WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-dimensional turbulent boundary

  1. Two-dimensional energy spectra in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Dileep; Baidya, Rio; Monty, Jason; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    The current study measures the two-dimensional (2D) spectra of streamwise velocity component (u) in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer for the first time. A 2D spectra shows the contribution of streamwise (λx) and spanwise (λy) length scales to the streamwise variance at a given wall height (z). 2D spectra could be a better tool to analyse spectral scaling laws as it is devoid of energy aliasing errors that could be present in one-dimensional spectra. A novel method is used to calculate the 2D spectra from the 2D correlation of u which is obtained by measuring velocity time series at various spanwise locations using hot-wire anemometry. At low Reynolds number, the shape of the 2D spectra at a constant energy level shows λy √{ zλx } behaviour at larger scales which is in agreement with the literature. However, at high Reynolds number, it is observed that the square-root relationship gradually transforms into a linear relationship (λy λx) which could be caused by the large packets of eddies whose length grows proportionately to the growth of its width. Additionally, we will show that this linear relationship observed at high Reynolds number is consistent with attached eddy predictions. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the Australian Research Council.

  2. Turbulent Friction in the Boundary Layer of a Flat Plate in a Two-Dimensional Compressible Flow at High Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, F.; Voishel, V.

    1943-01-01

    In the present report an investigation is made on a flat plate in a two-dimensional compressible flow of the effect of compressibility and heating on the turbulent frictional drag coefficient in the boundary layer of an airfoil or wing radiator. The analysis is based on the Prandtl-Karman theory of the turbulent boundary later and the Stodola-Crocco, theorem on the linear relation between the total energy of the flow and its velocity. Formulas are obtained for the velocity distribution and the frictional drag law in a turbulent boundary later with the compressibility effect and heat transfer taken into account. It is found that with increase of compressibility and temperature at full retardation of the flow (the temperature when the velocity of the flow at a given point is reduced to zero in case of an adiabatic process in the gas) at a constant R (sub x), the frictional drag coefficient C (sub f) decreased, both of these factors acting in the same sense.

  3. Structure of two-dimensional and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers with sparsely distributed roughness elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jacob

    The present study deals with the effects of sparsely distributed three-dimensional elements on two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent boundary layers (TBL) such as those that occur on submarines, ship hulls, etc. This study was achieved in three parts: Part 1 dealt with the cylinders when placed individually in the turbulent boundary layers, thereby considering the effect of a single perturbation on the TBL; Part 2 considered the effects when the same individual elements were placed in a sparse and regular distribution, thus studying the response of the flow to a sequence of perturbations; and in Part 3, the distributions were subjected to 3-D turbulent boundary layers, thus examining the effects of streamwise and spanwise pressure gradients on the same perturbed flows as considered in Part 2. The 3-D turbulent boundary layers were generated by an idealized wing-body junction flow. Detailed 3-velocity-component Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and other measurements were carried out to understand and describe the rough-wall flow structure. The measurements include mean velocities, turbulence quantities (Reynolds stresses and triple products), skin friction, surface pressure and oil flow visualizations in 2-D and 3-D rough-wall flows for Reynolds numbers, based on momentum thickness, greater than 7000. Very uniform circular cylindrical roughness elements of 0.38mm, 0.76mm and 1.52mm height (k) were used in square and diagonal patterns, yielding six different roughness geometries of rough-wall surface. For the 2-D rough-wall flows, the roughness Reynolds numbers, k +, based on the element height (k) and the friction velocity (Utau), range from 26 to 131. Results for the 2-D rough-wall flows reveal that the velocity-defect law is similar for both smooth and rough surfaces, and the semi-logarithmic velocity-distribution curve is shifted by an amount DeltaU/U, depending on the height of the roughness element, showing that Delta U/Utau is a function

  4. A Numerical Scheme Based on an Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Turbulent Flows with Shocks: Application to Two-Dimensional Flows around Cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Takahashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational code adopting immersed boundary methods for compressible gas-particle multiphase turbulent flows is developed and validated through two-dimensional numerical experiments. The turbulent flow region is modeled by a second-order pseudo skew-symmetric form with minimum dissipation, while the monotone upstream-centered scheme for conservation laws (MUSCL scheme is employed in the shock region. The present scheme is applied to the flow around a two-dimensional cylinder under various freestream Mach numbers. Compared with the original MUSCL scheme, the minimum dissipation enabled by the pseudo skew-symmetric form significantly improves the resolution of the vortex generated in the wake while retaining the shock capturing ability. In addition, the resulting aerodynamic force is significantly improved. Also, the present scheme is successfully applied to moving two-cylinder problems.

  5. Intermittency measurement in two dimensional bacterial turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Xiang; Huang, Yongxiang; Chen, Ming; Lu, Zhiming; Liu, Yulu; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental velocity database of a bacterial collective motion , e.g., \\textit{B. subtilis}, in turbulent phase with volume filling fraction $84\\%$ provided by Professor Goldstein at the Cambridge University UK, was analyzed to emphasize the scaling behavior of this active turbulence system. This was accomplished by performing a Hilbert-based methodology analysis to retrieve the scaling property without the $\\beta-$limitation. A dual-power-law behavior separated by the viscosity scale $\\ell_{\

  6. Nonlocal bottleneck effect in two-dimensional turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biskamp, D; Schwarz, E

    1998-01-01

    The bottleneck pileup in the energy spectrum is investigated for several two-dimensional (2D) turbulence systems by numerical simulation using high-order diffusion terms to amplify the effect, which is weak for normal diffusion. For 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, 2D electron MHD (EMHD) turbulence and 2D thermal convection, which all exhibit direct energy cascades, a nonlocal behavior is found resulting in a logarithmic enhancement of the spectrum.

  7. Magnetic reconnection in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidio, S; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Cassak, P A; Dmitruk, P

    2009-03-20

    Systematic analysis of numerical simulations of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence reveals the presence of a large number of X-type neutral points where magnetic reconnection occurs. We examine the statistical properties of this ensemble of reconnection events that are spontaneously generated by turbulence. The associated reconnection rates are distributed over a wide range of values and scales with the geometry of the diffusion region. Locally, these events can be described through a variant of the Sweet-Parker model, in which the parameters are externally controlled by turbulence. This new perspective on reconnection is relevant in space and astrophysical contexts, where plasma is generally in a fully turbulent regime.

  8. Two-Dimensional Turbulent Separated Flow. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    of detached turbulent boundary layers, even when the sign of U is changed to account for mean backflows. Thus, earlier researchers, such as Kuhn and...Turbulent Shear Layer," Third Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows, pp. 16.23-16.29. Hillier, R., Latour , M.E.M.P., and Cherry, N.J. (1983), "Unsteady...344. Kuhn , G.D. and Nielsen, J.N. (1971), "An Analytical Method for Calculating Turbulent Separated Flows Due to Adverse Pressure Gradients

  9. Local kinetic effects in two-dimensional plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidio, S; Valentini, F; Califano, F; Veltri, P

    2012-01-27

    Using direct numerical simulations of a hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell model, kinetic processes are investigated in a two-dimensional turbulent plasma. In the turbulent regime, kinetic effects manifest through a deformation of the ion distribution function. These patterns of non-Maxwellian features are concentrated in space nearby regions of strong magnetic activity: the distribution function is modulated by the magnetic topology, and can elongate along or across the local magnetic field. These results open a new path on the study of kinetic processes such as heating, particle acceleration, and temperature anisotropy, commonly observed in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  10. Consistent theory of turbulent transport in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-jin

    2006-03-03

    A theory of turbulent transport is presented in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics with background shear and magnetic fields. We provide theoretical predictions for the transport of magnetic flux, momentum, and particles and turbulent intensities, which show stronger reduction compared with the hydrodynamic case, with different dependences on shearing rate, magnetic field, and values of viscosity, Ohmic diffusion, and particle diffusivity. In particular, particle transport is more severely suppressed than momentum transport, effectively leading to a more efficient momentum transport. The role of magnetic fields in quenching transport without altering the amplitude of flow velocity and in inhibiting the generation of shear flows is elucidated. Implications of the results are discussed.

  11. Velocity Statistics in the Two-Dimensional Granular Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Isobe, Masaharu

    2003-01-01

    We studied the macroscopic statistical properties on the freely evolving quasi-elastic hard disk (granular) system by performing a large-scale (up to a few million particles) event-driven molecular dynamics systematically and found that remarkably analogous to an enstrophy cascade process in the decaying two-dimensional fluid turbulence. There are four typical stages in the freely evolving inelastic hard disk system, which are homogeneous, shearing (vortex), clustering and final state. In the...

  12. Statistical study of approximations to two dimensional inviscid turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaz, H.M.

    1977-09-01

    A numerical technique is developed for studying the ergodic and mixing hypotheses for the dynamical systems arising from the truncated Fourier transformed two-dimensional inviscid Navier-Stokes equations. This method has the advantage of exactly conserving energy and entropy (i.e., total vorticity) in the inviscid case except for numerical error in solving the ordinary differential equations. The development of the mathematical model as an approximation to a real physical (turbulent) flow and the numerical results obtained are discussed.

  13. Interaction of two-dimensional turbulence with a sheared channel flow: a numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Leon; Marques Rosas Fernandes, Vitor; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of large-scale flows with turbulence is of fundamental and widespread importance in geophysical fluid dynamics and also, more recently for the dynamics of fusion plasma. More specifically the interplay between two-dimensional turbulence and so-called zonal flows has gained considerable interest because of its relevance for transport and associated barriers. We present numerical results on the interaction of driven two-dimensional turbulence with typical sheared channel flows (Couette and Poiseuille). It turns out that a linear shear rate that is being sustained by moving channel walls (Couette flow) is far more effective in suppressing turbulence and associated transport than a Poiseuille flow. We explore the mechanisms behind this in relation to the width of the channel and the strength of the shear of the background flow. Also the prominent role played by the no-slip boundaries and the Reynolds stress is discussed.

  14. A renormalization group analysis of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wenli Z.; Diamond, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    The renormalization group (RNG) method is used to study the physics of two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. It is shown that, for a turbulent magnetofluid in two dimensions, no RNG transformation fixed point exists on account of the coexistence of energy transfer to small scales and mean-square magnetic flux transfer to large scales. The absence of a fixed point renders the RNG method incapable of describing the 2D MHD system. A similar conclusion is reached for 2D hydrodynamics, where enstrophy flows to small scales and energy to large scales. These analyses suggest that the applicability of the RNG method to turbulent systems is intrinsically limited, especially in the case of systems with dual-direction transfer.

  15. Broken Ergodicity in Two-Dimensional Homogeneous Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence has many of the same qualitative features as three-dimensional (3-D) homogeneous MHD turbulence.The se features include several ideal invariants, along with the phenomenon of broken ergodicity. Broken ergodicity appears when certain modes act like random variables with mean values that are large compared to their standard deviations, indicating a coherent structure or dynamo.Recently, the origin of broken ergodicity in 3-D MHD turbulence that is manifest in the lowest wavenumbers was explained. Here, a detailed description of the origins of broken ergodicity in 2-D MHD turbulence is presented. It will be seen that broken ergodicity in ideal 2-D MHD turbulence can be manifest in the lowest wavenumbers of a finite numerical model for certain initial conditions or in the highest wavenumbers for another set of initial conditions.T he origins of broken ergodicity in ideal 2-D homogeneous MHD turbulence are found through an eigen analysis of the covariance matrices of the modal probability density functions.It will also be shown that when the lowest wavenumber magnetic field becomes quasi-stationary, the higher wavenumber modes can propagate as Alfven waves on these almost static large-scale magnetic structures

  16. The Persistence Problem in Two-Dimensional Fluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Perlekar, Prasad; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Pandit, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    We present a natural framework for studying the persistence problem in two-dimensional fluid turbulence by using the Okubo-Weiss parameter {\\Lambda} to distinguish between vortical and extensional regions. We then use a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with Ekman friction to study probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the persistence times of vortical and extensional regions by employing both Eulerian and Lagrangian measurements. We find that, in the Eulerian case, the persistence-time PDFs have exponential tails; by contrast, this PDF for Lagrangian particles, in vortical regions, has a power-law tail with a universal exponent {\\theta} = 3.1 \\pm 0.2.

  17. Enstrophy inertial range dynamics in generalized two-dimensional turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwayama, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    We show that the transition to a k-1 spectrum in the enstrophy inertial range of generalized two-dimensional turbulence can be derived analytically using the eddy damped quasinormal Markovianized (EDQNM) closure. The governing equation for the generalized two-dimensional fluid system includes a nonlinear term with a real parameter α . This parameter controls the relationship between the stream function and generalized vorticity and the nonlocality of the dynamics. An asymptotic analysis accounting for the overwhelming dominance of nonlocal triads allows the k-1 spectrum to be derived based upon a scaling analysis. We thereby provide a detailed analytical explanation for the scaling transition that occurs in the enstrophy inertial range at α =2 in terms of the spectral dynamics of the EDQNM closure, which extends and enhances the usual phenomenological explanations.

  18. Dynamic Multiscaling in Two-dimensional Fluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Perlekar, Prasad; Pandit, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We obtain, by extensive direct numerical simulations, time-dependent and equal-time structure functions for the vorticity, in both quasi-Lagrangian and Eulerian frames, for the direct-cascade regime in two-dimensional fluid turbulence with air-drag-induced friction. We show that different ways of extracting time scales from these time-dependent structure functions lead to different dynamic-multiscaling exponents, which are related to equal-time multiscaling exponents by different classes of bridge relations; for a representative value of the friction we verify that, given our error bars, these bridge relations hold.

  19. On final states of two-dimensional decaying turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Numerical and analytical studies of final states of two-dimensional (2D) decaying turbulence are carried out. The first part of this work is trying to give a definition for final states of 2D decaying turbulence. The functional relation of ω-ψ, which is frequently adopted as the characterization of those final states, is merely a sufficient but not necessary condition; moreover, it is not proper to use it as the definition. It is found that the method through the value of the effective area S covered by the scatter ω-ψ plot, initially suggested by Read, Rhines, and White ["Geostrophic scatter diagrams and potential vorticity dynamics," J. Atmos. Sci. 43, 3226 (1986)] is more general and suitable for the definition. Based on this concept, a definition is presented, which covers all existing results in late states of decaying 2D flows (including some previous unexplainable weird double-valued ω-ψ scatter plots). The remaining part of the paper is trying to further study 2D decaying turbulence with the assistance of this definition. Some numerical results, leading to "bar" final states and further verifying the predictive ability of statistical mechanics [Yin, Montgomery, and Clercx, "Alternative statistical-mechanical descriptions of decaying two-dimensional turbulence in terms of patches and points," Phys. Fluids 15, 1937 (2003)], are reported. It is realized that some simulations with narrow-band energy spectral initial conditions result in some final states that cannot be very well interpreted by the statistical theory (meanwhile, those final states are still in the scope of the definition).

  20. Confinement and dynamical regulation in two-dimensional convective turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low-frequency bur......In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low......-frequency bursting in the fluctuation level and the convective heat flux integral, both resulting in a state of large-scale intermittency. The first one involves the control of convective transport by sheared mean flows. This regulation relies on the conservative transfer of kinetic energy from tilted fluctuations...... to the mean component of the flow. Bursting can also result from the quasi-linear modification of the linear instability drive which is the mean pressure gradient. For each bursting process the relevant zero-dimensional model equations are given. These are finally coupled in a minimal model of convection...

  1. Two-Dimensional turbulence in the inverse cascade range

    CERN Document Server

    Yakhot, V

    1999-01-01

    A theory of two-dimensional turbulence in the inverse energy cascade range is presented. Strong time-dependence of the large-scale features of the flow ($\\bar{u^{2}}\\propto t$) results in decoupling of the large-scale dynamics from statistically steady-state small-scale random processes. This time-dependence is also a reason for the localness of the pressure-gradient terms in the equations governing the small-scale velocity difference PDF's. The derived expressions for the pressure gradient contributions lead to a gaussian statistics of transverse velocity differences. The solution for the PDF of longitudinal velocity differences is based on a smallness of the energy flux in two-dimensional turbulence. The theory makes a few quantitative predictions which can be tested experimentally. One of the most surprising results, derived in this paper, is that the small-scale transverse velocity differences are governed by a linear Langevin-like equation, strirred by a non-local universal gaussian random force. This ex...

  2. Velocity statistics in two-dimensional granular turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Masaharu

    2003-10-01

    We studied the macroscopic statistical properties on the freely evolving quasielastic hard disk (granular) system by performing a large-scale (up to a few million particles) event-driven molecular dynamics systematically and found it to be remarkably analogous to an enstrophy cascade process in the decaying two-dimensional fluid turbulence. There are four typical stages in the freely evolving inelastic hard disk system, which are homogeneous, shearing (vortex), clustering, and final state. In the shearing stage, the self-organized macroscopic coherent vortices become dominant. In the clustering stage, the energy spectra are close to the expectation of Kraichnan-Batchelor theory and the squared two-particle separation strictly obeys Richardson law.

  3. The modified cumulant expansion for two-dimensional isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, T.; Yanase, S.

    1981-09-01

    The two-dimensional isotropic turbulence in an incompressible fluid is investigated using the modified zero fourth-order cumulant approximation. The dynamical equation for the energy spectrum obtained under this approximation is solved numerically and the similarity laws governing the solution in the energy-containing and enstrophy-dissipation ranges are derived analytically. At large Reynolds numbers the numerical solutions yield the k to the -3rd power inertial subrange spectrum which was predicted by Kraichnan (1967), Leith (1968) and Batchelor (1969), assuming a finite enstrophy dissipation in the inviscid limit. The energy-containing range is found to satisfy an inviscid similarity while the enstrophy-dissipation range is governed by the quasi-equilibrium similarity with respect to the enstrophy dissipation as proposed by Batchelor (1969). There exists a critical time which separates the initial period and the similarity period in which the enstrophy dissipation vanishes and remains non-zero respectively in the inviscid limit.

  4. Hilbert Statistics of Vorticity Scaling in Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, H S; Meng, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the scaling property of the inverse energy cascade and forward enstrophy cascade of the vorticity filed $\\omega(x,y)$ in two-dimensional (2D) turbulence is analyzed. This is accomplished by applying a Hilbert-based technique, namely Hilbert-Huang Transform, to a vorticity field obtained from a $8192^2$ grid-points direct numerical simulation of the 2D turbulence with a forcing scale $k_f=100$ and an Ekman friction. The measured joint probability density function $p(C,k)$ of mode $C_i(x)$ of the vorticity $\\omega$ and instantaneous wavenumber $k(x)$ is separated by the forcing scale $k_f$ into two parts, which corresponding to the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. It is found that all conditional pdf $p(C\\vert k)$ at given wavenumber $k$ has an exponential tail. In the inverse energy cascade, the shape of $p(C\\vert k)$ does collapse with each other, indicating a nonintermittent cascade. The measured scaling exponent $\\zeta_{\\omega}^I(q)$ is linear with the statistical ord...

  5. Intermittency measurement in two-dimensional bacterial turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiang; Ding, Long; Huang, Yongxiang; Chen, Ming; Lu, Zhiming; Liu, Yulu; Zhou, Quan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an experimental velocity database of a bacterial collective motion, e.g., Bacillus subtilis, in turbulent phase with volume filling fraction 84 % provided by Professor Goldstein at Cambridge University (UK), was analyzed to emphasize the scaling behavior of this active turbulence system. This was accomplished by performing a Hilbert-based methodology analysis to retrieve the scaling property without the β -limitation. A dual-power-law behavior separated by the viscosity scale ℓν was observed for the q th -order Hilbert moment Lq(k ) . This dual-power-law belongs to an inverse-cascade since the scaling range is above the injection scale R , e.g., the bacterial body length. The measured scaling exponents ζ (q ) of both the small-scale (k >kν ) and large-scale (k two-dimensional Ekman-Navier-Stokes equation, a continuum model indicates that the origin of the multifractality could be a result of some additional nonlinear interaction terms, which deservers a more careful investigation.

  6. Turbulence models and Reynolds analogy for two-dimensional supersonic compression ramp flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi R.; Bidek, Maleina C.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the application of turbulence models and the Reynolds analogy to the Navier-Stokes computations of Mach 2.9 two-dimensional compression ramp flows are presented. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy viscosity model and the kappa-epsilon turbulence transport equations for the turbulent momentum flux modeling in the Navier-Stokes equations are studied. The Reynolds analogy for the turbulent heat flux modeling in the energy equation was also studied. The Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation were numerically solved for the flow properties. The Reynolds shear stress, the skin friction factor, and the surface heat transfer rate were calculated and compared with their measurements. It was concluded that with a hybrid kappa-epsilon turbulence model for turbulence modeling, the present computations predicted the skin friction factors of the 8 deg and 16 deg compression ramp flows and with the turbulent Prandtl number Pr(sub t) = 0.93 and the ratio of the turbulent thermal and momentum transport coefficients mu(sub q)/mu(sub t) = 2/Prt, the present computations also predicted the surface heat transfer rates beneath the boundary layer flow of the 16 compression ramp.

  7. Two-dimensional state in driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Barbara; Galtier, Sébastien

    2011-02-01

    The dynamics of the two-dimensional (2D) state in driven three-dimensional (3D) incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is investigated through high-resolution direct numerical simulations and in the presence of an external magnetic field at various intensities. For such a flow the 2D state (or slow mode) and the 3D modes correspond, respectively, to spectral fluctuations in the plane k(∥)=0 and in the area k(∥)>0. It is shown that if initially the 2D state is set to zero it becomes nonnegligible in few turnover times, particularly when the external magnetic field is strong. The maintenance of a large-scale driving leads to a break for the energy spectra of 3D modes; when the driving is stopped, the previous break is removed and a decay phase emerges with Alfvénic fluctuations. For a strong external magnetic field the energy at large perpendicular scales lies mainly in the 2D state, and in all situations a pinning effect is observed at small scales.

  8. Fermionic boundary modes in two-dimensional noncentrosymmetric superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhin, K. V.; Mukherjee, S. P.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the spectrum of the Andreev boundary modes in a two-dimensional superconductor formed at an interface between two different nonsuperconducting materials, e.g., insulating oxides. Inversion symmetry is absent in this system, and both the electron band structure and the superconducting pairing are strongly affected by the spin-orbit coupling of the Rashba type. We consider isotropic s -wave pairing states, both with and without time-reversal symmetry breaking, as well as various d -wave states. In all cases, there exist subgap Andreev boundary states, whose properties, in particular, the number and location of the zero-energy modes, qualitatively depend on the gap symmetry and the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  9. On the large-scale structure and spectral dynamics of two-dimensional turbulence in a periodic channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, W.; Clercx, H.J.H.; van Heijst, G.J.F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a numerical study of forced two-dimensional turbulence in a periodic channel with flat no-slip walls. Since corners or curved domain boundaries, which are met in the standard rectangular, square, or circular geometries, are absent in this geometry, the (statistical) analysis of

  10. A two-dimensional embedded-boundary method for convection problems with moving boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassen, Y.J.; Koren, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional embedded-boundary algorithm for convection problems is presented. A moving body of arbitrary boundary shape is immersed in a Cartesian finite-volume grid, which is fixed in space. The boundary surface is reconstructed in such a way that only certain fluxes in the imme

  11. Two-Dimensional Thermal Boundary Layer Corrections for Convective Heat Flux Gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max; Haddad, George

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) study of two-dimensional thermal boundary layer correction factors for convective heat flux gauges mounted in flat plate subjected to a surface temperature discontinuity with variable properties taken into account. A two-equation k - omega turbulence model is considered. Results are obtained for a wide range of Mach numbers (1 to 5), gauge radius ratio, and wall temperature discontinuity. Comparisons are made for correction factors with constant properties and variable properties. It is shown that the variable-property effects on the heat flux correction factors become significant

  12. Effects of friction on forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackbourn, Luke A. K.; Tran, Chuong V.

    2011-10-01

    Large-scale dissipation mechanisms have been routinely employed in numerical simulations of two-dimensional turbulence to absorb energy at large scales, presumably mimicking the quasisteady picture of Kraichnan in an unbounded fluid. Here, “side effects” of such a mechanism—mechanical friction—on the small-scale dynamics of forced two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence are elaborated by both theoretical and numerical analysis. Given a positive friction coefficient α, viscous dissipation of enstrophy has been known to vanish in the inviscid limit ν→0. This effectively renders the scale-neutral friction the only mechanism responsible for enstrophy dissipation in that limit. The resulting dynamical picture is that the classical enstrophy inertial range becomes a dissipation range in which the dissipation of enstrophy by friction mainly occurs. For each α>0, there exists a critical viscosity νc, which depends on physical parameters, separating the regimes of predominant viscous and frictional dissipation of enstrophy. It is found that νc=[η'1/3/(Ckf2)]exp[-η'1/3/(Cα)], where η' is half the enstrophy injection rate, kf is the forcing wave number, and C is a nondimensional constant (the Kraichnan-Batchelor constant). The present results have important theoretical and practical implications. Apparently, mechanical friction is a poor choice in numerical attempts to address fundamental issues concerning the direct enstrophy transfer in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence. Furthermore, as relatively strong friction naturally occurs on the surfaces and at lateral boundaries of experimental fluids as well as at the interfaces of shallow layers in geophysical fluid models, the frictional effects discussed in this study are crucial in understanding the dynamics of these systems.

  13. Coherent structures in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huld, T.; Nielsen, A.H.; Pécseli, H.L.;

    1991-01-01

    -band turbulent fluctuations is demonstrated by a conditional sampling technique. Depending on plasma parameters, the dominant structures can appear as monopole or multipole vortices, dipole vortices in particular. The importance of large structures for the turbulent plasma diffusion is discussed. A statistical...... analysis of the randomly varying plasma flux is presented....

  14. Water-channel study of flow and turbulence past a two-dimensional array of obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bernardino, Annalisa; Leuzzi, Giovanni; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    A neutral boundary layer was generated in the laboratory to analyze the mean velocity field and the turbulence field within and above an array of two-dimensional obstacles simulating an urban canopy. Different geometrical configurations were considered in order to investigate the main characteristics of the flow as a function of the aspect ratio (AR) of the canopy. To this end, a summary of the two-dimensional fields of the fundamental turbulence parameters is given for AR ranging from 1 to 2. The results show that the flow field depends strongly on AR only within the canyon, while the outer flow seems to be less sensitive to this parameter. This is not true for the vertical momentum flux, which is one of the parameters most affected by AR, both within and outside the canyon. The experiments also indicate that, when (i.e. the skimming flow regime), the roughness sub-layer extends up to a height equal to 1.25 times the height of the obstacles (H), surmounted by an inertial sub-layer that extends up to 2.7 H. I...

  15. Coherent vortical structures in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, H.L.; Coutsias, E.A.; Huld, T.;

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was carried out in order to study the nonlinear saturated stage of the cross-field electrostatic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a strongly magnetized plasma. The presence of large vortex-like structures in a background of wide-band turbulent fluctuations was demonstrated...... simulations. The importance of the large scale structures for the turbulent plasma transport across magnetic field lines was analyzed in detail....

  16. Material line fluctuations slaved to bulk correlations in two-dimensional turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odijk, Theo

    2017-02-01

    An analogy is pointed out between a polymer chain fluctuating in a two-dimensional nematic background and a freely floating material line buffeted by a two-dimensional turbulent fluid in the inertial (Kraichnan) regime. Under certain conditions, the back-reaction of the line on the turbulent flow may be neglected. The fractal exponent related to the size-contour relation of the material line is connected to a "nematic" correlation function in the bulk.

  17. Equipartition and transport in two-dimensional electrostatic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Nycander, J.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1998-01-01

    of the magnetic field. Numerical solutions of the model equations on a bounded domain with sources and sinks show that the flux-driven turbulent fluctuations give rise to up-gradient transport, a “pinch flux,” of heat or particles. The averaged equilibrium density and temperature profiles approach n∼B and T∼B2...

  18. Boundary-value problems for two-dimensional canonical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassi, Seppo; De Snoo, H; Winkler, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    The two-dimensional canonical system Jy' = -lHy where the nonnegative Hamiltonian matrix function H(x) is trace-normed on (0,∞) has been studied in a function-theoretic way by L. de Branges. We show that the Hamiltonian system induces a closed symmetric relation which can be reduced to a, not necess

  19. Origin of the inverse energy cascade in two-dimensional quantum turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Skaugen, Audun

    2016-01-01

    We unravel the intimate connection between fundamental characteristics of two dimensional turbulence, i.e. the large-scale coherent structures and the inverse energy cascade. We propose a driven, dissipative point vortex model that is able to capture the dynamics of two-dimensional quantum turbulence by the emergent clustering of same-sign vortices, which form a non-equilibrium analogue of Onsager vortex equilibria. The inverse energy cascade developing in a statistically neutral system originates from this clustering of co-rotating and counter-rotating vortices. The Kolmogorov energy spectrum $k^{-5/3}$ is attributed to the scale-free correlations in the vorticity field fluctuations, here measured by the weighted pair correlation function that has a power-law decay as $r^{-4/3}$ on inertial separation lengthscales $r$. This scale-invariant statistics of vorticity, attributed to a conformal symmetry of two-dimensional classical turbulence, draws further analogies between classical and quantum turbulence beyon...

  20. High-beta turbulence in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, D.; Montgomery, D.

    1975-01-01

    Incompressible turbulent flows were investigated in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Equilibrium canonical distributions are determined in a phase whose coordinates are the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier coefficients for the field variables. The magnetic field and fluid velocity have variable x and y components, and all field quantities are independent of z. Three constants of the motion are found which survive the truncation in Fourier space and permit the construction of canonical distributions with three independent temperatures. Spectral densities are calculated. One of the more novel physical effects is the appearance of macroscopic structures involving long wavelength, self-generated, magnetic fields ("magnetic islands"). In the presence of finite dissipation, energy cascades to higher wave numbers can be accompanied by vector potential cascades to lower wave numbers, in much the same way that in the fluid dynamic case, energy cascades to lower wave numbers accompany entropy cascades to higher wave numbers.

  1. Investigation of Efficient Turbulence Model for Two-Dimensional Nozzle Designed for Supersonic Cruise Using STAR-CCM+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Mummidisetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, investigation of various turbulence models has been carried out for predicting the efficient turbulence model for a two-dimensional nozzle designed for a supersonic cruise nozzle. Initially, a computational domain was created for a two-dimensional nozzle for a supersonic cruise, then, with an appropriate mesh size, various turbulence models has been used for simulations. The main objective of the present work is to determine the efficient turbulence model for nozzle designs. As till date, commercial software’s are implementing many advanced technique, the test of turbulence model is very much needed for today’s research. The results obtained from the computational approach were compared with experimental approach which was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.8 to 1.2 by NASA Langley Research Centre, Virginia. These supersonic cruise nozzles have a wide range of applications in designing Fighter jets and supersonic cruise aircraft's. The present work was conducted by using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics Software, STAR-CCM+. Initially, Nozzle at a free stream Mach number 0.9 was designed and all the initial and boundary conditions were calculated. From the results obtained in the present investigation, we can conclude that there was an excellent correlation between the experimental and computational data for K-Epsilon turbulence model.

  2. "Ultimate state" of two-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection between free-slip fixed temperature boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehead, Jared P

    2011-01-01

    Rigorous upper limits on the vertical heat transport in two dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection between stress-free isothermal boundaries are derived from the Boussinesq approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The Nusselt number Nu is bounded in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra according to $Nu \\leq 0.2295 Ra^{5/12}$ uniformly in the Prandtl number Pr. This Nusselt number scaling challenges some theoretical arguments regarding the asymptotic high Rayleigh number heat transport by turbulent convection.

  3. Transition to two-dimensionality in magnetohydrodynamic turbulent Taylor-Couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yurong; Tao, Jianjun; Zikanov, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    Transition from a Taylor-Couette turbulent flow to a completely two-dimensional axisymmetric turbulent state is realized numerically by increasing gradually the strength of the azimuthal magnetic field produced by electric current flowing through the axial rod. With the increase of the Hartmann number, the Taylor-vortex-like structures shrink, move closer to the inner cylinder, and turn into unsteady but perfect tori at sufficiently high Hartmann numbers.

  4. Analytical Studies of Two-Dimensional Channel Turbulent Flow Subjected to Coriolis Force

    OpenAIRE

    鬼頭, 修己; 中林, 功一; キトウ, オサミ; Kito, Osami

    1992-01-01

    Coriolis effects on fully developed turbulent flow in a two-dimensional channel rotating about an axis perpendicular to its axis are considered. The Coriolis force has stabilizing/destabilizing effects on turbulence, and the mean velocity distribution changes accordingly. Experimental and numerical studies on the velocity characteristics have already been conducted by other researchers for various conditions. However, we cannot assemble the overall picture of the Coriolis effect on the veloci...

  5. Boundary-Value Problem for Two-Dimensional Fluctuations in Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    inviscid analysis by P. Durbin "Distortion of turbulence by a constant-shear layer adjacent to a wall," private communication (1977). (l.2e) 2-D...vortices near a boundary," ~ of the Americ~ p ~ ~ , Volume 20, Number 9 (November 1975). 21. Hultgren, Lennart S. and Gustavsson, L. Hakan, " Algebraic

  6. Effects of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry;

    2007-01-01

    The appearance of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. We have developed the analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the ......The appearance of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. We have developed the analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together...... with the divorticity lines. Compressibility of this mapping can be considered as the main reason for the formation of the sharp vorticity gradients at high Reynolds numbers. For two-dimensional turbulence in the case of strong anisotropy the sharp vorticity gradients can generate spectra which fall off as k−3 at large...... k, resembling the Kraichnan spectrum for the enstrophy cascade. For turbulence with weak anisotropy the k dependence of the spectrum due to the sharp gradients coincides with the Saffman spectrum, E(k)~k−4. We have compared the analytical predictions with direct numerical solutions of the two...

  7. On two-dimensionalization of three-dimensional turbulence in shell models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Sagar; Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Sarkar, A.

    2010-01-01

    Applying a modified version of the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada (GOY) shell model, the signatures of so-called two-dimensionalization effect of three-dimensional incompressible, homogeneous, isotropic fully developed unforced turbulence have been studied and reproduced. Within the framework of shell...

  8. Energy Spectra of Vortex Distributions in Two-Dimensional Quantum Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashton S. Bradley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically explore key concepts of two-dimensional turbulence in a homogeneous compressible superfluid described by a dissipative two-dimensional Gross-Pitaeveskii equation. Such a fluid supports quantized vortices that have a size characterized by the healing length ξ. We show that, for the divergence-free portion of the superfluid velocity field, the kinetic-energy spectrum over wave number k may be decomposed into an ultraviolet regime (k≫ξ^{-1} having a universal k^{-3} scaling arising from the vortex core structure, and an infrared regime (k≪ξ^{-1} with a spectrum that arises purely from the configuration of the vortices. The Novikov power-law distribution of intervortex distances with exponent -1/3 for vortices of the same sign of circulation leads to an infrared kinetic-energy spectrum with a Kolmogorov k^{-5/3} power law, which is consistent with the existence of an inertial range. The presence of these k^{-3} and k^{-5/3} power laws, together with the constraint of continuity at the smallest configurational scale k≈ξ^{-1}, allows us to derive a new analytical expression for the Kolmogorov constant that we test against a numerical simulation of a forced homogeneous, compressible, two-dimensional superfluid. The numerical simulation corroborates our analysis of the spectral features of the kinetic-energy distribution, once we introduce the concept of a clustered fraction consisting of the fraction of vortices that have the same sign of circulation as their nearest neighboring vortices. Our analysis presents a new approach to understanding two-dimensional quantum turbulence and interpreting similarities and differences with classical two-dimensional turbulence, and suggests new methods to characterize vortex turbulence in two-dimensional quantum fluids via vortex position and circulation measurements.

  9. On the use of wall functions as boundary conditions for two-dimensional separated compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.; Horstman, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    A new and improved wall function method for compressible turbulent flows has been developed and tested. This method is applicable to attached and separated flows, to both high- and low-Reynolds number flows, and to flows with adiabatic and nonadiabatic surfaces. This wall function method has been applied to the Launder-Spalding k-epsilon two-equation model of turbulence. The tests consist of comparisons of calculated and experimental results for: (1) an axisymmetrical transonic shock-wave/boundary-wave interaction flow at low Reynolds number in an adiabatic tube, (2) an axisymmetrical high-Reynolds number transonic flow over a nonadiabatic bump, and (3) a two-dimensional supersonic high-Reynolds number flow on a nonadiabatic deflected flap. Each of these experiments had significant regions of flow separation. The calculations are performed with an implicit algorithm that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the results obtained agree very well with the data for the complex compressible flows tested.

  10. A two-dimensional Segmented Boundary Algorithm for complex moving solid boundaries in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasanizade, Sh.; Sousa, J. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    A Segmented Boundary Algorithm (SBA) is proposed to deal with complex boundaries and moving bodies in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Boundaries are formed in this algorithm with chains of lines obtained from the decomposition of two-dimensional objects, based on simple line geometry. Various two-dimensional, viscous fluid flow cases have been studied here using a truly incompressible SPH method with the aim of assessing the capabilities of the SBA. Firstly, the flow over a stationary circular cylinder in a plane channel was analyzed at steady and unsteady regimes, for a single value of blockage ratio. Subsequently, the flow produced by a moving circular cylinder with a prescribed acceleration inside a plane channel was investigated as well. Next, the simulation of the flow generated by the impulsive start of a flat plate, again inside a plane channel, has been carried out. This was followed by the study of confined sedimentation of an elliptic body subjected to gravity, for various density ratios. The set of test cases was completed with the simulation of periodic flow around a sunflower-shaped object. Extensive comparisons of the results obtained here with published data have demonstrated the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms, namely in cases involving complex geometries and moving bodies.

  11. Turbulent pair separation due to multi scale stagnation point structure and its time asymmetry in two-dimensional turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Tristan; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The pair separation model of Goto and Vassilicos (S Goto and J C Vassilicos, 2004, New J.Phys., 6, p.65) is revisited and placed on a sound mathematical foundation. A DNS of two dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence with an inverse energy cascade and a k^{-5/3} power law is used to investigate properties of pair separation in two dimensional turbulence. A special focus lies on the time asymmetry observed between forward and backward separation. Application of the present model to this ...

  12. Structure of turbulence in three-dimensional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the three dimensional turbulent boundary layer concepts and of the currently available experimental information for their turbulence modeling. It is found that more reliable turbulence data, especially of the Reynolds stress transport terms, is needed to improve the existing modeling capabilities. An experiment is proposed to study the three dimensional boundary layer formed by a 'sink flow' in a fully developed two dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Also, the mean and turbulence field measurement procedure using a three component laser Doppler velocimeter is described.

  13. Adjustment of roughness sublayer in turbulent flows over two-dimensional idealised roughness elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    HO, Yat-Kiu; LIU, Chun-Ho

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) immediately above the urban canopy is the roughness sublayer (RSL). In this layer, flows and turbulence are strongly affected by the roughness elements beneath, e.g. building obstacles. The wind flows over urban areas could be represented by conventional logarithmic law of the wall (log-law) in the neutrally stratified ABL. However, in the RSL region, the vertical wind profile deviates from that predicted from log-law and the effect could be extended from ground level up to several canopy heights. As a result, the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails and an additional length scale is required to describe the flows. The key aim of this study is to introduce a simple wind profile model which accounts for the effect of the RSL in neutral stratification using wind tunnel experiments. Profile measurements of wind speeds and turbulence quantities over various two-dimensional (2D) idealised roughness elements are carried out in an open-circuit wind tunnel with test section of size 560 mm (width) × 560 mm (height) × 6 m (length). The separation between the roughness elements is varied systematically so that ten different types of surface forms are adopted. The velocity measurements are obtained by hot-wire anemometry using X-probe design (for UW- measurements) with a constant temperature anemometer. For each configuration, eight vertical profiles are collected over the canopy, including solid boundaries and cavities of the roughness elements. Firstly, we compute the measurement results using conventional MOST to determine different roughness parameters. Afterwards, we derive the RSL height from the Reynolds stress profiles. Since the profiles taken from different locations of the canopy are eventually converged with increasing height, we use this 'congregated height' to define the RSL height. Next, we introduce an alternative function, i.e. power-law function, instead of MOST, to describe the velocity profile in attempt to

  14. Scale-selective dissipation in energy-conserving finite element schemes for two-dimensional turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Natale, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the multiscale properties of energy-conserving upwind-stabilised finite element discretisations of the two-dimensional incompressible Euler equations. We focus our attention on two particular methods: the Lie derivative discretisation introduced in Natale and Cotter (2016a) and the SUPG discretisation of the vorticity advection equation. Such discretisations provide control on enstrophy by modelling different types of scale interactions. We quantify the performance of the schemes in reproducing the non-local energy backscatter that characterises two-dimensional turbulent flows.

  15. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  16. Isotopological Relaxation, Coherent Structures, and Gaussian Turbulence in Two-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Isichenko, M B

    1994-01-01

    The long-time relaxation of ideal two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence subject to the conservation of two infinite families of constants of motion---the magnetic and the "cross" topology invariants--is examined. The analysis of the Gibbs ensemble, where all integrals of motion are respected, predicts the initial state to evolve into an equilibrium, stable coherent structure (the most probable state) and decaying Gaussian turbulence (fluctuations) with a vanishing, but always positive temperature. The non-dissipative turbulence decay is accompanied by decrease in both the amplitude and the length scale of the fluctuations, so that the fluctuation energy remains finite. The coherent structure represents a set of singular magnetic islands with plasma flow whose magnetic topology is identical to that of the initial state, while the energy and the cross topology invariants are shared between the coherent structure and the Gaussian turbulence. These conservation laws suggest the variational principle of i...

  17. A numerical study of the alpha model for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A G

    2004-01-01

    We explore some consequences of the ``alpha model,'' also called the ``Lagrangian-averaged'' model, for two-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. This model is an extension of the smoothing procedure in fluid dynamics which filters velocity fields locally while leaving their associated vorticities unsmoothed, and has proved useful for high Reynolds number turbulence computations. We consider several known effects (selective decay, dynamic alignment, inverse cascades, and the probability distribution functions of fluctuating turbulent quantities) in magnetofluid turbulence and compare the results of numerical solutions of the primitive MHD equations with their alpha-model counterparts' performance for the same flows, in regimes where available resolution is adequate to explore both. The hope is to justify the use of the alpha model in regimes that lie outside currently available resolution, as will be the case in particular in three-dimensional geometry or for magnetic Prandtl number...

  18. Atmospheric turbulence not simply two-dimensional or three-dimensional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-08-01

    A complete mathematical description of turbulence is one of the most sought-after prizes in physics, and although the research of Pinel et al. does not provide a full account, it does aim to pin down the answer to one subset of that effort: Are two-dimensional (2-D) or 3-D the main options for atmospheric turbulence? In the earliest statistical descriptions, scientists assumed that turbulence was direction independent (isotropic) but in two separate regimes: at large scales being horizontally isotropic, while at small scales being isotropic in 3-D space. In this view, only large-scale turbulence behaves differently in the vertical and horizontal directions, that is, with horizontally stratified vortices.

  19. Sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional turbulence and the energy spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry;

    2010-01-01

    Formation of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. The analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the di-vorticity lines...... is developed and compressibility of this mapping appears as the main reason for the formation of the sharp vorticity gradients at high Reynolds numbers. In the case of strong anisotropy the sharp vorticity gradients can generate spectra which fall off as k −3 at large k, which appear to take the same form...... as the Kraichnan spectrum for the enstrophy cascade. For turbulence with weak anisotropy the k dependence of the spectrum due to the sharp gradients coincides with the Saffman spectrum: E(k) ~ k −4. Numerical investigations of decaying turbulence reveal exponential growth of di-vorticity with a spatial distributed...

  20. A further experiment on two-dimensional decaying turbulence on a rotating sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoden, S. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Geophysics; Ishioka, K.; Yamada, M. [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Graduate Schoool of Mathematical Sciences; Hayashi, Y.-Y. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Div. of Earth and Planetary Sciences

    1999-12-01

    A series of numerical experiments on the two-dimensional decaying turbulence is performed for a non-divergent barotropic fluid on a rotating sphere by using a high-resolution spectral model. Time variations of the energy spectrum and the flow field are highly dependent on the rotation rate. In non-rotational cases, isolated coherent vortices emerge in the course of time development as in the planar two-dimensional turbulence. As the rotation rate increases, however, the evolution of the flow field charges drastically, and a westward circumpolar vortex appears in high-latitudes as well as zonal band structures in mid- and low-latitudes. The dependence of these features on the initial energy spectrum is investigated and the dynamics of such pattern formulations is discussed.

  1. Logarithmic discretization and systematic derivation of shell models in two-dimensional turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürcan, Ö D; Morel, P; Kobayashi, S; Singh, Rameswar; Xu, S; Diamond, P H

    2016-09-01

    A detailed systematic derivation of a logarithmically discretized model for two-dimensional turbulence is given, starting from the basic fluid equations and proceeding with a particular form of discretization of the wave-number space. We show that it is possible to keep all or a subset of the interactions, either local or disparate scale, and recover various limiting forms of shell models used in plasma and geophysical turbulence studies. The method makes no use of the conservation laws even though it respects the underlying conservation properties of the fluid equations. It gives a family of models ranging from shell models with nonlocal interactions to anisotropic shell models depending on the way the shells are constructed. Numerical integration of the model shows that energy and enstrophy equipartition seem to dominate over the dual cascade, which is a common problem of two-dimensional shell models.

  2. Coexistence of two dissipative mechanisms in two-dimensional turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Romain Nguyen van [FB Mathematik und Informatik, Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Farge, Marie [LMD-CNRS-IPSL, ENS Paris (France); Schneider, Kai, E-mail: rnguyen@zedat.fu-berlin.de [M2P2-CNRS, Universite d' Aix-Marseille (France)

    2011-12-22

    Two distinct dissipative mechanisms occurring in two-dimensional fully developed turbulent flows in the limit of vanishing viscosity have been highlighted by means of direct numerical simulation. First, molecular energy dissipation is triggered by the production of localized vortices at the walls. Second, instabilities intrinsic to the flow itself generate a noisy component which can be quantified by wavelet analysis. The possibilities of competition and coexistence of the two mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Numerical Investigation on Two-dimensional Boundary Layer Flow with Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhao; Tianlin Wang; Zhi Zong

    2014-01-01

    As a basic problem in many engineering applications, transition from laminar to turbulence still remains a difficult problem in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A numerical study of one transitional flow in two-dimensional is conducted by Reynolds averaged numerical simulation (RANS) in this paper. Turbulence model plays a significant role in the complex flows’ simulation, and four advanced turbulence models are evaluated. Numerical solution of frictional resistance coefficient is compared with the measured one in the transitional zone, which indicates that Wilcox (2006) k-ω model with correction is the best candidate. Comparisons of numerical and analytical solutions for dimensionless velocity show that averaged streamwise dimensionless velocity profiles correct the shape rapidly in transitional region. Furthermore, turbulence quantities such as turbulence kinetic energy, eddy viscosity, and Reynolds stress are also studied, which are helpful to learn the transition’s behavior.

  4. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  5. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Comişel, H; Narita, Y; Motschmann, U

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfv\\'en/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  6. Two-dimensional cellular automaton model of traffic flow with open boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tadaki, S I

    1996-01-01

    A two-dimensional cellular automaton model of traffic flow with open boundaries are investigated by computer simulations. The outflow of cars from the system and the average velocity are investigated. The time sequences of the outflow and average velocity have flicker noises in a jamming phase. The low density behavior are discussed with simple jam-free approximation.

  7. Study of the forward Dirichlet boundary value problem for the two-dimensional Electrical Impedance Equation

    CERN Document Server

    T, M P Ramirez

    2012-01-01

    Using a conjecture that allows to approach separable-variables conductivity functions, the elements of the Modern Pseudoanalytic Function Theory are used, for the first time, to numerically solve the Dirichlet boundary value problem of the two-dimensional Electrical Impedance Equation, when the conductivity function arises from geometrical figures, located within bounded domains.

  8. Phenomenology of two-dimensional stably stratified turbulence under large-scale forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Abhishek; Sukhatmae, Jai

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we characterize the scaling of energy spectra, and the interscale transfer of energy and enstrophy, for strongly, moderately and weakly stably stratified two-dimensional (2D) turbulence under large-scale random forcing. In the strongly stratified case, a large-scale vertically sheared horizontal flow (VSHF) co-exists with small scale turbulence. The VSHF consists of internal gravity waves and the turbulent flow has a kinetic energy (KE) spectrum that follows an approximate $k^{-3}$ scaling with zero KE flux and a robust positive enstrophy flux. The spectrum of the turbulent potential energy (PE) also approximately follows a $k^{-3}$ power-law and its flux is directed to small scales. For moderate stratification, there is no VSHF and the KE of the turbulent flow exhibits Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling that transitions from a shallow $k^{-11/5}$ form at large scales, to a steeper approximate $k^{-3}$ scaling at small scales. The entire range of scales shows a strong forward enstrophy flux, and interesti...

  9. Experimental Observation of Exact Coherent Structures in a Weakly Turbulent Quasi-Two-Dimensional Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Balachandra; Tithof, Jeffrey; Pallantla, Ravi Kumar; Grigoriev, Roman; Schatz, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The dynamical systems approach to fluid turbulence relies on understanding the role of unstable, non-chaotic solutions - such as equilibria, traveling waves, and periodic orbits - of the Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions, called Exact Coherent Structures, exist in the same parameter regime as turbulence, but being unstable, are observed in experiments only as short transients. In this talk, we present experimental evidence for the existence and dynamical relevance of unstable equilibria in a weakly turbulent quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) Kolmogorov flow. In the experiment, this Q2D flow is generated in an electromagnetically driven shallow layer of electrolyte. The numerical simulations, however, use a strictly 2D model which incorporates the effects of the finite thickness of the fluid layer in the experiment. During its evolution, there are instances when the dynamics of a weakly turbulent flow slow down, rather dramatically. Using experimental flow fields from such instances, and by means of a Newton-Solver, we numerically compute several unstable equilibria. Additionally, using numerical simulations, we show that the dynamics of a turbulent flow in the neighbourhood of an equilibrium are accurately described by the unstable manifold of the equilibrium. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grants CBET-0900018, and CMMI-1234436.

  10. Prandtl's Boundary Layer Equation for Two-Dimensional Flow: Exact Solutions via the Simplest Equation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The simplest equation method is employed to construct some new exact closed-form solutions of the general Prandtl's boundary layer equation for two-dimensional flow with vanishing or uniform mainstream velocity. We obtain solutions for the case when the simplest equation is the Bernoulli equation or the Riccati equation. Prandtl's boundary layer equation arises in the study of various physical models of fluid dynamics. Thus finding the exact solutions of this equation is of great importance and interest.

