resolution was compared to that of self - supported 25-mm diameter crystals, with and without an Al reflective coating. An upstream monochromator was used to select 17-keV x-rays from the broadband APS bending magnet source of synchrotron radiation. The upstream , adjustable Mo collimators were then used to provide a series of x-ray source transverse sizes from 200 microns down to about 15-20 microns (FWHM) at the crystal surface. The emitted scintillator radiation was in this case lens coupled to the ANDOR Neo sCMOS camera, and the indirect x-ray images were processed offline by a MATLAB - based image processing program. Based on single Gaussian peak fits to the x-ray image projected profiles, we observed a 10.5 micron PSF. This sample thus exhibited superior spatial resolution to standard P43 polycrystalline phosphors of the same thickness which would have about a 100-micron PSF. Lastly, this single crystal resolution combined with the 88-mm diameter makes it a candidate to support future x-ray diffraction or wafer topography experiments.

  20. Full Field X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging Using Micro Pore Optics for Planetary Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D. F.; Gailhanou, M.; Walter, P.; Schyns, E.; Marchis, F.; Thompson, K.; Bristow, T.

    2016-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes leave evidence as small features in the sub-millimetre scale. Current planetary X-ray fluorescence spectrometers lack the spatial resolution to analyse such small features as they only provide global analyses of areas greater than 100 mm(exp 2). A micro-XRF spectrometer will be deployed on the NASA Mars 2020 rover to analyse spots as small as 120m. When using its line-scanning capacity combined to perpendicular scanning by the rover arm, elemental maps can be generated. We present a new instrument that provides full-field XRF imaging, alleviating the need for precise positioning and scanning mechanisms. The Mapping X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer - "Map-X" - will allow elemental imaging with approximately 100µm spatial resolution and simultaneously provide elemental chemistry at the scale where many relict physical, chemical and biological features can be imaged in ancient rocks. The arm-mounted Map-X instrument is placed directly on the surface of an object and held in a fixed position during measurements. A 25x25 mm(exp 2) surface area is uniformly illuminated with X-rays or alpha-particles and gamma-rays. A novel Micro Pore Optic focusses a fraction of the emitted X-ray fluorescence onto a CCD operated at a few frames per second. On board processing allows measuring the energy and coordinates of each X-ray photon collected. Large sets of frames are reduced into 2d histograms used to compute higher level data products such as elemental maps and XRF spectra from selected regions of interest. XRF spectra are processed on the ground to further determine quantitative elemental compositions. The instrument development will be presented with an emphasis on the characterization and modelling of the X-ray focussing Micro Pore Optic. An outlook on possible alternative XRF imaging applications will be discussed.

  1. Fast generation of virtual X-ray images for reconstruction of 3D anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlke, Moritz; Ramm, Heiko; Lamecker, Hans; Hege, Hans-Christian; Zachow, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    We propose a novel GPU-based approach to render virtual X-ray projections of deformable tetrahedral meshes. These meshes represent the shape and the internal density distribution of a particular anatomical structure and are derived from statistical shape and intensity models (SSIMs). We apply our method to improve the geometric reconstruction of 3D anatomy (e.g. pelvic bone) from 2D X-ray images. For that purpose, shape and density of a tetrahedral mesh are varied and virtual X-ray projections are generated within an optimization process until the similarity between the computed virtual X-ray and the respective anatomy depicted in a given clinical X-ray is maximized. The OpenGL implementation presented in this work deforms and projects tetrahedral meshes of high resolution (200.000+ tetrahedra) at interactive rates. It generates virtual X-rays that accurately depict the density distribution of an anatomy of interest. Compared to existing methods that accumulate X-ray attenuation in deformable meshes, our novel approach significantly boosts the deformation/projection performance. The proposed projection algorithm scales better with respect to mesh resolution and complexity of the density distribution, and the combined deformation and projection on the GPU scales better with respect to the number of deformation parameters. The gain in performance allows for a larger number of cycles in the optimization process. Consequently, it reduces the risk of being stuck in a local optimum. We believe that our approach will improve treatments in orthopedics, where 3D anatomical information is essential.