  11. Variable enstrophy flux and energy spectrum in two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2012-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations reveal that in the forward cascade regime, the energy spectrum of two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction deviates from Kraichnan's prediction of $k^{-3}$ power spectrum. In this letter we explain this observation using an analytic model based on variable enstrophy flux arising due to Ekman friction. We derive an expression for the enstrophy flux which exhibits a logarithmic dependence in the inertial range for the Ekman-friction dominated flows. The energy spectrum obtained using this enstrophy flux shows a power law scaling for large Reynolds number and small Ekman friction, but has an exponential behaviour for large Ekman friction and relatively small Reynolds number.

  12. Solvable phase diagrams and ensemble inequivalence for two-dimensional and geophysical turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Venaille, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    Using explicit analytical computations, generic occurrence of inequivalence between two or more statistical ensembles is obtained for a large class of equilibrium states of two-dimensional and geophysical turbulent flows. The occurrence of statistical ensemble inequivalence is shown to be related to previously observed phase transitions in the equilibrium flow topology. We find in these turbulent flow equilibria, two mechanisms for the appearance of ensemble equivalences, that were not observed in any physical systems before. These mechanisms are associated respectively with second-order azeotropy (simultaneous appearance of two second-order phase transitions), and with bicritical points (bifurcation from a first-order to two second-order phase transition lines). The important roles of domain geometry, of topography, and of a screening length scale (the Rossby radius of deformation) are discussed. It is found that decreasing the screening length scale (making interactions more local) surprisingly widens the r...

  13. On the late phase of relaxation of two-dimensional fluids: turbulence of unitons

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, F

    2016-01-01

    The two-dimensional ideal fluid and the plasma confined by a strong magnetic field exhibit an intrinsic tendency to organization due to the inverse spectral cascade. In the asymptotic states reached at relaxation the turbulence has vanished and there are only coherent vortical structures. We are interested in the regime that precedes these ordered flow patterns, in which there still is turbulence and imperfect but robust structures have emerged. To develop an analytical description we propose to start from the stationary coherent states and (in the direction opposite to relaxation) explore the space of configurations before the extremum of the functional that defines the structures has been reached. We find necessary to assemble different but related models: point-like vortices, its field theoretical formulation as interacting matter and gauge fields, chiral model and surfaces with constant mean curvature. These models are connected by the similar ability to describe randomly interacting coherent structures. ...

  14. Statistics of the inverse-cascade regime in two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Debarghya; Pandit, Rahul

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed direct numerical simulation of statistically steady, homogeneous, isotropic, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Our study concentrates on the inverse cascade of the magnetic vector potential. We examine the dependence of the statistical properties of such turbulence on dissipation and friction coefficients. We extend earlier work significantly by calculating fluid and magnetic spectra, probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the velocity, magnetic, vorticity, current, stream-function, and magnetic-vector-potential fields, and their increments. We quantify the deviations of these PDFs from Gaussian ones by computing their flatnesses and hyperflatnesses. We also present PDFs of the Okubo-Weiss parameter, which distinguishes between vortical and extensional flow regions, and its magnetic analog. We show that the hyperflatnesses of PDFs of the increments of the stream function and the magnetic vector potential exhibit significant scale dependence and we examine the implication of this for the multiscaling of structure functions. We compare our results with those of earlier studies.

  15. Angular statistics of fluid particle trajectories in confined two-dimensional turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoch, Benjamin; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai

    2015-11-01

    The directional change of fluid particles can be characterized by the angle between subsequent particle displacement increments evaluated as a function of the time lag. At small values of the time-increment the so-defined angle is proportional to the curvature of the trajectory. At large values this coarse-grained curvature should be affected by the presence of solid no-slip walls around the flow domain. In we applied these statistics to three-dimensional isotropic turbulence, here we compare homogeneous and confined two-dimensional turbulent flows. We show that at long times the probability density function of the angles carries the signature of the confining domain if finite size effects are present. At short times, the PDF of the cosine of the angle is given by a power law with a well defined exponent, reminiscent of the close to Gaussian character of the velocity field.

  16. Stationary two-dimensional turbulence statistics using a Markovian forcing scheme

    CERN Document Server

    San, Omer; 10.1016/j.compfluid.2012.10.002

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the statistics of two-dimensional stationary turbulence using a Markovian forcing scheme, which correlates the forcing process in the current time step to the previous time step according to a defined memory coefficient. In addition to the Markovian forcing mechanism, the hyperviscous dissipation mechanism for small scales and the Ekman friction type of linear damping mechanism for the large scales are included in the model. We examine the effects of various dissipation and forcing parameters on the turbulence statistics in both wave space and physical space. Our analysis includes the effects of the effective forcing scale, the bandwidth of the forcing, the memory correlation coefficient, and the forcing amplitude, along with the large scale friction and small scale dissipation coefficients. Scaling exponents of structure functions and energy spectra are calculated, and the role of the parameters associated with the Markovian forcing is discussed. We found that the scaling exponen...

  17. Freely Evolving Process and Statistics in the Two-Dimensional Granular Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Masaharu

    2002-08-01

    We studied the macroscopic statistical properties on the freely evolving quasi-inelastic hard disk (granular) system by performing large-scale (more than a million particles) event-driven molecular dynamics systematically and found that remarkably analogous to an enstrophy cascade process in decaying two-dimensional fluid turbulence. There are four typcial stages in the freely evolving inelastic hard disk system, which are homogeneous, shearing (vortex), clustering and final state. In the shearing stage, the self-organized macroscopic coherent vortices become dominant and the enstrophy decays power-low behavior. In the clustering stage, the energy spectra are close to the expectation of Kraichnan-Batchelor theory and the squared two particle separation strictly obeys Richardson law. These results indicate that the cooperative behavior of quasi-inelastic hard disks system has a same universal class as the macroscopic Navier-Stokes fluid turbulence in the study of dissipative structure.

  18. A Numerical Solution of the Two-Dimensional Fusion Problem with Convective Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülkaç, Vildan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an LOD method for solving the two-dimensional fusion problem with convective boundary conditions. In this study, we extend our earlier work [1] on the solution of the two-dimensional fusion problem by considering a class of time-split finite-difference methods, namely locally one-dimensional (LOD) schemes. In addition, following the idea of Douglas [2, 3], a Douglas-like splitting scheme is presented. A stability analysis by Fourier series method (von Neumann stability) of the scheme is also investigated. Computational results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the results reported previously by other research.

  19. Nonlinear transverse cascade and two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic subcritical turbulence in plane shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatsashvili, G R; Gogichaishvili, D Z; Chagelishvili, G D; Horton, W

    2014-04-01

    We find and investigate via numerical simulations self-sustained two-dimensional turbulence in a magnetohydrodynamic flow with a maximally simple configuration: plane, noninflectional (with a constant shear of velocity), and threaded by a parallel uniform background magnetic field. This flow is spectrally stable, so the turbulence is subcritical by nature and hence it can be energetically supported just by a transient growth mechanism due to shear flow non-normality. This mechanism appears to be essentially anisotropic in the spectral (wave-number) plane and operates mainly for spatial Fourier harmonics with streamwise wave numbers less than the ratio of flow shear to Alfvén speed, kymagnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence research. We find similarity of the nonlinear dynamics to the related dynamics in hydrodynamic flows: to the bypass concept of subcritical turbulence. The essence of the analyzed nonlinear MHD processes appears to be a transverse redistribution of kinetic and magnetic spectral energies in the wave-number plane [as occurs in the related hydrodynamic flow; see Horton et al., Phys. Rev. E 81, 066304 (2010)] and differs fundamentally from the existing concepts of (anisotropic direct and inverse) cascade processes in MHD shear flows.

  20. Anisotropic characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade in two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, E A

    2015-01-01

    Statistical characteristics of the Kraichnan direct cascade for two-dimensional hydrodynamic turbulence are numerically studied (with spatial resolution $8192\\times 8192$) in the presence of pumping and viscous-like damping. It is shown that quasi-shocks of vorticity and their Fourier partnerships in the form of jets introduce an essential influence in turbulence leading to strong angular dependencies for correlation functions. The energy distribution as a function of modulus $k$ for each angle in the inertial interval has the Kraichnan behavior, $\\sim k^{-4}$, and simultaneously a strong dependence on angles. However, angle average provides with a high accuracy the Kraichnan turbulence spectrum $E_k=C_K\\eta^{2/3} k^{-3}$ where $\\eta$ is enstrophy flux and the Kraichnan constant $C_K\\simeq 1.3$, in correspondence with the previous simulations. Familiar situation takes place for third-order velocity structure function $S_3^L$ which, as for the isotropic turbulence, gives the same scaling with respect to separa...

  1. Signatures of chaos and non-integrability in two-dimensional gravity with dynamical boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitkevich Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model of two-dimensional dilaton gravity with a boundary. In the bulk our model coincides with the classically integrable CGHS model; the dynamical boundary cuts of the CGHS strong-coupling region. As a result, classical dynamics in our model reminds that in the spherically-symmetric gravity: wave packets of matter fields either reflect from the boundary or form black holes. We find large integrable sector of multisoliton solutions in this model. At the same time, we argue that the model is globally non-integrable because solutions at the verge of black hole formation display chaotic properties.

  2. Contact position controlling for two-dimensional motion bodies by the boundary element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for controlling two-dimensional motion contact bodies with conforming discretization. Since a kind of special boundary element is utilized in the algorithm, the displacement compatibility and traction equilibrium conditions at nodes can be satisfied simultaneously in arbitrary locations of the contact interface. In addition, a method is also proposed in which the contact boundary location can be moved flexibly on the possible contact boundary. This method is effective to deal with moving and rolling contact problems on a possible larger moving or rolling contact region. Numerical examples show effectiveness of the presented scheme.

  3. A two-dimensional vibration analysis of piezoelectrically actuated microbeam with nonideal boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M. P.; Zamanian, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the influences of nonideal boundary conditions (due to flexibility) on the primary resonant behavior of a piezoelectrically actuated microbeam have been studied, for the first time. The structure has been assumed to treat as an Euler-Bernoulli beam, considering the effects of geometric nonlinearity. In this work, the general nonideal supports have been modeled as a the combination of horizontal, vertical and rotational springs, simultaneously. Allocating particular values to the stiffness of these springs provides the mathematical models for the majority of boundary conditions. This consideration leads to use a two-dimensional analysis of the multiple scales method instead of previous works' method (one-dimensional analysis). If one neglects the nonideal effects, then this paper would be an effort to solve the two-dimensional equations of motion without a need of a combination of these equations using the shortening or stretching effect. Letting the nonideal effects equal to zero and comparing their results with the results of previous approaches have been demonstrated the accuracy of the two-dimensional solutions. The results have been identified the unique effects of constraining and stiffening of boundaries in horizontal, vertical and rotational directions. This means that it is inaccurate to suppose the nonideality of supports only in one or two of these directions like as previous works. The findings are of vital importance as a better prediction of the frequency response for the nonideal supports. Furthermore, the main findings of this effort can help to choose appropriate boundary conditions for desired systems.

  4. Boundaries determine the formation energies of lattice defects in two-dimensional buckled materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sandeep K.; Juričić, Vladimir; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2016-07-01

    Lattice defects are inevitably present in two-dimensional materials, with direct implications on their physical and chemical properties. We show that the formation energy of a lattice defect in buckled two-dimensional crystals is not uniquely defined as it takes different values for different boundary conditions even in the thermodynamic limit, as opposed to their perfectly planar counterparts. Also, the approach to the thermodynamic limit follows a different scaling: inversely proportional to the logarithm of the system size for buckled materials, rather than the usual power-law approach. In graphene samples of ˜1000 atoms, different boundary conditions can cause differences exceeding 10 eV. Besides presenting numerical evidence in simulations, we show that the universal features in this behavior can be understood with simple bead-spring models. Fundamentally, our findings imply that it is necessary to specify the boundary conditions for the energy of the lattice defects in the buckled two-dimensional crystals to be uniquely defined, and this may explain the lack of agreement in the reported values of formation energies in graphene. We argue that boundary conditions may also have an impact on other physical observables such as the melting temperature.

  5. Cascades and spectra of a turbulent spinodal decomposition in two-dimensional symmetric binary liquid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang; Diamond, P. H.; Chacón, L.; Li, Hui

    2016-09-01

    We study the fundamental physics of cascades and spectra in two-dimensional (2D) Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes (CHNS) turbulence, and compare and contrast this system with 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The important similarities include basic equations, ideal quadratic invariants, cascades, and the role of linear elastic waves. Surface tension induces elasticity, and the balance between surface tension energy and turbulent kinetic energy determines a length scale (Hinze scale) of the system. The Hinze scale may be thought of as the scale of emergent critical balance between fluid straining and elastic restoring forces. The scales between the Hinze scale and dissipation scale constitute the elastic range of the 2D CHNS system. By direct numerical simulation, we find that in the elastic range, the mean square concentration spectrum Hkψ of the 2D CHNS system exhibits the same power law (-7 /3 ) as the mean square magnetic potential spectrum HkA in the inverse cascade regime of 2D MHD. This power law is consistent with an inverse cascade of Hψ, which is observed. The kinetic energy spectrum of the 2D CHNS system is EkK˜k-3 if forced at large scale, suggestive of the direct enstrophy cascade power law of 2D Navier-Stokes turbulence. The difference from the energy spectra of 2D MHD turbulence implies that the back reaction of the concentration field to fluid motion is limited. We suggest this is because the surface tension back reaction is significant only in the interfacial regions. The interfacial regions fill only a small portion of the 2D CHNS system, and their interface packing fraction is much smaller than that for 2D MHD.

  6. Phenomenology of two-dimensional stably stratified turbulence under large-scale forcing

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2017-01-11

    In this paper, we characterise the scaling of energy spectra, and the interscale transfer of energy and enstrophy, for strongly, moderately and weakly stably stratified two-dimensional (2D) turbulence, restricted in a vertical plane, under large-scale random forcing. In the strongly stratified case, a large-scale vertically sheared horizontal flow (VSHF) coexists with small scale turbulence. The VSHF consists of internal gravity waves and the turbulent flow has a kinetic energy (KE) spectrum that follows an approximate k−3 scaling with zero KE flux and a robust positive enstrophy flux. The spectrum of the turbulent potential energy (PE) also approximately follows a k−3 power-law and its flux is directed to small scales. For moderate stratification, there is no VSHF and the KE of the turbulent flow exhibits Bolgiano–Obukhov scaling that transitions from a shallow k−11/5 form at large scales, to a steeper approximate k−3 scaling at small scales. The entire range of scales shows a strong forward enstrophy flux, and interestingly, large (small) scales show an inverse (forward) KE flux. The PE flux in this regime is directed to small scales, and the PE spectrum is characterised by an approximate k−1.64 scaling. Finally, for weak stratification, KE is transferred upscale and its spectrum closely follows a k−2.5 scaling, while PE exhibits a forward transfer and its spectrum shows an approximate k−1.6 power-law. For all stratification strengths, the total energy always flows from large to small scales and almost all the spectral indicies are well explained by accounting for the scale-dependent nature of the corresponding flux.

  7. Experimental study of two-dimensional turbulence properties in a plane duct in an azimuthal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Votsish, A.D.; Kolesnikov, Yu.B.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for an experimental study of two-dimensional turbulent flow with shifts in a plane duct in an azimuthal magnetic field. The turbulent flow was shown to become practically equal to zero in a sufficiently strong field whereas the intensity of the pulsation rate has a finite value. This is explained by the fact that the magnetic field transforms the structure of turbulence into a two-dimensional structure whose maintenance merely requires an insignificant portion of medium flow energy. 4 illustrations, 8 references.

  8. Group classification of steady two-dimensional boundary-layer stagnation-point flow equations

    OpenAIRE

    Nadjafikhah, Mehdi; Hejazi, Seyed Reza

    2010-01-01

    Lie symmetry group method is applied to study the boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional steady flow of an incompressible, viscous fluid near a stagnation point at a heated stretching sheet placed in a porous medium equation. The symmetry group and its optimal system are given, and group invariant solutions associated to the symmetries are obtained. Finally the structure of the Lie algebra symmetries is determined.

  9. Kinetic cascade beyond MHD of solar wind turbulence in two-dimensional hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Verscharen, Daniel; Motschmann, Uwe; Müller, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The nature of solar wind turbulence in the dissipation range at scales much smaller than the large MHD scales remains under debate. Here a two-dimensional model based on the hybrid code abbreviated as A.I.K.E.F. is presented, which treats massive ions as particles obeying the kinetic Vlasov equation and massless electrons as a neutralizing fluid. Up to a certain wavenumber in the MHD regime, the numerical system is initialized by assuming a superposition of isotropic Alfv\\'en waves with amplitudes that follow the empirically confirmed spectral law of Kolmogorov. Then turbulence develops and energy cascades into the dispersive spectral range, where also dissipative effects occur. Under typical solar wind conditions, weak turbulence develops as a superposition of normal modes in the kinetic regime. Spectral analysis in the direction parallel to the background magnetic field reveals a cascade of left-handed Alfv\\'en/ion-cyclotron waves up to wave vectors where their resonant absorption sets in, as well as a cont...

  10. Two-dimensional Turbulence in Symmetric Binary-Fluid Mixtures: Coarsening Arrest by the Inverse Cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Perlekar, Prasad; Pandit, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    We study two-dimensional (2D) binary-fluid turbulence by carrying out an extensive direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the forced, statistically steady turbulence in the coupled Cahn-Hilliard and Navier-Stokes equations. In the absence of any coupling, we choose parameters that lead (a) to spinodal decomposition and domain growth, which is characterized by the spatiotemporal evolution of the Cahn-Hilliard order parameter $\\phi$, and (b) the formation of an inverse-energy-cascade regime in the energy spectrum $E(k)$, in which energy cascades towards wave numbers $k$ that are smaller than the energy-injection scale $k_{inj}$ in the turbulent fluid. We show that the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes coupling leads to an arrest of phase separation at a length scale $L_c$, which we evaluate from $S(k)$, the spectrum of the fluctuations of $\\phi$. We demonstrate that (a) $L_c \\sim L_H$, the Hinze scale that follows from balancing inertial and interfacial-tension forces, and (b) $L_c$ is independent, within error bars, o...

  11. Boundary magnetization of a two-dimensional Ising model with inhomogeneous nearest-neighbor interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzola, Alessandro

    1994-11-01

    An explicit formula for the boundary magnetization of a two-dimensional Ising model with a strip of inhomogeneous interactions is obtained by means of a transfer matrix mean-field method introduced by Lipowski and Suzuki. There is clear numerical evidence that the formula is exact By taking the limit where the width of the strip approaches infinity and the interactions have well defined bulk limits, I arrive at the boundary magnetization for a model which includes the Hilhorst-van Leeuwen model. The rich critical behavior of the latter magnetization is thereby rederived with little effort.

  12. Evidence for two-dimensional turbulence proceses in the lower thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    A striking feature of chemical release trails in the lower thermosphere is the transition from turbulent flow to apparently laminar flow at the nominal turbopause height. The transition is very sharp, occurring over a vertical distance of a few hundred meters or less and is easily recognizable in the images. Detailed quantitative information about turbulence properties in the critical transition region is difficult to obtain. The chemical trails are one of the few sources of such information, although extracting information about turbulent energy dissipation rates and turbulent diffusion coefficients requires images with good time and angular resolution and is a time intensive analysis process. The number of such analyses is therefore limited, but the results consistently show direct evidence of anomalous diffusion over an altitude range that extends 10-15 km above the nominal turbopause, i.e., in an altitude range where the flow qualitatively appears to be laminar. Anomalous diffusion, in this case, refers to tracer expansion that is more rapid than expected from molecular diffusion alone. The region where the anomalous trail expansion is found is also characterized by large wind speeds that tend to maximize within that altitude range. The maximum winds generally exceed 80 m/s and are often in the 100 to 150 m/s range, as shown by a large database of more than 500 chemical release wind measurements obtained over an extended period at a variety of locations and local times. In addition, rapid transport of Space Shuttle exhaust products from low to high latitudes is also known to occur in the same altitude range, suggesting that the transport is effective over large scales. The observational evidence thus indicates that the lower thermosphere, in the altitude range between 100 and 115 km, is a region of enhanced anomalous transport that operates over a broad range of spatial scales, from a kilometer or less to the planetary scale. Evidence for two-dimensional

  13. Critical wetting transitions in two-dimensional systems subject to long-ranged boundary fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiński, A.; Maciołek, A.; Barasiński, A.; Dietrich, S.

    2009-04-01

    Using the quasiexact density-matrix renormalization-group method and ground-state analysis we study interface delocalization transitions in wide two-dimensional Ising strips subject to long-ranged boundary fields with opposite signs at the two surfaces. Based on this approach, our explicit calculations demonstrate that critical wetting transitions do exist for semi-infinite two-dimensional systems even if the corresponding effective interface potentials decay asymptotically for large ℓ as slow as ℓ-δ with δinterface position from the one-dimensional surface. This supersedes opposite claims by Kroll and Lipowsky [Phys. Rev. B 28, 5273 (1983)] and by Privman and Švrakić [Phys. Rev. B 37, 5974 (1988)] obtained within effective interface models. The corresponding wetting phase diagram is determined, including the cases δ=2 and δ=49 with the latter mimicking short-ranged surface fields. Our analysis highlights the limits of reliability of effective interface models.

  14. Critical wetting transitions in two-dimensional systems subject to long-ranged boundary fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiński, A; Maciołek, A; Barasiński, A; Dietrich, S

    2009-04-01

    Using the quasiexact density-matrix renormalization-group method and ground-state analysis we study interface delocalization transitions in wide two-dimensional Ising strips subject to long-ranged boundary fields with opposite signs at the two surfaces. Based on this approach, our explicit calculations demonstrate that critical wetting transitions do exist for semi-infinite two-dimensional systems even if the corresponding effective interface potentials decay asymptotically for large l as slow as l(-delta) with deltainterface position from the one-dimensional surface. This supersedes opposite claims by Kroll and Lipowsky [Phys. Rev. B 28, 5273 (1983)] and by Privman and Svrakić [Phys. Rev. B 37, 5974 (1988)] obtained within effective interface models. The corresponding wetting phase diagram is determined, including the cases delta=2 and delta=49 with the latter mimicking short-ranged surface fields. Our analysis highlights the limits of reliability of effective interface models.

  15. Critical Casimir force scaling functions of the two-dimensional Ising model for various boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Hobrecht, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic method to calculate the scaling functions for the critical Casimir force and the according potential of the two-dimensional Ising model with various boundary conditions. Therefore we start with the dimer representation of the corresponding partition function $Z$ on an $L\\times M$ square lattice, wrapped around a torus with aspect ratio $\\rho=L/M$. By assuming periodic boundary conditions and translational invariance in at least one direction, we systematically reduce the problem to a $2\\times2$ transfer matrix representation. For the torus we first reproduce the results by Kaufman and then give a detailed calculation of the scaling functions. Afterwards we present the calculation for the cylinder with open boundary conditions. All scaling functions are given in form of combinations of infinite products and integrals. Our results reproduce the known scaling functions in the limit of thin films $\\rho\\to 0$. Additionally, for the cylinder at criticality our result confirms the predictions...

  16. Fourier solution of two-dimensional Navier Stokes equation with periodic boundary conditions and incompressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiper, Logan K

    2016-01-01

    An approximate solution to the two dimensional Navier Stokes equation with periodic boundary conditions is obtained by representing the x any y components of fluid velocity with complex Fourier basis vectors. The chosen space of basis vectors is finite to allow for numerical calculations, but of variable size. Comparisons of the resulting approximate solutions as they vary with the size of the chosen vector space allow for extrapolation to an infinite basis vector space. Results suggest that such a solution, with the full basis vector space and which would give the exact solution, would fail for certain initial velocity configurations when initial velocity and time t exceed certain limits.

  17. A computer program for generating two-dimensional boundary-fitted orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1997-11-01

    A numerical method is described which generates an orthogonal curvilinear mesh, subject to the constraint that mesh lines are matched to all boundaries of a closed, simply connected two-dimensional region of arbitrary shape. The method is based on the solution, by an iterative finite-difference technique, of an elliptic differential system of equations for the Cartesian coordinates of the orthogonal grid nodes. The interior grid distribution is controlled by a technique which ensures that coordinate lines can be concentrated as desired. Examples of orthogonal meshes inscribed in various geometrical figures are included.

  18. The kinetic magnetoelectric effect in laterally boundary-confined ballistic two-dimensional hole gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Hai-Tao; Hu Liang-Bin; Zhang Xin-Ding; Zhu Shi-Liang

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is presented on the characteristics of the kinetic magnetoelectric effect in laterally boundary-confined ballistic two-dimensional hole gases.It was shown that,though the momentum-dependent effective magnetic fields felt by charge carriers due to the spin-orbit interaction are in-plane orientated in such systems,both in-plane polarized and normal polarized nonequilibrium spin polarization densities could be electrically induced by the kinetic magnetoelectric effect,and the induced nonequilibrium spin polarizations exhibit some interesting characteristics.The characteristics we found indicate that there may be some possible relation between this effect and some recent experimental findings.

  19. The Boundary Element Method Applied to the Two Dimensional Stefan Moving Boundary Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-15

    iterate 12 times to reach :34 BOUNDARY TIME EVOLUION Figure 3.4. Fixed Boundary Time Evolution ’onvergence in the successive approximation. The squares...memory requirements of the code, especially if more intricate geometries are to be considered. If fast conmput.- ing resources are not available, the

  20. A method of boundary parameter estimation for a two-dimensional diffusion system under noisy observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahara, Y.; Kojima, F.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish a method for identifying unknown parameters involved in the boundary state of a class of diffusion systems under noisy observations. A mathematical model of the system dynamics is given by a two-dimensional diffusion equation. Noisy observations are made by sensors allocated on the system boundary. Starting with the mathematical model mentioned above, an online parameter estimation algorithm is proposed within the framework of the maximum likelihood estimation. Existence of the optimal solution and related necessary conditions are discussed. By solving a local variation of the cost functional with respect to the perturbation of parameters, the estimation mechanism is proposed in a form of recursive computations. Finally, the feasibility of the estimator proposed here is demonstrated through results of digital simulation experiments.

  1. Snell's law for particles moving on piecewise homogeneous two dimensional surface with linear boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Mandrekar, Pratik

    2011-01-01

    We study the properties of least time trajectories for particles moving on a two dimensional surface which consists of piecewise homogeneous regions. The particles are assumed to move with different constant speeds on different regions and on the boundary between regions. The speed of the particle is assumed to be highest when it moves along the edges formed by the boundary of two regions. We get an analogous behavior to Snell's Law of light refraction, but in a more generalized form. The model could be used for studying properties of animal and insect trails which tend to form predominantly along edges. The model predicts three types of behavior for the trajectories near a corner forming edge: fully edge following, partial edge following and complete avoidance of the edge, which are indeed observed in natural ant trails.

  2. CYCLIC HARDENING BEHAVIOR OF POLYCRYSTALS WITH PENETRABLE GRAIN BOUNDARIES: TWO-DIMENSIONAL DISCRETE DISLOCATION DYNAMICS SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuantao Hou; Zhenhuan Li; Minsheng Huang; Chaojun Ouyang

    2009-01-01

    A two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) technology by Giessen and Needleman (1995), which has been extended by integrating a dislocation-grain boundary interaction model, is used to computationally analyze the micro-cyclic plastic response of polycrystals containing micron-sized grains, with special attentions to significant influence of dislocationpenetrable grain boundaries (GBs) on the micro-plastic cyclic responses of polycrystals and underlying dislocation mechanism. Toward this end, a typical polycrystalline rectangular specimen under simple tension-compression loading is considered. Results show that, with the increase of cycle accumulative strain, continual dislocation accumulation and enhanced dislocation-dislocation interactions induce the cyclic hardening behavior; however, when a dynamic balance among dislocation nucleation, penetration through GB and dislocation annihilation is approximately established, cyclic stress gradually tends to saturate. In addition, other factors, including the grain size, cyclic strain amplitude and its history, also have considerable influences on the cyclic hardening and saturation.

  3. Comprehensive two-dimensional river ice model based on boundary-fitted coordinate transformation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-yu MAO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available River ice is a natural phenomenon in cold regions, influenced by meteorology, geomorphology, and hydraulic conditions. River ice processes involve complex interactions between hydrodynamic, mechanical, and thermal processes, and they are also influenced by weather and hydrologic conditions. Because natural rivers are serpentine, with bends, narrows, and straight reaches, the commonly-used one-dimensional river ice models and two-dimensional models based on the rectangular Cartesian coordinates are incapable of simulating the physical phenomena accurately. In order to accurately simulate the complicated river geometry and overcome the difficulties of numerical simulation resulting from both complex boundaries and differences between length and width scales, a two-dimensional river ice numerical model based on a boundary-fitted coordinate transformation method was developed. The presented model considers the influence of the frazil ice accumulation under ice cover and the shape of the leading edge of ice cover during the freezing process. The model is capable of determining the velocity field, the distribution of water temperature, the concentration distribution of frazil ice, the transport of floating ice, the progression, stability, and thawing of ice cover, and the transport, accumulation, and erosion of ice under ice cover. A MacCormack scheme was used to solve the equations numerically. The model was validated with field observations from the Hequ Reach of the Yellow River. Comparison of simulation results with field data indicates that the model is capable of simulating the river ice process with high accuracy.

  4. New insight into flow development and two dimensionality of turbulent channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Bartrons, Eduard; Chiu, Daniel; Dressler, Kristofer M.; Rüedi, J.-D.; Suzuki, Yasumasa; Nagib, Hassan M.

    2014-06-01

    The experimental conditions required for a turbulent channel flow to be considered fully developed and nominally two dimensional remain a challenging objective. In this study, we show that the flow obtained in a high-aspect-ratio channel facility cannot be reproduced by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of spanwise-periodic channel flows; therefore, we reserve the term "channel" for spanwise-periodic DNSs and denote the experimental flow by the term "duct." Oil film interferometry (OFI) and static pressure measurements were carried out over the range in an adjustable-geometry duct flow facility. Three-dimensional effects were studied by considering different aspect ratio (AR) configurations and also by fixing the AR and modifying the hydraulic diameter of the section. The conditions at the centerplane of the duct were characterized through the local skin friction from the OFI and the centerline velocity at four different streamwise locations and through the wall shear based on the streamwise global pressure gradient. The skin friction obtained from pressure gradient overestimated the local shear measurements obtained from the OFI and did not reproduce the same AR dependence observed with OFI. Differences between the local and global techniques were also reflected in the flow development. For the range of Reynolds numbers tested, the development length of high-aspect-ratio ducts scales with the duct full-height and is around , much larger than the values of around 100-150 H previously reported in the literature.

  5. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flow over Two-Dimensional River Dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    We performed large-eddy simulations of the flow over a typical two-dimensional dune geometry at laboratory scale (the Reynolds number based on the average channel height and mean velocity is 18,900) using the Lagrangian dynamic eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale model. The flow separates at the dune crest and reattaches downstream on the bed (at x=5.7h). A favorable pressure gradient accelerates the flow over the stoss-side (the upward-sloping region for x > 8h) and an unfavorable gradient for x < 8h decelerates the flow over the lee-side of the dune. Due to the separation of the flow, a shear layer is generated after the crest that expands in the wake region towards the next dune. The outer-layer turbulence structures are visualized through isosurfaces of pressure fluctuations colored by distance to the surface. Spanwise vortices are generated in the shear layer separating from the crest due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. They are convected downstream and either interact with the wall or rise to the surfa...

  6. Two-dimensional fracture analysis of piezoelectric material based on the scaled boundary node method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen-Shen, Chen; Juan, Wang; Qing-Hua, Li

    2016-04-01

    A scaled boundary node method (SBNM) is developed for two-dimensional fracture analysis of piezoelectric material, which allows the stress and electric displacement intensity factors to be calculated directly and accurately. As a boundary-type meshless method, the SBNM employs the moving Kriging (MK) interpolation technique to an approximate unknown field in the circumferential direction and therefore only a set of scattered nodes are required to discretize the boundary. As the shape functions satisfy Kronecker delta property, no special techniques are required to impose the essential boundary conditions. In the radial direction, the SBNM seeks analytical solutions by making use of analytical techniques available to solve ordinary differential equations. Numerical examples are investigated and satisfactory solutions are obtained, which validates the accuracy and simplicity of the proposed approach. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11462006 and 21466012), the Foundation of Jiangxi Provincial Educational Committee, China (Grant No. KJLD14041), and the Foundation of East China Jiaotong University, China (Grant No. 09130020).

  7. Stress and mixed boundary conditions for two-dimensional dodecagonal quasi-crystal plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Gao; Si-Peng Xu; Bao-Sheng Zhao

    2007-05-01

    For plate bending and stretching problems in two-dimensional (2D) dodecagonal quasi-crystal (QC) media, the reciprocal theorem and the general solution for QCs are applied in a novel way to obtain the appropriate stress and mixed boundary conditions accurate to all order. The method developed by Gregory and Wan is used to generate necessary conditions which the prescribed data on the edge of the plate must satisfy in order that it should generate a decaying state within the plate; these decaying state conditions are obtained explicitly for axisymmetric bending and stretching of a circular plate when stress or mixed conditions are imposed on the plate edge. They are then used for the correct formulation of boundary conditions for the interior solution. For the stress data, our boundary conditions coincide with those obtained in conventional forms of plate theories. More importantly, appropriate boundary conditions with a set of mixed edge-data are obtained for the first time. Furthermore, the corresponding necessary conditions for transversely isotropic elastic plate are obtained directly, and their isotropic elastic counterparts are also obtained.

  8. Universal equations of unsteady two-dimensional MHD boundary layer whose temperature varies with time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boričić Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns with unsteady two-dimensional temperature laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD boundary layer of incompressible fluid. It is assumed that induction of outer magnetic field is function of longitudinal coordinate with force lines perpendicular to the body surface on which boundary layer forms. Outer electric filed is neglected and magnetic Reynolds number is significantly lower then one i.e. considered problem is in inductionless approximation. Characteristic properties of fluid are constant because velocity of flow is much lower than speed of light and temperature difference is small enough (under 50ºC . Introduced assumptions simplify considered problem in sake of mathematical solving, but adopted physical model is interesting from practical point of view, because its relation with large number of technically significant MHD flows. Obtained partial differential equations can be solved with modern numerical methods for every particular problem. Conclusions based on these solutions are related only with specific temperature MHD boundary layer problem. In this paper, quite different approach is used. First new variables are introduced and then sets of similarity parameters which transform equations on the form which don't contain inside and in corresponding boundary conditions characteristics of particular problems and in that sense equations are considered as universal. Obtained universal equations in appropriate approximation can be solved numerically once for all. So-called universal solutions of equations can be used to carry out general conclusions about temperature MHD boundary layer and for calculation of arbitrary particular problems. To calculate any particular problem it is necessary also to solve corresponding momentum integral equation.

  9. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J.; Baraffe, I.; Goffrey, T.; Geroux, C.; Viallet, M.; Folini, D.; Constantino, T.; Popov, M.; Walder, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Studies of stellar convection typically use a spherical-shell geometry. The radial extent of the shell and the boundary conditions applied are based on the model of the star investigated. We study the impact of different two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from an established one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star, like our sun at 106 years of age. Aims: We analyze how the radial extent of the spherical shell changes the convective dynamics that result in the deep interior of the young sun model, far from the surface. In the near-surface layers, simple small-scale convection develops from the profiles of temperature and density. A central radiative zone below the convection zone provides a lower boundary on the convection zone. The inclusion of either of these physically distinct layers in the spherical shell can potentially affect the characteristics of deep convection. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over tens or even hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: To measure the impact of the spherical-shell geometry and our treatment of boundaries, we evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, so that our results are focused toward studies exploiting the so

  10. Measurement of Turbulence Energy Balance in a Two-Dimensional Wall Jet along a Plane Surface

    OpenAIRE

    藤沢, 延行; 白井, 紘行

    1987-01-01

    The sructure of turbulence in a wall jet along a plane surface is investigated by measuring the balance of turbulence energy. With the aid of a hot-wire anemometer system, convection velocities of small-scale turbulent motion are measured as well as other time-averaged flow properties and turbulence characteristics. It is found that the convection velocity of small-scale turbulence deviates significantly from the mean flow velocity, that is, Taylor's hypothesis is not valid for the present wa...

  11. Evaporation, Heat Transfer, and Velocity Distribution in Two-Dimensional and Rotationally Symmetrical Laminar Boundary-Layer Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froessling, Nils

    1958-01-01

    The fundamental boundary layer equations for the flow, temperature and concentration fields are presented. Two dimensional symmetrical and unsymmetrical and rotationally symmetrical steady boundary layer flows are treated as well as the transfer boundary layer. Approximation methods for the calculation of the transfer layer are discussed and a brief survey of an investigation into the validity of the law that the Nusselt number is proportional to the cube root of the Prandtl number is presented.

  12. Mesoscopic current transport in two-dimensional materials with grain boundaries: Four-point probe resistance and Hall effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Mikkel Rønne; Boll, Mads; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the behavior of micro four-point probe (M4PP) measurements on two-dimensional (2D) sheets composed of grains of varying size and grain boundary resistivity by Monte Carlo based finite element (FE) modelling. The 2D sheet of the FE model was constructed using Voronoi tessellation......-configurations depends on the dimensionality of the current transport (i.e., one- or two-dimensional). At low grain density or low grain boundary resistivity, two-dimensional transport is observed. In contrast, at moderate grain density and high grain resistivity, one-dimensional transport is seen. Ultimately......, this affects how measurements on defective systems should be interpreted in order to extract relevant sample parameters. The Hall effect response in all M4PP configurations was only significant for moderate grain densities and fairly large grain boundary resistivity....

  13. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheisari, R., E-mail: gheisari@pgu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Energy Research Center, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H. [Department of Physics, University of Birjand, Birjand 97175 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D{sub 2}O and solid D{sub 2} (sD{sub 2}). The D{sub 2}O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD{sub 2} as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ − z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD{sub 2}. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD{sub 2} volume) equal to 6.79 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} and 2.20 ×10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}s{sup −1}, respectively.

  14. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-01

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D2O and solid D2 (sD2). The D2O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD2 as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ - z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD2. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD2 volume) equal to 6.79 × 106 cm-2s-1 and 2.20 ×105 cm-3s-1, respectively.

  15. A tunable isoelectric focusing via moving reaction boundary for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chen-Gang; Shang, Zhi; Yan, Jian; Li, Si; Li, Guo-Qing; Liu, Rong-Zhong; Qing, Ying; Fan, Liu-Yin; Xiao, Hua; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2015-05-01

    Routine native immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) are still suffering from unfortunate reproducibility, poor resolution (caused by protein precipitation) and instability in characterization of intact protein isoforms and posttranslational modifications. Based on the concept of moving reaction boundary (MRB), we firstly proposed a tunable non-IPG-IEF system to address these issues. By choosing proper pairs of catholyte and anolyte, we could achieve desired cathodic and anodic migrating pH gradients in non-IPG-IEF system, effectively eliminating protein precipitation and uncertainty of quantitation existing in routine IEF and 2DE, and enhancing the resolution and sensitivity of IEF. Then, an adjustable 2DE system was developed by combining non-IPG-IEF with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The improved 2DE was evaluated by testing model proteins and colon cancer cell lysates. The experiments revealed that (i) a tunable pH gradient could be designed via MRB; (ii) up to 1.65 fold improvement of resolution was achieved via non-IPG-IEF; (iii) the sensitivity of developed techniques was increased up to 2.7 folds; and (iv) up to about 16.4% more protein spots could be observed via the adjustable 2DE as compared with routine one. The developed techniques might contribute to complex proteome research, especially for screening of biological marker and analysis of extreme acidic/alkaline proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gheisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source was modeled based on an arrangement of D2O and solid D2 (sD2. The D2O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD2 as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (ρ − z geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD2. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD2 volume equal to 6.79 × 106 cm−2s−1 and 2.20 ×105 cm−3s−1, respectively.

  17. Two-dimensional physical-based inversion of confined and unconfined aquifers under unknown boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jianying; Zhang, Ye

    2014-03-01

    An inverse method is developed to simultaneously estimate multiple hydraulic conductivities, source/sink strengths, and boundary conditions, for two-dimensional confined and unconfined aquifers under non-pumping or pumping conditions. The method incorporates noisy observed data (hydraulic heads, groundwater fluxes, or well rates) at measurement locations. With a set of hybrid formulations, given sufficient measurement data, the method yields well-posed systems of equations that can be solved efficiently via nonlinear optimization. The solution is stable when measurement errors are increased. The method is successfully tested on problems with regular and irregular geometries, different heterogeneity patterns and variances (maximum Kmax/Kmin tested is 10,000), and error magnitudes. Under non-pumping conditions, when error-free observed data are used, the estimated conductivities and recharge rates are accurate within 8% of the true values. When data contain increasing errors, the estimated parameters become less accurate, as expected. For problems where the underlying parameter variation is unknown, equivalent conductivities and average recharge rates can be estimated. Under pumping (and/or injection) conditions, a hybrid formulation is developed to address these local source/sink effects, while different types of boundary conditions can also exert significant influences on drawdowns. Local grid refinement near wells is not needed to obtain accurate results, thus inversion is successful with coarse inverse grids, leading to high computation efficiency. Furthermore, flux measurements are not needed for the inversion to succeed; data requirement of the method is thus not much different from that of interpreting classic well tests. Finally, inversion accuracy is not sensitive to the degree of nonlinearity of the flow equations. Performance of the inverse method for confined and unconfined aquifer problems is similar in terms of the accuracy of the estimated parameters

  18. Mesoscopic current transport in two-dimensional materials with grain boundaries: Four-point probe resistance and Hall effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, Mikkel Rønne; Boll, Mads; Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard;

    2016-01-01

    configuration sheet resistance as well as the resistance measured between opposing edges of the square sample have a simple unique dependency on the dimension-less parameter √nρGBG0, where G0 is the sheet conductance of a grain. The value of the ratio RA/RB between resistances measured in A- and B......-configurations depends on the dimensionality of the current transport (i.e., one- or two-dimensional). At low grain density or low grain boundary resistivity, two-dimensional transport is observed. In contrast, at moderate grain density and high grain resistivity, one-dimensional transport is seen. Ultimately...

  19. A parametrization of two-dimensional turbulence based on a maximum entropy production principle with a local conservation of energy

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri

    2014-01-01

    In the context of two-dimensional (2D) turbulence, we apply the maximum entropy production principle (MEPP) by enforcing a local conservation of energy. This leads to an equation for the vorticity distribution that conserves all the Casimirs, the energy, and that increases monotonically the mixing entropy ($H$-theorem). Furthermore, the equation for the coarse-grained vorticity dissipates monotonically all the generalized enstrophies. These equations may provide a parametrization of 2D turbulence. They do not generally relax towards the maximum entropy state. The vorticity current vanishes for any steady state of the 2D Euler equation. Interestingly, the equation for the coarse-grained vorticity obtained from the MEPP turns out to coincide, after some algebraic manipulations, with the one obtained with the anticipated vorticity method. This shows a connection between these two approaches when the conservation of energy is treated locally. Furthermore, the newly derived equation, which incorporates a diffusion...

  20. Statistical theory of reversals in two-dimensional confined turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Vishwanath; Brachet, Marc

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that the Truncated Euler Equations, i.e. a finite set of ordinary differential equations for the amplitude of the large-scale modes, can correctly describe the complex transitional dynamics that occur within the turbulent regime of a confined 2D Navier-Stokes flow with bottom friction and a spatially periodic forcing. In particular, the random reversals of the large scale circulation on the turbulent background involve bifurcations of the probability distribution function of the large-scale circulation velocity that are described by the related microcanonical distribution which displays transitions from gaussian to bimodal and broken ergodicity. A minimal 13-mode model reproduces these results.

  1. Bispectral experimental estimation of the nonlinear energy transfer in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2008-01-01

    -wave turbulence. The density fluctuations, which at the realistic collisionality are advected as a passive scalar with the vorticity, show power transfer from large to small scales, while the spectral power in potential fluctuations, which represents the energy, is transferred as an inverse cascade to larger...

  2. Measurement of the turbulence intensity behind a two-dimensional cascade and in a three-stage axial blower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiock, R.

    1978-01-01

    Turbulence intensity (Tu) measurements were made in two-dimensional and rotating cascades of blades in a low-speed cascade wind tunnel using hot-wire probes as sensors. The local Tu at Re = 1.6x100000 was determined in the wake zone behind a two-dimensional cascade. Then the values were recomputed for a rotating cascade, giving a mean turbulence intensity of 6.5% at 1/10 chord downstream and 2.9% at one chord. Fans were used for measurements on the rotating cascade. Re was equal to 7x100000. Frequency analysis was employed to separate the actual Tu of the entry flow from the effects caused by interaction with the rotor blades, showing that the true Tu increased from a few tenths of a percent to 6.6% in the 1st rotor, and from 7.2 to 9.3% in the 2d rotor. The Tu behind the 3d rotor was equal to 8.9%.

  3. Mesoscopic current transport in two-dimensional materials with grain boundaries: Four-point probe resistance and Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotz, Mikkel R.; Boll, Mads; Østerberg, Frederik W.; Hansen, Ole; Petersen, Dirch H.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the behavior of micro four-point probe (M4PP) measurements on two-dimensional (2D) sheets composed of grains of varying size and grain boundary resistivity by Monte Carlo based finite element (FE) modelling. The 2D sheet of the FE model was constructed using Voronoi tessellation to emulate a polycrystalline sheet, and a square sample was cut from the tessellated surface. Four-point resistances and Hall effect signals were calculated for a probe placed in the center of the square sample as a function of grain density n and grain boundary resistivity ρ GB . We find that the dual configuration sheet resistance as well as the resistance measured between opposing edges of the square sample have a simple unique dependency on the dimension-less parameter √{ n } ρ GB G 0 , where G0 is the sheet conductance of a grain. The value of the ratio R A / R B between resistances measured in A- and B-configurations depends on the dimensionality of the current transport (i.e., one- or two-dimensional). At low grain density or low grain boundary resistivity, two-dimensional transport is observed. In contrast, at moderate grain density and high grain resistivity, one-dimensional transport is seen. Ultimately, this affects how measurements on defective systems should be interpreted in order to extract relevant sample parameters. The Hall effect response in all M4PP configurations was only significant for moderate grain densities and fairly large grain boundary resistivity.

  4. Streamline topologies near simple degenerate critical points in two-dimensional flow away from boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten; Hartnack, Johan Nicolai

    1999-01-01

    Streamline patterns and their bifurcations in two-dimensional incompressible flow are investigated from a topological point of view. The velocity field is expanded at a point in the fluid, and the expansion coefficients are considered as bifurcation parameters. A series of nonlinear coordinate...

  5. Streamline topologies near simple degenerate critical points in two-dimensional flow away from boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten; Hartnack, Johan Nicolai

    1998-01-01

    Streamline patterns and their bifurcations in two-dimensional incompressible flow are investigated from a topological point of view. The velocity field is expanded at a point in the fluid, and the expansion coefficients are considered as bifurcation parameters. A series of non-linear coordinate...

  6. Exact field-driven interface dynamics in the two-dimensional stochastic Ising model with helicoidal boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    de Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the interface dynamics of the two-dimensional stochastic Ising model in an external field under helicoidal boundary conditions. At sufficiently low temperatures and fields, the dynamics of the interface is described by an exactly solvable high-spin asymmetric quantum Hamiltonian that is the infinitesimal generator of the zero range process. Generally, the critical dynamics of the interface fluctuations is in the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class of critical behavior. We re...

  7. Spherical-shell boundaries for two-dimensional compressible convection in a star

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, J; Goffrey, T; Geroux, C; Viallet, M; Folini, D; Constantino, T; Popov, M; Walder, R

    2016-01-01

    Context: We study the impact of two-dimensional spherical shells on compressible convection. Realistic profiles for density and temperature from a one-dimensional stellar evolution code are used to produce a model of a large stellar convection zone representative of a young low-mass star. Methods: We perform hydrodynamic implicit large-eddy simulations of compressible convection using the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC). Because MUSIC has been designed to use realistic stellar models produced from one-dimensional stellar evolution calculations, MUSIC simulations are capable of seamlessly modeling a whole star. Simulations in two-dimensional spherical shells that have different radial extents are performed over hundreds of convective turnover times, permitting the collection of well-converged statistics. Results: We evaluate basic statistics of the convective turnover time, the convective velocity, and the overshooting layer. These quantities are selected for their relevance to one-dimensional s...

  8. Footprints of funnel vortices in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Roi; Liberzon, Alex; Hetsroni, Gad

    2003-11-01

    The topology of large scale funnel structures in a turbulent boundary layer in a flume is investigated experimentally. The large scale structure is reconstructed from the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) eigenmodes, calculated from the two-dimensional projections of the fluctuated vorticity field realizations. The instantaneous two-dimensional velocity field realizations are obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. The dominant funnel structure appears to have a longitudinal streamwise orientation, an inclination angle of 8 degrees, streamwise length of 1000 wall units, and a distance between the neighboring structures of about 100 wall units in the spanwise direction. The spatial characteristics of the funnel structure, measured in the streamwise - wall normal plane of the flume, has been found to be independent of the Reynolds number. The identification technique is based on all the data set and provide a statistical descrition of the structure footprint.

  9. Solving Two -Dimensional Diffusion Equations with Nonlocal Boundary Conditions by a Special Class of Padé Approximants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Siddique

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Parabolic partial differential equations with nonlocal boundary conditions arise in modeling of a wide range of important application areas such as chemical diffusion, thermoelasticity, heat conduction process, control theory and medicine science. In this paper, we present the implementation of positivity- preserving Padé numerical schemes to the two-dimensional diffusion equation with nonlocal time dependent boundary condition. We successfully implemented these numerical schemes for both Homogeneous and Inhomogeneous cases. The numerical results show that these Padé approximation based numerical schemes are quite accurate and easily implemented.

  10. Vortex statistics for turbulence in a container with rigid boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of vortex statistics for decaying two-dimensional turbulence in a square container with rigid no-slip walls is compared with a few available experimental results and with the scaling theory of two-dimensional turbulent decay as proposed by Carnevale et al. Power-law exponents...

  11. Central charges and boundary fields for two dimensional dilatonic black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinamonti, N

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we first show that within the Hamiltonian description of general relativity, the central charge of a near horizon asymptotic symmetry group is zero, and therefore that the entropy of the system cannot be estimated using Cardy's formula. This is done by mapping a static black hole to a two dimensional plane. We explain how such a charge can only appear to a static observer who chooses to stay permanently outside the black hole. Then an alternative argument is given for the presence of a universal central charge. Finally we suggest an effective quantum theory on the horizon that is compatible with the thermodynamics behaviour of the black hole.

  12. Structure of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, O.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2014-11-01

    Relaminarization of a turbulent boundary layer in a strongly accelerated flow has received a great attention in recent times. It has been found that such relaminarization is a general and regularly occurring phenomenon in the leading-edge region of a swept wing of an airplane (van Dam et al., 1993). In this work, we investigate the effect of initial Reynolds number on the process of relaminarization in turbulent boundary layers. The experimental and numerical investigation of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers undergoing same history reveals that the boundary layer with higher initial Reynolds number relaminarizes at a lower pressure gradient value compared to the one with lower Reynolds number. This effect can be explained on the inviscid theory proposed earlier in the literature. Further, various parameter criteria proposed to predict relaminarization, are assessed and the structure of relaminarizing boundary layers is investigated. A mechanism for stabilization of near-wall low speed streaks is proposed.