  2. Improving image quality in laboratory x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, F.; Marschner, M.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Noël, P.; Herzen, J.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2017-03-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast (gbPC) is known to provide significant benefits for biomedical imaging. To investigate these benefits, a high-sensitivity gbPC micro-CT setup for small (≍ 5 cm) biological samples has been constructed. Unfortunately, high differential-phase sensitivity leads to an increased magnitude of data processing artifacts, limiting the quality of tomographic reconstructions. Most importantly, processing of phase-stepping data with incorrect stepping positions can introduce artifacts resembling Moiré fringes to the projections. Additionally, the focal spot size of the X-ray source limits resolution of tomograms. Here we present a set of algorithms to minimize artifacts, increase resolution and improve visual impression of projections and tomograms from the examined setup. We assessed two algorithms for artifact reduction: Firstly, a correction algorithm exploiting correlations of the artifacts and differential-phase data was developed and tested. Artifacts were reliably removed without compromising image data. Secondly, we implemented a new algorithm for flatfield selection, which was shown to exclude flat-fields with strong artifacts. Both procedures successfully improved image quality of projections and tomograms. Deconvolution of all projections of a CT scan can minimize blurring introduced by the finite size of the X-ray source focal spot. Application of the Richardson-Lucy deconvolution algorithm to gbPC-CT projections resulted in an improved resolution of phase-contrast tomograms. Additionally, we found that nearest-neighbor interpolation of projections can improve the visual impression of very small features in phase-contrast tomograms. In conclusion, we achieved an increase in image resolution and quality for the investigated setup, which may lead to an improved detection of very small sample features, thereby maximizing the setup's utility.

  3. Three dimensional analysis of coelacanth body structure by computer graphics and X-ray CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Naoki (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Hamada, Takashi

    1990-06-01

    Three dimensional imaging processes were applied for the structural and functional analyses of the modern coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae). Visualization of the obtained images is performed with computer graphics on the basis of serial images by an X-ray CT scanning method. Reconstruction of three dimensional images of the body structure of coelacanth using the volume rendering and surface rendering methods provides us various information about external and internal shapes of this exquisite fish. (author).

  4. Luminescence imaging of water during irradiation of X-ray photons lower energy than Cerenkov- light threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Koyama, Shuji; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    Luminescence imaging of water using X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than maximum energy of ~200 keV is thought to be impossible because the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov- light. Contrary to this consensus assumption, we show that the luminescence imaging of water can be achieved by X-ray irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV. We placed water phantoms on a table with a conventional X-ray imaging system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during X-ray photon irradiation at energy below 120 keV. We also carried out such imaging of an acrylic block and plastic scintillator. The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during X-ray photon irradiation clearly showed X-ray photon distribution. The intensity of the X-ray photon images of the phantom increased almost proportionally to the number of X-ray irradiations. Lower-energy X-ray photon irradiation showed lower-intensity luminescence at the deeper parts of the phantom due to the higher X-ray absorption in the water phantom. Furthermore, lower-intensity luminescence also appeared at the deeper parts of the acrylic phantom due to its higher density than water. The intensity of the luminescence for water was 0.005% of that for plastic scintillator. Luminescence imaging of water during X-ray photon irradiation at energy lower than 120 keV was possible. This luminescence imaging method is promising for dose estimation in X-ray imaging systems.

  5. X-Ray Phase Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    cross sections,” Journal of Physical Chemistry Reference Data 4, 471–538 (1975); 32. L. Rudin , “Images, numerical analysis of singularities and shock...filters,” Report #TR:5250:87, Caltech, C,S, Dept. (1987). 33. L. I. Rudin , S. Osher, and E. Fatemi, “Nonlinear total variation based noise removal...the authors suggest a measure which can be employed as an appropriate image accuracy measure, which was first investigated by Rudin in [32]. 2.2. An

  6. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  7. Microfocus X-ray imaging of Brazil nuts for quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Margareth Kazuyo Kobayashi Dias, E-mail: mkfranco@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Yokaichiya, Fabiano, E-mail: fabiano.yokaichiya@helmholtz-berlin.de [Department Quantum Phenomena in Novel Materials, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlim für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Kardjilov, Nikolay, E-mail: kardjilov@helmholtz-berlim.de [Institut Angewandte Materialforschung, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlim für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Ferraz, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira, E-mail: carlos@feagri.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEAGRI/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Agricola

    2015-07-15

    Non-destructive quality assessment of food prior to processing is desirable in commercial facilities due to its non-invasive nature, for economic reasons and for its safety appeals. Grading Brazil nuts in this way allows for the separation of undesirable nuts to avoid contamination during the automatic nut shelling process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of X-ray phase contrast enhanced imaging in assessing nut quality. For this goal, details of the imaging technique are described and phase contrast X-ray and microtomography imaging of nut samples are investigated. Both high quality (i.e. 'sound' nuts as well as treated nuts were examined. It was concluded that both the X-ray imaging and tomography techniques have the potential to discriminate morphological features of the nut and to identify 'sound' kernels from atypical ones. Larger nuts and nuts with a larger gap area between shell and kernel were concluded to have more atypical formations. Both techniques also seemed promising for use in automatic sorting lines. However, by using microtomography, the visualization of finer formations not noticeable in the X-ray images was possible. Further studies shall be carried out to investigate the nature of these formations, how they affect nut quality and their evolution with storage time. (author)

  8. Hard X-ray spectroscopic nano-imaging of hierarchical functional materials at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2013-11-11

    Heterogeneous catalysts often consist of an active metal (oxide) in close contact with a support material and various promoter elements. Although macroscopic properties, such as activity, selectivity and stability, can be assessed with catalyst performance testing, the development of relevant, preferably quantitative structure-performance relationships require the use of advanced characterisation methods. Spectroscopic imaging in the hard X-ray region with nanometer-scale resolution has very recently emerged as a powerful approach to elucidate the hierarchical structure and related chemistry of catalytic solids in action under realistic reaction conditions. This X-ray-based chemical imaging method benefits from the combination of high resolution (∼30 nm) with large X-ray penetration and depth of focus, and the possibility for probing large areas with mosaic imaging. These capabilities make it possible to obtain spatial and temporal information on chemical changes in catalytic solids as well as a wide variety of other functional materials, such as fuel cells and batteries, in their full complexity and integrity. In this concept article we provide details on the method and setup of full-field hard X-ray spectroscopic imaging, illustrate its potential for spatiotemporal chemical imaging by making use of recent showcases, outline the pros and cons of this experimental approach and discuss some future directions for hierarchical functional materials research.

  9. High-Resolution X-Ray Lensless Imaging by Differential Holographic Encoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Diling [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Wu, Benny [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Scherz, Andreas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Material and Energy Science; Acremann, Yves [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Photon Ultrafast Laser Science and Engineering Inst. (PULSE); Tyliszczak, Tolek [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source (ALS); Fischer, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Center for X-ray Optics; Friedenberger, Nina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Ollefs, Katharina [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Farle, Michael [Universitat Duisburg-Essen (Germany). Dept. of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE); Fienup, James R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Inst. of Optics; Stöhr, Joachim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    2010-07-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by split and- delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with state of-the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  10. Design of MiSolFA Hard X-Ray Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastufka, Erica; Casadei, Diego

    2017-08-01

    Advances in the study of coronal electron-accelerating regions have so far been limited by the dynamic range of X-ray instruments. A quick and economical alternative to desirable focusing optics technology is stereo observation. The micro-satellite MiSolFA (Micro Solar-Flare Apparatus) is designed both as a stand-alone X-ray imaging spectrometer and a complement to the Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) mission. These instruments will be the first pair of cross-calibrated X-ray imaging spectrometers to look at solar flares from very different points of view. MiSolFA will achieve indirect imaging between 10 and 60 keV and provide spectroscopy up to 100 keV, equipped with grids producing moiré patterns in a similar way to STIX. New manufacturing techniques produce gold gratings on a graphite or silicon substrate, with periods ranging from 15 to 225 micrometers, separated by a distance of 15.47 cm, to achieve a spatial resolutions from 10" to 60" (as compared to RHESSI's separation of 150 cm and 1" resolution). We present the progress of the imager design, the performance of the first prototypes, and reach out to the community for further scientific objectives to consider in optimizing the final design.