  13. Initial and Boundary Value Problems for Two-Dimensional Non-hydrostatic Boussinesq Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈春; 孙梅娜

    2005-01-01

    Based on the theory of stratification, the weU-posedness of the initial and boundary value problems for the system of twodimensional non-hydrostatic Boussinesq equations was discussed. The sufficient and necessary conditions of the existence and uniqueness for the solution of the equations were given for some representative initial and boundary value problems. Several special cases were discussed.

  14. Prediction of mean flow data for adiabatic 2-D compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motallebi, F.

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a method for the prediction of mean flow data (i.e. skin friction, velocity profile and shape parameter) for adiabatic two-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers at zero pressure gradient. The transformed law of the wall, law of the lake, the van Driest model for the

  15. Prediction of mean flow data for adiabatic 2-D compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motallebi, F.

    1997-01-01

    This book presents a method for the prediction of mean flow data (i.e. skin friction, velocity profile and shape parameter) for adiabatic two-dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers at zero pressure gradient. The transformed law of the wall, law of the lake, the van Driest model for the c

  16. A parametrization of two-dimensional turbulence based on a maximum entropy production principle with a local conservation of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: chavanis@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-01

    In the context of two-dimensional (2D) turbulence, we apply the maximum entropy production principle (MEPP) by enforcing a local conservation of energy. This leads to an equation for the vorticity distribution that conserves all the Casimirs, the energy, and that increases monotonically the mixing entropy (H-theorem). Furthermore, the equation for the coarse-grained vorticity dissipates monotonically all the generalized enstrophies. These equations may provide a parametrization of 2D turbulence. They do not generally relax towards the maximum entropy state. The vorticity current vanishes for any steady state of the 2D Euler equation. Interestingly, the equation for the coarse-grained vorticity obtained from the MEPP turns out to coincide, after some algebraic manipulations, with the one obtained with the anticipated vorticity method. This shows a connection between these two approaches when the conservation of energy is treated locally. Furthermore, the newly derived equation, which incorporates a diffusion term and a drift term, has a nice physical interpretation in terms of a selective decay principle. This sheds new light on both the MEPP and the anticipated vorticity method. (paper)

  17. Unified approach to split absorbing boundary conditions for nonlinear Schrödinger equations: Two-dimensional case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiwei; Xu, Zhenli; Wu, Xiaonan

    2009-04-01

    This paper aims to design local absorbing boundary conditions (LABCs) for the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations on a rectangle by extending the unified approach. Based on the time-splitting idea, the main process of the unified approach is to approximate the kinetic energy part by a one-way equation, unite it with the potential energy equation, and then obtain the well-posed and accurate LABCs on the artificial boundaries. In the corners, we use the (1,1)-Padé approximation to the kinetic term and also unite it with the nonlinear term to give some local corner boundary conditions. Numerical tests are given to verify the stable and tractable advantages of the method.

  18. Alpha models and boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskidov, Alexey

    We study boundary-layer turbulence using the Navier-Stokes-alpha model obtaining an extension of the Prandtl equations for the averaged flow in a turbulent boundary layer. In the case of a zero pressure gradient flow along a flat plate, we derive a nonlinear fifth-order ordinary differential equation, an extension of the Blasius equation. We study it analytically and prove the existence of a two-parameter family of solutions satisfying physical boundary conditions. From this equation we obtain a theoretical prediction of the skin-friction coefficient in a wide range of Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, and deduce the maximal value of the skin-friction coefficient in the turbulent boundary layer. The two-parameter family of solutions to the equation matches experimental data in the transitional boundary layers with different free stream turbulence intensity. A one-parameter sub-family of solutions, obtained using our skin-friction coefficient law, matches experimental data in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  19. Numerical Bifurcation Diagram for the Two-Dimensional Boundary-fed CDIMA System

    CERN Document Server

    Setayeshgar, S

    1999-01-01

    We present numerical solution of the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system in two dimensions in a boundary-fed system using a realistic model. The bifurcation diagram for the transition from non-symmetry breaking structures along boundary feed gradients to transverse symmetry breaking patterns in a single layer is numerically determined. We find this transition to be discontinuous. We make connection with earlier results and discuss prospects for future work.

  20. A Global Solution to a Two-dimensional Riemann Problem Involving Shocks as Free Boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuxi Zheng

    2003-01-01

    We present a global solution to a Riemann problem for the pressure gradient system of equations.The Riemann problem has initially two shock waves and two contact discontinuities. The angle between the two shock waves is set initially to be close to 180 degrees. The solution has a shock wave that is usually regarded as a free boundary in the self-similar variable plane. Our main contribution in methodology is handling the tangential oblique derivative boundary values.

  1. Two-Dimensional Analytical Solution of the Laminar Forced Convection in a Circular Duct with Periodic Boundary Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Astaraki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study analytical solution for forced convection heat transfer in a circular duct with a special boundary condition has been presented, because the external wall temperature is a periodic function of axial direction. Local energy balance equation is written with reference to the fully developed regime. Also governing equations are two-dimensionally solved, and the effect of duct wall thickness has been considered. The temperature distribution of fluid and solid phases is assumed as a periodic function of axial direction and finally temperature distribution in the flow field, solid wall, and local Nusselt number, is obtained analytically.

  2. Simple vibration modeling of structural fuzzy with continuous boundary by including two-dimensional spatial memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    -dimensional continuous boundary. Additionally, a simple method for determining the so-called equivalent coupling factor is presented. The validity of this method is demonstrated by numerical simulations of the vibration response of a master plate structure with fuzzy attachments. It is revealed that the method performs...

  3. Fundamental interactions of vortical structures with boundary layers in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1991-01-01

    in the vorticity-stream function representation for bounded geometries. Fundamental processes connected to vorticity detachment from the boundary layers caused by the proximity of vortical structures are described. These processes include enstrophy enhancement of the main flow during bursting events, and pinning...

  4. DESIGN OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL SUPERSONIC TURBINE ROTOR BLADES WITH BOUNDARY-LAYER CORRECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, L. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the design of supersonic rotor blades where losses are accounted for by correcting the ideal blade geometry for boundary layer displacement thickness. The ideal blade passage is designed by the method of characteristics and is based on establishing vortex flow within the passage. Boundary-layer parameters (displacement and momentum thicknesses) are calculated for the ideal passage, and the final blade geometry is obtained by adding the displacement thicknesses to the ideal nozzle coordinates. The boundary-layer parameters are also used to calculate the aftermixing conditions downstream of the rotor blades assuming the flow mixes to a uniform state. The computer program input consists essentially of the rotor inlet and outlet Mach numbers, upper- and lower-surface Mach numbers, inlet flow angle, specific heat ratio, and total flow conditions. The program gas properties are set up for air. Additional gases require changes to be made to the program. The computer output consists of the corrected rotor blade coordinates, the principal boundary-layer parameters, and the aftermixing conditions. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 7094. This program was developed in 1971.

  5. A new method of boundary parameter estimation for a two-dimensional diffusion system under noisy observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunahara, Y.; Kojima, F.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to establish a method for identifying unknown parameters involved in the boundary state of a class of diffusion systems under noisy observations. A mathematical model of the system dynamics is given by a two-dimensional diffusion equation. Noisy observations are made by sensors allocated on the system boundary. Starting with the mathematical model mentioned above, an online parameter estimation algorithm is proposed within the framework of the maximum likelihood estimation. Existence of the optimal solution and related necessary conditions are discussed. By solving a local variation of the cost functional with respect to the perturbation of parameters, the estimation mechanism is proposed in a form of recursive computations. Finally, the feasibility of the estimator proposed here is demonstrated through results of digital simulation experiments.

  6. AN IMPROVED HYBRID BOUNDARY NODE METHOD IN TWO-DIMENSIONAL SOLIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Yu; Wang Yuanhan; Jiang Heyang

    2005-01-01

    The hybrid boundary node method (HBNM) is a promising method for solving boundary value problems with the hybrid displacement variational formulation and shape functions from the moving least squares(MLS) approximation. The main idea is to reduce the dimensionality of the former and keep the meshless advantage of the latter. Following its application in solving potential problems, it is further developed and numerically implemented for 2D solids in this paper. The rigid movement method is employed to solve the hyper-singular integrations. Numerical examples for some 2D solids have been given to show the characteristics. The computation results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the analytical solution.The parameters that influence the performance of this method are studied through numerical examples.

  7. Linear Controllers for Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Junwoo; Kim, John; Kang, Sung-Moon; Speyer, Jason

    2000-11-01

    Several recent studies have shown that controllers based on a linear system theory work surprisingly well in turbulent flows, suggesting that a linear mechanism may play an important role even in turbulent flows. It has been also shown that non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations is an essential characteristic in the regeneration of near-wall turbulence structures in turbulent boundary layers. A few controllers designed to reduce the role of different linear mechanisms, including that to minimize the non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, have been developed and applied to a low Reynolds nubmer turbulent channel flow. A reduced-order model containing the most controllable and observables modes is derived for each system. Other existing control schemes, such as Choi et al's opposition control, have been examined from the point of a linear system control. Further discussion on controller design, such as choice of cost function and other control parameters, will be presented.

  8. Nonparallel stability of two-dimensional nonuniformly heated boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; El-Hady, N. M.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented for the linear stability of water boundary-layer flows over nonuniformly flat plates. Included in the analysis are disturbances due to velocity, pressure, temperatures, density, and transport properties as well as variations of the liquid properties with temperature. The method of multiple scales is used to account for the nonparallelism of the mean flow. In contrast with previous analyses, the nonsimilarity of the mean flow is taken into account. No analysis agrees, even qualitatively, with the experimental data when similar profiles are used. However, both the parallel and nonparallel results qualitatively agree with the experimental results of Strazisar and Reshotko when nonsimilar profiles are used.

  9. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  10. Uncertainty propagation by using spectral methods: A practical application to a two-dimensional turbulence fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Fabio; Milanese, Lucio; Ricci, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    To reduce the computational cost of the uncertainty propagation analysis, which is used to study the impact of input parameter variations on the results of a simulation, a general and simple to apply methodology based on decomposing the solution to the model equations in terms of Chebyshev polynomials is discussed. This methodology, based on the work by Scheffel [Am. J. Comput. Math. 2, 173-193 (2012)], approximates the model equation solution with a semi-analytic expression that depends explicitly on time, spatial coordinates, and input parameters. By employing a weighted residual method, a set of nonlinear algebraic equations for the coefficients appearing in the Chebyshev decomposition is then obtained. The methodology is applied to a two-dimensional Braginskii model used to simulate plasma turbulence in basic plasma physics experiments and in the scrape-off layer of tokamaks, in order to study the impact on the simulation results of the input parameter that describes the parallel losses. The uncertainty that characterizes the time-averaged density gradient lengths, time-averaged densities, and fluctuation density level are evaluated. A reasonable estimate of the uncertainty of these distributions can be obtained with a single reduced-cost simulation.

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF UNSTEADY TURBULENT FLOW INDUCED BY TWO-DIMENSIONAL ELEVATOR CAR AND COUNTER WEIGHT SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of unsteady turbulent flow induced by high-speed elevator system was established in the present study. The research was focused on the instantaneous variation of the aerodynamic force on the car structure during traversing motion of the counter weight in the hoistway. A dynamic meshing method was employed to treat the multi-body motion system to avoid poor distortion of meshes. A comprehensive understanding of this significant aspect was obtained by varying the horizontal gap (δ=0.1m, 0.2m, and 0.3m) between the elevator car and the counter weight, and the moving speed (U0=2m/s, 6m/s, and 10m/s) of the elevator system. A pulsed intensification of the aerodynamic force on the elevator car and subsequent appearance of large valley with negative aerodynamic force were clearly observed in the numerical results. In parameters studied (δ=0.1m, U0=2m/s, 6m/s, 10m/s), the peaked horizontal and vertical forces are respectively 7-11 and 4.3-5.65 times of that when the counter weight is far from the car. These results demonstrated the prominent influence of the traversing counter weight on aerodynamic force on the elevator car, which is of great significance to designers of high-speed elevator system.

  12. Mean flow development of a longitudinal vortex embedded in an attached, three-dimensional, turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizawa, T. [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Eaton, J.K. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1990-12-31

    The interaction of a longitudinal vortex with a pressure-driven, three dimensional turbulent boundary layer was investigated experimentally. The vortex was attenuated much more rapidly in the three dimensional layer than in a two-dimensional boundary layer. The persistence for the vortex-induced perturbation was strongly dependent on the sign of the vortex.

  13. Inertial-range dynamics and scaling laws of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the weak-field regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackbourn, Luke A K; Tran, Chuong V

    2014-08-01

    We study inertial-range dynamics and scaling laws in unforced two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the regime of moderately small and small initial magnetic-to-kinetic-energy ratio r(0), with an emphasis on the latter. The regime of small r(0) corresponds to a relatively weak field and strong magnetic stretching, whereby the turbulence is characterized by an intense conversion of kinetic into magnetic energy (dynamo action in the three-dimensional context). This conversion is an inertial-range phenomenon and, upon becoming quasisaturated, deposits the converted energy within the inertial range rather than transferring it to the small scales. As a result, the magnetic-energy spectrum E(b)(k) in the inertial range can become quite shallow and may not be adequately explained or understood in terms of conventional cascade theories. It is demonstrated by numerical simulations at high Reynolds numbers (and unity magnetic Prandtl number) that the energetics and inertial-range scaling depend strongly on r(0). In particular, for fully developed turbulence with r(0) in the range [1/4,1/4096], E(b)(k) is found to scale as k(α), where α≳-1, including α>0. The extent of such a shallow spectrum is limited, becoming broader as r(0) is decreased. The slope α increases as r(0) is decreased, appearing to tend to +1 in the limit of small r(0). This implies equipartition of magnetic energy among the Fourier modes of the inertial range and the scaling k(-1) of the magnetic potential variance, whose flux is direct rather than inverse. This behavior of the potential resembles that of a passive scalar. However, unlike a passive scalar whose variance dissipation rate slowly vanishes in the diffusionless limit, the dissipation rate of the magnetic potential variance scales linearly with the diffusivity in that limit. Meanwhile, the kinetic-energy spectrum is relatively steep, followed by a much shallower tail due to strong antidynamo excitation. This gives rise to a total

  14. BEM/FDM Conjugate Heat Transfer Analysis of a Two-dimensional Air-cooled Turbine Blade Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A coupled boundary element method (BEM) and finite difference method (FDM) are applied to solve conjugate heat transfer problem of a two-dimensional air-cooled turbine blade boundary layer. A loosely coupled strategy is adopted, in which each set of field equations is solved to provide boundary conditions for the other. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved by HIT-NS code. In this code, the FDM is adopted and is used to resolve the convective heat transfer in the fluid region. The BEM code is used to resolve the conduction heat transfer in the solid region. An iterated convergence criterion is the continuity of temperature and heat flux at the fluid-solid interface. The numerical results from the BEM adopted in this paper are in good agreement with the results of analyrical solution and the results of commercial code, such as Fluent 6.2. The BEM avoids the complicated mesh needed in other computation method and saves the computation time. The results prove that the BEM adopted in this paper can give the same precision in numerical results with less boundary points. Comparing the conjugate results with the numerical results of an adiabatic wall flow solution, it reveals a significant difference in the distribution of metal temperatures. The results from conjugate heat transfer analysis are more accurate and they are closer to realistic thermal environment of turbines.

  15. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  16. Turbulent Boundary Layers - Experiments, Theory and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT (ORGANISATION DU TRAITE DE L’ATLANTIQUE NORD ) AGARD Conference Proceedings No.271 TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS - EXPERIMENTS, THEORY AND...photographs of Figures 21 and 22. In this case, the photographs are taken with a single flash strobe and thus yield the instantaneous positions of the

  17. Boundary crisis and suppression of Fermi acceleration in a dissipative two-dimensional non-integrable time-dependent billiard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Diego F.M., E-mail: diegofregolente@gmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515 Bela Vista, CEP, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Leonel, Edson D., E-mail: edleonel@rc.unesp.b [Departamento de Estatistica, Matematica Aplicada e Computacao, Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515 Bela Vista, CEP, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-05

    Some dynamical properties for a dissipative time-dependent oval-shaped billiard are studied. The system is described in terms of a four-dimensional nonlinear mapping. Dissipation is introduced via inelastic collisions of the particle with the boundary, thus implying that the particle has a fractional loss of energy upon collision. The dissipation causes profound modifications in the dynamics of the particle as well as in the phase space of the non-dissipative system. In particular, inelastic collisions can be assumed as an efficient mechanism to suppress Fermi acceleration of the particle. The dissipation also creates attractors in the system, including chaotic. We show that a slightly modification of the intensity of the damping coefficient yields a drastic and sudden destruction of the chaotic attractor, thus leading the system to experience a boundary crisis. We have characterized such a boundary crisis via a collision of the chaotic attractor with its own basin of attraction and confirmed that inelastic collisions do indeed suppress Fermi acceleration in two-dimensional time-dependent billiards.

  18. Inversion of two-dimensional tidal open boundary conditions of M2 constituent in the Bohai and Yellow Seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Anzhou; GUO Zheng; L(U) Xianqing

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional tidal open boundary conditions of the M2 constituent in the Bohai and Yellow Seas(BYS)have been estimated by assimilating T/P altimeter data.During inversion,independent point (IP)strategy was used,in which several IPs on the open boundary is assumed,values at these IPs can be optimized with an adjoint method,and those at other grid points are determined by linearly interpolating the values at IPs.The reasonability and feasibility of the model are tested by ideal twin experiments.In the practical experiment(PE)after assimilation,the cost function may reach 1% or less of its initial value.Mean absolute errors in amplitude and phase can be less than 5 cm and 5°,respectively,and the obtained co-chart can show the character of the M2 constituent in the BYS.The results of the PE indicate that using only two IPs on the open boundary can yield better simulated results.

  19. Identification of Lagrangian coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) method, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in a fully developed flat-plate turbulent boundary layer are successfully identified from a two-dimensional (2D) velocity field obtained by time-resolved 2D PIV measurement. The typical LCSs in the turbulent boundary layer are hairpin-like structures, which are characterized as legs of quasi-streamwise vor- tices extending deep into the near wall region with an inclination angle θ to the wall, and heads of the transverse vortex tube located in the outer region. Statistical analysis on the characteristic shape of typical LCS reveals that the probability density distribution of θ accords well with t-distribution in the near wall region, but presents a bimodal distribution with two peaks in the outer region, corresponding to the hairpin head and the hairpin neck, respectively. Spatial correlation analysis of FTLE field is im- plemented to get the ensemble-averaged inclination angle θ R of typical LCS. θ R first increases and then decreases along the wall-normal direction, similar to that of the mean value of θ. Moreover, the most probable value of θ saturates at y+=100 with the maximum value of about 24°, suggesting that the most likely position where hairpins transit from the neck to the head is located around y+=100. The ensem- ble-averaged convection velocity Uc of typical LCS is finally calculated from temporal-spatial correla- tion analysis of FTLE field. It is found that the wall-normal profile of the convection velocity Uc(y) ac- cords well with the local mean velocity profile U(y) beyond the buffer layer, evidencing that the down- stream convection of hairpins determines the transportation properties of the turbulent boundary layer in the log-region and beyond.

  20. Identification of Lagrangian coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Chong; WANG JinJun; ZHANG Cao

    2009-01-01

    Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) method, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) in a fully developed flat-plate turbulent boundary layer are successfully identified from a two-dimensional (2D) velocity field obtained by time-resolved 2D PIV measurement. The typical LCSs in the turbulent boundary layer are hairpin-like structures, which are characterized as legs of quasi-streamwise vor-tices extending deep into the near wall region with an inclination angle θto the wall, and heads of the transverse vortex tube located in the outer region. Statistical analysis on the characteristic shape of typical LCS reveals that the probability density distribution of # accords well with t-distribution in the near wall region, but presents a bimodal distribution with two peaks in the outer region, corresponding to the hairpin head and the hairpin neck, respectively. Spatial correlation analysis of FTLE field is im-plemented to get the ensemble-averaged inclination angle θR of typical LCS. θR first increases and then decreases along the wall-normal direction, similar to that of the mean value of θ. Moreover, the most probable value of 8 saturates at Y+=100 with the maximum value of about 24°, suggesting that the most likely position where hairpins transit from the neck to the head is located around Y+=100. The ensem-ble-averaged convection velocity Uc of typical LCS is finally calculated from temporal-spatial correla-tion analysis of FTLE field. It is found that the wall-normal profile of the convection velocity Uc(Y) ac-cords well with the local mean velocity profile U(y) beyond the buffer layer, evidencing that the down-stream convection of hairpins determines the transportation properties of the turbulent boundary layer in the log-region and beyond.

  1. Boundary layer structure in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Nan; Schumacher, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    The structure of the boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection is studied by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations. We consider convection in a cylindrical cell at an aspect ratio one for Rayleigh numbers of Ra=3e+9 and 3e+10 at fixed Prandtl number Pr=0.7. Similar to the experimental results in the same setup and for the same Prandtl number, the structure of the laminar boundary layers of the velocity and temperature fields is found to deviate from the prediction of the Prandtl-Blasius-Pohlhausen theory. Deviations decrease when a dynamical rescaling of the data with an instantaneously defined boundary layer thickness is performed and the analysis plane is aligned with the instantaneous direction of the large-scale circulation in the closed cell. Our numerical results demonstrate that important assumptions which enter existing classical laminar boundary layer theories for forced and natural convection are violated, such as the strict two-dimensionality of the dynamics or the s...

  2. MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chi-kwan

    2012-01-01

    The physical modeling of the accretion disk boundary layer, the region where the disk meets the surface of the accreting star, usually relies on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity, widely adopted in astrophysics, satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability is inefficient in this inner disk region. I will discuss the results of a recent study on the generation of hydromagnetic stresses and energy density in the boundary layer around a weakly magnetized star. Our findings suggest that although magnetic energy density can be significantly amplified in this region, angular momentum transport is rather inefficient. This seems consistent with the results obtained in numerical simulations...

  3. Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer: DNS and RANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing-Lei; MA Hui-Yang

    2007-01-01

    We assess the performance of a few turbulence models for Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of supersonic boundary layers, compared to the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of supersonic flat-plate turbulent boundary layers, carried out by Gao et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 22 (2005) 1709] and Huang et al. [Sci.Chin. 48 (2005) 614], as well as some available experimental data. The assessment is made for two test cases, with incoming Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers M = 2.25, Re = 365, 000/in, and M = 4.5, Re - 1.7 × 107/m,respectively. It is found that in the first case the prediction of RANS models agrees well with the DNS and the experimental data, while for the second case the agreement of the DNS models with experiment is less satisfactory.The compressibility effect on the RANS models is discussed.

  4. Turbulent boundary layer over flexible plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Parand; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2016-11-01

    This research describes the structure of a turbulent boundary layer flow with a zero pressure gradient over elastic plates. The elastic plates made of a thin aluminum sheets with thickness between 50 and 500 microns were placed on the floor of a subsonic wind tunnel and exposed to a turbulent boundary layer flow with a free stream velocity between 20m/s and 100m/s. The ceiling of the test section of the wind tunnel is adjustable so that a nearly zero pressure gradient is obtained in the test section. Hot-wire anemometry was used to measure the velocity components. Mean, fluctuating velocities and Reynolds stresses will be presented and compared with the values of a rigid plate.

  5. Water-Channel Estimation of Eulerian and Lagrangian Time Scales of the Turbulence in Idealized Two-Dimensional Urban Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardino, Annalisa; Monti, Paolo; Leuzzi, Giovanni; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2017-07-01

    Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics are obtained from a water-channel experiment of an idealized two-dimensional urban canopy flow in neutral conditions. The objective is to quantify the Eulerian (TE) and Lagrangian (TL) time scales of the turbulence above the canopy layer as well as to investigate their dependence on the aspect ratio of the canopy, AR, as the latter is the ratio of the width (W) to the height (H) of the canyon. Experiments are also conducted for the case of flat terrain, which can be thought of as equivalent to a classical one-directional shear flow. The values found for the Eulerian time scales on flat terrain are in agreement with previous numerical results found in the literature. It is found that both the streamwise and vertical components of the Lagrangian time scale, T_u^L and T_w^L , follow Raupach's linear law within the constant-flux layer. The same holds true for T_w^L in both the canopies analyzed (AR= 1 and AR= 2 ) and also for T_u^L when AR = 1 . In contrast, for AR = 2 , T_u^L follows Raupach's law only above z=2H . Below that level, T_u^L is nearly constant with height, showing at z=H a value approximately one order of magnitude greater than that found for AR = 1 . It is shown that the assumption usually adopted for flat terrain, that β =TL/TE is proportional to the inverse of the turbulence intensity, also holds true even for the canopy flow in the constant-flux layer. In particular, γ /i_u fits well β _u =T_u^L /T_u^E in both the configurations by choosing γ to be 0.35 (here, i_u =σ _u / \\bar{u} , where \\bar{u} and σ _u are the mean and the root-mean-square of the streamwise velocity component, respectively). On the other hand, β _w =T_w^L /T_w^E follows approximately γ /i_w =0.65/( {σ _w /\\bar{u} } ) for z > 2H , irrespective of the AR value. The second main objective is to estimate other parameters of interest in dispersion studies, such as the eddy diffusivity of momentum (KT) and the Kolmogorov constant (C_0) . It

  6. Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer: Observables and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    In situ satellite observations reveal strong lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF waves in the substorm subauroral geospace at and earthward of the electron plasmasheet boundary. These coincide with subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the plasmasphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ~10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasma jet (injection fronts over the plasmasphere. Plasma turbulence leads to the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. As a result, a turbulent boundary layer forms between the inner edge of the electron plasmasheet and plasmasphere. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions inside the plasmasphere. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  7. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated...

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF MOVING SCOUR BOUNDARY AND TURBULENCE FLOW AROUND SUBMARINE PIPELINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-cheng; LU Lin

    2005-01-01

    A two dimensional vertical mathematical model is proposed in this paper for simulating the equilibrium profile of local scour around submarine pipelines. The current model is composed of a new k-ε turbulence model, fitting moving boundary with pre-meshed grid lines and incipient criterion of shear stress for sediments. Employing the proposed model, an instance is carried out numerically and compared with experiments. The calculation results agree well with the experiments. It shows that the improved two-equation turbulence model adopted in this paper is appropriate to simulating the turbulent flow field around submarine pipelines, fitting moving boundary with pre-meshed grid lines method is efficient for moving boundary problems in a multiply-connected domain and the stability evaluation method for seabed with critical shear stress based on log-wall law is a reliable choice.

  9. Some measurements in synthetic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas, O.

    1980-01-01

    Synthetic turbulent boundary layers are examined which were constructed on a flat plate by generating systematic moving patterns of turbulent spots in a laminar flow. The experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number based on plate length of 1,700,000. Spots were generated periodically in space and time near the leading edge to form a regular hexagonal pattern. The disturbance mechanism was a camshaft which displaced small pins momentarily into the laminar flow at frequencies up to 80 Hz. The main instrumentation was a rake of 24 hot wires placed across the flow in a line parallel to the surface. The main measured variable was local intermittency; i.e., the probability of observing turbulent flow at a particular point in space and time. The results are reported in x-t diagrams showing the evolution of various synthetic flows along the plate. The dimensionless celerity or phase velocity of the large eddies is found to be 0.88, independent of eddy scale. All patterns with sufficiently small scales eventually showed loss of coherence as they moved downstream. A novel phenomenon called eddy transposition was observed in several flows which contained appreciable laminar regions. The large eddies shifted in formation to new positions, intermediate to their original ones, while preserving their hexagonal pattern. The present results, together with some empirical properties of a turbulent spot, are used to estimate the best choice of scales for constructing a synthetic boundary layer suitable for detailed study. The values recommended are: spanwise scale/thickness = 2.5, streamwise scale/thickness = 8.

  10. Effects of Various Shaped Roughness Elements in Two-Dimensional High Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-28

    the tunnel floor. Each piece of wood is routered on their respective ends to provide the necessary support and a smooth continuation of the test...0 . Ci (P q 0No U)ý2- N0’ t - - - 000099997799CýC 7N CCD C Aý 0.6 CD) -A- C. 4(oC1 r -M C 00 CC C4- III A >. 0. o) CN t N- m-L w N-C~ t o9 E CNC ...C, -: E+ +0 - IL IL0 CN 0 7 C\\Ic? 4? CA U) N 0C0000000 C N’ C> ’ý CN(? *U C) ot C -- (L 0 D00 0o 0) * Uý (’JD CNC >1L oC (L 7 N U’) + u Co 0>00000000

  11. Multilocality and fusion rules on the generalized structure functions in two-dimensional and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios

    2016-09-01

    Using the fusion-rules hypothesis for three-dimensional and two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence, we generalize a previous nonperturbative locality proof to multiple applications of the nonlinear interactions operator on generalized structure functions of velocity differences. We call this generalization of nonperturbative locality to multiple applications of the nonlinear interactions operator "multilocality." The resulting cross terms pose a new challenge requiring a new argument and the introduction of a new fusion rule that takes advantage of rotational symmetry. Our main result is that the fusion-rules hypothesis implies both locality and multilocality in both the IR and UV limits for the downscale energy cascade of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence and the downscale enstrophy cascade and inverse energy cascade of two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence. We stress that these claims relate to nonperturbative locality of generalized structure functions on all orders and not the term-by-term perturbative locality of diagrammatic theories or closure models that involve only two-point correlation and response functions.

  12. Analytic prediction for planar turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Analytic predictions of mean velocity profile (MVP) and streamwise ($x$) development of related integral quantities are presented for flows in channel and turbulent boundary layer (TBL), based on a symmetry analysis of eddy length and total stress. Specific predictions are the friction velocity $u_\\tau$: ${ U_e/u_\\tau }\\approx 2.22\\ln Re_x+2.86-3.83\\ln(\\ln Re_x)$; the boundary layer thickness $\\delta_e$: $x/\\delta_e \\approx 7.27\\ln Re_x-5.18-12.52\\ln(\\ln Re_x)$; the momentum thickness Reynolds number: $Re_x/Re_\\theta=4.94[{(\\ln {{\\mathop{\\rm Re}\

  13. Turbulence in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Harindra; Kit, Eliezer; Conry, Patrick; Hocut, Christopher; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-11-01

    During the field campaigns of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program, fine-scale measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were made using a novel sonic and hot-film anemometer dyad (a combo probe). A swath of scales, from large down to Kolmogorov scales, was covered. The hot-film was located on a gimbal within the sonic probe volume, and was automated to rotate in the horizontal plane to align with the mean flow measured by sonic. This procedure not only helped satisfy the requirement of hot-film alignment with the mean flow, but also allowed in-situ calibration of hot-films. This paper analyzes a period of nocturnal flow that was similar to an idealized stratified parallel shear flow. Some new phenomena were identified, which included the occurrence of strong bursts in the velocity records indicative of turbulence generation at finer scales that are not captured by conventional sonic anemometers. The spectra showed bottleneck effect, but its manifestation did not fit into the framework of previous bottleneck-effect theories and was unequivocally related to bursts of turbulence. The measurements were also used to evaluate the energetics of stratified shear flows typical of the environment. ONR # N00014-11-1-0709; NSF # AGS-1528451; ISF 408/15.

  14. Turbulent boundary layer over a chine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchapakesan, N. R.; Joubert, P. N.

    1999-11-01

    The flow over an edge aligned with the streamwise direction is studied as a representative of the turbulent boundary layers developing over hard chines found on the hulls of ships and catamarans. We present results of a traditional experimental investigation of this geometry in a wind tunnel with pitot tubes and hot-wires. The chine model consisted of two surfaces made of varnished fibre boards with leading edges of airfoil sections and a 90 degree corner. The boundary layer was tripped with wires close to the leading edge. The model was housed in a test section of length 6.5 m in a closed circuit wind tunnel. The experiments were conducted at a unit Reynolds number of 680,000 /m corresponding to a nominal free stream velocity of 10 m/s. The mean velocity field and the associated integral parameters obtained with pitot tube measurements are presented for different streamwise locations from 0.2 to 4.7 m from the trip wire. The flow at the two farthest locations were also studied with single and 'x' hot-wires. The secondary mean flow and the turbulence field in the corner region are described with these measurements.

  15. Simulation in water of a two-dimensional model of existing turbulences while a ladle is poured; Simulacao em agua com modelo bidimensional de turbulencias existentes durante o vazamento de uma panela de aco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Cunha Ferreira, Marcelo de [Mannesmann SA, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Jacobi, Hatto; Wuennenberg, Klaus [Mannesmann-Forschungsinstitut GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    1992-12-31

    It is described a two dimensional model made to study how different geometries influence existing current and turbulences while a ladle equipped with sliding gates is poured. (author). 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Formation of proto-cluster: a virialized structure from gravo-turbulent collapse II. A two-dimensional analytical model for rotating and accreting system

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Yueh-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Most stars are born in the gaseous proto-cluster environment. The knowledge of this intermediate stage gives more accurate constraints on star formation characteristics. We demonstrate that a virialized globally supported structure, in which star formation happens, is formed out of a collapsing molecular cloud, and derive a mapping from the parent cloud parameters to the proto-cluster to predict its properties, with a view to confront analytical calculations with observations and simulations. The virial theorem is decomposed into two dimensions to account for the rotation and the flattened geometry. Equilibrium is found by balancing rotation, turbulence and self-gravity, while turbulence is maintained by accretion driving and dissipates in one crossing time. The angular momentum and the accretion rate of the proto-cluster are estimated from the parent cloud properties. The two-dimensional virial model predicts the size and velocity dispersion given the mass of the proto-cluster and that of the parent cloud. T...

  17. Characterization of an incipiently separated shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, A.-M.; Dussauge, J.-P.; Krämer, E.

    2017-03-01

    The turbulence structure in a shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction at incipient separation was investigated in order to get insight into turbulence generation and amplification mechanisms in such flow fields. The flow along a two-dimensional 11.5° compression corner was studied experimentally at a Mach number of M=2.53 and with a momentum-thickness Reynolds number of Re_{θ }=5370. From hot-wire boundary layer traverses and surface heat-flux density fluctuation measurements with the fast-response atomic layer thermopile, the turbulence structure and amplification was described. Space-time correlations of the mass-flux fluctuations across the boundary layer and the surface heat-flux density fluctuations were measured to further characterize the development of the turbulence structure across the interaction. The large-scale boundary layer structures are concealed by shock-related effects in the strongly disturbed shock-foot region. Shortly downstream, however, large-scale structures dominate the signal again, just as in the incoming flow. A mechanism explaining this behavior is suggested.

  18. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-06-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated at a constant wall temperature to investigate the effects of thermal convection under the effects of freestream turbulence. For both cases, the turbulence intensity in the freestream is Tu = 1.3% ˜ 2.4%, and the integral length scale of freestream turbulence, L∞, is much smaller than the boundary layer thickness δ, i.e., L∞/δ ≪1. The Reynolds numbers Reθ based on the momentum thickness and freestream speed U∞ are Reθ = 560, 1100, 1310, and 2330 in isothermal boundary layers without grid turbulence. Instantaneous velocities, U and V, and instantaneous temperature T are simultaneously measured using a hot-wire anemometry and a constant-current resistance thermometer. The results show that the rms velocities and Reynolds shear stress normalized by the friction velocity are strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence throughout the boundary layer in both isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers. In the non-isothermal boundary layers, the normalized rms temperature and vertical turbulent heat flux are also strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat transfer at the wall are enhanced by the freestream turbulence and the enhancement is notable in unstable stratification. The power spectra of u, v, and θ and their cospectra show that motions of almost all scales are suppressed by the freestream turbulence in both the isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers.

  19. Turbulent Boundary Layer at Large Re

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia DUMITRESCU

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluids as deformable bodies without own shape, when starting from rest, experience interactions between the flowing fluid and the physical surfaces marking the bounds of flow. These interactions are a kind of impact process where there is a momentum exchange between two colliding bodies, i.e. the flow and its boundary surfaces. Within a short time of contact a post-impact shear flow occurs where two main effects are triggered off by the flow-induced collision: dramatic redistribution of the momentum and the boundary vorticity followed by the shear stress/viscosity change in the microstructure of the fluid which at the beginning behaves as linear reactive medium and latter as nonlinear dispersive medium. The disturbance of the starting flow induces the entanglement of the wall-bounded flow in the form of point-vortices or concentrated vorticity balls whence waves are emitted and propagated through flow field. The paper develops a wave mechanism for the transport of the concentrated boundary vorticity, directly related to the fascinating turbulence phenomenon, using the torsion concept of vorticity filaments associated with the hypothesis of thixotropic/nonlinear viscous fluid.

  20. Effects of large-scale free stream turbulence on a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, N. S.; Neuscamman, S.; Warhaft, Z.

    2009-09-01

    Results of a wind tunnel experiment in which there are systematic variations of free stream turbulence above a flat-plate boundary layer are presented. Upstream of the plate, an active grid generates free stream turbulence varying in intensity from 0.25% to 10.5%. The momentum thickness Reynolds number of the boundary layer varies from 550 to nearly 3000. In all cases, the ratio of the free stream turbulence length scale to the boundary layer depth is greater than unity. Hotwire measurements show that, at high turbulence intensities, the effects of the free stream turbulence extend deep into the boundary layer, affecting the wall stress as well as the small-scale (derivative) statistics. Premultiplied energy spectra show a double peak. At very low free stream turbulence intensities these peaks are associated with the inner and outer scales of the turbulent boundary layer, but at high turbulence intensities the free stream energy peak dominates over the boundary layer's outer scale. The implications of the effect of the large free stream turbulence scales on the small, near-wall scales is discussed with reference to recent high Reynolds number experiments in a turbulent boundary layer without free stream turbulence [Hutchins and Marusic, Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 365, 647 (2007)].

  1. Impulse transfer in a turbulent flow with two-dimensional structure of disturbances in a homogeneous shear region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Votsish, A.D.

    1977-07-01

    Results are given for experimental studies of the effect that a cross-sectional magnetic field has on longitudinal and cross-sectional velocity pulsations and the coefficient of their correlation in a homogeneous shear region of averaged flow velocity. An opposite sign change for turbulent friction was obtained as the magnetic field was increased. In this connection an identification was made of an impulse transfer from regions with lower speeds to regions with high speeds. 4 references, 1 figure.

  2. Effect of velocity boundary conditions on the heat transfer and flow topology in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Poel, Erwin P; Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-07-01

    The effect of various velocity boundary condition is studied in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Combinations of no-slip, stress-free, and periodic boundary conditions are used on both the sidewalls and the horizontal plates. For the studied Rayleigh numbers Ra between 10(8) and 10(11) the heat transport is lower for Γ=0.33 than for Γ=1 in case of no-slip sidewalls. This is, surprisingly, the opposite for stress-free sidewalls, where the heat transport increases for a lower aspect ratio. In wider cells the aspect-ratio dependence is observed to disappear for Ra ≥ 10(10). Two distinct flow types with very different dynamics can be seen, mostly dependent on the plate velocity boundary condition, namely roll-like flow and zonal flow, which have a substantial effect on the dynamics and heat transport in the system. The predominantly horizontal zonal flow suppresses heat flux and is observed for stress-free and asymmetric plates. Low aspect-ratio periodic sidewall simulations with a no-slip boundary condition on the plates also exhibit zonal flow. In all the other cases, the flow is roll like. In two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the velocity boundary conditions thus have large implications on both roll-like and zonal flow that have to be taken into consideration before the boundary conditions are imposed.

  3. ALGEBRAIC TURBULENCE MODEL WITH MEMORY FOR COMPUTATION OF 3-D TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS WITH VALIDATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Additional equations were found based on experiments for an algebraic turbulence model to improve the prediction of the behavior of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers by taking account of the effects of pressure gradient and the historical variation of eddy viscosity, so the model is with memory. Numerical calculation by solving boundary layer equations was carried out for the five pressure driven three dimensional turbulent boundary layers developed on flat plates, swept-wing, and prolate spheroid in symmetrical plane. Comparing the computational results with the experimental data, it is obvious that the prediction will be more accurate if the proposed closure equations are used, especially for the turbulent shear stresses.

  4. Computational solution of the defect stream-function equation for nonequilibrium turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The derivation of the accurate, second-order, almost linear, approximate equation governing the defect stream function for nonequilibrium compressible turbulent boundary layers is reviewed. The similarity of this equation to the heat conduction equation is exploited in the development of an unconditionally stable, tridiagonal computational method which is second-order accurate in the marching direction and fourth-order accurate in the surface-normal direction. Results compare well with experimental data. Nonlinear effects are shown to be small. This two-dimensional method is simple and has been implemented on a programmable calculator.

  5. Compressibility Effects in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yu-Hui; PEI Jie; CHEN Jun; SHE Zhen-Su

    2008-01-01

    Local cascade (LC) scheme and space-time correlations are used to study turbulent structures and their convection behaviour in the near-wall region of compressible boundary layers at Ma = 0.8 and 1.3. The convection velocities of fluctuating velocity components u (streamwise) and v (vertical) are investigated by statistically analysing scale-dependent ensembles of LC structures. The results suggest that u is convected with entropy perturbations while v with an isentropic process. An abnormal thin layer distinct from the conventional viscous sub-layer is discovered in the immediate vicinity of the wall (y+≤1) in supersonic flows. While in the region 1 < y+ < 30,streamwise streaks dominate velocity, density and temperature fluctuations, the abnormal thin layer is dominated by spanwise streaks in vertical velocity and density fluctuations, where pressure and density fluctuations are strongly correlated. The LC scheme is proven to be effective in studying the nature of supersonic flows and compressibility effects on wall-bounded motions.

  6. Effect of externally generated turbulence on wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kozakiewicz, A.

    2003-01-01

    This experimental study deals with the effect of externally generated turbulence on the oscillatory boundary layer to simulate the turbulence in the wave boundary layer under broken waves in the swash zone. The subject has been investigated experimentally in a U-shaped, oscillating water tunnel...... with a smooth bottom. Turbulence was generated ´externally´ as the flow in the oscillator was passed through a series of grids, that extended from the cover of the water tunnel to about mid-depth. Two different types of grid porosities were used. Direct measurements of the bed shear stress and velocity...... results. The mean and turbulence quantities in the outer flow region are increased substantially with the introduction of the grids. It is shown that the externally generated turbulence is able to penetrate the bed boundary layer, resulting in an increase in the bed shear stress, and therefore...

  7. On the interaction between turbulence grids and boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irps Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence grids are widely used in wind tunnels to produce representative turbulence levels when testing aerodynamic phenomena around models. Although the purpose of the grid is to introduce a desired turbulence level in the freestream flow, the wall boundary layers of the tunnel are subjected to modification due to the presence of such grids. This could have major implications to the flow around the models to be tested and hence there is a need to further understand this interaction. The study described in this paper examines wind tunnel wall boundary layer modification by turbulence grids of different mesh sizes and porosities to understand the effect of these parameters on such interaction. Experimental results are presented in the form of pressure loss coefficients, boundary layer velocity profiles and the statistics of turbulence modification.

  8. Definition of Turbulent Boundary-Layer with Entropy Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the entropy increment and the viscosity dissipation in turbulent boundary-layer is systematically investigated. Through theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulation (DNS, an entropy function fs is proposed to distinguish the turbulent boundary-layer from the external flow. This approach is proved to be reliable after comparing its performance in the following complex flows, namely, low-speed airfoil flows with different wall temperature, supersonic cavity-ramp flow dominated by the combination of free-shear layer, larger recirculation and shocks, and the hypersonic flow past an aeroplane configuration. Moreover, fs is deduced from the point of energy, independent of any particular turbulent quantities. That is, this entropy concept could be utilized by other engineering applications related with turbulent boundary-layer, such as turbulence modelling transition prediction and engineering thermal protection.

  9. Some remarks on the role of the boundary layers in decaying 2D turbulence in containers no-slip walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clercx, H.J.H.; Van Heijst, G.J.F. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands). J.M. Burges Centre for Fluid Dynamics, Dept. of Physics

    1999-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations of decaying two-dimensional (2D) turbulence inside a square container with no-slip boundaries have been carried out for Reynolds numbers up to 2000. The role of the boundary layers during the decay process has been illustrated with ensemble-averaged results for the power law behaviour of several characteristic properties of the coherent vortices which emerge during the decay of 2D turbulence. The evolution of the vortex density, the average vortex radius, the enstrophy and the vorticity extrema have been computed. An algebraic decay regime has been observed during the initial turbulent decay stage. The computed decay exponents disagree, however, with the exponents from the classical scaling theory for 2D decaying turbulence on an unbounded domain.

  10. The improvement of turbulence modeling for the aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The engineering computation of turbulent flows is mainly based on turbulence modeling,however,accurate aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is still a not well-solved problem. Aerothermal computation for turbulent boundary layers on a supersonic or hypersonic blunt cone with small bluntness is done firstly by using both direct numerical simulation and BL model,and seven different cases are investigated. Then the results obtained by the two methods are compared,and the reason causing the differences is found to be the incorrect assumption in the turbulence modeling that the ratio between eddy heat conductivity and eddy viscosity is constant throughout the whole boundary layer. Based on certain theoretical arguments,a method of modifying the expression of eddy heat conductivity in the region surrounding the peak location of the turbulent kinetic energy is proposed,which is verified to be effective,at least for the seven cases investigated.

  11. CONTINUOUS WAVELET TRANSFORM OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ying-zheng; KE Feng; CHEN Han-ping

    2005-01-01

    The spatio-temporal characteristics of the velocity fluctuations in a fully-developed turbulent boundary layer flow was investigated using hotwire. A low-speed wind tunnel was established. The experimental data was extensively analyzed in terms of continuous wavelet transform coefficients and their auto-correlation. The results yielded a potential wealth of information on inherent characteristics of coherent structures embedded in turbulent boundary layer flow. Spatial and temporal variations of the low- and high- frequency motions were revealed.

  12. A Compilation of Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layer Experimental Data,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    HIRSCH KITAet ai, GOSTELOW EHERENSBERGER LU HO & CHEN KOBASHI & HAYAKAWA MAINARDI & PANDAY MARVIN* LORBER & COVERT MIZUSHINA I SAXENA RAMAPRIAN & TU...Laminar Boundary Layer by a Moving Belt. AIAA Paj_2r 69-40, New York, N.Y., 1969. (LT) Mainardi , H. and Panday, P. K.: A Study of Turbulent Pulsating...Flow in a (-cular Pipe. Eurovisc 77 - Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layers and Shear Flows, Toulouse, France, Jar,. 2977. (TE-D) Mainardi , H. and Panday

  13. Flowfield measurements in a separated and reattached flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, William P.

    1987-03-01

    The separation and reattachment of a large-scale, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at low subsonic speed on a flat plate has been studied experimentally. The separation bubble was 55 cm long and had a maximum bubble thickness, measured to the height of the mean dividing streamline, of 17 cm, which was twice the thickness of the inlet boundary layer. A combination of laser velocimetry, hot-wire anemometry, pneumatic probing techniques, and flow visualization were used as diagnostics. Principal findings were that an outer inviscid rotational flow was defined which essentially convected over the blockage associated with the inner, viscously dominated bubble recirculation region. A strong backflow region in which the flow moved upstream 100 percent of the time was measured near the test surface over the central 35 percent of the bubble. A laminar backflow boundary layer having pseudo-turbulent characteristics including a log-linear velocity profile was generated under the highly turbulent backflow. Velocity profile shapes in the reversed flow region matched a previously developed universal backflow profile at the upstream edge of the separation region but not in the steady backflow region downstream. A smoke flow visualization movie and hot-film measurements revealed low frequency nonperiodic flapping at reattachment. However, forward flow fraction data at reattachment and mean velocity profiles in the redeveloping boundary layer downstream of reattachment correlated with backward-facing step data when the axial dimension was scaled by the distance from the maximum bubble thickness to reattachment.

  14. DNS of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition induced by solid obstacles

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandi, Paolo; Bernardini, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations obtained by a staggered finite difference scheme together with an efficient immersed boundary method are presented to understand the effects of the shape of three-dimensional obstacles on the transition of a boundary layer from a laminar to a turbulent regime. Fully resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), highlight that the closer to the obstacle the symmetry is disrupted the smaller is the transitional Reynolds number. It has been also found that the transition can not be related to the critical roughness Reynolds number used in the past. The simulations highlight the differences between wake and inflectional instabilities, proving that two-dimensional tripping devices are more efficient in promoting the transition. Simulations at high Reynolds number demonstrate that the reproduction of a real experiment with a solid obstacle at the inlet is an efficient tool to generate numerical data bases for understanding the physics of boundary layers. The quality of the numerical ...

  15. EFFECT OF COOLED BOUNDARY ON THE TURBULENT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-xiang; Mao Hua-yong; Li Na

    2003-01-01

    The flow field in the cooled channel of a heat exchanger was measured using the X-type film probes of Hot Wire/Firm Anemotheter, and the turbulent mechanism was discussed. It is concluded that the airflow is cooled in the flow process, the distribution of the turbulent intensity is relatively convergent near the centerline and the boundary, the constriction action produced due to heat release at the foot of the fins causes u to decrease and w to increase near the root downstream. It is concluded that the turbulent flow with cooled boundary results from the balance of production, dissipation and intermittency caused by constriction action.

  16. DNS of compressible turbulent boundary layer around a sharp cone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XinLiang; FU DeXun; MA YanWen

    2008-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of the turbulent boundary layer over a sharp cone with 20° cone angle (or 10° half-cone angle) is performed by using the mixed seventh-order up-wind biased finite difference scheme and sixth-order central difference scheme.The free stream Mach number is 0.7 and free stream unit Reynolds number is 250000/inch.The characteristics of transition and turbulence of the sharp cone boundary layer are compared with those of the flat plate boundary layer,Statistics of fully developed turbulent flow agree well with the experimental and theoretical data for the turbulent flat-plate boundary layer flow.The near wall streak-like structure is shown and the average space between streaks (normalized by the local wall unit) keeps approximately invariable at different streamwise locations,The turbulent energy equation in the cylindrical coordinate is given and turbulent en-ergy budget is studied.The computed results show that the effect of circumferen-tial curvature on turbulence characteristics is not obvious.

  17. Transient thermal response of turbulent compressible boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Nalim, M. Razi; Merkle, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    and Smith, and the turbulent Prandtl number formulation originally developed by Kays and Crawford. The governing differential equations are discretized with the Keller-box method. The numerical accuracy is validated through grid-independence studies and comparison with the steady state solution......-dimensional semi-infinite flat plate. The compressible Reynolds-averaged boundary layer equations are transformed into incompressible form through the Dorodnitsyn-Howarth transformation and then solved with similarity transformations. Turbulence is modeled using a two-layer eddy viscosity model developed by Cebeci....... In turbulent flow as in laminar, the transient heat transfer rates are very different from that obtained from quasi-steady analysis. It is found that the time scale for response of the turbulent boundary layer to far-field temperature changes is 40% less than for laminar flow, and the turbulent local Nusselt...