  11. BodyPart Detection in X-Ray Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeanne, V.; Unay, D.

    2008-01-01

    Medical Image Classification& Retrieval is nowadays a hot topic. Many projects already exist in this field, like the IRMA project, but the obtained results are not yet good enough for real implementation. The goal of this report is to investigate in features that could enable a good performance fo

  12. X-ray imaging of spin currents and magnetisation dynamics at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Understanding how spins move in time and space is the aim of both fundamental and applied research in modern magnetism. Over the past three decades, research in this field has led to technological advances that have had a major impact on our society, while improving the understanding of the fundamentals of spin physics. However, important questions still remain unanswered, because it is experimentally challenging to directly observe spins and their motion with a combined high spatial and temporal resolution. In this article, we present an overview of the recent advances in x-ray microscopy that allow researchers to directly watch spins move in time and space at the microscopically relevant scales. We discuss scanning x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) at resonant soft x-ray edges, which is available at most modern synchrotron light sources. This technique measures magnetic contrast through the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effect at the resonant absorption edges, while focusing the x-ray radiation at the nanometre scale, and using the intrinsic pulsed structure of synchrotron-generated x-rays to create time-resolved images of magnetism at the nanoscale. In particular, we discuss how the presence of spin currents can be detected by imaging spin accumulation, and how the magnetisation dynamics in thin ferromagnetic films can be directly imaged. We discuss how a direct look at the phenomena allows for a deeper understanding of the the physics at play, that is not accessible to other, more indirect techniques. Finally, we present an overview of the exciting opportunities that lie ahead to further understand the fundamentals of novel spin physics, opportunities offered by the appearance of diffraction limited storage rings and free electron lasers.

  13. Feasibility study of on-line digital X-ray imaging for irradiated fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthoens, Y.; Gys, A. [Reactor Material Research Department, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Smolders, V. [Industrial Engineer Department, Katholieke Hogeschool Kempen, Geel (Belgium)

    2003-07-01

    At the Reactor Material Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN Xray imaging of the internal parts of irradiated fuel rods is done on silver-halide films using a 420 kV X-ray source. The replacement of the films by an on-line digital X-ray imaging system implies several advantages. Images can be evaluated instantly and source parameters can be optimized more easily. Time consuming film development is superfluous. The images can digitally be enhanced, processed, reported and archived. Within this work the feasibility of four commercial on-line digital X-ray imaging systems were studied for post-irradiation examination on fuel rods in a hot cell environment. The criteria to evaluate the systems were image quality, integration in the existing hot cell infrastructure, durability and cost price. For the evaluation and comparison of the image quality a simulation fuel rod was fabricated. Three systems suffered from lack of sensitivity, contrast and/or resolution. Only the CsI-scintillator coupled to a CCD-camera with image intensifier gave a sufficient image quality. On the other hand the image intensifiers' dimensions are difficult to integrate in the existing hot cell infrastructure. Also the durability of intensifier screens is questionable as they are susceptible to image burn. Smaller image intensifiers easier to integrate are commercial available nowadays.

  14. Rest-wavelength fiducials for the ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Graf, A T; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Leutenegger, M A; Porter, F S

    2012-10-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W(64+), which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin "the way") core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf Lβ(3) line and the Ir Lα(2) line, which bracket the W(64+) line by ±30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir Lα(1) and Lα(2) lines and the Hf Lβ(1) and Lβ(2) lines, which bracket the W(64+) line by ±40 and ±160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W(64+) line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer.

  15. X-ray Birefringence Imaging of Materials with Anisotropic Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Benjamin A; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R; Kariuki, Benson M; Harris, Kenneth D M; Dolbnya, Igor P; Collins, Stephen P; Sutter, John P

    2015-02-05

    The X-ray birefringence imaging (XBI) technique, reported very recently, is a sensitive tool for spatially resolved mapping of the local orientational properties of anisotropic materials. In this paper, we report the first XBI measurements on materials that undergo anisotropic molecular dynamics. Using incident linearly polarized X-rays with energy close to the Br K-edge, the X-ray birefringence is dictated by the orientational properties of the C-Br bonds in the material. We focus on two materials (urea inclusion compounds containing 1,8-dibromooctane and 1,10-dibromodecane guest molecules) for which the reorientational dynamics of the brominated guest molecules (and hence the reorientational dynamics of the C-Br bonds) are already well characterized by other experimental techniques. The XBI results demonstrate clearly that, for the anisotropic molecular dynamics in these materials, the effective X-ray optic axis for the X-ray birefringence phenomenon is the time-averaged resultant of the orientational distribution of the C-Br bonds.