  18. A computational study on oblique shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Md. Saddam Hossain; Rahman, Saeedur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Matsuo, S.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical computation of an oblique shock wave incident on a turbulent boundary layer was performed for free stream flow of air at M∞ = 2.0 and Re1 = 10.5×106 m-1. The oblique shock wave was generated from a 8° wedge. Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation with k-ω SST turbulence model was first utilized for two dimensional (2D) steady case. The results were compared with the experiment at the same flow conditions. Further, to capture the unsteadiness, a 2D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with sub-grid scale model WMLES was performed which showed the unsteady effects. The frequency of the shock oscillation was computed and was found to be comparable with that of experimental measurement.

  19. Two-dimensional percolation transition at finite temperature: Phase boundary for in-plane magnetism in films with two atomic layers of Fe on W(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, R.; Venus, D.

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) percolation transition in Fe/W(110) ultrathin magnetic films occurs when islands in the second atomic layer percolate and resolve a frustrated magnetic state to produce long-range in-plane ferromagnetic order. Novel measurements of percolation using the magnetic susceptibility χ (θ ) as the films are deposited at a constant temperature, allow the long-range percolation transition to be observed as a sharp peak consistent with a critical phase transition. The measurements are used to trace the paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase boundary between the T =0 percolation magnetic transition and the thermal Curie magnetic transition of the undiluted film. A quantitative comparison to critical scaling theory is made by fitting the functional form of the phase boundary. The fitted parameters are then used in theoretical expressions for χ (T ) in the critical region of the paramagnetic state to provide an excellent, independent representation of the experimental measurements.

  20. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  1. Prediction of two-dimensional sound propagation over an arbitrarily-shaped barrier using the boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong M.; Eversman, W.

    1992-01-01

    2D sound propagation over an arbitrarily-shaped barrier situated on a locally reacting infinite plane in a homogeneous medium is treated utilizing the BEM. The BIE is formulated so that the integral along an infinite homogeneous plane disappears if the half space Green's function is selected to satisfy the boundary condition of this plane. Comparison of the BEM results with test results by Habault and by Kearns shows good agreement of the sound field utilizing the BEM.

  2. Solution of Two-dimensional Parabolic Equation Subject to Non-local Boundary Conditions Using Homotopy Perturbation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puskar Raj SHARMA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the paper is to investigate solution of twodimensional linear parabolic partial differential equation with non-local boundary conditions using Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM. This method is not only reliable in obtaining solution of such problems in series form with high accuracy but it also guarantees considerable saving of the calculation volume and time as compared to other methods. The application of the method has been illustrated through an example

  3. Theory and Applications of Two-dimensional, Null-boundary, Nine-Neighborhood, Cellular Automata Linear rules

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Pabitra Pal; Sahoo, Sudhakar; Rath, Sunil Pankaj

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory and application of 2-Dimensional, nine-neighborhood, null- boundary, uniform as well as hybrid Cellular Automata (2D CA) linear rules in image processing. These rules are classified into nine groups depending upon the number of neighboring cells influences the cell under consideration. All the Uniform rules have been found to be rendering multiple copies of a given image depending on the groups to which they belong where as Hybrid rules are also shown to be characterizing the phenomena of zooming in, zooming out, thickening and thinning of a given image. Further, using hybrid CA rules a new searching algorithm is developed called Sweepers algorithm which is found to be applicable to simulate many inter disciplinary research areas like migration of organisms towards a single point destination, Single Attractor and Multiple Attractor Cellular Automata Theory, Pattern Classification and Clustering Problem, Image compression, Encryption and Decryption problems, Density Classificat...

  4. Dispersed phase effects on boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Helgans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    In natural and environmental settings, turbulence is often seeded with some sort of dispersed phase: dust, rain, snow, sediment, etc. Depending on the circumstances, elements of the dispersed phase can participate in both dynamic and thermodynamic coupling, thereby altering the turbulent transfer of heat, moisture, and momentum through several complex avenues. In this study, evaporating droplets are two-way coupled to turbulent wall-bounded flow via direct numerical simulation (DNS) and Lagrangian point particle tracking, and we are specifically interested in the wall-normal transport of momentum, heat, and moisture. Our studies show that particles can carry significant portions of all three, and that this is a strong function of the particle Stokes number. These findings are interpreted in the context of environmental flows and the practical implications will be discussed. The authors acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding under Grant #AGS-1429921.

  5. Direct force wall shear measurements in pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcallister, J. E.; Tennant, M. H.; Pierce, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Unique, simultaneous direct measurements of the magnitude and direction of the local wall shear stress in a pressure-driven three-dimensional turbulent boundary layer are presented. The flow is also described with an oil streak wall flow pattern, a map of the wall shear stress-wall pressure gradient orientations, a comparison of the wall shear stress directions relative to the directions of the nearest wall velocity as measured with a typical, small boundary layer directionally sensitive claw probe, as well as limiting wall streamline directions from the oil streak patterns, and a comparison of the freestream streamlines and the wall flow streamlines. A review of corrections for direct force sensing shear meters for two-dimensional flows is presented with a brief discussion of their applicability to three-dimensional devices.

  6. A Experimental Investigation of the Interaction Between Convecting Spanwise Vortices and a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRorie, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between convecting spanwise vortices and a flat plate turbulent boundary layer was studied experimentally. The results are relevant to the flow downstream of unsteady airfoils or spoilers. Vortices were generated with a rapidly pitched airfoil upstream of a test plate leading edge in a low-speed wind tunnel. By varying the height of the vortex generator the degree to which the vortices interacted with the test plate was controlled. Dynamic stall vortices of both positive and negative circulation were studied with Reynolds numbers (Gamma/upsilon ) of 9300 and 7400 respectively. The free-stream velocity was 5.9 m/s for all cases and the boundary layer momentum thickness Reynolds number was 480 at the primary measurement station. The measurement techniques were hot -wire anemometry (single and cross wire) and smoke-wire visualization. The results focus on two distinct aspects of the flow, first is the decay and diffusion rates of the vortices. Only in the case where a negative circulation vortex impinges directly on the leading edge does surface interaction significantly increase the vortex decay/diffusion rate. The second aspect is the response of the turbulent boundary layer to the convecting vortices. Wall shear stress measurements show that the passage of a positive circulation vortex results in an increase in wall shear after a delay-time, while the negative circulation vortices result in a decrease in wall shear. An application of log-law scaling to the ensemble-averaged mean flow was found to produce a velocity scale which resembles one based on measured wall shear stress but is offset by a phase lag. The ratio of turbulent shear stress to the two-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy was generally not constant, although it did show a constant value across the boundary layer at different phases of the interaction.

  7. A two-dimensional iterative panel method and boundary layer model for bio-inspired multi-body wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Christopher J.; Dhruv, Akash; Wickenheiser, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    The increased use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) has created a continuous demand for improved flight capabilities and range of use. During the last decade, engineers have turned to bio-inspiration for new and innovative flow control methods for gust alleviation, maneuverability, and stability improvement using morphing aircraft wings. The bio-inspired wing design considered in this study mimics the flow manipulation techniques performed by birds to extend the operating envelope of UAVs through the installation of an array of feather-like panels across the airfoil's upper and lower surfaces while replacing the trailing edge flap. Each flap has the ability to deflect into both the airfoil and the inbound airflow using hinge points with a single degree-of-freedom, situated at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of the chord. The installation of the surface flaps offers configurations that enable advantageous maneuvers while alleviating gust disturbances. Due to the number of possible permutations available for the flap configurations, an iterative constant-strength doublet/source panel method has been developed with an integrated boundary layer model to calculate the pressure distribution and viscous drag over the wing's surface. As a result, the lift, drag and moment coefficients for each airfoil configuration can be calculated. The flight coefficients of this numerical method are validated using experimental data from a low speed suction wind tunnel operating at a Reynolds Number 300,000. This method enables the aerodynamic assessment of a morphing wing profile to be performed accurately and efficiently in comparison to Computational Fluid Dynamics methods and experiments as discussed herein.

  8. Two-Dimensional Boundary Element Method Application for Surface Deformation Modeling around Lembang and Cimandiri Fault, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahya, M. J.; Sanny, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    Lembang and Cimandiri fault are active faults in West Java that thread people near the faults with earthquake and surface deformation risk. To determine the deformation, GPS measurements around Lembang and Cimandiri fault was conducted then the data was processed to get the horizontal velocity at each GPS stations by Graduate Research of Earthquake and Active Tectonics (GREAT) Department of Geodesy and Geomatics Engineering Study Program, ITB. The purpose of this study is to model the displacement distribution as deformation parameter in the area along Lembang and Cimandiri fault using 2-dimensional boundary element method (BEM) using the horizontal velocity that has been corrected by the effect of Sunda plate horizontal movement as the input. The assumptions that used at the modeling stage are the deformation occurs in homogeneous and isotropic medium, and the stresses that acted on faults are in elastostatic condition. The results of modeling show that Lembang fault had left-lateral slip component and divided into two segments. A lineament oriented in southwest-northeast direction is observed near Tangkuban Perahu Mountain separating the eastern and the western segments of Lembang fault. The displacement pattern of Cimandiri fault shows that Cimandiri fault is divided into the eastern segment with right-lateral slip component and the western segment with left-lateral slip component separated by a northwest-southeast oriented lineament at the western part of Gede Pangrango Mountain. The displacement value between Lembang and Cimandiri fault is nearly zero indicating that Lembang and Cimandiri fault are not connected each other and this area is relatively safe for infrastructure development.

  9. Turbulent oceanic western-boundary layers at low latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam Cyrille Akuetevi, Cataria; Wirth, Achim

    2013-04-01

    Low latitude oceanic western-boundary layers range within the most turbulent regions in the worlds ocean. The Somali current system with the Great Whirl and the Brazilian current system with its eddy shedding are the most prominent examples. Results from analytical calculations and integration of a one layer reduced-gravity fine resolution shallow water model is used to entangle this turbulent dynamics. Two types of wind-forcing are applied: a remote Trade wind forcing with maximum shear along the equator and a local Monsoon wind forcing with maximum shear in the vicinity of the boundary. For high values of the viscosity (> 1000m2s-1) the stationary solutions compare well to analytical predictions using Munk and inertial layer theory. When lowering the friction parameter time dependence results. The onset of instability is strongly influenced by inertial effects. The unstable boundary current proceeds as a succession of anti-cyclonic coherent eddies performing a chaotic dynamics in a turbulent flow. The dynamics is governed by the turbulent fluxes of mass and momentum. We determine these fluxes by analyzing the (potential) vorticity dynamics. We demonstrate that the boundary-layer can be separated in four sub-layers, which are (starting from the boundary): (1) the viscous sub-layer (2) the turbulent buffer-layer (3) the layer containing the coherent structures and (4) the extended boundary layer. The characteristics of each sub-layer and the corresponding turbulent fluxes are determined, as are the dependence on latitude and the type of forcing. A new pragmatic method of determining the eddy viscosity, based on Munk-layer theory, is proposed. Results are compared to observations and solutions of the multi-level primitive equation model (DRAKKAR).

  10. Turbulent boundary layer on perforated surfaces with vector injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroshenko, V. M.; Zaichik, L. I.; Klimov, A. A.; Ianovskii, L. S.; Kondratev, V. I.

    1980-10-01

    The paper presents an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer on perforated plates with uniform vector injection at various angles to gas flow. It was shown that with strong injection at angles oriented in the flow direction the intensity of turbulent pulsation is decreased, while injection at angles in the opposite direction increase the intensity. A relationship was established between the critical parameters of the boundary layer injection angles; it was concluded that the asymptotic theory of Kutateladze and Leontiev can be used for determining the coefficient of friction of vector injection.

  11. The effect of velocity boundary conditions on the heat transfer and flow topology in two-dimensional Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection

    CERN Document Server

    van der Poel, Erwin P; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The effect of various velocity boundary condition is studied in two-dimensional Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection. Combinations of no-slip, stress-free and periodic boundary conditions are used on both the sidewalls and the horizontal plates. For the studied Rayleigh numbers Ra between $10^8$ and $10^{11}$ the heat transport is lower for $\\Gamma = 0.33$ than for $\\Gamma = 1$ in case of no-slip sidewalls. This is surprisingly opposite for stress-free sidewalls, where the heat transport increases for lower aspect-ratio. In wider cells the aspect-ratio dependence is observed to disappear for $\\text{Ra} \\ge 10^{10}$. Two distinct flow types with very different dynamics can be seen, mostly dependent on the plate velocity boundary condition, namely roll-like flow and horizontal zonal flow, which have a substantial effect on the dynamics and heat transport in the system. The predominantly horizontal zonal flow suppresses heat flux and is observed for stress-free and asymmetric plates. Low aspect-ratio periodic sidewall s...

  12. The Research of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Hypersonic Three-Dimensional Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marat A.GOLDFELD; Evgeniy V. ORLIK

    2005-01-01

    @@ The results of experimental investigation of laminar-turbulent transition in three-dimensional flow under the high continuous pressure gradient including the flow with local boundary layer separation are presented. The experimental studies were performed within the Mach number range from 4 to 6 and Reynolds number 10~60 ×106 1/m, the angles of attack were 00 and 50. The experiments were carried out on the three-dimensional convergent inlet model with and without sidewalls. The influence of artificial turbulator of boundary layer on transition and flow structure was studied. The conducted researches have shown that adverse pressure gradient increase hastens transition and leads to decrease of transition area length. If pressure gradient rises velocity profile fullness increases and profile transformation from laminar to turbulent occurs. As a result of it the decrease of separation area length occurs. The same effect was reached with Reynolds number increase. These results are compared with the data on two-dimensional model with longitudinal curvature.

  13. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, R.-E.

    2013-07-15

    turbine wake turbulence by comparison to field data and wind tunnel experiments. 3. A two-dimensional eddy viscosity model is implemented to govern the distribution of turbulent stresses in the wake deficit. The modified eddy viscosity model improves the least-square fit of the velocity field in the wake by {approx}13% when compared to higher-order models. 4. A method is proposed to couple the increased turbulence level experienced by a turbine operating in waked conditions, to the downstream wake evolution of the wake-affected turbine. The intraturbine turbulence coupling improved the fit of the turbulence distribution by {approx}40% and the wind speed distribution by {approx}30% over a row of eight turbines. 5. The effect of the atmospheric shear on the turbulent stresses in the wake is captured by including a local strain-rate contribution for the ambient shear gradient. This results in more realistic turbulent stress levels in regions of small wake deficit gradients; this is particularly important in the far-wake region where atmospheric shear gradients are an important contribution to the local strain-rate. 6. A method to include the effect of atmospheric stability on the wake deficit evolution and wake meandering is described. Including the atmospheric stability effects improved the model prediction of the mean velocity field by {approx}19% and of turbulence distribution by {approx}28% in unstable atmospheric conditions compared to actuator line results. The power production by a row of wind turbines aligned with the wind direction is reduced by {approx}10% in very stable conditions compared to very unstable conditions at the same turbulence intensity. This power drop is comparable to measurements from the North Hoyle and OWEZ wind farms. (Author)

  14. New Theories on Boundary Layer Transition and Turbulence Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a short review of our recent DNS work on physics of late boundary layer transition and turbulence. Based on our DNS observation, we propose a new theory on boundary layer transition, which has five steps, that is, receptivity, linear instability, large vortex structure formation, small length scale generation, loss of symmetry and randomization to turbulence. For turbulence generation and sustenance, the classical theory, described with Richardson's energy cascade and Kolmogorov length scale, is not observed by our DNS. We proposed a new theory on turbulence generation that all small length scales are generated by “shear layer instability” through multiple level ejections and sweeps and consequent multiple level positive and negative spikes, but not by “vortex breakdown.” We believe “shear layer instability” is the “mother of turbulence.” The energy transferring from large vortices to small vortices is carried out by multiple level sweeps, but does not follow Kolmogorov's theory that large vortices pass energy to small ones through vortex stretch and breakdown. The loss of symmetry starts from the second level ring cycle in the middle of the flow field and spreads to the bottom of the boundary layer and then the whole flow field.

  15. Measurements of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer by focusing schlieren deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S.; Settles, G. S.

    Some novel, non-intrusive, high-frequency, localized optical measurements of turbulence in compressible flows are described. The technique is based upon focusing schlieren optics coupled with high-speed quantitative measurement of light intensity fluctuations in the schlieren image. Measurements of density gradient fluctuations confined to a thin slice of the flowfield are thus obtained. The new instrument was used to investigate the structure of a two-dimensional, adiabatic, wind tunnel wall boundary layer at a Mach number of 3. The measurements were compared to data obtained using hot-wire anemometry and good agreement was found between the two. Distributions of broadband convection velocity of large-scale structures through the boundary later were also measured. In marked contrast to earlier results, it is shown here that the convection velocity is essentially identical to the local mean velocity. Further, results obtained using the VITA conditional sampling technique shed new light on the turbulent boundary layer structure. Overall, the data presented herein serve to validate the new measurement technique.

  16. Initial and Boundary Value Problems for Two-Dimensional Non-hydrostatic Boussinesq Equations%二维非静力Boussinesq方程组的初边值问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈春; 孙梅娜

    2005-01-01

    Based on the theory of stratification, the well-posedness of the initial and boundary value problems for the system of two-dimensional non-hydrostatic Boussinesq equations was discussed. The sufficient and necessary conditions of the existence and uniqueness for the solution of the equations were given for some representative initial and boundary value problems. Several special cases were discussed.

  17. Turbulent boundary layer measurements over high-porosity surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Christoph; Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Porous surfaces are ubiquitous across a variety of turbulent boundary layer flows of scientific and engineering interest. While turbulent flows over smooth and rough walls have been studied extensively, experimental measurements over porous walls have thus far focused on packed beds, which are limited in porosity (Φ = 0 . 3 - 0 . 5) by their geometry. The current project seeks to address this limitation. A two-component laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) is used to generate velocity measurements in turbulent boundary layer flows over commercially available reticulated foams and 3D-printed porous media at Reynolds number Reθ 3000 - 4000 . Smooth wall profiles for mean and turbulent quantities are compared to data over substrates with porosity Φ > 0 . 8 and average pore sizes in the range 0.4-2.5mm (corresponding to 8 - 50 viscous units). Previous analytical and simulation efforts indicate that the effects of porous substrates on boundary layer flows depend on a modified Reynolds number defined using the length scale √{ κ}, where κ is substrate permeability. A custom permeameter is currently being developed to estimate κ for the substrates tested in the boundary layer experiments.

  18. Drizzle and Turbulence Variability in Stratocumulus-topped Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollias, P.; Luke, E. P.; Szyrmer, W.

    2015-12-01

    Marine stratocumulus clouds frequently produce light precipitation in the form of drizzle. The drizzle rate at the cloud base (RCB) dictates the impact of drizzle on the boundary layer turbulence and cloud organization. Here, synergistic observations from the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) site located on Graciosa Island in the Azores are used to investigate the relationship between RCB, and boundary layer turbulence and dynamics. The ARM ENA site is a heavily instrumented ground-based facility that offers new measurement capabilities in stratocumulus-topped boundary layers (STBL). The RCB is retrieved using a radar-lidar algorithm. The STBL turbulent structure is characterized using the Doppler lidar and radar observations. The profiling radar/lidar/radiometer observations are used to describe the cloud fraction and morphology. Finally, surface-based aerosol number concentration measurements are used to investigate the connection between the boundary layer turbulence, cloud morphology and aerosol loading. Preliminary correlative relationships between the aforementioned variables will be shown.

  19. Two Phases of Coherent Structure Motions in Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Hua; JIANG Nan

    2007-01-01

    Two phases of coherent structure motion are acquired after obtaining conditional phase-averaged waveforms for longitudinal velocity of coherent structures in turbulent boundary layer based on Harr wavelet transfer. The correspondences of the two phases to the two processes (i.e. ejection and sweep) during a burst are determined.

  20. Well-Hidden Grain Boundary in the Monolayer MoS2 Formed by a Two-Dimensional Core-Shell Growth Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenting; Lin, Yue; Wang, Qi; Li, Weijie; Wang, Zhifeng; Song, Jiangluqi; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lijie; Zhu, Lixin; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2017-09-22

    Guided by the hexagonal lattice symmetry, triangles and hexagons are the most basic morphological units for two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Also, it is widely acknowledged that these units start from the single nucleation site and then grow epitaxially. Accordingly, the triangular monolayer (ML) samples are generally considered as single crystals. Here, we report a 2D core-shell growth mode in the CVD process for ML-MoS2, which leads to one kind of "pseudo" single-crystal triangles containing triangular outline grain boundaries (TO-GBs). It is difficult to be optically distinguished from the "true" single-crystal triangles. The weakening of Raman peaks and the remarkable enhancement of photoluminescence (PL) are found at the built-in TO-GBs, which could be useful for high-performance optoelectronics. In addition, the electrical measurements indicate that the TO-GBs are conductive. Furthermore, TO-GBs and the common grain boundaries (CO-GBs) can coexist in a single flake, whereas their optical visibility and optical modifications (Raman and PL) are quite different. This work is helpful in further understanding the growth mechanism of 2D TMD materials and may also play a significant role in related nanodevices.

  1. Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow over Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    Figure 1 were a highly viscous fluid, such as honey , the boundary layer would be thick while if the fluid were water, a low-viscosity fluid, the boundary...drag has become even more important. In response to this need, and with the benefit of modern technology, the drag-reduction field is replete with...manufactured with “riblets,” small ridges on the order of fractions of millimeters, built-into the hull or skin that seek to reduce frictional drag. The

  2. Large-eddy simulation of separation and reattachment of a flat plate turbulent boundary layer

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, W.

    2015-11-11

    © 2015 Cambridge University Press. We present large-eddy simulations (LES) of separation and reattachment of a flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow. Instead of resolving the near wall region, we develop a two-dimensional virtual wall model which can calculate the time- and space-dependent skin-friction vector field at the wall, at the resolved scale. By combining the virtual-wall model with the stretched-vortex subgrid-scale (SGS) model, we construct a self-consistent framework for the LES of separating and reattaching turbulent wall-bounded flows at large Reynolds numbers. The present LES methodology is applied to two different experimental flows designed to produce separation/reattachment of a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer at medium Reynolds number Reθ based on the momentum boundary-layer thickness θ. Comparison with data from the first case at demonstrates the present capability for accurate calculation of the variation, with the streamwise co-ordinate up to separation, of the skin friction coefficient, Reθ, the boundary-layer shape factor and a non-dimensional pressure-gradient parameter. Additionally the main large-scale features of the separation bubble, including the mean streamwise velocity profiles, show good agreement with experiment. At the larger Reθ = 11000 of the second case, the LES provides good postdiction of the measured skin-friction variation along the whole streamwise extent of the experiment, consisting of a very strong adverse pressure gradient leading to separation within the separation bubble itself, and in the recovering or reattachment region of strongly-favourable pressure gradient. Overall, the present two-dimensional wall model used in LES appears to be capable of capturing the quantitative features of a separation-reattachment turbulent boundary-layer flow at low to moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  3. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Deike, Luc; Gutiérrez-Matus, Pablo; Jamin, Timothée; Semin, Benoit; Aumaitre, Sébastien; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric; BONNEFOY, Félicien

    2014-01-01

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely...

  4. Measured Instantaneous Viscous Boundary Layer in Turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Quan

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the instantaneous viscous boundary layer (BL) thickness $\\delta_v(t)$ in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection. It is found that $\\delta_v(t)$ obtained from the measured instantaneous two-dimensional velocity field exhibits intermittent fluctuations. For small values, $\\delta_v(t)$ obeys a lognormal distribution, whereas for large values the distribution of $\\delta_v(t)$ exhibits an exponential tail. The variation of $\\delta_v(t)$ with time is found to be driven by the fluctuations of the large-scale mean flow velocity, as expected, and the local horizontal velocities close to the plate can be used as an instant measure of this variation. It is further found that the mean velocity profile measured in the laboratory frame can now be brought into coincidence with the theoretical Blasius laminar BL profile, if it is resampled relative to the time-dependent frame of $\\delta_v(t)$.

  5. Direct simulation of a turbulent oscillating boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalart, Philippe R.; Baldwin, Barrett S.

    1987-01-01

    The turbulent boundary layer driven by a freestream velocity that varies sinusoidally in time around a zero mean is considered. The flow has a rich behavior including strong pressure gradients, inflection points, and reversal. A theory for the velocity and stress profiles at high Reynolds number is formulated. Well-resolved direct Navier-Stokes simulations are conducted over a narrow range of Reynolds numbers, and the results are compared with the theoretical predictions. The flow is also computed over a wide range of Reynolds numbers using a new algebraic turbulence model; the results are compared with the direct simulations and the theory.

  6. Interaction of a Boundary Layer with a Turbulent Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piomelli, Ugo

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this grant was to study the transition mechanisms on a flat-plate boundary layer interacting with the wake of a bluff body. This is a simplified configuration presented and designed to exemplify the phenomena that occur in multi-element airfoils, in which the wake of an upstream element impinges on a downstream one. Some experimental data is available for this configuration at various Reynolds numbers. The first task carried out was the implementation and validation of the immersed-boundary method. This was achieved by performing calculations of the flow over a cylinder at low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The low-Reynolds number results are discussed, which is enclosed as Appendix A. The high-Reynolds number results are presented in a paper in preparation for the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. We performed calculations of the wake-boundary-layer interaction at two Reynolds numbers, Re approximately equal to 385 and 1155. The first case is discussed and a comparison of the two calculations is reported. The simulations indicate that at the lower Reynolds number the boundary layer is buffeted by the unsteady Karman vortex street shed by the cylinder. This is shown: long streaky structures appear in the boundary layer in correspondence of the three-dimensionalities in the rollers. The fluctuations, however, cannot be self-sustained due to the low Reynolds-number, and the flow does not reach a turbulent state within the computational domain. In contrast, in the higher Reynolds-number case, boundary-layer fluctuations persist after the wake has decayed (due, in part, to the higher values of the local Reynolds number Re achieved in this case); some evidence could be observed that a self-sustaining turbulence generation cycle was beginning to be established. A third simulation was subsequently carried out at a higher Reynolds number, Re=3900. This calculation gave results similar to those of the Re=l155 case. Turbulence was established at fairly low

  7. Spatially developing turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J H; Hutchins, N; Monty, J P

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video submitted to the Gallery of Fluid motion shows a turbulent boundary layer developing under a 5 metre-long flat plate towed through water. A stationary imaging system provides a unique view of the developing boundary layer as it would form over the hull of a ship or fuselage of an aircraft. The towed plate permits visualisation of the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer as it develops from the trip to a high Reynolds number state ($Re_\\tau \\approx 3000$). An evolving large-scale coherent structure will appear almost stationary in this frame of reference. The visualisations provide an unique view of the evolution of fundamental processes in the boundary layer (such as interfacial bulging, entrainment, vortical motions, etc.). In the more traditional laboratory frame of reference, in which fluid passes over a stationary body, it is difficult to observe the full evolution and lifetime of turbulent coherent structures. An equivalent experiment in a wind/water-tunnel would requ...

  8. A three-dimensional coupled-mode model for the acoustic field in a two-dimensional waveguide with perfectly reflecting boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wen-Yu; Yu, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Ze-Zhong; Zhang, Ren-He

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) coupled-mode model using the direct-global-matrix technique as well as Fourier synthesis. This model is a full wave, two-way three-dimensional model, and is therefore capable of providing accurate acoustic field solutions. Because the problem of sound propagation excited by a point source in an ideal wedge with perfectly reflecting boundaries is one of a few three-dimensional problems with analytical solutions, the ideal wedge problem is chosen in this work to validate the presented three-dimensional model. Numerical results show that the field results by analytical solutions and those by the presented model are in excellent agreement, indicating that the presented model can serve as a benchmark model for three-dimensional sound propagation problems involving a planar two-dimensional geometry as well as a point source. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11125420, 11434012, and 41561144006) and the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  9. Theoretical Studies of Turbulent Transport Processes at Rough Boundaries with Application to the Interface Between Sea Ice and the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppaladoddi, S.; Succi, S.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    We study the effects of rough walls on turbulent flows to understand the coupling between the rough underside of Arctic sea ice and the ocean. Of particular relevance is the fact that the climatological thickness of Arctic sea ice is a sensitive function of the turbulent ice/ocean heat flux, which depends sensitively on the roughness of the phase boundary. We tailor the geometry of the upper boundary to manipulate the boundary layer - interior flow interaction and study the turbulent transport of heat in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection with numerical simulations using the Lattice Boltzmann method. By fixing the roughness amplitude of the upper boundary and varying the wavelength λλ, we find that the exponent ββ in the Nusselt-Rayleigh scaling relation, Nu-1∝RaβNu-1 ∝ Ra^β, is maximized at λ≡λmax≈(2π)-1λ ≡ λ_{max} ≈ (2 π)^{-1}, but decays to the planar value in both the large (λ≫λmaxλ ≫ λ_{max}) and small (λ≪λmaxλ ≪ λ_{max}) wavelength limits. The changes in the exponent originate in the nature of the coupling between the boundary layer and the interior flow. We present a simple scaling argument embodying this coupling, which describes the maximal convective heat flux.

  10. Turbulent dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzijlbergh, R. A.; Jonker, H. J. J.; Heus, T.; Vilöguerau de Arellano, J.

    2009-02-01

    Compared to dry boundary layers, dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers has received less attention. In this LES based numerical study we investigate the dispersion of a passive tracer in the form of Lagrangian particles for four kinds of atmospheric boundary layers: 1) a dry convective boundary layer (for reference), 2) a "smoke" cloud boundary layer in which the turbulence is driven by radiative cooling, 3) a stratocumulus topped boundary layer and 4) a shallow cumulus topped boundary layer. We show that the dispersion characteristics of the smoke cloud boundary layer as well as the stratocumulus situation can be well understood by borrowing concepts from previous studies of dispersion in the dry convective boundary layer. A general result is that the presence of clouds enhances mixing and dispersion - a notion that is not always reflected well in traditional parameterization models, in which clouds usually suppress dispersion by diminishing solar irradiance. The dispersion characteristics of a cumulus cloud layer turn out to be markedly different from the other three cases and the results can not be explained by only considering the well-known top-hat velocity distribution. To understand the surprising characteristics in the shallow cumulus layer, this case has been examined in more detail by 1) determining the velocity distribution conditioned on the distance to the nearest cloud and 2) accounting for the wavelike behaviour associated with the stratified dry environment.

  11. Breaking the boundary layer symmetry in turbulent convection using wall geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Toppaladoddi, Srikanth; Wettlaufer, John S

    2014-01-01

    We systematically probe the interaction of the boundary layer with the core flow during two-dimensional turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection using numerical simulations and scaling theory. The boundary layer/core flow interaction is manipulated by configuring the top plate with a sinusoidal geometry and breaking the symmetry between the top and bottom thermal boundary layers. At long wavelength the planar results are recovered. However, at intermediate wavelengths, and for Rayleigh numbers ($Ra$) such that the amplitude of the roughness elements is larger than the boundary layer thickness, there is enhanced cold plume production at the tips of the elements. It is found that, while the interior of the flow is well mixed as in the classical theory of Malkus, the mean temperature is lower than that in the planar case. For a Prandtl number of unity and $Ra = 10^6$ to $2.5 \\times 10^9$ we find a Nusselt number ($Nu$) scaling law of $Nu = 0.052 \\times Ra^{0.34}$, in good agreement with recent experiments. The c...

  12. LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF A SEPARATION/REATTACHMENT BUBBLE IN A TURBULENT-BOUNDARY-LAYER SUBJECTED TO A PRESCRIBED UPPER-BOUNDARY, VERTICAL-VELOCITY PROFILE

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2015-06-30

    We describe large-eddy simulations of turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at high Reynolds number in the presence of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow separation/reattachment bubble. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is used in the main flow domain combined with a wall-model that is a two-dimensional extension of that developed by Chung & Pullin (2009). Flow separation and re-attachment of the incoming boundary layer is induced by prescribing wall-normal velocity distribution on the upper boundary of the flow domain that produces an adverse-favorable stream-wise pressure distribution at the wall. The LES predicts the distribution of mean shear stress along the wall including the interior of the separation bubble. Several properties of the separation/reattachment flow are discussed.

  13. Influence of localised double suction on a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewola, O.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of localised suction applied through a pair of porous wall strips on a turbulent boundary layer have been quantified through the measurements of mean velocity and Reynolds stresses. The results indicate that the use of second strip extends the pseudo-relaminarisation zone but also reduces the overshoot in the longitudinal and normal r.m.s. velocities. While the minimum r.m.s. occurs at x/δo=3.0 (one strip) and x/δo=12 (two strips), the reduction observed for the latter case is larger. Relative to no suction, the turbulence level is modified by suction and the effect is enhanced with double suction. This increased effectiveness reflects the fact that the second strip acts on a boundary layer whose near-wall active motion has been seriously weakened by the first strip.

  14. Small Scale Forcing in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, Thomas; Rathnasingham, Ruben; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    1996-11-01

    In order to understand the effect of small scale forcing on turbulent flows and its implications on control, an experimental investigation is made into the forcing of the inertial scales in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. A wall-mounted resonant actuator is used to produce a local vortical structure in the streamwise direction which is convected downstream by the boundary layer flow. The frequency associated with this structure is governed by the resonant frequency of the device and falls in the range of the inertial scales at the Reynolds number of the experiment (Re_θ = 2000). Hot-wire anemometry is used to map the velocity field at several stations downstream of the actuator. The signals are also conditioned to identify the effect of the actuator on different scales in the flow. Amplitude and modulation effects are also discussed. ^*Supported by ONR Grant N00014-92-J-1910.

  15. Turbulence measurements in high Reynolds number boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallikivi, Margit; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Measurements are conducted in zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers for Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 9,000 to 225,000. The experiments were performed in the High Reynolds number Test Facility (HRTF) at Princeton University, which uses compressed air as the working fluid. Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probes (NSTAPs) are used to acquire data with very high spatial and temporal precision. These new data are used to study the scaling behavior of the streamwise velocity fluctuations in the boundary layer and make comparisons with the scaling of other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-09-1-0263 (program manager Ron Joslin) and NSF Grant CBET-1064257 (program manager Henning Winter).

  16. Transport of particles in an atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiongping Luo; Shiyi Chen

    2005-01-01

    A program incorporating the parallel code of large eddy simulation (LES) and particle transportation model is developed to simulate the motion of particles in an atmospheric turbulent boundary layer (ATBL). A model of particles of 100-micrometer order coupling with large scale ATBL is proposed. Two typical cases are studied, one focuses on the evolution of particle profile in the ATBL and the landing displacement of particles, whereas the other on the motion of particle stream.

  17. Turbulent thermal boundary layers subjected to severe acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    Favorable turbulent boundary layers are flows of great importance in industry. Particularly, understanding the mechanisms of quasi-laminarization by means of a very strong favorable streamwise pressure gradient is indeed crucial in drag reduction and energy management applications. Furthermore, due to the low Reynolds numbers involved in the quasi-laminarization process, abundant experimental investigation can be found in the literature for the past few decades. However, several grey zones still remain unsolved, principally associated with the difficulties that experiments encounter as the boundary layer becomes smaller. In addition, little attention has been paid to the heat transfer in a quasi-laminarization process. In this investigation, DNS of spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers with prescribed very strong favorable pressure gradients (K = 4 × 10-6) are performed. Realistic inflow conditions are prescribed based on the Dynamic Multi-scale Approach (DMA) [Araya et al. JFM, Vol. 670, pp. 581-605, 2011]. In this sense the flow carries the footprint of turbulence, particularly in the streamwise component of the Reynolds stresses.

  18. Reynolds number influences on turbulent boundary layer momentum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshana, Paththage A.

    There are many engineering applications at Reynolds numbers orders of magnitude higher than existing turbulent boundary layer studies. Currently, the mechanisms for turbulent transport and the Reynolds number dependence of these mechanisms are not well understood. This dissertation presents Reynolds number influences on velocity and vorticity statistics, Reynolds shear stress, and velocity-vorticity correlations for turbulent boundary layers. Well resolved hot-wire data for this study were acquired in the atmospheric surface layer at the SLTEST facility in western Utah. It is shown that during near neutral thermal stability, the flow behaves as a canonical zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer, in which the Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, Rtheta, is approximately 2 x 106. The present study also provides information regarding the effects of wall roughness over a limited range of roughness. It is observed that with increasing Rtheta, the inner normalized streamwise intensity increases. This statistic is less sensitive to wall roughness away from the roughness sublayer. In contrast, the inner normalized wall normal intensity is less sensitive to the variation of Rtheta, and it is significantly sensitive to wall roughness. Outside the viscous sublayer, the inner normalized vorticity intensity is less sensitive to both Rtheta and roughness. A primary observation of the Reynolds stress study is that the predominant motions underlying the Reynolds shear stress undergo a significant shift from large to intermediate scales as Rtheta becomes large, irrespective of surface roughness. Quadrant analysis shows that types of motions contributing to the Reynolds stress change significantly at comparable wall normal locations with increasing Rtheta. The mean wall normal gradients of the Reynolds shear stress and the turbulent kinetic energy have direct connections to the transport mechanisms of the turbulent boundary layer. These gradients can be expressed in

  19. The calculation of incompressible separated turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, A.; Migemi, S.

    1990-02-01

    The algebraic turbulent model of Baldwin-Lomax was incorporated into the incompressible Navier-Stokes code FIDAP. This model has been extensively tested in the past in finite difference codes. We believe that the incorporation of the model into the finite element code also has resulted in a practical method to compute a variety of separated turbulent two-dimensional flows. Firstly, the model is used to compute the attached flow about an airfoil. Next, the application of the model to separated flows is presented, by computing the flows at high angles of attack up to maximum lift. It is shown that the model is capable of predicting separation, steady stall and C(sub L MAX). As a difficult test of the model, we compute the laminar separation bubble development directly, using the full Navier-Stokes finite elements code. As far as we know, this approach has not been reported previously. The importance of using an appropriate upwinding is discussed. When possible, comparison of computed results with experiments is presented and the agreement is good.

  20. The effects of external conditions in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzek, Brian G.

    The effects of multiple external conditions on turbulent boundary layers were studied in detail. These external conditions include: surface roughness, upstream turbulence intensity, and pressure gradient. Furthermore, the combined effects of these conditions show the complicated nature of many realistic flow conditions. It was found that the effects of surface roughness are difficult to generalize, given the importance of so many parameters. These parameters include: roughness geometry, roughness regime, roughness height to boundary layer thickness, (k/delta), roughness parameter, ( k+), Reynolds number, and roughness function (Delta B+). A further complication, is the difficulty in computing the wall shear stress, tauw/rho. For the sand grain type roughness, the mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were studied in inner and outer variables, as well as, boundary layer parameters, anisotropy tensor, production term, and viscous stress and form drag contributions. To explore the effects of roughness and Reynolds number dependence in the boundary layer, a new experiment was carefully designed to properly capture the x-dependence of the single-point statistics. It was found that roughness destroys the viscous layer near the wall, thus, reducing the contribution of the viscous stress in the wall region. As a result, the contribution in the skin friction due to form drag increases, while the viscous stress decreases. This yields Reynolds number invariance in the skin friction, near-wall roughness parameters, and inner velocity profiles as k + increases into the fully rough regime. However, in the transitionally rough regime, (i.e., 5 component shows the largest influence of roughness, where the high peak near the wall was decreased and became nearly flat for the fully rough regime profiles. In addition, the Reynolds stresses in outer variables show self-similarity for fixed experimental conditions. However, as the roughness parameter, k +, increases, all Reynolds stress

  1. Investigation of a turbulent spot and a tripped turbulent boundary layer flow using time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, A.; Geisler, R.; Elsinga, G.E.; Scarano, F.; Dierksheide, U.

    2007-01-01

    In this feasibility study the tomographic PIV technique has been applied to time resolved PIV recordings for the study of the growth of a turbulent spot in a laminar flat plate boundary layer and to visualize the topology of coherent flow structures within a tripped turbulent flat plate boundary lay

  2. DNS of stratified spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano; Jansen, Kenneth

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers under stratification are performed. It is well known that the transport phenomena of the flow is significantly affected by buoyancy, particularly in urban environments where stable and unstable atmospheric boundary layers are encountered. In the present investigation, the Dynamic Multi-scale approach by Araya et al. (JFM, 670, 2011) for turbulent inflow generation is extended to thermally stratified boundary layers. Furthermore, the proposed Dynamic Multi-scale approach is based on the original rescaling-recycling method by Lund et al. (1998). The two major improvements are: (i) the utilization of two different scaling laws in the inner and outer parts of the boundary layer to better absorb external conditions such as inlet Reynolds numbers, streamwise pressure gradients, buoyancy effects, etc., (ii) the implementation of a Dynamic approach to compute scaling parameters from the flow solution without the need of empirical correlations as in Lund et al. (1998). Numerical results are shown for ZPG flows at high momentum thickness Reynolds numbers (~ 3,000) and a comparison with experimental data is also carried out.

  3. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers with constant skin friction

    KAUST Repository

    Sridhar, A.

    2017-03-28

    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the development of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer in the presence of surface roughness with length scale ks that varies with streamwise distance x . Interest is centred on flows for which all terms of the von Kármán integral relation, including the ratio of outer velocity to friction velocity U+∞≡U∞/uτ , are streamwise constant. For Rex assumed large, use is made of a simple log-wake model of the local turbulent mean-velocity profile that contains a standard mean-velocity correction for the asymptotic fully rough regime and with assumed constant parameter values. It is then shown that, for a general power-law external velocity variation U∞∼xm , all measures of the boundary-layer thickness must be proportional to x and that the surface sand-grain roughness scale variation must be the linear form ks(x)=αx , where x is the distance from the boundary layer of zero thickness and α is a dimensionless constant. This is shown to give a two-parameter (m,α) family of solutions, for which U+∞ (or equivalently Cf ) and boundary-layer thicknesses can be simply calculated. These correspond to perfectly self-similar boundary-layer growth in the streamwise direction with similarity variable z/(αx) , where z is the wall-normal coordinate. Results from this model over a range of α are discussed for several cases, including the zero-pressure-gradient ( m=0 ) and sink-flow ( m=−1 ) boundary layers. Trends observed in the model are supported by wall-modelled large-eddy simulation of the zero-pressure-gradient case for Rex in the range 108−1010 and for four values of α . Linear streamwise growth of the displacement, momentum and nominal boundary-layer thicknesses is confirmed, while, for each α , the mean-velocity profiles and streamwise turbulent variances are found to collapse reasonably well onto z/(αx) . For given α , calculations of U+∞ obtained from large-eddy simulations are streamwise

  4. Turbulence transition in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kreilos, Tobias; Schneider, Tobias M; Veble, Gregor; Duguet, Yohann; Schlatter, Philipp; Henningson, Dan S; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We study the transition to turbulence in the asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL) by direct numerical simulation. Tracking the motion of trajectories intermediate between laminar and turbulent states we can identify the invariant object inside the laminar-turbulent boundary, the edge state. In small domains, the flow behaves like a travelling wave over short time intervals. On longer times one notes that the energy shows strong bursts at regular time intervals. During the bursts the streak structure is lost, but it reforms, translated in the spanwise direction by half the domain size. Varying the suction velocity allows to embed the flow into a family of flows that interpolate between plane Couette flow and the ASBL. Near the plane Couette limit, the edge state is a travelling wave. Increasing the suction, the travelling wave and a symmetry-related copy of it undergo a saddle-node infinite-period (SNIPER) bifurcation that leads to bursting and discrete-symmetry shifts. In wider domains, the structures loc...

  5. Scaling of pressure spectrum in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Saurabh S.; Ramesh, O. N.

    2014-04-01

    Scaling of pressure spectrum in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers is discussed. Spatial DNS data of boundary layer at one time instant (Reθ = 4500) are used for the analysis. It is observed that in the outer regions the pressure spectra tends towards the -7/3 law predicted by Kolmogorov's theory of small-scale turbulence. The slope in the pressure spectra varies from -1 close to the wall to a value close to -7/3 in the outer region. The streamwise velocity spectra also show a -5/3 trend in the outer region of the flow. The exercise carried out to study the amplitude modulation effect of the large scales on the smaller ones in the near-wall region reveals a strong modulation effect for the streamwise velocity, but not for the pressure fluctuations. The skewness of the pressure follows the same trend as the amplitude modulation coefficient, as is the case for the velocity. In the inner region, pressure spectra were seen to collapse better when normalized with the local Reynolds stress than when scaled with the local turbulent kinetic energy

  6. Sonic eddy model of the turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenthal, Robert; Dintilhac, Paul; Williams, Owen

    2016-11-01

    A model of the compressible turbulent boundary layer is proposed. It is based on the notion that turbulent transport by an eddy requires that information of nonsteady events propagates across the diameter of that eddy during one rotation period. The finite acoustic signaling speed then controls the turbulent fluxes. As a consequence, the fluxes are limited by the largest eddies that satisfies this requirement. Therefore "sonic eddies" with a rotational Mach number of about unity would determine the skin friction, which is predicted to vary inversely with Mach number. This sonic eddy model contrasts with conventional models that are based on the energy equation and variations in the density. The effect of density variations is known to be weak in free shear flows, and the sonic eddy model assumes the same for the boundary layer. In general, Mach number plays two simultaneous roles in compressible flow, one related to signaling and the other related to the energy equation. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data and DNS results from the literature.

  7. Turbulent Prandtl number and space-time temperature correlation measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; Strataridakis, Constantine J.; White, Bruce R.

    1990-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary laeyr flow over a heated flat plate at zero pressure gradient were made using an x-probe and temperature fluctuation probe. The experiments resulted in direct measurement of the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of height through the boundary layer for three temperature difference cases. Also, space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime were obtained with a pair of temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities of the T-prime large-scale structure are presented for the three temperature difference cases. The mean convection velocity of the T-prime structure is a function of position y(+) and is found to be independent of the temperature difference for the cases considered.

  8. Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers on a Strongly Heated Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    This paper concerns the theoretical and experimental modelling of the flat wall,highly heated,compressible turbulent boundary layer.Its final objective is to develop a numerical Navier-Stokes solver and to conclude on its capability to correctly represent complex aerothermic viscous flows near the wall.The paper presents a constructed numerical method with particular attention given to the turbulence modelling at low Reynolds number and comparisons with supersonic and transonic experimental data.For the transonic experiment,very high wall temperature(Tw=1100K)is realized.The method of this difficult experimental set up is discussed.The comparison between experimental and computational data conducts to the first conclusion and gives some indications for the future work.

  9. Turbulent pipe flow: Statistics, Re-dependence, structures and similarities with channel and boundary layer flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El Khoury, George K; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Johansson, Arne V

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation data of fully developed turbulent pipe flow are extensively compared with those of turbulent channel flow and zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer flow for Re-tau up to 1 000...

  10. An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kenji

    2010-03-01

    An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers (BBLs) is proposed using eddy viscosity of a quadratic form. The common definition of friction velocity based on maximum bottom shear stress is found unsatisfactory for BBLs under rotating flows, and a possible extension based on turbulent kinetic energy balance is proposed. The model solutions show that the flow may slip at the top of the boundary layer due to capping by the water surface or stratification, reducing the bottom shear stress, and that the Earth's rotation induces current and bottom shear stress components perpendicular to the interior flow with a phase lag (or lead). Comparisons with field and numerical experiments indicate that the model predicts the essential characteristics of the velocity profiles, although the agreement is rather qualitative due to assumptions of quadratic eddy viscosity with time-independent friction velocity and a well-mixed boundary layer. On the other hand, the predicted linear friction coefficients, phase lead, and veering angle at the bottom agreed with available data with an error of 3%-10%, 5°-10°, and 5°-10°, respectively. As an application of the model, the friction coefficients are used to calculate e-folding decay distances of progressive internal waves with a semidiurnal frequency.

  11. Influence of high-intensity turbulence on laminar boundary layer development on a cylindrical leading edge: Enhancement to eddy diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Juli K.

    The growing demand for increased efficiency in turbine engine designs has sparked a growing interest for research of air flow around curved surfaces. The turbine's operating conditions result in material property constraints, especially in the first stage turbine vanes and blades. These turbine vane components experience extreme loading conditions of both high temperature and high turbulence intensities exiting the combustor. The surface of the turbine blades has cylindrical leading edges that promote stabilizing flow accelerations. These convex surfaces can cause a reduced eddy diffusivity across the boundary layer. This thesis reviews measurements of velocity and turbulence intensities taken just shy of the thirty degrees offset from the stagnation line of a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge under a wide range of turbulence and flow conditions flow conditions. Flow conditions and velocity measurements were gathered with respect to the distance to the surface. The length of the measurements extended from the surface to beyond the boundary layer's edge. The instrumentation used to collect data was a single wire driven by a constant temperature anemometer bridge. The hot wire is specially modified to measure data near the cylindrical leading edges curved surface. The traversing system allowed the acquisition of high-resolution boundary layer data. The traversing system was installed internally to the cylindrical leading edge to reduce probe blockage.

  12. Injection-induced turbulence in stagnation-point boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.

    1984-02-01

    A theory is developed for the stagnation point boundary layer with injection under the hypothesis that turbulence is produced at the wall by injection. From the existing experimental heat transfer rate data obtained in wind tunnels, the wall mixing length is deduced to be a product of a time constant and an injection velocity. The theory reproduces the observed increase in heat transfer rates at high injection rates. For graphite and carbon-carbon composite, the time constant is determined to be 0.0002 sec from the existing ablation data taken in an arc-jet tunnel and a balistic range.

  13. Optimal control of wind turbines in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali Emre; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, optimal control theory was combined with large-eddy simulations to study the optimal control of wind farms and their interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer. The individual turbine's induction factors were dynamically controlled in time with the aim of increasing overall power extraction. In these studies, wind turbines were represented using an actuator disk method. In the current work, we focus on optimal control on a much finer mesh (and a smaller computational domain), representing turbines with an actuator line method. Similar to Refs., optimization is performed using a gradient-based method, and gradients are obtained employing an adjoint formulation. Different cases are investigated, that include a single and a double turbine case both with uniform inflow, and with turbulent-boundary-layer inflow. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  14. Temporally optimized spanwise vorticity sensor measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill-Winter, C.; Klewicki, J.; Baidya, R.; Marusic, I.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-element hot-wire anemometry was used to measure spanwise vorticity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers. Smooth wall boundary layer profiles, with very good spatial and temporal resolution, were acquired over a Kármán number range of 2000-12,700 at the Melbourne Wind Tunnel at the University of Melbourne and the University of New Hampshire's Flow Physics Facility. A custom hot-wire probe was necessary to simultaneously obtain velocity and spanwise vorticity measurements centered at a fixed point in space. A custom calibration/processing scheme was developed to utilize single-wall-parallel wires to optimize the accuracy of the measured wall-normal velocity fluctuations derived from the sensor's ×-array.

  15. Operation in the turbulent jet field of a linear array of multiple rectangular jets using a two-dimensional jet (Variation of mean velocity field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Shigetaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mean flowfield of a linear array of multiple rectangular jets run through transversely with a two-dimensional jet, has been investigated, experimentally. The object of this experiment is to operate both the velocity scale and the length scale of the multiple rectangular jets using a two-dimensional jet. The reason of the adoption of this nozzle exit shape was caused by the reports of authors in which the cruciform nozzle promoted the inward secondary flows strongly on both the two jet axes. Aspect ratio of the rectangular nozzle used in this experiment was 12.5. Reynolds number based on the nozzle width d and the exit mean velocity Ue (≅ 39 m / s was kept constant 25000. Longitudinal mean velocity was measured using an X-array Hot-Wire Probe (lh = 3.1 μm in diameter, dh = 0.6 mm effective length : dh / lh = 194 operated by the linearized constant temperature anemometers (DANTEC, and the spanwise and the lateral mean velocities were measured using a yaw meter. The signals from the anemometers were passed through the low-pass filters and sampled using A.D. converter. The processing of the signals was made by a personal computer. Acquisition time of the signals was usually 60 seconds. From this experiment, it was revealed that the magnitude of the inward secondary flows on both the y and z axes in the upstream region of the present jet was promoted by a two-dimensional jet which run through transversely perpendicular to the multiple rectangular jets, therefore the potential core length on the x axis of the present jet extended 2.3 times longer than that of the multiple rectangular jets, and the half-velocity width on the rectangular jet axis of the present jet was suppressed 41% shorter compared with that of the multiple rectangular jets.

  16. Operation in the turbulent jet field of a linear array of multiple rectangular jets using a two-dimensional jet (Variation of mean velocity field)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shigetaka; Harima, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The mean flowfield of a linear array of multiple rectangular jets run through transversely with a two-dimensional jet, has been investigated, experimentally. The object of this experiment is to operate both the velocity scale and the length scale of the multiple rectangular jets using a two-dimensional jet. The reason of the adoption of this nozzle exit shape was caused by the reports of authors in which the cruciform nozzle promoted the inward secondary flows strongly on both the two jet axes. Aspect ratio of the rectangular nozzle used in this experiment was 12.5. Reynolds number based on the nozzle width d and the exit mean velocity Ue (≅ 39 m / s) was kept constant 25000. Longitudinal mean velocity was measured using an X-array Hot-Wire Probe (lh = 3.1 μm in diameter, dh = 0.6 mm effective length : dh / lh = 194) operated by the linearized constant temperature anemometers (DANTEC), and the spanwise and the lateral mean velocities were measured using a yaw meter. The signals from the anemometers were passed through the low-pass filters and sampled using A.D. converter. The processing of the signals was made by a personal computer. Acquisition time of the signals was usually 60 seconds. From this experiment, it was revealed that the magnitude of the inward secondary flows on both the y and z axes in the upstream region of the present jet was promoted by a two-dimensional jet which run through transversely perpendicular to the multiple rectangular jets, therefore the potential core length on the x axis of the present jet extended 2.3 times longer than that of the multiple rectangular jets, and the half-velocity width on the rectangular jet axis of the present jet was suppressed 41% shorter compared with that of the multiple rectangular jets.

  17. A Cautionary Note on the Thermal Boundary Layer Similarity Scaling for the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Weyburne, David

    2016-01-01

    Wang and Castillo have developed empirical parameters for scaling the temperature profile of the turbulent boundary layer flowing over a heated wall in the paper X. Wang and L. Castillo, J. Turbul., 4, 1(2003). They presented experimental data plots that showed similarity type behavior when scaled with their new scaling parameters. However, what was actually plotted, and what actually showed similarity type behavior, was not the temperature profile but the defect profile formed by subtracting the temperature in the boundary layer from the temperature in the bulk flow. We show that if the same data and same scaling is replotted as just the scaled temperature profile, similarity is no longer prevalent. This failure to show both defect profile similarity and temperature profile similarity is indicative of false similarity. The nature of this false similarity problem is discussed in detail.

  18. Heavy Particle Transport in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D. H.

    2016-12-01

    To describe the emission and transport of dust in the atmosphere, assumptions must typically be made in order to connect the micro-scale emission and saltation process with the larger-scale atmospheric uptake and turbulent flux. In the context of numerical models, this can be thought of as the transport process which occurs between the domain bottom and the first vertical grid point. For example, in the limit of small particles (both low inertia and low settling velocity), theory built upon Monin-Obukhov similarity has proven effective in relating mean dust concentration profiles to surface emission fluxes. For increasing particle mass, however, it becomes more difficult to represent dust transport as a simple extension of the transport of a passive scalar due to issues such as the crossing trajectories effect. This study focuses specifically on the problem of large particle transport and dispersion in the turbulent boundary layer by utilizing direct numerical simulations with Lagrangian point-particle tracking to determine under what, if any, conditions the large particles can be described in a simplified Eulerian framework such as Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. In particular, results will be presented detailing the independent contributions of both particle inertia and particle settling velocity relative to the strength of the surrounding turbulent flow.

  19. Thermographic analysis of turbulent non-isothermal water boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the turbulent water boundary layer in the jet mixing flows using high-speed infrared (IR) thermography. Two turbulent mixing processes were studied: a submerged water jet impinging on a flat surface and two intersecting jets in a round disc-shaped vessel. An infrared camera (FLIR Systems SC7700) was focused on the window transparent for IR radiation; it provided high-speed recordings of heat fluxes from a thin water layer close to the window. Temperature versus time curves at different points of water boundary layer near the wall surface were acquired using the IR camera with the recording frequency of 100 Hz. The time of recording varied from 3 till 20 min. The power spectra for the temperature fluctuations at different points on the hot-cold water mixing zone were calculated using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The obtained spectral behavior was compared to the Kolmogorov "-5/3 spectrum" (a direct energy cascade) and the dual-cascade scenario predicted for...

  20. On the development of turbulent boundary layer with wall transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Marco; Downs, Robert S., III; Fallenius, Bengt E. G.; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of the development of the transpired boundary layer in zero pressure gradient is carried out on a 6.4 m long hydrodynamically smooth and perforated plate. The relatively longer development length of the present perforated plate compared to the ones used in previous studies allows us to investigate whether an asymptotic suction boundary layer with constant thickness is achieved for the turbulent state, analogously to what happens in the laminar state. Velocity profiles are obtained via hot-wire anemometry while the wall shear stress is measured at several streamwise locations with hot-film and wall-wire probes as well as with oil-film interferometry. The threshold suction coefficient above which relaminarization starts to occur is examined. The scaling of the mean velocity and of higher order velocity moments is discussed in light of the measured wall shear stress data. Support from the European Research Council of the Advanced Fluid Research On Drag reduction in Turbulence Experiments (AFRODITE) is acknowledged.

  1. Wave-Particle Interactions in the Turbulent Plasmaspheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, Evgeny

    2012-10-01

    We present in situ satellite observations of plasmaspheric lower hybrid/fast magnetosonic turbulence and broadband hiss-like VLF emissions related with substorm subauroral ion drifts/polarization streams (SAID/SAPS) in the magnetosphere and topside ionosphere. SAID/SAPS appear in ˜10 min after the substorm onset consistent with the fast propagation of substorm injection fronts. The SAID channel follows the dispersionless cutoff of the energetic electron flux at the plasmapause. This indicates that the cold plasma maintains charge neutrality within the channel, thereby short-circuiting the injected plasmoid (injection front) over the plasmasphere. As with the well-documented plasmoid-magnetic barrier problem, plasma turbulence ensures the circuit resistivity and magnetic diffusion as well as significant electron heating and acceleration. The SAID/SAPS-related VLF emissions were used to simulate interactions with the outer zone electrons. These emissions appear to constitute a distinctive subset of substorm/storm-related VLF activity in the region co-located with freshly injected energetic ions equatorward of the plasma sheet boundary. Significant pitch-angle diffusion coefficients suggest that substorm SAID/SAPS-related VLF waves could be responsible for the alteration of the outer radiation belt boundary during (sub)storms.

  2. Velocity-vorticity correlation structures in compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Li, Shi-Yao; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A velocity-vorticity correlation structure (VVCS) analysis is applied to analyze data of 3-dimensional (3-D) direct numerical simulations (DNS), to investigate the quantitative properties of the most correlated vortex structures in compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL) at Mach numbers, Ma = 2 . 25 and 6 . 0 . It is found that the geometry variation of the VVCS closely reflects the streamwise development of CTBL. In laminar region, the VVCS captures the instability wave number of the boundary layer. The transition region displays a distinct scaling change of the dimensions of VVCS. The developed turbulence region is characterized by a constant spatial extension of the VVCS. For various Mach numbers, the maximum correlation coefficient of the VVCS presents a clear multi-layer structure with the same scaling laws as a recent symmetry analysis proposed to quantifying the sublayer, the log-layer, and the wake flow. A surprising discovery is that the wall friction coefficient, Cf, holds a "-1"-power law of the wall normal distance of the VVCS, ys. This validates the speculation that the wall friction is determined by the near-wall coherent structure, which clarifies the correlation between statistical structures and the near-wall dynamics. Project 11452002 and 11172006 supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  3. Lumley decomposition of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkun, Murat; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition proposed by Lumley in 1966 is applied to a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The experimental database was created by a hot-wire rake of 143 probes in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. The Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness (Reθ) are 9800 and 19 100. Three-dimensional decomposition is performed, namely, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in the inhomogeneous and bounded wall-normal direction, Fourier decomposition in the homogeneous spanwise direction, and Fourier decomposition in time. The first POD modes in both cases carry nearly 50% of turbulence kinetic energy when the energy is integrated over Fourier dimensions. The eigenspectra always peak near zero frequency and most of the large scale, energy carrying features are found at the low end of the spectra. The spanwise Fourier mode which has the largest amount of energy is the first spanwise mode and its symmetrical pair. Pre-multiplied eigenspectra have only one distinct peak and it matches the secondary peak observed in the log-layer of pre-multiplied velocity spectra. Energy carrying modes obtained from the POD scale with outer scaling parameters. Full or partial reconstruction of turbulent velocity signal based only on energetic modes or non-energetic modes revealed the behaviour of urms in distinct regions across the boundary layer. When urms is based on energetic reconstruction, there exists (a) an exponential decay from near wall to log-layer, (b) a constant layer through the log-layer, and (c) another exponential decay in the outer region. The non-energetic reconstruction reveals that urms has (a) an exponential decay from the near-wall to the end of log-layer and (b) a constant layer in the outer region. Scaling of urms using the outer parameters is best when both energetic and non-energetic profiles are combined.

  4. Properties of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Borrell, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a boundary layer in the range $Re_\\theta=2800-6600$, with emphasis on the behaviour of the relatively large-scale fractal intermittent region. This requires the introduction of a new definition of the distance between a point and a general surface, which is compared with the more usual vertical distance to the top of the layer. Interfaces are obtained by thresholding the enstrophy field and the magnitude of the rate-of-strain tensor, and it is concluded that, while the former are physically relevant features, the latter are not. By varying the threshold, a topological transition is identified as the interface moves from the free stream into the turbulent core. A vorticity scale is defined that collapses that transition for different Reynolds numbers, roughly equivalent to the root-mean-squared vorticity at the edge of the boundary layer. Conditionally averaged flow variables are analysed as functions of the new distance, bot...

  5. Experimental study on the local similarity scaling of the turbulence spectrum in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA ZhenYan; JIANG Nan; TIAN Yan; WANG YuChun

    2009-01-01

    The streamwise fluctuating velocity in the turbulent boundary layer is measured under approximately medium Reynolds Number by hot wire in order to investigate the scaling properties of the overlapped turbulent spectrum among energy-containing area, inertial subrange and dissipation range based on FFT analysis. The experiment indicates that the high Reynolds flow reported before is not indispensable to produce -1 scaling. So far as the measured position is provided with much higher spatial resolution and enough closing to the wall, -1 scaling is determinate to exist when approaching medium Reynolds. The scaling ranges are supposed to begin at inner scale and end in outer scale, which reveals the local similarity of the energy spectrum over the energy-containing eddies near the wall. In the logarithmic area (y+>130), -5/3 scaling occurs in the energy spectrum, while moving away from the wall with Reynolds numbers increasing, the inertial subrange extends to the lower wavenumbers. On the condition k1η>>0.1, the curves of the turbulence spectrum in the logarithmic layer are superposed, which expresses the similarity of turbulence energy distributed in Komogorov scaling area and exhibits local isotropy characteristics by virtue of the viscous dissipation.

  6. Experimental study on the local similarity scaling of the turbulence spectrum in the turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The streamwise fluctuating velocity in the turbulent boundary layer is measured under approximately medium Reynolds Number by hot wire in order to investigate the scaling properties of the overlapped turbulent spectrum among energy-containing area, inertial subrange and dissipation range based on FFT analysis. The experiment indicates that the high Reynolds flow reported before is not indispensable to produce -1 scaling. So far as the measured position is provided with much higher spatial resolution and enough closing to the wall, -1 scaling is determinate to exist when approaching medium Reynolds. The scaling ranges are supposed to begin at inner scale and end in outer scale, which reveals the local similarity of the energy spectrum over the energy-containing eddies near the wall. In the logarithmic area (y+ > 130), -5/3 scaling occurs in the energy spectrum, while moving away from the wall with Reynolds numbers increasing, the inertial subrange extends to the lower wavenumbers. On the condition k1η 0.1, the curves of the turbulence spectrum in the logarithmic layer are superposed, which expresses the similarity of turbulence energy distributed in Komogorov scaling area and exhibits local isotropy characteristics by virtue of the viscous dissipation.

  7. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model...

  8. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph John

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong (K = {nuover U_sp{infty} {2}}{dUinftyover dx} as high as 9times 10^{ -6}) acceleration. The high FSTI experiments are the main focus of the work. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. The high FSTI boundary layers undergo transition from a strongly disturbed non-turbulent state to a fully-turbulent state. Due to the stabilizing effect of strong acceleration, the transition zones are of extended length in spite of the high FSTI. Transitional values of skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers drop below flat-plate, low FSTI, turbulent flow correlations, but remain well above laminar flow values. Mean velocity and temperature profiles exhibit clear changes in shape as the flow passes through transition. Turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. Turbulent transport is strongly suppressed below values in unaccelerated turbulent boundary layers. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Octant analysis shows a fundamental difference between transitional and fully-turbulent boundary layers. Transitional boundary layers are characterized by incomplete mixing compared to fully-turbulent boundary layers. Similar octant analysis results are observed in both low and high FSTI cases. Spectral analysis suggests that the non-turbulent zone of the high FSTI flow is dominated by large scale

  9. A model for turbulent dissipation rate in a constant pressure boundary layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J DEY; P PHANI KUMAR

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the turbulent dissipation rate in a boundary layer is a very involved process.Experimental determination of either the dissipation rate or the Taylor microscale, even in isotropic turbulence,which may occur in a portion of the turbulent boundary layer, is known to be a difficult task. For constant pressure boundary layers, a model for the turbulent dissipation rate is proposed here in terms of the local mean flow quantities. Comparable agreement between the estimated Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov length scale with other data in the logarithmic region suggests usefulness of this model in obtaining these quantitiesexperimentally

  10. Detecting Multi-Scale Coherent Eddy Structures and Intermittency in Turbulent Boundary Layer by Wavelet Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Nan; ZHANG Jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ Multi-scale decomposition by wavelet transform has been performed to velocity time sequences obtained by fine measurements of turbulent boundary layer flow. A conditional sampling technique for detecting multi-scale coherent eddy structures in turbulent field is proposed by using multi-scale instantaneous intensity factor and flatness factor of wavelet coefficients. Although the number of coherent eddy structures in the turbulent boundary layer is very small, their energy percentage with respect to the turbulence kinetic energy is high. Especially in buffer layer, the energy percentages of coherent structures are significantly higher than those in the logarithmic layer, indicating that the buffer layer is the most active region in the turbulent boundary layer. These multi-scale coherent eddy structures share some common dynamical characteristics and are responsible for the anomalous scaling law in the turbulent boundary layer.

  11. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence 2011 field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lothon, M.; Lohou, F.; Durand, P.; Couvreux, F.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Legain, D.; Pardyjak, E.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Boer, van de A.; Moene, A.F.; Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) aims at better understanding the thermodynamical processes that occur during the late afternoon in the lower troposphere. In direct contact with the Earth surface, the atmospheric boundary layer is governed by buoyant and mechanical turbul

  12. Modification of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows by Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael P.; Tuteja, Anish; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of near zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (TBL) flow over several superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) are presented and compared to those for a hydraulically smooth baseline. The surfaces were developed at the University of Michigan as part of an ongoing research thrust to investigate the feasibility of SHSs for skin-friction drag reduction in turbulent flow. The SHSs were previously evaluated in fully-developed turbulent channel flow and have been shown to provide meaningful drag reduction. The TBL experiments were conducted at the USNA in a water tunnel with a test section 2.0 m (L) x 0.2 m (W) x 0.2 m (H). The free-stream speed was set to 1.26 m/s which corresponded to a friction Reynolds number of 1,500. The TBL was tripped at the test section inlet with a 0.8 mm diameter wire. The upper and side walls provided optical access, while the lower wall was either the smooth baseline or a spray coated SHS. The velocity measurements were obtained with a TSI FSA3500 two-component Laser-Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and custom-designed beam displacer operated in coincidence mode. The LDV probe volume diameter was 45 μm (approx. one wall-unit). The measurements were recorded 1.5 m downstream of the trip. When the measured quantities were normalized using the inner variables, the results indicated a significant reduction in the near wall viscous and total stresses with little effect on the flow outside the inner layer.

  13. An experimental investigation of a low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    A very low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer subject to an adverse pressure gradient is studied. The aim is to obtain highly accurate mean-flow and turbulence measurements under conditions that can be closely related to the numerical simulations of Philippe Spalart for the purposes of CFD validation. Much of the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel was completely rebuilt with a new wider contraction and working section which will improve compatibility with the simulations. A unique sophisticated high-speed computer controlled 3-D probe traversing mechanism was integrated into the test section. Construction of the tunnel and traverse is discussed in some detail. The hardware is now complete, and measurements are in progress. The mean-flow data indicate that a suitably two-dimensional base flow was established. Automation of the probe positioning and data acquistion have led to a decreased running time for total pressure measurements. However, the most significant benefits are expected to occur when using hot-wire probes. Calibrations can be performed automatically and there is no need to handle fragile probes when moving between measuring stations. Techniques are being developed which require sampling of the signals from moving hot-wire probes on the basis of their position in the flow. Measurements can be made in high intensity turbulence by flying probes upstream at high speed so that the relative magnitude of the turbulent velocity fluctuations are reduced. In regions, where the turbulence intensity is not too large, the probe can also be repetitively scanned across very dense spatial grids in other directions. With this technique, a complete profile can be measured in about 1/3 the time and with a spatial density about 50 times that obtainable using a stationary probe.

  14. Coherent vorticity extraction in turbulent boundary layers using orthogonal wavelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khujadze, George; Oberlack, Martin [Chair of Fluid Dynamics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Yen, Romain Nguyen van [Institut fuer Mathematik, Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Schneider, Kai [M2P2-CNRS and CMI, Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Farge, Marie, E-mail: khujadze@fdy.tu-darmstadt.de [LMD-IPSL-CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France)

    2011-12-22

    Turbulent boundary layer data computed by direct numerical simulation are analyzed using orthogonal anisotropic wavelets. The flow fields, originally given on a Chebychev grid, are first interpolated on a locally refined dyadic grid. Then, they are decomposed using a wavelet basis, which accounts for the anisotropy of the flow by using different scales in the wall-normal direction and in the planes parallel to the wall. Thus the vorticity field is decomposed into coherent and incoherent contributions using thresholding of the wavelet coefficients. It is shown that less than 1% of the coefficients retain the coherent structures of the flow, while the majority of the coefficients corresponds to a structureless, i.e., noise-like background flow. Scale-and direction-dependent statistics in wavelet space quantify the flow properties at different wall distances.

  15. Logarithmic boundary layers in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Huisman, Sander G; Cierpka, Christian; Kahler, Christian J; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We provide direct measurements of the boundary layer properties in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow up to $\\text{Ta}=6.2 \\times 10^{12}$ using high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV). We find that the mean azimuthal velocity profile at the inner and outer cylinder can be fitted by the von K\\'arm\\'an log law $u^+ = \\frac 1\\kappa \\ln y^+ +B$. The von K\\'arm\\'an constant $\\kappa$ is found to depend on the driving strength $\\text{Ta}$ and for large $\\text{Ta}$ asymptotically approaches $\\kappa \\approx 0.40$. The variance profiles of the local azimuthal velocity have a universal peak around $y^+ \\approx 12$ and collapse when rescaled with the driving velocity (and not with the friction velocity), displaying a log-dependence of $y^+$ as also found for channel and pipe flows [1,2].

  16. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER CHARACTERISTICS OVER STREAMWISE RIBLETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-yong; DONG Shou-ping; DU Ya-nan

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of characteristics by means of a two-component Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) were carried out in turbulent boundary layers over both a symmetric V-shaped ribbed plate and a smooth one in a low speed wind tunnel. The present results clearly indicate that the logarithmic velocity profile over the riblets surface is shifted upward with a 30.9% increase in the thickness of the viscous sublayer. Also a change in the log-law region is found. And the maximum value of streamwise velocity fluctuations is reduced by approximately 17%. The skewness and flatness factors do not show any change besides those in the region of y+<0.6. It is evident that the Reynolds shear stress over the riblets is reduced. Further more, in log-law region, the Reynolds shear stress has a larger reduction of up to 18%.

  17. Turbulent boundary layer over a divergent convergent superhydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalabadi, Razieh; Hwang, Jinyul; Nadeem, Muhammad; Yoon, Min; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-08-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer over a divergent and convergent superhydrophobic surface (SHS) was performed over the range 800 < Reθ < 1200. The surface patterns were aligned along the streamwise direction. The SHS was modeled as a pattern of free-slip and no-slip surfaces. The gas fraction of the divergent and convergent SHS was the same as that for the straight SHS for a given slip area. The divergent and convergent SHS gave 21% more drag reduction than the straight SHS. Although the maximum value of the streamwise slip velocity was larger over the divergent and convergent SHS, the average slip velocity (Uslip/U∞) was larger over the straight SHS. The greater drag reduction was attributed to the manipulation of the secondary flow in the y-z plane and the changes in the turbulence structure. The streamwise vortices generated by the secondary flow over the divergent and convergent SHS were diminished which reduced drag relative to the flow over the straight SHS. The ejection and sweep motions were weak, and the vortical structure was attenuated near the wall over the divergent and convergent SHS. The skin friction contributions were explored using the velocity-vorticity correlation. The vortex stretching contribution dominated the skin friction budget. The reduced skin friction over the divergent and convergent SHS resulted mainly from reduced vortex stretching.

  18. A study of synthetic large scales in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; Luhar, Mitul; Barnard, Casey; Sheplak, Mark; McKeon, Beverley

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic spanwise-constant spatio-temporal disturbances are excited in a turbulent boundary layer through a spatially impulsive patch of dynamic wall-roughness. The downstream flow response is studied through hot wire anemometry, pressure measurements at the wall and direct measurements of wall-shear-stress made using a novel micro-machined capacitive floating element sensor. These measurements are phase-locked to the input perturbation to recover the synthetic large-scale motion and characterize its structure and wall signature. The phase relationship between the synthetic large scale and small scale activity provides further insights into the apparent amplitude modulation effect between them, and the dynamics of wall-bounded turbulent flows in general. Results from these experiments will be discussed in the context of the critical-layer behavior revealed by the resolvent analysis of McKeon & Sharma (J Fluid Mech, 2010), and compared with similar earlier work by Jacobi & McKeon (J Fluid Mech, 2011). Model predictions are shown to be in broad agreement with experiments. The support of AFOSR grant #FA 9550-12-1-0469, Resnick Institute Graduate Research Fellowship (S.D.) and Sandia Graduate Fellowship (C.B.) are gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Calculations of Turbulent Boundary Layer (TBL) Pressure Fluctuations Transmitted into a Viscoelastic Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuation transmitted into a layer of viscoelastic material. The theoretical model used here is a plane elastomer...Spring 1985. The objective of this paper is to develop a model for calculating the turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuation transmitted into a...the noise level calculated in terms of decibels. FIGURE 4 (CORCOS MODEL ) This is a model cross-spectrum of turbulent wall pressure , frequently

  20. Wavelets, turbulence, and boundary value problems for partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, John E.

    1995-04-01

    In this paper the qualitative properties of an inviscid, incompressible two-dimensional fluid are examined by numerical methods based on the compactly supported wavelets (the wavelet- Galerkin method). In particular, we examine the behavior of the spatial gradients of the vorticity. The growth of these gradients is related to the transfer of enstrophy (integral of squared vorticity) to the small-scales of the fluid motion. Implicit time differencing and wavelet-Galerkin space discretization allow a direct investigation of the long time behavior of the inviscid fluid. The effects of hyperviscosity on the long time limit are examined. To solve boundary problems we developed a new numerical method for the solution of partial differential equations in nonseparable domains. The method uses a wavelet-Galerkin solver with a nontrivial adaptation of the standard capacitance matrix method. The numerical solutions exhibit spectral convergence with regard to the order of the compactly supported, Daubechies wavelet basis. Furthermore, the rate of convergence is found to be independent of the geometry. We solve the Helmholtz equation since, for the indefinite case, the solutions have qualitative properties that well illustrate the applications of our method.

  1. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Mean flow and turbulence measurements are presented for adiabatic compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients. The gradients were induced on the wall of an axially symmetric wind tunnel by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The boundary layer turbulence downstream of a boundary layer bleed section in a zero pressure gradient was also examined. The measurements were obtained using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The adverse pressure gradients were found to significantly alter the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. With flow through the bleed holes there was a measureable decrease in the rms longitudinal velocity fluctuations near the wall and the turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer was reduced.

  2. PIV-based pressure fluctuations in the turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Sina; Ragni, Daniele; Scarano, Fulvio

    2012-12-01

    The unsteady pressure field is obtained from time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) measurement within a fully developed turbulent boundary layer at free stream velocity of U ∞ = 9.3 m/s and Reθ = 2,400. The pressure field is evaluated from the velocity fields measured by Tomo-PIV at 10 kHz invoking the momentum equation for unsteady incompressible flows. The spatial integration of the pressure gradient is conducted by solving the Poisson pressure equation with fixed boundary conditions at the outer edge of the boundary layer. The PIV-based evaluation of the pressure field is validated against simultaneous surface pressure measurement using calibrated condenser microphones mounted behind a pinhole orifice. The comparison shows agreement between the two pressure signals obtained from the Tomo-PIV and the microphones with a cross-correlation coefficient of 0.6 while their power spectral densities (PSD) overlap up to 3 kHz. The impact of several parameters governing the pressure evaluation from the PIV data is evaluated. The use of the Tomo-PIV system with the application of three-dimensional momentum equation shows higher accuracy compared to the planar version of the technique. The results show that the evaluation of the wall pressure can be conducted using a domain as small as half the boundary layer thickness (0.5δ99) in both the streamwise and the wall normal directions. The combination of a correlation sliding-average technique, the Lagrangian approach to the evaluation of the material derivative and the planar integration of the Poisson pressure equation results in the best agreement with the pressure measurement of the surface microphones.

  3. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation and Experimental Validation of Hypersonic Turbulence Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Hong

    2013-08-01

    large deviation. The hypersonic flat-plate laminar flow was also compared with CP and st calculated from the three turbulence models for the three grids. Evidently, the grids near the wall must be encrypted to an appropriate extent to simulate more accurately the boundary laminar flow as well as obtain proper surface friction and heat flow. The calculation in the present study showed that the Reynolds number in the first layer of the grid was more reasonable when it was about 20. The simulation result for the hypersonic isothermal two-dimensional turning wall flow showed that the calculation and experiment results from the different turbulence model were consistent. There was little difference between the location of the simulated heat flow peak and the position given by experiment. However, the peak, the curve trend after the peak and the experimental result widely differed. The curve and experimental results for pressure distribution greatly varied because of the existence of an isolated area in the calculation of the laminar flow. The calculation and experimental results from different turbulence models were close. The curve trend, the peak and the experimental result basically matched.

  5. On the Derivation of Highest-Order Compact Finite Difference Schemes for the One- and Two-Dimensional Poisson Equation with Dirichlet Boundary Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Settle, Sean O.

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to answer the question, What are the highest-order five- or nine-point compact finite difference schemes? To answer this question, we present several simple derivations of finite difference schemes for the one- and two-dimensional Poisson equation on uniform, quasi-uniform, and nonuniform face-to-face hyperrectangular grids and directly prove the existence or nonexistence of their highest-order local accuracies. Our derivations are unique in that we do not make any initial assumptions on stencil symmetries or weights. For the one-dimensional problem, the derivation using the three-point stencil on both uniform and nonuniform grids yields a scheme with arbitrarily high-order local accuracy. However, for the two-dimensional problem, the derivation using the corresponding five-point stencil on uniform and quasi-uniform grids yields a scheme with at most second-order local accuracy, and on nonuniform grids yields at most first-order local accuracy. When expanding the five-point stencil to the nine-point stencil, the derivation using the nine-point stencil on uniform grids yields at most sixth-order local accuracy, but on quasi- and nonuniform grids yields at most fourth- and third-order local accuracy, respectively. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  6. An investigation of turbulence structure in a low Reynolds number incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strataridakis, Constantine John

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a flat plate at zero pressure gradient were made using two X-probes simultaneously. The experiment was performed in the large Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Wind Tunnel at the University of California, Davis. The 7.32 meter long flat plate installed within the wind tunnel generated approximately 20 cm thick boundary layer, R (sub theta) approximately 4,000. Mean velocity and turbulence intensity data very close to the wall (y(+) is greater than or = to 1) were measured with a single hot wire to improve the measurement resolution. Space-time correlations of mu' and upsilon' velocities and of their instantaneous product were obtained with a pair of X-wires. The mean convection velocities, the extent in space, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the mu', upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') large-scale structures are presented. (The (mu')(upsilon') results are presented for the first time.) The mu' structure is inclined at a small angle (19 deg) to the wall, while the upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') structures propagate almost at wall-normal directions. Each of the mu' and upsilon' structures appears elongated in the direction of the corresponding velocity fluctuation and is limited to delta-extent in the other two directions. The similarity between the upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon') suggests that the (mu')(upsilon') might mainly be a consequence of the motion of the upsilon' structure. Finally, a possible explanation for the differences between the (mu')(upsilon'), upsilon' and the mu' structures is the existence of different coherent scales, one dominating mu' and the other dominating upsilon' and (mu')(upsilon').

  7. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer with Spanwise Wall Oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidan Ni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulations (DNS of Mach = 2.9 supersonic turbulent boundary layers with spanwise wall oscillation (SWO are conducted to investigate the turbulent heat transport mechanism and its relation with the turbulent momentum transport. The turbulent coherent structures are suppressed by SWO and the drag is reduced. Although the velocity and temperature statistics are disturbed by SWO differently, the turbulence transports of momentum and heat are simultaneously suppressed. The Reynolds analogy and the strong Reynolds analogy are also preserved in all the controlled flows, proving the consistent mechanisms of momentum transport and heat transport in the turbulent boundary layer with SWO. Despite the extra dissipation and heat induced by SWO, a net wall heat flux reduction can be achieved with the proper selected SWO parameters. The consistent mechanism of momentum and heat transports supports the application of turbulent drag reduction technologies to wall heat flux controls in high-speed vehicles.

  8. Spectral Anisotropy of Els\\"asser Variables in Two Dimensional Wave-vector Space as Observed in the Fast Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Limei; Zhang, Lei; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H K; Wang, Xin; Wang, Linghua; Wicks, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Intensive studies have been conducted to understand the anisotropy of solar wind turbulence. However, the anisotropy of Els\\"asser variables ($\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$) in 2D wave-vector space has yet to be investigated. Here we first verify the transformation based on the projection-slice theorem between the power spectral density PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ and the spatial correlation function CF$_{2D} (r_\\parallel,r_\\perp )$. Based on the application of the transformation to the magnetic field and the particle measurements from the WIND spacecraft, we investigate the spectral anisotropy of Els\\"asser variables ($\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$), and the distribution of residual energy E$_{R}$, Alfv\\'en ratio R$_{A}$ and Els\\"asser ratio R$_{E}$ in the $(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp)$ space. The spectra PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ of $\\textbf{B}$, $\\textbf{V}$, and $\\textbf{Z}_{major}$ (the larger of $\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$) show a similar pattern that PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ is mainly distributed along a ridge inclined toward t...

  9. Existence and Stability of Two-Dimensional Compact-Like Discrete Breathers in Discrete Two-Dimensional Monatomic Square Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; TIAN Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers in discrete two-dimensional monatomic square lattices are investigated by discussing a generafized discrete two-dimensional monatomic model.It is proven that the twodimensional compact-like discrete breathers exist not only in two-dimensional soft Ф4 potentials but also in hard two-dimensional Ф4 potentials and pure two-dimensional K4 lattices.The measurements of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breather cores in soft and hard two-dimensional Ф4 potential are determined by coupling parameter K4,while those in pure two-dimensional K4 lattices have no coupling with parameter K4.The stabilities of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers correlate closely to the coupling parameter K4 and the boundary condition of lattices.

  10. Boundary-layer turbulence in experiments of quasi-Keplerian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Most flows in nature and engineering are turbulent because of their large velocities and spatial scales. Laboratory experiments of rotating quasi-Keplerian flows, for which the angular velocity decreases radially but the angular momentum increases, are however laminar at Reynolds numbers exceeding one million. This is in apparent contradiction to direct numerical simulations showing that in these experiments turbulence transition is triggered by the axial boundaries. We here show numerically that as the Reynolds number increases turbulence becomes progressively confined to the boundary layers and the flow in the bulk fully relaminarizes. Our findings support that hydrodynamic turbulence cannot drive accretion in astrophysical disks.

  11. Comparison between two and three-dimensional POD in a turbulent boundary layer using multi-plane stereoscopic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Alex; Gurka, Roi; Hetsroni, Gad

    2011-12-01

    A comparison between two- and three-dimensional analyses using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is performed. The investigated flow field is a turbulent boundary layer in a flume. The decomposition is applied to the vorticity fields measured using a multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement system. The decomposition was applied using two methods: A) two-dimensional slices of the data that were used separately in a so-called slice-POD, and B) as a volumetric dataset that provides 3D-POD modes. Linear combination of the first three modes, energy distribution and reconstruction of snapshots are compared. Both decompositions capture most of the turbulent flow patterns; yet, the lower order modes show significant discrepancies between the slice-POD and 3D-POD. Therefore, in order to characterize coherent structures in turbulent flows, it is essential to perform both two- and three-dimensional decompositions. These two methods complement each other and can provide an improved interpretation of various flow features.

  12. Comparison between two and three-dimensional POD in a turbulent boundary layer using multi-plane stereoscopic PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberzon, Alex [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); Gurka, Roi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Hetsroni, Gad, E-mail: alexlib@eng.tau.ac.il [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2011-12-22

    A comparison between two- and three-dimensional analyses using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is performed. The investigated flow field is a turbulent boundary layer in a flume. The decomposition is applied to the vorticity fields measured using a multi-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement system. The decomposition was applied using two methods: A) two-dimensional slices of the data that were used separately in a so-called slice-POD, and B) as a volumetric dataset that provides 3D-POD modes. Linear combination of the first three modes, energy distribution and reconstruction of snapshots are compared. Both decompositions capture most of the turbulent flow patterns; yet, the lower order modes show significant discrepancies between the slice-POD and 3D-POD. Therefore, in order to characterize coherent structures in turbulent flows, it is essential to perform both two- and three-dimensional decompositions. These two methods complement each other and can provide an improved interpretation of various flow features.

  13. Numerical investigation of non-equilibrium effects in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilbum; Kim, John; Zhong, Xiaolin; Eldredge, Jeff

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of a spatially developing hypersonic boundary layer have been conducted in order to investigate thermal and chemical non-equilibrium effects in a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer. Two different flows, pure oxygen and pure nitrogen flows with specific total enthalpy, h0 ,O2 = 9 . 5017 MJ/kg and h0 ,N2 = 19 . 1116 MJ/kg, respectively, have been considered. The boundary edge conditions were obtained from a separate calculation of a flow over a blunt wedge at free-stream Mach numbers M∞ ,O2 = 15 and M∞ ,N2 = 20 . The inflow conditions were obtained from a simulation of a turbulent boundary layer of a perfect gas. Non-equilibrium effects on turbulence statistics and near-wall turbulence structures were examined by comparing with those obtained in a simulation of the same boundary layer with a perfect-gas assumption.

  14. A method for calculating turbulent boundary layers and losses in the flow channels of turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Lawrence F.

    1987-01-01

    An interactive inviscid core flow-boundary layer method is presented for the calculation of turbomachine channel flows. For this method, a one-dimensional inviscid core flow is assumed. The end-wall and blade surface boundary layers are calculated using an integral entrainment method. The boundary layers are assumed to be collateral and thus are two-dimensional. The boundary layer equations are written in a streamline coordinate system. The streamwise velocity profiles are approximated by power law profiles. Compressibility is accounted for in the streamwise direction but not in the normal direction. Equations are derived for the special cases of conical and two-dimensional rectangular diffusers. For these cases, the assumptions of a one-dimensional core flow and collateral boundary layers are valid. Results using the method are compared with experiment and good quantitative agreement is obtained.

  15. Two-dimensional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Osserman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The basic component of several-variable calculus, two-dimensional calculus is vital to mastery of the broader field. This extensive treatment of the subject offers the advantage of a thorough integration of linear algebra and materials, which aids readers in the development of geometric intuition. An introductory chapter presents background information on vectors in the plane, plane curves, and functions of two variables. Subsequent chapters address differentiation, transformations, and integration. Each chapter concludes with problem sets, and answers to selected exercises appear at the end o

  16. Two dimensional vernier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional vernier scale is disclosed utilizing a cartesian grid on one plate member with a polar grid on an overlying transparent plate member. The polar grid has multiple concentric circles at a fractional spacing of the spacing of the cartesian grid lines. By locating the center of the polar grid on a location on the cartesian grid, interpolation can be made of both the X and Y fractional relationship to the cartesian grid by noting which circles coincide with a cartesian grid line for the X and Y direction.

  17. An Evaluation of Recently Developed RANS-Based Turbulence Models for Flow Over a Two-Dimensional Block Subjected to Different Mesh Structures and Grid Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardan, Farshid; Cheng, Wai-Chi; Baverel, Olivier; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Understanding, analyzing and predicting meteorological phenomena related to urban planning and built environment are becoming more essential than ever to architectural and urban projects. Recently, various version of RANS models have been established but more validation cases are required to confirm their capability for wind flows. In the present study, the performance of recently developed RANS models, including the RNG k-ɛ , SST BSL k-ω and SST ⪆mma-Reθ , have been evaluated for the flow past a single block (which represent the idealized architecture scale). For validation purposes, the velocity streamlines and the vertical profiles of the mean velocities and variances were compared with published LES and wind tunnel experiment results. Furthermore, other additional CFD simulations were performed to analyze the impact of regular/irregular mesh structures and grid resolutions based on selected turbulence model in order to analyze the grid independency. Three different grid resolutions (coarse, medium and fine) of Nx × Ny × Nz = 320 × 80 × 320, 160 × 40 × 160 and 80 × 20 × 80 for the computational domain and nx × nz = 26 × 32, 13 × 16 and 6 × 8, which correspond to number of grid points on the block edges, were chosen and tested. It can be concluded that among all simulated RANS models, the SST ⪆mma-Reθ model performed best and agreed fairly well to the LES simulation and experimental results. It can also be concluded that the SST ⪆mma-Reθ model provides a very satisfactory results in terms of grid dependency in the fine and medium grid resolutions in both regular and irregular structure meshes. On the other hand, despite a very good performance of the RNG k-ɛ model in the fine resolution and in the regular structure grids, a disappointing performance of this model in the coarse and medium grid resolutions indicates that the RNG k-ɛ model is highly dependent on grid structure and grid resolution. These quantitative validations are essential

  18. Instantaneous velocity profile measurements in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Instantaneous wall shear stress and streamwise velocities have been measured simultaneously in a flat-plate, turbulent boundary layer at moderate Reynolds number in an effort to provide experimental support for large eddy simulations. Data were obtained using a buried-wire, wall shear gage and a hot-wire rake positioned in the log region of the flow. Fluctuations of the instantaneous U(+) versus Y(+) profiles about a mean law of the wall are shown to be significant and complex. Peak cross-correlation values between wall shear stress and the velocities are high, and reflect the passage of a large structure inclined at a small angle to the wall. Estimates of this angle are consistent with those made by other investigators. Conditional sampling techniques were used to detect the passage of various sizes and types of flow disturbances (events), and to estimate their mean frequency of occurrence. Events characterized by large aand sudden streamwise accelerations were found to be highly coherent throughout the log region and were strongly correlated with large fluctuations in wall shear stress. Phase randomness between the near-wall quantities and the outer velocities was small. The results suggest that the flow events detected by conditional sampling applied to velocities in the log region may be related to the bursting process.

  19. Large Scale Organization of a Near Wall Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislas, Michel; Dekou Tiomajou, Raoul Florent; Foucaut, Jean Marc

    2016-11-01

    This study lies in the context of large scale coherent structures investigation in a near wall turbulent boundary layer. An experimental database at high Reynolds numbers (Re θ = 9830 and Re θ = 19660) was obtained in the LML wind tunnel with stereo-PIV at 4 Hz and hot wire anemometry at 30 kHz. A Linear Stochastic Estimation procedure, is used to reconstruct a 3 component field resolved in space and time. Algorithms were developed to extract coherent structures from the reconstructed field. A sample of 3D view of the structures is depicted in Figure 1. Uniform momentum regions are characterized with their mean hydraulic diameter in the YZ plane, their life time and their contribution to Reynolds stresses. The vortical motions are characterized by their position, radius, circulation and vorticity in addition to their life time and their number computed at a fixed position from the wall. The spatial organization of the structures was investigated through a correlation of their respective indicative functions in the spanwise direction. The simplified large scale model that arise is compared to the ones available in the literature. Streamwise low (green) and high (yellow) uniform momentum regions with positive (red) and negative (blue) vortical motions. This work was supported by Campus International pour la Sécurité et l'Intermodalité des Transports.

  20. Mixing at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet

    CERN Document Server

    Eidelman, A; Kleeorin, N; Hazak, G; Rogachevskii, I; Sadot, O; Sapir-Katiraie, I

    2009-01-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically mixing at the external boundary of a submerged turbulent jet. In the experimental study we use Particle Image Velocimetry and an Image Processing Technique based on the analysis of the intensity of the Mie scattering to determine the spatial distribution of tracer particles. An air jet is seeded with the incense smoke particles which are characterized by large Schmidt number and small Stokes number. We determine the spatial distributions of the jet fluid characterized by a high concentration of the particles and of the ambient fluid characterized by a low concentration of the tracer particles. In the data analysis we use two approaches, whereby one approach is based on the measured phase function for the study of the mixed state of two fluids. The other approach is based on the analysis of the two-point second-order correlation function of the particle number density fluctuations generated by tangling of the gradient of the mean particle number density by the turbulen...

  1. A hybrid wavelet-based adaptive immersed boundary finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method for two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiongwei; Yao, Xiongliang; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Minghao

    2017-03-01

    A second generation wavelet-based adaptive finite-difference Lattice Boltzmann method (FD-LBM) is developed in this paper. In this approach, the adaptive wavelet collocation method (AWCM) is firstly, to the best of our knowledge, incorporated into the FD-LBM. According to the grid refinement criterion based on the wavelet amplitudes of density distribution functions, an adaptive sparse grid is generated by the omission and addition of collocation points. On the sparse grid, the finite differences are used to approximate the derivatives. To eliminate the special treatments in using the FD-based derivative approximation near boundaries, the immersed boundary method (IBM) is also introduced into FD-LBM. By using the adaptive technique, the adaptive code requires much less grid points as compared to the uniform-mesh code. As a consequence, the computational efficiency can be improved. To justify the proposed method, a series of test cases, including fixed boundary cases and moving boundary cases, are invested. A good agreement between the present results and the data in previous literatures is obtained, which demonstrates the accuracy and effectiveness of the present AWCM-IB-LBM.

  2. Velocity fields and optical turbulence near the boundary in a strongly convective laboratory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Goode, Wesley; Hellman, Samuel

    2016-05-01

    Boundary layers around moving underwater vehicles or other platforms can be a limiting factor for optical communication. Turbulence in the boundary layer of a body moving through a stratified medium can lead to small variations in the index of refraction, which impede optical signals. As a first step towards investigating this boundary layer effect on underwater optics, we study the flow near the boundary in the Rayleigh-Bénard laboratory tank at the Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center. The tank is set up to generate temperature-driven, i.e., convective turbulence, and allows control of the turbulence intensity. This controlled turbulence environment is complemented by computational fluid dynamics simulations to visualize and quantify multi-scale flow patterns. The boundary layer dynamics in the laboratory tank are quantified using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system to examine the boundary layer velocities and turbulence parameters. The velocity fields and flow dynamics from the PIV are compared to the numerical model and show the model to accurately reproduce the velocity range and flow dynamics. The temperature variations and thus optical turbulence effects can then be inferred from the model temperature data. Optical turbulence is also visible in the raw data from the PIV system. The newly collected data are consistent with previously reported measurements from high-resolution Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter profilers (Nortek Vectrino), as well as fast thermistor probes and novel next-generation fiber-optics temperature sensors. This multi-level approach to studying optical turbulence near a boundary, combining in-situ measurements, optical techniques, and numerical simulations, can provide new insight and aid in mitigating turbulence impacts on underwater optical signal transmission.

  3. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  4. Intermittent turbulence and oscillations in the stable boundary layer over land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.J.H.

    2002-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates, our main subject of interest is: "Intermittent turbulence and oscillation in the stable boundary layer over land". As such, this theme connects the different chapters. Here, intermittent turbulence is defined as a sequence of events were 'burst' of increased tu

  5. The Minimum Wind Speed for Sustainable Turbulence in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Baas, P.; Basu, S.; Donda, J.M.M.; Sun, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The collapse of turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer is studied by means of a simple bulk model that describes the basic physical interactions in the surface energy balance. It is shown that for a given mechanical forcing, the amount of turbulent heat that can be transported downward is

  6. The minimum wind speed for sustainable turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Wiel, B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Baas, P.; Basu, S.; Donda, J.M.M.; Sun, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The collapse of turbulence in the nocturnal boundary layer is studied by means of a simple bulk model that describes the basic physical interactions in the surface energy balance. It is shown that for a given mechanical forcing, the amount of turbulent heat that can be transported downward is

  7. Length Scale of Free Stream Turbulence and Its Impact on Bypass Transition in a Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grzelak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was carried out to study the turbulent flow over a flat plate in a subsonic wind tunnel. The enhanced level of turbulence was generated by five wicker grids with square meshes, and different parameters (diameter of the grid rod d = 0.3 to 3 mm and the grid mesh size M = 1 to 30 mm. The velocity of the flow was measured by means of a 1D hot-wire probe, suitable for measurements in a boundary layer. The main aim of the investigation was to explore the influence of the free stream turbulence length scale on the onset of laminar-turbulent bypass transition in a boundary layer on a flat plate. For this purpose, several transition correlations were presented, including intensity and length scales of turbulence, both at the leading edge of a plate and at the onset of transition. The paper ends with an attempt to create a correlation, which takes into account a simultaneous impact of turbulence intensity and turbulence scale on the boundary layer transition. To assess the isotropy of turbulence, the skewness factor of the flow velocity distribution was determined. Also several longitudinal scales of turbulence were determined and compared (integral scale, dissipation scale, Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov scale for different grids and different velocities of the mean flow U = 4, 6, 10, 15, 20 m/s.

  8. Recovery of a supersonic turbulent boundary layer after an expansion corner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Hu, Zhiwei; Sandham, Neil D.

    2017-07-01

    Supersonic turbulent flows at Mach 2.7 over expansion corners with deflection angles of 0° (flat plate), 2°, and 4° have been studied using direct numerical simulation. Distributions of skin friction, pressure, velocity, and boundary layer growth show that the turbulent boundary layer experiences a recovery from a non-equilibrium to an equilibrium state downstream of the expansion corner. Analysis of velocity profiles indicates that the streamwise velocity undergoes a reduction in the near-wall region even though the velocity in the core part of the boundary layer is accelerated after the expansion corner. Growth of the boundary layer was evaluated and a higher shape factor was found in the expansion cases. Turbulence was found to be mostly suppressed downstream of the corner, and throughout the recovery region, even though turbulence is regenerated in the near-wall region. The expansion ramp increases the near-wall streak spacing compared to a flat plate, and turbulent kinetic energy profiles and budgets exhibit a characteristic two-layer structure. Near-wall turbulence recovers to a balance between the local production and dissipation equilibrium more quickly in the inner layer than in the outer layer. The two-layer structure is due to a history effect of turbulence decay in the outer part of the boundary layer downstream of the expansion corner, with limited momentum and energy exchange between the inner layer and the main stream.

  9. Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows FA9550-11-1-0203 Dr. Charles E. Tinney, Aerospace Engineering and Engineering...Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows Contract/Grant Number: FA9550-11-1-0203...driven by transonic resonance (Zaman et al, 2002). What is common about many of these planar nozzle studies is that there is just one single

  10. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Non-turbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmond J. Walsh; Kevin P. Nolan; Donald M. McEligot; Ralph J. Volino; Adrian Bejan

    2007-05-01

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  11. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  12. Two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the principles and applications of two-dimensional vibrational and optical spectroscopy techniques. This book provides an account of basic theory required for an understanding of two-dimensional vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  13. Boundary Layer for the Navier-Stokes-alpha Model of Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskidov, A.

    We study boundary-layer turbulence using the Navier-Stokes-alpha model obtaining an extension of the Prandtl equations for the averaged flow in a turbulent boundary layer. In the case of a zero pressure gradient flow along a flat plate, we derive a nonlinear fifth-order ordinary differential equation, which is an extension of the Blasius equation. We study it analytically and prove the existence of a two-parameter family of solutions satisfying physical boundary conditions. Matching these parameters with the skin-friction coefficient and the Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, we get an agreement of the solutions with experimental data in the laminar and transitional boundary layers, as well as in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  14. Moist turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Weidauer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with phase changes in an extended layer between two parallel impermeable planes is studied by means of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations for Rayleigh numbers between 10^4 and 1.5\\times 10^7 and for Prandtl number Pr=0.7. Two different sets of boundary conditions of temperature and total water content are compared: imposed constant amplitudes which translate into Dirichlet boundary conditions for the scalar field fluctuations about the quiescent diffusive equilibrium and constant imposed flux boundary conditions that result in Neumann boundary conditions. Moist turbulent convection is in the conditionally unstable regime throughout this study for which unsaturated air parcels are stably and saturated air parcels unstably stratified. A direct comparison of both sets of boundary conditions with the same parameters requires to start the turbulence simulations out of differently saturated equilibrium states. Similar to dry Rayleigh-Benard convection the differences...