  16. Rest-wavelength Fiducials for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Graf, A. T.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W64+, which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin the way) core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf L3 line and the Ir L2 line, which bracket the W64+ line by 30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir L1 and L2 lines and the Hf L1 and L2 lines, which bracket the W64+ line by 40 and 160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W64+ line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer

  17. CIX - A Detector for Spectral Enhanced X-ray Imaging by Simultaneous Counting and Integrating

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Kraft, E; Wermes, N; Fischer, P; Peric, I; Herrmann, C; Overdick, M; Rütten, W

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid pixel detector based on the concept of simultaneous charge integration and photon counting will be presented. The second generation of a counting and integrating X-ray prototype CMOS chip (CIX) has been operated with different direct converting sensor materials (CdZnTe and CdTe) bump bonded to its 8x8 pixel matrix. Photon counting devices give excellent results for low to medium X-ray fluxes but saturate at high rates while charge integration allows the detection of very high fluxes but is limited at low rates by the finite signal to noise ratio. The combination of both signal processing concepts therefore extends the resolvable dynamic range of the X-ray detector. In addition, for a large region of the dynamic range, where counter and integrator operate simultaneously, the mean energy of the detected X-ray spectrum can be calculated. This spectral information can be used to enhance the contrast of the X-ray image. The advantages of the counting and integrating signal processing concept and the perfo...

  18. Detective quantum efficiency of medical x-ray image intensifiers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thirlwall, JT

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available .J.B.Reed,ElectronMicroprobeAnalysis~CambridgeUniversityPress, Cambridge,England,1975!.p.262. 13 S.J.B.Reed,inRef.12,p.271. 14 S.J.B.ReedandN.G.Ware,J.Phys.E5,582~1972!. 15 R.K.Swank,J.Appl.Phys.45,3673~1974!. 16 J.D.Kingsley,inReal-TimeRadiologicImaging:MedicalandIndustrial Applications...

  19. Soft x-ray imaging with incoherent sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P.; Torrisi, A.; Ayele, M.; Bartnik, A.; Czwartos, J.; Wegrzyński, Ł.; Fok, T.; Parkman, T.; Vondrová, Š.; Turnová, J.; Odstrcil, M.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we present experimental, compact desk-top SXR microscope, the EUV microscope which is at this stage a technology demonstrator, and finally, the SXR contact microscope. The systems are based on laser-plasma EUV and SXR sources, employing a double stream gas puff target. The EUV and SXR full field microscopes, operating at 13.8 nm and 2.88 nm wavelengths, respectively, are capable of imaging nanostructures with a sub-50 nm spatial resolution with relatively short (seconds) exposure times. The SXR contact microscope operates in the "water-window" spectral range, to produce an imprint of the internal structure of the sample in a thin layer of SXR light sensitive photoresist. Applications of such desk-top EUV and SXR microscopes for studies of variety of different samples - test objects for resolution assessment and other objects such as carbon membranes, DNA plasmid samples, organic and inorganic thin layers, diatoms, algae and carcinoma cells, are also presented. Details about the sources, the microscopes as well as the imaging results for various objects will be presented and discussed. The development of such compact imaging systems may be important to the new research related to biological, material science and nanotechnology applications.

  20. Tracking the density evolution in counter-propagating shock waves using imaging X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kraus, D.; Benage, J. F.; Drake, R. P.; Efthimion, P.; Falk, K.; Falcone, R. W.; Fletcher, L. B.; Galtier, E.; Gauthier, M.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Heimann, P.; Hill, K.; Keiter, P. A.; Lu, J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nagler, B.; Pablant, N.; Schropp, A.; Tobias, B.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    We present results from time-resolved X-ray imaging and inelastic scattering on collective excitations. These data are then employed to infer the mass density evolution within laser-driven shock waves. In our experiments, thin carbon foils are first strongly compressed and then driven into a dense state by counter-propagating shock waves. The different measurements agree that the graphite sample is about twofold compressed when the shock waves collide, and a sharp increase in forward scattering indicates disassembly of the sample 1 ns thereafter. We can benchmark hydrodynamics simulations of colliding shock waves by the X-ray scattering methods employed.