  15. An experimental study on laminar-turbulent transition at high free-stream turbulence in boundary layers with pressure gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernoray Valery

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here the results of a study on measurements and prediction of laminar-turbulent transition at high free-stream turbulence in boundary layers of the airfoil-like geometries with presence of the external pressure gradient changeover. The experiments are performed for a number of flow cases with different flow Reynolds number, turbulence intensity and pressure gradient distributions. The results were then compared to numerical calculations for same geometries and flow conditions. The experiments and computations are performed for the flow parameters which are typical for turbomachinery applications and the major idea of the current study is the validation of the turbulence model which can be used for such engineering applications.

  16. Implicit Large-Eddy Simulations of Zero-Pressure Gradient, Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Susheel; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2015-01-01

    A set of direct simulations of zero-pressure gradient, turbulent boundary layer flows are conducted using various span widths (62-630 wall units), to document their influence on the generated turbulence. The FDL3DI code that solves compressible Navier-Stokes equations using high-order compact-difference scheme and filter, with the standard recycling/rescaling method of turbulence generation, is used. Results are analyzed at two different Re values (500 and 1,400), and compared with spectral DNS data. They show that a minimum span width is required for the mere initiation of numerical turbulence. Narrower domains ((is) less than 100 w.u.) result in relaminarization. Wider spans ((is) greater than 600 w.u.) are required for the turbulent statistics to match reference DNS. The upper-wall boundary condition for this setup spawns marginal deviations in the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, particularly in the buffer region.

  17. Turbulent dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijlbergh, R.A.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Heus, T.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to dry boundary layers, dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers has received less attention. In this LES based numerical study we investigate the dispersion of a passive tracer in the form of Lagrangian particles for four kinds of atmospheric boundary layers: 1) a dry convective boundary

  18. Power Law or Logarithmic Law?—A data Analysis for Zero Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layers with Low Reδs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MatthiasBuschmann

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of two-dimensional zero pressure gradient(ZPG) turbulent boundary layers(TBL) with regard to the application of power laws,only TBL with low Reynolds number 300turbulent viscosity is suggested.

  19. Boundary conditions for heat transfer and evaporative cooling in the trachea and air sac system of the domestic fowl: a two-dimensional CFD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlova, Nina S; Lambertz, Markus; Witzel, Ulrich; Perry, Steven F

    2012-01-01

    Various parts of the respiratory system play an important role in temperature control in birds. We create a simplified computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of heat exchange in the trachea and air sacs of the domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus) in order to investigate the boundary conditions for the convective and evaporative cooling in these parts of the respiratory system. The model is based upon published values for respiratory times, pressures and volumes and upon anatomical data for this species, and the calculated heat exchange is compared with experimentally determined values for the domestic fowl and a closely related, wild species. In addition, we studied the trachea histologically to estimate the thickness of the heat transfer barrier and determine the structure and function of moisture-producing glands. In the transient CFD simulation, the airflow in the trachea of a 2-dimensional model is evoked by changing the volume of the simplified air sac. The heat exchange between the respiratory system and the environment is simulated for different ambient temperatures and humidities, and using two different models of evaporation: constant water vapour concentration model and the droplet injection model. According to the histological results, small mucous glands are numerous but discrete serous glands are lacking on the tracheal surface. The amount of water and heat loss in the simulation is comparable with measured respiratory values previously reported. Tracheal temperature control in the avian respiratory system may be used as a model for extinct or rare animals and could have high relevance for explaining how gigantic, long-necked dinosaurs such as sauropoda might have maintained a high metabolic rate.

  20. Boundary conditions for heat transfer and evaporative cooling in the trachea and air sac system of the domestic fowl: a two-dimensional CFD analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S Sverdlova

    Full Text Available Various parts of the respiratory system play an important role in temperature control in birds. We create a simplified computational fluid dynamics (CFD model of heat exchange in the trachea and air sacs of the domestic fowl (Gallus domesticus in order to investigate the boundary conditions for the convective and evaporative cooling in these parts of the respiratory system. The model is based upon published values for respiratory times, pressures and volumes and upon anatomical data for this species, and the calculated heat exchange is compared with experimentally determined values for the domestic fowl and a closely related, wild species. In addition, we studied the trachea histologically to estimate the thickness of the heat transfer barrier and determine the structure and function of moisture-producing glands. In the transient CFD simulation, the airflow in the trachea of a 2-dimensional model is evoked by changing the volume of the simplified air sac. The heat exchange between the respiratory system and the environment is simulated for different ambient temperatures and humidities, and using two different models of evaporation: constant water vapour concentration model and the droplet injection model. According to the histological results, small mucous glands are numerous but discrete serous glands are lacking on the tracheal surface. The amount of water and heat loss in the simulation is comparable with measured respiratory values previously reported. Tracheal temperature control in the avian respiratory system may be used as a model for extinct or rare animals and could have high relevance for explaining how gigantic, long-necked dinosaurs such as sauropoda might have maintained a high metabolic rate.

  1. Turbulence vertical structure of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Darbieu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the decay of planetary boundary layer (PBL turbulence in the afternoon, from the time the surface buoyancy flux starts to decrease until sunset. Dense observations of mean and turbulent parameters were acquired during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST field experiment by several meteorological surface stations, sounding balloons, radars, lidars, and two aircraft flying extensively during the afternoon transition. We analyzed a case study based on some of those observations and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES data focusing on the turbulent vertical structure throughout the afternoon transition. The decay of turbulence is quantified through the temporal and vertical evolution of (1 the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE, (2 the characteristic length scales of turbulence, (3 the shape of the turbulence spectra. A spectral analysis of LES data, airborne and surface measurements is performed in order to (1 characterize the variation of the turbulent decay with height and (2 study the distribution of turbulence over eddy size. This study points out the LES ability to reproduce the turbulence evolution throughout the afternoon. LES and observations agree that the afternoon transition can be divided in two phases: (1 a first phase during which the TKE decays with a low rate, with no significant change in turbulence characteristics, (2 a second phase characterized by a larger TKE decay rate and a change spectral shape, implying an evolution of eddy size distribution and energy cascade from low to high wavenumber. The changes observed either on TKE decay (during the first phase or on the vertical wind spectra shape (during the second phase of the afternoon transition occur first in the upper region of the PBL. The higher within the PBL, the stronger the spectra shape changes.

  2. Dynamics of turbulent western boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow water model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Q. C. Akuetevi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western boundary currents, subject to two different types of idealized wind forcing, Monsoon Wind and Trade Wind, is considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s−1 and above, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical solutions of the Munk-layer and the inertial-layer, derived from quasigeostrophic theory. Modifications due to variations in the layer thickness (vortex stretching are only important close to the boundary. When the viscosity is reduced the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the viscous sub-layer, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity. The second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse resolution numerical models is proposed.

  3. Interaction of Atmospheric Turbulence with Blade Boundary Layer Dynamics on a 5MW Wind Turbine using Blade-Boundary-Layer-Resolved CFD with hybrid URANS-LES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Brasseur, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lavely, Adam; Jayaraman, Balaji; Craven, Brent

    2016-01-04

    We describe the response of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine blade boundary layer to the passage of atmospheric turbulence using blade-boundary-layer-resolved computational fluid dynamics with hybrid URANS-LES modeling.

  4. Developments in the Taxonomy of Structures in Rotating Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, B.; Clayson, C. A.; Jayne, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    The creation, migration, and destruction of coherent flow structures within rotating turbulent boundary layers has received far less attention than statistical descriptions of the dynamics, but identification of coherent structures can yield physical insights for improved modelling efforts. The broad range of dynamical scales with turbulent boundary layers makes instantaneous flow structure data difficult to collect either by observations or direct numerical simulations, and the lack of a standard definition of a vortex renders the definition of flow structures a qualitative endeavor. However, the formation and evolution of a menagerie of coherent structures, such as high/low momentum streaks and hairpin vorticies, has been documented and widely accepted for canonical non-rotating turbulent boundary layers. How do turbulent structures form and evolve as the Reynolds number increases in Ekman layers? Are turbulent Ekman layer structures similar to turbulent internal flow boundary layers, which are also constrained vertically? How does buoyancy or sloping topography alter, destroy, or generate flow structures? In this study flow structure descriptions from experiments, observations, and simulations are reviewed.

  5. On the impact of adverse pressure gradient on the supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-Cheng; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Zhao, Yu-Xin

    2016-11-01

    By employing the particle image velocimetry, the mean and turbulent characteristics of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer are experimentally investigated without the impact of curvature. The physical mechanism with which the streamwise adverse pressure gradient affects the supersonic boundary layer is revealed. The data are compared to that of the concave boundary layer with similar streamwise distributions of wall static pressure to clarify the separate impacts of the adverse pressure gradient and the concave curvature. The logarithmic law is observed to be well preserved for both of the cases. The dip below the logarithmic law is not observed in present investigation. Theoretical analysis indicates that it could be the result of compromise between the opposite impacts of the compression wave and the increased turbulent intensity. Compared to the zero pressure gradient boundary layer, the principal strain rate and the turbulent intensities are increased by the adverse pressure gradient. The shear layer formed due the hairpin packets could be sharpened by the compression wave, which leads to higher principal strain rate and the associated turbulent level. Due to the additional impact of the centrifugal instability brought by the concave wall, even higher turbulent intensities than that of the adverse pressure gradient case are introduced. The existence of velocity modes within the zero pressure gradient boundary layer suggests that the large scale motions are statistically well organized. The generation of new velocity modes due to the adverse pressure gradient indicates that the turbulent structure is changed by the adverse pressure gradient, through which more turbulence production that cannot be effectively predicted by the Reynolds-stress transport equations could be brought.

  6. Dynamics of turbulent western-boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow-water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuetevi, C. Q. C.; Wirth, A.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western-boundary currents (WBCs) crossing the Equator are considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced-gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s-1 and greater, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical Munk-layer solution. When the viscosity is reduced, the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in the form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer, VSL) and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the VSL, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity; the second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. Characteristic scales of the dynamics and dissipation are determined. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse-resolution numerical models is proposed.

  7. Dynamics of turbulent western boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow water model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Q. C. Akuetevi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western boundary currents crossing the equator is considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s−1 and more, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical Munk-layer solution. When the viscosity is reduced, the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the viscous sub-layer, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity. The second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. Characteristic scales of the dynamics and dissipation are determined. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse resolution numerical models is proposed.

  8. Calculation of eddy viscosity in a compressible turbulent boundary layer with mass injection and chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, S.; Gross, K. W.

    1973-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy equation is coupled with boundary layer equations to solve the characteristics of compressible turbulent boundary layers with mass injection and combustion. The Reynolds stress is related to the turbulent kinetic energy using the Prandtl-Wieghardt formulation. When a lean mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen is injected through a porous plate into the subsonic turbulent boundary layer of air flow and ignited by external means, the turbulent kinetic energy increases twice as much as that of noncombusting flow with the same mass injection rate of nitrogen. The magnitudes of eddy viscosity between combusting and noncombusting flows with injection, however, are almost the same due to temperature effects, while the distributions are different. The velocity profiles are significantly affected by combustion. If pure hydrogen as a transpiration coolant is injected into a rocket nozzle boundary layer flow of combustion products, the temperature drops significantly across the boundary layer due to the high heat capacity of hydrogen. At a certain distance from the wall hydrogen reacts with the combustion products, liberating an extensive amount of heat.

  9. A finite-difference outer layer and integral inner layer method for the solution of the turbulent boundary layer equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell, R. W.; Dejarnette, F. R.; Wahls, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A new turbulent boundary-layer method is developed which models the inner region with the law of the wall while the outer region uses Clauser's eddy viscosity in Matsuno's finite-difference method. The match point between the inner and outer regions as well as the wall shear stress are determined at each marching step during the computation. Results obtained for incompressible, two-dimensional flow over flat plates and ellipses are compared with solutions from a baseline method which uses a finite-difference method for the entire boundary layer. Since the present method used the finite-difference method in the outer region only, the number of grid points required was about half that needed for the baseline method. Accurate displacement and momentum thicknesses were predicted for all cases. Skin friction was predicted well for the flat plate, but the accuracy decreased significantly for the ellipses. Adding a wake functions to the law of the wall allows some of the pressure gradient effect to be taken into account thereby increasing the accuracy of the method.

  10. Turbulent boundary-layer control with spanwise travelling waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalley, Richard D; Choi, Kwing-So, E-mail: Richard.Whalley@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: Kwing-So.Choi@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-22

    It has been demonstrated through numerical simulations using Lorentz forcing that spanwise travelling waves on turbulent wall flows can lead to a skin-friction drag reduction on the order of 30%. As an aeronautical application of this innovative flow control technique, we have investigated into the use of Dielectric-Barrier-Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to generate spanwise travelling waves in air. The near-wall structures modified by the spanwise travelling waves were studied using the PIV technique in a wind tunnel, while the associated turbulence statistics were carefully documented using hot-wire anemometry. We observed the spreading of low-speed fluid by the spanwise travelling streamwise vortices, which seems to have greatly attenuated the turbulence production process. This is very much in line with the finding of DNS studies, where wide low-speed ribbons replaced the low-speed streaks.

  11. A high-resolution code for large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent boundary layer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Wan

    2014-03-01

    We describe a framework for large eddy simulation (LES) of incompressible turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate. This framework uses a fractional-step method with fourth-order finite difference on a staggered mesh. We present several laminar examples to establish the fourth-order accuracy and energy conservation property of the code. Furthermore, we implement a recycling method to generate turbulent inflow. We use the stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and virtual wall model to simulate the turbulent boundary layer flow. We find that the case with Reθ ≈ 2.5 × 105 agrees well with available experimental measurements of wall friction, streamwise velocity profiles and turbulent intensities. We demonstrate that for cases with extremely large Reynolds numbers (Reθ = 1012), the present LES can reasonably predict the flow with a coarse mesh. The parallel implementation of the LES code demonstrates reasonable scaling on O(103) cores. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Transition to turbulence in strongly heated vertical natural convection boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    De Larochelambert, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms governing the transition to turbulence in natural convection boundary layers along strongly heated vertical walls remain neither very clear nor well understood, because of the lack of experiments and the difficulties of physical modelling. Our measurements bring experimental data focusing on this transition in quiescent air along radiating and conducting plates in the whole range of 2000 to 8000 W/m\\^2 heating rate. The analysis of the time series obtained by sliding window cross-correlation thermoanemometry leads us to point out coherent turbulent structures on short heights throughout the thin boundary layer, which seem to be governed by heat transfer and time-microscales of turbulence through the inner sublayer. Physical interpretations are given to relate to the observed heat transfer correlation and these turbulence transition structures along with radiation and conduction.

  13. Measurements of laminar and turbulent flow in a curved duct with thin inlet boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Yianneskis, M.

    1981-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the laminar and turbulent flow in a 90 deg square bend of strong curvature. The boundary layers at the inlet to the bend were approximately 25 percent and 15 percent of the hydraulic diameter for the laminar and turbulent flows, respectively. The development of the pressure driven secondary motion is more rapid for laminar flow: the maximum cross stream component measured was 60 percent of the bulk velocity in contrast to 40 percent for turbulent flow. The streamwise isotachs show that, for laminar flow, large velocities are found progressively nearer to the outer radius of the bend and along the sidewalls. For turbulent flow, the isotachs move towards the inner radius until about 60 deg around the bend where strong secondary motion results in a similar redistribution. Turbulence level and shear stress measurements are also presented.

  14. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic

  15. Reynolds shear stress near its maxima, turbulent bursting process and associated velocity profle in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Noor

    2014-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress around maxima, turbulent bursting process and associate velocity profile in ZGP turbulent boundary layer is considered in the intermediate layer/mesolayer proposed by Afzal (1982 Ing. Arch. 53, 355-277), in addition to inner and outer layers. The intermediate length scale δm = δRτ- 1 / 2 having velocity Um = mUe with 1 / 2 AIAA J). For channel/pipe flow, Sreenivasan et al. (1981989, 1997, 2006a,b) proposed critical layer / mesolayer, cited/adopted work Long and Chen and McKeon, B.J. & Sharma, A. 2010 JFM 658, page 370 stated ``retaining the assumption that the critical layer occurs when U (y) = (2 / 3) UCL (i.e. that the critical layer scales with y+ ~Rτ+ 2 / 3),'' both untenable assumptions, but ignored citation of papers Afzal 1982 onwards on pipe flow. The present turbulent boundary layer work shows that Reynolds shear maxima, shape factor and turbulent bursting time scale with mesolayer variables and Taylor length/time scale. Residence, Embassy Hotel Rasal Gang Aligarh 202001 UP India.

  16. Is Ultra-High Reynolds Number Necessary for Comprehensive Log Scaling in a Turbulent Boundary Layer?

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Shivsai Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in an extraordinary turbulent boundary layer called the sink flow, displaying a perfect streamwise invariance, show a wide extent of logarithmic scaling for moments of streamwise velocity up to order 12, even at moderate Reynolds numbers. This is in striking contrast to canonical constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers that show such comprehensive log scaling only at ultra-high Reynolds numbers. This suggests that for comprehensive log scaling, ultra-high-Reynolds-number is not a necessary condition; while specific details of the sink flow are special, the relevance to general turbulent boundary layers is that the sink flow underscores the importance of the streamwise invariance condition that needs to be met in a general flow for obtaining log scaling. Indeed, a simple theory shows that, for log scaling in the inertial sublayer, the invariance of dimensionless mean velocity and higher-order moments along a mean streamline is a necessary and sufficient condition. Ultra-high Reynolds number pri...

  17. Relating instantaneous structures and mean flow characteristics of turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Charitha; Philip, Jimmy; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    Recent works have highlighted the presence of thin interfacial layers of high shear that demarcate regions of relatively uniform streamwise momentum in turbulent boundary layers. Here, we aim to further our understanding of how such a zonal-like structural arrangement manifests in the averaged flow statistics. To this end, we start by identifying high shear interfaces in turbulent boundary layers employing particle image velocimetry databases that span more than an order of magnitude of friction Reynolds number (Reτ =103 -104). Inspection of these recurrent features reveal that their geometry is highly contorted and exhibits self-similarity across a wide range of scales. The Reynolds number dependence of these features is also investigated, together with their associated scaling. Based on these findings and the persistent presence of sharp changes in momentum in turbulent boundary layers, a simple model is presented towards reconstructing the mean velocity profile.

  18. Predicting the mean fields of compressible turbulent boundary layer via a symmetry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A symmetry approach for canonical wall turbulence is extended to develop mean-field predictions for compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL). A stress length and a weighted heat flux length are identified to obey the multilayer dilation symmetry of canonical flows, giving rise to predictions of the mean velocity and temperature profiles for a range of Reynolds number (Re), Mach number (Ma) and wall temperature (Tw). Also predicted are the streamwise developments of the shape factor, the boundary layer edge velocity and the boundary layer thicknesses, etc. Only three parameters are involved in the predictions, which have sound physics and organized behaviors with respect to the Re, Ma and Tw effects. The predictions are extensively validated by direct numerical simulation and experimental data, showing better accuracies than the previous theories. The results provide new quantifications that can be used to assess computations, measurements and turbulence models of CTBL, as well as to provide new insights for the CTBL physics.

  19. Analytical solution of conjugate turbulent forced convection boundary layer flow over plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joneydi Shariatzadeh Omid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A conjugate (coupled forced convection heat transfer from a heated conducting plate under turbulent boundary layer flow is considered. A heated plate of finite thickness is cooled under turbulent forced convection boundary layer flow. Because the conduction and convection boundary layer flow is coupled (conjugated in the problem, a semi-analytical solution based on Differential Transform Method (DTM is presented for solving the non-linear integro-differential equation occurring in the problem. The main conclusion is that in the conjugate heat transfer case the temperature distribution of the plate is flatter than the one in the non-conjugate case. This feature is more pronounced under turbulent flow when compared with the laminar flow.

  20. Smooth and rough boundaries in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Thomas H.; Doering, Charles R.; Lohse, Detlef; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2003-01-01

    We examine the torque required to drive the smooth or rough cylinders in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow. With rough inner and outer walls the scaling of the dimensionless torque G is found to be consistent with pure Kolmogorov scaling G~Re2. The results are interpreted within the Grossmann-Lohse theo

  1. Statistical characterization of turbulence in the boundary plasma of EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Xu, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    In Ohmic heated low confinement mode (L-mode) discharges, the intermittent statistical characteristics of turbulent fluctuations have been investigated in the edge and the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma on EAST (the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak) by fast reciprocating Langmuir probe...

  2. 基于MATLAB对二维混合边界静电场域的分析%Based on MATLAB for two-dimensional mixed boundary electrostatic field analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小兵

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the principles and concepts of the finite difference method, the electromagnetic field problem involves three types of boundary conditions using finite difference numerical calculation and analysis of border issues, to analyze the electrostatic field of two-dimensional mixed-type boundary and calculate the differential equations using MATLAB programming.and overrelaxation iterative method is introduced into the calculation of the differential equation and compared with the simple iterative method, using the same calculation accuracy overrelaxation method not only saves storage space, and the speed of convergence. It can be seen by calculating the Matlab in solving practical engineering, and mathematics problem, easier to use, the statement is more powerful, and visually demonstrate the two-dimensional mixed boundary electrostatic field potential maps and field strength three-dimensional maps.%本文分析了有限差分法的原理与概念,讨论了电磁场问题涉及3种类型的边界条件,采用有限差分数值计算分析边界问题,对二维混合型边界静电场进行分析,用MATLAB编程计算差分方程,并将超松弛迭代法引入到差分方程的计算,并与简单迭代方法进行比较,同样的计算精度下采用超松弛法不仅节省存储空间,而且加快了收敛速度。通过计算可以看出MATLAB在解决实际的工程和数学问题中,具有使用更为简便、语句功能更强的特点,能直观地演示二维混合边界静电场的电势分布图和场强立体分布图。

  3. Impact of Neutral Boundary-Layer Turbulence on Wind-Turbine Wakes: A Numerical Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englberger, Antonia; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The wake characteristics of a wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer under neutral stratification are investigated systematically by means of large-eddy simulations. A methodology to maintain the turbulence of the background flow for simulations with open horizontal boundaries, without the necessity of the permanent import of turbulence data from a precursor simulation, was implemented in the geophysical flow solver EULAG. These requirements are fulfilled by applying the spectral energy distribution of a neutral boundary layer in the wind-turbine simulations. A detailed analysis of the wake response towards different turbulence levels of the background flow results in a more rapid recovery of the wake for a higher level of turbulence. A modified version of the Rankine-Froude actuator disc model and the blade element momentum method are tested as wind-turbine parametrizations resulting in a strong dependence of the near-wake wind field on the parametrization, whereas the far-wake flow is fairly insensitive to it. The wake characteristics are influenced by the two considered airfoils in the blade element momentum method up to a streamwise distance of 14 D ( D = rotor diameter). In addition, the swirl induced by the rotation has an impact on the velocity field of the wind turbine even in the far wake. Further, a wake response study reveals a considerable effect of different subgrid-scale closure models on the streamwise turbulent intensity.

  4. Investigation of Turbulence Behaviour in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Arbitrary-Order Hilbert Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.; Zhang, H. S.; Schmitt, F. G.; Huang, Y. X.; Cai, X. H.; Song, Y.; Huang, X.; Zhang, H.

    2017-01-01

    The CASES-99 experimental data are used to analyze turbulence behaviour under a range of stable conditions using an adaptive method based on Hilbert spectral analysis. The characteristic scales of intrinsic mode functions vary between different stratifications. The second-order Hilbert marginal spectra display clear separation between fine-scale turbulence and large-scale motions. After removing the large-scale motions, the statistical characteristics of the reconstructed signals confirm the distinction of different stratifications in the fine-scale range. The correlation coefficient analyses reveal that the Hilbert spectral analysis method separates turbulence from large-scale motions in the stable boundary layer.

  5. Equilibrium turbulent boundary layers with wall suction/blowing and pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Saurabh; Ramesh, O. N.

    2012-11-01

    Conditions for the equilibrium conditions in turbulent boundary layers with suction or blowing across a no slip wall and pressure gradients are derived from the governing equations. It is also shown that under these conditions the governing equations show self similarity in the conventional inner co-ordinates as well as ``laminar-like'' co-ordinates. The only turbulent boundary layer in ``perfect equilibrium'' known as sink flow turbulent boundary layer forms a subset of this more general equilibrium concept. Direct numerical simulations were carried out to investigate this hypothesis for the case of favourable pressure gradient with small blowing at the wall. Reynolds number invariance and complete self similarity of mean velocity profile and second order turbulence statistics is observed along the flow direction similar to the sink flow boundary layer. A comparison between the case with wall blowing and imposed favourable pressure gradient and the sink flow case for same value of pressure gradient parameter reveals a shift in log law in mean velocity profile and increase in peak turbulence intensities.

  6. Heat transfer through turbulent boundary layers - The effects of introduction of and recovery from convex curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the heat transfer through a turbulent boundary layer on a convexly curved isothermal wall and on a flat plate following the curved section. Data were taken for one free-stream velocity and two different ratios of boundary layer thickness to radius of curvature delta/R = 0.051 and delta/R = 0.077. Only small differences were observed in the distribution of heat transfer rates for the two boundary layer thicknesses tested, although differences were noted in the temperature distributions within the boundary layer

  7. The Influence of Convergence Movement on Turbulent Transportation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡隐樵; 左洪超

    2003-01-01

    Classical turbulent K closure theory of the atmospheric boundary layer assumes that the verticalturbulent transport flux of any macroscopic quantity is equivalent to that quantity's vertical gradienttransport flux. But a cross coupling between the thermodynamic processes and the dynamic processesin the atmospheric system is demonstrated based on the Curier-Prigogine principle of cross coupling oflinear thermodynamics. The vertical turbulent transportation of energy and substance in the atmosphericboundary layer is related not only to their macroscopic gradient but also to the convergence and the di-vergence movement. The transportation of the convergence or divergence movement is important for theatmospheric boundary layer of the heterogeneous underlying surface and the convection boundary layer.Based on this, the turbulent transportatiou in the atmospheric boundary layer, the energy budget of theheterogeneous underlying surface and the convection boundary layer, and the boundary layer parameteri-zation of land surface processes over the heterogeneous underlying surface are studied. This research offersclues not only for establishing the atmospheric boundary layer theory about the heterogeneous underlyingsurface, but also for overcoming the difficulties encountered recently in the application of the atmosphericboundary layer theory.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  9. A Generic Length-scale Equation For Second-order Turbulence Models of Oceanic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umlauf, L.; Burchard, H.

    A generic transport equation for a generalized length-scale in second-order turbulence closure models for geophysical boundary layers is suggested. This variable consists of the products of powers of the turbulent kinetic energy, k, and the integral length-scale, l. The new approach generalizes traditional second-order models used in geophysical boundary layer modelling, e.g. the Mellor-Yamada model and the k- model, which, however, can be recovered as special cases. It is demonstrated how this new model can be calibrated with measurements in some typical geophysical boundary layer flows. As an example, the generic model is applied to the uppermost oceanic boundary layer directly influenced by the effects of breaking surface waves. Recent measurements show that in this layer the classical law of the wall is invalid, since there turbulence is dominated by turbulent transport of TKE from above, and not by shear-production. A widely accepted approach to describe the wave-affected layer with a one-equation turbulence model was suggested by Craig and Banner (1994). Here, some deficien- cies of their solutions are pointed out and a generalization of their ideas for the case of two-equation models is suggested. Direct comparison with very recently obtained measurements of the dissipation rate, , in the wave-affected boundary layer with com- puted results clearly demonstrate that only the generic two-equation model yields cor- rect predictions for the profiles of and the turbulent length scale, l. Also, the pre- dicted velocity profiles in the wave-affected layer, important e.g. for the interpretation of surface drifter experiments, are reproduced correctly only by the generic model. Implementation and computational costs of the generic model are comparable with traditonal two-equation models.

  10. DNS of compressible turbulent boundary layer over a blunt wedge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xinliang; FU Dexun; MA Yanwan

    2005-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of spatially evolving compressible boundary layer over a blunt wedge is performed in this paper. The free-stream Mach number is 6 and the disturbance source produced by wall blowing and suction is located downstream of the sound-speed point. Statistics are studied and compared with the results in incompressible flat-plate boundary layer. The mean pressure gradient effects on the vortex structure are studied.

  11. Comparison of spatial and temporal characteristics of a turbulent boundary layer in the presence of free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R. Jason; Hanson, Ronald E.; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2016-11-01

    Free-stream turbulence (FST) has previously been shown to enhance the scale interactions occurring within a turbulent boundary layer (TBL). This is investigated further by generating FST with an active grid over a zero-pressure gradient TBL that developed on a smooth flat plate. Simultaneous measurements were performed using four hot-wires mounted to a rake that traversed the boundary layer height. Planar PIV measurements were also performed. Hot-wire measurements indicate that on average large-scale structures occurring in the free-stream penetrate the boundary layer and increase the streamwise velocity fluctuations throughout. Two-point correlations of the streamwise velocity fluctuations from the hot-wires enable determination of the inclination angle of the wall-structures in the boundary layer using Taylor's hypothesis. This angle is observed to be invariant around 11-15 degrees in the near-wall region in agreement with the literature for canonical TBLs. This presentation will compare the planar PIV data to these hot-wire measurements to determine if these phenomena that appear in the statistics using Taylor's hypothesis can be tracked to instantaneous spatial features in the TBL subjected to FST. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC Grant Agreement No. 277472), EPSRC (Grant ref no: EP/I037717/1).

  12. The BOUT Project; Validation and Benchmark of BOUT Code and Experimental Diagnostic Tools for Fusion Boundary Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐学桥

    2001-01-01

    A boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT is presented. The preliminary encour aging results have been obtained when comparing with probe measurements for a typical Ohmic discharge in HT-7 tokamak. The validation and benchmark of BOUT code and experimental diagnostic tools for fusion boundary plasma turbulence is proposed.

  13. An Experimental Study of the Dynamics of an Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    41 3.4 Data-Rduction Procedure . . . . . . 42 v p 4 EXPERIENTAL RESULTS .................. 43 4.1 General Considerations ... *..*.... . 44...fruitful. The following recommendations are addressed to the unsteady tur- bulent boundary layer research community at large: 0 Unsteady, turbulent...34 private communication , submit- ted to Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 1983. Tellonis, D. P. [1977], "Unsteady Boundary Layers, Separated and At- tached," AGARD

  14. A near-wall four-equation turbulence model for compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T. P.; So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.

    1992-01-01

    A near-wall four-equation turbulence model is developed for the calculation of high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers. The four equations used are the k-epsilon equations and the theta(exp 2)-epsilon(sub theta) equations. These equations are used to define the turbulent diffusivities for momentum and heat fluxes, thus allowing the assumption of dynamic similarity between momentum and heat transport to be relaxed. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with the four transport equations. Calculations are compared with measurements and with another model's predictions where the assumption of the constant turbulent Prandtl number is invoked. Compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers with both adiabatic and constant temperature wall boundary conditions are considered. Results for the range of low Mach numbers and temperature ratios investigated are essentially the same as those obtained using an identical near-wall k-epsilon model. In general, the numerical predictions are in very good agreement with measurements and there are significant improvements in the predictions of mean flow properties at high Mach numbers.

  15. Aero-optic analysis of anisotropic turbulent boundary layer by direct integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S.; Price, J.; Chen, C. P.; Pond, John E.; Sutton, G. W.

    2013-09-01

    Aero-optic aberrations that effect optical sensor performance and laser beam propagation, can be caused by changes in the index-of-refraction field as the optical wave traverses a compressible non-uniform, turbulent flowfield. Mean flowfield non-uniformities cause bore sight error and blurring and, if the mean flowfield is unsteady, jitter. Turbulence causes blurring and high frequency jitter. Blurring also causes the signal-to-noise ratio to decrease and image distortion, and adversely affects centroid location for precision tracking. The objective of this study is to develop an unified approach for whole-field aero-optics prediction using hybrid LES/RANS (Large Eddy Simulation/Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) turbulence modeling in combination with a newly formulated optical Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). The whole field turbulence includes the near-vehicle boundary layer mean and turbulence, as well as far-field atmospheric turbulence. A flat plate compressible boundary layer case is used to demonstrate the methodology. the abstract two lines below author names and addresses.

  16. Vegetation Effects on Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows and their Role in Lotic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, V. S.

    2009-12-01

    The effects of vegetation on fully developed turbulent boundary layer flows are profound and play an important role in lotic ecosystems. Recent experiments on flow past isolated plant stems (e.g. tree trunks in flood plains), alternating vegetation patches (e.g. Justicia americana in gravel bed rivers), and simulated emergent and submerged plant stem arrays in laboratory flumes are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to fully developed turbulent flows through submerged vegetation modeled by large eddy simulation (LES), with a focus on understanding the role of the coherent structures on the momentum transfer across the water-plant interface. Comparisons are made with fully developed turbulent boundary layer flows in unobstructed (unvegetated) channels to show how the vegetation significantly changes the mean flow, Reynolds shear stress, turbulence intensities, turbulence event frequencies and the energy budget within and above the vegetation layer. The results demonstrate how vegetation in the lotic environment delineates ecotones with edge effects that are beneficial to mobile organisms (e.g. macroinvertebrates and fish), and how it alters mean flow and turbulence characteristics near the bed to promote desirable physical habitat conditions, e.g. substrate composition and stability, for benthic organisms such as mussels and crayfish. Vincent Neary, Ph.D., P.E. President, Springburn LLC Natural Engineering and Restoration

  17. Structure and dynamics of turbulent boundary layer flow over healthy and algae-covered corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocking, Jonathan B.; Rippe, John P.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2016-09-01

    Fine-scale velocity measurements over healthy and algae-covered corals were collected in situ to characterize combined wave-current boundary layer flow and the effects of algal canopies on turbulence hydrodynamics. Data were collected using acoustic Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. Flow over healthy corals is well described by traditional wall-bounded shear layers, distinguished by a logarithmic velocity profile, a local balance of turbulence production and dissipation, and high levels of bed shear stress. Healthy corals exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity in boundary layer flow structure resulting from variations in large-scale coral topography. By contrast, the turbulence structure of algae-covered corals is best represented by a plane mixing layer, with a sharp inflection point in mean velocity at the canopy top, a large imbalance of turbulence production and dissipation, and strongly damped flow and shear stresses within the canopy. The presence of an algal canopy increases turbulent kinetic energy within the roughness sublayer by ~2.5 times compared to healthy corals while simultaneously reducing bed shear stress by nearly an order of magnitude. Reduced bed shear at the coral surface and within-canopy turbulent stresses imply reduced mass transfer of necessary metabolites (e.g., oxygen, nutrients), leading to negative impacts on coral health.

  18. Boundary layer control by a fish: Unsteady laminar boundary layers of rainbow trout swimming in turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Yanase

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss [0.231±0.016 m total body length (L (mean±s.d.; N=6], swimming at 1.6±0.09 L s−1 (N=6 in an experimental flow channel (Reynolds number, Re=4×105 with medium turbulence (5.6% intensity were examined using the particle image velocimetry technique. The tangential flow velocity distributions in the pectoral and pelvic surface regions (arc length from the rostrum, lx=71±8 mm, N=3, and lx=110±13 mm, N=4, respectively were approximated by a laminar boundary layer model, the Falkner−Skan equation. The flow regime over the pectoral and pelvic surfaces was regarded as a laminar flow, which could create less skin-friction drag than would be the case with turbulent flow. Flow separation was postponed until vortex shedding occurred over the posterior surface (lx=163±22 mm, N=3. The ratio of the body-wave velocity to the swimming speed was in the order of 1.2. This was consistent with the condition of the boundary layer laminarization that had been confirmed earlier using a mechanical model. These findings suggest an energy-efficient swimming strategy for rainbow trout in a turbulent environment.

  19. Turbulence and intermittent transport at the boundary of magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    a forcing region with spatially localized sources of particles and heat outside which losses due to the motion along open magnetic-field lines dominate, corresponding to the edge region and the scrape-off layer, respectively. Turbulent states reveal intermittent eruptions of hot plasma from the edge region......, propagating radially far into the scrape-off layer in the form of field-aligned filaments, or blobs. This results in positively skewed and flattened single-point probability distribution functions of particle density and temperature, reflecting the frequent appearance of large fluctuations. The conditional...

  20. Vertical structure of aeolian turbulence in a boundary layer with sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Zoe S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Recently we have found that Reynolds shear stress shows a significant variability with measurement height (Lee and Baas, 2016), and so an alternative parameter for boundary layer turbulence may help to explain the relationship between wind forcing and sediment transport. We present data that were collected during a field study of boundary layer turbulence conducted on a North Atlantic beach. High-frequency (50 Hz) 3D wind velocity measurements were collected using ultrasonic anemometry at thirteen different measurement heights in a tight vertical array between 0.11 and 1.62 metres above the surface. Thanks to the high density installation of sensors a detailed analysis of the boundary layer flow can be conducted using methods more typically used in studies where data is only available from one or just a few measurement heights. We use quadrant analysis to explore the vertical structure of turbulence and track the changes in quadrant signatures with measurement elevation and over time. Results of quadrant analysis, at the 'raw' 50 Hz timescale, demonstrates the tendency for event clustering across all four quadrants, which implies that at-a-point quadrant events are part of larger-scale turbulent structures. Using an HSV colour model, applied to the quadrant analysis data and plotted in series, we create colour maps of turbulence, which can provide a clear visualisation of the clustering of event activity at each height and illustrate the shape of the larger coherent flow structures that are present within the boundary layer. By including a saturation component to the colour model, the most significant stress producing sections of the data are emphasised. This results in a 'banded' colour map, which relates to clustering of quadrant I (Outward Interaction) and quadrant IV (Sweep) activity, separate from clustering of quadrant II (Burst) and quadrant III (Inward Interaction). Both 'sweep-type' and 'burst-type' sequences are shown to have a diagonal structure

  1. Drag Reduction in a Swimming Humboldt Penguin, Spheniscus Humboldti, when the Boundary Layer is Turbulent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alex R. Parfitt; Julian F.V. Vincent

    2005-01-01

    An area of protruding feathers found around the beak of many penguin species is thought to induce a turbulent boundary layer whilst swimming. Hydrodynamic tests on a model Humboldt penguin, Spheniscus humboldti, suggest that induced turbulence causes a significant reduction in boundary layer height, flow separation, and an average of 31% reduction in drag (1.0 m/s to 4.5 m/s). Visualisation of surface flow showed it to follow the body profile, over the feet and tail, before separating. Movement of the feet in swimming penguins correlates with steering of the bird. Induced turbulence may therefore further increase swimming efficiency by reducing the amount of foot movement required to direct the swimming bird.

  2. Three-dimensional structure of dominant instabilities in turbulent flow over smooth and rough boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, A. J.; Stuart, R. J.; Mansour-Tehrani, M.

    1991-01-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding coherent vortical structures in turbulent boundary layers and their role in turbulence generation are reviewed. The investigations reported in the study concentrate attention on rough-wall flows prevailing in the geophysical environment and include an experiment determining the three-dimensional form of the turbulence structures linked to the ejection and inrush events observed over rough walls and an experiment concerned with measuring the actual spanwise scale of the near-wall structures for boundary conditions ranging from hydrodynamically smooth to fully rough. It is demonstrated that horseshoe vortical structures are present and play an important role in rough-wall flows and they increase in scale with increasing wall distance, while a dominant spanwise wavelength occurs in the instantaneous cross-flow distribution of streamwise velocity close to the rough wall.

  3. Coherent structures of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Jiménez, Javier; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The turbulence statistics and structures are studied in direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL). The self-similar APG-TBL at the verged of separation is achieved by a modification of the far-field boundary condition to produce the desired pressure gradient. The turbulence statistics in the self-similar region collapse by using the scaling of the external velocity and the displacement thickness. The coherent structures of the APG-TBL are investigated and compared to those of zero-pressure gradient case and homogeneous shear flow. The support of the ARC, NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Modeling of individual coherent structures in wall region of a turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恒; 陆昌根; 罗纪生

    1999-01-01

    Models for individual coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer are proposed. Method of numerical simulations is used to follow the evolution of the structures. It is found that the proposed model does bear many features of coherent structures found in experiments.

  5. Effects of shear in the convective boundary layer: analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of convective and mechanical turbulence at the entrainment zone are studied through the use of systematic Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) experiments. Five LES experiments with different shear characteristics in the quasi-steady barotropic boundary layer were conducted by increasing the value of

  6. On the Estimation of Spanwise Pressure Coherence of a Turbulent Boundary Layer over a Flat Plate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, W.C.P.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.; De Jong, A.T.; Bijl, H.

    2014-01-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with four different closure models are analyzed in OpenFOAM, an open source Computional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package and validated for the determination of the streamwise and spanwise coherence length of the pressure field below a turbulent boundary layer at low

  7. Eulerian and Lagrangian views of a turbulent boundary layer flow using time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, A.; Geisler, R.; Staack, K.; Elsinga, G.E.; Scarano, F.; Wieneke, B.; Henning, A.; Poelma, C.; Westerweel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Coherent structures and their time evolution in the logarithmic region of a turbulent boundary layer investigated by means of 3D space–time correlations and time-dependent conditional averaging techniques are the focuses of the present paper. Experiments have been performed in the water tunnel at TU

  8. Three-dimensional vortex organization in a high-Reynolds-number supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, G.E.; Adrian, R.J.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.; Scarano, F.

    2010-01-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry was used to quantitatively visualize the three-dimensional coherent structures in a supersonic (Mach 2) turbulent boundary layer in the region between y/δ = 0.15 and 0.89. The Reynolds number based on momentum thickness Reθ = 34000. The instantaneous velocity f

  9. Embedded-LES and experiment of turbulent boundary layer flow around a floor-mounted cube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nina Gall; Koss, Holger; Bennetsen, Jens Chr.

    An Embedded LES approach is used to numerically simulate fluctuating surface pressures on a floor-mounted cube in a turbulent boundary layer flow and compared to wind tunnel experiments. The computation were performed with the CFD software ANSYS FLUENT at a Reynolds number at cube height of Reh = 1...

  10. Direct numerical simulation of heat transfer in a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jianren

    2016-10-01

    Direct numerical simulation has been performed to investigate heat transfer in a zero-pressure-gradient spatially developing turbulent boundary layer with realistic thermal inflow boundary conditions. The temperature is considered as a passive scalar and the molecular Prandtl number is set to be 0.71. The turbulence statistics for both the velocity and temperature fields show good agreement with previous numerical and experimental data in the literature. The present study provides a valuable database for the spatially developing turbulent thermal boundary layer over a wide range of Reynolds numbers from Reθ = 1100 to 1940. The simulation results indicate that both the peak value and peak location of the streamwise velocity fluctuation grow slightly with increasing Reynolds number, same as those of the temperature fluctuation. The relationship between the streamwise velocity and temperature fluctuations has been examined and a strong correlation is observed in the vicinity of the wall. With increasing distance from the wall, however, the degree of correlation significantly decreases. In addition, the difference between the turbulent velocity and temperature fields is also analysed by investigating the mechanisms of heat and momentum transport in boundary layer flow.

  11. Tuning of turbulent boundary layer anisotropy for improved surface pressure and trailing-edge noise modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Fischer, Andreas; Zhu, Wei Jun

    2014-01-01

    The modeling of the surface pressure spectrum beneath a turbulent boundary layer is investigated, focusing on the case of airfoil flows and associated trailing edge noise prediction using the so-called TNO model. This type of flow is characterized by the presence of an adverse pressure gradient a...

  12. Application of a Novel Laser-Doppler Velocimeter for Turbulence: Structural Measurements in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-18

    Reynolds stress anisotropy which exists in all real turbulent flows ( Durbin and Petterson Reif 2001). To solve the system in (1.3), it is necessary to...general frequency-domain techniques like the FFT. Thus, a purely algebraic algorithm is specified, as described to follow. 3.1.2.1.2.1 RMS Power...how often?" Sound and Vibration, January, pp. 14- 24. Durbin , P.A. and Petterson Reif, B.A. 2001 Statistical Theory and Modeling for Turbulent Flows

  13. Comparison of several methods for predicting separation in a compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, P. M.; Bober, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Several methods for predicting the separation point for a compressible turbulent boundary layer were applied to the flow over a bump on a wind-tunnel wall. Measured pressure distributions were used as input. Two integral boundary-layer methods, three finite-difference boundary-layer methods, and three simple methods were applied at five free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.354 to 0.7325. Each of the boundary-layer methods failed to explicitly predict separation. However, by relaxing the theoretical separation criteria, several boundary-layer methods were made to yield reasonable separation predictions, but none of the methods accurately predicted the important boundary-layer parameters at separation. Only one of the simple methods consistently predicted separation with reasonable accuracy in a manner consistent with the theory. The other methods either indicated several possible separation locations or only sometimes predicted separation.

  14. Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Cylinder in Axial Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-29

    wall- norma 6caling or Rao’s wall-normal scaling. Other measurements of the mean velocity in a cylindrical boundary layer should be mentioned for...located near the wall at three azimuthal locations that w𔃽re 900 apa ,-t and at several streamwise spacings for flow conditions resulting in 8/a=8

  15. Skin-friction measurements in a turbulent boundary layer under the influence of free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Luis Blay; Dogan, Eda; Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-09-01

    This experimental investigation deals with the influence of free-stream turbulence (FST) produced by an active grid on the skin friction of a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer. Wall shear stress is obtained by oil-film interferometry. In addition, hot-wire anemometry was performed to obtain wall-normal profiles of streamwise velocity. This enables the skin friction to be deduced from the mean profile. Both methods show remarkable agreement for every test case. Although skin friction is shown to increase with FST, the trend with Reynolds number is found to be similar to cases without FST. Furthermore, once the change in the friction velocity is accounted for, the self-similarity of the logarithmic region and below (i.e. law of the wall) appears to hold for all FST cases investigated.

  16. Enhancing the prediction of turbulent kinetic energy in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, R. J.; Emeis, S.

    2010-09-01

    A recent study by Shaikh and Siddiqui (2010) has shown definitively that the turbulent structure of boundary layer flows over water is fundamentally different compared with that over a smooth surface and with that over a solid wavy surface whose wave amplitude is similar to that of dynamically wind-generated waves. In light of this new information, the constants of the Mellor-Yamada boundary layer model, which are based on laboratory data over solid walls, are re-evaluated to suit the turbulent dynamics of a dynamic, wavy surface. The constants are based on the principal that the enhanced turbulent production in the vicinity of waves is redistributed among the normal stress components by virtue of the enhanced pressure-velocity covariances also found in the vicinity of waves. There is then a feedback mechanism whereby enhanced normal stresses modify the dynamic surface. The net effect of this is that in the marine boundary layer, one can expect an enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy due to the enhancement of normal stresses at the expense of shear stresses. The constants in the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic planetary boundary layer scheme within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model are changed to fit this principal. Simulations are then performed and compared with data (wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy) from the FINO1 platform in the North Sea. It is found that while predictions of the wind speed are barely changed, the magnitude of the tke error (RMS) is reduced by up to 50%. This is expected to be practically relevant for the estimation of blade fatigue of wind energy converters, where the tke is an important parameter in this assessment. It could also be relevant for pollution dispersion in marine boundary layers.

  17. Janus spectra in two-dimensional flows

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    In theory, large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows and other two-dimensional flows may host two distinct types of turbulent energy spectra---in one, $\\alpha$, the spectral exponent of velocity fluctuations, equals $3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the small scales, and in the other, $\\alpha=5/3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the large scales---but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed $\\alpha = 3$. Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which $\\alpha$ has transitioned from $3$ to $5/3$ for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to $3$ for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows...

  18. Investigation of turbulence models with compressibility corrections for hypersonic boundary flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The applications of pressure work, pressure-dilatation, and dilatation-dissipation (Sarkar, Zeman, and Wilcox models to hypersonic boundary flows are investigated. The flat plate boundary layer flows of Mach number 5–11 and shock wave/boundary layer interactions of compression corners are simulated numerically. For the flat plate boundary layer flows, original turbulence models overestimate the heat flux with Mach number high up to 10, and compressibility corrections applied to turbulence models lead to a decrease in friction coefficients and heating rates. The pressure work and pressure-dilatation models yield the better results. Among the three dilatation-dissipation models, Sarkar and Wilcox corrections present larger deviations from the experiment measurement, while Zeman correction can achieve acceptable results. For hypersonic compression corner flows, due to the evident increase of turbulence Mach number in separation zone, compressibility corrections make the separation areas larger, thus cannot improve the accuracy of calculated results. It is unreasonable that compressibility corrections take effect in separation zone. Density-corrected model by Catris and Aupoix is suitable for shock wave/boundary layer interaction flows which can improve the simulation accuracy of the peak heating and have a little influence on separation zone.

  19. Aerodynamic heating in gaps of thermal protection system tile arrays in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental heat-transfer investigation was conducted on two staggered arrays of metallic tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. This investigation was conducted for two purposes. The impingement heating distribution where flow in a longitudinal gap intersects a transverse gap and impinges on a downstream blocking tile was defined. The influence of tile and gap geometries was analyzed to develop empirical relationships for impingement heating in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted in a high temperature structures tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 1800 K, and free-stream unit Reynolds numbers from 1.0 x 10 million to 4.8 x 10 million per meter. The test results were used to assess the impingement heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, longitudinal gap length, slope of the tile forward-facing wall, boundary-layer displacement thickness, Reynolds number, and local surface pressure.

  20. A high-order immersed boundary method for high-fidelity turbulent combustion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Yuki; Aoki, Kozo; Osawa, Kosuke; Shi, Tuo; Prodan, Alexandru; Tanahashi, Mamoru

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) have played important roles in the research of turbulent combustion. With the recent advancement in high-performance computing, DNS of slightly complicated configurations such as V-, various jet and swirl flames have been performed, and such DNS will further our understanding on the physics of turbulent combustion. Since these configurations include walls that do not necessarily conform with the preferred mesh coordinates for combustion DNS, most of these simulations use presumed profiles for inflow/near-wall flows as boundary conditions. A high-order immersed boundary method suited for parallel computation is one way to improve these simulations. The present research implements such a boundary technique in a combustion DNS code, and simulations are performed to confirm its accuracy and performance. This work was partly supported by Council for Science, Technology and Innovation, Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP), "Innovative Combustion Technology" (Funding agency: JST).

  1. Modeling Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Surface and Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    index. In the boundary layer, atmospheric temperature fluctuations are primarily responsible for the variations in refractive index at ultraviolet...parameterization of the atmospheric emissivity, in the early 1980s a parallel study of the SEB was conducted by the US Army Waterways Experiment Station...period of rotation of the atmosphere can be defined as TI = 2π/fc. At most mid- latitude locations this period is approximately 17 h. This quantity is

  2. Turbulent boundary layer separation control using plasma actuator at Reynolds number 2000000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xin; Huang Yong; Wang Xunnian; Wang Wanbo; Tang Kun; Li Huaxing

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of symmetrical plasma actuators on turbulent boundary layer separation control at high Reynolds number. Com-pared with the traditional control method of plasma actuator, the whole test model was made of aluminum and acted as a covered electrode of the symmetrical plasma actuator. The experimental study of plasma actuators’ effect on surrounding air, a canonical zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary, was carried out using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) in the 0.75 m ? 0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the symmetrical plasma actuator characterization in an external flow. A half model of wing-body configuration was experimentally investigated in the £ 3.2 m low speed wind tunnel with a six-component strain gauge balance and PIV. The results show that the turbulent boundary layer separation of wing can be obviously sup-pressed and the maximum lift coefficient is improved at high Reynolds number with the symmetri-cal plasma actuator. It turns out that the maximum lift coefficient increased by approximately 8.98% and the stall angle of attack was delayed by approximately 2? at Reynolds number 2 ? 106. The effective mechanism for the turbulent separation control by the symmetrical plasma actuators is to induce the vortex near the wing surface which could create the relatively large-scale disturbance and promote momentum mixing between low speed flow and main flow regions.

  3. Turbulent kinetic energy generation in the convective boundary layer derived from thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slameršak, Aljoša; Renner, Maik; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Hartogensis, Oscar; Kolle, Olaf; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulent heat fluxes facilitate the bulk of heat transfer between the surface and lower atmosphere, which results in the diurnal growth of convective boundary layer (CBL) and turbulent kinetic energy generation (TKE). Here we postulate the hypothesis that TKE generation in the CBL occurs as a result of heat transfer in a "Carnot-like" heat engine with temporal changes in the internal energy of the boundary layer. We used the Tennekes energy-balance model of CBL and extended it with the analysis of the entropy balance to derive the estimates of TKE generation in the CBL. These TKE generation estimates were compared to the turbulent dissipation from a simple dissipation model from Moeng and Sullivan, to test the validity of our heat engine hypothesis. In addition, to evaluate the performance of the dissipation model, this was independently validated by a comparison of its estimates with the turbulent dissipation calculations based on spectral analysis of eddy covariance wind measurements at a German field station. Our analysis demonstrates how a consistent application of thermodynamics can be used to obtain an independent physical constraint on the diurnal boundary layer evolution. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that the CBL operates at the thermodynamic limit, thus imposing a thermodynamic constraint on surface-atmosphere exchange.

  4. Performance of Renormalization Group Algebraic Turbulence Model on Boundary Layer Transition Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyung H.

    1994-01-01

    The RNG-based algebraic turbulence model, with a new method of solving the cubic equation and applying new length scales, is introduced. An analysis is made of the RNG length scale which was previously reported and the resulting eddy viscosity is compared with those from other algebraic turbulence models. Subsequently, a new length scale is introduced which actually uses the two previous RNG length scales in a systematic way to improve the model performance. The performance of the present RNG model is demonstrated by simulating the boundary layer flow over a flat plate and the flow over an airfoil.

  5. Estimation of turbulent energy dissipation in the boundary layer using Smoke Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Goltsman, A. E.; Saushin, I. I.; Dushina, O. A.

    2017-08-01

    Turbulent energy dissipation in the turbulent boundary layer has been estimated experimentally. Dissipation has been derived from dynamics of two-component instantaneous velocity vector fields measured by an optical method. Smoke Image Velocimetry technique based on digital processing of smoke visualization of flow and adapted to relatively large smoke displacement between two consecutive video frames has been employed. The obtained dissipation profiles have been compared with measurements by multi-sensor hot-wire anemometers, stereo PIV, Tomo-3D-PTV with VIC+, and DNS results.

  6. A law of the wall for turbulent boundary layers with suction: Stevenson's formula revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdorovich, Igor

    2016-08-01

    The turbulent velocity field in the viscous sublayer of the boundary layer with suction to a first approximation is homogeneous in any direction parallel to the wall and is determined by only three constant quantities — the wall shear stress, the suction velocity, and the fluid viscosity. This means that there exists a finite algebraic relation between the turbulent shear stress and the longitudinal mean-velocity gradient, using which as a closure condition for the equations of motion, we establish an exact asymptotic behavior of the velocity profile at the outer edge of the viscous sublayer. The obtained relationship provides a generalization of the logarithmic law to the case of wall suction.

  7. Calculation of Turbulent Boundary Layers Using the Dissipation Integral Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MatthiasBuschmann

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction into the dissipation integral method.The general integral equations for the three-dimensional case are derved.It is found that for a practical calculation algorithm the integral monentum equation and the integral energy equation are msot useful.Using Two different sets of mean velocity profiles the hyperbolical character of a dissipation integral method is shown.Test cases for two-and three-dimensional boundary layers are analysed and discussed.The paper concludes with a discussion of the advantages and limits of dissipation integral methods.

  8. Turbulent transitions in the stable boundary layer: Couette and Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Amber M.; Monahan, Adam H.

    2016-11-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) can be classified into two distinct regimes. The weakly stable regime (WSBL) which occurs in the presence of moderate to strong pressure gradients or cloudy skies and is characterized by continuous turbulent mixing, and the very stable regime (VSBL) which occurs in the presence of weak pressure gradients or clear skies and turbulence weakens to the point of collapse. Modelling and observational results indicate that transitions from the WSBL to the VSBL occur when the maximum sustainable heat flux (MSHF), or shear capacity, is exceeded. The collapse of turbulence in the SBL is investigated using a one dimensional model of Couette flow with a constant heat flux. We show that the MSHF framework for predicting turbulent collapse is qualitatively robust to the choice of turbulence parameterization and extend these earlier stability analyses by numerically determining the unstable modes along the unstable branch. To explore transitions between the VSBL and the WSBL we extend the model to include a horizontal pressure gradient and a surface radiation scheme. Analysis of the Poiseuille flow demonstrates how the idealized energy/momentum budget model with parameterized turbulence can reproduce the regime transitions present in atmospheric data. We acknowledge support from NSERC and the computing facilities of Westgrid and Compute Canada.

  9. Inflow conditions for spatial direct numerical simulation of turbulent boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The inflow conditions for spatial direct numerical simulation(SDNS) of turbulent boundary layers should reflect the characteristics of upstream turbulence,which is a puzzle. In this paper a new method is suggested,in which the flow field obtained by using temporal direct numerical simulation(TDNS) for fully developed turbulent flow(only flow field for a single moment is sufficient) can be used as the inflow of SDNS with a proper transformation. The calculation results confirm that this method is feasible and effective. It is also found that,under a proper time-space transformation,all statistics of the fully developed turbulence obtained by both temporal mode and spatial mode DNS are in excellent agreement with each other,not only qualitatively,but also quantitatively. The normal-wise distributions of mean flow profile,turbulent Mach number and the root mean square(RMS) of the fluctuations of various variables,as well as the Reynolds stresses of the fully developed turbulence obtained by using SDNS,bear similarity in nature.

  10. High Reynolds number rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dougal; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Schultz, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In his review of turbulent flows over rough-walls, Jimenez (2004) concludes that there are gaps in the current database of relevant experiments. The author calls for measurements in which δ / k and k+ are both large--low blockage, fully-rough flow--and where δ / k is large and k+ is small--low blockage, transitionally-rough flow--to help clarify ongoing questions regarding the physics of rough-wall-bounded flows. The present contribution details results from a large set of measurements carried out above sandpaper in the Melbourne Wind Tunnel. The campaign spans 45 rough-wall measurements using single and multiple-wire hot-wire anemometry sensors and particle image velocimetry. A floating element drag balance is employed to obtain the rough-wall skin friction force. The data span 20

  11. Geostrophic convective turbulence: The effect of boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Kunnen, Rudie P J; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents results of the first direct numerical simulations of rotating Rayleigh--B\\'enard convection in the so-called geostrophic regime, (hence very small Ekman numbers $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-7})$ and high Rayleigh numbers~$Ra=10^{10}$ and~$5\\cdot 10^{10}$), employing the \\emph{full} Navier--Stokes equations. In the geostrophic regime the criteria of very strong rotation and large supercriticality are met simultaneously, which is true for many geophysical and astrophysical flows. Until now, numerical approaches of this regime have been based on \\emph{reduced} versions of the Navier--Stokes equations (cf. Sprague \\emph{et al.} J. Fluid Mech., \\textbf{551}, 141 (2006)), omitting the effect of the viscous (Ekman) boundary layers. By using different velocity boundary conditions at the plates, we study the effect of these Ekman layers. We find that the formation of large-scale structures (Rubio \\emph{et al.} (Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{112} (2014)), which indicates the presence of an inverse energy cascade, ...

  12. Assessment of Turbulent Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations Using the OVERFLOW Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Schwing, A. M.; Blaisdell, G> A.; Lyrintzis, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two popular turbulence models, the Spalart-Allmaras model and Menter s SST model, and one relatively new model, Olsen & Coakley s Lag model, are evaluated using the OVERFLOWcode. Turbulent shock-boundary layer interaction predictions are evaluated with three different experimental datasets: a series of 2D compression ramps at Mach 2.87, a series of 2D compression ramps at Mach 2.94, and an axisymmetric coneflare at Mach 11. The experimental datasets include flows with no separation, moderate separation, and significant separation, and use several different experimental measurement techniques (including laser doppler velocimetry (LDV), pitot-probe measurement, inclined hot-wire probe measurement, preston tube skin friction measurement, and surface pressure measurement). Additionally, the OVERFLOW solutions are compared to the solutions of a second CFD code, DPLR. The predictions for weak shock-boundary layer interactions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For strong shock-boundary layer interactions, all of the turbulence models overpredict the separation size and fail to predict the correct skin friction recovery distribution. In most cases, surface pressure predictions show too much upstream influence, however including the tunnel side-wall boundary layers in the computation improves the separation predictions.

  13. DNS of self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Julio; Kitsios, Vassili; Sekimoto, Atsushi; Atkinson, Callum; Jiménez, Javier

    2016-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient (APG) turbulent boundary layer (TBL) at the verge of separation has been set-up and carried out. The DNS APG TBL has a displacement thickness based Reynolds number that ranges up to 30,000. The conditions for self-similarity and appropriate scaling will be highlighted, with the first and second order velocity statistical profiles non-dimensionalised using this scaling. The details of the DNS and the required boundary conditions that are necessary to establish this self-similar APG-TBL will be presented. The statistical properties of the self-similar adverse pressure gradient (APG) turbulent boundary layer (TBL) DNS will presented, as will the profiles of the terms in the momentum equation, spanwise/wall-normal kinetic energy spectrum and two-point correlations, which will be compared to those of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer. NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Routes to turbulence in the rotating disk boundary-layer of a rotor-stator cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Eunok; Serre, Eric; Martinand, Denis; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    The rotating disk is an important classical problem, due to the similarities between the 3D boundary layers on a disk and a swept aircraft wing. It is nowadays admitted that a direct transition to turbulence may exist through a steep-fronted nonlinear global mode located at the boundary between the locally connectively and absolutely unstable regions (Pier 2003; Viaud et al. 2008, 2011; Imayama et al. 2014 and others). However, recent studies (Healey 2010; Harris et al. 2012; Imayama et al. 2013) suggest that there may be an alternative route starting at lower critical Reynolds number, based on convective travelling waves but this scenario is still not fully validated and proven. To better characterize such transition, direct numerical simulations are performed in a closed cylindrical rotor-stator cavity (without hub) up to Re = O (105) . All boundaries are no slip and for the stable region around the rotation axis prevents the disturbances coming from the very unstable stator boundary to disturb the rotor boundary layer. Different transition scenarii to turbulence are investigated when the rotor boundary layer is forced at different positions and forcing amplitude. The associated dynamics of coherent structures in various flow regions are also investigated when increasing Re .

  15. The Modelling of Particle Resuspension in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan

    2011-10-20

    The work presented concerns the way small particles attached to a surface are resuspended when exposed to a turbulent flow. Of particular concern to this work is the remobilization of radioactive particles as a consequence of potential nuclear accidents. In this particular case the focus is on small particles, < 5 microns in diameter, where the principal force holding such particles onto a surface arises from van der Waals inter-molecular forces. Given its suitable treatment of the microphysics of small particles, it was decided here to aim to develop improved versions of the Rock'n'Roll (R'n'R) model; the R'n'R model is based on a statistical approach to resuspension involving the rocking and rolling of a particle about surface asperities induced by the moments of the fluctuating drag forces acting on the particle close to the surface. Firstly, a force (moment) balance model has been modified by including the distribution of the aerodynamic force instead of considering only its mean value. The R'n'R model is significantly improved by using realistic statistical fluctuations of both the stream-wise fluid velocity and acceleration close to the wall obtained from Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow; in the standard model a major assumption is that these obey a Gaussian distribution. The flow conditions are translated into the moments of the drag force acting on the particle attached to the surface. In so doing the influence of highly non-Gaussian forces on the resuspension rate has been examined along with the sensitivity of the fluctuation statistics to LES and DNS. As a result of the analysis of our DNS/LES data 3 distinct features of the modified R'n'R model have emerged as playing an important part in the resuspension. The first is the typical forcing frequency due to the turbulent aerodynamic drag forces acting on the particle attached to a surface. The

  16. Scale ratios in decaying quasi-geographic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dritschel, G. [St. Andrews Univ., St. Andrews, Scotland (United Kingdom). School of Mathematics

    1999-12-01

    The study re-examines quasi-geographic turbulence in vertically periodic boundaries, at times well before two-dimensional vortices might emerge. It has been focused specifically on the characteristic scale ratio of structures, and how it compares to that found for rigid, isothermal boundaries.

  17. Large-eddy simulations of geophysical turbulent flows with applications to planetary boundary layer research

    CERN Document Server

    Esau, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The present study gives an overview and emphasizes principal moments of the applications of the turbulence-resolving modeling with large-eddy simulation (LES) numerical technique to planetary boundary layer (PBL) research and climate studies. LES proved to be very useful in understanding of the atmospheric and ocean turbulent exchange and ultimately in parameterization improvement in traditional meteorological models. LES have played a key role in recognizing the importance of previously ignored self-organized structures in the geophysical turbulence. LES assisted theoreticians and weather/climate modelers with reliable information about the averaged vertical structure of the PBL in convection and shear regimes as well as with better estimations of key PBL parameters, e.g. an entrainment rate, for model calibrations. At present, LES are an essential, indispensible part of geosciences, while the mainstream of the LES research still deals with idealized case studies with rather simple micro-physics.

  18. Flat plate heat transfer for laminar transition and turbulent boundary layers using a shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostmeyer, J. D.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer results are presented for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers for a Mach number of 0.12 with gas temperatures of 425 K and 1000 K over a flat plate at room temperature. The measurements were made in air for a Reynolds number range of 600 to 6 million. The heat transfer measurements were conducted in a 70-ft long, 4 in. diameter shock tube. Reflecting wedges were used to reflect the incident shock wave to produce a flow Mach number of 0.12 behind the reflected shock wave. Thin film platinum heat gages were mounted on the plate surface to measure the local heat flux. The laminar results for gas temperatures of 425 K to 1000 K agree well with theory. The turbulent results are also close to incompressible theory, with the 1000 K flow case being slightly higher. The transition results lie between the laminar and turbulent predictions.

  19. Spontaneous generation of inertial waves from boundary turbulence in a librating sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Sauret, Alban; Bars, Michael Le

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report the excitation of inertial waves in a librating sphere even for libration frequencies where these waves are not directly forced. This spontaneous generation comes from the localized turbulence induced by the centrifugal instabilities in the Ekman boundary layer near the equator and does not depend on the libration frequency. We characterize the key features of these inertial waves in analogy with previous studies of the generation of internal waves in stratified flows from localized turbulent patterns. In particular, the temporal spectrum exhibits preferred values of excited frequency. This first-order phenomenon is generic to any rotating flow in the presence of localized turbulence and is fully relevant for planetary applications.

  20. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    of this thesis is on online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (online LC×LC) with reverse phase in both dimensions (online RP×RP). Since online RP×RP has not been attempted before within this research group, a significant part of this thesis consists of knowledge and experience gained...

  1. RESEARCH AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER AT POSITIVE PRESSURE GRADIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Mamchuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mathematical modeling of complex turbulent near-wall flows, that occur during the flow of airfoils, is impossible without understanding the nature of the flow in boundary layer. From a mathematical point of view, the calculation of such flows, because in practical problems they regarded as turbulent, and the characteristics of turbulence are largely dependent on the geometry of the profile of the longitudinal component of the average velocity of the near-wall flow. Based on this, the purpose of this work is studying and mathematical modeling of turbulent near-wall flows in the interaction with the real streamlined surface, that has certain features, such as the curvature, roughness, etc., as well as the study and research of the influence of the pressure gradient on the empirical coefficients, parameters of the flow, velocity profiles and friction stress. Methods: We performed the calculations using numerical finite-difference marching method with algebraic model of turbulent viscosity coefficient. Results: In this paper we present some results of the numerical study of the effect of the positive pressure gradient on the empirical coefficients of the transition zone and the law of the near-wall and the outer-wall areas. Discussion: Comparison of the calculated results with the experimental data shows that the proposed approaches provide an opportunity to simulate the flow as close as possible to their physical properties. Presented mathematical model for the calculation of turbulent boundary layers and near-wall flows makes it possible to calculate such a complex and valuable from a practical point of view type of the flow as the aerodynamic trail behind the streamlined body.

  2. A finite difference method for predicting supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows with tangential slot injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, E. W.; Lewis, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    An implicit finite difference method has been applied to tangential slot injection into supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows. In addition, the effects induced by the interaction between the boundary layer displacement thickness and the external pressure field are considered. In the present method, three different eddy viscosity models have been used to specify the turbulent momentum exchange. One model depends on the species concentration profile and the species conservation equation has been included in the system of governing partial differential equations. Results are compared with experimental data at stream Mach numbers of 2.4 and 6.0 and with results of another finite difference method. Good agreement was generally obtained for the reduction of wall skin friction with slot injection and with experimental Mach number and pitot pressure profiles. Calculations with the effects of pressure interaction included showed these effects to be smaller than effects of changing eddy viscosity models.

  3. Interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Feo, A.

    1975-01-01

    Interaction between a shock wave and an unseparated turbulent boundary layer is considered. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used, with solutions valid in the double limit as Reynolds number tends to infinity and Mach number tends to unity. The shock is weak enough that interaction effects can be considered as perturbations to the undisturbed flow; the case considered is that where the sonic line is near the outer edge of the boundary layer. It is shown that, with order estimates for Reynolds stress perturbations, the induced wall pressure distribution can be calculated using only the two outer interaction regions, independent of a specific closure condition and that this solution is in fact a turbulent free interaction solution. A detailed analysis of the inner regions, for which an eddy viscosity model for the Reynolds shear stress is used, provides a description of the variations in velocity, temperature and density near and at the wall.

  4. Experimental Study of Turbulent Boundary Layers on Groove/Smooth Flat Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei MA; Qiao TIAN; Hui WU

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the turbulent boundary layers on both groove and smooth flat surfaces. The flow structures were shown in a water tunnel using the hydrogen-bubble flow visualization technique. The measurement results indicate that: (1) the grooves can effectively reduce accumulation of low-speed fluids, decrease the number of the low-speed streaks and depress oscillation of the streaks in the sublayer; (2) the grooves can restrain forming of the horseshoe vortices in the buffer region; (3) the grooves bate oscillation and kinking of the quasi-streamwise vortices and restrain production of the hairpin vortices and the ring vortices, reducing both frequency and intensity of the turbulence bursting; (4) the grooves directly affect the flow structures in the sublayer of the boundary layer and then modulate the flow field up to the buffer region and the logarithmic region by restraining development and interaction of the vortices.

  5. Spectrum of turbulent-boundary-layer fluctuation pressure and response of a polyvinylidence fluoride hydrophone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Huiliang; HE Zuoyong; BAO Xuemei

    2001-01-01

    The point power spectrum density and the wavenumber frequency spectrum density of turbulent-boundary-layer fluctuation pressure were measured in water-tunnel by use of a φ8 mm hydrophone and a 20-element array, respectively. The non-dimensional representation of measured point power spectrum coincides with the measured results by Bull M. K. et. al. in wind tunnel. The convection peak can be seen clearly in the measured wavenumber frequencyspectrum and the convection velocity can be calculated from the location of the convection peak.The response spectrum of a polyvinylidence fluoride (PVDF) hydrophone, which receiving area is 100 mm × 60 mm, was also measured. By comparing it with the response spectrum of the φ8 mm hydrophone, it is shown that the PVDF hyrdophone has a strong wavenumber filtering effect on turbulent-boundary-layer pressure fluctuation.

  6. On the Coupling Between a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer and a Flexible Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model and a computer code have been developed to fully couple the vibration of an aircraft fuselage panel to the surrounding flow field, turbulent boundary layer and acoustic fluid. The turbulent boundary layer model is derived using a triple decomposition of the flow variables and applying a conditional averaging to the resulting equations. Linearized panel and acoustic equations are used. Results from this model are in good agreement with existing experimental and numerical data. It is shown that in the supersonic regime, full coupling of the flexible panel leads to lower response and radiation from the panel. This is believed to be due to an increase in acoustic damping on the panel in this regime. Increasing the Mach number increases the acoustic damping, which is in agreement with earlier work.

  7. Modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emran, Mohammad; Shishkina, Olga

    2016-11-01

    We report modeling of the thermal boundary layer in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), which incorporates the effect of turbulent fluctuations. The study is based on the thermal boundary layer equation from Shishkina et al., and new Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of RBC in a cylindrical cell of the aspect ratio 1, for the Prandtl number variation of several orders of magnitude. Our modeled temperature profiles are found to agree with the DNS much better than those obtained with the classical Prandtl-Blasius or Falkner-Skan approaches. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship and SFB963, Project A06.

  8. Drag reduction by means of dimpled surfaces in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nesselrooij, M.; Veldhuis, L. L. M.; van Oudheusden, B. W.; Schrijer, F. F. J.

    2016-09-01

    Direct force measurements and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to investigate the drag and flow structure caused by surfaces with patterns of shallow spherical dimples with rounded edges subject to turbulent boundary layers. Drag reduction of up to 4 % is found compared to a flat surface. The largest drag reduction was found at the highest tested Reynolds number of 40,000 (based on dimple diameter). A favorable trend promises further improvements at higher Reynolds numbers. PIV revealed the absence of significant separation inside the dimples but did show the existence of a converging/diverging flow in the upstream and downstream dimple half, respectively. This leads to the rejection of theories proposed by other authors concerning the mechanism responsible for drag reduction. Instead, a fundamental dependence on pattern orientation is observed. Furthermore, preliminary Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations have been compared with the PIV data. Although the large-scale mean flows show good agreement, the numerical simulation predicts no drag reduction. As the RANS approach is inherently incapable of resolving effects on the behavior of small-scale turbulence structure, the origin of drag reduction is attributed to effects on the small-scale turbulence, which is not resolved in the simulations. It is argued that dimples, when placed in well-designed patterns to create the necessary large-scale flow structure, lead to drag reduction by affecting the turbulent structures in the boundary layer, possibly in a way similar to spanwise oscillations of the wall.

  9. Laminar and turbulent channel flow simulations and the choice of appropriate boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baerwolff, G. [FB Mathematik, TU Berlin (Germany); Koster, F.

    1998-07-01

    Transitional flow over a backward-facing step is studied by large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). The simulation was performed at a Reynolds number of 3000 based on step height and inlet stream velocity. We compare the passive flow and the flow controlled by a two-dimensional acoustic manipulation in front of the separation line. The aim of the boundary layer control is to decrease the reattachment length. Huppertz and Janke (1995/1997) demonstrated experimentally a reduction of the reattachment length of approximately 30% for a cetain frequency of the acoustic disturbancies. Our statistical results show a good agreement with the experimental data of Huppertz and Janke. The problem of the choice of suitable outflow boundary conditions was considered with respect to the reduction of the length of the computational domain and the reduction of computational expenses respectively. (orig.)

  10. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    suspended sediment concentrations, (2) turbulence suppression due to density gradients in the water–sand mixture, (3) boundary layer streaming due to convective terms, and (4) converging–diverging effects due to a sloping bed. The present model therefore provides a framework for simultaneous inclusion...... of a number of local factors important within cross-shore wave boundary layer and sediment transport dynamics. The hydrodynamic model is validated for both hydraulically smooth and rough conditions, based on wave friction factor diagrams and boundary layer streaming profiles, with the results in excellent...... to investigate the importance of boundary layer streaming effects on sediment transport in selected velocity-skewed conditions. For the medium sand grain conditions considered, the model results suggest that streaming effects can enhance onshore sediment transport rates by asmuch as a factor of two...

  11. Boundary layers in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in air

    CERN Document Server

    Puits, Ronald du; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André

    2012-01-01

    The boundary layer flow in a Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection cell of rectangular shape has been visualized in this fluid dynamics video. The experiment has been undertaken in air at a Rayleigh number $Ra=1.3\\times 10^{10}$ and a Prandtl number $Pr=0.7$. Various sequences captured at selected positions of the heating plate show that the boundary layer is a very transient flow region characterized by coherent structures that permanently evolve. It becomes fully turbulent in the areas where the large-scale circulation impinge or leave the bottom plate.

  12. Structure of 2-D and 3-D Turbulent Boundary Layers with Sparsely Distributed Roughness Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-28

    straight orientation. Stations U, 6, mm 6", mm 0, mm Ree k+ k/6 1 25.98 58.565 12.70 7.65 11997 58.5 0.0130 2 25.36 54.56 12.65 7.52 11518 60.4 0.0139 3...a flat plate boundary layer transition. Engineering Turbulence Modeling and Experiments - 4, W. Rodi and D. Laurence (Eds.), Elsevier Science Ltd

  13. An extension of the transpired skin-friction equation to compressible turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Freire, Atila P.

    1988-11-01

    A skin-friction equation for transpired incompressible turbulent boundary layer, proposed in a previous paper (Silva-Freire, 1988), is extended to compressible flow. The expression derived here is simple and gives more consistent results than the momentum-integral equation. The difficulty with the present formulation, however, is that the wake profile parameter due to injection has to be carefully determined in order to obtain good results.

  14. Drag of a turbulent boundary layer with transverse 2D circular rods on the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Md; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.; Talluru, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a turbulent boundary layer developing over a rod-roughened wall with a spacing of ( is the spacing between two adjacent roughness elements, and is the rod diameter). Static pressure measurements are taken around a single roughness element to accurately determine the friction velocity, and the error in the origin, , which are the two prominent issues that surround rough-wall boundary layers. In addition, velocity measurements are taken at several streamwise locations using hot-wire anemometry to obtain from the momentum integral equation. Results showed that both methods give consistent values for , indicating that the contribution of the viscous drag over this rough wall is negligible. This supports the results of Perry et al. (J Fluid Mech 177:437-466, 1969) and Antonia and Luxton (J Fluid Mech 48(04):721-761, 1971) in a boundary layer and of Leonardi et al. (2003) in a channel flow but does not agree with those of Furuya et al. (J Fluids Eng 98(4):635-643, 1976). The results show that both and can be unambiguously measured on this particular rough wall. This paves the way for a proper comparison between the boundary layer developing over this wall and the smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer.

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Zero-Pressure Gradient and Sink Flow Turbulent Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, O.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2010-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations have been performed for the zero pressure gradient (ZPG) (600 < Reθ< 900) and for the sink flow turbulent boundary layers (K = 7.71x10-7). A finite difference code on Cartesian grid was used to perform the simulations. Inflow generation method developed by Lund et al. was used to generate inflow boundary condition for the ZPG case. This method was slightly modified for the case of sink flow in view of self-similarity it possesses in the inner co-ordinates. Hence, there was no need to use empirical relations for the calculation of inlet θ or δ and rescaling in outer co-ordinates. The average statistics obtained from the simulations are in close agreement with the experimental as well as DNS data available in the literature. The intermittency distribution in the case of sink flow approaches zero inside the boundary layer (y = 0.8δ), an observation which is also confirmed by the experiments. This effect could be due to the acceleration near the boundary layer edge which suppresses the turbulent fluctuations near the boundary layer edge.

  16. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, R.; Bobke, A.; Örlü, R.; Schlatter, P.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, we analyze three commonly used methods to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. ["Criteria for assessing experiments in zero pressure gradient boundary layers," Fluid Dyn. Res. 41, 021404 (2009)] and the one by Nickels ["Inner scaling for wall-bounded flows subject to large pressure gradients," J. Fluid Mech. 521, 217-239 (2004)], and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. ["A new scaling for the streamwise turbulence intensity in wall-bounded turbulent flows and what it tells us about the `outer' peak," Phys. Fluids 23, 041702 (2011)]. The boundary layers developing over the suction and pressure sides of a NACA4412 wing section, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at chord Reynolds number Rec = 400 000, are used as the test case, besides other numerical and experimental data from favorable, zero, and adverse pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, although the composite-profile techniques require data preparation, including initial estimations of fitting parameters and data truncation. Stronger pressure gradients (with a Rotta-Clauser pressure-gradient parameter β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Collapse of intermittency factors obtained from a wide range of pressure-gradient and Re conditions on the wing further highlights the robustness of the diagnostic plot method to determine the

  17. A Laboratory Study of the Turbulent Velocity Characteristics in the Convective Boundary Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the measurement of the velocity field in the convective boundary layer (CBL) in a convection water tank with the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, this paper studies the characteristics of the CBL turbulent velocity in a modified convection tank. The experiment results show that the velocity distribution in the mixed layer clearly possesses the characteristics of the CBL thermals, and the turbulent eddies can be seen obviously. The comparison of the vertical distribution of the turbulent velocity variables indicates that the modeling in the new tank is better than in the old one. The experiment data show that the thermal's motion in the entrainment zone sometimes fluctuates obviously due to the intermittence of turbulence. Analyses show that this fluctuation can influence the agreement of the measurement data with the parameterization scheme, in which the convective Richardson number is used to characterize the entrainment zone depth. The normalized square velocity w2i/w2* at the top of the mixed layer seems to be time-dependent, and has a decreasing trend during the experiments. This implies that the vertical turbulent velocity at the top of the mixed layer may not be proportional to the convective velocity (w*).

  18. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments - A separate effects study on a convexly-curved wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Surface heat transfer rates have been measured for several different flows on an isothermal, convexly curved surface. The freestream velocity, boundary layer thickness, acceleration parameter, and unheated starting length were varied systematically, and both turbulent and transitional boundary layers were studied. The effect of convex curvature on heat transfer rates is significant with Stanton numbers reduced 20-25% below flat wall values for the same enthalpy thickness Reynolds number. Heat transfer rates recovered slowly on a flat wall downstream of the curved wall, and after 60 cm, the Stanton numbers were still 15-20% below flat wall values. The behavior of the boundary layer suggests the existence of an asymptotic condition. Boundary layer thickness, freestream velocity, and boundary layer maturity affect the initial response to the introduction of curvature and the rate at which the asymptotic state is approached. Convex curvature appears to increase the boundary layer's sensitivity to acceleration; it also delays and retards transition. Near-laminar or early-transitional boundary layers recover from curvature rapidly, whereas late-transitional and mature boundary layers recover slowly.

  19. INTERACTIVE STUDY BETWEEN IDENTICAL COHERENT STRUCTURES IN THE WALL REGION OF A TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical model for identical coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer was proposed, using the idea of general resonant triad of the hydrodynamic stability. The evolution of the structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer was studied by combining the compact finite differences of high numerical accuracy and the Fourier spectral hybrid method for solving the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. In this method, the third order mixed explicit-implicit scheme was applied for the time integration. The fifth-order upwind compact finite difference schemes for the nonlinear convection terms in the physical space, and the sixth-order center compact schemes for the derivatives in spectral space were introduced, respectively. The fourth-order compact schemes satisfied by the velocities and pressure in spectral space was derived. As an application, the method was implemented to the wall region of a turbulent boundary to study the evolution of identical coherent structures. It is found that the numerical results are satisfactory.

  20. Reactive Control of Boundary Layer Streaks Induced by Freestream Turbulence Using Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouder, Kevin; Naguib, Ahmed; Lavoie, Philippe; Morrison, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Over the past few years we have carried out a systematic series of investigations aimed at evaluating the capability of a plasma-actuator-based feedforward-feedback control system to weaken streaks induced ``synthetically'' in a Blasius boundary layer via dynamic roughness elements. This work has been motivated by the delay of bypass boundary layer transition in which the streaks form stochastically beneath a freestream with turbulence of intensity of more than approximately 1%. In the present work, we carry forward the knowhow from our previous research in a first attempt to control such naturally occurring streaks. The experimental setup consists of a turbulence-generating grid upstream of a flat plate with a sharp leading edge. At the freestream velocity of the experiment, turbulent spot formation is observed to start at a streamwise location of x ~ 350 mm from the leading edge. The control system is implemented within a streamwise domain stretching from x = 150 mm to 300mm, where the streaks exhibit linear growth. At the upstream and downstream end of the domain a feedforward and a feedback wall-shear-stress sensors are utilized. The output from the sensors is fed to appropriately designed controllers which drive two plasma actuators providing positive and negative wall-normal forcing to oppose naturally occurring high- and low-speed streaks respectively. The results provide an assessment of the viability of the control approach to weaken the boundary layer streaks and to delay transition.

  1. Turbulent boundary layer control through spanwise wall oscillation using Kagome lattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, James; Santer, Matthew; Morrison, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    It is well established that a reduction in skin-friction and turbulence intensity can be achieved by applying in-plane spanwise forcing to a surface beneath a turbulent boundary layer. It has also been shown in DNS (M. Quadrio, P. Ricco, & C. Viotti; J. Fluid Mech; 627, 161, 2009), that this phenomenon is significantly enhanced when the forcing takes the form of a streamwise travelling wave of spanwise perturbation. In the present work, this type of forcing is generated by an active surface comprising a compliant structure, based on a Kagome lattice geometry, supporting a membrane skin. The structural design ensures negligible wall normal displacement while facilitating large in-plane velocities. The surface is driven pneumatically, achieving displacements of 3 mm approximately, at frequencies in excess of 70 Hz for a turbulent boundary layer at Reτ ~ 1000 . As the influence of this forcing on boundary layer is highly dependent on the wavenumber and frequency of the travelling wave, a flat surface was designed and optimised to allow these forcing parameters to be varied, without reconfiguration of the experiment. Simultaneous measurements of the fluid and surface motion are presented, and notable skin-friction drag reduction is demonstrated. Airbus support agreement IW202838 is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. An experimental investigation of the supersonic turbulent boundary layer subjected to concave curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian-cheng; Wang, Zhen-guo; Zhao, Yu-xin

    2016-09-01

    By employing particle image velocimetry, the response of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer to the concave curvature is experimentally investigated. The radius of the concave wall is 350 mm, and the turning angle is 20∘. Logarithmic law is well preserved in the profile of streamwise velocity at all streamwise positions despite the impact of curvature. The varying trend of principal strain rate is found to be different at different heights within the boundary layer, which cannot be explained by the suggestion given by former researchers. Based on the three-layer model proposed in this paper, distribution of the principal strain rate is carefully analyzed. The streamwise increase of wall friction is suggested to be brought by the increase of velocity gradient in the thin subsonic layer. Increases of the static temperature and the related sound speed are responsible for that. Larger correlated turbulent motions could be introduced by the concave curvature. The probability density histograms of streamwise velocity reveal that the large scale hairpin packets are statistically well organized. The concave curvature is found to have the potential of reinforcing the organization, which explains the increase of turbulent level in the supersonic concave boundary layer.

  3. High Frequency Measurements in Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interaction at Duplicated Flight Conditions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large amplitude, unsteady heating loads and steep flow gradients produced in regions of shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction (SWTBLI) pose a serious and...

  4. High Frequency Measurements in Shock-Wave/Turbulent Boundary-Layer Interaction at Duplicated Flight Conditions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Large amplitude, unsteady heating loads and steep flow gradients produced in regions of shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction (SWTBLI) pose a serious and...

  5. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  6. Two-Dimensional Vernier Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    Modified vernier scale gives accurate two-dimensional coordinates from maps, drawings, or cathode-ray-tube displays. Movable circular overlay rests on fixed rectangular-grid overlay. Pitch of circles nine-tenths that of grid and, for greatest accuracy, radii of circles large compared with pitch of grid. Scale enables user to interpolate between finest divisions of regularly spaced rule simply by observing which mark on auxiliary vernier rule aligns with mark on primary rule.

  7. A compressible near-wall turbulence model for boundary layer calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.; Lai, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A compressible near-wall two-equation model is derived by relaxing the assumption of dynamical field similarity between compressible and incompressible flows. This requires justifications for extending the incompressible models to compressible flows and the formulation of the turbulent kinetic energy equation in a form similar to its incompressible counterpart. As a result, the compressible dissipation function has to be split into a solenoidal part, which is not sensitive to changes of compressibility indicators, and a dilational part, which is directly affected by these changes. This approach isolates terms with explicit dependence on compressibility so that they can be modeled accordingly. An equation that governs the transport of the solenoidal dissipation rate with additional terms that are explicitly dependent on the compressibility effects is derived similarly. A model with an explicit dependence on the turbulent Mach number is proposed for the dilational dissipation rate. Thus formulated, all near-wall incompressible flow models could be expressed in terms of the solenoidal dissipation rate and straight-forwardly extended to compressible flows. Therefore, the incompressible equations are recovered correctly in the limit of constant density. The two-equation model and the assumption of constant turbulent Prandtl number are used to calculate compressible boundary layers on a flat plate with different wall thermal boundary conditions and free-stream Mach numbers. The calculated results, including the near-wall distributions of turbulence statistics and their limiting behavior, are in good agreement with measurements. In particular, the near-wall asymptotic properties are found to be consistent with incompressible behavior; thus suggesting that turbulent flows in the viscous sublayer are not much affected by compressibility effects.

  8. Statistical mechanics of two-dimensional and geophysical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, Freddy

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical study of the self-organization of two-dimensional and geophysical turbulent flows is addressed based on statistical mechanics methods. This review is a self-contained presentation of classical and recent works on this subject; from the statistical mechanics basis of the theory up to applications to Jupiter's troposphere and ocean vortices and jets. Emphasize has been placed on examples with available analytical treatment in order to favor better understanding of the physics and dynamics. The equilibrium microcanonical measure is built from the Liouville theorem. On this theoretical basis, we predict the output of the long time evolution of complex turbulent flows as statistical equilibria. This is applied to make quantitative models of two-dimensional turbulence, the Great Red Spot and other Jovian vortices, ocean jets like the Gulf-Stream, and ocean vortices. We also present recent results for non-equilibrium situations, for the studies of either the relaxation towards equilibrium or non-equi...

  9. Turbulent boundary layer separation control using plasma actuator at Reynolds number 2000000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of symmetrical plasma actuators on turbulent boundary layer separation control at high Reynolds number. Compared with the traditional control method of plasma actuator, the whole test model was made of aluminum and acted as a covered electrode of the symmetrical plasma actuator. The experimental study of plasma actuators’ effect on surrounding air, a canonical zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary, was carried out using particle image velocimetry (PIV and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV in the 0.75 m × 0.75 m low speed wind tunnel to reveal the symmetrical plasma actuator characterization in an external flow. A half model of wing-body configuration was experimentally investigated in the ∅ 3.2 m low speed wind tunnel with a six-component strain gauge balance and PIV. The results show that the turbulent boundary layer separation of wing can be obviously suppressed and the maximum lift coefficient is improved at high Reynolds number with the symmetrical plasma actuator. It turns out that the maximum lift coefficient increased by approximately 8.98% and the stall angle of attack was delayed by approximately 2° at Reynolds number 2 × 106. The effective mechanism for the turbulent separation control by the symmetrical plasma actuators is to induce the vortex near the wing surface which could create the relatively large-scale disturbance and promote momentum mixing between low speed flow and main flow regions.

  10. Influence of large-eddy breakup device on near-wall turbulent structures in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Seok; Hwang, Jinyul; Yoon, Min; Ahn, Junsun; Sung, Hyung Jin; Flow Control Lab Team

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a large-eddy breakup (LEBU) device in a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer was performed to investigate the influence of outer structures on the near-wall turbulence. The thin and rectangular shaped LEBU device was placed on y / δ = 0 . 8 and the device reduced the skin-friction coefficient (Cf) up to 17%. Decomposition of Cf showed that the contribution of the Reynolds shear stress decreased along the wall-normal direction. The reduction of the Reynolds shear stress was associated with the decrease of the ejection and sweep events, and in particular the latter was significantly reduced compared to the former in the near-wall region. The spanwise length scale of high-speed structures was more shortened than that of low-speed very near the wall (y+ = 20). As a result, the dispersive motions induced by the outer sweeps were weakened leading to the reduction of Cf even the LEBU device located far from the wall. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  11. An updated length-scale formulation for turbulent mixing in clear and cloudy boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenderink, G.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2004-10-01

    A new mixing-length scale is presented for turbulence-closure schemes, with special emphasis on neutral-to-convective conditions in clear and cloudy boundary layers. The length scale is intended for a prognostic turbulent-kinetic-energy closure. It is argued that present-day length-scale formulations may easily fail in one of two limiting situations. Schemes based on a local stability measure (e.g.the Richardson number) display unrealistic behaviour and instabilities in the convective limit. This strongly limits the representation of mixing in cloudy boundary layers. On the other hand, it is shown that non-local parcel methods may misrepresent mixing near the surface. The new length-scale formulation combines local and non-local stability in a new way; it uses vertical integrals over the stability (the Richardson number) in a simple 'parcel' framework. The length scale matches with surface-layer similarity for near-neutral conditions and displays a realistic convective limit. The use of the length-scale formulation can be extended easily to cloudy boundary layers. The scheme is numerically stable and computationally cheap. The behaviour of the length scale is evaluated in a single-column model (SCM) and in a high-resolution limited-area model (LAM). The SCM shows good behaviour in three cases with and without boundary-layer clouds. The prediction of the near-surface wind and temperature in the LAM compares favourably with tower measurements at Cabauw (the Netherlands).

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer inside an Axisymmetric Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junji; Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step toward a study of acoustic disturbance field within a conventional, hypersonic wind tunnel, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a Mach 6 turbulent boundary layer on the inner wall of a straight axisymmetric nozzle are conducted and the results are compared with those for a flat plate. The DNS results for a nozzle radius to boundary-layer thickness ratio of 5:5 show that the turbulence statistics of the nozzle-wall boundary layer are nearly unaffected by the transverse curvature of the nozzle wall. Before the acoustic waves emanating from different parts of the nozzle surface can interfere with each other and undergo reflections from adjacent portions of the nozzle surface, the rms pressure fluctuation beyond the boundary layer edge increases toward the nozzle axis, apparently due to a focusing effect inside the axisymmetric configuration. Spectral analysis of pressure fluctuations at both the wall and the freestream indicates a similar distribution of energy content for both the nozzle and the flat plate, with the peak of the premultiplied frequency spectrum at a frequency of [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 6.0 inside the free stream and at [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 2.0 along the wall. The present results provide the basis for follow-on simulations involving reverberation effects inside the nozzle.

  13. On determining characteristic length scales in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Örlü, Ramis; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we analyze three methods used to determine the edge of pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers: two based on composite profiles, the one by Chauhan et al. (Fluid Dyn. Res. 41:021401, 2009) and the one by Nickels (J. Fluid Mech. 521:217-239, 2004), and the other one based on the condition of vanishing mean velocity gradient. Additionally, a new method is introduced based on the diagnostic plot concept by Alfredsson et al. (Phys. Fluids 23:041702, 2011). The boundary layer developing over the suction side of a NACA4412 wing profile, extracted from a direct numerical simulation at Rec = 400,000, is used as the test case. We find that all the methods produce robust results with mild or moderate pressure gradients, but stronger pressure gradients (with β larger than around 7) lead to inconsistent results in all the techniques except the diagnostic plot. This method also has the advantage of providing an objective way of defining the point where the mean streamwise velocity is 99% of the edge velocity, and shows consistent results in a wide range of pressure gradient conditions, as well as flow histories. Therefore, the technique based on the diagnostic plot is a robust method to determine the boundary layer thickness (equivalent to δ99) and edge velocity in pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers.

  14. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects including introduction and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the heat transfer rate through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20% to 50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15% to 20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: the effect of initial boundary layer thickness, the effect of freestream velocity, the effect of freestream acceleration, the effect of unheated starting length, and the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. An existing curvature prediction model was tested against this broad heat transfer data base to determine where it could appropriately be used for heat transfer predictions.

  15. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  16. On the influence of free-stream turbulence length scales on boundary-layer transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Jens; Shahinfar, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    A measurement campaign on the free-stream turbulence (FST) induced boundary layer transition has been carried out in the Minimum-Turbulence-Level wind tunnel at KTH. Previous numerical investigations where the turbulence intensity (Tu) has been kept constant, while the integral length scale (Λx) has been varied, have shown that the transition location is advanced for increasing Λx. The present measurement campaign has been carried out using hot-wire anemometry and consists of 42 unique FST conditions with thorough measurements throughout the transitional region. Unlike other extensive FST induced transition measurements the free-stream velocity was here kept constant for all cases, implying that the boundary layer scale is locked up to transition onset. Our measurements confirm previous results on the advancement of the transition location with increasing Λx for low to moderate Tu levels, but show the opposite effect for higher levels, i.e. a delay in the transition location for larger Λx, which to the knowledge of the present authors so far is unreported. In addition, the common belief that the FST length scales have a negligible effect on the transition location with regards to the Tu level does not seem to be fully true.

  17. A symmetry based approach to quantifying the compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Bi, Wei-Tao; She, Zhen-Su; Hussain, Fazle

    2015-11-01

    Developing analytical description of the compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL) is of great importance to many technological applications and to the understanding and modeling of compressible turbulence. Here a symmetry-based approach is applied to analyze the CTBL data acquired from DNS, covering a wide range of Reynolds number (Re), Mach number (Ma) and wall temperature. The Reynolds stress length scale displays a four-layer structure in the direction normal to the wall and obeys the dilation group invariance as in the incompressible TBL. A newly-identified turbulent heat flux length scale behaves similarly, which is the classical temperature mixing length weighted by the mean temperature. A significant result is the identification of three physical parameters for each length function to characterize the adiabatic flow: a bulk flow constant, a buffer layer thickness and a boundary layer edge, which vary with Re and Ma. For the diabatic flow, the sublayer thickness and the inner layer scaling exponents vary additionally with the wall temperature. These parameters are modeled empirically, leading to a highly accurate prediction of the mean fields of the CTBL. Thus we reveal that the symmetry principle found in canonical wall-bounded flows holds also for the CTBL, and a quantitative mean field theory is viable with appropriate symmetry considerations.

  18. The effects of an algal biofilm on the turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen; Steppe, Cecily; Reidenbach, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofilms are an important fouling community on ship hulls, with severe economic consequences due to increased drag. As with other types of roughness on aquatic surfaces, biofilms increase skin friction and thus induce severe drag penalties. In fact, slime layers appear to induce greater drag than would be predicted by the roughness height alone. Our work indicates that this is likely due to two characteristics of algal biofilms: i) flexible streamers that protrude into the flow, and ii) the compliant nature of a biofilm layer. High resolution PIV was used to measure the turbulent boundary layer flow over diatomaceous biofilm grown under dynamic conditions. Local mean streamwise velocity profiles were used to estimate the local wall shear stresses and to determine the similarity between the inner and outer layers of the boundary layer and those of a smooth wall. Spatially explicit turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), Reynolds shear stress (RSS), swirling strength and quadrant analyses over the biofilm were compared to those over a smooth wall and a rigid mesh roughness. We found that the combination of canopy flow due to streamers coupled with compliant wall-flow interactions result in large wall shear stresses and higher turbulence. Funding provided by the ONR NURP program and the NSF GRIP program.

  19. Influence of pressure gradient on streamwise skewness factor in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dróżdż, Artur

    2014-08-01

    The paper shows an effect of favourable and adverse pressure gradients on turbulent boundary layer. The skewness factor of streamwise velocity component was chosen as a measure of the pressure gradient impact. It appears that skewness factor is an indicator of convection velocity of coherent structures, which is not always equal to the average flow velocity. The analysis has been performed based upon velocity profiles measured with hot-wire technique in turbulent boundary layer with pressure gradient corresponding to turbomachinery conditions. The results show that the skewness factor decreases in the flow region subjected to FPG and increases in the APG conditions. The changes of convection velocity and skewness factor are caused by influence of large-scale motion through the mechanism called amplitude modulation. The large-scale motion is less active in FPG and more active in APG, therefore in FPG the production of vortices is random (there are no high and low speed regions), while in the APG the large-scale motion drives the production of vortices. Namely, the vortices appear only in the high-speed regions, therefore have convection velocity higher than local mean velocity. The convection velocity affects directly the turbulent sweep and ejection events. The more flow is dominated by large-scale motion the higher values takes both the convection velocity of small-scale structures and sweep events induced by them.

  20. DHMPIV and Tomo-PIV measurements of three-dimensional structures in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amili, O.; Atkinson, C.; Soria, J.

    In turbulent boundary layers, a large portion of total turbulence production happens in the near wall region, y/δ Tomo-PIV) was used to extract the 3C-3D velocity field using a rapid and less memory intensive reconstruction algorithm. It is based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Application of MLOS-SART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Refθ=2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1000×1000×160 voxels is discussed. In addition, near wall velocity measurement attempt made by digital holographic microscopic particle image velocimetry (DHMPIV). The technique provides a solution to overcome the poor axial accuracy and the low spatial resolution which are common problems in digital holography [5]. By reducing the depth of focus by at least one order of magnitude as well as increasing the lateral spatial resolution, DHMPIV provides the opportunity to resolve the small-scale structures existing in near wall layers.

  1. Global effect of local skin friction drag reduction in spatially developing turbulent boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Stroh, A; Schlatter, P; Frohnapfel, B

    2016-01-01

    A numerical investigation of two locally applied drag reducing control schemes is carried out in the configuration of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer (TBL). One control is designed to damp near-wall turbulence and the other induces constant mass flux in the wall-normal direction. Both control schemes yield similar local drag reduction rates within the control region. However, the flow development downstream of the control significantly differs: persistent drag reduction is found for the uniform blowing case whereas drag increase is found for the turbulence damping case. In order to account for this difference the formulation of a global drag reduction rate is suggested. It represents the reduction of the streamwise force exerted by the fluid on a finite length plate. Furthermore, it is shown that the far downstream development of the TBL after the control region can be described by a single quantity, namely a streamwise shift of the uncontrolled boundary layer, i.e. a changed virtual origin. B...

  2. Similarity considerations for a turbulent axisymmetric wake with rotation subjected to a boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Recently an analytical and experimental investigation of the turbulent axisymmetric wake with rotation found a new asymptotic scaling function for the mean swirl, Wmax ~Uo3/ 2 ~x-1 (Dufresne and Wosnik, Mar Technol Soc J, 47, no.4, 193-205, 2013). An equilibrium similarity theory derived scaling functions from the conditions for the existence of similarity directly from the equations of motion. Axial and azimuthal (swirl) velocities were measured in the wake of a single 3-bladed wind turbine in a free stream up to 20 diameters downstream, and the data were found to support the theoretical results. The scaling implies that the mean swirl decays faster, with x-1, than the mean velocity deficit, with x - 2 / 3. Real wind turbines, however, operate in the atmospheric boundary layer. They are subjected to mean shear and turbulence, both have been observed to improve wake recovery. Similarity considerations are extended to place a turbulent axisymmetric wake with rotation in a boundary layer flow, and the scaling implications are examined. Corresponding experiments were carried out in the UNH Flow Physics Facility, using model wind turbines of various sizes as swirling wake generators. Supported by NSF CBET grant 1150797.