  1. Towards multi-order hard X-ray imaging with multilayer zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Markus; Eberl, Christian; Döring, Florian; Wilke, Robin N; Wallentin, Jesper; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich; Sprung, Michael; Salditt, Tim

    2015-02-01

    This article describes holographic imaging experiments using a hard X-ray multilayer zone plate (MZP) with an outermost zone width of 10 nm at a photon energy of 18 keV. An order-sorting aperture (OSA) is omitted and emulated during data analysis by a 'software OSA'. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy usually carried out in the focal plane is generalized to the holographic regime. The MZP focus is characterized by a three-plane phase-retrieval algorithm to an FWHM of 10 nm.

  2. Near-field speckle-scanning-based x-ray imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Berujon, Sebastien; Ziegler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The x-ray near-field speckle-scanning concept is an approach recently introduced to obtain absorption, phase, and dark-field images of a sample. In this paper, we present ways of recovering from a sample its ultrasmall-angle x-ray scattering distribution using numerical deconvolution. We also show how to access the 2D phase gradient signal from random step scans, the latter having the potential to elude the flat-field correction error. Each feature is explained theoretically and demonstrated ...

  3. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

  4. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-08-22

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY.

  5. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Defects in Biological Macromolecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z. W.; Lai, B.; Chu, Y. S.; Cai, Z.; Mancini, D. C.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Characterization of defects and/or disorder in biological macromolecular crystals presents much greater challenges than in conventional small-molecule crystals. The lack of sufficient contrast of defects is often a limiting factor in x-ray diffraction topography of protein crystals. This has seriously hampered efforts to understand mechanisms and origins of formation of imperfections, and the role of defects as essential entities in the bulk of macromolecular crystals. In this report, we employ a phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging approach for augmenting the contrast of defects in protein crystals.

  6. X-ray dark-field imaging for detection of foreign bodies in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mikkel Schou; Lauridsen, Torsten; Feidenhans'l, Robert Krarup;

    2013-01-01

    Conventional X-ray transmission radiography has long been used for online detection of foreign bodies in food products relying on the absorption contrast between the foreign body and food product. In this paper, we present a novel approach for detection of organic foreign bodies such as paper...... and insects in two food products using X-ray dark-field imaging with a grating interferometer. The ability to detect the foreign bodies is quantified using a measure of the contrast-to-noise ratio. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd....

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  8. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, F. J.; Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2015-12-01

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  9. Imaging of Biological Materials and Cells by X-ray Scattering and Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hémonnot, Clément Y J; Köster, Sarah

    2017-09-26

    Cells and biological materials are large objects in comparison to the size of internal components such as organelles and proteins. An understanding of the functions of these nanoscale elements is key to elucidating cellular function. In this review, we describe the advances in X-ray scattering and diffraction techniques for imaging biological systems at the nanoscale. We present a number of principal technological advances in X-ray optics and development of sample environments. We identify radiation damage as one of the most severe challenges in the field, thus rendering the dose an important parameter when putting different X-ray methods in perspective. Furthermore, we describe different successful approaches, including scanning and full-field techniques, along with prominent examples. Finally, we present a few recent studies that combined several techniques in one experiment in order to collect highly complementary data for a multidimensional sample characterization.

  10. Geometrical Calibration of X-Ray Imaging With RGB Cameras for 3D Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiol, Francisco; Corbi, Alberto; Albiol, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We present a methodology to recover the geometrical calibration of conventional X-ray settings with the help of an ordinary video camera and visible fiducials that are present in the scene. After calibration, equivalent points of interest can be easily identifiable with the help of the epipolar geometry. The same procedure also allows the measurement of real anatomic lengths and angles and obtains accurate 3D locations from image points. Our approach completely eliminates the need for X-ray-opaque reference marks (and necessary supporting frames) which can sometimes be invasive for the patient, occlude the radiographic picture, and end up projected outside the imaging sensor area in oblique protocols. Two possible frameworks are envisioned: a spatially shifting X-ray anode around the patient/object and a moving patient that moves/rotates while the imaging system remains fixed. As a proof of concept, experiences with a device under test (DUT), an anthropomorphic phantom and a real brachytherapy session have been carried out. The results show that it is possible to identify common points with a proper level of accuracy and retrieve three-dimensional locations, lengths and shapes with a millimetric level of precision. The presented approach is simple and compatible with both current and legacy widespread diagnostic X-ray imaging deployments and it can represent a good and inexpensive alternative to other radiological modalities like CT.

  11. Spinal curvature determination from an X-ray image using a deformable model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sardjono, T.A.; Wilkinson, M.H.F.; Ooijen, P.M.A. van; Veldhuizen, A.G.; Purnama, K.E.; Verkerke, G.J.; Ibrahim, F; Osman, NAA; Usman, J; Kadri, NA

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a spinal curvature determination from frontal X-ray images of scoliotic patients. A new deformable model, Modified CPM (Charged Particles Model), has been developed and used to determine the spinal curvature. The Modified CPM is a new approach of a deformable model based on CPM,

  12. 3D Prior Image Constrained Projection Completion for X-ray CT Metal Artifact Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Rahmim, Arman; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-01-01

    The presence of metallic implants in the body of patients undergoing X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations often results insevere streaking artifacts that degrade image quality. In this work, we propose a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm for 2D fan-beam and 3D cone-beam CT based on

  13. Single-grain Silicon Technology for Large Area X-ray Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flat panel X-ray imagers are currently using a-Si and poly-Si thin-film-transistors (TFTs). a-Si TFT permits the use of large area substrates, however, due to the amorphous nature, the carrier mobility is very low (<1 cm2/Vs). Poly-Si TFT improves the mobility (~150 cm2/Vs) but due to random

  14. A multiple-plate, multiple-pinhole camera for X-ray gamma-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    Plates with identical patterns of precisely aligned pinholes constitute lens system which, when rotated about optical axis, produces continuous high resolution image of small energy X-ray or gamma ray source. Camera has applications in radiation treatment and nuclear medicine.

  15. Edgeless silicon sensors for Medipix-based large-area X-ray imaging detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, M.J.; Visser, J.; Evrard, O.; de Moor, P.; de Munck, K.; Sabuncuoglu Tezcan, D.; Koffeman, E.N.

    2011-01-01

    Some X-ray imaging applications demand sensitive areas exceeding the active area of a single sensor. This requires a seamless tessellation of multiple detector modules with edgeless sensors. Our research is aimed at minimising the insensitive periphery that isolates the active area from the edge. Re

  16. Hohlraum Target Alignment from X-ray Detector Images using Starburst Design Patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, R R; Conder, A; Edwards, O; Kroll, J; Kozioziemski, B; Mapoles, E; McGuigan, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2010-12-14

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  17. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using pro...

  18. Single-grain Silicon Technology for Large Area X-ray Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flat panel X-ray imagers are currently using a-Si and poly-Si thin-film-transistors (TFTs). a-Si TFT permits the use of large area substrates, however, due to the amorphous nature, the carrier mobility is very low (<1 cm2/Vs). Poly-Si TFT improves the mobility (~150 cm2/Vs) but due to random

  19. Image-based characterization of microfocus x-ray target failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Vance S.; Raber, Thomas; Ross, William R.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray targets in microfocus x-ray tubes fail primarily due to sublimation and evaporation of tungsten while exposed to the electron beam. The temperature at the point of impact of the electron beam depends on the beam energy (200-300 kV), the beam current (<10 mA), the cross section (<1 mm) and the intensity profile. In order to preserve the target for a reasonable lifetime, temperatures at the spot do not typically exceed 2500 C. As tungsten evaporates from the surface of the target, the surface starts to pit and this can affect the x-ray production in multiple ways: the photon flux decreases, the heel effect is enhanced, the effective spot size changes shape and/or size. Indirectly, the target damage incurred over time or due to intense use will undermine the image quality by reducing image contrast, changing the resolution or degrading the signal to noise ratio. A detailed description of how x-ray target damage is incurred and the potential impact on image quality is reviewed in detail. Experimental results showing the target damage and associated loss of image quality are discussed.

  20. 77 FR 27463 - Device Improvements for Pediatric X-Ray Imaging; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... instructions for pediatric digital radiography (Ref. 8) and fluoroscopy (ongoing project). These materials will... follows: ``Manufacturers seeking marketing clearance for a new x-ray imaging device with a pediatric.... Manufacturers who seek marketing clearance only for general indications or do not submit adequate data to...