  3. PIV experiments in rough-wall, laminar-to-turbulent, oscillatory boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Mier, Jose M.; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Bateman, Allen; Garcia, Marcelo H.

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of oscillatory boundary layers were conducted over a smooth and two different rough beds spanning the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes using a multi-camera 2D-PIV system in a small oscillatory-flow tunnel (Admiraal et al. in J Hydraul Res 44(4):437-450, 2006). Results show how the phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity is better defined when the integral of the momentum equation is used to estimate the bed shear stress. Observed differences in bed shear stress and phase lag between bed shear stress and free-stream velocity are highly sensitive to the definition of the bed position ( y = b). The underestimation of turbulent stresses close to the wall is found to explain such differences when using the addition of Reynolds and viscous stresses to define both the bed shear stress and the phase lag. Regardless of the flow regime, in all experiments, boundary-layer thickness reached its maximum value at a phase near the flow reversal at the wall. Friction factors in smooth walls are better estimated using a theoretical equation first proposed by Batchelor (An introduction to fluid dynamics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1967) while the more recent empirical predictor of Pedocchi and Garcia (J Hydraul Res 47(4):438-444, 2009a) was found to be appropriate for estimating friction coefficients in the laminar-to-turbulent transition regime.

  4. Multilayer scaling of mean velocity and thermal fields of compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weitao; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yousheng; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2014-11-01

    Recently, a symmetry based structural ensemble dynamics (SED) theory was proposed by She et al. for canonical wall bounded turbulent flows, yielding prediction of the mean velocity profile at an unprecedented accuracy (99%). Here, we extend the theory to compressible turbulent boundary layers (TBL) at supersonic and hypersonic Mach numbers. The flows are acquired by spatially evolving direct numerical simulations (DNS). A momentum mixing length displays a four layer structure and quantitatively obeys the dilation group invariance as for the incompressible TBL. In addition, a temperature mixing length behaves very similarly to the momentum mixing length when the wall is adiabatic, with a small difference in the scaling exponents in the buffer layer - consistent with the strong Reynolds analogy. The Lie group based formulization of the two mixing lengths yields a multilayer model for the turbulent Prandtl number, along with predictions to the mean thermal and velocity profiles, both in good agreement with the DNS. Thus, we assert that the compressible TBLs are governed by the same symmetry principle as that in the canonical wall bounded turbulent flows, and its mean fields can be accurately described by the SED theory.

  5. Turbulent pipe flow: Statistics, Re-dependence, structures and similarities with channel and boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, George K.; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Johansson, Arne V.

    2014-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation data of fully developed turbulent pipe flow are extensively compared with those of turbulent channel flow and zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer flow for Reτ up to 1000. In the near-wall region, a high degree of similarity is observed in the three flow cases in terms of one-point statistics, probability density functions of the wall-shear stress and pressure, spectra, Reynolds stress budgets and advection velocity of the turbulent structures. This supports the notion that the near-wall region is universal for pipe and channel flow. Probability density functions of the wall shear stress, streamwise turbulence intensities, one-dimensional spanwise/azimuthal spectra of the streamwise velocity and Reynolds-stress budgets are very similar near the wall in the three flow cases, suggesting that the three canonical wall-bounded flows share many features. In the wake region, the mean streamwise velocity and Reynolds stress budgets show some expected differences.

  6. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    Two-dimensional liquid chromatography has received increasing interest due to the rise in demand for analysis of complex chemical mixtures. Separation of complex mixtures is hard to achieve as a simple consequence of the sheer number of analytes, as these samples might contain hundreds or even...... dimensions. As a consequence of the conclusions made within this thesis, the research group has, for the time being, decided against further development of online LC×LC systems, since it was not deemed ideal for the intended application, the analysis of the polar fraction of oil. Trap-and...

  7. The effect of pressure gradient on the structure of an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ting-Kwo

    1993-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry was used to study the effect of adverse pressure gradient on the large-scale structures of equilibrium turbulent boundary layers. A previously existing zero-pressure gradient wind tunnel was modified into an adverse-pressure gradient wind tunnel, which had the capability of creating designated adverse-pressure gradient equilibrium turbulent boundary layer flows. The range of the equilibrium parameter beta was from 0.0 to 1.8 along a 1.50 m long test section of the wind tunnel. Computer programs were developed to predict the geometric shape of the test section for an equilibrium adverse-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer flow. The numerical prediction of the test section geometry was found to be satisfactory and a substantial effort was saved in the establishment of an equilibrium boundary layer. Three equilibrium boundary layer flows at values of beta = 0.0, 0.8, and 1.8, which respectively represents zero, mild, and strong adverse pressure gradient, were established and were found to be suitable for turbulence structure measurements. Space-time correlation measurements were carried out to determine the convection velocities and inclination angles of the large-scale structures for the three different pressure gradient cases. The convection velocity measurements were performed at various heights which ranged form y(sup +) = 225 to 525 for each beta value. It was found that, within the range of height of the measurements, the convection velocity was independent of height In the case of the strong adverse-pressure gradient flow, the convection velocity was observed to be much lower than the convection velocity observed in the case of zero-pressure gradient. In the case of the mild-pressure gradient flow, it was observed that the pressure gradient effect on the convection velocity was negligible as compared to the zero-pressure gradient case. The inclination angle in the case of strong-pressure gradient case was found to be much greater than

  8. The measurement of shear stress and total heat flux in a nonadiabatic turbulent hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulla, V.; Horstman, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress and direct turbulent total heat-flux measurements have been made across a nonadiabatic, zero pressure gradient, hypersonic boundary layer by using specially designed hot-wire probes free of strain-gauging and wire oscillation. Heat-flux measurements were in reasonably good agreement with values obtained by integrating the energy equation using measured profiles of velocity and temperature. The shear-stress values deduced from the measurements, by assuming zero correlation of velocity and pressure fluctuations, were lower than the values obtained by integrating the momentum equation. Statistical properties of the cross-correlations are similar to corresponding incompressible measurements at approximately the same momentum-thickness Reynolds number.

  9. Coupled Mesoscale-Large-Eddy Modeling of Realistic Stable Boundary Layer Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yao; Manuel, Lance

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific flow and turbulence information are needed for various practical applications, ranging from aerodynamic/aeroelastic modeling for wind turbine design to optical diffraction calculations. Even though highly desirable, collecting on-site meteorological measurements can be an expensive, time-consuming, and sometimes a challenging task. In this work, we propose a coupled mesoscale-large-eddy modeling framework to synthetically generate site-specific flow and turbulence data. The workhorses behind our framework are a state-of-the-art, open-source atmospheric model called the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and a tuning-free large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Using this coupled framework, we simulate a nighttime stable boundary layer (SBL) case from the well-known CASES-99 field campaign. One of the unique aspects of this work is the usage of a diverse range of observations for characterization and validation. The coupled models reproduce certain characteristics of observed low-level jets....

  10. Double large field stereoscopic PIV in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudert, S.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Stanislas, M.; Braud, P.; Fourment, C.; Delville, J.; Tutkun, M.; Mehdi, F.; Johansson, P.; George, W. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number has been carried out in the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (LML, UMR CNRS 8107) wind tunnel. This experiment was performed jointly with LEA (UMR CNRS 6609) in Poitiers (France) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden), in the frame of the WALLTURB European project. The simultaneous recording of 143 hot wires in one transverse plane and of two perpendicular stereoscopic PIV fields was performed successfully. The first SPIV plane is 1 cm upstream of the hot wire rake and the second is both orthogonal to the first one and to the wall. The first PIV results show a blockage effect which based on both statistical results (i.e. mean, RMS and spatial correlation) and a potential model does not seem to affect the turbulence organization.

  11. Investigation of turbulent boundary layer flow over 2D bump using highly resolved large eddy simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Meyer, Knud Erik

    2011-01-01

    A large eddy simulation (LES) study of turbulent non-equilibrium boundary layer flow over 2 D Bump, at comparatively low Reynolds number Reh = U∞h/ν = 1950, was conducted. A well-known LES issue of obtaining and sustaining turbulent flow inside the computational domain at such low Re, is addresse...... partially confirm a close interdependency between generation and evolution of internal layers and the abrupt changes in the skin friction, previously reported in the literature. © 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers......., showed a good agreement with the available laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements. Analysis of the flow was directly able to identify and confirm the existence of internal layers at positions related to the vicinity of the upstream and downstream discontinuities in the surface curvature and also...

  12. LOLAS: an optical turbulence profiler in the atmospheric boundary layer with extreme altitude-resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, R; Wilson, R W; Chun, M; Butterley, T; Carrasco, E

    2008-01-01

    We report the development and first results of an instrument called Low Layer Scidar (LOLAS) which is aimed at the measurement of optical-turbulence profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer with high altitude-resolution. The method is based on the Generalized Scidar (GS) concept, but unlike the GS instruments which need a 1- m or larger telescope, LOLAS is implemented on a dedicated 40-cm telescope, making it an independent instrument. The system is designed for widely separated double-star targets, which enables the high altitude-resolution. Using a 20000-separation double- star, we have obtained turbulence profiles with unprecedented 12-m resolution. The system incorporates necessary novel algorithms for autoguiding, autofocus and image stabilisation. The results presented here were obtained at Mauna Kea Observatory. They show LOLAS capabilities but cannot be considered as representative of the site. A forthcoming paper will be devoted to the site characterisation. The instrument was built as part of the ...

  13. Fluid-structure interaction of turbulent boundary layer over a compliant surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharamu, Sreevatsa; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows induce unsteady loads on surfaces in contact with them, which affect material stresses, surface vibrations and far-field acoustics. We are developing a numerical methodology to study the coupled interaction of a turbulent boundary layer with the underlying surface. The surface is modeled as a linear elastic solid, while the fluid follows the spatially filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. An incompressible Large Eddy Simulation finite volume flow approach based on the algorithm of Mahesh et al. is used in the fluid domain. The discrete kinetic energy conserving property of the method ensures robustness at high Reynolds number. The linear elastic model in the solid domain is integrated in space using finite element method and in time using the Newmark time integration method. The fluid and solid domain solvers are coupled using both weak and strong coupling methods. Details of the algorithm, validation, and relevant results will be presented. This work is supported by NSWCCD, ONR.

  14. Structuring of turbulence and its impact on basic features of Ekman boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Esau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent Ekman boundary layer (EBL has been studied in a large number of theoretical, laboratory and modeling works since F. Nansen's observations during the Norwegian Polar Expedition 1893–1896. Nevertheless, the proposed analytical models, analysis of the EBL instabilities, and turbulence-resolving numerical simulations are not fully consistent. In particular, the role of turbulence self-organization into longitudinal roll vortices in the EBL and its dependence on the meridional component of the Coriolis force remain unclear. A new set of large-eddy simulations (LES are presented in this study. LES were performed for eight different latitudes (from 1° N to 90° N in the domain spanning 144 km in the meridional direction. Geostrophic winds from the west and from the east were used to drive the development of EBL turbulence. The emergence and growth of longitudinal rolls in the EBL was simulated. The simulated rolls are in good agreement with EBL stability analysis given in Dubos et al. (2008. The destruction of rolls in the westerly flow at low latitude was observed in simulations, which agrees well with the action of secondary instability on the rolls in the EBL. This study quantifies the effect of the meridional component of the Coriolis force and the effect of rolls in the EBL on the internal EBL parameters such as friction velocity, cross-isobaric angle, parameters of the EBL depth and resistance laws. A large impact of the roll development or destruction is found. The depth of the EBL in the westerly flow is about five times less than it is in the easterly flow at low latitudes. The EBL parameters, which depend on the depth, also exhibit large difference in these two types of the EBL. Thus, this study supports the need to include the horizontal component of the Coriolis force into theoretical constructions and parameterizations of the boundary layer in models.

  15. Krypton tagging velocimetry in a turbulent Mach 2.7 boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahradka, D.; Parziale, N. J.; Smith, M. S.; Marineau, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    The krypton tagging velocimetry (KTV) technique is applied to the turbulent boundary layer on the wall of the "Mach 3 Calibration Tunnel" at Arnold Engineering Development Complex (AEDC) White Oak. Profiles of velocity were measured with KTV and Pitot-pressure probes in the Mach 2.7 turbulent boundary layer comprised of 99 % {N}2/1 % Kr at momentum-thickness Reynolds numbers of {Re}_{\\varTheta }= 800, 1400, and 2400. Agreement between the KTV- and Pitot-derived velocity profiles is excellent. The KTV and Pitot velocity data follow the law of the wall in the logarithmic region with application of the Van Driest I transformation. The velocity data are analyzed in the outer region of the boundary layer with the law of the wake and a velocity-defect law. KTV-derived streamwise velocity fluctuation measurements are reported and are consistent with data from the literature. To enable near-wall measurement with KTV (y/δ ≈ 0.1-0.2), an 800-nm longpass filter was used to block the 760.2-nm read-laser pulse. With the longpass filter, the 819.0-nm emission from the re-excited Kr can be imaged to track the displacement of the metastable tracer without imaging the reflection and scatter from the read-laser off of solid surfaces. To operate the Mach 3 AEDC Calibration Tunnel at several discrete unit Reynolds numbers, a modification was required and is described herein.

  16. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  17. DNS of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, L.; Choudhari, M.; Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode that, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. An inlet boundary condition is carefully designed to allow for accurate injection of instability wave modes and minimize acoustic reflections at numerical boundaries. Nonlinear parabolized stability equation (PSE) predictions compare well with the DNS in terms of modal amplitudes and modal shape during the strongly nonlinear phase of the secondary instability mode. During the transition process, the skin friction coefficient rises rather rapidly and the wall-shear distribution shows a sawtooth pattern that is analogous to the previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. Fully turbulent features are observed in the downstream region of the flow.

  18. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, N.D., E-mail: nbrubaker@math.arizona.edu; Lega, J., E-mail: lega@math.arizona.edu

    2016-01-08

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  19. Experimental Study of the Fluid Mechanics of Unsteady Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    research most relevant to the present work, the material of this section is restricted to developing turbulent boundary-layer flows and to fully...within which the results of this study are to be examined is presented in this chapter. Although some of the material is found in , earlier works on...8y !-U,, ( aula ) (7 (uly -UIVI(a I/ay) unste ’.dy flow steady flow Figure 5.17 Transfer of kinetic energy between velocity fields near the wall (the

  20. Investigation of Wall Pressure Fluctuations in a Turbulent Boundary Layer by Large Eddy Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) was used to investigate the space-time field of the low Mach number, fully developed turbulent boundary layer on a smooth, rigid flat plate. The wall-pressure field simulated by LES was analyzed to obtain the pressure statistics , including the wall-pressure root-mean square, skewness and flatness factors, which show the wall pressure distribution was not Gaussian. The profile of the auto-power spectral density and the contour of the streamwise wavenumber-frequency spectral density of wall-pressure were plotted. The "convection ridge" can be observed clearly and the convection velocity can be calculated from the location of the convection peak.

  1. Non-Gaussian PDF Modeling of Turbulent Boundary Layer Fluctuating Pressure Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinwolf, Alexander; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate properties of the probability density function (PDF) of turbulent boundary layer fluctuating pressures measured on the exterior of a supersonic transport aircraft. It is shown that fluctuating pressure PDFs differ from the Gaussian distribution even for surface conditions having no significant discontinuities. The PDF tails are wider and longer than those of the Gaussian model. For pressure fluctuations upstream of forward-facing step discontinuities and downstream of aft-facing step discontinuities, deviations from the Gaussian model are more significant and the PDFs become asymmetrical. Various analytical PDF distributions are used and further developed to model this behavior.

  2. Numerical simulation of quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex generation in turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nan; LU Li-peng; DUAN Zhen-zhen; YUAN Xiang-jiang

    2008-01-01

    A mechanism for generation of near wall quasi-streamwise hairpin-like vortex (QHV) and secondary quasi-streamwise vortices (SQV) is presented. The conceptual model of resonant triad in the theory of hydrodynamic instability and direct numerical simulation of a turbulent boundary layer were applied to reveal the formation of QHV and SQV. The generation procedures and the characteristics of the vortex structures are obtained, which share some similarities with previous numerical simulations. The research using resonant triad conceptual model and numerical simulation provides a possibility for investigating and controling the vortex structures, which play a dominant role in the evolution of coherent structures in the near-wall region.

  3. A study on turbulence transportation and modification of Spalart–Allmaras model for shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It is of great significance to improve the accuracy of turbulence models in shock-wave/boundary layer interaction flow. The relationship between the pressure gradient, as well as the shear layer, and the development of turbulent kinetic energy in impinging shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flow at Mach 2.25 is analyzed based on the data of direct numerical simulation (DNS. It is found that the turbulent kinetic energy is amplified by strong shear in the separation zone and the adverse pressure gradient near the separation point. The pressure gradient was non-dimensionalised with local density, velocity, and viscosity. Spalart–Allmaras (S–A model is modified by introducing the non-dimensional pressure gradient into the production term of the eddy viscosity transportation equation. Simulation results show that the production and dissipation of eddy viscosity are strongly enhanced by the modification of S–A model. Compared with DNS and experimental data, the wall pressure and the wall skin friction coefficient as well as the velocity profile of the modified S–A model are obviously improved. Thus it can be concluded that the modification of S–A model with the pressure gradient can improve the predictive accuracy for simulating the shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction.

  4. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  5. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  6. Effects of free stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with zero pressure gradient. 4th Report. Calculation of flow field; Seiatsu ittei no heiban ranryu kyokaiso ni oyobosu shuryubu midare no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, M.; Yata, J. [Kyoto Inst. of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Minamiyama, T. [Fukuyama University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-04-25

    The effects of free stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer were calculated using a {kappa}-{epsilon} two-equation model. The calculations were performed with respect to velocity profiles on a flat plate wall shear stress turbulence energy integral length scales of turbulence and decay of free stream turbulence and the results were compared with experimental results. The energy of free stream turbulence and the dissipation values at the leading edge of flat plate were used, as the initial conditions for calculation. These initial values of dissipation were determined from the integral length scales of free stream turbulence at the leading edge. The calculated wall shear stress increased with the free stream turbulence and integral length scales of turbulence. The velocity profiles and turbulence energy agreed well with the experimental results and the effects of free stream turbulence on the wall shear stress agreed fairly well with those observed in experiments. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  8. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, N. D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid.

  9. Two-dimensional cubic convolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E; Geng, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The paper develops two-dimensional (2D), nonseparable, piecewise cubic convolution (PCC) for image interpolation. Traditionally, PCC has been implemented based on a one-dimensional (1D) derivation with a separable generalization to two dimensions. However, typical scenes and imaging systems are not separable, so the traditional approach is suboptimal. We develop a closed-form derivation for a two-parameter, 2D PCC kernel with support [-2,2] x [-2,2] that is constrained for continuity, smoothness, symmetry, and flat-field response. Our analyses, using several image models, including Markov random fields, demonstrate that the 2D PCC yields small improvements in interpolation fidelity over the traditional, separable approach. The constraints on the derivation can be relaxed to provide greater flexibility and performance.

  10. Experimental Measurements of a High Reynolds Num- ber Adverse Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Amili, Omid; Stanislas, Michel; Cuvier, Christophe; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Srinath, Sricharan; Laval, Jean-Philippe; Kaehler, Christian; Hain, Rainer; Scharnowski, Sven; Schroeder, Andreas; Geisler, Reinhard; Agocs, Janos; Roese, Anni; Willert, Christian; Klinner, Joachim; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The study of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers is complicated by the need to characterise both the local pressure gradient and it's upstream flow history. It is therefore necessary to measure a significant streamwise domain at a resolution sufficient to resolve the small scales features. To achieve this collaborative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in the large boundary layer wind-tunnel at the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille, including: planar measurements spanning a streamwise domain of 3.5m using 16 cameras covering 15 δ spanwise wall-normal stereo-PIV measurements, high-speed micro-PIV of the near wall region and wall shear stress; and streamwise wall-normal PIV in the viscous sub layer. Details of the measurements and preliminary results will be presented.

  11. Turbulent behaviour within a coastal boundary layer, observations and modelling at the Isola del Giglio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandini, Carlo; Taddei, Stefano; Doronzo, Bartolomeo; Fattorini, Maria; Costanza, Letizia; Perna, Massimo; Serafino, Francesco; Ludeno, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    The hydrodynamics of coastal areas is characterized by the interaction among phenomena occurring at different spatial and temporal scales, such as the interaction of a large-scale ocean current with the local bathymetry and coastline, and local forcing conditions. In order to take into account all relevant phenomena, the study of the hydrodynamics of coastal zones requires a high-spatial and temporal resolution for both observations and simulation of local currents. This resolution can be obtained by using X-band radar, which allows simultaneous measurement of waves and currents in a range of 1-3 miles from the coastline, as well as high-resolution numerical models implemented in the area and configured through multiple nesting techniques in order to reach resolutions comparable to such coastal observations. Such an integrated monitoring system was implemented at the Isola del Giglio in 2012, after the accident of the Costa Concordia ship. Results can be used as a cross-validation of data produced independently by radar observations and numerical models. In addition, results give some important insights on the dynamics of the coastal boundary layer, both for what concerns the attenuation in the profile of the depth-averaged velocities which typically occur in turbulent boundary layers, as well as for the production, detachment and evolution of vorticity produced by the interaction of large-scale ocean currents with the coastline and the subsequent time evolution of such boundary layer. This transition between large-scale regional currents and the coastal boundary layer is often neglected in regional forecasting systems, but it has an important role in the ocean turbulence processes.

  12. Turbulent production in an internal wave bottom boundary layer maintained by a vertically propagating seiche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Stephen M.

    2016-04-01

    Internal seiches, which supply the energy responsible for mixing many lakes, are often modeled as vertically standing waves. However, recent observations of vertical seiche propagation in a small lake are inconsistent with the standard, vertically standing model. To examine the processes responsible for such propagation, drag and turbulent production in the bottom boundary layer of a small lake are related to the energy supplied by a propagating seiche (period 10-24 h). Despite complex and fluctuating stratification, which often inhibited mixing within 0.4 m of the bed, bottom stress was well represented by a simple drag coefficient model (drag coefficient 1.5 × 10-3). The net supply of seiche energy to the boundary layer was estimated by fitting a model for internal wave vertical propagation to velocity profiles measured above the boundary layer (1-4.5 m above lakebed). Fitted reflection coefficients ranged from 0.3 at 1 cycle/d frequency to 0.7 at 2.4 cycles/d (cf. near-unity coefficients of classical seiche theories). The net supply of seiche energy approximately balanced boundary layer turbulent production. Three of four peaks in production and energy flux occurred 0.8-2.2 days after strong oscillating winds, a delay comparable to the time required for seiche energy to propagate to the lakebed. A model based on the estimated drag coefficient predicted the observed frequency dependence of the seiche reflection coefficient. For flat-bed regions in narrow lakes, the model predicts that reflection is controlled by the ratio of water velocity to vertical wave propagation speed, with sufficiently large ratios leading to weak reflection, and clear vertical seiche propagation.

  13. Heat transfer and wall temperature effects in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, M.; Asproulias, I.; Larsson, J.; Pirozzoli, S.; Grasso, F.

    2016-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the wall temperature on the behavior of oblique shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at free-stream Mach number 2.28 and shock angle of the wedge generator φ =8∘ . Five values of the wall-to-recovery-temperature ratio (Tw/Tr ) are considered, corresponding to cold, adiabatic, and hot wall thermal conditions. We show that the main effect of cooling is to decrease the characteristic scales of the interaction in terms of upstream influence and extent of the separation bubble. The opposite behavior is observed in the case of heating, which produces a marked dilatation of the interaction region. The distribution of the Stanton number shows that a strong amplification of the heat transfer occurs across the interaction, with the maximum thermal and dynamic loads found for the case of the cold wall. The analysis reveals that the fluctuating heat flux exhibits a strong intermittent behavior, characterized by scattered spots with extremely high values compared to the mean. Furthermore, the analogy between momentum and heat transfer, typical of compressible, wall-bounded, equilibrium turbulent flows, does not apply for most of the interaction domain. The premultiplied spectra of the wall heat flux do not show any evidence of the influence of the low-frequency shock motion, and the primary mechanism for the generation of peak heating is found to be linked with the turbulence amplification in the interaction region.

  14. Influence of grid aspect ratio on planetary boundary layer turbulence in large-eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nishizawa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the influence of the grid aspect ratio of horizontal to vertical grid spacing on turbulence in the planetary boundary layer (PBL in a large-eddy simulation (LES. In order to clarify and distinguish them from other artificial effects caused by numerical schemes, we used a fully compressible meteorological LES model with a fully explicit scheme of temporal integration. The influences are investigated with a series of sensitivity tests with parameter sweeps of spatial resolution and grid aspect ratio. We confirmed that the mixing length of the eddy viscosity and diffusion due to sub-grid-scale turbulence plays an essential role in reproducing the theoretical −5/3 slope of the energy spectrum. If we define the filter length in LES modeling based on consideration of the numerical scheme, and introduce a corrective factor for the grid aspect ratio into the mixing length, the theoretical slope of the energy spectrum can be obtained; otherwise, spurious energy piling appears at high wave numbers. We also found that the grid aspect ratio has influence on the turbulent statistics, especially the skewness of the vertical velocity near the top of the PBL, which becomes spuriously large with large aspect ratio, even if a reasonable spectrum is obtained.

  15. The response of the Ocean Surface Boundary Layer and Langmuir turbulence to tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Kukulka, Tobias; Reichl, Brandon; Hara, Tetsu; Ginis, Isaac

    2016-11-01

    The interaction of turbulent ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) currents and the surface waves' Stokes drift generates Langmuir turbulence (LT), which enhances OSBL mixing. This study investigates the response of LT to extreme wind and complex wave forcing under tropical cyclones (TCs), using a large eddy simulation (LES) approach based on the wave-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. We simulate the OSBL response to TC systems by imposing the wind forcing of an idealized TC storm model, covering the entire horizontal extent of the storm systems. The Stokes drift vector that drives the wave forcing in the LES is determined from realistic spectral wave simulations forced by the same wind fields. We find that the orientations of Langmuir cells are vertically uniform and aligned with the wind in most regions despite substantial wind-wave misalignment in TC conditions. LT's penetration depth is related to Stokes drift depth and limited by OSBL depth. A wind-projected surface layer Langmuir number is proposed and successfully applied to scale turbulent vertical velocity variance in extreme TC conditions. Current affiliation: Princeton University/NOAA GFDL.

  16. A Clustering Method to Characterize Intermittent Bursts of Turbulence and Submeso Motions Interaction in the Stable Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, N.; Klein, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers with stable stratification include a variety of small-scale non-turbulent motions such as waves, microfronts and other complex structures. When the thermal stratification becomes strong, the presence of such submeso motions could affect the turbulent mixing to a large extent and common similarity theory that is used to describe weakly stable conditions may become unreliable. The scientific community clearly lacks understanding of what these motions are and of the extent to which they affect turbulent mixing in the stable boundary layer. We use a data-based approach to isolate regimes in which small-scale, non-turbulent motions are a main influencing parameter of turbulent mixing. We apply a clustering methodology derived for multidimensional nonstationary timeseries. The technique is based on a bounded variation, finite element method (FEM-BV) and we use it to characterize the interaction between small-scale non-turbulent motions and turbulence. Turbulence data are approximated by an optimal sequence of locally stationary multivariate autoregressive factor models (VARX) processes and some slow hidden process switching between them (FEM-BV-VARX (Horenko 2010, JAS)). The VARX processes that approximate the data include influence from external forcing. We perform prefiltering of the turbulence data to isolate submeso motions and use them as external forcing in the clustering strategy. Thus the strategy separates periods for which the influence of the external factors, i.e. non-turbulent motions on the turbulence differs. We use this strategy to derive a stochastic representation of the interactions between non-turbulent motions and turbulence under stable stratification. Our results show that submeso motions are a main forcing of turbulence in the most stable cases and not for the weakly stable cases. As these different influence regimes are isolated by the FEM-BV-VARX technique, a Markov transition matrix describes the probability of

  17. High Reynolds number rough wall turbulent boundary layer experiments using Braille surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Michael; Monty, Jason; Nova, Todd; Allen, James; Chong, Min

    2007-11-01

    This paper details smooth, transitional and fully rough turbulent boundary layer experiments in the New Mexico State high Reynolds number rough wall wind tunnel. The initial surface tested was generated with a Braille printer and consisted of an uniform array of Braille points. The average point height being 0.5mm, the spacing between the points in the span was 0.5mm and the surface consisted of span wise rows separated by 4mm. The wavelength to peak ratio was 8:1. The boundary layer thickness at the measurement location was 190mm giving a large separation of roughness height to layer thickness. The maximum friction velocity was uτ=1.5m/s at Rex=3.8 x10^7. Results for the skin friction co-efficient show that this surface follows a Nikuradse type inflectional curve and that Townsends outer layer similarity hypothesis is valid for rough wall flows with a large separation of scales. Mean flow and turbulence statistics will be presented.

  18. Computation of turbulent boundary layers employing the defect wall-function method. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Douglas L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to decrease overall computational time requirements of spatially-marching parabolized Navier-Stokes finite-difference computer code when applied to turbulent fluid flow, a wall-function methodology, originally proposed by R. Barnwell, was implemented. This numerical effort increases computational speed and calculates reasonably accurate wall shear stress spatial distributions and boundary-layer profiles. Since the wall shear stress is analytically determined from the wall-function model, the computational grid near the wall is not required to spatially resolve the laminar-viscous sublayer. Consequently, a substantially increased computational integration step size is achieved resulting in a considerable decrease in net computational time. This wall-function technique is demonstrated for adiabatic flat plate test cases from Mach 2 to Mach 8. These test cases are analytically verified employing: (1) Eckert reference method solutions, (2) experimental turbulent boundary-layer data of Mabey, and (3) finite-difference computational code solutions with fully resolved laminar-viscous sublayers. Additionally, results have been obtained for two pressure-gradient cases: (1) an adiabatic expansion corner and (2) an adiabatic compression corner.

  19. Insight on Turbulence Characteristics of an Urban-type Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Bruno; Swanson, Jonathan; Wark, Candace

    2010-11-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow through an urban-type boundary layer (4 rows of 3 cuboid Plexiglas blocks) in an experimentally modeled atmospheric boundary layer will be presented. Stereoscopic PIV is utilized to obtain 3D flow characteristics of the flow field within this complex geometry. The streamwise spacing of the array is chosen so as to mimic a common flow regime in urban areas, i.e. skimming flow regime. A large number of vertical planes distributed across the streets allows for a very good spatial description of the flow features. Measurements are obtained directly upstream of the model and in each of the middle streets of the 4 by 3 array. Coherent structure identification tools are used to highlight the 3D patterns within each of the streets. A large number of SPIV realizations in the domain provides valuable information about the flow field turbulence statistics as the flow is evolving from one street to the next. The incidence angle of the incoming flow field is also varied to assess the effect of flow channeling within the urban environment. Finally, two mean free stream speeds are studied to investigate the effect of the incoming wind profiles on the flow field turbulence.

  20. The accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry for measurements of a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Coudert, Sebastien; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Stanislas, Michel; Soria, Julio

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the accuracy of tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) for turbulent boundary layer measurements, a series of synthetic image-based simulations and practical experiments are performed on a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer at Reθ = 7,800. Two different approaches to Tomo-PIV are examined using a full-volume slab measurement and a thin-volume "fat" light sheet approach. Tomographic reconstruction is performed using both the standard MART technique and the more efficient MLOS-SMART approach, showing a 10-time increase in processing speed. Random and bias errors are quantified under the influence of the near-wall velocity gradient, reconstruction method, ghost particles, seeding density and volume thickness, using synthetic images. Experimental Tomo-PIV results are compared with hot-wire measurements and errors are examined in terms of the measured mean and fluctuating profiles, probability density functions of the fluctuations, distributions of fluctuating divergence through the volume and velocity power spectra. Velocity gradients have a large effect on errors near the wall and also increase the errors associated with ghost particles, which convect at mean velocities through the volume thickness. Tomo-PIV provides accurate experimental measurements at low wave numbers; however, reconstruction introduces high noise levels that reduces the effective spatial resolution. A thinner volume is shown to provide a higher measurement accuracy at the expense of the measurement domain, albeit still at a lower effective spatial resolution than planar and Stereo-PIV.

  1. Coupling Between Turbulent Boundary Layer and Radiative Heat Transfer Under Engine-Relevant Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, A.; Paul, C.; Ferreyro, S.; Imren, A.; Haworth, D. C.; Roy, S.; Ge, W.; Modest, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    The lack of accurate submodels for in-cylinder radiation and heat transfer has been identified as a key shortcoming in developing truly predictive CFD models that can be used to develop combustion systems for advanced high-efficiency, low-emissions engines. Recent measurements of wall layers in engines show discrepancies of up to 100% with respect to standard CFD boundary-layer models. And recent analysis of in-cylinder radiation based on recent spectral property databases and high-fidelity radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers has shown that at operating conditions typical of heavy-duty CI engines, radiative emission can be as high as 40% of the wall heat losses, that molecular gas radiation can be more important than soot radiation, and that a significant fraction of the emitted radiation can be reabsorbed before reaching the walls. That is, radiation changes the in-cylinder temperature distribution, which in turn affects combustion and emissions. The goal of this research is to develop models that explicitly account for the potentially strong coupling between radiative and turbulent boundary layer heat transfer. For example, for optically thick conditions, a simple diffusion model might be formulated in terms of an absorption-coefficient-dependent turbulent Prandtl number. NSF, DOE.

  2. Evolution and formation of shear layers in a developing turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghoon; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    The evolution and formation mechanism of shear layers in the outer region of a turbulent boundary layer are investigated using time-resolved PIV datasets of a developing turbulent boundary layer from inception at the trip up to Reτ = 3000 . An analysis of a sequence of instantaneous streamwise velocity fluctuation fields reveals that strong streamwise velocity gradients are prevalent along interfaces where low- and high-speed regions interact. To provide an insight on how such regions are associated with the formation of shear layers in the outer regions, we compute conditional averages of streamwise velocity fluctuations based on a strong shear layer. Our results reveal that one possible mechanism for the generation of shear layers in the outer region is due to the mismatch in the convection velocities between low- and high-speed regions. The results also indicate that the angle of the inclined shear layer is developing in time. In addition, the conditionally averaged velocity fluctuations exhibit a local instability along these shear layers, leading to a shear layer roll-up event as the layers evolve in time. Based on these findings, we propose a conceptual model which describes dynamic interactions of shear layers and their associated large-scale coherent motions. The authors wish to acknowledge the financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  3. Confinement effects in shock/turbulent-boundary-layer interaction through wall-modeled LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo-Moreno, Ivan; Campo, Laura; Larsson, Johan; Bodart, Julien; Helmer, David; Eaton, John

    2016-11-01

    Wall-modeled large-eddy simulations (WMLES) are used to investigate three-dimensional effects imposed by lateral confinement on the interaction of oblique shock waves impinging on turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) developed along the walls of a nearly-square duct. A constant Mach number, M = 2 . 05 , of the incoming air stream is considered, with a Reynolds number based on the incoming turbulent boundary layer momentum thickness Reθ 14 , 000 . The strength of the impinging shock is varied by increasing the height of a compression wedge located at a constant streamwise location that spans the top wall of the duct at a 20° angle. Simulation results are first validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data obtained at several vertical planes. Emphasis is placed on the study of the instantaneous and time-averaged structure of the flow for the stronger-interaction case, which shows mean flow reversal. By performing additional spanwise-periodic simulations, it is found that the structure and location of the shock system and separation bubble are significantly modified by the lateral confinement. Low-frequency unsteadiness and downstream evolution of corner flows are also investigated. Financial support from the United States Department of Energy under the PSAAP program is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Turbulence radiation coupling in boundary layers of heavy-duty diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Ge, Wenjun [University of California Merced (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-05

    The lack of accurate submodels for in-cylinder radiation and heat transfer has been identified as a key shortcoming in developing truly predictive, physics-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to develop combustion systems for advanced high-efficiency, low-emissions engines. Recent measurements of wall layers in engines show discrepancies of up to 100% with respect to standard CFD boundary-layer models. And recent analysis of in-cylinder radiation based on the most recent spectral property databases and high-fidelity radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers has shown that at operating pressures and exhaust-gas recirculation levels typical of modern heavy-duty compression-ignition engines, radiative emission can be as high as 40% of the wall heat losses, that molecular gas radiation (mainly CO2 and H2O) can be more important than soot radiation, and that a significant fraction of the emitted radiation can be reabsorbed before reaching the walls. That is, radiation not only contributes to heat losses, but also changes the in-cylinder temperature distribution, which in turn affects combustion and emissions. The goal of this research is to develop models that explicitly account for the potentially strong coupling between radiative and turbulent boundary layer heat transfer. For example, for optically thick conditions, a simple diffusion model might be formulated in terms of an absorption-coefficient-dependent turbulent Prandtl number.

  5. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, C.; Potts, I.; Reeks, M. W., E-mail: mike.reeks@ncl.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Stephenson Building, Claremont Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. In this way, we are able to account directly for the influence of ejection and sweeping events as others have done but without resorting to the use of adjustable parameters. Deposition rate predictions for a wide range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition, deposition rates are compared with those obtained from continuous random walk models and Langevin equation based ejection and sweep models which noticeably give significantly lower deposition rates. Various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented. Finally, we consider the model limitations in using the model to calculate deposition in more complex flows where the near wall turbulence may be significantly different.

  6. Edge states for the turbulence transition in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Kreilos, Tobias; Schneider, Tobias M; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of an exact invariant solution to the Navier-Stokes equations for the asymptotic suction boundary layer. The identified periodic orbit with a very long period of several thousand advective time units is found as a local dynamical attractor embedded in the stability boundary between laminar and turbulent dynamics. Its dynamics captures both the interplay of downstream oriented vortex pairs and streaks observed in numerous shear flows as well as the energetic bursting that is characteristic for boundary layers. By embedding the flow into a family of flows that interpolates between plane Couette flow and the boundary layer we demonstrate that the periodic orbit emerges in a saddle-node infinite-period (SNIPER) bifurcation of two symmetry-related travelling wave solutions of plane Couette flow. Physically, the long period is due to a slow streak instability which leads to a violent breakup of a streak associated with the bursting and the reformation of the streak at a different spanwi...

  7. Sensitivity to Mean Flow Parameters of the Low Wavenumber Content of the Wall Pressure under a Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    fit to the turbulence data discussed in Section B .2 and the analytical expression for the mean shear discussed in Section B .2. A cubic spline fit to the...functions) interpolation schemes. The inner integral in Eqs. 16 and 17 is evaluated using Simpson’s rule. B . Turbulent Boundary Layer Data 1. Data Sources...the data points. Once such a curve has been defined, the data can be interpolated at any location between measurement points. Spline interpolation is

  8. Numerical Study of Two-Dimensional Viscous Flow over Dams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王利兵; 刘宇陆; 涂敏杰

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristics of two-dimensional viscous flow over two dams were numerically investigated. The results show that the behavior of the vortices is closely related to the space between two dams, water depth, Fr number and Reynolds number. In addition, the flow properties behind each dam are different, and the changes over two dams are more complex than over one dam. Finally, the relevant turbulent characteristics were analyzed.

  9. Laboratory measurements of scalar and momentum structure in turbulent aquatic benthic boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombroski, Daniel Edward

    In aquatic benthic environments, hydrodynamic transport of mass and momentum have shaped the evolution of form-function relationships. Animals whose life cycle depends on success in such environments have developed the biological structure and behavioral mechanisms to sustain dynamic stresses and complex chemical signals. It has become increasingly clear that understanding the ecology of these organisms is dependent on examining the complexities of the turbulent environment. In this dissertation, hydrodynamics and the structure of chemical signals within turbulent boundary layer flows are examined in the context of natural and biological systems. Experiments were conducted in the benthic region of a water flume using a combination of point-measurement and full-field imaging techniques. There are three areas of focus within the complete body of work: (1) The accuracy of an acoustic measurement technique commonly used in natural flows was evaluated. Errors in the technique, primarily attributed to a sampling volume that is large relative to the scales of motion in turbulent flows, were found to be larger than and extend farther from the bed than previously reported. (2) A three-dimensional laser-based imaging system was developed for quantifying turbulent scalar structure. The system was employed to study the topology and orientation of structure within a bed-level, passively released scalar plume. (3) Hydrodynamic stresses were measured near marine fouling communities in a study aimed at predicting larval settlement probabilities. Turbulent stresses, and by extension, the suitability of microhabitats, were found to be highly dependent on local topography and outer-scale flow conditions. This body of work advances the field of experimental fluid mechanics by contributing to the development of methods for quantifying turbulent flows, as well as furthering current understanding of the capabilities and limitations associated with new and existing techniques. Statistical

  10. Resolving vorticity and dissipation in a turbulent boundary layer by tomographic PTV and VIC+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiders, Jan F. G.; Scarano, Fulvio; Elsinga, Gerrit E.

    2017-04-01

    The existing time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements by Jodai and Elsinga (J Fluid Mech 795:611-633; Jodai, Elsinga, J Fluid Mech 795:611-633, 2016) in a turbulent boundary layer ( Re θ = 2038) are reprocessed using tomographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) and vortex-in-cell-plus (VIC+). The resulting small-scale flow properties, i.e. vorticity and turbulence dissipation, are compared. The VIC+ technique was recently proposed and uses the concept of pouring time into space to increase reconstruction quality of instantaneous velocity. The tomographic PTV particle track measurements are interpolated using VIC+ to a dense grid, making use of both particle velocity and Lagrangian acceleration. Comparison of the vortical structures by visualization of isosurfaces of vorticity magnitude shows that the two methods return similar coherent vortical structures, but their strength in terms of vorticity magnitude is increased when using VIC+, which suggests an improvement in spatial resolution. Further statistical evaluation shows that the root mean square (rms) of vorticity fluctuations from tomographic PIV is approximately 40% lower in comparison to a reference profile available from a DNS simulation, while the VIC+ technique returns rms vorticity fluctuations to within 10% of the reference. The dissipation rate is heavily underestimated by tomographic PIV with approximately 50% damping, whereas the VIC+ analysis yields a dissipation rate to within approximately 5% for y + > 25. The fact that dissipation can be directly measured by a volumetric experiment is novel. It differs from existing approaches that involve 2d measurements combined with isotropic turbulence assumptions or apply corrections based on sub-grid scale turbulence modelling. Finally, the study quantifies the spatial response of VIC+ with a sine-wave lattice analysis. The results indicate a twofold increase of spatial resolution with respect to cross

  11. Measurements of Turbulence Dissipation Rates in the Planetary Boundary Layer from Wind Profiling Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, K.; Bianco, L.; Wilczak, J. M.; Johnston, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    When forecasting winds at a wind plant for energy production, the turbulence parameterizations are crucial for understanding wind plant performance. Recent research shows that the turbulence (eddy) dissipation rate in planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes introduces significant uncertainty in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Thus, developing the capability to measure dissipation rates in the PBL will allow for identification of weaknesses in, and improvements to the parameterizations. We use data from a 915-MHz wind profiling radar at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, collected during the XPIA campaign in spring 2015, to identify the critical parameters for measuring eddy dissipation rates using the spectral width method. Radar set-up parameters (e.g., spectral resolution), post-processing techniques (e.g., filtering for non-atmospheric signals), and spectral averaging, are optimized to capture the most accurate power spectrum for measuring spectral widths for use in the computation of the eddy dissipation rates. These estimates are compared to six heights of turbulence-measuring sonic anemometers from 50 - 300 m on a co-located 300 m tower as verification, showing encouraging results. These methods are then applied to the wind profiling radar data being collected in the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project 2 (WFIP2), a DOE funded campaign that aims to improve the ability to forecast hub-height winds from WRF-based models. This campaign uses of a suite of field observations, including many wind profiling radars, in the Columbia River Gorge, a location with complex terrain where turbulence parameterizations are critical for wind energy prediction.

  12. Wind-tunnel experiments of thermally-stratified turbulent boundary layer flow over a wall-mounted 2-D block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent boundary-layer flows over complex topography have been extensively studied in the atmospheric sciences and wind engineering communities. The upwind turbulence level, the atmospheric thermal stability and the shape of the topography as well as surface characteristics play important roles in turbulent transport of momentum and scalar fluxes. However, to the best of our knowledge, atmospheric thermal stability has rarely been taken into account in laboratory simulations, particularly in wind-tunnel experiments. Extension of such studies in thermally-stratified wind tunnels will substantially advance our understanding of thermal stability effects on the physics of flow over complex topography. Additionally, high-resolution experimental data can be used for development of new parameterization of surface fluxes and validation of numerical models such as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). A series of experiments of neutral and thermally-stratified boundary-layer flows over a wall-mounted 2-D block were conducted at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory boundary-layer wind tunnel. The 2-D block, with a width to height ratio of 2:1, occupied the lowest 25% of the turbulent boundary layer. Stable and convective boundary layers were simulated by independently controlling the temperature of air flow, the test section floor, and the wall-mounted block surfaces. Measurements using high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), x-wire/cold-wire anemometry, thermal-couples and surface heat flux sensors were made to quantify the turbulent properties and surface fluxes in distinct macroscopic flow regions, including the separation/recirculation zones, evolving shear layer and the asymptotic far wake. Emphasis will be put on addressing thermal stability effects on the spatial distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulent fluxes of momentum and scalar from the near to far wake region. Terms of the TKE budget equation are also inferred from measurements and

  13. Specification of a Two-Dimensional Test Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    This paper describes the geometry and other boundary conditions for a test case which can be used to test different two-dimensional CFD codes in the lEA Annex 20 work. The given supply opening is large compared with practical openings. Therefore, this geometry will reduce the need for a high number...... of grid points in the wall jet region....

  14. Confined two-dimensional fermions at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    De Francia, M; Loewe, M; Santangelo, E M; De Francia, M; Falomir, H; Loewe, M; Santangelo, E M

    1995-01-01

    We introduce the chemical potential in a system of two-dimensional massless fermions, confined to a finite region, by imposing twisted boundary conditions in the Euclidean time direction. We explore in this simple model the application of functional techniques which could be used in more complicated situations.

  15. Two-dimensional manifold with point-like defects

    CERN Document Server

    Gani, Vakhid A; Rubin, Sergei G

    2014-01-01

    We study a class of two-dimensional extra spaces isomorphic to the $S^2$ sphere in the framework of the multidimensional gravitation. We show that there exists a family of stationary metrics that depend on the initial (boundary) conditions. All these geometries have a singular point. We also discuss the possibility for these deformed extra spaces to be considered as dark matter candidates.

  16. Classifying Two-dimensional Hyporeductive Triple Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Issa, A Nourou

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional real hyporeductive triple algebras (h.t.a.) are investigated. A classification of such algebras is presented. As a consequence, a classification of two-dimensional real Lie triple algebras (i.e. generalized Lie triple systems) and two-dimensional real Bol algebras is given.

  17. Implications of Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence on the Near-Wake Structure of Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bhaganagar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence structure in the wake behind a full-scale horizontal-axis wind turbine under the influence of real-time atmospheric inflow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Precursor atmospheric boundary layer (ABL simulations have been performed to obtain mean and turbulence states of the atmosphere under stable stratification subjected to two different cooling rates. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of the turbine wake. Increasing stability results in shallower boundary layers with stronger wind shear, steeper vertical wind angle gradients, lower turbulence, and suppressed vertical motions. A turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the wind turbines, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer.

  18. Active control of flow noise sources in turbulent boundary layer on a flat-plate using piezoelectric bimorph film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Woo Seog; Lee, Seung Bae [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Shin [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, Yang [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    The piezoelectric bimorph film, which, as an actuator, can generate more effective displacement than the usual PVDF film, is used to control the turbulent boundary-layer flow. The change of wall pressures inside the turbulent boundary layer is observed by using the multi-channel microphone array flush-mounted on the surface when actuation at the non-dimensional frequency f{sub b}{sup +} =0.008 and 0.028 is applied to the turbulent boundary layer. The wall pressure characteristics by the actuation to produce local displacement are more dominantly influenced by the size of the actuator module than the actuation frequency. The movement of large-scale turbulent structures to the upper layer is found to be the main mechanism of the reduction in the wall-pressure energy spectrum when the 700{nu}/u{sub {tau}}-long bimorph film is periodically actuated at the non-dimensional frequency f{sub b}{sup +} =0.008 and 0.028. The bimorph actuator is triggered with the time delay for the active forcing at a single frequency when a 1/8' pressure-type, pin-holed microphone sensor detects the large-amplitude pressure event by the turbulent spot. The wall-pressure energy in the late-transitional boundary layer is partially reduced near the convection wavenumber by the open-loop control based on the large amplitude event.

  19. Fluctuation spectra and variances in convective turbulent boundary layers: A reevaluation of old models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaglom, A. M.

    1994-02-01

    Most of the existing theoretical models for statistical characteristics of turbulence in convective boundary layers are based on the similarity theory by Monin and Obukhov [Trudy Geofiz. Inst. Akad. Nauk SSSR 24(151), 163 (1954)], and its further refinements. A number of such models was recently reconsidered and partially compared with available data by Kader and Yaglom [J. Fluid Mech. 212, 637 (1990); Turbulence and Coherent Structures (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1991), p. 387]. However, in these papers the data related to variances =σ2u and =σ2v of horizontal velocity components were not considered at all, and the data on horizontal velocity spectra Eu(k) and Ev(k) were used only for a restricted range of not too small wave numbers k. This is connected with findings by Kaimal et al. [Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 98, 563 (1972)] and Panofsky et al. [Boundary-Layer Meteorol. 11, 355 (1977)], who showed that the Monin-Obukhov theory cannot be applied to velocity variance σ2u and σ2v and to spectra Eu(k) and Ev(k) in energy ranges of wave numbers. It is shown in this paper that a simple generalization of the traditional similarity theory, which takes into account the influence of large-scale organized structures, leads to new models of horizontal velocity variances and spectra, which describe the observed deviations of these characteristics from the predictions based on the Monin-Obukhov theory, and agree satisfactorily with the available data. The application of the same approach to the temperature spectrum and variance explains why the observed deviations of temperature spectrum in convective boundary layers from the Monin-Obukhov similarity does not lead to marked violations of the same similarity as applied to temperature variance =σ2t.

  20. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates $\\vec{r}$, it is different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals constituting by the medium columns of dielectric constants are constants. We find the band gaps of two-dimensional function photonic crystals are different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals, and when the functions form of dielectric constants are different, the band gaps structure should be changed, which can be designed into the appropriate band gaps structures by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals.