WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-dimensional time resolved

  1. Holographic and time-resolving ability of pulse-pair two-dimensional velocity interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, David J., E-mail: erskine1@llnl.gov; Smith, R. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Bolme, C. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ali, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Previous velocity interferometers used at research laboratories for shock physics experiments measured target motion at a point or many points on a line on the target. Recently, a two-dimensional (2d) version (2d-velocity interferometer system for any reflector) has been demonstrated using a pair of ultrashort (3 ps) pulses for illumination, separated by 268 ps. We have discovered new abilities for this instrument, by treating the complex output image as a hologram. For data taken in an out of focus configuration, we can Fourier process to bring narrow features such as cracks into sharp focus, which are otherwise completely blurred. This solves a practical problem when using high numerical aperture optics having narrow depth of field to observe moving surface features such as cracks. Furthermore, theory predicts that the target appearance (position and reflectivity) at two separate moments in time are recorded by the main and conjugate images of the same hologram, and are partially separable during analysis for narrow features. Hence, for the cracks we bring into refocus, we can make a two-frame movie with a subnanosecond frame period. Longer and shorter frame periods are possible with different interferometer delays. Since the megapixel optical detectors we use have superior spatial resolution over electronic beam based framing cameras, this technology could be of great use in studying microscopic three-dimensional-behavior of targets at ultrafast times scales. Demonstrations on shocked silicon are shown.

  2. A method for the frequency control in time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Kaneko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an extension of the time-resolved two-dimensional gigahertz surface acoustic wave imaging based on the optical pump-probe technique with periodic light source at a fixed repetition frequency. Usually such imaging measurement may generate and detect acoustic waves with their frequencies only at or near the integer multiples of the repetition frequency. Here we propose a method which utilizes the amplitude modulation of the excitation pulse train to modify the generation frequency free from the mentioned limitation, and allows for the first time the discrimination of the resulted upper- and lower-side-band frequency components in the detection. The validity of the method is demonstrated in a simple measurement on an isotropic glass plate covered by a metal thin film to extract the dispersion curves of the surface acoustic waves.

  3. New light on protein folding: Unraveling folding and unfolding mechanisms using time-resolved and two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Meuzelaar

    2015-01-01

    How a protein folds from its one-dimensional sequence of amino acids into its three-dimensional, functional structure on biologically relevant time scales (typically on the micro- to millisecond time scale) is one of the most challenging questions currently investigated in several scientific discipl

  4. New light on protein folding: Unraveling folding and unfolding mechanisms using time-resolved and two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuzelaar, H.

    2015-01-01

    How a protein folds from its one-dimensional sequence of amino acids into its three-dimensional, functional structure on biologically relevant time scales (typically on the micro- to millisecond time scale) is one of the most challenging questions currently investigated in several scientific

  5. Resolving Two Dimensional Angular Velocity within a Rotary Tumbler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminiak, Nathaniel; Helminiak, David; Cariapa, Vikram; Borg, John

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a horizontally oriented cylindrical tumbler, filled at variable depth with cylindrical media, was rotated at various constant speeds. A monoplane layer of media was photographed with a high-speed camera and images were post processed with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) algorithms in order to resolve both the translational and rotational flow fields. Although the translational velocity fields have been well characterized, contemporary resources enabled the ability to expand upon and refine data regarding rotational characteristics of particles within a rotary tumbler. The results indicate that particles rotate according to intermittent no-slip interactions between the particles and solid body rotation. Particles within the bed, not confined to solid body rotation, exhibited behavior indicative of gearing between particles; each reacting to the tangential component of contact forming rotation chains. Furthermore, it was observed that solid body interactions corresponded to areas of confined motion, as areas of high interaction dissuaded no-slip rotation, while areas of developing flow tended towards no-slip rotation. Special thanks to: NASA Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium Program as well as Marquette University OPUS College of Engineering.

  6. Entanglement Entropy for time dependent two dimensional holographic superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Mazhari, N S; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Myrzakulov, R

    2016-01-01

    We studied entanglement entropy for a time dependent two dimensional holographic superconductor. We showed that the conserved charge of the system plays the role of the critical parameter to have condensation.

  7. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B., E-mail: dturner@nyu.edu [Department of Chemistry, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, New York 10003 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  8. Waiting Time Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example,

  9. Two-dimensional random arrays for real time volumetric imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Richard E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Smith, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays are necessary for a variety of ultrasonic imaging techniques, including elevation focusing, 2-D phase aberration correction, and real time volumetric imaging. In order to reduce system cost and complexity, sparse 2-D arrays have been considered with element geometries...... real time volumetric imaging system, which employs a wide transmit beam and receive mode parallel processing to increase image frame rate. Depth-of-field comparisons were made from simulated on-axis and off-axis beamplots at ranges from 30 to 160 mm for both coaxial and offset transmit and receive...... selected ad hoc, by algorithm, or by random process. Two random sparse array geometries and a sparse array with a Mills cross receive pattern were simulated and compared to a fully sampled aperture with the same overall dimensions. The sparse arrays were designed to the constraints of the Duke University...

  10. Application of two-dimensional J-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to differentiation of beer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatib, Alfi [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Wilson, Erica G. [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kim, Hye Kyong [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lefeber, Alfons W.M. [Division of NMR, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Erkelens, Cornelis [Division of NMR, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Choi, Young Hae [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: y.choi@chem.leidenuniv.nl; Verpoorte, Robert [Division of Pharmacognosy, Section Metabolomics, Institute of Biology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-02-16

    A number of ingredients in beer that directly or indirectly affect its quality require an unbiased wide-spectrum analytical method that allows for the determination of a wide array of compounds for its efficient control. {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a method that clearly meets this description as the broad range of compounds in beer is detectable. However, the resulting congestion of signals added to the low resolution of {sup 1}H NMR spectra makes the identification of individual components very difficult. Among two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques that increase the resolution, J-resolved NMR spectra were successfully applied to the analysis of 2-butanol extracts of beer as overlapping signals in {sup 1}H NMR spectra were fully resolved by the additional axis of the coupling constant. Principal component analysis based on the projected J-resolved NMR spectra showed a clear separation between all of the six brands of pilsner beer evaluated in this study. The compounds responsible for the differentiation were identified by 2D NMR spectra including correlated spectroscopy and heteronuclear multiple bond correlation spectra together with J-resolved spectra. They were identified as nucleic acid derivatives (adenine, uridine and xanthine), amino acids (tyrosine and proline), organic acid (succinic and lactic acid), alcohol (tyrosol and isopropanol), cholines and carbohydrates.

  11. Waiting time dynamics in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Thomas L C; Knoester, Jasper

    2009-09-15

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of chemically relevant processes take place on this time scale. Such processes range from forming and breaking hydrogen bonds and proton transfer to solvent exchange and vibrational population transfer. In typical 2DIR spectra, multiple processes contribute to the waiting time dynamics and the spectra are often congested. This makes the spectra challenging to interpret, and the aid of theoretical models and simulations is often needed. To be useful, such models need to account for all dynamical processes in the sample simultaneously. The numerical integration of the Schrodinger equation (NISE) method has proven to allow for a very general treatment of the dynamical processes. It accounts for both the motional narrowing resulting from solvent-induced frequency fluctuations and population transfer between coupled vibrations. At the same time, frequency shifts arising from chemical-exchange reactions and changes of the transition dipoles because of either non-Condon effects or molecular reorientation are included in the treatment. This method therefore allows for the disentanglement of all of these processes. The NISE method has thus far been successfully applied to study chemical-exchange processes. It was demonstrated that 2DIR is not only sensitive to reaction kinetics but also to the more detailed reaction dynamics. NISE has also been applied to the study of population transfer within the amide I band (CO stretch) and between the amide I and amide II bands (CN stretch and NH bend) in polypeptides. From the amide I studies, it was found that the population transfer can be used to enhance cross-peaks that act as

  12. Cell growth characteristics from angle- and polarization-resolved light scattering: Prospects for two-dimensional correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herran Cuspinera, Roxana M.; Hore, Dennis K.

    2016-11-01

    We highlight the potential of generalized two-dimensional correlation analysis for the fingerprinting of cell growth in solution monitored by light scattering, where the synchronous and asynchronous responses serve as a sensitive marker for the effect of growth conditions on the distribution of cell morphologies. The polarization of the scattered light varies according to the cell size distribution, and so the changes in the polarization over time are an excellent indicator of the dynamic growth conditions. However, direct comparison of the polarization-, time-, and angle-resolved signals between different experiments is hindered by the subtle changes in the data, and the inability to easily adapt models to account for these differences. Using Mie scattering simulations of different growth conditions, and some preliminary experimental data for a single set of conditions, we illustrate that correlation analysis provides rapid and sensitive qualitative markers of growth characteristics.

  13. Time-resolved two-photon photoemission at the Si(001)-surface. Hot electron dynamics and two-dimensional Fano resonance; Zeitaufgeloeste Zweiphotonen-Photoemission an der Si(001)-Oberflaeche. Dynamik heisser Elektronen und zweidimensionaler Fano-Effekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eickhoff, Christian

    2010-10-27

    By combining ultrafast laser excitation with energy-, angle- and time-resolved twophoton photoemission (2PPE), the electronic properties of bulk silicon and the Si(001) surface are investigated in this thesis. A custom-built laser- and UHV-systemequipped with a display type 2D-CCD-detector gives new insight into the relaxation dynamics of excited carriers on a femtosecond timescale. The bandgap between occupied valence bands and unoccupied conduction bands characteristically influences the dynamics of excited electrons in the bulk, as well as in surface states and resonances. For the electron-phonon interaction this leads to the formation of a bottleneck during the relaxation of hot electrons in the conduction band, which maintains the elevated electronic temperature for several picoseconds. During relaxation, excited electrons also scatter from the conduction band into the unoccupied dangling-bond surface state D{sub down}. Depending on the excitation density this surface recombination is dominated by electron-electron- or electron-phonon scattering. The relaxation of the carriers in the D{sub down}-band is again slowed down by the formation of a bottleneck in electron-phonon coupling. Furthermore, the new laser system has allowed detection of the Rydberg-like series of image-potential resonances on the Si(001)-surface. It is shown that the lifetime of these image-potential resonances in front of the semiconducting surface exhibits the same behavior as those in front of metallic surfaces. Moreover the electron-phonon coupling in the first image-potential resonance was investigated and compared to the D{sub down}-surface state. For the first time, Fano-type lineprofiles are demonstrated and analyzed in a 2PPEprocess on a surface. Tuning the photon energy of the pump-laser across the resonance between the occupied dangling-bond state D{sub up}, and the unoccupied image-potential resonance n=1, reveals a clear intensity variation that can be successfully described

  14. Results from laboratory tests of the two-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D; Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

    2014-09-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of two dimensional time-encoded imaging. A prototype two-dimensional time encoded imaging system was designed and constructed. Results from imaging measurements of single and multiple point sources as well as extended source distributions are presented. Time encoded imaging has proven to be a simple method for achieving high resolution two-dimensional imaging with potential to be used in future arms control and treaty verification applications.

  15. Mapping of 34 minisatellite loci resolved by two-dimensional DNA typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Anders; Nyegaard, Mette; Kvistgaard, AB

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) DNA typing is based on electrophoretic separation of genomic DNA fragments in two dimensions according to independent criteria (size and base-pair sequence), followed by hybridization analysis using multilocus probes. The technique allows simultaneous visualization of severa...

  16. Mapping of 34 minisatellite loci resolved by two-dimensional DNA typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Anders; Nyegaard, Mette; Kvistgaard, AB

    1997-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2-D) DNA typing is based on electrophoretic separation of genomic DNA fragments in two dimensions according to independent criteria (size and base-pair sequence), followed by hybridization analysis using multilocus probes. The technique allows simultaneous visualization of several...... could be deduced, showing no evidence of clustering. In the analysis of spot patterns, use was made of a computerized image analysis system specifically designed for 2-D DNA typing. Since experimental variations between different separation patterns were automatically corrected for with this program......, rapid and reliable scorings could be obtained. The results presented demonstrate the availability of reliable genetic information throughout the 2-D separation pattern. Adding the use of semiautomated computerized pattern analysis, this study further substantiates the applicability of 2-D DNA typing...

  17. System identification of two-dimensional continuous-time systems using wavelets as modulating functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadabadi, Mahdiye Sadat; Shafiee, Masoud; Karrari, Mehdi

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, parameter identification of two-dimensional continuous-time systems via two-dimensional modulating functions is proposed. In the proposed method, trigonometric functions and sine-cosine wavelets are used as modulating functions. By this, a partial differential equation on the finite-time intervals is converted into an algebraic equation linear in parameters. The parameters of the system can then be estimated using the least square algorithms. The underlying computations utilize a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform algorithm, without the need for estimating the unknown initial or boundary conditions, at the beginning of each finite-time interval. Numerical simulations are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Holder's and Hardy's Two Dimensional Diamond-alpha Inequalities on Time Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Ammi, Moulay Rchid Sidi

    2010-01-01

    We prove a two dimensional Holder and reverse-Holder inequality on time scales via the diamond-alpha integral. Other integral inequalities are established as well, which have as corollaries some recent proved Hardy-type inequalities on time scales.

  19. Integrability of Nonlinear Equations of Motion on Two-Dimensional World Sheet Space-Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun

    2005-01-01

    The integrability character of nonlinear equations of motion of two-dimensional gravity with dynamical torsion and bosonic string coupling is studied in this paper. The space-like and time-like first integrals of equations of motion are also found.

  20. Two-Dimensional Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Yu Zhao; Wei-Wei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract¾In this work, we review the developing progress of two-dimensional terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and its diverse applications, including analyzing the polarization of THz radiation from a laser-induced plasma source and studying the corresponding physical mechanism, and characterizing the optical properties of crystals, etc.

  1. Imaginary time propagation code for large-scale two-dimensional eigenvalue problems in magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We present a code for solving the single-particle, time-independent Schr\\"odinger equation in two dimensions. Our program utilizes the imaginary time propagation (ITP) algorithm, and it includes the most recent developments in the ITP method: the arbitrary order operator factorization and the exact inclusion of a (possibly very strong) magnetic field. Our program is able to solve thousands of eigenstates of a two-dimensional quantum system in reasonable time with commonly available hardware. ...

  2. Imaginary time propagation code for large-scale two-dimensional eigenvalue problems in magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Luukko, P J J

    2013-01-01

    We present a code for solving the single-particle, time-independent Schr\\"odinger equation in two dimensions. Our program utilizes the imaginary time propagation (ITP) algorithm, and it includes the most recent developments in the ITP method: the arbitrary order operator factorization and the exact inclusion of a (possibly very strong) magnetic field. Our program is able to solve thousands of eigenstates of a two-dimensional quantum system in reasonable time with commonly available hardware. The main motivation behind our work is to allow the study of highly excited states and energy spectra of two-dimensional quantum dots and billiard systems with a single versatile code, e.g., in quantum chaos research. In our implementation we emphasize a modern and easily extensible design, simple and user-friendly interfaces, and an open-source development philosophy.

  3. Detection of low-molecular weight allergens resolved on two-dimensional electrophoresis with acid-urea polyacrylamide gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitta, Kazumi; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Moriyama, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Tadashi; Kawamoto, Shinichi

    2006-04-15

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis with immobilized pH gradient (IPG) followed by acetic acid/urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (AU-PAGE) was developed for the detection of low-molecular weight food allergens. Wheat proteins were used to test the applicability of AU-PAGE for the analysis of food allergens. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) for first dimension was performed with IPG pH 3-10. AU-PAGE was performed as a second-dimensional electrophoresis and high resolution was obtained, especially for proteins below 15 kDa. For immunodetection, the proteins resolved on AU gel were transferred to a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane. The assembly of semidry electroblotting for AU gel was set reversed as for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE gel. The electroblotted membrane was immunolabeled with serum from a radio-allergosorbent test-positive individual for wheat to identify allergenic proteins. Protein spots strongly recognized by the patient's serum were chosen for further analysis. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that these proteins were alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitors and lipid transfer protein. The system developed in this study was shown to be useful as a standard protocol for the separation of low-molecular weight proteins. Moreover, the IPG strips on which IEF was performed could be used either for SDS-PAGE or AU-PAGE by only changing equilibrating conditions, allowing for a wide range of allergen analysis.

  4. A CMOS VLSI IC for real-time opto-electronic two-dimensional histogram generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richstein, James K.

    1993-12-01

    Histogram generation, a standard image processing operation, is a record of the intensity distribution in the image. Histogram generation has straightforward implementations on digital computers using high level languages. A prototype of an optical-electronic histogram generator was designed and tested for 1-D objects using wirewrapped MSI TTL components. The system has shown to be fairly modular in design. The aspects of the extension to two dimensions and the VLSI implementation of this design are discussed. In this paper, we report a VLSI design to be used in a two-dimensional real-time histogram generation scheme. The overall system design is such that the electronic signal obtained from the optically scanned two-dimensional semi-opaque image is processed and displayed within a period of one cycle of the scanning process. Specifically, in the VLSI implementation of the two-dimensional histogram generator, modifications were made to the original design. For the two-dimensional application, the output controller was analyzed as a finite state machine. The process used to describe the required timing signals and translate them to a VLSI finite state machine using Computer Aided Design Tools is discussed. In addition, the circuitry for sampling, binning, and display were combined with the timing circuitry on one IC. In the original design, the pulse width of the electronically sampled photodetector is limited with an analog one-shot. The high sampling rates associated with the extension to two dimensions requires significant reduction in the original 1-D prototype's sample pulse width of approximately 75 ns. The alternate design using VLSI logic gates will provide one-shot pulse widths of approximately 3 ns.

  5. Two-dimensional dissipative rogue waves due to time-delayed feedback in cavity nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlidi, Mustapha; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a way to generate two-dimensional rogue waves in two types of broad area nonlinear optical systems subject to time-delayed feedback: in the generic Lugiato-Lefever model and in the model of a broad-area surface-emitting laser with saturable absorber. The delayed feedback is found to induce a spontaneous formation of rogue waves. In the absence of delayed feedback, spatial pulses are stationary. The rogue waves are exited and controlled by the delay feedback. We characterize their formation by computing the probability distribution of the pulse height. The long-tailed statistical contribution, which is often considered as a signature of the presence of rogue waves, appears for sufficiently strong feedback. The generality of our analysis suggests that the feedback induced instability leading to the spontaneous formation of two-dimensional rogue waves is a universal phenomenon.

  6. Effects of doubled carbon dioxide on rainfall responses to large-scale forcing: A two-dimensional cloud-resolving modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Shen, Xinyong; Liu, Jia

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall responses to doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration were investigated through the analysis of two pairs of two-dimensional cloud-resolving model sensitivity experiments. One pair of experiments simulated pre-summer heavy rainfall over southern China around the summer solstice, whereas the other pair of experiments simulated tropical rainfall around the winter solstice. The analysis of the time and model domain mean heat budget revealed that the enhanced local atmospheric warming was associated with doubled carbon dioxide through the weakened infrared radiative cooling during the summer solstice. The weakened mean pre-summer rainfall corresponded to the weakened mean infrared radiative cooling. Doubled carbon dioxide increased the mean tropical atmospheric warming via the enhanced mean latent heat in correspondence with the strengthened mean infrared radiative cooling during the winter solstice. The enhanced mean tropical rainfall was associated with the increased mean latent heat.

  7. Neimark-Sacker bifurcation of a two-dimensional discrete-time predator-prey model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A Q

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics and bifurcation of a two-dimensional discrete-time predator-prey model in the closed first quadrant [Formula: see text]. The existence and local stability of the unique positive equilibrium of the model are analyzed algebraically. It is shown that the model can undergo a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in a small neighborhood of the unique positive equilibrium and an invariant circle will appear. Some numerical simulations are presented to illustrate our theocratical results and numerically it is shown that the unique positive equilibrium of the system is globally asymptotically stable.

  8. Finite-time barriers to front propagation in two-dimensional fluid flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mahoney, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations have demonstrated the role of certain invariant manifolds, termed burning invariant manifolds (BIMs), as one-way dynamical barriers to reaction fronts propagating within a flowing fluid. These barriers form one-dimensional curves in a two-dimensional fluid flow. In prior studies, the fluid velocity field was required to be either time-independent or time-periodic. In the present study, we develop an approach to identify prominent one-way barriers based only on fluid velocity data over a finite time interval, which may have arbitrary time-dependence. We call such a barrier a burning Lagrangian coherent structure (bLCS) in analogy to Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) commonly used in passive advection. Our approach is based on the variational formulation of LCSs using curves of stationary "Lagrangian shear", introduced by Farazmand, Blazevski, and Haller [Physica D 278-279, 44 (2014)] in the context of passive advection. We numerically validate our techniqu...

  9. Coefficient of restitution dependence of intruder rise time in two-dimensional Brazil-nut effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesuma, T.; Aji, D. P. Purwa; Viridi, S.; Suprijadi

    2016-04-01

    Brazil-Nut Effect (BNE) is a granular material phenomenon, where larger grains (usually known as intruder) rise to the top when the granular system vibrated. We observe a single intruder rise time of BNE phenomenon in a two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of hard spheres collision scheme. Some experiments have shown that some granular properties, such as size and density ratio, play an important role to determine the rise time. However, other property, such as coefficients of restitution, is considered not to have a measurable impact. We explore the intruder inelasticity dependence of the rise time by varying its coefficient of restitution. We found that the intruder rise time tends to be flat for relatively high coefficient of restitution and increases exponentially below a certain deflecting point for low coefficient of restitution. This holds for specific mass ratio.

  10. Positioning with stationary emitters in a two-dimensional space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Coll, B; Morales, J A; Coll, Bartolom\\'{e}; Ferrando, Joan Josep; Morales, Juan Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The basic elements of the relativistic positioning systems in a two-dimensional space-time have been introduced in a previous work [Phys. Rev. D {\\bf 73}, 084017 (2006)] where geodesic positioning systems, constituted by two geodesic emitters, have been considered in a flat space-time. Here, we want to show in what precise senses positioning systems allow to make {\\em relativistic gravimetry}. For this purpose, we consider stationary positioning systems, constituted by two uniformly accelerated emitters separated by a constant distance, in two different situations: absence of gravitational field (Minkowski plane) and presence of a gravitational mass (Schwarzschild plane). The physical coordinate system constituted by the electromagnetic signals broadcasting the proper time of the emitters are the so called {\\em emission coordinates}, and we show that, in such emission coordinates, the trajectories of the emitters in both situations, absence and presence of a gravitational field, are identical. The interesting...

  11. A Hybrid Nodal Method for Time-Dependent Incompressible Flow in Two-Dimensional Arbitrary Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toreja, A J; Uddin, R

    2002-10-21

    A hybrid nodal-integral/finite-analytic method (NI-FAM) is developed for time-dependent, incompressible flow in two-dimensional arbitrary geometries. In this hybrid approach, the computational domain is divided into parallelepiped and wedge-shaped space-time nodes (cells). The conventional nodal integral method (NIM) is applied to the interfaces between adjacent parallelepiped nodes (cells), while a finite analytic approach is applied to the interfaces between parallelepiped and wedge-shaped nodes (cells). In this paper, the hybrid method is formally developed and an application of the NI-FAM to fluid flow in an enclosed cavity is presented. Results are compared with those obtained using a commercial computational fluid dynamics code.

  12. Reproducibility of retention time and peak area in comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Victoria; Wulf, Volker; Wirtz, Michaela; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography is used to separate anionic, nonionic, and amphoteric surfactants by substance class, alkyl chain distribution, and degree of ethoxylation. A nearly orthogonal system with a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) phase in the first and a reversed-phase material in the second dimension is applied to generate a separation with maximum peak capacity. The potential of the developed method is demonstrated by the reproducibility of retention time and peak area, which shows standard deviations less than 5 % and the analysis of real samples. An external calibration and the standard addition method were applied to determine unknown concentrations for the alkyl chain homologues of a betaine and for one ethoxylate (EO) homologue of a fatty alcohol ethoxylate in a sample mixture.

  13. Enhanced Transport of Passive Tracers In A Time Periodic Two-dimensional Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, G.; Cencini, M.; Espa, S.; Musacchio, S.

    , investigating systems in which the second condition is violated is much more inter- esting. With this purpose, some experiments have shown how superdiffusion arises in a two-dimensional quasi-geostrophic (planetary-type) flow, where particles can jump for very long time in the same direction performing a Levy flight (Castiglione et al., 2001 ). Moreover, two recent papers (Vulpiani, 1998; Solomon, 2001) show how, also in very simple two-dimensional, time and space periodic cellular flows,anomalous diffusive behaviours can appear. In this paper we present an experimental study of transport in an electromagnetically forced time periodic two-dimensional flow. The flow is generated by applying an electromagnetic forcing on a thin layer of an elec- trolyte solution and reveals in a square grid of alternating vortices. Time dependence can be easily obtained by changing the time dependence of the electric fields. In par- ticular, considering certain values of the imposed oscillation frequencies, particles can display very long jump. Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) is used to measure the flow field. This technique is the most suitable for studying dispersion phenomena in a Lagrangian framework allowing the direct evaluation of particle displacements and related quantities (Cenedese, Querzoli; 2000). Moreover, due to the characteristics of the analyzed flow and to the improvement of the tracking procedure, we have been able to track a great number of particles for time intervals greater than the charac- teristic time-scales of the flow. In order to characterize the time correlations we will evaluate the so-called jumps probabilities with memory which represent the probabil- ities to jump in a given direction conditioned to having experienced jumps in the same direction at previous times. Such statistics will revealed very useful and suitable for detecting the onset of the aforementioned correlations. 2

  14. Imaginary time propagation code for large-scale two-dimensional eigenvalue problems in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, P. J. J.; Räsänen, E.

    2013-03-01

    We present a code for solving the single-particle, time-independent Schrödinger equation in two dimensions. Our program utilizes the imaginary time propagation (ITP) algorithm, and it includes the most recent developments in the ITP method: the arbitrary order operator factorization and the exact inclusion of a (possibly very strong) magnetic field. Our program is able to solve thousands of eigenstates of a two-dimensional quantum system in reasonable time with commonly available hardware. The main motivation behind our work is to allow the study of highly excited states and energy spectra of two-dimensional quantum dots and billiard systems with a single versatile code, e.g., in quantum chaos research. In our implementation we emphasize a modern and easily extensible design, simple and user-friendly interfaces, and an open-source development philosophy. Catalogue identifier: AENR_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENR_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11310 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 97720 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ and Python. Computer: Tested on x86 and x86-64 architectures. Operating system: Tested under Linux with the g++ compiler. Any POSIX-compliant OS with a C++ compiler and the required external routines should suffice. Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes, with OpenMP. RAM: 1 MB or more, depending on system size. Classification: 7.3. External routines: FFTW3 (http://www.fftw.org), CBLAS (http://netlib.org/blas), LAPACK (http://www.netlib.org/lapack), HDF5 (http://www.hdfgroup.org/HDF5), OpenMP (http://openmp.org), TCLAP (http://tclap.sourceforge.net), Python (http://python.org), Google Test (http://code.google.com/p/googletest/) Nature of problem: Numerical calculation

  15. Time integration algorithms for the two-dimensional Euler equations on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, David C.; Whitaker, D. L.; Walters, Robert W.

    1994-06-01

    Explicit and implicit time integration algorithms for the two-dimensional Euler equations on unstructured grids are presented. Both cell-centered and cell-vertex finite volume upwind schemes utilizing Roe's approximate Riemann solver are developed. For the cell-vertex scheme, a four-stage Runge-Kutta time integration, a fourstage Runge-Kutta time integration with implicit residual averaging, a point Jacobi method, a symmetric point Gauss-Seidel method and two methods utilizing preconditioned sparse matrix solvers are presented. For the cell-centered scheme, a Runge-Kutta scheme, an implicit tridiagonal relaxation scheme modeled after line Gauss-Seidel, a fully implicit lower-upper (LU) decomposition, and a hybrid scheme utilizing both Runge-Kutta and LU methods are presented. A reverse Cuthill-McKee renumbering scheme is employed for the direct solver to decrease CPU time by reducing the fill of the Jacobian matrix. A comparison of the various time integration schemes is made for both first-order and higher order accurate solutions using several mesh sizes, higher order accuracy is achieved by using multidimensional monotone linear reconstruction procedures. The results obtained for a transonic flow over a circular arc suggest that the preconditioned sparse matrix solvers perform better than the other methods as the number of elements in the mesh increases.

  16. Time-Domain Measurement of Optical True-Time Delay in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Geng-Yan; ZHOU Qiang; CUI Kai-Yu; ZHANG Wei; HUANG Yi-Dong

    2010-01-01

    @@ We report on the realization of optical true-time delay(TTD)by a two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide(PCWG).Design and fabrication of the PCWG are investigated.The spectral dependence of the group delay is measured by detecting the phase shifts of a 10 GHz modulating signal,and a maximum delay of 25 ± 2.5 ps is obtained.

  17. Positioning in a flat two-dimensional space-time: the delay master equation

    CERN Document Server

    Coll, Bartolomé; Morales-Lladosa, Juan Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The basic theory on relativistic positioning systems in a two-dimensional space-time has been presented in two previous papers [Phys. Rev. D {\\bf 73}, 084017 (2006); {\\bf 74}, 104003 (2006)], where the possibility of making relativistic gravimetry with these systems has been analyzed by considering specific examples. Here we study generic relativistic positioning systems in the Minkowski plane. We analyze the information that can be obtained from the data received by a user of the positioning system. We show that the accelerations of the emitters and of the user along their trajectories are determined by the sole knowledge of the emitter positioning data and of the acceleration of only one of the emitters. Moreover, as a consequence of the so called master delay equation, the knowledge of this acceleration is only required during an echo interval, i.e., the interval between the emission time of a signal by an emitter and its reception time after being reflected by the other emitter. We illustrate these result...

  18. Finite-time scaling via linear driving: application to the two-dimensional Potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianzhi; Gong, Shurong; Zhong, Fan; Fan, Shuangli

    2010-04-01

    We apply finite-time scaling to the q-state Potts model with q=3 and 4 on two-dimensional lattices to determine its critical properties. This consists in applying to the model a linearly varying external field that couples to one of its q states to manipulate its dynamics in the vicinity of its criticality and that drives the system out of equilibrium and thus produces hysteresis and in defining an order parameter other than the usual one and a nonequilibrium susceptibility to extract coercive fields. From the finite-time scaling of the order parameter, the coercivity, and the hysteresis area and its derivative, we are able to determine systematically both static and dynamic critical exponents as well as the critical temperature. The static critical exponents obtained in general and the magnetic exponent delta in particular agree reasonably with the conjectured ones. The dynamic critical exponents obtained appear to confirm the proposed dynamic weak universality but unlikely to agree with recent short-time dynamic results for q=4. Our results also suggest an alternative way to characterize the weak universality.

  19. Progress in two-dimensional arrays for real-time volumetric imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, E D; Davidsen, R E; Fiering, J O; Hruschka, T A; Smith, S W

    1998-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of two dimensional array transducers for real-time volumetric imaging are described. The transducers we have previously described operated at frequencies below 3 MHz and were unwieldy to the operator because of the interconnect schemes used in connecting to the transducer handle. Several new transducers have been developed using new connection technology. A 40 x 40 = 1,600 element, 3.5 MHz array was fabricated with 256 transmit and 256 receive elements. A 60 x 60 = 3,600 element 5.0 MHz array was constructed with 248 transmit and 256 receive elements. An 80 x 80 = 6,400 element, 2.5 MHz array was fabricated with 256 transmit and 208receive elements. 2-D transducer arrays were also developed for volumetric scanning in an intra cardiac catheter, a 10 x 10 = 100 element 5.0 MHz forward-looking array and an 11 x 13 = 143 element 5.0 MHz side-scanning array. The-6dB fractional bandwidths for the different arrays varied from 50% to 63%, and the 50 omega insertion loss for all the transducers was about-64 dB. The transducers were used to generate real-time volumetric images in phantoms and in vivo using the Duke University real time volumetric imaging system, which is capable of generating multiple planes at any desired angle and depth within the pyramidal volume.

  20. Numerical investigations on the finite time singularity in two-dimensional Boussinesq equations

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Z

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the finite time singularity in three-dimensional (3D) Euler flows, the simplified model of 3D axisymmetric incompressible fluids (i.e., two-dimensional Boussinesq approximation equations) is studied numerically. The system describes a cap-like hot zone of fluid rising from the bottom, while the edges of the cap lag behind, forming eye-like vortices. The hot liquid is driven by the buoyancy and meanwhile attracted by the vortices, which leads to the singularity-forming mechanism in our simulation. In the previous 2D Boussinesq simulations, the symmetricial initial data is used. However, it is observed that the adoption of symmetry leads to coordinate singularity. Moreover, as demonstrated in this work that the locations of peak values for the vorticity and the temperature gradient becomes far apart as $t$ approaches the predicted blow-up time. This suggests that the symmetry assumption may be unreasonable for searching solution blow-ups. One of the main contributions of this work is to propose a...

  1. A Parallel Algorithm for the Two-Dimensional Time Fractional Diffusion Equation with Implicit Difference Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunye Gong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is very time consuming to solve fractional differential equations. The computational complexity of two-dimensional fractional differential equation (2D-TFDE with iterative implicit finite difference method is O(MxMyN2. In this paper, we present a parallel algorithm for 2D-TFDE and give an in-depth discussion about this algorithm. A task distribution model and data layout with virtual boundary are designed for this parallel algorithm. The experimental results show that the parallel algorithm compares well with the exact solution. The parallel algorithm on single Intel Xeon X5540 CPU runs 3.16–4.17 times faster than the serial algorithm on single CPU core. The parallel efficiency of 81 processes is up to 88.24% compared with 9 processes on a distributed memory cluster system. We do think that the parallel computing technology will become a very basic method for the computational intensive fractional applications in the near future.

  2. Thermodynamic-based retention time predictions of endogenous steroids in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Aline C A; Ebrahimi-Najafadabi, Heshmatollah; McGinitie, Teague M; Casilli, Alessandro; Pereira, Henrique M G; Aquino Neto, Francisco R; Harynuk, James J

    2015-05-01

    This work evaluates the application of a thermodynamic model to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry for anabolic agent investigation. Doping control deals with hundreds of drugs that are prohibited in sports. Drug discovery in biological matrices is a challenging task that requires powerful tools when one is faced with the rapidly changing designer drug landscape. In this work, a thermodynamic model developed for the prediction of both primary and secondary retention times in GC × GC has been applied to trimethylsilylated hydroxyl (O-TMS)- and methoxime-trimethylsilylated carbonyl (MO-TMS)-derivatized endogenous steroids. This model was previously demonstrated on a pneumatically modulated GC × GC system, and is applied for the first time to a thermally modulated GC × GC system. Preliminary one-dimensional experiments allowed the calculation of thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔC p ) which were successfully applied for the prediction of the analytes' interactions with the stationary phases of both the first-dimension column and the second-dimension column. The model was able to predict both first-dimension and second-dimension retention times with high accuracy compared with the GC × GC experimental measurements. Maximum differences of -8.22 s in the first dimension and 0.4 s in the second dimension were encountered for the O-TMS derivatives of 11β-hydroxyandrosterone and 11-ketoetiocholanolone, respectively. For the MO-TMS derivatives, the largest discrepancies were from testosterone (9.65 ) for the first-dimension retention times and 11-keto-etiocholanolone (0.4 s) for the second-dimension retention times.

  3. Bifurcations of a two-dimensional discrete time plant-herbivore system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Qadeer; Ma, Jiying; Xiao, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, bifurcations of a two dimensional discrete time plant-herbivore system formulated by Allen et al. (1993) have been studied. It is proved that the system undergoes a transcritical bifurcation in a small neighborhood of a boundary equilibrium and a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in a small neighborhood of the unique positive equilibrium. An invariant closed curve bifurcates from the unique positive equilibrium by Neimark-Sacker bifurcation, which corresponds to the periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations between plant and herbivore populations. For a special form of the system, which appears in Kulenović and Ladas (2002), it is shown that the system can undergo a supercritical Neimark-Sacker bifurcation in a small neighborhood of the unique positive equilibrium and a stable invariant closed curve appears. This bifurcation analysis provides a theoretical support on the earlier numerical observations in Allen et al. (1993) and gives a supportive evidence of the conjecture in Kulenović and Ladas (2002). Some numerical simulations are also presented to illustrate our theocratical results.

  4. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jun; Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-09-02

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Γ point, we can construct pseudo-time-reversal symmetry as well as pseudo-spin states in this classical system. We develop an effective Hamiltonian for the associated dispersion bands around the Brillouin zone center, and find the inherent link between the band inversion and the topological phase transition. With numerical simulations, we unambiguously demonstrate the unidirectional propagation of acoustic edge states along the interface between a topologically nontrivial acoustic crystal and a trivial one, and the robustness of the edge states against defects with sharp bends. Our work provides a new design paradigm for manipulating and transporting acoustic waves in a topologically protected manner. Technological applications and devices based on our design are expected in various frequency ranges of interest, spanning from infrasound to ultrasound.

  5. Variational tensor network renormalization in imaginary time: Two-dimensional quantum compass model at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnik, Piotr; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2016-05-01

    Progress in describing thermodynamic phase transitions in quantum systems is obtained by noticing that the Gibbs operator e-β H for a two-dimensional (2D) lattice system with a Hamiltonian H can be represented by a three-dimensional tensor network, the third dimension being the imaginary time (inverse temperature) β . Coarse graining the network along β results in a 2D projected entangled-pair operator (PEPO) with a finite bond dimension D . The coarse graining is performed by a tree tensor network of isometries. The isometries are optimized variationally, taking into account full tensor environment, to maximize the accuracy of the PEPO. The algorithm is applied to the isotropic quantum compass model on an infinite square lattice near a symmetry-breaking phase transition at finite temperature. From the linear susceptibility in the symmetric phase and the order parameter in the symmetry-broken phase, the critical temperature is estimated at Tc=0.0606 (4 ) J , where J is the isotropic coupling constant between S =1/2 pseudospins.

  6. Pseudo-time-reversal symmetry and topological edge states in two-dimensional acoustic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Jun

    2016-09-02

    We propose a simple two-dimensional acoustic crystal to realize topologically protected edge states for acoustic waves. The acoustic crystal is composed of a triangular array of core-shell cylinders embedded in a water host. By utilizing the point group symmetry of two doubly degenerate eigenstates at the Î

  7. On physical interpretation of two dimensional time-correlations regarding time delay velocities and eddy shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Manz, P. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut feur Plasmaphysik, Association Euratom-IPP, 85748Garching (Germany); Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Time delay estimation (TDE) techniques are frequently used to estimate the flow velocity from fluctuating measurements. Tilted structures carried by the flow lead to misinterpretation of the time delays in terms of velocity direction and amplitude. It affects TDE measurements from probes, and is also intrinsically important for beam emission spectroscopy and gas puff imaging measurements. Local eddy shapes estimated from 2D fluctuating field are necessary to gain a more accurate flow estimate from TDE, as illustrated by Langmuir probe array measurements. A least square regression approach is proposed to estimate both flow field and shaping parameters. The technique is applied to a test case built from numerical simulation of interchange fluctuations. The local eddy shape does not only provide corrections for the velocity field but also quantitative information about the statistical interaction mechanisms between local eddies and E Multiplication-Sign B flow shear. The technique is then tested on gaz puff imaging data collected at the edge of EAST tokamak plasmas. It is shown that poloidal asymmetries of the fluctuation fields-velocity and eddy shape-are consistent at least qualitatively with a ballooning type of turbulence immersed in a radially sheared equilibrium flow.

  8. Automated classification of single airborne particles from two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns by non-linear filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Pan, Yong-Le; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Casati, Caterina; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Chang, Richard K.; Videen, Gorden W.

    2013-12-01

    Measurement of two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns is an attractive technique for detecting and characterizing micron-sized airborne particles. In general, the interpretation of these patterns and the retrieval of the particle refractive index, shape or size alone, are difficult problems. By reformulating the problem in statistical learning terms, a solution is proposed herewith: rather than identifying airborne particles from their scattering patterns, TAOS patterns themselves are classified through a learning machine, where feature extraction interacts with multivariate statistical analysis. Feature extraction relies on spectrum enhancement, which includes the discrete cosine FOURIER transform and non-linear operations. Multivariate statistical analysis includes computation of the principal components and supervised training, based on the maximization of a suitable figure of merit. All algorithms have been combined together to analyze TAOS patterns, organize feature vectors, design classification experiments, carry out supervised training, assign unknown patterns to classes, and fuse information from different training and recognition experiments. The algorithms have been tested on a data set with more than 3000 TAOS patterns. The parameters that control the algorithms at different stages have been allowed to vary within suitable bounds and are optimized to some extent. Classification has been targeted at discriminating aerosolized Bacillus subtilis particles, a simulant of anthrax, from atmospheric aerosol particles and interfering particles, like diesel soot. By assuming that all training and recognition patterns come from the respective reference materials only, the most satisfactory classification result corresponds to 20% false negatives from B. subtilis particles and classification method may be adapted into a real-time operation technique, capable of detecting and characterizing micron-sized airborne particles.

  9. Chemical characterization of bio-oils using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarolo, Nathalia S; dos Santos, Luciana R M; Silva, Raphael S F; Azevedo, Débora A

    2013-03-01

    The liquid product obtained via the biomass flash pyrolysis is commonly called bio-oil or pyrolysis oil. Bio-oils can be used as sources for chemicals or as fuels, primarily in mixtures or emulsions with fossil fuels. A detailed chemical characterization of bio-oil is necessary to determine its potential uses. Such characterization demands a powerful analytical technique such as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). Limited chemical information can be obtained from conventional gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry (GC-MS) because of the large number of compounds and coelutions. Thus, GC×GC-TOFMS was used for the individual identification of bio-oil components from two samples prepared via the flash pyrolysis of empty palm fruit bunch and pine wood chips. To the best of our knowledge, few papers have reported comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) for bio-oil analysis. Many classes of compounds such as phenols, benzenediols, cyclopentenones, furanones, indanones and alkylpyridines were identified. Several coelutions present in the GC-MS were resolved using GC×GC-TOFMS. Many peaks were detected for the samples by GC-MS (~166 and 129), but 631 and 857 were detected by GC×GC-TOFMS, respectively. The GC×GC-TOFMS analyses indicated that the major classes of components (analytes>0.5% relative area) in the two bio-oil samples are ketones, cyclopentenones, furanones, furans, phenols, benzenediols, methoxy- and dimethoxy-phenols and sugars. In addition, esters, aldehydes and pyridines were found for sample obtained from empty palm fruit bunch, while alcohols and cyclopentanediones were found in sample prepared from pine wood chips indicating different composition profiles due to the biomass sources. The elucidation of the composition of empty fruit bunch and pine wood chips bio-oils indicates that these oils are suitable for the production of value-added chemicals. The

  10. Real-Time Time-Frequency Two-Dimensional Imaging of Ultrafast Transient Signals in Solid-State Organic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Takeda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we demonstrate a real-time time-frequency two-dimensional (2D pump-probe imaging spectroscopy implemented on a single shot basis applicable to excited-state dynamics in solid-state organic and biological materials. Using this technique, we could successfully map ultrafast time-frequency 2D transient absorption signals of β-carotene in solid films with wide temporal and spectral ranges having very short accumulation time of 20 ms per unit frame. The results obtained indicate the high potential of this technique as a powerful and unique spectroscopic tool to observe ultrafast excited-state dynamics of organic and biological materials in solid-state, which undergo rapid photodegradation.

  11. Turbulent pair separation due to multi scale stagnation point structure and its time asymmetry in two-dimensional turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Faber, Tristan; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The pair separation model of Goto and Vassilicos (S Goto and J C Vassilicos, 2004, New J.Phys., 6, p.65) is revisited and placed on a sound mathematical foundation. A DNS of two dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence with an inverse energy cascade and a k^{-5/3} power law is used to investigate properties of pair separation in two dimensional turbulence. A special focus lies on the time asymmetry observed between forward and backward separation. Application of the present model to this ...

  12. Three-dimensional liver motion tracking using real-time two-dimensional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, Lau, E-mail: lau.brix@stab.rm.dk [Department of Procurement and Clinical Engineering, Region Midt, Olof Palmes Allé 15, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark and MR Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Ringgaard, Steffen [MR Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Department of Computer Science, Aarhus University, Aabogade 34, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark and Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Brendstrupgaardsvej 100, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark and Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and linear accelerators for radiotherapy (MR-Linacs) are currently under development. MRI is noninvasive and nonionizing and can produce images with high soft tissue contrast. However, new tracking methods are required to obtain fast real-time spatial target localization. This study develops and evaluates a method for tracking three-dimensional (3D) respiratory liver motion in two-dimensional (2D) real-time MRI image series with high temporal and spatial resolution. Methods: The proposed method for 3D tracking in 2D real-time MRI series has three steps: (1) Recording of a 3D MRI scan and selection of a blood vessel (or tumor) structure to be tracked in subsequent 2D MRI series. (2) Generation of a library of 2D image templates oriented parallel to the 2D MRI image series by reslicing and resampling the 3D MRI scan. (3) 3D tracking of the selected structure in each real-time 2D image by finding the template and template position that yield the highest normalized cross correlation coefficient with the image. Since the tracked structure has a known 3D position relative to each template, the selection and 2D localization of a specific template translates into quantification of both the through-plane and in-plane position of the structure. As a proof of principle, 3D tracking of liver blood vessel structures was performed in five healthy volunteers in two 5.4 Hz axial, sagittal, and coronal real-time 2D MRI series of 30 s duration. In each 2D MRI series, the 3D localization was carried out twice, using nonoverlapping template libraries, which resulted in a total of 12 estimated 3D trajectories per volunteer. Validation tests carried out to support the tracking algorithm included quantification of the breathing induced 3D liver motion and liver motion directionality for the volunteers, and comparison of 2D MRI estimated positions of a structure in a watermelon with the actual positions. Results: Axial, sagittal

  13. Two dimensional recursive digital filters for near real time image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D.; Sherrod, E.

    1980-01-01

    A program was designed toward the demonstration of the feasibility of using two dimensional recursive digital filters for subjective image processing applications that require rapid turn around. The concept of the use of a dedicated minicomputer for the processor for this application was demonstrated. The minicomputer used was the HP1000 series E with a RTE 2 disc operating system and 32K words of memory. A Grinnel 256 x 512 x 8 bit display system was used to display the images. Sample images were provided by NASA Goddard on a 800 BPI, 9 track tape. Four 512 x 512 images representing 4 spectral regions of the same scene were provided. These images were filtered with enhancement filters developed during this effort.

  14. Crystallization of a Two-Dimensional Hydrogen-Bonded Molecular Assembly: Evolution of the Local Structure Resolved by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patera, Laerte L; Liu, Xunshan; Mosso, Nico; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia; Repp, Jascha

    2017-08-28

    Structures of the aromatic N-heterocyclic hexaazatriphenylene (HAT) molecular synthon obtained by surface-assisted self-assembly were analyzed with sub-Å resolution by means of noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM), both in the kinetically trapped amorphous state and in the thermodynamically stable crystalline phase. These results reveal how the crystallization governs the length scale of the network order for non-flexible molecular species without affecting the local bonding schemes. The capability of nc-AFM to accurately resolve structural relaxations will be highly relevant for the characterization of vitreous two-dimensional supramolecular materials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Development of a two-dimensional imaging GEM detector using the resistive anode readout method with $6\\times6$ cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Xu-Dong; Zhou, Chuan-Xing; Dong, Jing; Zhao, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Qi, Hui-Rong; Ou-Yang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of the resistive anode readout method on a two dimensional imaging GEM detector. The resistive anode consists $6\\times6$ cells with the cell size $6~\\mathrm{mm}\\times6~\\mathrm{mm}$. New electronics and DAQ system are used to process the signals from 49 readout channels. The detector has been tested by using the X-ray tube (8~keV). The spatial resolution of the detector is about $103.46~\\mathrm{{\\mu}m}$ with the signal part $66.41~\\mathrm{{\\mu}m}$. The nonlinearity of the detector is less than $0.5\\%$. A good two dimensional imaging capability is achieved as well. The performances of the detector show the prospect of the resistive anode readout method for the large readout area imaging detectors.

  16. Derivation of asymptotic two-dimensional time-dependent equations for ocean wave propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Lannes, David

    2007-01-01

    A general method for the derivation of asymptotic nonlinear shallow water and deep water models is presented. Starting from a general dimensionless version of the water-wave equations, we reduce the problem to a system of two equations on the surface elevation and the velocity potential at the free surface. These equations involve a Dirichlet-Neumann operator and we show that all the asymptotic models can be recovered by a simple asymptotic expansion of this operator, in function of the shallowness parameter (shallow water limit) or the steepness parameter (deep water limit). Based on this method, a new two-dimensional fully dispersive model for small wave steepness is also derived, which extends to uneven bottom the approach developed by Matsuno \\cite{matsuno3} and Choi \\cite{choi}. This model is still valid in shallow water but with less precision than what can be achieved with Green-Naghdi model, when fully nonlinear waves are considered. The combination, or the coupling, of the new fully dispersive equati...

  17. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  18. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  19. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair); Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE’s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOE’s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  20. The Response of Rice Root to Time Course Water Deficit Stress-Two Dimensional Electrophoresis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Toorchi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is the staple food of more than half of the population worldwide. Water deficit stress is one of the harsh limiting factors for successful production of crops. Rice during its growing period comes a cross different environmental hazards like drought stress. Recent advance in molecular physiology are promising for more progress in increasing rice yield by identification of novel candidate proteins for drought tolerance. To investigate the effect of water deficit on rice root protein expression pattern, an experiment was conducted in completely randomize design with four replications. With holding water for 24, 36 and 48 hours along with control constituted the experimental treatments. The experiment was conducted in growth chamber under controlled condition and root samples, after stress imposition, were harvested for two-dimensional electrophorese (2-DE. Proteome analysis of root tissue by 2-DE indicated that out of 135 protein spots diagnosed by Coomassie blue staining, 14 spots showed significant expression change under water deficit condition, seven of them at 1% and the other seven at 5% probability levels. Differentially changed proteins were taken into account for search in data bank using isoelectric point and molecular weight to identify the most probable responsive proteins. Up- regulation of ferredoxin oxidoreductase at first 24 hour after applying stress indicates the main role of this protein in reducing water deficit stress effects. On the other hand ribosomal proteins, GAP-3 and ATP synthase were down regulated under water deficit stress. Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, glucose- 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and chitinase down regulated up to 36 h of stress imposition but, were later up- regulated by prolonging stress up to 48 h. It could be inferred the plant tries to decrease the effect of oxidative stress.

  1. Universal equations of unsteady two-dimensional MHD boundary layer whose temperature varies with time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boričić Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns with unsteady two-dimensional temperature laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD boundary layer of incompressible fluid. It is assumed that induction of outer magnetic field is function of longitudinal coordinate with force lines perpendicular to the body surface on which boundary layer forms. Outer electric filed is neglected and magnetic Reynolds number is significantly lower then one i.e. considered problem is in inductionless approximation. Characteristic properties of fluid are constant because velocity of flow is much lower than speed of light and temperature difference is small enough (under 50ºC . Introduced assumptions simplify considered problem in sake of mathematical solving, but adopted physical model is interesting from practical point of view, because its relation with large number of technically significant MHD flows. Obtained partial differential equations can be solved with modern numerical methods for every particular problem. Conclusions based on these solutions are related only with specific temperature MHD boundary layer problem. In this paper, quite different approach is used. First new variables are introduced and then sets of similarity parameters which transform equations on the form which don't contain inside and in corresponding boundary conditions characteristics of particular problems and in that sense equations are considered as universal. Obtained universal equations in appropriate approximation can be solved numerically once for all. So-called universal solutions of equations can be used to carry out general conclusions about temperature MHD boundary layer and for calculation of arbitrary particular problems. To calculate any particular problem it is necessary also to solve corresponding momentum integral equation.

  2. Time-resolved molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junliang; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Agostini, Pierre; DiMauro, Louis F.

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved molecular imaging is a frontier of ultrafast optical science and physical chemistry. In this article, we review present and future key spectroscopic and microscopic techniques for ultrafast imaging of molecular dynamics and show their differences and connections. The advent of femtosecond lasers and free electron x-ray lasers bring us closer to this goal, which eventually will extend our knowledge about molecular dynamics to the attosecond time domain.

  3. A Study of Electron and Phonon Dynamics by Broadband Two-Dimensional THz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhengping

    Terahertz (THz) wave interacts with semiconductors in many ways, such as resonant excitation of lattice vibration, intraband transition and polaron formation. Different from the optical waves, THz wave has lower photon energy (1 THz = 4.14 meV) and is suitable for studying dynamics of low-energy excitations. Recently the studies of the interaction of THz wave and semiconductors have been extending from the linear regime to the nonlinear regime, owing to the advance of the high-intensity THz generation and detection methods. Two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy, as a useful tool to unravel the nonlinearity of materials, has been well developed in nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared region. However, the counterpart in THz region has not been well developed and was only demonstrated at frequency around 20 THz due to the lack of intense broadband THz sources. Using laser-induced plasma as the THz source, we developed collinear broadband 2D THz time-domain spectroscopy covering from 0.5 THz to 20 THz. Broadband intense THz pulses emitted from laser-induced plasma provide access to a variety of nonlinear properties of materials. Ultrafast optical and THz pulses make it possible to resolve the transient change of the material properties with temporal resolution of tens of femtoseconds. This thesis focuses on the linear and nonlinear interaction of the THz wave with semiconductors. Since a great many physical processes, including vibrational motion of lattice and plasma oscillation, has resonant frequency in the THz range, rich physics can be studies in our experiment. The thesis starts from the linear interaction of the THz wave with semiconductors. In the narrow band gap semiconductor InSb, the plasma absorption edge, Restrahlen band and dispersion of polaritons are observed. The nonlinear response of InSb in high THz field is verified in the frequency-resolved THz Z-scan experiment. The third harmonic generations due to the anharmonicity of plasma oscillation and the

  4. A Pseudospectral Time-Domain Algorithm for Calculating the Band Structure of a Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何江平; 沈林放; 张全; 何赛灵

    2002-01-01

    A pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) method is developed for calculating the band structure of a two-dimensional photonic crystal. Maxwell's equations are rewritten in terms of period fields by using the Bloch theorem. Instead of spatial finite differences, the fast Fourier transform is used to calculate the spatial derivatives. To reach a similar accuracy, fewer sample points are required in the present PSTD method as compared to the conventional finite-difference time-domain methods. Our numerical simulation shows that the present PSTD method is an efficient and accurate method for calculating the band structure of a photonic crystal.

  5. Lorentz contraction of the equal-time Bethe-Salpeter amplitude in two-dimensional massless quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radozycki, Tomasz [Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, College of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-09-15

    The Lorentz transformation properties of the equal-time bound-state Bethe-Salpeter amplitude in the two-dimensional massless quantum electrodynamics (the so-called Schwinger model) are considered. It is shown that while boosting a bound state (a 'meson') this amplitude is subject to approximate Lorentz contraction. The effect is exact for large separations of constituent particles ('quarks'), while for small distances the deviation is more significant. For this phenomenon to appear, the full function, i.e. with the inclusion of all instanton contributions, has to be considered. The amplitude in each separate topological sector does not exhibit such properties. (orig.)

  6. Lorentz contraction of the equal-time Bethe–Salpeter amplitude in two-dimensional massless quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radożycki, Tomasz, E-mail: t.radozycki@uksw.edu.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, College of Sciences, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University, Wóycickiego 1/3, 01-938, Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-09-24

    The Lorentz transformation properties of the equal-time bound-state Bethe–Salpeter amplitude in the two-dimensional massless quantum electrodynamics (the so-called Schwinger model) are considered. It is shown that while boosting a bound state (a ‘meson’) this amplitude is subject to approximate Lorentz contraction. The effect is exact for large separations of constituent particles (‘quarks’), while for small distances the deviation is more significant. For this phenomenon to appear, the full function, i.e. with the inclusion of all instanton contributions, has to be considered. The amplitude in each separate topological sector does not exhibit such properties.

  7. Two Hybrid Methods for Solving Two-Dimensional Linear Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Jacobs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computationally efficient hybridization of the Laplace transform with two spatial discretization techniques is investigated for numerical solutions of time-fractional linear partial differential equations in two space variables. The Chebyshev collocation method is compared with the standard finite difference spatial discretization and the absolute error is obtained for several test problems. Accurate numerical solutions are achieved in the Chebyshev collocation method subject to both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The solution obtained by these hybrid methods allows for the evaluation at any point in time without the need for time-marching to a particular point in time.

  8. Quantitative characterization of solid epoxy resins using comprehensive two dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julka, Samir; Cortes, Hernan; Harfmann, Robert; Bell, Bruce; Schweizer-Theobaldt, Andreas; Pursch, Matthias; Mondello, Luigi; Maynard, Shawn; West, David

    2009-06-01

    A comprehensive multidimensional liquid chromatography system coupled to Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (LCxLC-ESI-MS) was developed for detailed characterization and quantitation of solid epoxy resin components. The two orthogonal modes of separation selected were size exclusion chromatography (SEC) in the first dimension and liquid chromatography at critical conditions (LCCC) in the second dimension. Different components present in the solid epoxy resins were separated and quantitated for the first time based on the functional groups and molecular weight heterogeneity. Coupling LCxLC separations with mass spectrometry enabled the identification of components resolved in the two-dimensional space. Several different functional group families of compounds were separated and identified, including epoxy-epoxy and epoxy-alpha-glycol functional oligomers, and their individual molecular weight ranges were determined. Repeatability obtained ranged from 0.5% for the main product to 21% for oligomers at the 0.4% concentration level.

  9. Two-Dimensional Time-Domain Antenna Arrays for Optimum Steerable Energy Pattern with Low Side Lobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Reyna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This document presents the synthesis of different two-dimensional time-domain antenna arrays for steerable energy patterns with side lobe levels. The research is focused on the uniform and nonuniform distributions of true-time exciting delays and positions of antenna elements. The uniform square array, random array, uniform concentric ring array, and rotated nonuniform concentric ring array geometries are particularly studied. These geometries are synthesized by using the well-known sequential quadratic programming. The synthesis regards the optimal true-time exciting delays and optimal positions of pulsed antenna elements. The results show the capabilities of the different antenna arrays to steer the beam in their energy pattern in time domain and how their performance is in frequency domain after the synthesis in time domain.

  10. Real-time three-dimensional flexible needle tracking using two-dimensional ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrooijink, G.J.; Abayazid, Momen; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    Needle insertion is one of the most commonly performed minimally invasive procedures. Visualization of the needle during insertion is key for either successful diagnosis or therapy. This work presents the real-time three-dimensional tracking of flexible needles during insertion into a soft-tissue

  11. Short-time dynamics of monomers and dimers in quasi-two-dimensional colloidal mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento-Gómez, Erick; Villanueva-Valencia, José Ramón; Herrera-Velarde, Salvador; Ruiz-Santoyo, José Arturo; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Arauz-Lara, José Luis; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    We report on the short-time dynamics in colloidal mixtures made up of monomers and dimers highly confined between two glass plates. At low concentrations, the experimental measurements of colloidal motion agree well with the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers; the latter takes into account the increase in the drag force on a colloidal particle due to wall-particle hydrodynamic forces. More importantly, we find that the ratio of the short-time diffusion coefficient of the monomer and that of the center of mass of the dimmer is almost independent of both the dimer molar fraction, xd, and the total packing fraction, ϕ , up to ϕ ≈0.5 . At higher concentrations, this ratio displays a small but systematic increase. A similar physical scenario is observed for the ratio between the parallel and the perpendicular components of the short-time diffusion coefficients of the dimer. This dynamical behavior is corroborated by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations that include explicitly the particle-particle hydrodynamic forces induced by the solvent. Our results suggest that the effects of colloid-colloid hydrodynamic interactions on the short-time diffusion coefficients are almost identical and factorable in both species.

  12. Two-dimensional time-dependent quantum-mechanical scattering event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbraith, I.; Ching, Y.S.; Abraham, E.

    1984-01-01

    Nonrelativistic quantum-mechanical scattering in two dimensions is studied numerically by integrating the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A partial-wave analysis is used to discuss the numerical results. A potential barrier, a square well and a single slit are considered as the scattering potentials.

  13. Two-dimensional time-domain finite-difference modeling for viscoelastic seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Na; Zhao, Lian-Feng; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Ge, Zengxi; Yao, Zhen-Xing

    2016-09-01

    Real Earth media are not perfectly elastic. Instead, they attenuate propagating mechanical waves. This anelastic phenomenon in wave propagation can be modeled by a viscoelastic mechanical model consisting of several standard linear solids. Using this viscoelastic model, we approximate a constant Q over a frequency band of interest. We use a four-element viscoelastic model with a trade-off between accuracy and computational costs to incorporate Q into 2-D time-domain first-order velocity-stress wave equations. To improve the computational efficiency, we limit the Q in the model to a list of discrete values between 2 and 1000. The related stress and strain relaxation times that characterize the viscoelastic model are pre-calculated and stored in a database for use by the finite-difference calculation. A viscoelastic finite-difference scheme that is second order in time and fourth order in space is developed based on the MacCormack algorithm. The new method is validated by comparing the numerical result with analytical solutions that are calculated using the generalized reflection/transmission coefficient method. The synthetic seismograms exhibit greater than 95 per cent consistency in a two-layer viscoelastic model. The dispersion generated from the simulation is consistent with the Kolsky-Futterman dispersion relationship.

  14. A two-dimensional model of the plasmasphere - Refilling time constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Craig E.; Guiter, Steven M.; Thomas, Steven G.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D model of the plasmasphere has been developed to study the temporal evolution of plasma density in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere. This model includes the supply and loss of hydrogen ions due to ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling as well as the effects of E x B convection. A parametric model describing the required coupling fluxes has been developed which utilizes empirical models of the neutral atmosphere, the ionosphere and the saturated plasmasphere. The plasmaspheric model has been used to examine the time it takes for the plasmasphere to refill after it has been depleted by a magnetic storm. The time it takes for the plasmasphere to reach 90 percent of its equilibrium level ranges from 3 days at L = 3 during solar minimum to as high as 100 days at L = 5 during solar maximum. Refilling is also dependent on the month of the year, with refilling requiring a longer period of time at solar maximum during June than during December for L greater than 3.2.

  15. Two-Dimensional, Time-Dependent Plasma Structures of a Hall Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    47 3.7 Relative spectral response of the Shimadzu HPV -2 ultra-high speed camera taken from Shimadzu HPV -2 Spectral Response . 48 3.8 Sample...a National Instruments SCXI-1321 to measure the current of each component in real-time. 41 Figure 3.4: Electrical diagram of Hall thruster components...experiment. The direct emission data was collected with a Shimadzu HyperVision HPV -2 high-speed camera which is able to record at one-million frames per

  16. Two-dimensional catheter arrays for real-time intracardiac volumetric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Edward D.; Fiering, Jason O.; Lee, Warren; Wolf, Patrick D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    1999-06-01

    We have previously described 2D arrays of several thousand elements operating up to 5.0 MHz for transthoracic cardiac imaging. Lately, there has been interest in developing catheter based intracardiac imaging systems to aid in the precise tracking of anatomical features for improved diagnoses and therapies. We have constructed several arrays for real time intracardiac volumetric imaging based upon two different designs; a 10 X 10 equals 100 element 5.0 MHz forward looking 2D array, and a 13 X 11 equals 143 element 5.0 MHz 2D array for side scanning applications.

  17. Short-time critical dynamics of damage spreading in the two-dimensional Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio Puzzo, M. Leticia; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2010-05-01

    The short-time critical dynamics of propagation of damage in the Ising ferromagnet in two dimensions is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Starting with equilibrium configurations at T=∞ and magnetization M=0 , an initial damage is created by flipping a small amount of spins in one of the two replicas studied. In this way, the initial damage is proportional to the initial magnetization M0 in one of the configurations upon quenching the system at TC , the Onsager critical temperature of the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition. It is found that, at short times, the damage increases with an exponent θD=1.915(3) , which is much larger than the exponent θ=0.197 characteristic of the initial increase of the magnetization M(t) . Also, an epidemic study was performed. It is found that the average distance from the origin of the epidemic (⟨R2(t)⟩) grows with an exponent z∗≈η≈1.9 , which is the same, within error bars, as the exponent θD . However, the survival probability of the epidemics reaches a plateau so that δ=0 . On the other hand, by quenching the system to lower temperatures one observes the critical spreading of the damage at TD≃0.51TC , where all the measured observables exhibit power laws with exponents θD=1.026(3) , δ=0.133(1) , and z∗=1.74(3) .

  18. Quantization and the Issue of Time for Various Two-Dimensional Models of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Strobl, T

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that the models of 2D Liouville Gravity, 2D Black Hole- and $R^2$-Gravity are {\\em embedded} in the Katanaev-Volovich model of 2D NonEinsteinian Gravity. Different approaches to the formulation of a quantum theory for the above systems are then presented: The Dirac constraints can be solved exactly in the momentum representation, the path integral can be integrated out, and the constraint algebra can be {\\em explicitely} canonically abelianized, thus allowing also for a (superficial) reduced phase space quantization. Non--trivial dynamics are obtained by means of time dependent gauges. All of these approaches lead to the {\\em same} finite dimensional quantum mechanical system.

  19. Stability analysis and control synthesis of uncertain Roesser-type discrete-time two-dimensional systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jia; Hui Guo-Tao; Xie Xiang-Peng

    2013-01-01

    We study the stability analysis and control synthesis of uncertain discrete-time two-dimensional (2D) systems.The mathematical model of the discrete-time 2D system is established upon the well-known Roesser model,and the uncertainty phenomenon,which appears typically in practical environments,is modeled by a convex bounded (polytope type) uncertain domain.The stability analysis and control synthesis of uncertain discrete-time 2D systems are then developed by applying the Lyapunov stability theory.In the processes of stability analysis and control synthesis,the obtained stability/stabilzaition conditions become less conservative by applying some novel relaxed techniques.Moreover,the obtained results are formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities,which can be easily solved via standard numerical software.Finally,numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  20. A direct time measurement technique for the two-dimensional precision coordinate detectors based on thin-walled drift tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makankin, A.M.; Myalkovskiy, V.V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Peshekhonov, V.D., E-mail: Vladimir.Peshekhonov@sunse.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Ritt, S. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Vasilyev, S.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-21

    This article presents the results of a study of the longitudinal spatial resolution by means of the direct timing method (DTM) using 2 m long and 9.53 mm diameter straw tubes. The feasibility of achieving the spatial resolution (r.m.s.) better than 2 cm over full length of the straw is demonstrated. The spatial resolution changes little when measured by detecting gammas from a Fe-55 gamma ray source or minimum ionizing electrons from a Ru-106 source. The use of the same type of front end electronics (FEE) both for measuring the drift time of ionization electrons and propagation time of a signal along the anode wire allows one to construct a detector capable for measuring the two dimensional coordinates of charged particles.

  1. Two-dimensional time dependent hurricane overwash and erosion modeling at Santa Rosa Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, R.T.; Van Theil de Vries, J. S. M.; Plant, N.G.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Roelvink, J.A.; Thompson, D.M.; Reniers, A.J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    A 2DH numerical, model which is capable of computing nearshore circulation and morphodynamics, including dune erosion, breaching and overwash, is used to simulate overwash caused by Hurricane Ivan (2004) on a barrier island. The model is forced using parametric wave and surge time series based on field data and large-scale numerical model results. The model predicted beach face and dune erosion reasonably well as well as the development of washover fans. Furthermore, the model demonstrated considerable quantitative skill (upwards of 66% of variance explained, maximum bias - 0.21 m) in hindcasting the post-storm shape and elevation of the subaerial barrier island when a sheet flow sediment transport limiter was applied. The prediction skill ranged between 0.66 and 0.77 in a series of sensitivity tests in which several hydraulic forcing parameters were varied. The sensitivity studies showed that the variations in the incident wave height and wave period affected the entire simulated island morphology while variations in the surge level gradient between the ocean and back barrier bay affected the amount of deposition on the back barrier and in the back barrier bay. The model sensitivity to the sheet flow sediment transport limiter, which served as a proxy for unknown factors controlling the resistance to erosion, was significantly greater than the sensitivity to the hydraulic forcing parameters. If no limiter was applied the simulated morphological response of the barrier island was an order of magnitude greater than the measured morphological response.

  2. Two-dimensional convolver architecture for real-time image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeta, David; Malinowski, Chris W.

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents a novel architecture for two VLSI ICs, an 8-bit and 12-bit version, which execute real-time 3x3 kernel image convolutions at rates exceeding 10 ms per 512x512 pixel frame (at a 30 MHz external clock rate). The ICs are capable of performing "on-the-fly" convolutions of images without any need for external input image buffers. Both symmetric and asymmetric coefficient kernels are supported, with coefficient precision up to 12 bits. Nine on-chip multiplier-accumulators maintain double-precision accuracy for maximum precision of the results and minimum roundoff noise. In addition, an on-chip ALU can be switched into the pixel datapath to perform simultaneous pixel-point operations on the incoming data. Thus, operations such as thresholding, inversion, shifts, and double frame arithmetic can be performed on the pixels with no extra speed penalty. Flexible internal datapaths of the processors provide easy means for cascadability of several devices if larger image arrays need to be processed. Moreover, larger convolution kernels, such as 6x6, can easily be supported with no speed penalty by employing two or more convolvers. On-chip delay buffers can be programmed to any desired raster line width up to 1024 pixels. The delay buffers may also be bypassed when direct "Sum-Of-Products" operation of the multipliers is required; such as when external frame buffer address sequencing is desired. These features make the convolvers suitable for applications such as affine and bilinear interpolation, one-dimensional convolution (FIR filtration), and matrix operations. Several examples of applications illustrating stand-alone and cascade mode operation of the ICs will be discussed

  3. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Mapping of Relative Local Surface Temperatures with a Thin-Film Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic mapping of an object’s local temperature distribution may offer valuable information for failure analysis, system control and improvement. In this letter we present a computerized measurement system which is equipped with a hybrid, low-noise mechanical-electrical multiplexer for real-time two-dimensional (2D mapping of surface temperatures. We demonstrate the performance of the system on a device embedded with 32 pieces of built-in Cr-Pt thin-film thermocouples arranged in a 4 × 8 matrix. The system can display a continuous 2D mapping movie of relative temperatures with a time interval around 1 s. This technique may find applications in a variety of practical devices and systems.

  4. A direct time measurements technique for the two-dimensional precision coordinate detectors based on thin-walled drift tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Makankin, A M; Peshekhonov, V D; Ritt, S; Vasilyev, S E

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the longitudinal spatial resolution of 2 m long straw tubes by means of the direct timing method (DTM). The feasibility of achieving a coordinate resolution (r.m.s.) better than 2 cm over full length of the straw is demonstrated. The spatial resolution insignificantly changes when measured by detecting gammas from a Fe-55 gamma ray source or minimum ionizing particles from a Ru-106 source. The use of the same type of FEE for data taking both for measuring the drift time of ionization electrons and propagation of a signal along the anode wire allows one to construct a two-dimensional detector for precision coordinate measurements.

  5. Resolving two-dimensional kinetics of the integrin αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions using binding-unbinding correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinov, Rustem I; Mekler, Andrey; Shuman, Henry; Bennett, Joel S; Barsegov, Valeri; Weisel, John W

    2012-10-12

    Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach named binding-unbinding correlation spectroscopy (BUCS), we describe the two-dimensional kinetics of interactions between fibrinogen and the integrin αIIbβ3, the ligand-receptor pair essential for platelet function during hemostasis and thrombosis. The methodology uses the optical trap to probe force-free association of individual surface-attached fibrinogen and αIIbβ3 molecules and forced dissociation of an αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex. This novel approach combines force clamp measurements of bond lifetimes with the binding mode to quantify the dependence of the binding probability on the interaction time. We found that fibrinogen-reactive αIIbβ3 pre-exists in at least two states that differ in their zero force on-rates (k(on1) = 1.4 × 10(-4) and k(on2) = 2.3 × 10(-4) μm(2)/s), off-rates (k(off1) = 2.42 and k(off2) = 0.60 s(-1)), and dissociation constants (K(d)(1) = 1.7 × 10(4) and K(d)(2) = 2.6 × 10(3) μm(-2)). The integrin activator Mn(2+) changed the on-rates and affinities (K(d)(1) = 5 × 10(4) and K(d)(2) = 0.3 × 10(3) μm(-2)) but did not affect the off-rates. The strength of αIIbβ3-fibrinogen interactions was time-dependent due to a progressive increase in the fraction of the high affinity state of the αIIbβ3-fibrinogen complex characterized by a faster on-rate. Upon Mn(2+)-induced integrin activation, the force-dependent off-rates decrease while the complex undergoes a conformational transition from a lower to higher affinity state. The results obtained provide quantitative estimates of the two-dimensional kinetic rates for the low and high affinity αIIbβ3 and fibrinogen interactions at the single molecule level and offer direct evidence for the time- and force-dependent changes in αIIbβ3 conformation and ligand binding activity, underlying the dynamics of fibrinogen-mediated platelet adhesion and aggregation.

  6. Two-dimensional solitons in conservative and parity-time-symmetric triple-core waveguides with cubic-quintic nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Feijoo, David; Konotop, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a system of three two-dimensional nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equations coupled by linear terms and with the cubic-quintic (focusing-defocusing) nonlinearity. We consider two versions of the model: conservative and parity-time ($\\mathcal{PT}$) symmetric. These models describe triple-core nonlinear optical waveguides, with balanced gain and losses in the $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric case. We obtain families of soliton solutions and discuss their stability. The latter study is performed using a linear stability analysis and checked with direct numerical simulations of the evolutional system of equations. Stable solitons are found in the conservative and $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric cases. Interactions and collisions between the conservative and $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric solitons are briefly investigated, as well.

  7. Non-Linear Non Stationary Analysis of Two-Dimensional Time-Series Applied to GRACE Data Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovative two-dimensional (2D) adaptive analysis will be tested NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission database in phase I in...

  8. Variationality with second derivatives, relativistic uniform acceleration, and the 'spin'-curvature interaction in two-dimensional space-time

    OpenAIRE

    Matsyuk, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A variational formulation for the geodesic circles in two-dimensional Riemannian manifold is discovered. Some relations with the uniform relativistic acceleration and the one-dimensional 'spin'-curvature interaction is investigated.

  9. Non-Linear Non Stationary Analysis of Two-Dimensional Time-Series Applied to GRACE Data Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovative two-dimensional (2D) empirical mode decomposition (EMD) analysis was applied to NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)...

  10. Compressive sensing based high-speed time-stretch optical microscopy for two-dimensional image acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Chen, Hongwei; Weng, Zhiliang; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-11-16

    In this paper, compressive sensing based high-speed time-stretch optical microscopy for two-dimensional (2D) image acquisition is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. A section of dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) is used to perform wavelength-to-time conversion and then ultrafast spectral shaping of broadband optical pulses can be achieved via high-speed intensity modulation. A 2D spatial disperser comprising a pair of orthogonally oriented dispersers is employed to produce spatially structured illumination for 2D image acquisition and a section of single mode fiber (SMF) is utilized for pulse compression in the optical domain. In our scheme, a 1.2-GHz photodetector and a 50-MHz analog-to-digital converter (ADC) are used to acquire the energy of the compressed pulses. Image reconstructions are demonstrated at a frame rate of 500 kHz and a sixteen-fold image compression is achieved in our proof-of-concept demonstration.

  11. Two-dimensional time-dependent modelling of fume formation in a pulsed gas metal arc welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselli, M.; Colombo, V.; Ghedini, E.; Gherardi, M.; Sanibondi, P.

    2013-06-01

    Fume formation in a pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is investigated by coupling a time-dependent axi-symmetric two-dimensional model, which takes into account both droplet detachment and production of metal vapour, with a model for fume formation and transport based on the method of moments for the solution of the aerosol general dynamic equation. We report simulative results of a pulsed process (peak current = 350 A, background current 30 A, period = 9 ms) for a 1 mm diameter iron wire, with Ar shielding gas. Results showed that metal vapour production occurs mainly at the wire tip, whereas fume formation is concentrated in the fringes of the arc in the spatial region close to the workpiece, where metal vapours are transported by convection. The proposed modelling approach allows time-dependent tracking of fumes also in plasma processes where temperature-time variations occur faster than nanoparticle transport from the nucleation region to the surrounding atmosphere, as is the case for most pulsed GMAW processes.

  12. The Variational Principle for the Uniform Acceleration and Quasi-Spin in Two Dimensional Space-Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsyuk, Roman Ya.

    2008-02-01

    The variational principle and the corresponding differential equation for geodesic circles in two dimensional (pseudo)-Riemannian space are being discovered. The relationship with the physical notion of uniformly accelerated relativistic particle is emphasized. The known form of spin-curvature interaction emerges due to the presence of second order derivatives in the expression for the Lagrange function. The variational equation itself reduces to the unique invariant variational equation of constant Frenet curvature in two dimensional (pseudo)-Euclidean geometry.

  13. The Variational Principle for the Uniform Acceleration and Quasi-Spin in Two Dimensional Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Matsyuk, Roman Ya

    2008-01-01

    The variational principle and the corresponding differential equation for geodesic circles in two dimensional (pseudo)-Riemannian space are being discovered. The relationship with the physical notion of uniformly accelerated relativistic particle is emphasized. The known form of spin-curvature interaction emerges due to the presence of second order derivatives in the expression for the Lagrange function. The variational equation itself reduces to the unique invariant variational equation of constant Frenet curvature in two dimensional (pseudo)-Euclidean geometry.

  14. The Variational Principle for the Uniform Acceleration and Quasi-Spin in Two Dimensional Space-Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Ya. Matsyuk

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The variational principle and the corresponding differential equation for geodesic circles in two dimensional (pseudo-Riemannian space are being discovered. The relationship with the physical notion of uniformly accelerated relativistic particle is emphasized. The known form of spin-curvature interaction emerges due to the presence of second order derivatives in the expression for the Lagrange function. The variational equation itself reduces to the unique invariant variational equation of constant Frenet curvature in two dimensional (pseudo-Euclidean geometry.

  15. Boundary crisis and suppression of Fermi acceleration in a dissipative two-dimensional non-integrable time-dependent billiard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Diego F.M., E-mail: diegofregolente@gmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515 Bela Vista, CEP, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Leonel, Edson D., E-mail: edleonel@rc.unesp.b [Departamento de Estatistica, Matematica Aplicada e Computacao, Instituto de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. 24A, 1515 Bela Vista, CEP, 13506-900 Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-05

    Some dynamical properties for a dissipative time-dependent oval-shaped billiard are studied. The system is described in terms of a four-dimensional nonlinear mapping. Dissipation is introduced via inelastic collisions of the particle with the boundary, thus implying that the particle has a fractional loss of energy upon collision. The dissipation causes profound modifications in the dynamics of the particle as well as in the phase space of the non-dissipative system. In particular, inelastic collisions can be assumed as an efficient mechanism to suppress Fermi acceleration of the particle. The dissipation also creates attractors in the system, including chaotic. We show that a slightly modification of the intensity of the damping coefficient yields a drastic and sudden destruction of the chaotic attractor, thus leading the system to experience a boundary crisis. We have characterized such a boundary crisis via a collision of the chaotic attractor with its own basin of attraction and confirmed that inelastic collisions do indeed suppress Fermi acceleration in two-dimensional time-dependent billiards.

  16. Two-dimensional time-dependent model of the transport of minor species in the Venus night side upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Arnaud; Cox, Cédric; Gérard, Jean-Claude

    2010-12-01

    We present a numerical tool developed to quantify the role of processes controlling the spatio-temporal distribution of the NO ultraviolet and O2(Δg1) infrared nightglows in the Venus night side upper atmosphere, observed with the VIRTIS and SPICAV instruments on board Venus Express. This numerical tool consists in a two-dimensional chemical-transport time-dependent model which computes in a hypothetical rectangular solving domain the spatio-temporal distributions of the number densities of the four minor species at play in these two nightglow emissions. The coupled nonlinear system of the four partial differential equations, describing the spatio-temporal variations of the minor species, has been solved using a finite volume method with a forward Euler method for the time integration scheme. As an application, we have first simulated a time-constant supply of atoms through the upper boundary of the solving domain. The fluxes are inhomogeneous relative to its horizontal direction, in order to simulate regions of enhanced downward flow of oxygen and nitrogen giving rise to NO and O 2 brightening. Given that these two emissions show large time variations, we have also simulated a time-dependent downward flux of O and N atoms. It results from these simulations that the lack of correlation between the NO and O2(Δg1) nightglows largely result from to the coupling between horizontal and vertical transport processes and the very different chemical lifetimes of the two species. In particular, we have quantified the role of each process generating spatio-temporal de-correlations between the NO and O2(Δg1) nightglows.

  17. Characterization of the Clostridium difficile volatile metabolome using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Christiaan A; Shen, Aimee; Hill, Jane E

    2016-12-15

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections of the gastrointestinal tract characterized by severe diarrhea. Exposure to certain classes of antibiotics, advanced age, and prolonged hospitalizations are known risk factors for infection by this organism. Anecdotally, healthcare providers have reported that they can smell C. difficile infections in their patients, and several studies have suggested that there may indeed be an olfactory signal associated with C. difficile-associated diarrhea. In this study, we sought to characterize the volatile molecules produced by an epidemic strain of C. difficile (R20291) using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). We report on a set of 77 volatile compounds, of which 59 have not previously been associated with C. difficile growth in vitro. Amongst these reported compounds, we detect both straight-chain and branched-chain carboxylic acids, as well as p-cresol, which have been the primary foci of C. difficile volatile metabolomic studies to-date. We additionally report on novel sulfur-containing and carbonyl-containing molecules that have not previously been reported for C. difficile. With the identification of these novel C. difficile-associated volatile compounds, we demonstrate the superior resolution and sensitivity of GC×GC-TOFMS relative to traditional GC-MS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of special surfactants by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Volker; Wienand, Nils; Wirtz, Michaela; Kling, Hans-Willi; Gäb, Siegmar; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2010-01-29

    Multidimensional gas-chromatographic analyses of olesochemically based nonionic, anionic and several cationic surfactants in industrial cleaners are demonstrated. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry allows the simultaneous determination of fatty alcohols, fatty alcohol sulphates and alkyl polyglucosides. In addition, the determination of fatty alcohol ethoxylates up to C(10)EO(8) (highest degree of ethoxylation) and C(18)EO(5) (longest C-chain at an ethoxylation degree of five) and the analysis of fatty alcohol alkoxylates that contain ethoxy (EO) and propoxy (PO) groups could be realized. Because of decomposition in the injector and a weak EI-fragmentation, cationic surfactants such as alkyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride could also be identified by their characteristic fragments. Thermogravimetric analyses confirmed that the temperature in a normal GC injector is not high enough to cause thermal decomposition of esterquats. However, we could demonstrate that a modified silylation procedure forms decomposition products of esterquats in the GC injector which are detectable by GCxGC-(TOF)MS and allows the identification of such GC-atypical analytes.

  19. VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, M.C.

    1981-08-01

    VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

  20. Detection of an extended human volatome with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Phillips

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOF MS has been proposed as a powerful new tool for multidimensional analysis of complex chemical mixtures. We investigated GCxGC-TOF MS as a new method for identifying volatile organic compounds (VOCs in normal human breath. METHODS: Samples of alveolar breath VOCs and ambient room air VOC were collected with a breath collection apparatus (BCA onto separate sorbent traps from 34 normal healthy volunteers (mean age = 40 yr, SD = 17 yr, male/female = 19/15. VOCs were separated on two serial capillary columns separated by a cryogenic modulator, and detected with TOF MS. The first and second dimension columns were non-polar and polar respectively. RESULTS: BCA collection combined with GC×GC-TOF MS analysis identified approximately 2000 different VOCs in samples of human breath, many of which have not been previously reported. The 50 VOCs with the highest alveolar gradients (abundance in breath minus abundance in ambient room air mostly comprised benzene derivatives, acetone, methylated derivatives of alkanes, and isoprene. CONCLUSIONS: Collection and analysis of breath VOCs with the BCA-GC×GC-TOF MS system extended the size of the detectable human volatile metabolome, the volatome, by an order of magnitude compared to previous reports employing one-dimensional GC-MS. The size of the human volatome has been under-estimated in the past due to coelution of VOCs in one-dimensional GC analytical systems.

  1. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Pagonis, V.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al2O3:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separ

  2. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Cooke, David G.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report on the numerical analysis of a time-resolved terahertz (THz) spectroscopy experiment using a modified finite-difference time-domain method. Using this method, we show that ultrafast carrier dynamics can be extracted with a time resolution smaller than the duration of the THz...... probe pulse and can be determined solely by the pump pulse duration. Our method is found to reproduce complicated two-dimensional transient conductivity maps exceedingly well, demonstrating the power of the time-domain numerical method for extracting ultrafast and dynamic transport parameters from time...

  3. Validation of automated Library-Based Qualitative Screening of Pesticides by Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, J.G.J.; Kamp, van der H.J.; Weg, van der G.; Lee, van der M.K.; Punt, A.M.; Rijk, de T.C.

    2011-01-01

    A method for automated detection and reporting of pesticides in plant materials based on comprehensive two-dimensional GC/time-of-flight MS with library-based detection by software has been developed and validated. Optimum settings for detection parameters such as spectral match threshold and first

  4. Second trimester ultrasound: reference values for two-dimensional speckle tracking-derived longitudinal strain, strain rate and time to peak deformation of the fetal heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapusta, L.; Mainzer, G.; Weiner, Z.; Deutsch, L.; Khoury, A.; Haddad, S.; Lorber, A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on myocardial deformation during the internationally widely used second-trimester screening are scarce and confusing. Reference values of time to peak strain are missing. The aims of this study were to assess reference values derived from two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiog

  5. Characterisation of volatile components of Pinotage wines using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC–TOFMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weldegergis, B.T.; Villiers, de A.; McNeish, C.; Seethapathy, S.; Mostafa, A.; Górecki, T.; Crouch, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the ongoing research into the chemical composition of the uniquely South African wine cultivar Pinotage, the volatile composition of nine young wines of this cultivar was investigated using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) in combination with time-of-flight mass

  6. Second trimester ultrasound: reference values for two-dimensional speckle tracking-derived longitudinal strain, strain rate and time to peak deformation of the fetal heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapusta, L.; Mainzer, G.; Weiner, Z.; Deutsch, L.; Khoury, A.; Haddad, S.; Lorber, A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on myocardial deformation during the internationally widely used second-trimester screening are scarce and confusing. Reference values of time to peak strain are missing. The aims of this study were to assess reference values derived from two-dimensional speckle-tracking

  7. Characterisation of volatile components of Pinotage wines using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC–TOFMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weldegergis, B.T.; Villiers, de A.; McNeish, C.; Seethapathy, S.; Mostafa, A.; Górecki, T.; Crouch, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the ongoing research into the chemical composition of the uniquely South African wine cultivar Pinotage, the volatile composition of nine young wines of this cultivar was investigated using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) in combination with time-of-flight mass

  8. Water-Channel Estimation of Eulerian and Lagrangian Time Scales of the Turbulence in Idealized Two-Dimensional Urban Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bernardino, Annalisa; Monti, Paolo; Leuzzi, Giovanni; Querzoli, Giorgio

    2017-07-01

    Lagrangian and Eulerian statistics are obtained from a water-channel experiment of an idealized two-dimensional urban canopy flow in neutral conditions. The objective is to quantify the Eulerian (TE) and Lagrangian (TL) time scales of the turbulence above the canopy layer as well as to investigate their dependence on the aspect ratio of the canopy, AR, as the latter is the ratio of the width (W) to the height (H) of the canyon. Experiments are also conducted for the case of flat terrain, which can be thought of as equivalent to a classical one-directional shear flow. The values found for the Eulerian time scales on flat terrain are in agreement with previous numerical results found in the literature. It is found that both the streamwise and vertical components of the Lagrangian time scale, T_u^L and T_w^L , follow Raupach's linear law within the constant-flux layer. The same holds true for T_w^L in both the canopies analyzed (AR= 1 and AR= 2 ) and also for T_u^L when AR = 1 . In contrast, for AR = 2 , T_u^L follows Raupach's law only above z=2H . Below that level, T_u^L is nearly constant with height, showing at z=H a value approximately one order of magnitude greater than that found for AR = 1 . It is shown that the assumption usually adopted for flat terrain, that β =TL/TE is proportional to the inverse of the turbulence intensity, also holds true even for the canopy flow in the constant-flux layer. In particular, γ /i_u fits well β _u =T_u^L /T_u^E in both the configurations by choosing γ to be 0.35 (here, i_u =σ _u / \\bar{u} , where \\bar{u} and σ _u are the mean and the root-mean-square of the streamwise velocity component, respectively). On the other hand, β _w =T_w^L /T_w^E follows approximately γ /i_w =0.65/( {σ _w /\\bar{u} } ) for z > 2H , irrespective of the AR value. The second main objective is to estimate other parameters of interest in dispersion studies, such as the eddy diffusivity of momentum (KT) and the Kolmogorov constant (C_0) . It

  9. Time resolved pyrolysis of char

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    pyrolysis, and slow heating in direct combination with mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection, respectively. Characteristic ions derived from the flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry data enable the release of volatiles to be time and, hence...

  10. Two-Dimensional Thermal Shock Problem of Generalized Magneto-Thermoelasticity with a Time-Fractional Heat Conduction Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachher, M.; Sarkar, N.

    2016-11-01

    An electromagneto-thermoelastic coupled problem for a homogeneous, isotropic, thermally and electrically conducting half-space solid whose surface is subjected to a thermal shock is considered in two-dimensional space. The equations of the theory of generalized electromagneto-thermoelasticity with fractional derivative heat transfer allowing the second sound effects are considered. An initial magnetic field acts parallel to the plane boundary of the half-space. The normal mode analysis and the eigenvalue approach techniques are used to solve the resulting nondimensional coupled field equations for the three theories. Numerical results for the temperature, displacements and thermal stresses distributions are presented graphically and discussed. A comparison is made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of the magnetic field.

  11. [Characterization of aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy gas oil using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Zelong

    2012-02-01

    An analytical method for separating and identifying the aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy gas oil using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) was established. The two-dimensional distribution by ring number of the aromatic hydrocarbons was obtained. Besides phenanthrene and methyl-phenanthrene, many other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as pyrene and benzo [a] anthracene were identified by using the retention times, standard mass spectra or literature reports. The method was successfully applied to the hydrotreating process of heavy gas oil and the hydrotreated products of phenanthrene, pyrene were identified. This method provided technical support for the characterization of aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy gas oil and the investigation of hydrogenation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Compared with the conventional method, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), the GC x GC-TOF MS method illustrated the obvious advantages for heavy gas oil analysis.

  12. Time resolved thermal lens in edible oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, T. A. S.; Pedreira, P. R. B.; Medina, A. N.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Bento, A. C.; Baesso, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    In this work time resolved thermal lens spectrometry is applied to investigate the optical properties of the following edible oils: soya, sunflower, canola, and corn oils. The experiments were performed at room temperature using the mode mismatched thermal lens configuration. The results showed that when the time resolved procedure is adopted the technique can be applied to investigate the photosensitivity of edible oils. Soya oil presented a stronger photochemical reaction as compared to the other investigated samples. This observation may be relevant for future studies evaluating edible oils storage conditions and also may contribute to a better understanding of the physical and chemical properties of this important foodstuff.

  13. Time-domain analysis of bandgap characteristics of two-dimensional periodic structures by use of a source-model technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Alon; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2008-02-01

    We introduce a time-domain source-model technique for analysis of two-dimensional, transverse-magnetic, plane-wave scattering by a photonic crystal slab composed of a finite number of identical layers, each comprising a linear periodic array of dielectric cylinders. The proposed technique takes advantage of the periodicity of the slab by solving the problem within a unit cell of the periodic structure. A spectral analysis of the temporal behavior of the fields scattered by the slab shows a clear agreement between frequency bands where the spectral density of the transmitted energy is low and the bandgaps of the corresponding two-dimensionally infinite periodic structure. The effect of the bandwidth of the incident pulse and its center frequency on the manner it is transmitted through and reflected by the slab is studied via numerical examples.

  14. Shear viscosity of a two-dimensional emulsion of drops using a multiple-relaxation-time-step lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, I; Xu, X; Burgin, K

    2017-02-01

    An extended Benzi-Dellar lattice Boltzmann equation scheme [R. Benzi, S. Succi, and M. Vergassola, Europhys. Lett. 13, 727 (1990)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/13/8/010; R. Benzi, S. Succi, and M. Vergassola, Phys. Rep. 222, 145 (1992)PRPLCM0370-157310.1016/0370-1573(92)90090-M; P. J. Dellar, Phys. Rev. E 65, 036309 (2002)1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.65.036309] is developed and applied to the problem of confirming, at low Re and drop fluid concentration, c, the variation of effective shear viscosity, η_{eff}=η_{1}[1+f(η_{1},η_{2})c], with respect to c for a sheared, two-dimensional, initially crystalline emulsion [here η_{1} (η_{2}) is the fluid (drop fluid) shear viscosity]. Data obtained with our enhanced multicomponent lattice Boltzmann method, using average shear stress and hydrodynamic dissipation, agree well once appropriate corrections to Landau's volume average shear stress [L. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, London, 1966)] are applied. Simulation results also confirm the expected form for f(η_{i},η_{2}), and they provide a reasonable estimate of its parameters. Most significantly, perhaps, the generality of our data supports the validity of Taylor's disputed simplification [G. I. Taylor, Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 138, 133 (1932)1364-502110.1098/rspa.1932.0175] to reduce the effect of one hydrodynamic boundary condition (on the continuity of the normal contraction of stress) to an assumption that interfacial tension is sufficiently strong to maintain a spherical drop shape.

  15. Shear viscosity of a two-dimensional emulsion of drops using a multiple-relaxation-time-step lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, I.; Xu, X.; Burgin, K.

    2017-02-01

    An extended Benzi-Dellar lattice Boltzmann equation scheme [R. Benzi, S. Succi, and M. Vergassola, Europhys. Lett. 13, 727 (1990), 10.1209/0295-5075/13/8/010; R. Benzi, S. Succi, and M. Vergassola, Phys. Rep. 222, 145 (1992), 10.1016/0370-1573(92)90090-M; P. J. Dellar, Phys. Rev. E 65, 036309 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevE.65.036309] is developed and applied to the problem of confirming, at low Re and drop fluid concentration, c , the variation of effective shear viscosity, ηeff=η1[1 +f (η1,η2) c ] , with respect to c for a sheared, two-dimensional, initially crystalline emulsion [here η1 (η2) is the fluid (drop fluid) shear viscosity]. Data obtained with our enhanced multicomponent lattice Boltzmann method, using average shear stress and hydrodynamic dissipation, agree well once appropriate corrections to Landau's volume average shear stress [L. Landau and E. M. Lifshitz, Fluid Mechanics, 6th ed. (Pergamon, London, 1966)] are applied. Simulation results also confirm the expected form for f (ηi,η2) , and they provide a reasonable estimate of its parameters. Most significantly, perhaps, the generality of our data supports the validity of Taylor's disputed simplification [G. I. Taylor, Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 138, 133 (1932), 10.1098/rspa.1932.0175] to reduce the effect of one hydrodynamic boundary condition (on the continuity of the normal contraction of stress) to an assumption that interfacial tension is sufficiently strong to maintain a spherical drop shape.

  16. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    CERN Document Server

    Nagele, Stefan; Wais, Michael; Wachter, Georg; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric effect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the field-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for effective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes $A$@$\\text{C}_{60}$ and discuss how streaking time shifts are modified due to the interaction of the $\\text{C}_...

  17. Time-resolved photoemission using attosecond streaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagele, S.; Pazourek, R.; Wais, M.; Wachter, G.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study time-resolved photoemission in atoms as probed by attosecond streaking. We review recent advances in the study of the photoelectric efect in the time domain and show that the experimentally accessible time shifts can be decomposed into distinct contributions that stem from the feld-free photoionization process itself and from probe-field induced corrections. We perform accurate quantum-mechanical as well as classical simulations of attosecond streaking for efective one-electron systems and determine all relevant contributions to the time delay with attosecond precision. In particular, we investigate the properties and limitations of attosecond streaking for the transition from short-ranged potentials (photodetachment) to long-ranged Coulomb potentials (photoionization). As an example for a more complex system, we study time-resolved photoionization for endohedral fullerenes A@C60 and discuss how streaking time shifts are modifed due to the interaction of the C60 cage with the probing infrared streaking field.

  18. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  19. Market Timing on Oslo Stock Exchange: A Two-dimensional Analysis of Long-term Abnormal Stock Price Performance Following Equity Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Holom, Erik Hiller

    2013-01-01

    I analyze the time-variation of long-term risk-adjusted abnormal stock price underperformances following equity issues on Oslo Stock Exchange between 1997 and 2011. Market timing effects are analyzed within a two dimensional framework reflecting both the pre-issue stock market performance and the short-term activity level in the equity capital market. An adjusted version of the Fama-French three-factor model is used for the risk-adjustment of stock returns. The long-term underperformance is h...

  20. Angle-resolved time delay in photoemission

    CERN Document Server

    Wätzel, Jonas; Pavlyukh, Yaroslav; Berakdar, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the relative time delay of photoelectrons originating from different atomic subshells of noble gases. This quantity was measured via attosecond streaking and studied theoretically by Schultze et al. [Science 328, 1658 (2010)] for neon. A substantial discrepancy was found between the measured and the calculated values of the relative time delay. Several theoretical studies were put forward to resolve this issue, e.g., by including correlation effects. In the present paper we explore a further aspect, namely the directional dependence of time delay. In contrast to neon, for argon target a strong angular dependence of time delay is found near a Cooper minimum.

  1. Split-step finite-difference time-domain method with perfectly matched layers for efficient analysis of two-dimensional photonic crystals with anisotropic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpreet; Tan, Eng Leong; Chen, Zhi Ning

    2012-02-01

    This Letter presents a split-step (SS) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for the efficient analysis of two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystals (PhCs) with anisotropic media. The proposed SS FDTD method is formulated with perfectly matched layer boundary conditions and caters for inhomogeneous anisotropic media. Furthermore, the proposed method is derived using the efficient SS1 splitting formulas with simpler right-hand sides that are more efficient and easier to implement. A 2-D PhC cavity with anisotropic media is used as an example to validate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional dynamic imaging of live biofilms in a microchannel by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xin; Marshall, Matthew J; Xiong, Yijia; Ma, Xiang; Zhou, Yufan; Tucker, Abigail E; Zhu, Zihua; Liu, Songqin; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2015-05-01

    A vacuum compatible microfluidic reactor, SALVI (System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface), was employed for in situ chemical imaging of live biofilms using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Depth profiling by sputtering materials in sequential layers resulted in live biofilm spatial chemical mapping. Two-dimensional (2D) images were reconstructed to report the first three-dimensional images of hydrated biofilm elucidating spatial and chemical heterogeneity. 2D image principal component analysis was conducted among biofilms at different locations in the microchannel. Our approach directly visualized spatial and chemical heterogeneity within the living biofilm by dynamic liquid ToF-SIMS.

  3. Incremental value of live/real time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography over the two-dimensional technique in the assessment of aortic atherosclerotic thrombi and ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Mahmoud; Bulur, Serkan; Kalla, Aditi; Ahmed, Mustafa I; Hsiung, Ming C; Uygur, Begum; Alagic, Nermina; Sungur, Aylin; Singh, Satinder; Nanda, Navin C

    2016-08-01

    We present two cases in whom live/real time three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3DTEE) provided incremental value in the assessment of atherosclerotic disease in the aorta. In one patient, it identified additional atherosclerotic ulcers as well as thrombi within them which were missed by two-dimensional (2D) TEE. In both cases, the size of the large mobile atherosclerotic plaque was underestimated by 2DTEE as compared with 3DTEE. Furthermore, 3DTEE provided volume quantification of the thrombi and ulcers which is not possible by 2DTEE. The echocardiographic findings of atherosclerotic plaques were confirmed by computed tomography in one patient and by surgery in the other.

  4. Time-domain measurement of terahertz frequency magnetoplasmon resonances in a two-dimensional electron system by the direct injection of picosecond pulsed currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jingbo; Mayorov, Alexander S.; Wood, Christopher D.; Mistry, Divyang; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A.; Cunningham, John E., E-mail: j.e.cunningham@leeds.ac.uk [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Sydoruk, Oleksiy [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-29

    We have investigated terahertz (THz) frequency magnetoplasmon resonances in a two-dimensional electron system through the direct injection of picosecond duration current pulses. The evolution of the time-domain signals was measured as a function of magnetic field, and the results were found to be in agreement with calculations using a mode-matching approach for four modes observed in the frequency range above 0.1 THz. This introduces a generic technique suitable for sampling ultrafast carrier dynamics in low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures at THz frequencies.

  5. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  6. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard W; Mane, Anil U; Elam, Jeffrey W; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew; Chollet, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  7. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Mane, Anil; Elam, Jeffrey; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  8. A multi-ASIC real-time implementation of the two dimensional affine transform with a bilinear interpolation scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Mark J.; Samsom, Martin M.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    1995-01-01

    Some image processing applications (e.g. computer graphics and robot vision) require the rotation, scaling and translation of digitized images in real-time (25–30 images per second). Today's standard image processors can not meet this timing constraint so other solutions have to be considered. This

  9. Two-dimensional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Osserman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The basic component of several-variable calculus, two-dimensional calculus is vital to mastery of the broader field. This extensive treatment of the subject offers the advantage of a thorough integration of linear algebra and materials, which aids readers in the development of geometric intuition. An introductory chapter presents background information on vectors in the plane, plane curves, and functions of two variables. Subsequent chapters address differentiation, transformations, and integration. Each chapter concludes with problem sets, and answers to selected exercises appear at the end o

  10. Two dimensional vernier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional vernier scale is disclosed utilizing a cartesian grid on one plate member with a polar grid on an overlying transparent plate member. The polar grid has multiple concentric circles at a fractional spacing of the spacing of the cartesian grid lines. By locating the center of the polar grid on a location on the cartesian grid, interpolation can be made of both the X and Y fractional relationship to the cartesian grid by noting which circles coincide with a cartesian grid line for the X and Y direction.

  11. Time-Dependent Parabolic Finite Difference Formulation for Harmonic Sound Propagation in a Two-Dimensional Duct with Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Kevin L.; Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference real time iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for future large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable for a harmonic monochromatic sound field, a parabolic (in time) approximation is introduced to reduce the order of the governing equation. The analysis begins with a harmonic sound source radiating into a quiescent duct. This fully explicit iteration method then calculates stepwise in time to obtain the 'steady state' harmonic solutions of the acoustic field. For stability, applications of conventional impedance boundary conditions requires coupling to explicit hyperbolic difference equations at the boundary. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  12. Time resolved spectroscopic studies on some nanophosphors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harish Chander; Santa Chawla

    2008-06-01

    Time resolved spectroscopy is an important tool for studying photophysical processes in phosphors. Present work investigates the steady state and time resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopic characteristics of ZnS, ZnO and (Zn, Mg)O nanophosphors both in powder as well as thin film form. Photoluminescence (PL) of ZnS nanophosphors typically exhibit a purple/blue emission peak termed as self activated (SA) luminescence and emission at different wavelengths arising due to dopant impurities e.g. green emission for ZnS : Cu, orange emission for ZnS : Mn and red emission for ZnS : Eu. The lifetimes obtained from decay curves range from ns to ms level and suggest the radiative recombination path involving donor–acceptor pair recombination or internal electronic transitions of the impurity atom. A series of ZnMgO nanophosphor thin films with varied Zn : Mg ratios were prepared by chemical bath deposition. Photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra exhibit variations with changing Mg ratio. Luminescence lifetime as short as 10-10 s was observed for ZnO and ZnMgO (100 : 10) nanophosphors. With increasing Mg ratio, PL decay shifts into microsecond range. ZnO and ZnMgO alloys up to 50% Mg were prepared as powder by solid state mixing and sintering at high temperature in reducing atmosphere. Time resolved decay of PL indicated lifetime in the microsecond time scale. The novelty of the work lies in clear experimental evidence of dopants (Cu, Mn, Eu and Mg) in the decay process and luminescence life times in II–VI semiconductor nanocrystals of ZnS and ZnO. For ZnS, blue self activated luminescence decays faster than Cu and Mn related emission. For undoped ZnO nanocrystals, PL decay is in the nanosecond range whereas with Mg doping the decay becomes much slower in the microsecond range.

  13. Strongly interacting two-dimensional Dirac fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, L.K.; Lazarides, A.; Hemmerich, Andreas; de Morais Smith, C.

    2009-01-01

    We show how strongly interacting two-dimensional Dirac fermions can be realized with ultracold atoms in a two-dimensional optical square lattice with an experimentally realistic, inherent gauge field, which breaks time reversal and inversion symmetries. We find remarkable phenomena in a temperature

  14. Application of a quantitative structure retention relationship approach for the prediction of the two-dimensional gas chromatography retention times of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycle compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieleciak, Rafal; Hager, Darcy; Heshka, Nicole E

    2016-03-11

    Information on the sulfur classes present in petroleum is a key factor in determining the value of refined products and processing behavior in the refinery. A large part of the sulfur present is included in polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs), which in turn are difficult to desulfurize. Furthermore, some PASHs are potentially more mutagenic and carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs. All of this calls for improved methods for the identification and quantification of individual sulfur species. Recent advances in analytical techniques such as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) have enabled the identification of many individual sulfur species. However, full identification of individual components, particularly in virgin oil fractions, is still out of reach as standards for numerous compounds are unavailable. In this work, a method for accurately predicting retention times in GC×GC using a QSRR (quantitative structure retention relationship) method was very helpful for the identification of individual sulfur compounds. Retention times for 89 saturated, aromatic, and polyaromatic sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds were determined using two-dimensional gas chromatography. These retention data were correlated with molecular descriptors generated with CODESSA software. Two independent QSRR relationships were derived for the primary as well as the secondary retention characteristics. The predictive ability of the relationships was tested by using both independent sets of compounds and a cross-validation technique. When the corresponding chemical standards are unavailable, the equations developed for predicting retention times can be used to identify unknown chromatographic peaks by matching their retention times with those of sulfur compounds of known molecular structure.

  15. Development of ultrafast time-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akifumi Asahara

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast time-resolved dual-comb spectroscopy (TR-DCS has been demonstrated, which enables direct observations of transient responses of complex optical spectra by combining dual-comb spectroscopy with the pump–probe method. TR-DCS achieves two-dimensional spectroscopy with a wide dynamic range for both the temporal and frequency axes. As a demonstration, we investigated the femtosecond relaxation dynamics of a photo-excited InGaAs saturable absorber in the near-infrared frequency region. The transient response of the interferogram was successfully obtained, and both the amplitude and phase spectra of the dynamic complex transmittance were independently deduced without using the Kramers-Kronig relations. A high phase resolution in the order of milliradian was achieved by suppressing the effect from the slow phase drift caused in the experimental system. Our proof-of-principle experiment promotes a pathway to coherent, highly accurate, and multi-dimensional pump–probe spectroscopy using the optical frequency comb technology.

  16. Two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the principles and applications of two-dimensional vibrational and optical spectroscopy techniques. This book provides an account of basic theory required for an understanding of two-dimensional vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  17. Space-Time Resolved Capillary Wave Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Berhanu, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We report experiments on the full space and time resolved statistics of capillary wave turbulence at the air-water interface. The three-dimensional shape of the free interface is measured as a function of time by using the optical method of Diffusing Light Photography associated with a fast camera. Linear and nonlinear dispersion relations are extracted from the spatio-temporal power spectrum of wave amplitude. When wave turbulence regime is reached, we observe power-law spectra both in frequency and in wave number, whose exponents are found in agreement with the predictions of capillary wave turbulence theory. Finally, the temporal dynamics of the spatial energy spectrum highlights the occurrence of stochastic bursts transferring wave energy through the spatial scales.

  18. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals the correlation between chemical compounds in Japanese sake and its organoleptic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kei; Kabashima, Fumie; Tsuchiya, Fumihiko

    2016-03-01

    Japanese sake is a traditional alcoholic beverage composed of a wide variety of metabolites, which give it many types of tastes and flavors. Previously, we have reported that medium-chain fatty acids contribute to a fatty odor in sake (Takahashi, K., et al., J. Agric. Food Chem., 62, 8478-8485, 2014). In this study, we have reanalyzed the data obtained using two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The relationship between the chemical components in sake and specific organoleptic properties such as off-flavor and quality has been explored. This led to the identification of the type of chemical compounds present and an assessment of the numerous candidate compounds that correlate with such organoleptic properties in sake. This research provides important fundamental knowledge for the sake-brewing industry. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of Salvinorin A in plants, water, and urine using solid-phase microextraction-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Brian B; Snow, Nicholas H

    2012-02-24

    Salvinorin A, a psychoactive hallucinogen, and related compounds, were analyzed in plants, water, and urine using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS). A semi-qualitative study of the extraction of Salvinorin A and analogs from Salvia divinorum plants by LLE showed ppb levels of Salvinorin A and several analogs in the leaves and stems of S. divinorum plants, much lower than expected. Quantitative analysis of Salvinorin A spiked into water and urine showed much better figures of merit for SPME than LLE, with limit of detection of about 5 ng/mL, linear range from 8 to 500 ng/mL and precision about ±10% for the SPME-based analyses using external standard quantitation. GC×GC-ToFMS was especially effective in separating the peaks of interest from matrix and chromatographic interferences.

  20. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    Two-dimensional liquid chromatography has received increasing interest due to the rise in demand for analysis of complex chemical mixtures. Separation of complex mixtures is hard to achieve as a simple consequence of the sheer number of analytes, as these samples might contain hundreds or even...... dimensions. As a consequence of the conclusions made within this thesis, the research group has, for the time being, decided against further development of online LC×LC systems, since it was not deemed ideal for the intended application, the analysis of the polar fraction of oil. Trap-and...

  1. New Developments in the Method of Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element-Applications to Two-Dimensional Time-Marching Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Chow, Chuen-Yen

    1994-01-01

    A new numerical discretization method for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially in both concept and methodology from the well-established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and spectral methods. It is motivated by several important physical/numerical considerations and designed to avoid several key limitations of the above traditional methods. As a result of the above considerations, a set of key principles for the design of numerical schemes was put forth in a previous report. These principles were used to construct several numerical schemes that model a 1-D time-dependent convection-diffusion equation. These schemes were then extended to solve the time-dependent Euler and Navier-Stokes equations of a perfect gas. It was shown that the above schemes compared favorably with the traditional schemes in simplicity, generality, and accuracy. In this report, the 2-D versions of the above schemes, except the Navier-Stokes solver, are constructed using the same set of design principles. Their constructions are simplified greatly by the use of a nontraditional space-time mesh. Its use results in the simplest stencil possible, i.e., a tetrahedron in a 3-D space-time with a vertex at the upper time level and other three at the lower time level. Because of the similarity in their design, each of the present 2-D solvers virtually shares with its 1-D counterpart the same fundamental characteristics. Moreover, it is shown that the present Euler solver is capable of generating highly accurate solutions for a famous 2-D shock reflection problem. Specifically, both the incident and the reflected shocks can be resolved by a single data point without the presence of numerical oscillations near the discontinuity.

  2. Time-resolved energy transfer from single chloride terminated nanocrystals to graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Ajayi, O A; Cotlet, M; Petrone, N; Gu, T; Wolcott, A; Gesuele, F; Hone, J; Owen, J S; Wong, C W

    2014-01-01

    We examine the time-resolved resonance energy transfer of excitons from single n-butyl amine-bound, chloride-terminated nanocrystals to two-dimensional graphene through time-correlated single photon counting. The radiative biexponential lifetime kinetics and blinking statistics of the individual surface-modified nanocrystal elucidate the non-radiative decay channels. Blinking modification as well as a 4 times reduction in spontaneous emission were observed with the short chloride and n-butylamine ligands, probing the energy transfer pathways for the development of graphene-nanocrystal nanophotonic devices.

  3. Couplings between hierarchical conformational dynamics from multi-time correlation functions and two-dimensional lifetime spectra: Application to adenylate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Junichi; Takada, Shoji; Saito, Shinji

    2015-06-07

    An analytical method based on a three-time correlation function and the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) lifetime spectrum is developed to elucidate the time-dependent couplings between the multi-timescale (i.e., hierarchical) conformational dynamics in heterogeneous systems such as proteins. In analogy with 2D NMR, IR, electronic, and fluorescence spectroscopies, the waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra can provide a quantitative description of the dynamical correlations between the conformational motions with different lifetimes. The present method is applied to intrinsic conformational changes of substrate-free adenylate kinase (AKE) using long-time coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the hierarchical conformational dynamics arise from the intra-domain structural transitions among conformational substates of AKE by analyzing the one-time correlation functions and one-dimensional lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances corresponding to single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer experiments with the use of the principal component analysis. In addition, the complicated waiting-time dependence of the off-diagonal peaks in the 2D lifetime spectra for the donor-acceptor distances is attributed to the fact that the time evolution of the couplings between the conformational dynamics depends upon both the spatial and temporal characters of the system. The present method is expected to shed light on the biological relationship among the structure, dynamics, and function.

  4. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography - time-of-flight mass spectrometry and simultaneous electron capture detection/nitrogen phosphorous detection for incense analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tin C.; Marriott, Philip J.

    This study reports comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography hyphenated to time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection (GC × GC/TOFMS) for characterisation and identification of components generated by four different types of powdered incense headspace (H/S) and incense smoke. GC × GC/TOFMS allowed simultaneous separation and identification of compounds emitted into the atmosphere as a result of combustion of incense powder. The smoke stream comprised compounds originating from the incense powder, and combustion products such as saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, essential oil type compounds, nitromusks, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, which possibly include oxygenated and nitrated PAH), N-heterocyclics, pyrans and furans, which were detected and tentatively identified by GC × GC/TOFMS. GC × GC-electron capture detector/nitrogen phosphorous detector (ECD/NPD) potentially offers the prospect of providing selective chemical compositional information of incense powder and smoke, such as nitrogen-containing (N-containing) and halogenated compounds. Results of GC×GC-ECD/NPD showed that both incense powder and smoke generated emission of N-containing and halogenated compounds. A significant number of halogenated and N-containing compounds were emitted during the incomplete combustion of incense. However, one further objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capacity of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to specific and/or selective detectors such as those used in this study (GC × GC-ECD/NPD) for the detection of particular classes of compounds such as N-containing and halogenated compounds at trace level concentrations in complex smoke samples.

  5. Applying a new computational method for biological tissue optics based on the time-dependent two-dimensional radiative transfer equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Fumeron, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    Optical tomography is a medical imaging technique based on light propagation in the near infrared (NIR) part of the spectrum. We present a new way of predicting the short-pulsed NIR light propagation using a time-dependent two-dimensional-global radiative transfer equation in an absorbing and strongly anisotropically scattering medium. A cell-vertex finite-volume method is proposed for the discretization of the spatial domain. The closure relation based on the exponential scheme and linear interpolations was applied for the first time in the context of time-dependent radiative heat transfer problems. Details are given about the application of the original method on unstructured triangular meshes. The angular space (4πSr) is uniformly subdivided into discrete directions and a finite-differences discretization of the time domain is used. Numerical simulations for media with physical properties analogous to healthy and metastatic human liver subjected to a collimated short-pulsed NIR light are presented and discussed. As expected, discrepancies between the two kinds of tissues were found. In particular, the level of light flux was found to be weaker (inside the medium and at boundaries) in the healthy medium than in the metastatic one.

  6. Novel Driving Method for Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Switchable Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays for Emission and Programming Time Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Hai-Jung; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2012-03-01

    A novel driving method for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) switchable active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays is proposed to extend emission time and data programming time during 3D display operation. The proposed pixel consists of six thin-film transistors (TFTs) and two capacitors, and the aperture ratio of the pixel is 45.8% under 40-in. full-high-definition television condition. By increasing emission time and programming time, the flicker problem can be reduced and the lifetime of AMOLED displays can be extended owing to the decrease in emission current density. Simulation results show that the emission current error range from -0.4 to 1.6% is achieved when the threshold voltage variation of driving TFTs is in the range from -1.0 to 1.0 V, and the emission current error is 1.0% when the power line IR-drop is 2.0 V.

  7. A matrix-exponential decomposition based time-domain method for calculating the defect states of scalar waves in two-dimensional periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2017-05-01

    A time-domain method for calculating the defect states of scalar waves in two-dimensional (2D) periodic structures is proposed. In the time-stepping process of the proposed method, the column vector containing the spatially sampled field values is updated by multiplying it with an iteration matrix, which is written in a matrix-exponential form. The matrix-exponential is first computed by using the Suzuki's decomposition based technique of the fourth order, in which the Floquet-Bloch boundary conditions are incorporated. The obtained iteration matrix is then squared to enlarge the time-step that can be used in the time-stepping process (namely, the squaring technique), and the small nonzero elements in the iteration matrix is finally pruned to improve the sparse structure of the matrix (namely, the pruning technique). The numerical examples of the super-cell calculations for 2D defect-containing phononic crystal structures show that, the fourth order decomposition based technique for the matrix-exponential computation is much more efficient than the frequently used precise integration technique (PIT) if the PIT is of an order greater than 2. Although it is not unconditionally stable, the proposed time-domain method is particularly efficient for the super-cell calculations of the defect states in a 2D periodic structure containing a defect with a wave speed much higher than those of the background materials. For this kind of defect-containing structures, the time-stepping process can run stably for a sufficiently large number of the time-steps with a time-step much larger than the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) upper limit, and consequently the overall efficiency of the proposed time-domain method can be significantly higher than that of the conventional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Some physical interpretations on the properties of the band structures and the defect states of the calculated periodic structures are also presented.

  8. A finite difference technique for solving a time strain separable K-BKZ constitutive equation for two-dimensional moving free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, M. F.; Bertoco, J.; Oishi, C. M.; Araujo, M. S. B.; Cruz, D.; Pinho, F. T.; Vynnycky, M.

    2016-04-01

    This work is concerned with the numerical solution of the K-BKZ integral constitutive equation for two-dimensional time-dependent free surface flows. The numerical method proposed herein is a finite difference technique for simulating flows possessing moving surfaces that can interact with solid walls. The main characteristics of the methodology employed are: the momentum and mass conservation equations are solved by an implicit method; the pressure boundary condition on the free surface is implicitly coupled with the Poisson equation for obtaining the pressure field from mass conservation; a novel scheme for defining the past times t‧ is employed; the Finger tensor is calculated by the deformation fields method and is advanced in time by a second-order Runge-Kutta method. This new technique is verified by solving shear and uniaxial elongational flows. Furthermore, an analytic solution for fully developed channel flow is obtained that is employed in the verification and assessment of convergence with mesh refinement of the numerical solution. For free surface flows, the assessment of convergence with mesh refinement relies on a jet impinging on a rigid surface and a comparison of the simulation of a extrudate swell problem studied by Mitsoulis (2010) [44] was performed. Finally, the new code is used to investigate in detail the jet buckling phenomenon of K-BKZ fluids.

  9. Mapping Two-Dimensional Deformation Field Time-Series of Large Slope by Coupling DInSAR-SBAS with MAI-SBAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming He

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mapping deformation field time-series, including vertical and horizontal motions, is vital for landslide monitoring and slope safety assessment. However, the conventional differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR technique can only detect the displacement component in the satellite-to-ground direction, i.e., line-of-sight (LOS direction displacement. To overcome this constraint, a new method was developed to obtain the displacement field time series of a slope by coupling DInSAR based small baseline subset approach (DInSAR-SBAS with multiple-aperture InSAR (MAI based small baseline subset approach (MAI-SBAS. This novel method has been applied to a set of 11 observations from the phased array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR sensor onboard the advanced land observing satellite (ALOS, spanning from 2007 to 2011, of two large-scale north–south slopes of the largest Asian open-pit mine in the Northeast of China. The retrieved displacement time series showed that the proposed method can detect and measure the large displacements that occurred along the north–south direction, and the gradually changing two-dimensional displacement fields. Moreover, we verified this new method by comparing the displacement results to global positioning system (GPS measurements.

  10. Fano resonance in the nonadiabatically pumped shot noise of a time-dependent quantum well in a two-dimensional electron gas and graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Rui, E-mail: rzhu@scut.edu.cn; Dai, Jiao-Hua [Department of Physics, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Guo, Yong [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2015-04-28

    Interference between different quantum paths can generate Fano resonance. One of the examples is transport through a quasibound state driven by a time-dependent scattering potential. Previously it is found that Fano resonance occurs as a result of energy matching in one-dimensional systems. In this work, we demonstrate that when transverse motion is present, Fano resonance occurs precisely at the wavevector matching situation. Using the Floquet scattering theory, we considered the transport properties of a nonadiabatic time-dependent well both in a two-dimensional electron gas and monolayer graphene structure. Dispersion of the quasibound state of a static quantum well is obtained with transverse motion present. We found that Fano resonance occurs when the wavevector in the transport direction of one of the Floquet sidebands is exactly identical to that of the quasibound state in the well at equilibrium and follows the dispersion pattern of the latter. To observe the Fano resonance phenomenon in the transmission spectrum, we also considered the pumped shot noise properties when time and spatial symmetry secures vanishing current in the considered configuration. Prominent Fano resonance is found in the differential pumped shot noise with respect to the reservoir Fermi energy.

  11. Determination of diamondoids in crude oils using gas purge microsyringe extraction with comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanfeng; Zhu, Shukui; Pang, Liling; Gao, Xuanbo; Zhu, Gang-Tian; Li, Donghao

    2016-12-23

    Based on a homemade device, gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE) of crude oil samples was developed for the first time. As a simple, fast, low-cost, sensitive and solvent-saving technique, GP-MSE provides some outstanding advantages over the widely used sample preparation methods for crude oils such as column chromatography (ASTM D2549). Several parameters affecting extraction efficiency were optimized, including extraction temperature, extraction time, extraction solvent, condensing temperature and purge gas flow rate. With the optimized GP-MSE conditions, several real crude oil samples were extracted, and trace diamondoids were determined using comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). In total, more than 100 diamondoids were detected and 27 marker compounds were identified and quantified accurately. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N=3) were less than 0.08μg/L for all diamondoids. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was below 8%, ranging from 1.1 to 7.6%. The linearity of the developed method was in the range of 0.5-100.0μg/L with correlation coefficients (R(2)) more than 0.996. The recoveries obtained at spiking 50μg/L were between 81 and 108% for diamondoids in crude oil samples. The developed method can also be extended to the analysis of other components in crude oils and other complex matrices.

  12. A time-domain numerical modeling of two-dimensional wave propagation in porous media with frequency-dependent dynamic permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Emilie; Chiavassa, Guillaume; Lombard, Bruno

    2013-12-01

    An explicit finite-difference scheme is presented for solving the two-dimensional Biot equations of poroelasticity across the full range of frequencies. The key difficulty is to discretize the Johnson-Koplik-Dashen (JKD) model which describes the viscous dissipations in the pores. Indeed, the time-domain version of Biot-JKD model involves order 1/2 fractional derivatives which amount to a time convolution product. To avoid storing the past values of the solution, a diffusive representation of fractional derivatives is used: The convolution kernel is replaced by a finite number of memory variables that satisfy local-in-time ordinary differential equations. The coefficients of the diffusive representation follow from an optimization procedure of the dispersion relation. Then, various methods of scientific computing are applied: The propagative part of the equations is discretized using a fourth-order finite-difference scheme, whereas the diffusive part is solved exactly. An immersed interface method is implemented to discretize the geometry on a Cartesian grid, and also to discretize the jump conditions at interfaces. Numerical experiments are proposed in various realistic configurations.

  13. A Real-Time Mathematical Model for the Two-Dimensional Temperature Field of Petroleum Coke Calcination in Vertical Shaft Calciner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jin; Huang, Jindi; Zhong, Qifan; Li, Fachuang; Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Jie

    2016-08-01

    A real-time mathematical model for the two-dimensional temperature field of petroleum coke calcination in vertical shaft calciner was developed based on computational fluid dynamics. In the modeling process, the petroleum coke discharging process was described by the solid viscous flow, the dynamic heat flux boundary condition was adopted to specify the heat transfer between the flue wall and the gas in the flue, and the Arrhenius equation was used to characterize the pyrolysis process of petroleum coke. The model was validated with both measurement data and data from the literature. The effects of discharge rate per pot, volatile content of green coke, and excess air coefficient on the temperature field of the vertical shaft calciner were investigated with the use of the developed model. The following reasonable operating conditions were obtained: the discharge rate per pot should be less than 90 kg/h, the volatile content of green coke should be in the range of 9-11%, and the excess air coefficient should be in the range of 1.10-1.20. In this work, the governing equations were discretized by using the finite volume method, and the discrete linear equations were solved by using sparse matrix package UMFPACK. The model calculating process takes about less than 15 s. Therefore, the model is beneficial in realizing real-time online temperature detection of petroleum coke calcination in a vertical shaft calciner.

  14. Elucidation of the aroma compositions of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar using comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhilei; Liu, Shuangping; Kong, Xiangwei; Ji, Zhongwei; Han, Xiao; Wu, Jianfeng; Mao, Jian

    2017-03-03

    In this work, a method to characterize the aroma compounds of Zhenjiang aromatic vinegar (ZAV) was developed using comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) and gas chromatography olfactometry (GC-O). The column combination was optimized and good separation was achieved. Structured chromatograms of furans and pyrazines were obtained and discussed. A total of 360 compounds were tentatively identified based on mass spectrum match factors, structured chromatogram and linear retention indices comparison. The most abundant class in number was ketones. A large number of esters, furans and derivatives, aldehydes and alcohols were also detected. The odor-active components were identified by comparison of the reported odor of the identified compounds with the odor of corresponding GC-O region. The odorants of methanethiol, 2-methyl-propanal, 2-methyl-butanal/3-methyl-butanal, octanal, 1-octen-3-one, dimethyl trisulfide, trimethyl-pyrazine, acetic acid, 3-(methylthio)-propanal, furfural, benzeneacetaldehyde, 3-methyl-butanoic acid/2-methyl-butanoic acid and phenethyl acetate were suspected to be the most potent. About half of them were identified as significant aroma constituents in ZAV for the first time. Their contribution to specific sensory attribute of ZAJ was also studied. The results indicated that the presented method is suitable for characterization of ZAV aroma constituents. This study also enriches our knowledge on the components and aroma of ZAV.

  15. Solid phase microextraction-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the analysis of honey volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajka, Tomás; Hajslová, Jana; Cochran, Jack; Holadová, Katerina; Klimánková, Eva

    2007-03-01

    Head-space solid phase microextration (SPME), followed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS), has been implemented for the analysis of honey volatiles, with emphasis on the optimal selection of SPME fibre and the first- and second-dimension GC capillaries. From seven SPME fibres investigated, a divinylbenzene/Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (DVB/CAR/PDMS) 50/30 microm fibre provided the best sorption capacity and the broadest range of volatiles extracted from the headspace of a mixed honey sample. A combination of DB-5ms x SUPELCOWAX 10 columns enabled the best resolution of sample components compared to the other two tested column configurations. Employing this powerful analytical strategy led to the identification of 164 volatile compounds present in a honey mixture during a 19-min GC run. Combination of this simple and inexpensive SPME-based sampling/concentration technique with the advanced separation/identification approach represented by GCxGC-TOFMS allows a rapid and comprehensive examination of the honey volatiles profile. In this way, the laboratory sample throughput can be increased significantly and, at the same time, the risk of erroneous identification, which cannot be avoided in one-dimensional GC separation, is minimised.

  16. Lipid profiling of cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 using two-dimensional liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Yabing; Liu, Yiqun; Yang, Li; Nie, Honggang; Shen, Sensen; Dong, Chunxia; Bai, Yu; Sun, Qing; Zhao, Jindong; Liu, Huwei

    2016-10-01

    Glycerolipid is a main component of membranes in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Up to now, the majority of publication in this area has focused on the physiological functions of glycerolipids and lipoprotein complexes in photosynthesis, but the study on the separation and identification of glycerolipids in thylakoid membrane in cyanobacteria is relatively rare. Here we report a new method to separate and identify five photosynthetic glycerolipid classes, including monoglucosyl diacylglycerol, monogalactosyl diacylglycerol, digalactosyl diacylglycerol, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol, and phosphatidylglycerol, in cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 by two-dimensional (normal- and reversed-phase) liquid chromatography online coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Over twice as many lipid species were detected by our method compared to the previously reported methods. Ten new odd-chain fatty acid glycerolipids were discovered for the first time. Moreover, complete separation of isomers of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol and monoglucosyl diacylglycerol was achieved. According to the tandem mass spectrometry results, we found that the head group of monoglucosyl diacylglycerols was not as stable as that of monogalactosyl diacylglycerols, which might explain why the organism chose monogalactosyl diacylglycerols and digalactosyl diacylglycerols instead of monoglucosyl diacylglycerols as the main content of the photosynthetic membranes in the history of evolution. This work will benefit further research on the physiological function of glycerolipids.

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopy of low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joseph R.

    -photoluminescence measurements of InGaAs quantum wells, the observation of optical Aharonov-Bohm oscillations were identified in the photoluminescence emission intensity. This effect, generally observed in type-II systems, was unexpected in a quantum well structure, however the recombinations dynamics were identified through the use of a lifetime comparison with samples that did not contain indium and cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy that show indium rich islands within the quantum well layer. Analysis of the oscillations yielded a value of 17.3 nm for the exciton radius for sample 1 and 14.8 nm for sample 2. Magneto-photoluminescence is used to probe the behavior of a series of coreshell- shell CdSe/CdMnS/CdS nanoplatelets. This study shows that the magnetic character of the nanoplatelets is directly related to the wave function overlap of the regions containing manganese ions. The atomically-precise synthesis of these nanoplatelets allows for the placement of magnetic ions in specific monolayers of these two-dimensional heterostructures and the optical characterization identifies how this placement affects the magneto-optical properties. A surprising result is that in some magnetic samples with limited carrier wave function overlap of the regions containing manganese ions, the magneto-optical properties more closely resemble those of non-magnetic samples. Using time-resolved differential transmission, the carrier lifetime in several graphene related structures is determined. In these measurements, the changes in transmission are too small to measure using conventional techniques, therefore a background-free technique is required to obtain the necessary sensitivity. These measurement yielded carrier lifetimes ranging from 0.4 ps to 12 ps depending on the composition of the structure and the form it was measured as i.e., in solution or film.

  18. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin bio-oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailof, Chrysoula; Sfetsas, Themistoklis; Stefanidis, Stylianos; Kalogiannis, Konstantinos; Theodoridis, Georgios; Lappas, Angelos

    2014-11-21

    Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis are efficient processes for the transformation of biomass to bio-oil, a liquid energy carrier and a general source of chemicals. The elucidation of the bio-oil's composition is essential for a rational design of both its production and utilization process. However, the complex composition of bio-oils hinders their complete qualitative and quantitative analysis, and conventional chromatographic techniques lack the necessary separation power. Two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS) is considered a suitable technique for bio-oil analysis due to its increased separation and resolution capacity. This work presents the tentative qualitative and quantitative analysis of bio-oils resulting from the thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of standard xylan, cellulose, lignin and their mixture by GC×GC-ToFMS. Emphasis is placed on the development of the quantitative method using phenol-d6 as internal standard. During the method development, a standard solution of 39 compounds was used for the determination of the respective Relative Response Factors (RRF) employing statistical methods, ANOVA and WLSLR, for verification of the data. The developed method was applied to the above mentioned bio-oils and their detailed analysis is presented. The different compounds produced and their diverse concentration allows for an elucidation of the pyrolysis mechanism and highlight the effect of the catalyst.

  19. Chemical characterization of aromatic compounds in extra heavy gas oil by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Bárbara M F; Pereira, Ricardo; Gomes, Alexandre O; Azevedo, Débora A

    2011-05-27

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) was used for the characterization of aromatic compounds present in extra heavy gas oil (EHGO) from Brazil. Individual identification of EHGO compounds was successfully achieved in addition to group-type separation on the chromatographic plane. Many aromatic hydrocarbons, especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur compounds, were detected and identified, such as chrysenes, phenanthrenes, perylenes, benzonaphthothiophenes and alkylbenzonaphthothiophenes. In addition, triaromatic steroids, methyl-triaromatic steroids, tetrahydrochrysenes and tetraromatic pentacyclic compounds were present in the EHGO aromatic fractions. Considering the roof-tile effect observed for many of these compound classes and the high number of individual compounds identified, GC×GC-TOFMS is an excellent technique to characterize the molecular composition of the aromatic fraction from EHGO samples. Moreover, data processing allowed the quantification of aromatic compounds, in class and individually, using external standards. EHGO data were obtained in μgg(-1), e.g., benzo[a]pyrene were in the range 351 to 1164μgg(-1). Thus, GC×GC-TOFMS was successfully applied in EHGO quantitative analysis.

  20. Time-lapse ultrashort pulse microscopy of infection in three-dimensional versus two-dimensional culture environments reveals enhanced extra-chromosomal virus replication compartment formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Holly C.; Sing, Garwin; Armas, Juan Carlos González; Campbell, Colin J.; Ghazal, Peter; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2013-03-01

    The mechanisms that enable viruses to harness cellular machinery for their own survival are primarily studied in cell lines cultured in two-dimensional (2-D) environments. However, there are increasing reports of biological differences between cells cultured in 2-D versus three-dimensional (3-D) environments. Here we report differences in host-virus interactions based on differences in culture environment. Using ultrashort pulse microscopy (UPM), a form of two-photon microscopy that utilizes sub-10-fs pulses to efficiently excite fluorophores, we have shown that de novo development of extra-chromosomal virus replication compartments (VRCs) upon murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) infection is markedly enhanced when host cells are cultured in 3-D collagen gels versus 2-D monolayers. In addition, time-lapse imaging revealed that mCMV-induced VRCs have the capacity to grow by coalescence. This work supports the future potential of 3-D culture as a useful bridge between traditional monolayer cultures and animal models to study host-virus interactions in a more physiologically relevant environment for the development of effective anti-viral therapeutics. These advances will require broader adoption of modalities, such as UPM, to image deep within scattering tissues.

  1. Non-contrast-enhanced hepatic MR angiography: Do two-dimensional parallel imaging and short tau inversion recovery methods shorten acquisition time without image quality deterioration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Kotaro, E-mail: kotaro@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Isoda, Hiroyoshi, E-mail: sayuki@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomokada@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kamae, Toshikazu, E-mail: toshi13@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Arizono, Shigeki, E-mail: arizono@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hirokawa, Yuusuke, E-mail: yuusuke@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Shibata, Toshiya, E-mail: ksj@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: ktogashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Objective: To study whether shortening the acquisition time for selective hepatic artery visualization is feasible without image quality deterioration by adopting two-dimensional (2D) parallel imaging (PI) and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) methods. Materials and methods: Twenty-four healthy volunteers were enrolled. 3D true steady-state free-precession imaging with a time spatial labeling inversion pulse was conducted using 1D or 2D-PI and fat suppression by chemical shift selective (CHESS) or STIR methods. Three groups of different scan conditions were assigned and compared: group A (1D-PI factor 2 and CHESS), group B (2D-PI factor 2 x 2 and CHESS), and group C (2D-PI factor 2 x 2 and STIR). The artery-to-liver contrast was quantified, and the quality of artery visualization and overall image quality were scored. Results: The mean scan time was 9.5 {+-} 1.0 min (mean {+-} standard deviation), 5.9 {+-} 0.8 min, and 5.8 {+-} 0.5 min in groups A, B, and C, respectively, and was significantly shorter in groups B and C than in group A (P < 0.01). The artery-to-liver contrast was significantly better in group C than in groups A and B (P < 0.01). The scores for artery visualization and overall image quality were worse in group B than in groups A and C. The differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05) regarding the arterial branches of segments 4 and 8. Between group A and group C, which had similar scores, there were no statistically significant differences. Conclusion: Shortening the acquisition time for selective hepatic artery visualization was feasible without deterioration of the image quality by the combination of 2D-PI and STIR methods. It will facilitate using non-contrast-enhanced MRA in clinical practice.

  2. Evaluation of left ventricular rotation by two-dimensional speckle tracking method and real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: comparison with MRI tagging method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hidetaka; Izumi, Chisato; Takahashi, Shuichi; Uchikoshi, Masato; Yamazaki, Ryou; Asanuma, Toshihiko; Ishikura, Fuminobu; Beppu, Shintaro; Nakatani, Satoshi

    2011-09-01

    Recently, it has become possible to evaluate left ventricular (LV) torsion by two-dimensional (2D) speckle tracking images. However, LV torsion is a three-dimensional (3D) performance, which per se cannot be assessed by the 2D speckle tracking method. The present study investigated the accuracy of the 2D speckle tracking method and real-time 3D echocardiography in measuring LV rotation, comparing with the MRI tagging method. We assessed LV apical rotation using the 2D speckle tracking method, real-time 3D echocardiography, and MRI tagging method in 26 normal subjects, and compared the results of these three methods. LV apical rotation was measured just before the level in which the posterior papillary muscle was absorbed into the free wall. The degree of LV apical rotation evaluated by the 2D speckle tracking method (Δθ 2D) was significantly smaller than that evaluated by 3D echocardiography (Δθ 3D) and the MRI tagging method (Δθ MRI) (Δθ 2D 7.3 ± 2.8°; Δθ 3D 8.8 ± 3.4°; Δθ MRI 9.0 ± 3.4°; Δθ 2D vs. Δθ 3D, p = 0.0001; Δθ 2D vs. Δθ MRI, p speckle tracking method compared with the MRI tagging method, whereas it could be precisely measured by 3D echocardiography.

  3. Implementation of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of halogenated contaminants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalachova, Kamila; Pulkrabova, Jana; Cajka, Tomas; Drabova, Lucie; Hajslova, Jana [Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic). Department of Food Chemistry and Analysis, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology

    2012-07-15

    In the presented study, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC-TOFMS) was shown to be a powerful tool for the simultaneous determination of various groups of contaminants including 18 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Since different groups of analytes (traditionally analyzed separately) were included into one instrumental method, significant time savings were achieved. Following the development of an integrated sample preparation procedure for an effective and rapid isolation of several groups of contaminants from fish tissue, the GC x GC-TOFMS instrumental method was optimized to obtain the best chromatographic resolution and low quantification limits (LOQs) of all target analytes in a complex mixture. Using large-volume programmable temperature vaporization, the following LOQs were achieved - PCBs, 0.01-0.25 {mu}g/kg; PBDEs, 0.025-5 {mu}g/kg; PAHs 0.025-0.5 {mu}g/kg. Furthermore, several capillary column combinations (BPX5, BPX50, and Rxi-17Sil-ms in the first dimension and BPX5, BPX50, Rt-LC35, and HT8 in the second dimension) were tested during the experiments, and the optimal separation of all target analytes even of critical groups of PAHs (group (a): benz[a]anthracene, cyclopenta[cd]pyrene and chrysene; group (b): benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[j]fluoranthene and benzo[k]fluoranthene; group (c): dibenz[ah]anthracene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene and benzo[ghi]perylene) was observed on BPX5 x BPX50 column setup. Moreover, since the determination of target analytes was performed using TOFMS detector, further identification of other non-target compounds in real life samples was also feasible. (orig.)

  4. Determination of nonylphenol isomers in landfill leachate and municipal wastewater using steam distillation extraction coupled with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caixiang; Eganhouse, Robert P.; Pontolillo, James; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Wang, Yanxin

    2012-01-01

    4-Nonylphenols (4-NPs) are known endocrine disruptors and by-products of the microbial degradation of nonylphenol polyethoxylate surfactants. One of the challenges to understanding the toxic effects of nonylphenols is the large number of isomers that may exist in environmental samples. In order to attribute toxic effects to specific compounds, a method is needed for the separation and quantitation of individual nonylphenol isomers. The pre-concentration methods of solvent sublimation, solid-phase extraction or liquid–liquid extraction prior to chromatographic analysis can be problematic because of co-extraction of thousands of compounds typically found in complex matrices such as municipal wastewater or landfill leachate. In the present study, steam distillation extraction (SDE) was found to be an effective pre-concentration method for extraction of 4-NPs from leachate and wastewater, and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) coupled with fast mass spectral data acquisition by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS) enhanced the resolution and identification of 4-NP isomers. Concentrations of eight 4-NP isomers were determined in leachate from landfill cells of different age and wastewater influent and effluent samples. 4-NP isomers were about 3 times more abundant in leachate from the younger cell than the older one, whereas concentrations in wastewater effluent were either below detection limits or <1% of influent concentrations. 4-NP isomer distribution patterns were found to have been altered following release to the environment. This is believed to reflect isomer-specific degradation and accumulation of 4-NPs in the aquatic environment.

  5. Analysis of volatile organic compounds released from the decay of surrogate human models simulating victims of collapsed buildings by thermal desorption-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapiou, A; Zorba, E; Mikedi, K; McGregor, L; Spiliopoulou, C; Statheropoulos, M

    2015-07-01

    Field experiments were devised to mimic the entrapment conditions under the rubble of collapsed buildings aiming to investigate the evolution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the early dead body decomposition stage. Three pig carcasses were placed inside concrete tunnels of a search and rescue (SAR) operational field terrain for simulating the entrapment environment after a building collapse. The experimental campaign employed both laboratory and on-site analytical methods running in parallel. The current work focuses only on the results of the laboratory method using thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOF MS). The flow-modulated TD-GC×GC-TOF MS provided enhanced separation of the VOC profile and served as a reference method for the evaluation of the on-site analytical methods in the current experimental campaign. Bespoke software was used to deconvolve the VOC profile to extract as much information as possible into peak lists. In total, 288 unique VOCs were identified (i.e., not found in blank samples). The majority were aliphatics (172), aromatics (25) and nitrogen compounds (19), followed by ketones (17), esters (13), alcohols (12), aldehydes (11), sulfur (9), miscellaneous (8) and acid compounds (2). The TD-GC×GC-TOF MS proved to be a sensitive and powerful system for resolving the chemical puzzle of above-ground "scent of death".

  6. Qualitative and quantitative two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography/high performance liquid chromatography/diode-array/electrospray-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry of cholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczek, Tomasz

    2016-09-10

    Recently launched thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (TLC-MS) interface enabling extraction of compounds directly from TLC plates into MS ion source was unusually extended into two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography/high performance liquid chromatography (2D, TLC/HPLC) system by its a direct connection to a rapid resolution 50×2.1mm, I.D. C18 column compartment followed by detection by diode array (DAD) and electrospray ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). In this way, even not separated bands of complicated mixtures of natural compounds could be analysed structurally, only within 1-2min after development of TLC plates. In comparison to typically applied TLC-MS interface, no ion suppression for acidic mobile phases was observed. Also, substantial increase in ESI-TOF-MS sensitivities and quality of spectra, were noticed. It has been utilised in combination with TLC- based bioautographic approaches of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, However, it can be also applied in any other procedures related to bioactivity (e.g. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl-DPPH screen test for radicals). This system has been also used for determination of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values) of the active inhibitor-galanthamine, as an example. Moreover, AChE inhibitory potencies of some of purified plant extracts, never studied before, have been quantitatively measured. This is first report of usage such the 2D TLC/HPLC/MS system both for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of cholinesterase inhibitors in biological matrices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O. (Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  8. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  9. Statistical threshold determination method through noise map generation for two dimensional amplitude and time-of-flight mapping of guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yenn Chong, See; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yik Park, Chan

    2013-03-01

    Conventional threshold crossing technique generally encounters the difficulty in setting a common threshold level in the extraction of the respective time-of-flights (ToFs) and amplitudes from the guided waves obtained at many different points by spatial scanning. Therefore, we propose a statistical threshold determination method through noise map generation to automatically process numerous guided waves having different propagation distances. First, a two-dimensional (2-D) noise map is generated using one-dimensional (1-D) WT magnitudes at time zero of the acquired waves. Then, the probability density functions (PDFs) of Gamma distribution, Weibull distribution and exponential distribution are used to model the measured 2-D noise map. Graphical goodness-of-fit measurements are used to find the best fit among the three theoretical distributions. Then, the threshold level is automatically determined by selecting the desired confidence level of the noise rejection in the cumulative distribution function of the best fit PDF. Based on this threshold level, the amplitudes and ToFs are extracted and mapped into a 2-D matrix array form. The threshold level determined by the noise statistics may cross the noise signal after time zero. These crossings are represented as salt-and-pepper noise in the ToF and amplitude maps but finally removed by the 1-D median filter. This proposed method was verified in a thick stainless steel hollow cylinder where guided waves were acquired in an area of 180 mm×126 mm of the cylinder by using a laser ultrasonic scanning system and an ultrasonic sensor. The Gamma distribution was estimated as the best fit to the verification experimental data by the proposed algorithm. The statistical parameters of the Gamma distribution were used to determine the threshold level appropriate for most of the guided waves. The ToFs and amplitudes of the first arrival mode were mapped into a 2-D matrix array form. Each map included 447 noisy points out of 90

  10. Characterisation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids of coal tar using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchotte-Lindsay, Caroline; McGregor, Laura; Richards, Phil; Kerr, Stephanie; Glenn, Aliyssa; Thomas, Russell; Kalin, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) is a recently developed analytical technique in which two capillary columns with different stationary phases are placed in series enabling planar resolution of the analytes. The resolution power of GCxGC is one order of magnitude higher than that of one dimension gas chromatography. Because of its high resolution capacity, the use of GCxGC for complex environmental samples such as crude oils, petroleum derivatives and polychlorinated biphenyls mixtures has rapidly grown in recent years. We developed a one-step method for the forensic analysis of coal tar dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) from former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) sites. Coal tar is the by-product of the gasification of coal for heating and lighting and it is composed of thousands of organic and inorganic compounds. Before the boom of natural gases and oils, most towns and cities had one or several manufactured gas plants that have, in many cases, left a devastating environmental print due to coal tar contamination. The fate of coal tar DNAPLs, which can persist in the environment for more than a hundred years, is therefore of crucial interest. The presented analytical method consists of a unique clean-up/ extraction stage by pressurized liquid extraction and a single analysis of its organic chemical composition using GCxGC coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). The chemical fingerprinting is further improved by derivatisation by N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) of the tar compounds containing -OH functions such as alcohols and carboxylic acids. We present here how, using the logical order of elution in GCxGC-TOFMS system, 1) the identification of never before observed -OH containing compounds is possible and 2) the isomeric selectivity of an oxidation reaction on a DNAPL sample can be revealed. Using samples collected at various FMGP sites, we demonstrate how this GCxGC method enables the simultaneous

  11. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haifeng; Zhang, Shuqing; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-12-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering was theoretically studied using deformation potential theory. Based on the Boltzmann equation with the relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was derived, showing that the influence of effective mass on mobility anisotropy is larger than those of deformation potential constant or elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic two-dimensional materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC2N , MXene, TiS3, and GeCH3) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio is overestimated by the previously described method.

  12. Solid phase extraction in combination with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the detailed investigation of volatiles in South African red wines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weldegergis, B.T.; Crouch, A.M.; Górecki, T.; Villiers, de A.

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC–TOFMS) has been applied for the analysis of volatile compounds in three young South African red wines. In spite of the significant benefits offered by GC × GC–TOFMS for the separation and

  13. Time-resolved spectroscopy with entangled photons

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, Dmitry A; Kalachev, Alexey A; Yu, Ye Feng; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I; Krivitsky, Leonid A

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of light with media often occurs with a femtosecond response time. Its measurement by conventional techniques requires the use of femtosecond lasers and sophisticated time-gated optical detection1-3. Here we demonstrate that by exploiting quantum interference of entangled photons it is possible to measure the phase relaxation time of a media on the femtosecond time scale (down to 100 fs) using accessible continuous wave laser and single-photon counting. We insert the sample in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer4 and infer the phase relaxation time from the modification of the two-photon interference pattern. In addition to its simplicity and ease of use, the technique does not require compensation of group velocity dispersion5-8 and does not induce photo-damage of the samples. This technique will be useful for characterization of ultrafast phase relaxation processes in material science, chemistry, and biology.

  14. Control and femtosecond time-resolved imaging of torsion in a chiral molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Jonas L; Madsen, Christian Bruun; Lindhardt, Anders Thyboe; Johansson, Mikael P; Skrydstrup, Troels; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    We study how the combination of long and short laser pulses, can be used to induce torsion in an axially chiral biphenyl derivative (3,5-difluoro-3',5'-dibromo-4'-cyanobiphenyl). A long, with respect to the molecular rotational periods, elliptically polarized laser pulse produces 3D alignment of the molecules, and a linearly polarized short pulse initiates torsion about the stereogenic axis. The torsional motion is monitored in real-time by measuring the dihedral angle using femtosecond time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging. Within the first 4 picoseconds, torsion occurs with a period of 1.25 picoseconds and an amplitude of 3 degrees in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations. At larger times the quantum states of the molecules describing the torsional motion dephase and an almost isotropic distribution of the dihedral angle is measured. We demonstrate an original application of covariance analysis of two-dimensional ion images to reveal strong correlations between specific ejected ionic fragments...

  15. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    of this thesis is on online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (online LC×LC) with reverse phase in both dimensions (online RP×RP). Since online RP×RP has not been attempted before within this research group, a significant part of this thesis consists of knowledge and experience gained...

  16. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  17. Colloquium: Time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houselt, van Arie; Zandvliet, Harold J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has revolutionized our ability to image, study, and manipulate solid surfaces on the size scale of atoms. One important limitation of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is, however, its poor time resolution. Recording a standard image with a STM typically takes abo

  18. Time-Resolved Holography with Photoelectrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huismans, Y.; Rouzee, A.; Gijsbertsen, A.; Jungmann, J. H.; Smolkowska, A. S.; Logman, Pswm; Lepine, F.; Cauchy, C.; Zamith, S.; Marchenko, T.; Bakker, J. M.; G. Berden,; Redlich, B.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Muller, H. G.; Vermin, W.; Schafer, K. J.; Spanner, M.; Ivanov, M. Y.; Smirnova, O.; Bauer, D.; Popruzhenko, S. V.; Vrakking, M. J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Ionization is the dominant response of atoms and molecules to intense laser fields and is at the basis of several important techniques, such as the generation of attosecond pulses that allow the measurement of electron motion in real time. We present experiments in which metastable xenon atoms were

  19. Time resolved spin Seebeck effect experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Roschewsky, Niklas; Schreier, Michael; Kamra, Akashdeep; Schade, Felix; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Meyer, Sibylle; Huebl, Hans; Geprägs, Stephan; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter, we present the results of transient thermopower experiments, performed at room temperature on yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. Upon application of a time-varying thermal gradient, we observe a characteristic low-pass frequency response of the ensuing thermopower voltage with cutoff frequencies of up to 37 MHz. We interpret our results in terms of the spin Seebeck effect, and argue that small wavevector magnons are of minor importance for the spin Seebeck effect in our th...

  20. Nonlinear two-dimensional terahertz photon echo and rotational spectroscopy in the gas phase

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jian; Hwang, Harold Y; Ofori-Okai, Benjamin K; Fleischer, Sharly; Nelson, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast two-dimensional spectroscopy utilizes correlated multiple light-matter interactions for retrieving dynamic features that may otherwise be hidden under the linear spectrum. Its extension to the terahertz regime of the electromagnetic spectrum, where a rich variety of material degrees of freedom reside, remains an experimental challenge. Here we report ultrafast two-dimensional terahertz spectroscopy of gas-phase molecular rotors at room temperature. Using time-delayed terahertz pulse pairs, we observe photon echoes and other nonlinear signals resulting from molecular dipole orientation induced by three terahertz field-dipole interactions. The nonlinear time-domain orientation signals are mapped into the frequency domain in two-dimensional rotational spectra which reveal J-state-resolved nonlinear rotational dynamics. The approach enables direct observation of correlated rotational transitions and may reveal rotational coupling and relaxation pathways in the ground electronic and vibrational state.

  1. Time resolved fluorescence of naproxen in organogel medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguete, M. Isabel; Izquierdo, M. Angeles; Galindo, Francisco; Luis, Santiago V.

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug naproxen and the self assembled fibrillar network created by a low molecular weight organogelator has been probed by means of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  2. Steady state and time resolved spectroscopy of photoswitchable systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hou, Lili

    2013-01-01

    Steady state en time resolved spectroscopie zijn twee fundamentele methodes voor het bestuderen van fotochemische processen. In dit proefschrift zijn drie zelf-opgezette spectroscopische systemen beschreven, waarmee samen met andere spectroscopische methoden verscheidende met licht schakelbare syste

  3. Time-resolved spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poliakoff, E.D.

    1979-08-01

    Work performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is reported. The timing characteristics of the SPEAR beam (pulse width less than or equal to 0.4 nsec, pulse repetition period = 780 nsec) were exploited to determine dynamic behavior of atomic, molecular, excimeric, and photodissociative gas-phase species excited by vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. Fast fluorescence timing measurements were done to determine excited-state lifetimes of Kr and Xe. Pressure-dependent timing studies on Xe gas at higher concentrations demonstrated some of the problems associated with previous kinetic modeling of the Xe/sub 2/ system. It was found that even qualitative agreement of observed Xe/sub 2/ lifetimes as a function of pressure required the assumption that the radiative lifetime was a strong function of internuclear separation. The radiative decays of chemically unstable fragments, CN* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/) and XeF* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/ and C/sup 2/ Pi/sub 3/2//), were studied by pulsed photodissociation of stable parent compounds, ICN and XeF/sub 2/. When the polarization of the CN* (B/sup 2/..sigma../sup +/) fragment fluorescence was measured, it was found to be non-zero and strongly dependent on excitation wavelength. This polarization is related to the symmetry of the photodissociative surface via a classical model, and the variations in the polarization with wavelength is attributed to symmetry and lifetime effects of a predissociating parent molecule. Despite the drawbacks of limited availability and low radiation flux, synchrotron radiation is definitely a useful spectroscopic tool for VUV studies of gas-phase systems.

  4. Time resolved spin Seebeck effect experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roschewsky, Niklas, E-mail: niklas.roschewsky@wmi.badw.de; Schreier, Michael; Schade, Felix; Ganzhorn, Kathrin; Meyer, Sibylle; Geprägs, Stephan [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Kamra, Akashdeep [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Munich (Germany); Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Munich (Germany)

    2014-05-19

    In this Letter, we present the results of transient thermopower experiments, performed at room temperature on yttrium iron garnet/platinum bilayers. Upon application of a time-varying thermal gradient, we observe a characteristic low-pass frequency response of the ensuing thermopower voltage with cutoff frequencies of up to 37 MHz. We interpret our results in terms of the spin Seebeck effect, and argue that small wavevector magnons are of minor importance for the spin Seebeck effect in our thin film hybrid structures.

  5. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  6. Spectra-resolved technique of a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhouyi; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Yali

    2004-07-01

    The lanthanide trivalence ion and its chelates are used for marking substance in time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA), marking the protein, hormone, antibody, nucleic acid probe or biologica alive cell, to measure the concentration of the analysis substance inside the reaction system with time-resolved fluorometry after the reaction system occurred, and attain the quantitative analysis's purpose. TRFIA has been become a kind of new and more sensitive measure method after radioisotope marking, enzymatic marking, chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, it primarily is decided by the special physics and chemistry characteristic of lanthanide trivalence ion and its chelates. In this paper, the result of spectroscopic evaluation of europium trivalence ion and its chelate, and the principle of spectra-resolved technology and a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrument made by ourselves are reported. In the set, a high frequency Xenon pulsed-light was adopted as exciting light, and two special filters was utilized according to spectra-resolved technique. Thus the influence of scattering light and short-lifetime fluorescence was removed. And the sensitivity is 10-12mol/L (when Eu3+ was used for marking substance), examination repeat is CV = 95% (p < 0.01).

  7. Time-resolved spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Britton

    1995-05-01

    In response to the conference organizer's request, I am presenting a summary of the current status of medical optical imaging and spectroscopy. This is a topic which is advancing rapidly and on which there have been a number of conferences recently, and yet there has not been presented an overview of the field and some idea of what the advantages and disadvantages of the photon diffusion technology may be. Thus, this paper emphasizes diffusion waves for spectroscopy and imaging deep within the tissue and, at the same time, for providing specificity information of both absorption and scattering. In achieving this goal, I will not be able to cite all of the advantages of technologies that view the superficial layers of skin, retina, etc., on the one hand, nor those that measure the photons that have been scattered minimally on the transit between input and output. One of the main reasons for this is that specificity of the optical methods requires all of the information available: absorption and scattering of intrinsic signals naturally in the tissue, and of extrinsic signal due to contrast agents that have been artificially lodged in strategic tissue volumes. Since this paper is essentially the transcript of a lecture, it is not proposed as a topic review and does not contain full-scale bibliographic references, some of which may be found in a recent review elsewhere. This paper highlights what we all might accomplish in order to bring to bear with maximal effectiveness the optical method for altering the outcome of medical problems. I have not emphasized the mathematics of photon diffusion so well represented by the papers of this symposium volume. The achievable goals of the optical methods are to speed detection, improve diagnosis, guide therapy, and what appears in the minds of most, contribute to the improvement of medical economics. In order to fulfill these objectives, we will in the end have to demonstrate by lengthy and expensive clinical studies that the

  8. Two-Dimensional Scheduling: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuolei Xiao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a literature review, classification schemes and analysis of methodology for scheduling problems on Batch Processing machine (BP with both processing time and job size constraints which is also regarded as Two-Dimensional (TD scheduling. Special attention is given to scheduling problems with non-identical job sizes and processing times, with details of the basic algorithms and other significant results.

  9. Two-Dimensional Vernier Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    Modified vernier scale gives accurate two-dimensional coordinates from maps, drawings, or cathode-ray-tube displays. Movable circular overlay rests on fixed rectangular-grid overlay. Pitch of circles nine-tenths that of grid and, for greatest accuracy, radii of circles large compared with pitch of grid. Scale enables user to interpolate between finest divisions of regularly spaced rule simply by observing which mark on auxiliary vernier rule aligns with mark on primary rule.

  10. Design considerations for a time-resolved tomographic diagnostic at DARHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris I. Kaufman, Daniel Frayer, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Alfred Meidinger

    2006-08-01

    An instrument has been developed to acquire time-resolved tomographic data from the electron beam at the DARHT [Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test] facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument contains four optical lines of sight that view a single tilted object. The lens design optically integrates along one optical axis for each line of sight. These images are relayed via fiber optic arrays to streak cameras, and the recorded streaks are used to reconstruct the original two-dimensional data. Installation of this instrument into the facility requires automation of both the optomechanical adjustments and calibration of the instrument in a constrained space. Additional design considerations include compound tilts on the object and image planes.

  11. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xiang, An; Shi, Tuanwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices.

  12. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haixiao; Sun, Weiqiang; Xiang, An; Shi, Tuanwei; Chen, Qing; Xu, Shengyong

    2012-08-29

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices.

  13. Time-resolved lidar fluorosensor for sea pollution detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, A.; Pizzolati, P. L.; Zanzottera, E.

    1986-01-01

    A contemporary time and spectral analysis of oil fluorescence is useful for the detection and the characterization of oil spills on the sea surface. Nevertheless the fluorosensor lidars, which were realized up to now, have only partial capability to perform this double analysis. The main difficulties are the high resolution required (of the order of 1 nanosecond) and the complexity of the detection system for the recording of a two-dimensional matrix of data for each laser pulse. An airborne system whose major specifications were: time range, 30 to 75 ns; time resolution, 1 ns; spectral range, 350 to 700 nm; and spectral resolution, 10 nm was designed and constructed. The designed system of a short pulse ultraviolet laser source and a streak camera based detector are described.

  14. Coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy of a Fano model

    CERN Document Server

    Poulsen, Felipe; Pullerits, Tõnu; Hansen, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The Fano lineshape arises from the interference of two excitation pathways to reach a continuum. Its generality has resulted in a tremendous success in explaining the lineshapes of many one-dimensional spectroscopies - absorption, emission, scattering, conductance, photofragmentation - applied to very varied systems - atoms, molecules, semiconductors and metals. Unravelling a spectroscopy into a second dimension reveals the relationship between states in addition to decongesting the spectra. Femtosecond-resolved two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is a four-wave mixing technique that measures the time-evolution of the populations, and coherences of excited states. It has been applied extensively to the dynamics of photosynthetic units, and more recently to materials with extended band-structures. In this letter, we solve the full time-dependent third-order response, measured in 2DES, of a Fano model and give the new system parameters that become accessible.

  15. Multiple-perturbation two-dimensional near-infrared correlation study of time-dependent water absorption behavior of cellulose affected by pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Awa, Kimie; Noda, Isao; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-02-01

    Transient water absorption by cellulosic samples manufactured under varying pressure was monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy to explore the absorption behavior affected by the pressure. A substantial level of variation of the spectral features was induced by the water absorption and changes in the pressure. The detail of the spectral changes was analyzed with a multiple-perturbation, two-dimensional (2D) correlation method to determine the underlying mechanism. The 2D correlation spectra indicated that the compression of the cellulose increased the packing density of the samples, preventing the penetration of water. In addition, the compression substantially disintegrated its crystalline structure and eventually resulted in the development of inter- and intrachain hydrogen-bonded structures arising from an interaction between the water and cellulose. Consequently, the cellulose samples essentially underwent an evolutionary change in the polymer structure as well as in the packing density during the compression. This structural change, in turn, led to the seemingly complicated absorption trends, depending on the pressure.

  16. A time-resolved image sensor for tubeless streak cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutomi, Keita; Han, SangMan; Seo, Min-Woong; Takasawa, Taishi; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining-only modulation (DOM) pixels for tube-less streak cameras. Although the conventional streak camera has high time resolution, the device requires high voltage and bulky system due to the structure with a vacuum tube. The proposed time-resolved imager with a simple optics realize a streak camera without any vacuum tubes. The proposed image sensor has DOM pixels, a delay-based pulse generator, and a readout circuitry. The delay-based pulse generator in combination with an in-pixel logic allows us to create and to provide a short gating clock to the pixel array. A prototype time-resolved CMOS image sensor with the proposed pixel is designed and implemented using 0.11um CMOS image sensor technology. The image array has 30(Vertical) x 128(Memory length) pixels with the pixel pitch of 22.4um. .

  17. Short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional scattering media by natural element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Xie, Ming; Tan, He-Ping

    2014-04-01

    The natural element method (NEM) is extended to solve transient radiative transfer (TRT) in two-dimensional semitransparent media subjected to a collimated short laser irradiation. The least-squares (LS) weighted residuals approach is employed to spatially discretize the transient radiative heat transfer equation. First, for the case of the refractive index matched boundary, LSNEM solutions to TRT are validated by comparison with results reported in the literature. Effects of the incident angle on time-resolved signals of transmittance and reflectance are investigated. Afterward, the accuracy of this algorithm for the case of the refractive index mismatched boundary is studied. Finally, the LSNEM is extended to study the TRT in a two-dimensional semitransparent medium with refractive index discontinuity irradiated by the short pulse laser. The effects of scattering albedo, optical thickness, scattering phase function, and refractive index on transmittance and reflectance signals are investigated. Several interesting trends on the time-resolved signals are observed and analyzed.

  18. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of black silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Jepsen, Peter Uhd;

    2010-01-01

    The ultrafast photoconductivity dynamics of black silicon is measured by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Black silicon is produced by laser annealing of an a-Si:H film. We show that the decay time of the photoconductivity depends on the annealing method and fluence used in the production...

  19. Time-resolved luminescence spectra of porous Si

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Tadaki; Lee, Kyu-Seok; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectra of porous Si were measured under an N_2 laser excitation. The luminescence shows a nonexponential decay with an initial time constant of less than 5 ns and more than 200 ns for the secondary decay. The luminescence is considered to be associated with localized states, which are probably conduction and valence sublevels in Si microstructures.

  20. Retrieving the susceptibility from time-resolved terahertz experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schins, J.M.; Hendry, E.; Bonn, M.; Muller, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analytical expression for the observed signal in time- and phase-resolved pump-probe studies, with particular emphasis on terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. Maxwell’s equations are solved for the response of damped, harmonic oscillators to a driving probe field in the perturbative reg

  1. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids An Experimental Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Torre, Renato

    2007-01-01

    Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids introduces current state-of-the-art techniques in the study of complex dynamical problems in liquid phases. With a unique focus on the experimental aspects applied to complex liquids, this volume provides an excellent overview into the quickly emerging field of soft-matter science. Researchers and engineers will find a comprehensive review of current non-linear spectroscopic and optical Kerr effect techniques, in addition to an in-depth look into relaxation dynamics in complex liquids. This volume offers current experimental findings in transient grating spectroscopy and their application to viscoelastic phenomena in glass-formers, dynamics of confined liquid-crystals, and a time-resolved analysis of the host-quest interactions of dye molecules in liquid-crystal matter. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy in Complex Liquids provides a cohesive introduction suitable for individuals involved in this emerging field, complete with the latest experimental procedures of complex ...

  2. Two-dimensional visualization of cluster beams by microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoukaz, A., E-mail: khoukaz@uni-muenster.de; Bonaventura, D.; Grieser, S.; Hergemöller, A.-K.; Köhler, E.; Täschner, A.

    2014-01-21

    An advanced technique for a two-dimensional real time visualization of cluster beams in a vacuum as well as of the overlap volume of cluster beams with particle accelerator beams is presented. The detection system consists of an array of microchannel plates (MCPs) in combination with a phosphor screen which is read out by a CCD camera. This setup together with the ionization of a cluster beam by an electron or ion beam allows for spatial resolved investigations of the cluster beam position, size, and intensity. Moreover, since electrically uncharged clusters remain undetected, the operation in an internal beam experiment opens the way to monitor the overlap region and thus the position and size of an accelerator beam crossing an originally electrically neutral cluster jet. The observed intensity distribution of the recorded image is directly proportional to the convolution of the spatial ion beam and cluster beam intensities and is by this a direct measure of the two-dimensional luminosity distribution. This information can directly be used for the reconstruction of vertex positions as well as for an input for numerical simulations of the reaction zone. The spatial resolution of the images is dominated by the granularity of the complete MCP device and was found to be in the order of σ≈100μm. -- Highlights: • We present a MCP system for a 2D real time visualization of cluster target beams. • With this device the vertex region of storage ring experiments can be investigated. • Time resolved 2D information about the target thickness distribution is accessible. • A spatial resolution of the MCP device of 0.1 mm was achieved. • The presented MCP system also allows for measurements on cluster masses.

  3. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, N.D., E-mail: nbrubaker@math.arizona.edu; Lega, J., E-mail: lega@math.arizona.edu

    2016-01-08

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  4. Time-resolved photon emission from layered turbid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hielscher, A.H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 South Main, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Liu, H.; Chance, B. [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania, D501 Richards Building, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6089 (United States); Tittel, F.K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, 6100 South Main, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Jacques, S.L. [Laser Biology Research Laboratory, Box 17, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    We present numerical and experimental results of time-resolved emission profiles from various layered turbid media. Numerical solutions determined by time-resolved Monte Carlo simulations are compared with measurements on layered-tissue phantoms made from gelatin. In particular, we show that in certain cases the effects of the upper layers can be eliminated. As a practical example, these results are used to analyze {ital in} {ital vivo} measurements on the human head. This demonstrates the influence of skin, skull, and meninges on the determination of the blood oxygenation in the brain. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  5. Two-dimensional visualization of cluster beams by microchannel plates

    CERN Document Server

    Khoukaz, Alfons; Grieser, Silke; Hergemöller, Ann-Katrin; Köhler, Esperanza; Täschner, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    An advanced technique for a two-dimensional real time visualization of cluster beams in vacuum as well as of the overlap volume of cluster beams with particle accelerator beams is presented. The detection system consists of an array of microchannel plates (MCP) in combination with a phosphor screen which is read out by a CCD camera. This setup together with the ionization of a cluster beam by an electron or ion beam allows for spatial resolved investigations of the cluster beam position, size, and intensity. Moreover, since electrically uncharged clusters remain undetected, the operation in an internal beam experiment opens the way to monitor the overlap region and thus the position and size of an accelerator beam crossing an originally electrically neutral cluster jet. The observed intensity distribution of the recorded image is directly proportional to the convolution of the spatial ion beam and cluster beam intensities and is by this a direct measure of the two-dimensional luminosity distribution. This inf...

  6. Online comprehensive two-dimensional ion chromatography × capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Leila; Gaudry, Adam J; Breadmore, Michael C; Shellie, Robert A

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensively coupled online two-dimensional ion chromatography-capillary electrophoresis (IC × CE) system for quantitative analysis of inorganic anions and organic acids in water is introduced. The system employs an in-house built sequential injection-capillary electrophoresis instrument and a nonfocusing modulation interface comprising a tee-piece and a six-port two-position injection valve that allows comprehensive sampling of the IC effluent. High field strength (+2 kV/cm) enables rapid second-dimension separations in which each peak eluted from the first-dimension separation column is analyzed at least three times in the second dimension. The IC × CE approach has been successfully used to resolve a suite of haloacetic acids, dalapon, and common inorganic anions. Two-dimensional peak capacity for IC × CE was 498 with a peak production rate of 9 peaks/min. Linear calibration curves were obtained for all analytes from 5 to 225 ng/mL (except dibromoacetic acid (10-225 ng/mL) and tribromoacetic acid (25-225 ng/mL)). The developed approach was used to analyze a spiked tap water sample, with good measured recoveries (69-119%).

  7. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard J; Light, Roger A; Sharples, Steve D; Johnston, Nicholas S; Pitter, Mark C; Somekh, Mike G

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  8. Time resolved Schlieren imaging of DBD actuator flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourgostar, Cyrus; Oksuz, Lutfi; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2009-10-01

    Schlieren imaging methods measure the first derivative of density in the direction of a knife-edge spatial filter. It has been used extensively in aerodynamic research to visualize the structure of flow fields. With a single barrier planer dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuator, Schlieren images clearly show the absence of significant vertical air flow normal to the surface, and no more than few millimeters thick induced boundary layer flow. A gated intensified CCD camera along with a Schlieren system can not only visualize the flow field induced by the actuator, but also temporarily resolve the images of the flow and plasma field. Our time resolved images with triangular applied voltage waveforms indicate that several separate discharge regimes occur during positive and negative going half cycles of single and double barrier DBD actuators. Time resolved Schlieren imaging of both single and double barrier DBDs with different applied waveforms, discharge parameters and electrode geometries reveal important information on the induced flow structure.

  9. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  10. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, N. D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid.

  11. Two-dimensional cubic convolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E; Geng, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The paper develops two-dimensional (2D), nonseparable, piecewise cubic convolution (PCC) for image interpolation. Traditionally, PCC has been implemented based on a one-dimensional (1D) derivation with a separable generalization to two dimensions. However, typical scenes and imaging systems are not separable, so the traditional approach is suboptimal. We develop a closed-form derivation for a two-parameter, 2D PCC kernel with support [-2,2] x [-2,2] that is constrained for continuity, smoothness, symmetry, and flat-field response. Our analyses, using several image models, including Markov random fields, demonstrate that the 2D PCC yields small improvements in interpolation fidelity over the traditional, separable approach. The constraints on the derivation can be relaxed to provide greater flexibility and performance.

  12. Time-resolved THz spectroscopy in a parallel plate waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy inside a novel parallel plate waveguide where one of the metallic plates is replaced by a transparent conducting oxide. Considerable improvements to the waveguide loss coefficient are shown, with a power absorption coefficient of 4cm-1 at 0.5 THz....... The time resolution of the technique is shown to be limited by the spatial excitation profile, which for sharply focused beams can approach ~1 ps time scales....

  13. Time-Resolved 2PPE and Time-Resolved PEEM as a Probe of LSP's in Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bayer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The time-resolved two-photon photoemission technique (TR-2PPE has been applied to study static and dynamic properties of localized surface plasmons (LSP in silver nanoparticles. Laterally, integrated measurements show the difference between LSP excitation and nonresonant single electron-hole pair creation. Studies below the optical diffraction limit were performed with the detection method of time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (TR-PEEM. This microscopy technique with a resolution down to 40 nm enables a systematic study of retardation effects across single nanoparticles. In addition, as will be shown in this paper, it is a highly sensitive sensor for coupling effects between nanoparticles.

  14. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy of a molecular shuttle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, M.R.; Bodis, P.; Shaw, D.J.; Bakker, B.H.; Newton, A.C.; Kay, E.R.; Leigh, D.A.; Buma, W.J.; Brouwer, A.M.; Woutersen, S.

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to investigate the inter-component motion of an ultraviolet-triggered two-station molecular shuttle. The operation cycle of this molecular shuttle involves several intermediate species, which are observable in the amide I and amide II regions of the mid

  15. Time-resolved luminescence from feldspars: New insight into fading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Denby, P.M.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IR-OSL) signals of K- and Na-feldspar samples extracted from sediments were measured in UV, blue and red detection windows, using a fast photon counter and pulsed IR stimulation (lambda = 875 nm). We observe that the relative contribution...

  16. Advances in Time-Resolved Tomographic Particle Image Velocimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynch, K.P.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis details advanced developments in 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) based on the tomographic PIV technique, with an emphasis on time-resolved experiments. Tomographic PIV is a technique introduced in 2006 to measure the flow velocity in a three-dimensional volume. When measurements are

  17. Optimizing a time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bressler, C; Chergui, M; Abela, R; Pattison, P

    2001-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the optimum conditions for performing a laser-pump X-ray probe time-resolved X-ray absorption experiment. The results concerning sensitivity and feasibility for implementing the method are illustrated for the case of the nascent I radical environment following I sup - photolysis in H sub 2 O.

  18. Super-resolved imaging with ultimate time resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ashida, Yuto

    2015-01-01

    Precisely and accurately locating point objects is a long-standing common thread in science. Super-resolved imaging of single molecules has revolutionized our view of quasi-static nanostructures $\\it{in-vivo}$. A wide-field approach based on localizing individual fluorophores has emerged as a versatile method to surpass the standard resolution limit. In those techniques, the super-resolution is realized by sparse photoactivation and localization together with the statistical analysis based on point spread functions. Nevertheless, the slow temporal resolution of super-resolved imaging severely restricts the utility to the study of live-cell phenomena. Clearly, a major breakthrough to observe fast, nanoscale dynamics needs to be made. Here we present a super-resolved imaging method that achieves the theoretical-limit time resolution. By invoking information theory, we can achieve the robust localization of overlapped light emitters at an order of magnitude faster speed than the conventional super-resolution mic...

  19. First-principles approach to excitons in time-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, E.; Sangalli, D.; Marini, A.; Stefanucci, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we put forward a first-principles approach and propose an accurate diagrammatic approximation to calculate the time-resolved (TR) and angle-resolved photoemission spectrum of systems with excitons. We also derive an alternative formula to the TR photocurrent which involves a single time-integral of the lesser Green's function. The diagrammatic approximation applies to the relaxed regime characterized by the presence of quasistationary excitons and vanishing polarization. The nonequilibrium self-energy diagrams are evaluated using excited Green's functions; since this is not standard, the analytic derivation is presented in detail. The final result is an expression for the lesser Green's function in terms of quantities that can all be calculated in a first-principles manner. The validity of the proposed theory is illustrated in a one-dimensional model system with a direct gap. We discuss possible scenarios and highlight some universal features of the exciton peaks. Our results indicate that the exciton dispersion can be observed in TR and angle-resolved photoemission.

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC; Rudakov, F.M.; /Brown U.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC; Cardoza, J.D.; /Brown U.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; /SLAC; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  1. Classifying Two-dimensional Hyporeductive Triple Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Issa, A Nourou

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional real hyporeductive triple algebras (h.t.a.) are investigated. A classification of such algebras is presented. As a consequence, a classification of two-dimensional real Lie triple algebras (i.e. generalized Lie triple systems) and two-dimensional real Bol algebras is given.

  2. Probing Local Environments by Time-Resolved Stimulated Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved stimulated emission spectroscopy was employed to probe the local environment of DASPMI (4-(4-(dimethylaminostyryl-N-methyl-pyridinium iodide in binary solvents of different viscosity and in a sol-gel matrix. DASPMI is one of the molecules of choice to probe local environments, and the dependence of its fluorescence emission decay on viscosity has been previously used for this purpose in biological samples, solid matrices as well as in solution. The results presented in this paper show that time-resolved stimulated emission of DASPMI is a suitable means to probe the viscosity of local environments. Having the advantage of a higher time resolution, stimulated emission can provide information that is complementary to that obtained from fluorescence decay measurements, making it feasible to probe systems with lower viscosity.

  3. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Haifeng; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon scattering was theoretically studied with the deformation potential theory. Based on Boltzmann equation with relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was deduced, which shows that the influence of effective mass to the mobility anisotropy is larger than that of deformation potential constant and elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic 2D materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC$_2$N, MXene, TiS$_3$, GeCH$_3$) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio was overestimated in the past.

  4. Time-resolved CT angiography in aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinel, Felix G., E-mail: felix.meinel@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.nikolaou@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Weidenhagen, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.weidenhagen@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hellbach, Katharina, E-mail: katharina.hellbach@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Helck, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.helck@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian, E-mail: fabian.bamberg@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F., E-mail: maximilian.reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Sommer, Wieland H., E-mail: wieland.sommer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians-University, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We performed this study to assess feasibility and additional diagnostic value of time-resolved CT angiography of the entire aorta in patients with aortic dissection. Materials and methods: 14 consecutive patients with known or suspected aortic dissection (aged 60 {+-} 9 years) referred for aortic CT angiography were scanned on a dual-source CT scanner (Somatom Definition Flash; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using a shuttle mode for multiphasic image acquisition (range 48 cm, time resolution 6 s, 6 phases, 100 kV, 110 mAs/rot). Effective radiation doses were calculated from recorded dose length products. For all phases, CT densities were measured in the aortic lumen and renal parenchyma. From the multiphasic data, 3 phases corresponding to a triphasic standard CT protocol, served as a reference and were compared against findings from the time-resolved datasets. Results: Mean effective radiation dose was 27.7 {+-} 3.5 mSv. CT density of the true lumen peaked at 355 {+-} 53 HU. Compared to the simulated triphasic protocol, time-resolved CT angiography added diagnostic information regarding a number of important findings: the enhancement delay between true and false lumen (n = 14); the degree of membrane oscillation (n = 14); the perfusion delay in arteries originating from the false lumen (n = 9). Other additional information included true lumen collapse (n = 4), quantitative assessment of renal perfusion asymmetry (n = 2), and dynamic occlusion of aortic branches (n = 2). In 3/14 patients (21%), these additional findings of the multiphasic protocol altered patient management. Conclusions: Multiphasic, time-resolved CT angiography covering the entire aorta is feasible at a reasonable effective radiation dose and adds significant diagnostic information with therapeutic consequences in patients with aortic dissection.

  5. Time-resolved MR angiography with limited projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuexi; Wright, Graham A

    2007-08-01

    A method for reconstruction of time-resolved MRI called highly-constrained backprojection (HYPR) has been developed. To evaluate the HYPR reconstruction in relation to data sparsity and temporal dynamics, computer simulations were performed, investigating signal modulations under different situations that reflect dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (MRA). In vivo studies were also performed with gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) for abdominal MRA in a canine model to demonstrate the application of HYPR for three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved MRA. When contrast dynamics vary over space, large vessels (e.g., veins) tend to introduce signal interference to small vessels (e.g., arteries) in HYPR, particularly when the vessels are in close proximity. The enhancement of background tissue signals may also alter the arterial and venous temporal profiles in HYPR. However, the artifacts are manifest as intensity modulation rather than structural interference, and therefore have little impact on structural diagnosis. Increasing the number of projections per time point increases temporal blur while reducing corruption of temporal behavior from adjacent tissues. Uniformly interleaved acquisition order, such as the bit-reversed order, is important to reduce artifacts. With high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and limited artifacts, HYPR reconstruction has potential to greatly improve time-resolved MRA in clinical practice.

  6. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates $\\vec{r}$, it is different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals constituting by the medium columns of dielectric constants are constants. We find the band gaps of two-dimensional function photonic crystals are different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals, and when the functions form of dielectric constants are different, the band gaps structure should be changed, which can be designed into the appropriate band gaps structures by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals.

  7. Time resolved spectroscopy of GRB 030501 using INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, V.; Borkowski, J.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.;

    2003-01-01

    The gamma-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL offer an unique opportunity to perform time resolved analysis on GRBs. The imager IBIS allows accurate positioning of GRBs and broad band spectral analysis, while SPI provides high resolution spectroscopy. GRB 030501 was discovered by the INTEGRAL Burst...... Alert System in the ISGRI field of view. Although the burst was fairly weak (fluence F20-200 keV similar or equal to 3.5x10(-6) erg cm(-2)) it was possible to perform time resolved spectroscopy with a resolution of a few seconds. The GRB shows a spectrum in the 20-400 keV range which is consistent...

  8. User’s Manual for SAC-2. A Two-Dimensional Nonlinear, Time Dependent Soil Analysis Code Using the Bounding Surface Plasticity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    of appropriate time step lengths is complicated by the fact that two distinct processes are involved, i.e. water flow and soil plasticity . Thus a...1981. 9. DeNatale, 3.S., L.R. Herrmann, and Y.F. Dafalias, "User’s Manual for MODCAL-Bounding Surface Soil Plasticity Model Calibration and Prediction

  9. Time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xian-yun; ZHANG Wei-jun; WANG Zhen-ya; HAO Li-qing; HUANG Ming-qiang; ZHAO Wen-wu; LONG Bo; Zhao Wei

    2008-01-01

    We develop a system to measure the elemental composition of unprepared samples using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in our laboratory, which can be used for the determination of elements in solids, liquids and aerosols. A description of the instrumentation, including laser, sample chamber and detection, is followed by a brief discussion. The time-resolved LIBS of aluminum at atmospheric pressure is presented. At the end, the possibilities and later uses of this technique are briefly discussed.

  10. Ultrafast time resolved vibrational spectroscopy in liquid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, G.; Hofmann, M.; Weidlich, K.; Graener, H. [Physics Institute, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of small molecules in the liquid phase can successfully be studied tracing the relaxation pathways of vibrational excess energy. Two complementing experimental techniques, picosecond IR double resonance spectroscopy and time resolved incoherent Anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, are very powerful tools for such studies. The capabilities of investigations combining these methods are discussed on the example of new experimental data on liquid dichloromethane (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. On the interpretation of time-resolved anisotropic diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we review existing systematic treatments for the interpretation of anisotropic diffraction patterns from partially aligned symmetric top molecules. Such patterns arise in the context of time-resolved diffraction experiments. We calculate diffraction patterns for ground-state NaI ex......I excited with an ultraviolet laser. The results are interpreted with the help of a qualitative analytic model, and general recommendations on the analysis and interpretation of anisotropic diffraction patterns are given....

  12. Time Resolved Broadband Terahertz Relaxation Dynamics of Electron in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tianwu; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Cooke, David G.;

    We investigated the transient response of the solvated electron in water ejected by photodetachment from potassium ferrocyanide using time resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TSTS). Ultrabroadband THz transients are generated and detected by a two-color femtosecond-induced air plasma and air biased...... coherent detection, respectively. We find that the measured frequency dependent conductivity can be well described by a Drude-Smith model, supplemented by a Lorentz model oscillating near 5 THz....

  13. Time-resolved imaging of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L. K.; Dinish, U. S.; Ong, S. K.; Chao, Z. X.; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2004-07-01

    Imaging of latent fingerprints using time-resolved (TR) method offers a broader platform to eliminate the unwanted background emission. In this paper, a novel TR imaging technique is demonstrated and implemented, which facilitates the detection of latent fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Simulated experiments were carried out with two overlapping fingerprints treated with two fluorescent powders having different lifetimes in nanosecond range. The dependence of the fluorescence emission intensity in nanosecond resolution of TR imaging is also revealed.

  14. Introductory lecture: Time-resolved chemistry at atomic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Philip; Novozhilova, Irina V

    2003-01-01

    Though time-resolved studies are still at an early stage, the field is rapidly being developed and applied to an increasingly broad spectrum of problems with timescales varying from seconds or more down to femtoseconds. In this overview a number of different techniques are discussed, with emphasis on chemical applications in which information is obtained at the atomic level. The need to correlate with theory, both for calibration of theoretical methods and to obtain related information not accessible experimentally, is stressed.

  15. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  16. Complete momentum and energy resolved TOF electron spectrometerfor time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, G.; Tremsin, A.; Siegmund, O.; Chen, Y.; Shen, Z.X.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-08-12

    Over the last decade, high-resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has emerged as a tool of choice for studying the electronic structure of solids, in particular, strongly correlated complex materials such as cuprate superconductors. In this paper we present the design of a novel time-of-flight based electron analyzer with capability of 2D in momentum space (kx and ky) and all energies (calculated from time of flight) in the third dimension. This analyzer will utilize an improved version of a 2D delay linedetector capable of imaging with<35 mm (700x700 pixels) spatial resolution and better than 120 ps FWHM timing resolution. Electron optics concepts and optimization procedure are considered for achieving an energy resolution less than 1 meV and an angular resolution better than 0.11.

  17. Simulating high Reynolds number flow in two-dimensional lid-driven cavity by multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chai Zhen-Hua; Shi Bao-Chang; Zheng Lin

    2006-01-01

    By coupling the non-equilibrium extrapolation scheme for boundary condition with the multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method, this paper finds that the stability of the multi-relaxation-time model can be improved greatly, especially on simulating high Reynolds number (Re) flow. As a discovery, the super-stability analysed by Lallemand and Luo is verified and the complex structure of the cavity flow is also exhibited in our numerical simulation when Re is high enough. To the best knowledge of the authors, the maximum of Re which has been investigated by direct numerical simulation is only around 50 000 in the literature; however, this paper can readily extend the maximum to 1000 000 with the above combination.

  18. Prostate biopsies guided by three-dimensional real-time (4-D) transrectal ultrasonography on a phantom: comparative study versus two-dimensional transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Jean-Alexandre; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Troccaz, Jocelyne; Rambeaud, Jean-Jacques; Descotes, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the accuracy in localisation and distribution of real-time three-dimensional (4-D) ultrasound-guided biopsies on a prostate phantom. METHODS: A prostate phantom was created. A three-dimensional real-time ultrasound system with a 5.9MHz probe was used, making it possible to see several reconstructed orthogonal viewing planes in real time. Fourteen operators performed biopsies first under 2-D then 4-D transurethral ultrasound (TRUS) guidance (336 biopsies). The biopsy path was modelled using segmentation in a 3-D ultrasonographic volume. Special software was used to visualise the biopsy paths in a reference prostate and assess the sampled area. A comparative study was performed to examine the accuracy of the entry points and target of the needle. Distribution was assessed by measuring the volume sampled and a redundancy ratio of the sampled prostate. RESULTS: A significant increase in accuracy in hitting the target zone was identified using 4-D ultrasonography as compared to 2-D....

  19. Decoherence in a Landau Quantized Two Dimensional Electron Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGill Stephen A.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the dynamics of a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas as a function of temperature. The presence of satellite reflections in the sample and magnet can be modeled in the time-domain.

  20. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional dynamic imaging of live biofilms in a microchannel by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Xin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Xiong, Yijia; Ma, Xiang; Zhou, Yufan; Tucker, Abigail E.; Zhu, Zihua; Liu, Songqin; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2015-05-01

    A vacuum compatible microfluidic reactor, SALVI (System for Analysis at the Liquid Vacuum Interface) was employed for in situ chemical imaging of live biofilms using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Depth profiling by sputtering materials in sequential layers resulted in live biofilm spatial chemical mapping. 2D images were reconstructed to report the first 3D images of hydrated biofilm elucidating spatial and chemical heterogeneity. 2D image principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted among biofilms at different locations in the microchannel. Our approach directly visualized spatial and chemical heterogeneity within the living biofilm by dynamic liquid ToF-SIMS.

  1. Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Multi-group, Multi-angle Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Simulation in the Core-Collapse Supernova Context

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, E; Walder, R; Lichtenstadt, I; Thompson, T A; Livne, Eli; Burrows, Adam; Walder, Rolf; Lichtenstadt, Itamar; Thompson, Todd A.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a time-dependent, multi-energy-group, and multi-angle (S$_n$) Boltzmann transport scheme for radiation hydrodynamics simulations, in one and two spatial dimensions. The implicit transport is coupled to both 1D (spherically-symmetric) and 2D (axially-symmetric) versions of the explicit Newtonian hydrodynamics code VULCAN. The 2D variant, VULCAN/2D, can be operated in general structured or unstructured grids and though the code can address many problems in astrophysics it was constructed specifically to study the core-collapse supernova problem. Furthermore, VULCAN/2D can simulate the radiation/hydrodynamic evolution of differentially rotating bodies. We summarize the equations solved and methods incorporated into the algorithm and present results of a time-dependent 2D test calculation. A more complete description of the algorithm is postponed to another paper. We highlight a 2D test run that follows for 22 milliseconds the immediate post-bounce evolution of a collapsed core. We present the r...

  2. Real-time comparison of conventional direct control and pattern recognition myoelectric control in a two-dimensional Fitts' law style test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurth, Sophie M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have directly compared real-time control performance of pattern recognition to direct control for the next generation of myoelectric controlled upper limb prostheses. Many different implementations of pattern recognition control have been proposed, with minor differentiations in the feature sets and classifiers. An objective and generalizable evaluation tool quantifying the control performance, other than classification accuracy, is needed. This paper used the implementation of such a tool through the design of a target acquisition test, similar to a Fitts' law test, relating movement time of the target acquisition to the difficulty of the target, for a given control strategy. Performance metrics such as throughput (bits/sec), completion rate (%) and path efficiency (%) allow for a complete evaluation of the described strategies. We compared direct control and pattern recognition control with the proposed test and found that 1) the test was valid for control system evaluation by following Fitts' law with high coefficients of determination for both types of control and 2) that pattern recognition significantly outperformed direct control in throughput with similar completion rates and path efficiencies. In this framework, the present pilot study supports pattern recognition as a promising strategy and forms a basis for the development of a general and objective tool for the performance evaluation of upper limb control strategies.

  3. A new numerical method to calculate inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation of two-dimensional geodynamic flows with application to diapirism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, L.; Schmeling, H.

    2013-08-01

    A key to understand many geodynamic processes is studying the associated large deformation fields. Finite deformation can be measured in the field by using geological strain markers giving the logarithmic strain f = log 10(R), where R is the ellipticity of the strain ellipse. It has been challenging to accurately quantify finite deformation of geodynamic models for inhomogeneous and time-dependent large deformation cases. We present a new formulation invoking a 2-D marker-in-cell approach. Mathematically, one can describe finite deformation by a coordinate transformation to a Lagrangian reference frame. For a known velocity field the deformation gradient tensor, F, can be calculated by integrating the differential equation DtFij = LikFkj, where L is the velocity gradient tensor and Dt the Lagrangian derivative. The tensor F contains all information about the minor and major semi-half axes and orientation of the strain ellipse and the rotation. To integrate the equation centrally in time and space along a particle's path, we use the numerical 2-D finite difference code FDCON in combination with a marker-in-cell approach. For a sufficiently high marker density we can accurately calculate F for any 2-D inhomogeneous and time-dependent creeping flow at any point for a deformation f up to 4. Comparison between the analytical and numerical solution for the finite deformation within a Poiseuille-Couette flow shows an error of less than 2 per cent for a deformation up to f = 1.7. Moreover, we determine the finite deformation and strain partitioning within Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTIs) of different viscosity and layer thickness ratios. These models provide a finite strain complement to the RTI benchmark of van Keken et al. Large finite deformation of up to f = 4 accumulates in RTIs within the stem and near the compositional boundaries. Distinction between different stages of diapirism shows a strong correlation between a maximum occurring deformation of f = 1, 3 and

  4. Determination of emerging contaminants in wastewater utilizing comprehensive two-dimensional gas-chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebihalo, Sarah; Brockman, Adrienne; Cochran, Jack; Dorman, Frank L

    2015-11-06

    An analytical method for identification of emerging contaminants of concern, such as pesticides and organohalogens has been developed and utilized for true discovery-based analysis. In order to achieve the level of sensitivity and selectivity necessary for detecting compounds in complex samples, comprehensive gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) was utilized to analyze wastewater samples obtained from the Pennsylvania State University wastewater treatment facility (WWTF). Determination of emerging contaminants through a process of combining samples which represent "normal background" and comparing this to new samples was developed. Results show the presence of halogenated benzotriazoles in wastewater samples as well as soil samples from Pennsylvania State University agricultural fields. The trace levels of chlorinated benzotriazoles observed in the monitoring wells present on the property indicate likely environmental degradation of the chlorinated benzotriazoles. Preliminary investigation of environmental fate of the substituted benzotriazoles indicates their likely degradation into phenol; an Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) priority pollutant.

  5. Methods for Autonomous Ground-based Real-Time Monitoring and Mapping of CO2 Concentrations Over Extended Two-Dimensional Fields of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccheo, T. S.; Pernini, T.; Botos, C.; Dobler, J. T.; Blume, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenhouse gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE) combines real-time differential Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (LAS) measurements with a lightweight web-based data acquisition and product generation system to provide autonomous 24/7 monitoring of CO2. The current GreenLITE system is comprised of two transceivers and a series of retro-reflectors that continuously measure the differential transmission over a user-defined set of intersecting line-of-site paths or "chords" that form the plane of interest. These observations are first combined with in situ surface measurements of temperature (T), pressure (P) and relative humidity (RH) to compute the integrated CO2 mixing ratios based on an iterative radiative transfer modeling approach. The retrieved CO2 mixing ratios are then grouped based on observation time and employed in a sparse sample reconstruction method to provide a tomographic- like representation of the 2-D distribution of CO2 over the field of interest. This reconstruction technique defines the field of interest as a set of idealized plumes whose integrated values best match the observations. The GreenLITE system has been deployed at two primary locations; 1) the Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) center in Bozeman, Montana, in Aug-Sept 2014, where more than 200 hours of data were collected over a wide range of environmental conditions while utilizing a controlled release of CO2 into a segmented underground pipe, and 2) continuously at a carbon sequestration test facility in Feb-Aug 2015. The system demonstrated the ability to identify persistent CO2 sources at the ZERT test facility and showed strong correlation with an independent measurement using a LI-COR based system. Here we describe the measurement approach, algorithm design and extended study results.

  6. Extreme paths in oriented two-dimensional percolation

    OpenAIRE

    Andjel, E. D.; Gray, L. F.

    2016-01-01

    International audience; A useful result about leftmost and rightmost paths in two dimensional bond percolation is proved. This result was introduced without proof in \\cite{G} in the context of the contact process in continuous time. As discussed here, it also holds for several related models, including the discrete time contact process and two dimensional site percolation. Among the consequences are a natural monotonicity in the probability of percolation between different sites and a somewha...

  7. The manipulation of massive ro-vibronic superpositions using time-frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TFRCARS) from quantum control to quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Zadoyan, R; Lidar, D A; Apkarian, V A

    2001-01-01

    Molecular ro-vibronic coherences, joint energy-time distributions of quantum amplitudes, are selectively prepared, manipulated, and imaged in Time-Frequency-Resolved Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (TFRCARS) measurements using femtosecond laser pulses. The studies are implemented in iodine vapor, with its thermally occupied statistical ro-vibrational density serving as initial state. The evolution of the massive ro-vibronic superpositions, consisting of 1000 eigenstates, is followed through two-dimensional images. The first- and second-order coherences are captured using time-integrated frequency-resolved CARS, while the third-order coherence is captured using time-gated frequency-resolved CARS. The Fourier filtering provided by time integrated detection projects out single ro-vibronic transitions, while time-gated detection allows the projection of arbitrary ro-vibronic superpositions from the coherent third-order polarization. Beside the control and imaging of chemistry, the controlled manipulation of...

  8. Retrospective analysis by data processing tools for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: a challenge for matrix-rich sediment core sample from Tokyo Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zushi, Yasuyuki; Hashimoto, Shunji; Tamada, Masafumi; Masunaga, Shigeki; Kanai, Yutaka; Tanabe, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-18

    Data processing tools for non-target analysis using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-HRTOFMS) were developed and applied to a sediment core in Tokyo Bay, focusing on chlorinated compounds in this study. The processing tools were classified in two different methods: (1) the consecutive use of mass defect filter followed by artificial neutral loss scan (MDF/artificial NLS) as a qualitative non-target screening method and (2) Entire Domain Combined Spectra Extraction and Integration Program (ComSpec) and two-dimensional peak sentinel (T-SEN) as a semi-quantitative target screening method. MDF/artificial NLS as a non-target screening approach revealed that PCBs, followed by octachlorodibenzo dioxin (OCDD), were the main chlorinated compounds present in all sediment layers. Furthermore, unknown peaks thought to be chlorinated compounds were found in increasing numbers, some in increasing amounts. T-SEN and ComSpec as a target screening approach were adapted for automatic semi-quantitative analysis showed that, in decreasing concentration order, PCBs, OCDD, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDEs, DDDs) were the main chlorinated pollutants in the sediments. The complementary use of both techniques allows us to extract significant chlorinated pollutants, including non-targeted compounds. This retrospective analysis by this approach performed well even on matrix-rich sediment samples and provided us an interesting insight of historical trends of pollution in Tokyo Bay.

  9. Extension of the two-dimensional mass channel cluster plot method to fast separations utilizing low thermal mass gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, Brian D; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-03-24

    Implementation of a data reduction and visualization method for use with high-speed gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) is reported. The method, called the "2D m/z cluster method" facilitates analyte detection, deconvolution, and identification, by accurately measuring peak widths and retention times using a fast TOFMS sampling frequency (500 Hz). Characteristics and requirements for high speed GC are taken into consideration: fast separations with narrow peak widths and high peak capacity, rapid data collection rate, and effective peak deconvolution. Transitioning from standard GC (10-60+ minute separations) to fast GC (1-10 min separations) required consideration of how to properly analyze the data. This report validates use of the 2D m/z cluster method with newly developed GC technology that produces ultra-fast separations (∼1 min) with narrow analyte peak widths. Low thermal mass gas chromatography (LTM-GC) operated at a heating rate of 250 °C/min coupled to a LECO Pegasus III TOFMS analyzed a 115 component test mixture in 120 s with peak widths-at-base, wb (4σ), of 350 ms (average) to produce a separation with a high peak capacity, nc ∼ 340 (at unit resolution Rs = 1). The 2D m/z cluster method is shown to separate overlapped analytes to a limiting Rs ∼ 0.03, so the effective peak capacity was increased nearly 30-fold to nc ∼10,000 in the 120 s separation. The method, when coupled with LTM-GC-TOFMS, is demonstrated to provide unambiguous peak rank (i.e. the number of analytes per overlapped peak in the total ion current (TIC)), by visualizing locations of pure and chromatographically overlapped m/z. Hence, peak deconvolution and identification using MCR-ALS (multivariate curve resolution - alternating least squares) is demonstrated.

  10. Time-resolved four-wave-mixing spectroscopy for inner-valence transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Thomas; Ott, Christian; Kaldun, Andreas; Blättermann, Alexander; Meyer, Kristina; Stooss, Veit; Rebholz, Marc; Birk, Paul; Hartmann, Maximilian; Brown, Andrew; Van Der Hart, Hugo; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Noncollinear four-wave-mixing (FWM) techniques at near-infrared (NIR), visible, and ultraviolet frequencies have been widely used to map vibrational and electronic couplings, typically in complex molecules. However, correlations between spatially localized inner-valence transitions among different sites of a molecule in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range have not been observed yet. As an experimental step toward this goal, we perform time-resolved FWM spectroscopy with femtosecond NIR and attosecond XUV pulses. The first two pulses (XUV-NIR) coincide in time and act as coherent excitation fields, while the third pulse (NIR) acts as a probe. As a first application, we show how coupling dynamics between odd- and even-parity, inner-valence excited states of neon can be revealed using a two-dimensional spectral representation. Experimentally obtained results are found to be in good agreement with ab initio time-dependent R-matrix calculations providing the full description of multielectron interactions, as well as few-level model simulations. Future applications of this method also include site-specific probing of electronic processes in molecules.

  11. Time-resolved four-wave-mixing spectroscopy for inner-valence transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Thomas; Kaldun, Andreas; Blättermann, Alexander; Meyer, Kristina; Stooß, Veit; Rebholz, Marc; Birk, Paul; Hartmann, Maximilian; Brown, Andrew; Van Der Hart, Hugo; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Non-collinear four-wave mixing (FWM) techniques at near-infrared (NIR), visible, and ultraviolet frequencies have been widely used to map vibrational and electronic couplings, typically in complex molecules. However, correlations between spatially localized inner-valence transitions among different sites of a molecule in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range have not been observed yet. As an experimental step towards this goal we perform time-resolved FWM spectroscopy with femtosecond NIR and attosecond XUV pulses. The first two pulses (XUV-NIR) coincide in time and act as coherent excitation fields, while the third pulse (NIR) acts as a probe. As a first application we show how coupling dynamics between odd- and even-parity inner-valence excited states of neon can be revealed using a two-dimensional spectral representation. Experimentally obtained results are found to be in good agreement with ab initio time-dependent R-matrix calculations providing the full description of multi-electron interactions,...

  12. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of organic-plasmonic hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Fiutowski, Jacek

    We study the optical properties of organic thin films and crystalline organic nanofibers as well as their interaction with plasmonic materials by means of laser-scanning fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TR-PLS). The aim of our......-carrier dynamics in such systems. In this contribution we will show how the interaction of organic nanofibers placed on top of regular arrays of nanostructures leads to a significantly enhanced second-harmonic response and, at the same time, an increased decay rate of the photoluminescence lifetime....

  13. Coherence Time Resolvable Diffraction and New Tunnelling Electronics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易林

    2002-01-01

    With the help of the perturbation method and the Feynman path integral technique, we analytically demonstrate that, when the electronic spectrum of a mesoscopic box is measured through two connecting leads, there exists a class of new diffraction phenomena in the coherence time domain, based on the new coherent tunnelling model.It is shown that the new diffraction effect determines the minimal resolvable coherence time to the Heisenberg limit. In particular, Fraunhofer optical phenomena, such as missing order and grating effects, can be reproduced in the meso-systems. The predicted periodic oscillations as a function of voltage are in excellent agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity assay with time-resolved fluorimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建中; 章竹君; 金伯泉; 田方

    1996-01-01

    A new time-resolved fluorimetric method for the measurement of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity has been developed by labelling the target cell K562 with a new synthesized fluorescence marker KLUK. The method has advantages of higher sensitivity, time-saving, good reproducibility and has no radioactivity problems. A satisfactory result is obtained by comparing it with 51Cr release method. It demonstrates that the new marker provides an alternative to currently used radioactive markers for the assessment of in vitro cellular cytotoxicity.

  15. Filming the invisible - time-resolved visualization of compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, H.

    2010-04-01

    Essentially all processes in gasdynamics are invisible to the naked eye as they occur in a transparent medium. The task to observe them is further complicated by the fact that most of these processes are also transient, often with characteristic times that are considerably below the threshold of human perception. Both difficulties can be overcome by combining visualization methods that reveal changes in the transparent medium, and high-speed photography techniques that “stop” the motion of the flow. The traditional approach is to reconstruct a transient process from a series of single images, each taken in a different experiment at a different instant. This approach, which is still widely used today, can only be expected to give reliable results when the process is reproducible. Truly time-resolved visualization, which yields a sequence of flow images in a single experiment, has been attempted for more than a century, but many of the developed camera systems were characterized by a high level of complexity and limited quality of the results. Recent advances in digital high-speed photography have changed this situation and have provided the tools to investigate, with relative ease and in sufficient detail, the true development of a transient flow with characteristic time scales down to one microsecond. This paper discusses the potential and the limitations one encounters when using density-sensitive visualization techniques in time-resolved mode. Several examples illustrate how this approach can reveal and explain a number of previously undetected phenomena in a variety of highly transient compressible flows. It is demonstrated that time-resolved visualization offers numerous advantages which normally outweigh its shortcomings, mainly the often-encountered loss in resolution. Apart from the capability to track the location and/or shape of flow features in space and time, adequate time-resolved visualization allows one to observe the development of deliberately

  16. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-10-25

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  17. Two-dimensional fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFlores, Lauren; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2013-09-03

    The present invention relates to a system and methods for acquiring two-dimensional Fourier transform (2D FT) spectra. Overlap of a collinear pulse pair and probe induce a molecular response which is collected by spectral dispersion of the signal modulated probe beam. Simultaneous collection of the molecular response, pulse timing and characteristics permit real time phasing and rapid acquisition of spectra. Full spectra are acquired as a function of pulse pair timings and numerically transformed to achieve the full frequency-frequency spectrum. This method demonstrates the ability to acquire information on molecular dynamics, couplings and structure in a simple apparatus. Multi-dimensional methods can be used for diagnostic and analytical measurements in the biological, biomedical, and chemical fields.

  18. Qualitative analysis of a sulfur-fumigated Chinese herbal medicine by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and high-resolution time of flight mass spectrometry using colorized fuzzy difference data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Cao, Gang; Zhang, Hong-Yan

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the chemical transformation of volatile compounds in sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) and high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-TOF/MS) with colorized fuzzy difference (CFD) method was used to investigate the effect of sulfur-fumigation on the volatile components from Radix Angelicae Sinensis. Twenty-five compounds that were found in sun-dried samples disappeared in sulfur-fumigated samples. Seventeen volatile components including two sulfur-containing compounds were newly generated for the first time in volatile oils of sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. The strategy can be successfully applied to rapidly and holistically discriminate sun-dried and sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Sinensis. GC×GC-HR-TOF/MS based CFD is a powerful and feasible approach for the global quality evaluation of Radix Angelicae Sinensis as well as other herbal medicines.

  19. Lucas-Kanade fluid trajectories for time-resolved PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegavian, Robin; Leclaire, Benjamin; Champagnat, Frédéric; Illoul, Cédric; Losfeld, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new method for estimating fluid trajectories in time-resolved PIV. It relies on a Lucas-Kanade paradigm and consists in a simple and direct extension of a two-frame estimation with FOLKI-PIV (Champagnat et al 2011 Exp. Fluids 50 1169-82). The so-called Lucas-Kanade Fluid Trajectories (LKFT) are assumed to be polynomial in time, and are found as the minimizer of a global functional, in which displacements are sought so as to match the intensities of a series of images pairs in the sequence, in the least-squares sense. All pairs involve the central image, similar to other recent time-resolved approaches (FTC (Lynch and Scarano 2013 Meas. Sci. Technol. 24 035305) and FTEE (Jeon et al 2014 Exp. Fluids 55 1-16)). As switching from a two-frame to a time-resolved objective simply amounts to adding terms in a functional, no significant additional algorithmic element is required. Similar to FOLKI-PIV the method is very well suited for GPU acceleration, which is an important feature as computational complexity increases with the image sequence size. Tests on synthetic data exhibiting peak-locking show that increasing the image sequence size strongly reduces both associated bias and random error, and that LKFT has a remaining total error comparable to that of FTEE on this case. Results on case B of the third PIV challenge (Stanislas et al 2008 Exp. Fluids 45 27-71) also show its ability to drastically reduce the error in situations with low signal-to-noise ratio. These results are finally confirmed on experimental images acquired in the near-field of a low Reynolds number jet. Strong reductions in peak-locking, spatial and temporal noise compared to two-frame estimation are also observed, on the displacement components themselves, as well as on spatial or temporal derivatives, such as vorticity and material acceleration.

  20. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-12

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  1. Time-resolved flowfield measurements in a turbine stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, J. L.

    1985-06-01

    Time-resolved flowfield measurements for a 0.5-meter diameter, high work transonic turbine have been completed in the MIT Turbine Blowdown Facility (TBF). Measurements were taken: to determine the blade-to-blade total temperature profile for comparison with predictions from the Euler turbine equation; to determine the effect of using time-averaged pressures to calculate turbine performance; and to provide a complete set of time-resolved turbine stage data. A preliminary objective (given a 6 kHz blade passing frequency) was to determine the frequency response characteristics of the instrumentation used to make the flowfield measurements. A shock tube was built for this purpose. Measurements were taken with high-frequency response instrumentation including a dual-hot-wire aspirating probe, a four-way angle probe, and two cobra head total pressure probes incorporating silicon diaphragm pressure transducers. The aspirating probe is found to have a natural frequency of 15.5 kHz in the test gas with a damping ratio of 0.36; the angle probe a characteristic frequency of 45 kHz with a settling time of 18 usec. Both results are satisfactory for application in the TBF. The measured total temperature profile shows a peak-to-peak variation of 65 C (20%) and a characteristic frequency twice that of the blade passing frequency.

  2. Time and spectral resolved phosphorescence of singlet oxygen and pigments in photosystem II particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedic, R.; Svoboda, A.; Psencik, J.; Lupinkova, L.; Komenda, J.; Hala, J. E-mail: hala@karlov.mff.cuni.cz

    2003-05-01

    Singlet oxygen generated via chlorophyll triplets in photosynthetic systems can destroy basic components of photosynthetic apparatus. In order to study this process a sensitive spectroscopic experimental set-up was built to detect both weak infrared (IR) chlorophyll phosphorescence (between 900 and 1000 nm) and singlet oxygen phosphorescence (at 1270 nm). The spectral and time resolution of the used monochromator and photon counting multiscaler are sufficient to provide two-dimensional matrix of temporally and spectrally resolved IR luminescence data. We have studied IR emission of photosystem II particles in D{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O buffer including the effect of the sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) detergent. Both sub-microsecond lifetime of chlorophyll triplet states and microsecond lifetime of singlet oxygen were determined. The singlet oxygen lifetime in D{sub 2}O (of 18 {mu}s) was approximately five times longer than that in H{sub 2}O. Quantum efficiency of singlet oxygen generation in photosystem II particles was significantly lower than that in chlorophyll a in acetone, however, it could be substantially increased by addition of SDS.

  3. Time-resolved MR angiography of the intracranial venous system: an alternative MR venography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Hasan; Turan, Aynur; Erguen, Elif; Kosar, Pinar; Kosar, Ugur [Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Altindag, Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-05-15

    To compare time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics (TRICKS) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with two-dimensional time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance venography (MRV), and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced (CE) MRV in the visualisation of normal cerebral veins and dural venous sinuses. This prospective study consisted of 35 consecutive patients. All patients were examined with TOF MRV, TRICKS MRA and CE MRV; a single dose of intravenous contrast material was administered for the last two sequences. The image quality of these techniques was assessed and compared qualitatively (by a semiquantitative scoring system) and quantitatively (by calculating signal-to-noise ratios [SNRs] and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]). Left transverse sinus, left sigmoid sinus, bilateral thalamostriate veins and Trolard veins were better visualised by TRICKS MRA and CE MRV compared with TOF MRV (P < 0.05). For left thalamostriate vein visualisation, TRICKS MRA was inferior to CE MRV (P < 0.05). With quantitative analysis the SNRs and CNRs were highest at TRICKS MRA, which was followed by CE MRV and TOF MRV (P < 0.05). Despite its limited spatial resolution, TRICKS MRA is comparable to static CE MRV and better than TOF MRV in the visualisation of normal dural sinuses and cerebral veins. (orig.)

  4. Hadamard States and Two-dimensional Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Salehi, H

    2001-01-01

    We have used a two-dimensional analog of the Hadamard state-condition to study the local constraints on the two-point function of a linear quantum field conformally coupled to a two-dimensional gravitational background. We develop a dynamical model in which the determination of the state of the quantum field is essentially related to the determination of a conformal frame. A particular conformal frame is then introduced in which a two-dimensional gravitational equation is established.

  5. Topological defects in two-dimensional crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yong; Qi, Wei-Kai

    2008-01-01

    By using topological current theory, we study the inner topological structure of the topological defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystal. We find that there are two elementary point defects topological current in two-dimensional crystal, one for dislocations and the other for disclinations. The topological quantization and evolution of topological defects in two-dimensional crystals are discussed. Finally, We compare our theory with Brownian-dynamics simulations in 2D Yukawa systems.

  6. Two Dimensional Nucleation Process by Monte Carlo Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    T., Irisawa; K., Matsumoto; Y., Arima; T., Kan; Computer Center, Gakushuin University; Department of Physics, Gakushuin University

    1997-01-01

    Two dimensional nucleation process on substrate is investigated by Monte Carlo simulation, and the critical nucleus size and its waiting time are measured with a high accuracy. In order to measure the critical nucleus with a high accuracy, we calculate the attachment and the detachment rate to the nucleus directly, and define the critical nucleus size when both rate are equal. Using the kinematical nucleation theory by Nishioka, it is found that, our obtained kinematical two dimensional criti...

  7. Time Resolved Phonon Spectroscopy, Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-22

    TRPS code was developed for the project "Time Resolved Phonon Spectroscopy". Routines contained in this piece of software were specially created to model phonon generation and tracking within materials that interact with ionizing radiation, particularly applicable to the modeling of cryogenic radiation detectors for dark matter and neutrino research. These routines were created to link seamlessly with the open source Geant4 framework for the modeling of radiation transport in matter, with the explicit intent of open sourcing them for eventual integration into that code base.

  8. Time resolved structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Franco V A; Hall, Christopher R; Anderson, Harry L; Meech, Stephen R; Heisler, Ismael A

    2016-03-01

    In this work, the timescales and mechanisms associated with the structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers are investigated through time resolved narrowband pump/broadband probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results confirm previous findings that the broadening is partly due to a distribution of structures with different (dihedral) angular conformations. Comparison of measurements with excitations on the red and blue sides of the Q-band unravel the ground and excited state conformational re-equilibration timescales. Further comparison to a planarized dimer, through the addition of a ligand, provides conclusive evidence for the twisting motion performed by the porphyrin dimer in solution.

  9. Time resolved structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco V. A. Camargo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the timescales and mechanisms associated with the structural dynamics of butadiyne-linked porphyrin dimers are investigated through time resolved narrowband pump/broadband probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Our results confirm previous findings that the broadening is partly due to a distribution of structures with different (dihedral angular conformations. Comparison of measurements with excitations on the red and blue sides of the Q-band unravel the ground and excited state conformational re-equilibration timescales. Further comparison to a planarized dimer, through the addition of a ligand, provides conclusive evidence for the twisting motion performed by the porphyrin dimer in solution.

  10. TIME-RESOLVED PHOTOLUMINESCENCE OF SINTERED ZnO CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN XIAO-MING(文小明); N.OHNO; ZHANG ZHONG-MING(张中明)

    2001-01-01

    The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) of sintered ZnO ceramics was measured at low temperatures. A broad luminescence band was observed in the visible region. The TRPL experiment shows that photolurninescence decay behaviour can be depicted as t-π(r). The decay rate n(r) and lifetime are wavelength dependent, and the former varies exponentially with wavelength. The power-lowering behaviour of the luminescence intensity indicates that the luminescence band originates from the recombination of donor-acceptor pairs.

  11. Time resolved cryogenic cooling analysis of the Cornell Injector Cryomodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, R.; Markham, S.; Smith, E.; Quigley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Managing parallel cryogenic flows has become a key challenge in designing efficient and smart cryo-modules for particle accelerators. In analysing the heating dynamics of the Cornell high current injector module a computational tool has been set-up allowing time resolved analysis and optimization. We describe the computational methods and data sets we have used, report the results and compare them to measured data from the module being in good agreement. Mitigation strategies developed on basis of this model have helped us in pushing the operational limitations.

  12. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  13. Time- and Site-Resolved Dynamics in a Topological Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ningyuan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From studies of exotic quantum many-body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed-matter frontier and the landscape of modern materials science. Accordingly, there is a broad effort to realize topologically nontrivial electronic and photonic materials for fundamental science as well as practical applications. In this work, we demonstrate the first simultaneous site- and time-resolved measurements of a time-reversal-invariant topological band structure, which we realize in a radio-frequency photonic circuit. We control band-structure topology via local permutation of a traveling-wave capacitor-inductor network, increasing robustness by going beyond the tight-binding limit. We observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of ϕ=π/2. In situ probes of the band gaps reveal spatially localized bulk states and delocalized edge states. Time-resolved measurements reveal dynamical separation of localized edge excitations into spin-polarized currents. The radio-frequency circuit paradigm is naturally compatible with nonlocal coupling schemes, allowing us to implement a Möbius strip topology inaccessible in conventional systems. This room-temperature experiment illuminates the origins of topology in band structure, and when combined with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, it provides a direct path to topologically ordered quantum matter.

  14. Time- and Site-Resolved Dynamics in a Topological Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningyuan, Jia; Owens, Clai; Sommer, Ariel; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    From studies of exotic quantum many-body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed-matter frontier and the landscape of modern materials science. Accordingly, there is a broad effort to realize topologically nontrivial electronic and photonic materials for fundamental science as well as practical applications. In this work, we demonstrate the first simultaneous site- and time-resolved measurements of a time-reversal-invariant topological band structure, which we realize in a radio-frequency photonic circuit. We control band-structure topology via local permutation of a traveling-wave capacitor-inductor network, increasing robustness by going beyond the tight-binding limit. We observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of ϕ =π /2 . In situ probes of the band gaps reveal spatially localized bulk states and delocalized edge states. Time-resolved measurements reveal dynamical separation of localized edge excitations into spin-polarized currents. The radio-frequency circuit paradigm is naturally compatible with nonlocal coupling schemes, allowing us to implement a Möbius strip topology inaccessible in conventional systems. This room-temperature experiment illuminates the origins of topology in band structure, and when combined with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, it provides a direct path to topologically ordered quantum matter.

  15. Time Resolved FTIR Analysis of Tailpipe Exhaust for Several Automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Allen R.; Allen, James; Devasher, Rebecca B.

    2011-06-01

    The automotive catalytic converter reduces or eliminates the emission of various chemical species (e.g. CO, hydrocarbons, etc.) that are the products of combustion from automobile exhaust. However, these units are only effective once they have reached operating temperature. The design and placement of catalytic converters has changed in order to reduce both the quantity of emissions and the time that is required for the converter to be effective. In order to compare the effectiveness of catalytic converters, time-resolved measurements were performed on several vehicles, including a 2010 Toyota Prius, a 2010 Honda Fit, a 1994 Honda Civic, and a 1967 Oldsmobile 442 (which is not equipped with a catalytic converter but is used as a baseline). The newer vehicles demonstrate bot a reduced overall level of CO and hydrocarbon emissions but are also effective more quickly than older units. The time-resolved emissions will be discussed along with the impact of catalytic converter design and location on the measured emissions.

  16. A purge and trap technique to capture volatile compounds combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry to investigate the effect of sulfur-fumigation on Radix Angelicae Dahuricae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gang; Li, Qinglin; Zhang, Jida; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang

    2014-09-01

    Sulfur-fumigation is known to reduce volatile compounds that are the main active components in herbs used in herbal medicine. We investigated changes in chemical composition between sun-dried and sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Dahuricae using a purge and trap technique to capture volatile compounds, and two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry for identification. Using sun-dried Radix Angelicae Dahuricae samples as a reference, the results showed that 73 volatile compounds, including 12 sulfide compounds, were found to be present only in sulfur-fumigated samples. Furthermore, 32 volatile compounds that were found in sun-dried Radix Angelicae Dahuricae samples disappeared after sulfur-fumigation. The proposed method can be applied to accurately discriminate sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Dahuricae from different commercial sources.

  17. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy of a molecular shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bodis, Pavol; Shaw, Danny J; Bakker, Bert H; Newton, Arthur C; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Woutersen, Sander

    2012-02-14

    Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to investigate the inter-component motion of an ultraviolet-triggered two-station molecular shuttle. The operation cycle of this molecular shuttle involves several intermediate species, which are observable in the amide I and amide II regions of the mid-IR spectrum. Using ab initio calculations on specific parts of the rotaxane, and by comparing the transient spectra of the normal rotaxane with that of the N-deuterated version, we can assign the observed vibrational modes of each species occurring during the shuttling cycle in an unambiguous way. The complete time- and frequency-dependent data set is analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). Using a kinetic model to describe the time-dependent concentrations of the transient species, we derive the absorption spectra associated with each stage in the operation cycle of the molecular shuttle, including the recombination of the charged species.

  18. metAlignID: a high-throughput software tool set for automated detection of trace level contaminants in comprehensive LECO two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommen, Arjen; van der Kamp, Henk J; Kools, Harrie J; van der Lee, Martijn K; van der Weg, Guido; Mol, Hans G J

    2012-11-09

    A new alternative data processing tool set, metAlignID, is developed for automated pre-processing and library-based identification and concentration estimation of target compounds after analysis by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The tool set has been developed for and tested on LECO data. The software is developed to run multi-threaded (one thread per processor core) on a standard PC (personal computer) under different operating systems and is as such capable of processing multiple data sets simultaneously. Raw data files are converted into netCDF (network Common Data Form) format using a fast conversion tool. They are then preprocessed using previously developed algorithms originating from metAlign software. Next, the resulting reduced data files are searched against a user-composed library (derived from user or commercial NIST-compatible libraries) (NIST=National Institute of Standards and Technology) and the identified compounds, including an indicative concentration, are reported in Excel format. Data can be processed batch wise. The overall time needed for conversion together with processing and searching of 30 raw data sets for 560 compounds is routinely within an hour. The screening performance is evaluated for detection of pesticides and contaminants in raw data obtained after analysis of soil and plant samples. Results are compared to the existing data-handling routine based on proprietary software (LECO, ChromaTOF). The developed software tool set, which is freely downloadable at www.metalign.nl, greatly accelerates data-analysis and offers more options for fine-tuning automated identification toward specific application needs. The quality of the results obtained is slightly better than the standard processing and also adds a quantitative estimate. The software tool set in combination with two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry shows great potential as a highly

  19. Analytical model of coincidence resolving time in TOF-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, H; Thon, A; Dey, T; Khanin, V; Rodnyi, P

    2016-06-21

    The coincidence resolving time (CRT) of scintillation detectors is the parameter determining noise reduction in time-of-flight PET. We derive an analytical CRT model based on the statistical distribution of photons for two different prototype scintillators. For the first one, characterized by single exponential decay, CRT is proportional to the decay time and inversely proportional to the number of photons, with a square root dependence on the trigger level. For the second scintillator prototype, characterized by exponential rise and decay, CRT is proportional to the square root of the product of rise time and decay time divided by the doubled number of photons, and it is nearly independent of the trigger level. This theory is verified by measurements of scintillation time constants, light yield and CRT on scintillator sticks. Trapping effects are taken into account by defining an effective decay time. We show that in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, CRT is as important as patient dose, imaging time or PET system sensitivity. The noise reduction effect of better timing resolution is verified and visualized by Monte Carlo simulation of a NEMA image quality phantom.

  20. Time resolved fluorescence of cow and goat milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandao, Mariana P.; de Carvalho dos Anjos, Virgílio; Bell., Maria José V.

    2017-01-01

    Milk powder is an international dairy commodity. Goat and cow milk powders are significant sources of nutrients and the investigation of the authenticity and classification of milk powder is particularly important. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to distinguish chemical composition and structure modifications could assist develop a portable and non-destructive methodology to perform milk powder classification and determine composition. This study goal is to differentiate milk powder samples from cows and goats using fluorescence lifetimes. The samples were excited at 315 nm and the fluorescence intensity decay registered at 468 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes of 1.5 ± 0.3, 6.4 ± 0.4 and 18.7 ± 2.5 ns for goat milk powder; and 1.7 ± 0.3, 6.9 ± 0.2 and 29.9 ± 1.6 ns for cow's milk powder. We discriminate goat and cow powder milk by analysis of variance using Fisher's method. In addition, we employed quadratic discriminant analysis to differentiate the milk samples with accuracy of 100%. Our results suggest that time-resolved fluorescence can provide a new method to the analysis of powder milk and its composition.

  1. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Fréderick

    2015-05-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. This allows to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge about spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using Telops MS-IR MW camera which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profile derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  2. Time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huot, Alexandrine; Gagnon, Marc-André; Jahjah, Karl-Alexandre; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Lagueux, Philippe; Guyot, Éric; Chamberland, Martin; Marcotte, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Thermal infrared imaging is a field of science that evolves rapidly. Scientists have used for years the simplest tool: thermal broadband cameras. These allow to perform target characterization in both the longwave (LWIR) and midwave (MWIR) infrared spectral range. Infrared thermal imaging is used for a wide range of applications, especially in the combustion domain. For example, it can be used to follow combustion reactions, in order to characterize the injection and the ignition in a combustion chamber or even to observe gases produced by a flare or smokestack. Most combustion gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), selectively absorb/emit infrared radiation at discrete energies, i.e. over a very narrow spectral range. Therefore, temperatures derived from broadband imaging are not reliable without prior knowledge of spectral emissivity. This information is not directly available from broadband images. However, spectral information is available using spectral filters. In this work, combustion analysis was carried out using a Telops MS-IR MW camera, which allows multispectral imaging at a high frame rate. A motorized filter wheel allowing synchronized acquisitions on eight (8) different channels was used to provide time-resolved multispectral imaging of combustion products of a candle in which black powder has been burnt to create a burst. It was then possible to estimate the temperature by modeling spectral profiles derived from information obtained with the different spectral filters. Comparison with temperatures obtained using conventional broadband imaging illustrates the benefits of time-resolved multispectral imaging for the characterization of combustion processes.

  3. Time resolved spectroscopy of GRB030501 using INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, V; Courvoisier, Thierry J L; Goetz, D; Hudec, R; Hroch, F; Lund, N; Mereghetti, S; Shaw, S E; Wigger, C

    2003-01-01

    The Gamma-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL offer an unique opportunity to perform time resolved analysis on GRBs. The imager IBIS allows accurate positiioning of GRBs and broad band spectral analysis, while SPI provides high resolution spectroscopy. GRB 030501 was discovered by the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System in the ISGRI field of view. Although the burst was fairly weak (fluence F = 3.5 * 10^-6 erg cm^-2 in the 20-200 keV energy band) it was possible to perform time resolved spectroscopy with a resolution of a few seconds. The GRB shows a spectrum in the 20 - 400 keV range which is consistent with a spectral photon index of -1.7. No emission line or spectral break was detectable in the spectrum. Although the flux seems to be correlated with the hardness of the GRB spectrum, there is no clear soft to hard evolution seen over the duration of the burst. The INTEGRAL data have been compared with results from the Ulysses and RHESSI experiments.

  4. Theories to support method development in comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bedani, F.; Schoenmakers, P.J.; Janssen, H.-G.

    2012-01-01

    On-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography techniques promise to resolve samples that current one-dimensional liquid chromatography methods cannot adequately deal with. To make full use of the potential of two-dimensional liquid chromatography, optimization is required. Optimization

  5. Time resolved FTIR study of the catalytic CO oxidation under periodic variation of the reactant concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritzenberger, J.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Oxidation of CO over palladium/zirconia catalyst obtained from an amorphous Pd{sub 25}Zr{sub 75} precursor was investigated by time resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Sine wave shaped modulation of the reactant concentration, i.e. variation of CO or O{sub 2} partial pressure, was used to induce variations of the IR signals of product (CO{sub 2}) and unconverted reactant (CO), which were detected in a multi-pass absorption cell. The phase shift {phi} between external perturbation and variation of the CO{sub 2} signal was examined in dependence on temperature (100{sup o}C{<=}T{<=}350{sup o}C) and modulation frequency (1.39x10{sup -4}Hz{<=}{omega}{<=}6.67x10{sup -2}Hz). From the phase shift values, a simple Eley-Rideal mechanism is excluded, and the rate limiting step of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism for the CO oxidation may be identified. Adsorption and possible surface movement of CO to the actual reaction site determine the rate of the CO oxidation on the palladium/zirconia catalyst used in our study. The introduction of an external perturbation is a first step towards the application of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to heterogeneous catalyzed reactions. (author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  6. Time Resolved Nucleation and Growth of Monodisperse FeOOH Nanoparticles Observed in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, B. A.; Zhu, M.; Zhang, H.; Waychunas, G.; Banfield, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The nucleation and growth of oxide minerals from aqueous solution is a poorly understood process. Complexities such as two-stage precipitation, phase transformation, and hydrolysis often inhibit simple interpretation. In this study, we track the thermally induced nucleation and growth of akaganeite (β-FeOOH) nanoparticles from FeCl3 solutions, using in situ time resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Variations in reaction temperature (from 37 deg C to 80 deg C) and FeCl3 concentration (from 5 mM to 800 mM) produce systematic changes in nucleation rate, growth rate, particle size distribution, and aspect ratio. Low FeCl3 concentrations and high temperatures lead to formation of very small particles via rapid nucleation. (FeCl3 solutions are actually more supersaturated with respect to akaganeite when concentrations are low, due to the acid-base chemistry of ferric iron.) Increasing the FeCl3 concentration leads to large, highly monodisperse particles via size focused growth. Suspensions of highly monodisperse, elongated particles are found to self-organize into two dimensional colloidal crystals. The well-controlled growth processes in this system make it possible to conduct detailed kinetic modeling, and determine how both nucleation and growth rate respond to changes in the experimental conditions.

  7. Topology optimization of two-dimensional waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2003-01-01

    In this work we use the method of topology optimization to design two-dimensional waveguides with low transmission loss.......In this work we use the method of topology optimization to design two-dimensional waveguides with low transmission loss....

  8. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Tremsin, A S; Tittelmeier, K; Schillinger, B; Schulz, M; Lerche, M; Feller, W B

    2015-01-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and...

  9. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J. [Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2015-09-28

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  10. Spectral characteristics of time resolved magnonic spin Seebeck effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etesami, S. R.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-09-01

    Spin Seebeck effect (SSE) holds promise for new spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. The underlying physics, essential for a further progress, is yet to be fully clarified. This study of the time resolved longitudinal SSE in the magnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet concludes that a substantial contribution to the spin current stems from small wave-vector subthermal exchange magnons. Our finding is in line with the recent experiment by S. R. Boona and J. P. Heremans [Phys. Rev. B 90, 064421 (2014)]. Technically, the spin-current dynamics is treated based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation also including magnons back-action on thermal bath, while the formation of the time dependent thermal gradient is described self-consistently via the heat equation coupled to the magnetization dynamics.

  11. Examining Electron-Boson Coupling Using Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentef, Michael; Kemper, Alexander F.; Moritz, Brian; Freericks, James K.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.

    2013-12-26

    Nonequilibrium pump-probe time-domain spectroscopies can become an important tool to disentangle degrees of freedom whose coupling leads to broad structures in the frequency domain. Here, using the time-resolved solution of a model photoexcited electron-phonon system, we show that the relaxational dynamics are directly governed by the equilibrium self-energy so that the phonon frequency sets a window for “slow” versus “fast” recovery. The overall temporal structure of this relaxation spectroscopy allows for a reliable and quantitative extraction of the electron-phonon coupling strength without requiring an effective temperature model or making strong assumptions about the underlying bare electronic band dispersion.

  12. Revealing Deactivation Pathways Hidden in Time-Resolved Photoelectron Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckenbauer, Matthias; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is commonly employed with the intention to monitor electronic excited-state dynamics occurring in a neutral molecule. With the help of theory, we show that when excited-state processes occur on similar time scales the different relaxation pathways are completely obscured in the total photoionization signal recorded in the experiment. Using non-adiabatic molecular dynamics and Dyson norms, we calculate the photoionization signal of cytosine and disentangle the transient contributions originating from the different deactivation pathways of its tautomers. In the simulations, the total signal from the relevant keto and enol tautomers can be decomposed into contributions either from the neutral electronic state populations or from the distinct mechanistic pathways across the multiple potential surfaces. The lifetimes corresponding to these contributions cannot be extracted from the experiment, thereby illustrating that new experimental setups are necessary to unravel the intricate non-adiabatic pathways occurring in polyatomic molecules after irradiation by light.

  13. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of semiconductor nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porte, Henrik

    of the photoconductivity is observed, due the release of carriers from the quantum dots into the conducting barrier states. Secondly, the carrier dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum wells subject to a built-in piezoelectric eld is described. An initial fast decay of the photoconductivity as the piezoelectric eld is screened......This thesis describes time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy measurements on various semiconductor nanostructures. The aim is to study the carrier dynamics in these nanostructures on a picosecond timescale. In a typical experiment carriers are excited with a visible or near-infrared pulse...... and by measuring the transmission of a terahertz probe pulse, the photoconductivity of the excited sample can be obtained. By changing the relative arrival time at the sample between the pump and the probe pulse, the photoconductivity dynamics can be studied on a picosecond timescale. The rst studied semiconductor...

  14. a Time-Resolved Photographic Study of Lightning in the Thunderstorm Research International Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idone, Vincent Peter

    Time-resolved recordings of 118 strokes in both natural and artificially triggered lightning flashes obtained during participation in the Thunderstorm Research International Program (TRIP) have allowed the measurement of leader and return stroke propagation speeds, providing the largest single body of such data to date. The mean two-dimensional return stroke propagation speed found for 63 natural lightning strokes is 11 x 10('7) m/s. The distribution of measured propagation speeds peaks strongly at (TURN)9 x 10('7) m/s and extends from 2.9 to 24 x 10('7) m/s. Propagation speed reductions in upper channel segments are observed in both first and subsequent strokes. Those results are compared with the earlier work of Schonland and McEachron; substantial disparities are found and examined. The return stroke propagation speeds of the triggered lightning strokes are evaluated in three dimensions via stereo photography of the lightning. A mean of 11 x 10('7) m/s is found for 55 strokes, with a range of 6.4 to 16 x 10('7) m/s. Return stroke propagation speed reductions during propagation along the channel are also observed for these triggered lightning strokes. Propagation speeds are determined for 21 natural and 32 triggered lightning dart leaders, with means of 11 x 10('6) m/s and 18 x 10('6) m/s, respectively. Dart leader propagation speed increases near ground are reported for the first time. Variations in the propagation speed and luminous characteristics of four natural lightning dart-stepped leaders, two triggered lightning dart-stepped leaders, and three natural lightning stepped leaders are examined. The analysis reveals a positive correlation between the dart length and the dart leader propagation speed, this being observed in both natural and triggered lightning. Also, a correlation is found between the dart leader and return stroke propagation speed for the triggered lightning data; no such correlation is found for natural lightning. For one stroke of the

  15. Dirac cones, Floquet side bands, and theory of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Aaron; Arsenault, A.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pump-probe techniques with high temporal resolution allow one to drive a system of interest out of equilibrium and at the same time probe its properties. Recent advances in these techniques open the door to studying new, nonequilibrium phenomena such as Floquet topological insulators and superconductors. These advances also necessitate the development of theoretical tools for understanding the experimental findings and predicting new ones. In the present paper, we provide a theoretical foundation to understand the nonequilibrium behavior of a Dirac system. We present detailed numerical calculations and simple analytic results for the time evolution of a Dirac system irradiated by light. These results are framed by appealing to the recently revitalized notion of side bands [A. Farrell and T. Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 106403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.106403; Phys. Rev. B 93, 045121 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045121], extended to the case of nonperiodic drive where the fast oscillations are modified by an envelope function. We apply this formalism to the case of photocurrent generated by a second probe pulse. We find that, under the application of circularly polarized light, a Dirac point only ever splits into two copies of side bands. Meanwhile, the application of linearly polarized light leaves the Dirac point intact while producing side bands. In both cases the population of the side bands are time dependent through their nonlinear dependence on the envelope of the pump pulse. Our immediate interest in this work is in connection to time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments, where we find excellent qualitative agreement between our results and those in the literature [Wang et al., Science 342, 453 (2013), 10.1126/science.1239834]. However, our results are general and may prove useful beyond this particular application and should be relevant to other pump-probe experiments.

  16. Two-Dimensional Materials for Sensing: Graphene and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seba Sara Varghese

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional materials have attracted great scientific attention due to their unusual and fascinating properties for use in electronics, spintronics, photovoltaics, medicine, composites, etc. Graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2, phosphorene, etc., which belong to the family of two-dimensional materials, have shown great promise for gas sensing applications due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, low noise and sensitivity of electronic properties to the changes in the surroundings. Two-dimensional nanostructured semiconducting metal oxide based gas sensors have also been recognized as successful gas detection devices. This review aims to provide the latest advancements in the field of gas sensors based on various two-dimensional materials with the main focus on sensor performance metrics such as sensitivity, specificity, detection limit, response time, and reversibility. Both experimental and theoretical studies on the gas sensing properties of graphene and other two-dimensional materials beyond graphene are also discussed. The article concludes with the current challenges and future prospects for two-dimensional materials in gas sensor applications.

  17. Growth and electronic properties of two-dimensional systems on (110) oriented GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, F.

    2005-07-01

    As the only non-polar plane the (110) surface has a unique role in GaAs. Together with Silicon as a dopant it is an important substrate orientation for the growth of n-type or p-type heterostructures. As a consequence, this thesis will concentrate on growth and research on that surface. In the course of this work we were able to realize two-dimensional electron systems with the highest mobilities reported so far on this orientation. Therefore, we review the necessary growth conditions and the accompanying molecular process. The two-dimensional electron systems allowed the study of a new, intriguing transport anisotropy not explained by current theory. Moreover, we were the first growing a two-dimensional hole gas on (110) GaAs with Si as dopant. For this purpose we invented a new growth modulation technique necessary to retrieve high mobility systems. In addition, we discovered and studied the metal-insulator transition in thin bulk p-type layers on (110) GaAs. Besides we investigated the activation process related to the conduction in the valence band and a parallelly conducting hopping band. The new two-dimensional hole gases revealed interesting physics. We studied the zero B-field spin splitting in these systems and compared it with the known theory. Furthermore, we investigated the anisotropy of the mobility. As opposed to the expectations we observed a strong persistent photoconductivity in our samples. Landau levels for two dimensional hole systems are non-linear and can show anticrossings. For the first time we were able to resolve anticrossings in a transport experiment and study the corresponding activation process. Finally, we compared these striking results with theoretical calculations. (orig.)

  18. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  19. Pose estimation using time-resolved inversion of diffuse light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Dan; Barsi, Christopher; Naik, Nikhil; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2014-08-25

    We present a novel approach for evaluation of position and orientation of geometric shapes from scattered time-resolved data. Traditionally, imaging systems treat scattering as unwanted and are designed to mitigate the effects. Instead, we show here that scattering can be exploited by implementing a system based on a femtosecond laser and a streak camera. The result is accurate estimation of object pose, which is a fundamental tool in analysis of complex scenarios and plays an important role in our understanding of physical phenomena. Here, we experimentally show that for a given geometry, a single incident illumination point yields enough information for pose estimation and tracking after multiple scattering events. Our technique can be used for single-shot imaging behind walls or through turbid media.

  20. Multidimensional Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Vibrational Coherence in Biopolyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-04-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm-1 to over 2,000 cm-1 and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  1. Time-Resolved Infrared (TRIR) Studies of Oxycarbonylnitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Tyler A; Liu, Yonglin; Toscano, John P

    2016-08-05

    N-Ethyloxycarbonyl-S,S-dibenzothiphene sulfilimine and N-t-butyloxycarbonyl-S,S-dibenzothiphene sulfilimine have been utilized as precursors to ethoxycarbonylnitrene and t-butyloxycarbonylnitrene. B3LYP/6-31G(d) calculations predict triplet ground states for both oxycarbonylnitrenes, albeit by small margins. Triplet ethoxycarbonylnitrene and triplet t-butyloxycarbonylnitrene have been observed following photolysis of these sulfilimine precursors by time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy. Kinetic studies show that ethoxycarbonylnitrene reacts with solvents such as acetonitrile and cyclohexane, while t-butyloxycarbonylnitrene undergoes an intramolecular insertion reaction to produce 5,5-dimethyl oxazolidinone. Product analysis following photolysis of N-t-butyloxycarbonyl-S,S-dibenzothiphene sulfilimine confirms that the oxazolidinone is the major product with an estimated yield of 90%. The products from these two nitrenes are derived from the corresponding singlet nitrene, either directly or via thermal repopulation of the singlet from the lower-energy triplet nitrene.

  2. Towards time-resolved serial crystallography in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawate, Ashtamurthy S; Šrajer, Vukica; Schieferstein, Jeremy; Guha, Sudipto; Henning, Robert; Kosheleva, Irina; Schmidt, Marius; Ren, Zhong; Kenis, Paul J A; Perry, Sarah L

    2015-07-01

    Serial methods for crystallography have the potential to enable dynamic structural studies of protein targets that have been resistant to single-crystal strategies. The use of serial data-collection strategies can circumvent challenges associated with radiation damage and repeated reaction initiation. This work utilizes a microfluidic crystallization platform for the serial time-resolved Laue diffraction analysis of macroscopic crystals of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). Reaction initiation was achieved via pulsed laser illumination, and the resultant electron-density difference maps clearly depict the expected pR(1)/pR(E46Q) and pR(2)/pR(CW) states at 10 µs and the pB1 intermediate at 1 ms. The strategies presented here have tremendous potential for extension to chemical triggering methods for reaction initiation and for extension to dynamic, multivariable analyses.

  3. Photon-Counting Arrays for Time-Resolved Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Michel Antolovic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a camera comprising 512 × 128 pixels capable of single-photon detection and gating with a maximum frame rate of 156 kfps. The photon capture is performed through a gated single-photon avalanche diode that generates a digital pulse upon photon detection and through a digital one-bit counter. Gray levels are obtained through multiple counting and accumulation, while time-resolved imaging is achieved through a 4-ns gating window controlled with subnanosecond accuracy by a field-programmable gate array. The sensor, which is equipped with microlenses to enhance its effective fill factor, was electro-optically characterized in terms of sensitivity and uniformity. Several examples of capture of fast events are shown to demonstrate the suitability of the approach.

  4. Multidimensional time-resolved spectroscopy of vibrational coherence in biopolyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckup, Tiago; Motzkus, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Multidimensional femtosecond time-resolved vibrational coherence spectroscopy allows one to investigate the evolution of vibrational coherence in electronic excited states. Methods such as pump-degenerate four-wave mixing and pump-impulsive vibrational spectroscopy combine an initial ultrashort laser pulse with a nonlinear probing sequence to reinduce vibrational coherence exclusively in the excited states. By carefully exploiting specific electronic resonances, one can detect vibrational coherence from 0 cm(-1) to over 2,000 cm(-1) and map its evolution. This review focuses on the observation and mapping of high-frequency vibrational coherence for all-trans biological polyenes such as β-carotene, lycopene, retinal, and retinal Schiff base. We discuss the role of molecular symmetry in vibrational coherence activity in the S1 electronic state and the interplay of coupling between electronic states and vibrational coherence.

  5. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  6. Time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-O. Häggblom

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI is a cationic antimicrobial protein produced by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, that specifically interacts with and kills Gram-negative bacteria. BPl competes with lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP secreted by liver cells into blood plasma for binding to lipopolysaccharide (LPS and thus reduces the proinflammatory effects of LPS. We have developed a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for BPI and measured the concentration of BPI in human serum and plasma samples. The assay is based on a rabbit antibody against recombinant BPI. This antibody specifically adheres to polymorphonuclear leukocytes in immunostained human tissues. The difference in the serum concentration of BPI between unselected hospitalized patients with and without an infection was statistically significant. The mean concentration of BPI in serum samples was 28.3 μg/l (range 1.64–132, S.D. 26.8, n = 83. In contrast, there was no difference between the two groups in the BPI levels in plasma samples. For all individuals tested, BPI levels were consistently higher in plasma samples compared to the matched serum samples. The mean concentration of BPI in plasma samples was 52.3 μg/l (range 0.9–403, S.D. 60.6, n = 90. There was a positive correlation between the concentration of BPI and the white blood cell count as well as between the BPI concentration and C-reactive protein (CRP in serum samples. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that BPI can be quantified reliably by time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay in human serum samples.

  7. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Brumfield, Brian E.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hartig, Kyle C.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2017-06-19

    We demonstrate measurement of uranium isotopes in femtosecond laser ablation plumes using two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2DFS). The high-resolution, tunable CW-laser spectroscopy technique clearly distinguishes atomic absorption from 235U and 238U in natural and highly enriched uranium metal samples. We present analysis of spectral resolution and analytical performance of 2DFS as a function of ambient pressure. Simultaneous measurement using time-resolved absorption spectroscopy provides information on temporal dynamics of the laser ablation plume and saturation behavior of fluorescence signals. The rapid, non-contact measurement is promising for in-field, standoff measurements of uranium enrichment for nuclear safety and security applications.

  8. Extracting Time-Resolved Information from Time-Integrated Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Grifoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS data are characterized by a strong dependence on the acquisition time after the onset of the laser plasma. However, time-resolved broadband spectrometers are expensive and often not suitable for being used in portable LIBS instruments. In this paper we will show how the analysis of a series of LIBS spectra, taken at different delays after the laser pulse, allows the recovery of time-resolved spectral information. The comparison of such spectra is presented for the analysis of an aluminium alloy. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and number density are evaluated, starting from the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra, respectively. The results are compared and discussed.

  9. Time Resolved X-Ray Scattering of molecules in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt van Driel, Tim

    The dissertation describes the use of Time-Resolved X-ray Diffuse Scattering (TR-XDS) to study photo-induced structural changes in molecules in solution. The application of the technique is exemplified with experiments on two bimetallic molecules. The main focus is on the data-flow and process...... of bringing the data from measurement to analysis. Bridging the experimental design and challenges of the experiments from X-ray synchrotrons to the newly available X-ray Free Electron Laser sources (XFEL).LCLS in California is the first XFEL to come online and delivers intense 30fs X-ray pulses, orders...... of magnitude shorter than the 100ps X-ray pulses available from synchroton sources. This increase in time-resolution allows for the use of X-ray techniques in a completely new time-domain, where coherent photo-induced changes in structure can be studied on their intrinsic time-scale. Measurements on Rh2(dimen...

  10. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopic techniques as applied to Channelrhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglof eRitter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among optogenetic tools, channelrhodopsins, the light gated ion channels of the plasma membrane from green algae, play the most important role. Properties like channel selectivity, timing parameters or color can be influenced by the exchange of selected amino acids. Although widely used, in the field of neurosciences for example, there is still little known about their photocycles and the mechanism of ion channel gating and conductance. One of the preferred methods for these studies is infrared spectroscopy since it allows observation of proteins and their function at a molecular level and in near-native environment. The absorption of a photon in channelrhodopsin leads to retinal isomerization within femtoseconds, the conductive states are reached in the microsecond time scale and the return into the fully dark-adapted state may take more than minutes. To be able to cover all these time regimes, a range of different spectroscopical approaches are necessary. This mini-review focuses on time-resolved applications of the infrared technique to study channelrhodopsins and other light triggered proteins. We will discuss the approaches with respect to their suitability to the investigation of channelrhodopsin and related proteins.

  11. Analysis of organic compounds of water-in-crude oil emulsions separated by microwave heating using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Lisiane S; Von Mühlen, Carin; Bortoluzzi, Janaína H; Zini, Claudia A; Fortuny, Montserrat; Dariva, Claudio; Coutinho, Raquel C C; Santos, Alexandre F; Caramão, Elina B

    2009-04-03

    In this work the higher peak capacity and resolution of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) has been successfully applied, for the first time, to tentatively identify several polar organic compounds of organic extracts of aqueous phases resulting from microwave demulsification process of water-in-crude oil emulsions. Results have shown that higher temperatures and longer exposure time to microwave irradiation produced water phases with a wider variety of polar organic compounds. The microwave process showed to be suitable for the extraction of several polar compounds classes of petroleum. The proposed microwave extraction method and GCxGC identification of polar compounds of petroleum samples are of practical interest for the petrochemical industry due to corrosion and related problems associated with these polar compounds in refinery equipments. The GCxGC/time-of-flight MS technique shows to be very important in the total separation of different classes of compounds and allows the identification of many compounds in these classes.

  12. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James Francis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO)3 and CpFe(CO)2 have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO)5[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO)5 have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  13. Time-resolved spectral analysis of Radachlorin luminescence in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belik, V. P.; Gadzhiev, I. M.; Semenova, I. V.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2017-05-01

    We report results of spectral- and time-resolved study of Radachlorin photosensitizer luminescence in water in the spectral range of 950-1350nm and for determination of the photosensitizer triplet state and the singlet oxygen lifetimes responsible for singlet oxygen generation and degradation. At any wavelength within the explored spectral range the luminescence decay contained two major contributions: a fast decay at the ns time scale and a slow evolution at the μs time scale. The fast decay was attributed to electric dipole fluorescence transitions in photosensitizer molecules and the slow evolution to intercombination phosphorescence transitions in singlet oxygen and photosensitizer molecules. Relatively high-amplitude ns peak observed at all wavelengths suggests that singlet oxygen monitoring with spectral isolation methods alone, without additional temporal resolution can be controversial. In the applied experimental conditions the total phosphorescence signal at any wavelength contained a contribution from the photosensitizer triplet state decay, while at 1274nm the singlet oxygen phosphorescence dominated. The results obtained can be used for optimization of the methods of singlet oxygen monitoring and imaging.

  14. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  15. A Clinical Tissue Oximeter Using NIR Time-Resolved Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaka, Shin-ichi; Ozaki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kamada, Tsuyoshi; Kitazawa, Ken; Nishizawa, Mitsunori; Takahashi, Akira; Suzuki, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The tNIRS-1, a new clinical tissue oximeter using NIR time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS), has been developed. The tNIRS-1 measures oxygenated, deoxygenated and total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation in living tissues. Two-channel TRS measurements are obtained using pulsed laser diodes (LD) at three wavelengths, multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) for light detection, and time-to-digital converters (TDC) for time-of-flight photon measurements. Incorporating advanced semiconductor devices helped to make the design of this small-size, low-cost and low-power TRS instrument possible. In order to evaluate the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1, a study using blood phantoms and healthy volunteers was conducted to compare data obtained from a conventional SRS device and data from an earlier TRS system designed for research purposes. The results of the study confirmed the correctness and reproducibility of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1. Clinical evaluations conducted in several hospitals demonstrated a high level of usability in clinical situations and confirmed the efficacy of measurement data obtained with the tNIRS-1.

  16. Time resolved ESR spectroscopy. ESR pulse radiolysis equipment with microsecond time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckert, D.; Mehler, K. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Leipzig. Zentralinstitut fuer Isotopen- und Strahlenforschung)

    1983-01-01

    Time resolved ESR experiments allow the study of the chemical kinetics as well as spin dynamics of free radicals in the liquid phase. Starting from the physical and chemical requirements the experimental parameters of a universal time resolved ESR spectrometer are derived. The main components of the ESR pulse radiolysis equipment are described and their technical parameters are discussed. By two experimental examples it is shown that at a time resolution of 0.3 ..mu..s a sensitivity of c/sub min/ = 10/sup -6/ mol dm/sup -3/ for simple radical spectra can be achieved.

  17. Two Dimensional Plasmonic Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) cavitiy modes on two dimensional Moire surfaces in the visible spectrum. Two dimensional hexagonal Moire surface can be recorded on a photoresist layer using Interference lithography (IL). Two sequential exposures at slightly different angles in IL generate one dimensional Moire surfaces. Further sequential exposure for the same sample at slightly different angles after turning the sample 60 degrees around its own axis generates two dimensional hexagonal Moire cavity. Spectroscopic reflection measurements have shown plasmonic band gaps and cavity states at all the azimuthal angles (omnidirectional cavity and band gap formation) investigated. The plasmonic band gap edge and the cavity states energies show six fold symmetry on the two dimensional Moire surface as measured in reflection measurements.

  18. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  19. Two-Dimensional Planetary Surface Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, H.; Sengupta, A.; Castillo, J.; McElrath, T.; Roberts, T.; Willis, P.

    2014-06-01

    A systems engineering study was conducted to leverage a new two-dimensional (2D) lander concept with a low per unit cost to enable scientific study at multiple locations with a single entry system as the delivery vehicle.

  20. Two-dimensional topological photonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Chen; He, Cheng; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Shi-Ning; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2017-09-01

    The topological phase of matter, originally proposed and first demonstrated in fermionic electronic systems, has drawn considerable research attention in the past decades due to its robust transport of edge states and its potential with respect to future quantum information, communication, and computation. Recently, searching for such a unique material phase in bosonic systems has become a hot research topic worldwide. So far, many bosonic topological models and methods for realizing them have been discovered in photonic systems, acoustic systems, mechanical systems, etc. These discoveries have certainly yielded vast opportunities in designing material phases and related properties in the topological domain. In this review, we first focus on some of the representative photonic topological models and employ the underlying Dirac model to analyze the edge states and geometric phase. On the basis of these models, three common types of two-dimensional topological photonic systems are discussed: 1) photonic quantum Hall effect with broken time-reversal symmetry; 2) photonic topological insulator and the associated pseudo-time-reversal symmetry-protected mechanism; 3) time/space periodically modulated photonic Floquet topological insulator. Finally, we provide a summary and extension of this emerging field, including a brief introduction to the Weyl point in three-dimensional systems.

  1. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    stability of the applied Bayesian deconvolution method enabled the possibility of performing time-resolved spectrometric measurements. By measuring in ToA mode and in parallel performing a THL scan, it is possible to gain information on both energy and time. This method was then tested for a conventional X-ray tube for measuring the time dependence of the spectrum emitted during the switching-on process of the radiation. As expected, the results showed a relatively long time-dependent change of the spectrum. This method was then applied for proving that a newly developed X-ray source shows a spectral change of the spectrum emitted on a very low time scale only. As this time dependence is much shorter compared to the total pulse duration of the radiation, it is negligible. This result guarantees that both pulse duration and energy can be adjusted independently. This enables further investigations with this new X-ray tube in the field of pulsed radiation and its use for e.g. type tests.

  2. Resolving the time when an electron exits a tunnelling barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafir, Dror; Soifer, Hadas; Bruner, Barry D; Dagan, Michal; Mairesse, Yann; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Ivanov, Misha Yu; Smirnova, Olga; Dudovich, Nirit

    2012-05-16

    The tunnelling of a particle through a barrier is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous quantum processes. When induced by an intense laser field, electron tunnelling from atoms and molecules initiates a broad range of phenomena such as the generation of attosecond pulses, laser-induced electron diffraction and holography. These processes evolve on the attosecond timescale (1 attosecond ≡ 1 as = 10(-18) seconds) and are well suited to the investigation of a general issue much debated since the early days of quantum mechanics--the link between the tunnelling of an electron through a barrier and its dynamics outside the barrier. Previous experiments have measured tunnelling rates with attosecond time resolution and tunnelling delay times. Here we study laser-induced tunnelling by using a weak probe field to steer the tunnelled electron in the lateral direction and then monitor the effect on the attosecond light bursts emitted when the liberated electron re-encounters the parent ion. We show that this approach allows us to measure the time at which the electron exits from the tunnelling barrier. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of the measurement by detecting subtle delays in ionization times from two orbitals of a carbon dioxide molecule. Measurement of the tunnelling process is essential for all attosecond experiments where strong-field ionization initiates ultrafast dynamics. Our approach provides a general tool for time-resolving multi-electron rearrangements in atoms and molecules--one of the key challenges in ultrafast science.

  3. Fielding of a Time-Resolved Tomographic Diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Frayer, Brian Cox, Wendi Dreesen, Douglas Johnson, Mike Jones, Morris Kaufman

    2008-09-11

    A diagnostic instrument has been developed for the acquisition of high-speed time-resolved images at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The instrument was developed in order to create time histories of the electron beam. Four discrete optical subsystems view Cerenkov light generated at an x-ray target inside of a vacuum envelope. Each system employs cylindrical optics to image light in one direction and collapse light in the orthogonal direction. Each of the four systems images and collapses in unique axes, thereby capturing unique information. Light along the imaging axis is relayed via optical fiber to streak cameras. A computer is used to reconstruct the original image from the four optically collapsed images. Due to DARHT’s adverse environment, the instrument can be operated remotely to adjust optical parameters and contains a subsystem for remote calibration. The instrument was deployed and calibrated, and has been used to capture and reconstruct images. Matters of alignment, calibration, control, resolution, and adverse conditions will be discussed.

  4. Electron-transfer acceleration investigated by time resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, Michael; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-03-17

    Ultrafast electron transfer (ET) processes are important primary steps in natural and artificial photosynthesis, as well as in molecular electronic/photonic devices. In biological systems, ET often occurs surprisingly fast over long distances of several tens of angströms. Laser-pulse irradiation is conveniently used to generate strongly oxidizing (or reducing) excited states whose reactions are then studied by time-resolved spectroscopic techniques. While photoluminescence decay and UV-vis absorption supply precise kinetics data, time-resolved infrared absorption (TRIR) and Raman-based spectroscopies have the advantage of providing additional structural information and monitoring vibrational energy flows and dissipation, as well as medium relaxation, that accompany ultrafast ET. We will discuss three cases of photoinduced ET involving the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) moiety (N,N = polypyridine) that occur much faster than would be expected from ET theories. [Re(4-N-methylpyridinium-pyridine)(CO)3(N,N)](2+) represents a case of excited-state picosecond ET between two different ligands that remains ultrafast even in slow-relaxing solvents, beating the adiabatic limit. This is caused by vibrational/solvational excitation of the precursor state and participation of high-frequency quantum modes in barrier crossing. The case of Re-tryptophan assemblies demonstrates that excited-state Trp → *Re(II) ET is accelerated from nanoseconds to picoseconds when the Re(I)(CO)3(N,N) chromophore is appended to a protein, close to a tryptophan residue. TRIR in combination with DFT calculations and structural studies reveals an interaction between the N,N ligand and the tryptophan indole. It results in partial electronic delocalization in the precursor excited state and likely contributes to the ultrafast ET rate. Long-lived vibrational/solvational excitation of the protein Re(I)(CO)3(N,N)···Trp moiety, documented by dynamic IR band shifts, could be another accelerating factor. The last

  5. Extension of modified power method to two-dimensional problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Hyunsuk; Lee, Deokjung

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the generalized modified power method was extended to two-dimensional problems. A direct application of the method to two-dimensional problems was shown to be unstable when the number of requested eigenmodes is larger than a certain problem dependent number. The root cause of this instability has been identified as the degeneracy of the transfer matrix. In order to resolve this instability, the number of sub-regions for the transfer matrix was increased to be larger than the number of requested eigenmodes; and a new transfer matrix was introduced accordingly which can be calculated by the least square method. The stability of the new method has been successfully demonstrated with a neutron diffusion eigenvalue problem and the 2D C5G7 benchmark problem.

  6. Two-dimensional hazard estimation for longevity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Peter; Guillen, M.; Nielsen, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    the two-dimensional mortality surface. Furthermore we look at aggregated synthetic population metrics as 'population life expectancy' and 'population survival probability'. For Danish women these metrics indicate decreasing mortality with respect to chronological time. The metrics can not directly be used......We investigate developments in Danish mortality based on data from 1974-1998 working in a two-dimensional model with chronological time and age as the two dimensions. The analyses are done with non-parametric kernel hazard estimation techniques. The only assumption is that the mortality surface...... for analysis of economic implications arising from mortality changes....

  7. Analysis of pesticide residues in strawberries and soils by GC-MS/MS, LC-MS/MS and two-dimensional GC-time-of-flight MS comparing organic and integrated pest management farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Virgínia C; Lehotay, Steven J; Geis-Asteggiante, Lucía; Kwon, Hyeyoung; Mol, Hans G J; van der Kamp, Henk; Mateus, Nuno; Domingues, Valentina F; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    This study analysed 22 strawberry and soil samples after their collection over the course of 2 years to compare the residue profiles from organic farming with integrated pest management practices in Portugal. For sample preparation, we used the citrate-buffered version of the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method. We applied three different methods for analysis: (1) 27 pesticides were targeted using LC-MS/MS; (2) 143 were targeted using low pressure GC-tandem mass spectrometry (LP-GC-MS/MS); and (3) more than 600 pesticides were screened in a targeted and untargeted approach using comprehensive, two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOF-MS). Comparison was made of the analyses using the different methods for the shared samples. The results were similar, thereby providing satisfactory confirmation of both similarly positive and negative findings. No pesticides were found in the organic-farmed samples. In samples from integrated pest management practices, nine pesticides were determined and confirmed to be present, ranging from 2 µg kg(-1) for fluazifop-p-butyl to 50 µg kg(-1) for fenpropathrin. Concentrations of residues in strawberries were less than European maximum residue limits.

  8. Use of Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometric Detection and Random Forest Pattern Recognition Techniques for Classifying Chemical Threat Agents and Detecting Chemical Attribution Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozier, Erich D; Mooney, Douglas D; Friedenberg, David A; Klupinski, Theodore P; Triplett, Cheryl A

    2016-07-19

    In this proof of concept study, chemical threat agent (CTA) samples were classified to their sources with accuracies of 87-100% by applying a random forest statistical pattern recognition technique to analytical data acquired by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection (GC × GC-TOFMS). Three organophosphate pesticides, chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, and dicrotophos, were used as the model CTAs, with data collected for 4-6 sources per CTA and 7-10 replicate analyses per source. The analytical data were also evaluated to determine tentatively identified chemical attribution signatures for the CTAs by comparing samples from different sources according to either the presence/absence of peaks or the relative responses of peaks. These results demonstrate that GC × GC-TOFMS analysis in combination with a random forest technique can be useful in sample classification and signature identification for pesticides. Furthermore, the results suggest that this combination of analytical chemistry and statistical approaches can be applied to forensic analysis of other chemicals for similar purposes.

  9. Characterization of sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Brazilian petroleum derivatives using ionic liquid capillary columns in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli Fontanive, Fernando; Souza-Silva, Érica Aparecida; Macedo da Silva, Juliana; Bastos Caramão, Elina; Alcaraz Zini, Claudia

    2016-08-26

    Diesel and naphtha samples were analyzed using ionic liquid (IL) columns to evaluate the best column set for the investigation of organic sulfur compounds (OSC) and nitrogen(N)-containing compounds analyses with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry detector (GC×GC/TOFMS). Employing a series of stationary phase sets, namely DB-5MS/DB-17, DB-17/DB-5MS, DB-5MS/IL-59, and IL-59/DB-5MS, the following parameters were systematically evaluated: number of tentatively identified OSC, 2D chromatographic space occupation, number of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and OSC co-elutions, and percentage of asymmetric peaks. DB-5MS/IL-59 was chosen for OSC analysis, while IL59/DB-5MS was chosen for nitrogen compounds, as each stationary phase set provided the best chromatographic efficiency for these two classes of compounds, respectively. Most compounds were tentatively identified by Lee and Van den Dool and Kratz retention indexes, and spectra-matching to library. Whenever available, compounds were also positively identified via injection of authentic standards.

  10. Tile-Based Fisher Ratio Analysis of Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC × GC – TOFMS) Data using a Null Distribution Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Brendon A.; Marney, Luke C.; Siegler, William C.; Hoggard, Jamin C.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2015-04-07

    Multi-dimensional chromatographic instrumentation produces information-rich, and chemically complex data containing meaningful chemical signals and/or chemical patterns. Two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC – TOFMS) is a prominent instrumental platform that has been applied extensively for discovery-based experimentation, where samples are sufficiently volatile or amenable to derivatization. Use of GC × GC – TOFMS and associated data analysis strategies aim to uncover meaningful chemical signals or chemical patterns. However, for complex samples, meaningful chemical information is often buried in a background of less meaningful chemical signal and noise. In this report, we utilize the tile-based F-ratio software in concert with the standard addition method by spiking non-native chemicals into a diesel fuel matrix at low concentrations. While the previous work studied the concentration range of 100-1000 ppm, the current study focuses on the 0 ppm to 100 ppm analyte spike range. This study demonstrates the sensitivity and selectivity of the tile-based F-ratio software for discovery of true positives in the non-targeted analysis of a chemically complex and analytically challenging sample matrix. By exploring the low concentration spike levels, we gain a better understanding of the limit of detection (LOD) of the tile-based F-ratio software with GC × GC – TOFMS data.

  11. A comparative study of volatile components in green, oolong and black teas by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Zhongda; Zhao, Chunxia; Kong, Hongwei; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2013-10-25

    The difference of volatile components in green, oolong and black teas was studied by using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). Simultaneous distillation extraction was proved to be a suitable technique to extract the analytes with interest. A total of 450 compounds were tentatively identified with comparison to the standard mass spectra in available databases, retention index on the first dimension and structured chromatogram. 33 tea samples, including 12, 12 and 9 samples of green, oolong and black tea were analyzed by using GC×GC-TOFMS. After peak alignment, around 3600 peaks were detected. Partial least squares - discriminant analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were used to classify these samples, then non-parametric hypothesis test (Mann-Whitney U test) and the variable importance in the projection (VIP) were applied to discover the key components to distinguish the three types of tea with significant difference amongst them. 74 differential compounds are defined to interpret the chemical differences of 3 types of tea. This study shows the power of GC×GC-TOFMS method combined with multivariate data analysis to investigate natural products with high complexity for information extraction.

  12. Chemical fingerprinting of naphthenic acids at an oil sands end pit lake by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOFMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, D. T.; Arriaga, D.; Morris, P.; Risacher, F.; Warren, L. A.; McCarry, B. E.; Slater, G.

    2016-12-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are naturally occurring in Athabasca oil sands and accumulate in tailings as a result of water-based extraction processes. NAs contribute to the toxicity of tailings and oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). NAs exist as a complex mixture, so the development of an analytical technique to characterize them has been an on-going challenge. The monitoring of individual NAs and their associated isomers through multidimensional chromatography has the potential to provide greater insight into the behavior of NAs in the environment. For NAs whose proportions do not change during environmental processing, NA ratios may provide a means to develop fingerprints characteristic of specific sources. Alternatively, relative changes in the proportions of NAs may provide a tracer of their occurrence and extent of removal. As yet, only a few studies have begun to explore these possibilities. In this study, comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to monitor individual naphthenic acids in an end pit lake in Alberta, Canada. NA profiles from different depths and sampling locations were compared to evaluate the spatial variations at the site.

  13. Characterization of sulfur compounds in whisky by full evaporation dynamic headspace and selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with simultaneous element-specific detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; MacNamara, Kevin

    2012-12-28

    A method is described for characterization of sulfur compounds in unaged and aged whisky. The method is based on full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) of 100 μL of whisky samples followed by selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) retention-time-locked (RTL) gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) with simultaneous element-specific detection using a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD) and a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). Sequential heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to identify each individual sulfur compound in the unaged whisky. Twenty sulfur compounds were positively identified by a MS library search, linear retention indices (LRI), and formula identification using MS calibration software. Additionally eight formulas were also identified for unknown sulfur compounds. Simultaneous heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to produce the (2)D RTL GC-SCD chromatograms for principal component analysis. PCA of the (2)D RTL GC-SCD data clearly demonstrated the difference between unaged and aged whisky, as well as two different whisky samples. Fourteen sulfur compounds could be characterized as key sulfur compounds responsible for the changes in the aging step and/or the difference between two kinds of whisky samples. The determined values of the key sulfur compounds were in the range of 0.3-210 ng mL(-1) (RSD: 0.37-12%, n=3).

  14. Time-resolved microrheology of actively remodeling actomyosin networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marina Soares e.; Stuhrmann, Björn; Betz, Timo; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2014-07-01

    Living cells constitute an extraordinary state of matter since they are inherently out of thermal equilibrium due to internal metabolic processes. Indeed, measurements of particle motion in the cytoplasm of animal cells have revealed clear signatures of nonthermal fluctuations superposed on passive thermal motion. However, it has been difficult to pinpoint the exact molecular origin of this activity. Here, we employ time-resolved microrheology based on particle tracking to measure nonequilibrium fluctuations produced by myosin motor proteins in a minimal model system composed of purified actin filaments and myosin motors. We show that the motors generate spatially heterogeneous contractile fluctuations, which become less frequent with time as a consequence of motor-driven network remodeling. We analyze the particle tracking data on different length scales, combining particle image velocimetry, an ensemble analysis of the particle trajectories, and finally a kymograph analysis of individual particle trajectories to quantify the length and time scales associated with active particle displacements. All analyses show clear signatures of nonequilibrium activity: the particles exhibit random motion with an enhanced amplitude compared to passive samples, and they exhibit sporadic contractile fluctuations with ballistic motion over large (up to 30 μm) distances. This nonequilibrium activity diminishes with sample age, even though the adenosine triphosphate level is held constant. We propose that network coarsening concentrates motors in large clusters and depletes them from the network, thus reducing the occurrence of contractile fluctuations. Our data provide valuable insight into the physical processes underlying stress generation within motor-driven actin networks and the analysis framework may prove useful for future microrheology studies in cells and model organisms.

  15. Microsecond Time-Resolved Circular Dichroism of Rhodopsin Photointermediates†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yiren Gu; Szundi, Istvan; Lewis, James W.; Kliger, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved circular dichroism measurements, over a spectral range from 300 to 700 nm, were made at delays of 5, 100 and 500 μs after room temperature photoexcitation of bovine rhodopsin in lauryl maltoside suspension. The purpose was to provide more structural information about intermediate states in the activation of rhodopsin and other G protein-coupled receptors. In particular, information was sought about photointermediates that are isochromic or nearly isochromic in their unpolarized absorbance. The circular dichroism spectrum of lumirhodopsin, obtained after correcting the 5 μs difference CD data for the rhodopsin bleached, was in reasonable agreement with the lumirhodopsin CD spectrum obtained previously by thermal trapping at -76°C. Similarly, the metarhodopsin II spectrum obtained at 500 μs delay was also in agreement with the results of previous work on the temperature trapped form of metarhodopsin II. However, the CD of the mixture formed at 100 μs delay after photoexcitation, whose only visible absorbing component is lumirhodopsin, could not be accounted for near 480 nm in terms of the initially formed, 5 μs lumirhodopsin CD spectrum. Thus, the CD spectrum of lumirhodopsin changes on the time scale from 5 to 100 μs, showing reduced rotational strength in its visible band, possibly associated with either a process responsible for a small spectral shift that occurs in the lumirhodopsin absorbance spectrum at earlier times or the Schiff base deprotonation-reprotonation which occurs during equilibration of lumirhodopsin with the Meta I380 photointermediate. Either explanation suggests a chromophore conformation change closely associated with deprotonation which could be the earliest direct trigger of activation. PMID:19905009

  16. The GMOX science case: resolving galaxies through cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennaro, Mario; Robberto, Massimo; Heckman, Timothy; Smee, Stephen A.; Barkhouser, Robert; Ninkov, Zoran; Adamo, Angela; Becker, George; Bellini, Andrea; Bianchi, Luciana; Bik, Arjan; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Calamida, Annalisa; Calzetti, Daniela; De Rosa, Gisella; Deustua, Susana; Kalirai, Jason; Lotz, Jennifer; MacKenty, John; Manara, Carlo Felice; Meixner, Margaret; Pacifici, Camilla; Sabbi, Elena; Sahu, Kailash; Tumlinson, Jason

    2016-08-01

    We present the key scientific questions that can be addressed by GMOX, a Multi-Object Spectrograph selected for feasibility study as a 4th generation instrument for the Gemini telescopes. Using commercial digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) as slit selection mechanisms, GMOX can observe hundreds of sources at R 5000 between the U and K band simultaneously. Exploiting the narrow PSF delivered by the Gemini South GeMS MCAO module, GMOX can synthesize slits as small as 40mas reaching extremely faint magnitude limits, and thus enabling a plethora of applications and innovative science. Our main scientific driver in developing GMOX has been Resolving galaxies through cosmic time: GMOX 40mas slit (at GeMS) corresponds to 300 pc at z 1:5, where the angular diameter distance reaches its maximum, and therefore to even smaller linear scales at any other redshift. This means that GMOX can take spectra of regions smaller than 300 pc in the whole observable Universe, allowing to probe the growth and evolution of galaxies with unprecedented detail. GMOXs multi-object capability and high angular resolution enable efficient studies of crowded fields, such as globular clusters, the Milky Way bulge, the Magellanic Clouds, Local Group galaxies and galaxy clusters. The wide-band simultaneous coverage and the very fast slit configuration mechanisms also make GMOX ideal for follow-up of LSST transients.

  17. Time-resolved two-photon photoemission from metal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Weinelt, M

    2002-01-01

    The Rydberg-like series of image-potential states is a prototype system for loosely bound electrons at a metal surface. The electronic structure and the femtosecond dynamics of these states is studied by high-resolution energy-and time-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy. The electron trapped in the image potential moves virtually freely laterally to the surface where it is subject to inelastic and quasielastic scattering processes which cause decay of population and phase relaxation. The influence of surface corrugation on these processes has been investigated for adsorbates on Cu(001) and stepped Cu(117) and Cu(119) surfaces which are vicinal to Cu(001). The dynamics depend on both the distance of the electron in front of the surface and the parallel momentum. For CO molecules on Cu(001) inelastic scattering into bulk states and adsorbate-induced resonances determine the decay rate. For small numbers of Cu adatoms on Cu(001) and the vicinal surfaces the decay rate of image-potential states is sig...

  18. Two-dimensional Electrophoresis Analysis of Differential Protein Expression in Squamous Carcinoma of the Cervix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xue-qiong; WU Jie-li; YU Li-rong; LIN Yi; L(U) Jie-qiang; ZOU Shuang-wei; HU Yue

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To establish and optimize the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis(2-DE)maps of squamous carcinoma of the cervix and to study the protein difference between squamous carcinoma of the cervix(SCC)and normal cervical tissue.Methods:Using Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by computer-assisted image analysis,the differential proteins between squamous carcinoma of the cervical tissue and normal cervical tissue were compared.Then using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry,the differential proteins were identified.Results:The well-resolved and reproducible two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns of squamous carcinoma of the cervix tissue and normal cervical tissue were obtained.After silver staining.the average matching ratio of squamous carcinoma of the cervix was 86.1%.There was a good reproducibility of spot position in 2-DE map,with average deviation in IEF direction of 0.95±0.13 mm,while in SDS-PAGE direction it was 1.20±0.18 mm.Ten protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry,some of which were involved in cell proliferation,cell apoptosis,intracellular enzymes,structural proteins,cycle regulation,and tumor occurrence.Conclusion:The differentially expressed proteins provide a fundamental basis for further study of human squamous carcinoma of the cervix and screening of its specific markers.

  19. Perspective: Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in complex systems. The 2DRR method can leverage electronic resonance enhancement to selectively probe chromophores embedded in complex environments (e.g., a cofactor in a protein). In addition, correlations between the two dimensions of the 2DRR spectrum reveal information that is not available in traditional Raman techniques. For example, distributions of reactant and product geometries can be correlated in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this perspective article, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide and myoglobin. We also address key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies. Most notably, it has been shown that these two techniques are subject to a tradeoff between sensitivity to anharmonicity and susceptibility to artifacts. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest great potential for the future of the technique.

  20. Network generation enhances interpretation of proteomics data sets by a combination of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xijun; Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wu, Gelin; Sun, Wenjun; Yan, Guangli

    2012-10-21

    Recent advances in proteomic technologies have enabled us to create detailed protein-protein interaction maps in diseases. As the size of the interaction dataset increases, powerful computational methods are required in order to effectively interpret network models from large scale interactome data. In this study, we carried out comparative proteomics to construct and identify the proteins networks associated with hepatic injury (HI) which are largely unknown, as a case study. All proteins expressed were separated and identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Protein-interacting networks and pathways were mapped using STRING analysis program. We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of HI rats, to uncover the networks altered by treated with CCl(4). Identification of fifteen spots (seven over-expressed and eight under-expressed) were established by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis using STRING software for better understanding of the biological context of the identified proteins. It suggested that modulation of multiple vital physiological pathways including DNA repair process, cell apoptosis, oxidation reduction, signal transduction, metabolic process, intracellular signaling cascade, regulation of biological processes, cell communication, regulation of cellular process, and molecular transport. In summary, the present study provides the first protein-interacting network maps and novel insights into the biological responses and potential pathways of HI. The generation of protein interaction networks clearly enhances the interpretation of proteomic data, particularly in respect of understanding molecular mechanisms of panel protein biomarkers.

  1. Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkens, M J [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H){sub 2}L (Cp* = (CH{sub 3}){sub 5}C{sub 5}, L = PPh{sub 3}, Ph = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO){sub 2} to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

  2. Time resolved studies of bond activation by organometallic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkens, Matthew J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    In 1971, Jetz and Graham discovered that the silicon-hydrogen bond in silanes could be broken under mild photochemical conditions in the presence of certain transition metal carbonyls. Such reactions fall within the class of oxidative addition. A decade later, similar reactivity was discovered in alkanes. In these cases a C-H bond in non-functionalized alkanes was broken through the oxidative addition of Cp*Ir(H)2L (Cp* = (CH3)5C5, L = PPh3, Ph = C6H5) to form Cp*ML(R)(H) or of Cp*Ir(CO)2 to form Cp*Ir(CO)(R)(H). These discoveries opened an entirely new field of research, one which naturally included mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating the various paths involved in these and related reactions. Much was learned from these experiments but they shared the disadvantage of studying under highly non-standard conditions a system which is of interest largely because of its characteristics under standard conditions. Ultrafast time-resolved IR spectroscopy provides an ideal solution to this problem; because it allows the resolution of chemical events taking place on the femto-through picosecond time scale, it is possible to study this important class of reactions under the ambient conditions which are most of interest to the practicing synthetic chemist. Certain of the molecules in question are particularly well-suited to study using the ultrafast IR spectrophotometer described in the experimental section because they contain one or more carbonyl ligands.

  3. Tracking dynamics of two-dimensional continuous attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, C. C. Alan; Wong, K. Y. Michael; Wu, Si

    2009-12-01

    We introduce an analytically solvable model of two-dimensional continuous attractor neural networks (CANNs). The synaptic input and the neuronal response form Gaussian bumps in the absence of external stimuli, and enable the network to track external stimuli by its translational displacement in the two-dimensional space. Basis functions of the two-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator in polar coordinates are introduced to describe the distortion modes of the Gaussian bump. The perturbative method is applied to analyze its dynamics. Testing the method by considering the network behavior when the external stimulus abruptly changes its position, we obtain results of the reaction time and the amplitudes of various distortion modes, with excellent agreement with simulation results.

  4. Control Operator for the Two-Dimensional Energized Wave Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Augustus REJU

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the analytical model for the construction of the two-dimensional Energized wave equation. The control operator is given in term of space and time t independent variables. The integral quadratic objective cost functional is subject to the constraint of two-dimensional Energized diffusion, Heat and a source. The operator that shall be obtained extends the Conjugate Gradient method (ECGM as developed by Hestenes et al (1952, [1]. The new operator enables the computation of the penalty cost, optimal controls and state trajectories of the two-dimensional energized wave equation when apply to the Conjugate Gradient methods in (Waziri & Reju, LEJPT & LJS, Issues 9, 2006, [2-4] to appear in this series.

  5. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy Using Incoherent Light: Theoretical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Daniel B; Sutor, Erika J; Hendrickson, Rebecca A; Gealy, M W; Ulness, Darin J

    2012-01-01

    Electronic energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs over a range of time scales and under a variety of intermolecular coupling conditions. Recent work has shown that electronic coupling between chromophores can lead to coherent oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy measurements of pigment-protein complexes measured with femtosecond laser pulses. A persistent issue in the field is to reconcile the results of measurements performed using femtosecond laser pulses with physiological illumination conditions. Noisy-light spectroscopy can begin to address this question. In this work we present the theoretical analysis of incoherent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, I(4) 2D ES. Simulations reveal diagonal peaks, cross peaks, and coherent oscillations similar to those observed in femtosecond two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments. The results also expose fundamental differences between the femtosecond-pulse and noisy-light techniques; the differences lead to new challenges and opp...

  6. Spectral Radiative Properties of Two-Dimensional Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yimin; Han, Yuge; Zhou, Yue

    2012-12-01

    Spectral radiative properties of two-dimensional rough surfaces are important for both academic research and practical applications. Besides material properties, surface structures have impact on the spectral radiative properties of rough surfaces. Based on the finite difference time domain algorithm, this paper studies the spectral energy propagation process on a two-dimensional rough surface and analyzes the effect of different factors such as the surface structure, angle, and polarization state of the incident wave on the spectral radiative properties of the two-dimensional rough surface. To quantitatively investigate the spatial distribution of energy reflected from the rough surface, the concept of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function is introduced. Correlation analysis between the reflectance and different impact factors is conducted to evaluate the influence degree. Comparison between the theoretical and experimental data is given to elucidate the accuracy of the computational code. This study is beneficial to optimizing the surface structures of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells.

  7. Interpolation by two-dimensional cubic convolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiazheng; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents results of image interpolation with an improved method for two-dimensional cubic convolution. Convolution with a piecewise cubic is one of the most popular methods for image reconstruction, but the traditional approach uses a separable two-dimensional convolution kernel that is based on a one-dimensional derivation. The traditional, separable method is sub-optimal for the usual case of non-separable images. The improved method in this paper implements the most general non-separable, two-dimensional, piecewise-cubic interpolator with constraints for symmetry, continuity, and smoothness. The improved method of two-dimensional cubic convolution has three parameters that can be tuned to yield maximal fidelity for specific scene ensembles characterized by autocorrelation or power-spectrum. This paper illustrates examples for several scene models (a circular disk of parametric size, a square pulse with parametric rotation, and a Markov random field with parametric spatial detail) and actual images -- presenting the optimal parameters and the resulting fidelity for each model. In these examples, improved two-dimensional cubic convolution is superior to several other popular small-kernel interpolation methods.

  8. Time- and space-resolved spectroscopic characterization of laser-induced swine muscle tissue plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, J.J. [Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Diaz, L., E-mail: luis.diaz@csic.es [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Ramirez, S. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CFMAC, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Caceres, J.O. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, Cuidad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    The spatial-temporal evolution of muscle tissue sample plasma induced by a high-power transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO{sub 2} pulsed laser at vacuum conditions (0.1–0.01 Pa) has been investigated using high-resolution optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and imaging methods. The induced plasma shows mainly electronically excited neutral Na, K, C, Mg, H, Ca, N and O atoms, ionized C{sup +}, C{sup 2+}, C{sup 3+}, Mg{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, N{sup +}, N{sup 2+}, Ca{sup +}, O{sup +} and O{sup 2+} species and molecular band systems of CN(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}), C{sub 2}(d{sup 3}Π{sub g}–a{sup 3}Π{sub u}), CH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup −}–X{sup 2}Π; A{sup 2}Δ–X{sup 2}Π), NH(A{sup 3}Π–X{sup 3}Σ{sup −}), OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2} Σ{sup +}), and CaOH(B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}; A{sup 2}Π–X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}). Time-resolved two-dimensional emission spectroscopy is used to study the expanded distribution of different species ejected during ablation. Spatial and temporal variations of different atoms and ionic excited species are reported. Plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature were measured from the spatio-temporal analysis of different species. Average velocities of some plasma species were estimated. - Highlights: • LIBS of swine muscle tissue sample generated by CO{sub 2} laser pulses has been done for the first time. • Average velocities of some plasma species have been calculated from spatial and temporally resolved 2D OES images. • Electron density (~ 9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) has been studied with spatial and temporal resolution. • Temporal evolution of the plasma temperature has been calculated by means of Boltzmann plots.

  9. Time-resolved single-shot terahertz time-domain spectroscopy for ultrafast irreversible processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhao-Hui; Zhong, Sen-Cheng; Li, Jun; Zhu, Li-Guo; Meng, Kun; Li, Jiang; Liu, Qiao; Peng, Qi-Xian; Li, Ze-Ren; Zhao, Jian-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed terahertz spectroscopy is suitable for spectroscopic diagnostics of ultrafast events. However, the study of irreversible or single shot ultrafast events requires ability to record transient properties at multiple time delays, i.e., time resolved at single shot level, which is not available currently. Here by angular multiplexing use of femtosecond laser pulses, we developed and demonstrated a time resolved, transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique, where burst mode THz pulses were generated and then detected in a single shot measurement manner. The burst mode THz pulses contain 2 sub-THz pulses, and the time gap between them is adjustable up to 1 ns with picosecond accuracy, thus it can be used to probe the single shot event at two different time delays. The system can detect the sub-THz pulses at 0.1 THz-2.5 THz range with signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ˜400 and spectrum resolution of 0.05 THz. System design was described here, and optimizations of single shot measurement of THz pulses were discussed in detail. Methods to improve SNR were also discussed in detail. A system application was demonstrated where pulsed THz signals at different time delays of the ultrafast process were successfully acquired within single shot measurement. This time resolved transient terahertz time domain spectroscopy technique provides a new diagnostic tool for irreversible or single shot ultrafast events where dynamic information can be extracted at terahertz range within one-shot experiment.

  10. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy measurements of shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Carlson, A. L.; Dunham, G. S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hanson, D. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been used to measure the shock pressure steadiness, emissivity, and temperature of liquid deuterium shocked to 22-90 GPa. The shock was produced using magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact, and spectra were acquired with a suite of four fiber-optic-coupled spectrometers with streak camera detectors. The shock pressure changes by an average of -1.2% over the 10-30 ns cell transit time, determined from the relative changes in the shock front self-emission with time. The shock front reflectivity was measured from 5140Å and 5320Å laser light reflected from the D2 shock. The emissivity inferred from the reflectivity measurements was in reasonably good agreement with quantum molecular dynamics simulation predictions. The spectral radiance wavelength dependence was found to agree well (average normalized χ2=1.6 ) with a Planckian multiplied by the emissivity. The shock front temperature was determined from the emissivity and the wavelength-dependent shock self-emission. Thirty-seven temperature measurements spanning the 22-90 GPa range were accumulated. The large number of temperature measurements enables a comparison of the scatter in the data with expectations for a Gaussian distribution. This facilitates determination of uncertainties that incorporate both apparatus contributions and otherwise unquantified systematic effects that cause self-emission variations from one experiment to another. Agreement between temperatures determined from the absolute spectral radiance and from the relative shape of the spectrum further substantiates the absence of systematic biases. The weighted mean temperature uncertainties were as low as ±3-4% , enabling the discrimination between competing models for the D2 equation of state (EOS). The temperature results agree well with models that predict a maximum compression of ˜4.4 . Softer models that predict approximately sixfold compression are inconsistent with the data to a very high

  11. Two-Dimensional Infrared (2DIR) Spectroscopy of the Peptide Beta3s Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zaizhi; Preketes, Nicholas K; Jiang, Jun; Mukamel, Shaul; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Probing underlying free energy landscape, pathways, and mechanism is the key for understanding protein folding in theory and experiment. Recently time-resolved two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) with femtosecond laser pulses, has emerged as a promising tool for investigating the protein folding dynamics on faster timescales than possible by NMR. We have employed molecular dynamics simulations to compute 2DIR spectra of the folding process of a peptide, Beta3s. Simulated non-chiral and chiral 2DIR signals illustrate the variation of the spectra as the peptide conformation evolves along the free energy landscape. Chiral spectra show stronger changes than the non-chiral signals because cross peaks caused by the formation of the β-sheet are clearly resolved. Chirality-induced 2DIR may be used to detect the folding of β-sheet proteins with high spectral and temporal resolution. PMID:23956818

  12. Classification of organic aerosol in the atmosphere over Seoul based on chemical group separation using two dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC TOFMS) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, S.; Lim, H. B.; Choi, N.; Lee, J.; Ahn, Y. K.; Kim, Y. P.

    2016-12-01

    Organic aerosols contain thousands of organic compounds and contribute to 20-90% of the total fine aerosol mass. For analyzing organic aerosols, a wide range of analytical techniques have been used such as gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GC/MS), liquid chromatography mass spectrometer (LC/MS), aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), etc. Among them, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (GCxGC/TOF-MS) can provide higher chemical resolution than AMS and analyze more mass fractions of organic aerosols than GC/MS. In this study, we suggest a new data processing method using GCxGC/TOF-MS data for analyzing organic compounds in the ambient aerosols. TSP samples were collected on the roof of the Asan engineering building, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea (37.56 °N, 126.94 °E, 20 m above ground level). A total of 67 samples were obtained during summer (August 2013) and winter (January and February 2014) with a PUF sampler (Tisch, TE-1000) on quartz fiber filter. Filters were extracted using accelerated solvent extractor with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (3:1, v/v). Total extracts were blown down to 0.5 mL using a nitrogen evaporator (Turbo Vap Ⅱ, caliper Life Sciences). Organic compounds in the TSP samples were separated into 6 chemical groups, depending on their retention time in two dimensions for their volatility and polarity. All area of peaks in each group was summed and variance of total area in each group was compared depending on season and diurnal cycle.

  13. TWO-DIMENSIONAL TOPOLOGY OF COSMOLOGICAL REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yougang; Xu, Yidong; Chen, Xuelei [Key Laboratory of Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100012 China (China); Park, Changbom [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juhan, E-mail: wangyg@bao.ac.cn, E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr [Center for Advanced Computation, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-20

    We study the two-dimensional topology of the 21-cm differential brightness temperature for two hydrodynamic radiative transfer simulations and two semi-numerical models. In each model, we calculate the two-dimensional genus curve for the early, middle, and late epochs of reionization. It is found that the genus curve depends strongly on the ionized fraction of hydrogen in each model. The genus curves are significantly different for different reionization scenarios even when the ionized faction is the same. We find that the two-dimensional topology analysis method is a useful tool to constrain the reionization models. Our method can be applied to the future observations such as those of the Square Kilometre Array.

  14. Two dimensional topology of cosmological reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yougang; Xu, Yidong; Chen, Xuelei; Kim, Juhan

    2015-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional topology of the 21-cm differential brightness temperature for two hydrodynamic radiative transfer simulations and two semi-numerical models. In each model, we calculate the two dimensional genus curve for the early, middle and late epochs of reionization. It is found that the genus curve depends strongly on the ionized fraction of hydrogen in each model. The genus curves are significantly different for different reionization scenarios even when the ionized faction is the same. We find that the two-dimensional topology analysis method is a useful tool to constrain the reionization models. Our method can be applied to the future observations such as those of the Square Kilometer Array.

  15. Numerical blowup in two-dimensional Boussinesq equations

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Zhaohua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we perform a three-stage numerical relay to investigate the finite time singularity in the two-dimensional Boussinesq approximation equations. The initial asymmetric condition is the middle-stage output of a $2048^2$ run, the highest resolution in our study is $40960^2$, and some signals of numerical blowup are observed.

  16. Dynamical phase transitions in the two-dimensional ANNNI model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, M.N.; Derrida, B.

    1988-06-01

    We study the phase diagram of the two-dimensional anisotropic next-nearest neighbor Ising (ANNNI) model by comparing the time evolution of two distinct spin configurations submitted to the same thermal noise. We clearly se several dynamical transitions between ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, antiphase, and floating phases. These dynamical transitions seem to occur rather close to the transition lines determined previously in the literature.

  17. Confined two-dimensional fermions at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    De Francia, M; Loewe, M; Santangelo, E M; De Francia, M; Falomir, H; Loewe, M; Santangelo, E M

    1995-01-01

    We introduce the chemical potential in a system of two-dimensional massless fermions, confined to a finite region, by imposing twisted boundary conditions in the Euclidean time direction. We explore in this simple model the application of functional techniques which could be used in more complicated situations.

  18. Instability of two-dimensional heterotic stringy black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Azreg-Ainou, M

    1999-01-01

    We solve the eigenvalue problem of general relativity for the case of charged black holes in two-dimensional heterotic string theory, derived by McGuigan et al. For the case of $m^{2}>q^{2}$, we find a physically acceptable time-dependent growing mode; thus the black hole is unstable. The extremal case $m^{2}=q^{2}$ is stable.

  19. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  20. Matching Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis' Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Anjos, António; AL-Tam, Faroq; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches. This ar......This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches...

  1. Towards two-dimensional search engines

    OpenAIRE

    Ermann, Leonardo; Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way the ranking of nodes becomes two-dimensional that paves the way for development of two-dimensional search engines of new type. Statistical properties of inf...

  2. Ultrafast two dimensional infrared chemical exchange spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The method of ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is described. Three ultrashort IR pulses tuned to the frequencies of the vibrational transitions of interest are directed into the sample. The interaction of these pulses with the molecular vibrational oscillators produces a polarization that gives rise to a fourth pulse, the vibrational echo. The vibrational echo pulse is combined with another pulse, the local oscillator, for heterodyne detection of the signal. For fixed time between the second and third pulses, the waiting time, the first pulse is scanned. Two Fourier transforms of the data yield a 2D IR spectrum. The waiting time is increased, and another spectrum is obtained. The change in the 2D IR spectra with increased waiting time provides information on the time evolution of the structure of the molecular system under observation. In a 2D IR chemical exchange experiment, two species A and B, are undergoing chemical exchange. A's are turning into B's, and B's are turning into A's, but the overall concentrations of the species are not changing. The kinetics of the chemical exchange on the ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions can be obtained 2D IR spectroscopy. A vibration that has a different frequency for the two species is monitored. At very short time, there will be two peaks on the diagonal of the 2D IR spectrum, one for A and one for B. As the waiting time is increased, chemical exchange causes off-diagonal peaks to grow in. The time dependence of the growth of these off-diagonal peaks gives the chemical exchange rate. The method is applied to organic solute-solvent complex formation, orientational isomerization about a carbon-carbon single bond, migration of a hydrogen bond from one position on a molecule to another, protein structural substate interconversion, and water hydrogen bond switching between ions and water molecules. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific

  3. Correlation of rocket propulsion fuel properties with chemical composition using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry followed by partial least squares regression analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehimkar, Benjamin; Hoggard, Jamin C.; Marney, Luke C.; Billingsley, Matthew; Fraga, Carlos G.; Bruno, Thomas J.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2014-01-31

    There is an increased need to more fully assess and control the composition of kerosene based rocket propulsion fuels, namely RP-1 and RP-2. In particular, it is crucial to be able to make better quantitative connections between the following three attributes: (a) fuel performance, (b) fuel properties (flash point, density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, hydrogen content, etc) and (c) the chemical composition of a given fuel (i.e., specific chemical compounds and compound classes present as a result of feedstock blending and processing). Indeed, recent efforts in predicting fuel performance through modeling put greater emphasis on detailed and accurate fuel properties and fuel compositional information. In this regard, advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology provides improved data relative to classical boiling point and volatility curve techniques. Using ADC metrology, data obtained from RP-1 and RP-2 fuels provides compositional variation information that is directly relevant to predictive modeling of fuel performance. Often, in such studies, one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is typically employed to provide chemical composition information. Building on approaches using GC-MS, but to glean substantially more chemical composition information from these complex fuels, we have recently studied the use of comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC - TOFMS) to provide chemical composition data that is significantly richer than that provided by GC-MS methods. In this report, by applying multivariate data analysis techniques, referred to as chemometrics, we are able to readily model (correlate) the chemical compositional information from RP-1 and RP-2 fuels provided using GC × GC - TOFMS, to the fuel property information such as that provided by the ADC method and other specification properties. We anticipate that this new chemical analysis

  4. Sensomics analysis of key hazelnut odorants (Corylus avellana L. 'Tonda Gentile') using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOF-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefl, Johannes; Pollner, Gwendola; Schieberle, Peter

    2013-06-05

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) has been used a few times to identify and quantitate single aroma-active compounds, but the capability of this technique to monitor a complete set of key odorants evoking the aroma of a given food in one run has not been exploited so far. A fast, multiodorant analysis using GC×GC-TOF-MS in combination with stable isotope dilution assays (SIDA) was developed to quantitate the entire set of aroma compounds, the sensometabolome, of raw and roasted hazelnuts ( Corylus avellana L. 'Tonda Gentile') previously established by GC-olfactometry. The capability of the method to evaluate the aroma contribution of each sensometabolite was evaluated by introducing a new term, the limit of odor activity value (LOAV), indicating whether a given aroma compound can be determined down to an odor activity value (OAV) of 1 (odor activity value = ratio of concentration to odor threshold). The advantage of the new method was proven by comparing the performance parameters with a traditional one-dimensional approach using GC-ion trap mass-spectrometry (GC-IT-MS). The results showed that the detector linearity and sensitivity of GC×GC-TOF-MS was on average higher by a factor of 10 compared to GC-IT-MS, thus enabling the quantitation of the aroma relevant amounts of 22 key odorants of hazelnuts in one run of the 30 aroma-active compounds. Seven novel isotopically labeled internal standards were synthesized to meet the analytical requirements defined by electron impact ionization in TOF-MS, that is, to keep the label. On the basis of the quantitative results obtained, it was possible to closely mimic the aroma of raw and roasted 'Tonda Gentile' hazelnuts by preparing an aroma recombinate containing the key odorants at their natural concentrations occurring in the nuts.

  5. Correlation of rocket propulsion fuel properties with chemical composition using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry followed by partial least squares regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehimkar, Benjamin; Hoggard, Jamin C; Marney, Luke C; Billingsley, Matthew C; Fraga, Carlos G; Bruno, Thomas J; Synovec, Robert E

    2014-01-31

    There is an increased need to more fully assess and control the composition of kerosene-based rocket propulsion fuels such as RP-1. In particular, it is critical to make better quantitative connections among the following three attributes: fuel performance (thermal stability, sooting propensity, engine specific impulse, etc.), fuel properties (such as flash point, density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, and hydrogen content), and the chemical composition of a given fuel, i.e., amounts of specific chemical compounds and compound classes present in a fuel as a result of feedstock blending and/or processing. Recent efforts in predicting fuel chemical and physical behavior through modeling put greater emphasis on attaining detailed and accurate fuel properties and fuel composition information. Often, one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is employed to provide chemical composition information. Building on approaches that used GC-MS, but to glean substantially more chemical information from these complex fuels, we recently studied the use of comprehensive two dimensional (2D) gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) using a "reversed column" format: RTX-wax column for the first dimension, and a RTX-1 column for the second dimension. In this report, by applying chemometric data analysis, specifically partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis, we are able to readily model (and correlate) the chemical compositional information provided by use of GC×GC-TOFMS to RP-1 fuel property information such as density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, and so on. Furthermore, we readily identified compounds that contribute significantly to measured differences in fuel properties based on results from the PLS models. We anticipate this new chemical analysis strategy will have broad implications for the development of high fidelity composition-property models, leading to an

  6. Novel analytical methods for flame retardants and plasticizers based on gas chromatography, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography, and direct probe coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-high resolution time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim E G

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we assess the applicability of different analytical techniques, namely, direct probe (DP), gas chromatography (GC), and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) with a high resolution (HR)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) for the analysis of flame retardants and plasticizers in electronic waste and car interiors. APCI-HRTOFMS is a combination scarcely exploited yet with GC or with a direct probe for screening purposes and to the best of our knowledge, never with GC × GC to provide comprehensive information. Because of the increasing number of flame retardants and questions about their environmental fate, there is a need for the development of wider target and untargeted screening techniques to assess human exposure to these compounds. With the use of the APCI source, we took the advantage of using a soft ionization technique that provides mainly molecular ions, in addition to the accuracy of HRMS for identification. The direct probe provided a very easy and inexpensive method for the identification of flame retardants without any sample preparation. This technique seems extremely useful for the screening of solid materials such as electrical devices, electronics and other waste. GC-APCI-HRTOF-MS appeared to be more sensitive compared to liquid chromatography (LC)-APCI/atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI)-HRTOF-MS for a wider range of flame retardants with absolute detection limits in the range of 0.5-25 pg. A variety of tri- to decabromodiphenyl ethers, phosphorus flame retardants and new flame retardants were found in the samples at levels from microgram per gram to milligram per gram levels.

  7. Follow-up after embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms: A prospective comparison of two-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography, and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafin, Zbigniew; Strzesniewski, Piotr; Lasek, Wladyslaw [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Bydgoszcz (Poland); Beuth, Wojciech [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Collegium Medicum, Department of Neurosurgery and Neurotraumatology, Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    To prospectively compare of the diagnostic value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF-MRA) in the follow-up of intracranial aneurysms after endovascular treatment. Seventy-two consecutive patients were examined 3 months after the embolization. The index tests included: two-dimensional DSA (2D-DSA), three-dimensional DSA (3D-DSA), and TOF-MRA. The reference test was a retrospective consensus between 2D-DSA images, 3D-DSA images, and source rotational DSA images. The evaluation included: detection of the residual flow, quantification of the flow, and validity of the decision regarding retreatment. Intraobserver agreement and interobserver agreement were determined. The sensitivity and specificity of residual flow detection ranged from 84.6 % (2D-DSA and TOF-MRA) to 92.3 % (3D-DSA) and from 91.3 % (TOF-MRA) to 97.8 % (3D-DSA), respectively. The accuracy of occlusion degree evaluation ranged from 0.78 (2D-DSA) to 0.92 (3D-DSA, Cohen's kappa). The 2D-DSA method presented lower performance in the decision on retreatment than 3D-DSA (P < 0.05, ROC analysis). The intraobserver agreement was very good for all techniques ({kappa} = 0.80-0.97). The interobserver agreement was moderate for TOF-MRA and very good for 2D-DSA and 3D-DSA ({kappa} = 0.72-0.94). Considering the invasiveness of DSA and the minor difference in the diagnostic performance between 3D-DSA and TOF-MRA, the latter method should be the first-line modality for follow-up after aneurysm embolization. (orig.)

  8. Identification of organic sulfur compounds in coal bitumen obtained by different extraction techniques using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Maria Elisabete; Fontanive, Fernando Cappelli; de Oliveira, José Vladimir; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz

    2011-11-01

    The determination of organic sulfur compounds (OSC) in coal is of great interest. Technically and operationally these compounds are not easily removed and promote corrosion of equipment. Environmentally, the burning of sulfur compounds leads to the emission of SO(x) gases, which are major contributors to acid rain. Health-wise, it is well known that these compounds have mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. Bitumen can be extracted from coal by different techniques, and use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric detection enables identification of compounds present in coal extracts. The OSC from three different bitumens were tentatively identified by use of three different extraction techniques: accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), ultrasonic extraction (UE), and supercritical-fluid extraction (SFE). Results obtained from one-dimensional gas chromatography (1D GC) coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometric detection (GC-qMS) and from two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection (GC × GC-TOFMS) were compared. By use of 2D GC, a greater number of OSC were found in ASE bitumen than in SFE and UE bitumens. No OSC were identified with 1D GC-qMS, although some benzothiophenes and dibenzothiophenes were detected by use of EIM and SIM modes. GC × GC-TOFMS applied to investigation of OSC in bitumens resulted in analytical improvement, as more OSC classes and compounds were identified (thiols, sulfides, thiophenes, naphthothiophenes, benzothiophenes, and benzonaphthothiophenes). The roof-tile effect was observed for OSC and PAH in all bitumens. Several co-elutions among analytes and with matrix interferents were solved by use of GC × GC.

  9. Evaluation of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the metabolic profiling of plant-fungus interaction in Aquilaria malaccensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yong Foo; Chin, Sung-Tong; Perlmutter, Patrick; Marriott, Philip J

    2015-03-27

    To explore the possible obligate interactions between the phytopathogenic fungus and Aquilaria malaccensis which result in generation of a complex array of secondary metabolites, we describe a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) method, coupled to accurate mass time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) for the untargeted and comprehensive metabolic profiling of essential oils from naturally infected A. malaccensis trees. A polar/non-polar column configuration was employed, offering an improved separation pattern of components when compared to other column sets. Four different grades of the oils displayed quite different metabolic patterns, suggesting the evolution of a signalling relationship between the host tree (emergence of various phytoalexins) and fungi (activation of biotransformation). In total, ca. 550 peaks/metabolites were detected, of which tentative identification of 155 of these compounds was reported, representing between 20.1% and 53.0% of the total ion count. These are distributed over the chemical families of monoterpenic and sesquiterpenic hydrocarbons, oxygenated monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes (comprised of ketone, aldehyde, oxide, alcohol, lactone, keto-alcohol and diol), norterpenoids, diterpenoids, short chain glycols, carboxylic acids and others. The large number of metabolites detected, combined with the ease with which they are located in the 2D separation space, emphasises the importance of a comprehensive analytical approach for the phytochemical analysis of plant metabolomes. Furthermore, the potential of this methodology in grading agarwood oils by comparing the obtained metabolic profiles (pattern recognition for unique metabolite chemical families) is discussed. The phytocomplexity of the agarwood oils signified the production of a multitude of plant-fungus mediated secondary metabolites as chemical signals for natural ecological communication. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most complete

  10. A comparison of two-dimensional and real-time 3D transoesophageal echocardiography and angiography for assessing the left atrial appendage anatomy for sizing a left atrial appendage occlusion system: impact of volume loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kassou, Baravan; Tzikas, Apostolos; Stock, Friederike; Neikes, Fabian; Völz, Alexander; Omran, Heyder

    2017-04-20

    Correct sizing of a left atrial appendage (LAA) closure system is important to avoid redeployment of the device and peri-device leaks. The aims of this study were to assess the significance of two-dimensional transoesophageal echocardiography (2D-TEE), real-time 3D transoesophageal echocardiography (RT 3D-TEE) and angiography for measuring the size of the LAA landing zone and to determine the impact on sizing an LAA closure device. Furthermore, we investigated the relevance of volume loading on LAA size. In a prospective study, 46 patients underwent 2D-TEE and RT 3D-TEE 24 hours prior to LAA closure, at the beginning of the procedure and just before the procedure after volume loading with an average of 1,035±246 ml. Angiography was performed immediately before the implantation. Maximal diameter (2.2±0.4 versus 2.3±0.4 cm; pcorrelation (R) between measurements and LAA device size was found for RT 3D-TEE-derived perimeter (R=0.97) and area (R=0.96), whereas the maximal diameter (R=0.78) measured by 2D-TEE and angiography (R=0.76) correlated less closely. Sizing based on an RT 3D-TEE-measured perimeter resulted only in 4% of undersizing the implanted device. Peri-device leaks occurred in seven cases (15%) and were associated with a lower compression of LAA devices (7±1.3% versus 14±3.2% for patients without leaks, pcorrelation to LAA closure device size than 2D-TEE or angiographic measurements.

  11. Separation and analysis of phenolic acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza and its related preparations by off-line two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction chromatography×reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wanyang; Tong, Ling; Miao, Jingzhuo; Huang, Jingyi; Li, Dongxiang; Li, Yunfei; Xiao, Hongting; Sun, Henry; Bi, Kaishun

    2016-01-29

    Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) is one of the most widely used Traditional Chinese Medicine. Active constituents of SM mainly contain hydrophilic phenolic acids (PAs) and lipophilic tanshinones. However, due to the existing of multiple ester bonds and unsaturated bonds in the structures, PAs have numerous chemical conversion products. Many of them are so low-abundant that hard to be separated using conventional methods. In this study, an off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) method was developed to separate PAs in SM and its related preparations. In the first dimension, samples were fractionated by hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) (Acchrom×Amide, 4.6×250mm, 5μm) mainly based on the hydrogen bonding effects. The fractions were then separated on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-LC) (Acquity HSS T3, 2.1×50mm, 1.7μm) according to hydrophobicity. For the selective identification of PAs, diode array detector (DAD) and electrospray ionization tandem ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-TOF-MS) were employed. Practical and effective peak capacities of all the samples were greater than 2046 and 1130, respectively, with the orthogonalities ranged from 69.7% to 92.8%, which indicated the high efficiency and versatility of this method. By utilizing the data post-processing techniques, including mass defect filter, neutral loss filter and product ion filter, a total of 265 compounds comprising 196 potentially new PAs were tentatively characterized. Twelve kinds of derivatives, mainly including glycosylated compounds, O-alkylated compounds, condensed compounds and hydrolyzed compounds, constituted the novelty of the newly identified PAs. The HILIC×RP-LC/TOF-MS system expanded our understanding on PAs of S. miltiorrhiza and its related preparations, which could also benefit the separation and characterization of polar constituents in complicated herbal extracts.

  12. metAlignID: A high-throughout sofware tool set for automated detection of trace level contaminants in comprehensive LECO two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommen, A.; Kamp, van der H.J.; Kools, H.J.; Lee, van der M.K.; Weg, van der G.

    2012-01-01

    A new alternative data processing tool set, metAlignID, is developed for automated pre-processing and library-based identification and concentration estimation of target compounds after analysis by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The tool set has b

  13. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  14. Time-resolved and position-resolved X-ray spectrometry with a pixelated detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Peter

    2012-12-07

    The aim of the work presented here was to measure X-ray spectra with a pixelated detector. Due to effects in the sensor the spectrum cannot be measured directly and has to be calculated by a deconvolution of the measured data. In the scope of this work the deconvolution of the measured spectra could be enhanced considerably by - amongst other things - the introduction of the Bayesian deconvolution method. Those improvements opened the possibilities for further measurements. For the measurements the detectors of the Medipix family have been used. They are nowadays used for a wide range of applications and scientific research. Their main advantage is the very high position resolution gained by a pixel pitch of 55 μm and a high number of 65536 pixels. The Timepix detector has, in particular, two special possibilities of measurement: the ToA mode and the ToT mode. In ToA mode the arrival time of an impinging photon is measured and in ToT mode the amount of deposited charge is measured. The most common method of operation is counting the number of impinging photons that release a charge higher than a preset threshold in each pixel. As this released charge is proportional to the energy deposition of the impinging photon, one can perform energy-sensitive measurements. To perform the deconvolution of the measured energy distribution there is a need of an energy response matrix describing the detector response on radiation. For some detectors it is possible to obtain an analytic model of the response functions. Due to the high discrepancy between the impinging spectrum and the measured spectrum in case of detectors of the Medipix family, there is so far no analytic model. Thus, the detector response has to be simulated. As I could improve the precision of the measurement quite extensively, I also intended to tune the simulation with more accurate and appropriate models to gain the same level of accuracy. The results of measurement and simulation have then been compared and

  15. Piezoelectricity in Two-Dimensional Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Tao

    2015-02-25

    Powering up 2D materials: Recent experimental studies confirmed the existence of piezoelectricity - the conversion of mechanical stress into electricity - in two-dimensional single-layer MoS2 nanosheets. The results represent a milestone towards embedding low-dimensional materials into future disruptive technologies. © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Kronecker Product of Two-dimensional Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Hu

    2006-01-01

    Kronecker sequences constructed from short sequences are good sequences for spread spectrum communication systems. In this paper we study a similar problem for two-dimensional arrays, and we determine the linear complexity of the Kronecker product of two arrays. Our result shows that similar good property on linear complexity holds for Kronecker product of arrays.

  17. Two-Dimensional Toda-Heisenberg Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim E. Vekslerchik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider a nonlinear model that is a combination of the anisotropic two-dimensional classical Heisenberg and Toda-like lattices. In the framework of the Hirota direct approach, we present the field equations of this model as a bilinear system, which is closely related to the Ablowitz-Ladik hierarchy, and derive its N-soliton solutions.

  18. A novel two dimensional particle velocity sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pjetri, Olti; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theo S.; Krijnen, Gijs J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a two wire, two-dimensional particle velocity sensor. The miniature sensor of size 1.0x2.5x0.525 mm, consisting of only two crossed wires, shows excellent directional sensitivity in both directions, thus requiring no directivity calibration, and is relatively easy to fabrica

  19. Two-dimensional microstrip detector for neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oed, A. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Because of their robust design, gas microstrip detectors, which were developed at ILL, can be assembled relatively quickly, provided the prefabricated components are available. At the beginning of 1996, orders were received for the construction of three two-dimensional neutron detectors. These detectors have been completed. The detectors are outlined below. (author). 2 refs.

  20. Two-dimensional magma-repository interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, O.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of magma-repository interactions reveal that the three phases --a shock tube, shock reflection and amplification, and shock attenuation and decay phase-- in a one-dimensional flow tube model have a precursor. This newly identified phase ``zero'' consists of the impact of

  1. Two-dimensional subwavelength plasmonic lattice solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, F; Hu, B; Panoiu, N C

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of plasmonic lattice solitons (PLSs) formed in two-dimensional (2D) arrays of metallic nanowires embedded into a nonlinear medium with Kerr nonlinearity. We analyze two classes of 2D PLSs families, namely, fundamental and vortical PLSs in both focusing and defocusing media. Their existence, stability, and subwavelength spatial confinement are studied in detai

  2. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, Jose; Stampfer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2...

  3. Volatilizable Biogenic Organic Compounds (VBOCs with two dimensional Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS: sampling methods, VBOC complexity, and chromatographic retention data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC with detection by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS was applied in the rapid analysis of air samples containing highly complex mixtures of volatilizable biogenic organic compounds (VBOCs. VBOC analytical methodologies are briefly reviewed, and optimal conditions are discussed for sampling with both adsorption/thermal desorption (ATD cartridges and solid-phase microextraction (SPME fibers. Air samples containing VBOC emissions from leaves of two tree species (Cedrus atlantica and Calycolpus moritzianus were obtained by both ATD and SPME. The optimized gas chromatographic conditions utilized a 45 m, 0.25 mm I.D. low-polarity primary column (DB-VRX, 1.4 μm film and a 1.5 m, 0.25 mm I.D. polar secondary column (StabilwaxTM, 0.25 μm film. Excellent separation was achieved in a 36 min temperature programmed GC × GC chromatogram. Thousands of VBOC peaks were present in the sample chromatograms; hundreds of tentative identifications by NIST mass spectral matching are provided. Very few of the tentatively identified compounds are currently available as authentic standards. Minimum detection limit values for a 5 l ATD sample were 3.5 pptv (10 ng m−3 for isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein, and ~1.5 pptv (~10 ng m−3 for monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Kovats-type chromatographic retention index values on the primary column and relative retention time values on the secondary column are provided for 21 standard compounds and for 417 tentatively identified VBOCs. 19 of the 21 authentic standard compounds were found in one of the Cedrus atlantica SPME samples. In addition, easily quantifiable levels of at least 13 sesquiterpenes were found in an ATD sample obtained from a branch enclosure of Calycolpus moritzianus. Overall, the results obtained via GC × GC-TOFMS highlight an extreme, and largely uncharacterized diversity of VBOCs, consistent with the hypothesis that sesquiterpenes and

  4. Volatilizable Biogenic Organic Compounds (VBOCs) with two dimensional Gas Chromatography-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS): sampling methods, VBOC complexity, and chromatographic retention data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, J. F.; Luo, W.; Melnychenko, A. N.; Barsanti, K. C.; Isabelle, L. M.; Chen, C.; Guenther, A. B.; Rosenstiel, T. N.

    2012-02-01

    Two dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) with detection by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) was applied in the rapid analysis of air samples containing highly complex mixtures of volatilizable biogenic organic compounds (VBOCs). VBOC analytical methodologies are briefly reviewed, and optimal conditions are discussed for sampling with both adsorption/thermal desorption (ATD) cartridges and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. Air samples containing VBOC emissions from leaves of two tree species (Cedrus atlantica and Calycolpus moritzianus) were obtained by both ATD and SPME. The optimized gas chromatographic conditions utilized a 45 m, 0.25 mm I.D. low-polarity primary column (DB-VRX, 1.4 μm film) and a 1.5 m, 0.25 mm I.D. polar secondary column (StabilwaxTM, 0.25 μm film). Excellent separation was achieved in a 36 min temperature programmed GC × GC chromatogram. Thousands of VBOC peaks were present in the sample chromatograms; hundreds of tentative identifications by NIST mass spectral matching are provided. Very few of the tentatively identified compounds are currently available as authentic standards. Minimum detection limit values for a 5 l ATD sample were 3.5 pptv (10 ng m-3) for isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein, and ~1.5 pptv (~10 ng m-3) for monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Kovats-type chromatographic retention index values on the primary column and relative retention time values on the secondary column are provided for 21 standard compounds and for 417 tentatively identified VBOCs. 19 of the 21 authentic standard compounds were found in one of the Cedrus atlantica SPME samples. In addition, easily quantifiable levels of at least 13 sesquiterpenes were found in an ATD sample obtained from a branch enclosure of Calycolpus moritzianus. Overall, the results obtained via GC × GC-TOFMS highlight an extreme, and largely uncharacterized diversity of VBOCs, consistent with the hypothesis that sesquiterpenes and other compounds

  5. Volatilizable biogenic organic compounds (VBOCs with two dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS: sampling methods, VBOC complexity, and chromatographic retention data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC with detection by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS was applied in the rapid analysis of air samples containing highly complex mixtures of volatilizable biogenic organic compounds (VBOCs. VBOC analytical methodologies are briefly reviewed, and optimal conditions are discussed for sampling with both adsorption/thermal desorption (ATD cartridges and solid-phase microextraction (SPME fibers. Air samples containing VBOC emissions from leaves of two tree species (Cedrus atlantica and Calycolpus moritzianus were obtained by both ATD and SPME. The optimized gas chromatographic conditions utilized a 45 m, 0.25 mm I.D. low-polarity primary column (DB-VRX, 1.4 μm film and a 1.5 m, 0.25 mm I.D. polar secondary column (Stabilwax® 0.25 μm film. Excellent separation was achieved in a 36 min temperature programmed GC × GC chromatogram. Thousands of VBOC peaks were present in the sample chromatograms; hundreds of tentative identifications by NIST mass spectral matching are provided. Very few of the tentatively identified compounds are currently available as authentic standards. Method detection limit values for a 5 l ATD sample were 3.5 pptv (10 ng m−3 for isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone, and methacrolein, and ~1.5 pptv (~10 ng m−3 for monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Kovats-type chromatographic retention index values on the primary column and relative retention time values on the secondary column are provided for 21 standard compounds and for 417 tentatively identified VBOCs. 19 of the 21 authentic standard compounds were found in one of the Cedrus atlantica SPME samples. In addition, easily quantifiable levels of at least 13 sesquiterpenes were found in an ATD sample obtained from a branch enclosure of Calycolpus moritzianus. Overall, the results obtained via GC × GC-TOFMS highlight an extreme, and largely uncharacterized diversity of VBOCs, consistent with the hypothesis that sesquiterpenes and other

  6. Evaluation of intrinsic chemical kinetics and transient product spectra from time-resolved spectroscopic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioumaev, A K

    1997-09-01

    This communication is devoted to the evaluation of true spectra and intrinsic (microscopic) rate constants from apparent kinetics measured in time-resolved spectroscopic experiments monitoring complex relaxation dynamics of multi-intermediate systems. Retinal proteins, cytochrom c oxidase, phytochrome, hemoglobin, and photoactive yellow protein are examples of natural systems in which several transient states (intermediates) overlap so strongly, both in time and spectral domains, that their isolation and full characterization by classical biochemical methods is impossible, and mathematical evaluation of their true spectra and microscopic kinetic constants is required. Most of the popular methods for analysis of kinetic data, global fitting (GF), singular value decomposition (SVD), principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA), are applicable to two-dimensional (2D, in time and spectral domains) arrays of data. All these methods produce only a phenomenological description of data, that approximates the measured data only with apparent kinetics. A fundamental limitation, namely, insufficient information in 2D data, does not allow any of these methods to reach the final goal: to recalculate from apparent to intrinsic values in any but the most trivial cases. A strategy was proposed (J.F. Nagle, Biophys. J.. 59 (1991) 476-487) to include an additional (third) information-rich dimension, temperature, into the simultaneous computer analysis. A simultaneous direct fitting of 3D data arrays to systems of differential rate equations allows recalculation of apparent kinetics into true spectra and intrinsic rate constants. In spite of its evident theoretical advantages, this strategy has not been successful on real data. Here we describe another custom-built program, SCHEMEFIT, developed for the same purpose: to fit measured kinetics directly to the system of coupled differential rate equations describing the photochrome's relaxation dynamics. Though sharing the

  7. Chemical characterization of the acid alteration of diesel fuel: Non-targeted analysis by two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry with tile-based Fisher ratio and combinatorial threshold determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, Brendon A.; Pinkerton, David K.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2016-04-01

    The illicit chemical alteration of petroleum fuels is of scientific interest, particularly to regulatory agencies which set fuel specifications, or excises based on those specifications. One type of alteration is the reaction of diesel fuel with concentrated sulfuric acid. Such reactions are known to subtly alter the chemical composition of the fuel, particularly the aromatic species native to the fuel. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC–TOFMS) is ideally suited for the analysis of diesel fuel, but may provide the analyst with an overwhelming amount of data, particularly in sample-class comparison experiments comprised of many samples. The tile-based Fisher-ratio (F-ratio) method reduces the abundance of data in a GC × GC–TOFMS experiment to only the peaks which significantly distinguish the unaltered and acid altered sample classes. Three samples of diesel fuel from different filling stations were each altered to discover chemical features, i.e., analyte peaks, which were consistently changed by the acid reaction. Using different fuels prioritizes the discovery of features which are likely to be robust to the variation present between fuel samples and which will consequently be useful in determining whether an unknown sample has been acid altered. The subsequent analysis confirmed that aromatic species are removed by the acid alteration, with the degree of removal consistent with predicted reactivity toward electrophilic aromatic sulfonation. Additionally, we observed that alkenes and alkynes were also removed from the fuel, and that sulfur dioxide or compounds that degrade to sulfur dioxide are generated by the acid alteration. In addition to applying the previously reported tile-based F-ratio method, this report also expands null distribution analysis to algorithmically determine an F-ratio threshold to confidently select only the features which are sufficiently class-distinguishing. When

  8. Electronics based on two-dimensional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Gianluca; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Palacios, Tomás; Neumaier, Daniel; Seabaugh, Alan; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Colombo, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    The compelling demand for higher performance and lower power consumption in electronic systems is the main driving force of the electronics industry's quest for devices and/or architectures based on new materials. Here, we provide a review of electronic devices based on two-dimensional materials, outlining their potential as a technological option beyond scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor switches. We focus on the performance limits and advantages of these materials and associated technologies, when exploited for both digital and analog applications, focusing on the main figures of merit needed to meet industry requirements. We also discuss the use of two-dimensional materials as an enabling factor for flexible electronics and provide our perspectives on future developments.

  9. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, A. O.; Zhirov, O. V.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists ab aeterno. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. While PageRank highlights very well known nodes with many ingoing links, CheiRank highlights very communicative nodes with many outgoing links. In this way the ranking becomes two-dimensional. Using CheiRank and PageRank we analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  10. Two-Dimensional NMR Lineshape Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Ramos, Andres; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2016-04-01

    NMR titration experiments are a rich source of structural, mechanistic, thermodynamic and kinetic information on biomolecular interactions, which can be extracted through the quantitative analysis of resonance lineshapes. However, applications of such analyses are frequently limited by peak overlap inherent to complex biomolecular systems. Moreover, systematic errors may arise due to the analysis of two-dimensional data using theoretical frameworks developed for one-dimensional experiments. Here we introduce a more accurate and convenient method for the analysis of such data, based on the direct quantum mechanical simulation and fitting of entire two-dimensional experiments, which we implement in a new software tool, TITAN (TITration ANalysis). We expect the approach, which we demonstrate for a variety of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, to be particularly useful in providing information on multi-step or multi-component interactions.

  11. Towards two-dimensional search engines

    CERN Document Server

    Ermann, Leonardo; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way the ranking of nodes becomes two-dimensional that paves the way for development of two-dimensional search engines of new type. Information flow properties on PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian Universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  12. Toward two-dimensional search engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, L.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way, the ranking of nodes becomes two dimensional which paves the way for the development of two-dimensional search engines of a new type. Statistical properties of information flow on the PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. A special emphasis is done for British universities networks using the large database publicly available in the UK. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  13. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M.; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-01

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  14. A two-dimensional Dirac fermion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøggild, Peter; Caridad, José M; Stampfer, Christoph; Calogero, Gaetano; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-06-09

    The electron microscope has been a powerful, highly versatile workhorse in the fields of material and surface science, micro and nanotechnology, biology and geology, for nearly 80 years. The advent of two-dimensional materials opens new possibilities for realizing an analogy to electron microscopy in the solid state. Here we provide a perspective view on how a two-dimensional (2D) Dirac fermion-based microscope can be realistically implemented and operated, using graphene as a vacuum chamber for ballistic electrons. We use semiclassical simulations to propose concrete architectures and design rules of 2D electron guns, deflectors, tunable lenses and various detectors. The simulations show how simple objects can be imaged with well-controlled and collimated in-plane beams consisting of relativistic charge carriers. Finally, we discuss the potential of such microscopes for investigating edges, terminations and defects, as well as interfaces, including external nanoscale structures such as adsorbed molecules, nanoparticles or quantum dots.

  15. Spectroscopic analysis of time-resolved emission from detonating thin film explosive samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jeffrey J.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Jilek, Brook A.; Knepper, Robert; Tappan, Alexander S.; Damm, David L.

    2017-01-01

    We report a series of time-resolved spectroscopic measurements that aim to characterize the reactions that occur during shock initiation of high explosives. The experiments employ time- and wavelength-resolved emission spectroscopy to analyze light emitted from detonating thin explosive films. This paper presents analysis of optical emission spectra from hexanitrostilbene (HNS) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) thin film samples. Both vibrationally resolved and broadband emission features are observed in the spectra and area as electronic transitions of intermediate species.

  16. Two dimensional fermions in four dimensional YM

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, R

    2009-01-01

    Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation of SU(N) live on a two dimensional torus flatly embedded in $R^4$. They interact with a four dimensional SU(N) Yang Mills vector potential preserving a global chiral symmetry at finite $N$. As the size of the torus in units of $\\frac{1}{\\Lambda_{SU(N)}}$ is varied from small to large, the chiral symmetry gets spontaneously broken in the infinite $N$ limit.

  17. Two-dimensional Kagome photonic bandgap waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Søndergaard, Thomas; Libori, Stig E. Barkou;

    2000-01-01

    The transverse-magnetic photonic-bandgap-guidance properties are investigated for a planar two-dimensional (2-D) Kagome waveguide configuration using a full-vectorial plane-wave-expansion method. Single-moded well-localized low-index guided modes are found. The localization of the optical modes...... is investigated with respect to the width of the 2-D Kagome waveguide, and the number of modes existing for specific frequencies and waveguide widths is mapped out....

  18. String breaking in two-dimensional QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hornbostel, K J

    1999-01-01

    I present results of a numerical calculation of the effects of light quark-antiquark pairs on the linear heavy-quark potential in light-cone quantized two-dimensional QCD. I extract the potential from the Q-Qbar component of the ground-state wavefunction, and observe string breaking at the heavy-light meson pair threshold. I briefly comment on the states responsible for the breaking.

  19. Two-dimensional supramolecular electron spin arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Nowakowski, Jan; Liu, Shi-Xia; Jaggi, Michael; Siewert, Dorota; Girovsky, Jan; Shchyrba, Aneliia; Hählen, Tatjana; Kleibert, Armin; Oppeneer, Peter M; Nolting, Frithjof; Decurtins, Silvio; Jung, Thomas A; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2013-05-07

    A bottom-up approach is introduced to fabricate two-dimensional self-assembled layers of molecular spin-systems containing Mn and Fe ions arranged in a chessboard lattice. We demonstrate that the Mn and Fe spin states can be reversibly operated by their selective response to coordination/decoordination of volatile ligands like ammonia (NH3). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  1. Two dimensional echocardiographic detection of intraatrial masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, N L; Soulen, R L; Kotler, M N; Mintz, G S

    1981-11-01

    With two dimensional echocardiography, a left atrial mass was detected in 19 patients. Of these, 10 patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis had a left atrial thrombus. The distinctive two dimensional echocardiographic features of left atrial thrombus included a mass of irregular nonmobile laminated echos within an enlarged atrial cavity, usually with a broad base of attachment to the posterior left atrial wall. Seven patients had a left atrial myxoma. Usually, the myxoma appeared as a mottled ovoid, sharply demarcated mobile mass attached to the interatrial septum. One patient had a right atrial angiosarcoma that appeared as a nonmobile mass extending from the inferior vena caval-right atrial junction into the right atrial cavity. One patient had a left atrial leiomyosarcoma producing a highly mobile mass attached to the lateral wall of the left atrium. M mode echocardiography detected six of the seven myxomas, one thrombus and neither of the other tumors. Thus, two dimensional echocardiography appears to be the technique of choice in the detection, localization and differentiation of intraatrial masses.

  2. Time-resolved detection of surface plasmon polaritons with a scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Ha, T.; Jensen, Jacob Riis;

    1998-01-01

    We present the time-resolved detection of surface plasmon polaritons with an STM. The results indicate that the time resolved signal is due to rectification of coherently superimposed plasmon voltages. The comparison with differential reflectivity measurements shows that the tip itself influences...

  3. Time-resolved Monte Carlo Simulation of Propagation of Photons Through Layered Tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Min(陈敏); CHEN Jianwen(陈建文); GAO Hongyi(高鸿奕); XU Zhizhan(徐志展)

    2002-01-01

    The propagation of photons through layered tissues is discussed using time resolved Monte Carlo method. The effects of the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and anisotropy coefficient on the shape of time resolved transmission are investigated. The energy attenuation of light in layered tissues is also achieved for the infinitesimal-width light and infinite-width light, respectively.

  4. Phylogenomics resolves the timing and pattern of insect evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misof, Bernhard; Liu, Shanlin; Meusemann, Karen; Peters, Ralph S; Donath, Alexander; Mayer, Christoph; Frandsen, Paul B; Ware, Jessica; Flouri, Tomáš; Beutel, Rolf G; Niehuis, Oliver; Petersen, Malte; Izquierdo-Carrasco, Fernando; Wappler, Torsten; Rust, Jes; Aberer, Andre J; Aspöck, Ulrike; Aspöck, Horst; Bartel, Daniela; Blanke, Alexander; Berger, Simon; Böhm, Alexander; Buckley, Thomas R; Calcott, Brett; Chen, Junqing; Friedrich, Frank; Fukui, Makiko; Fujita, Mari; Greve, Carola; Grobe, Peter; Gu, Shengchang; Huang, Ying; Jermiin, Lars S; Kawahara, Akito Y; Krogmann, Lars; Kubiak, Martin; Lanfear, Robert; Letsch, Harald; Li, Yiyuan; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Jiguang; Lu, Haorong; Machida, Ryuichiro; Mashimo, Yuta; Kapli, Pashalia; McKenna, Duane D; Meng, Guanliang; Nakagaki, Yasutaka; Navarrete-Heredia, José Luis; Ott, Michael; Ou, Yanxiang; Pass, Günther; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Pohl, Hans; von Reumont, Björn M; Schütte, Kai; Sekiya, Kaoru; Shimizu, Shota; Slipinski, Adam; Stamatakis, Alexandros; Song, Wenhui; Su, Xu; Szucsich, Nikolaus U; Tan, Meihua; Tan, Xuemei; Tang, Min; Tang, Jingbo; Timelthaler, Gerald; Tomizuka, Shigekazu; Trautwein, Michelle; Tong, Xiaoli; Uchifune, Toshiki; Walzl, Manfred G; Wiegmann, Brian M; Wilbrandt, Jeanne; Wipfler, Benjamin; Wong, Thomas K F; Wu, Qiong; Wu, Gengxiong; Xie, Yinlong; Yang, Shenzhou; Yang, Qing; Yeates, David K; Yoshizawa, Kazunori; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Wenwei; Zhang, Yunhui; Zhao, Jing; Zhou, Chengran; Zhou, Lili; Ziesmann, Tanja; Zou, Shijie; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Kjer, Karl M; Zhou, Xin

    2014-11-07

    Insects are the most speciose group of animals, but the phylogenetic relationships of many major lineages remain unresolved. We inferred the phylogeny of insects from 1478 protein-coding genes. Phylogenomic analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences, with site-specific nucleotide or domain-specific amino acid substitution models, produced statistically robust and congruent results resolving previously controversial phylogenetic relations hips. We dated the origin of insects to the Early Ordovician [~479 million years ago (Ma)], of insect flight to the Early Devonian (~406 Ma), of major extant lineages to the Mississippian (~345 Ma), and the major diversification of holometabolous insects to the Early Cretaceous. Our phylogenomic study provides a comprehensive reliable scaffold for future comparative analyses of evolutionary innovations among insects.

  5. Field-induced alignment of a smectic-A phase: a time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bras, W; Emsley, J W; Levine, Y K; Luckhurst, G R; Seddon, J M; Timimi, B A

    2004-09-01

    The field-induced alignment of a smectic-A phase is, in principle, a complicated process involving the director rotation via the interaction with the field and the layer rotation via the molecular interactions. Time-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has revealed this complexity in the case of the director alignment, but provides no direct information on the motion of the layers. Here we describe a time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment using synchrotron radiation to solve the challenging problem of capturing the diffraction pattern on a time scale which is fast in comparison with that for the alignment of the smectic layers. We have investigated the alignment of the smectic-A phase of 4-octyl-4(')-cyanobiphenyl by a magnetic field. The experiment consists of creating a monodomain sample of the smectic-A phase by slow cooling from the nematic phase in a magnetic field with a flux density of 7 T. The sample is then turned quickly through an angle phi(0) about an axis parallel to the x-ray beam direction but orthogonal to the field. A sequence of two-dimensional small angle x-ray diffraction patterns are then collected at short time intervals. Experiments were carried out for different values of phi(0), and at different temperatures. The results show that the alignment behavior changes fundamentally when phi(0) exceeds 45 degrees, and that there is a sharp change in the alignment process when the temperature is less than 3 degrees C below the smectic-A-nematic transition. The results of the x-ray experiments are in broad agreement with the NMR results, but reveal major phenomena concerning the maintenance of the integrity of the smectic-A layer structure during the alignment process. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  6. The Persistence Problem in Two-Dimensional Fluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Perlekar, Prasad; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Pandit, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    We present a natural framework for studying the persistence problem in two-dimensional fluid turbulence by using the Okubo-Weiss parameter {\\Lambda} to distinguish between vortical and extensional regions. We then use a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equation with Ekman friction to study probability distribution functions (PDFs) of the persistence times of vortical and extensional regions by employing both Eulerian and Lagrangian measurements. We find that, in the Eulerian case, the persistence-time PDFs have exponential tails; by contrast, this PDF for Lagrangian particles, in vortical regions, has a power-law tail with a universal exponent {\\theta} = 3.1 \\pm 0.2.

  7. Two-dimensional hazard estimation for longevity analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fledelius, Peter; Guillen, M.; Nielsen, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate developments in Danish mortality based on data from 1974-1998 working in a two-dimensional model with chronological time and age as the two dimensions. The analyses are done with non-parametric kernel hazard estimation techniques. The only assumption is that the mortality surface...... the two-dimensional mortality surface. Furthermore we look at aggregated synthetic population metrics as 'population life expectancy' and 'population survival probability'. For Danish women these metrics indicate decreasing mortality with respect to chronological time. The metrics can not directly be used...... for prediction purposes. However, we suggest that life insurance companies use the estimation technique and the cross-validation for bandwidth selection when analyzing their portfolio mortality. The non-parametric approach may give valuable information prior to developing more sophisticated prediction models...

  8. Phase separation under two-dimensional Poiseuille flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwata, H

    2001-05-01

    The spinodal decomposition of a two-dimensional binary fluid under Poiseuille flow is studied by numerical simulation. We investigated time dependence of domain sizes in directions parallel and perpendicular to the flow. In an effective region of the flow, the power-law growth of a characteristic length in the direction parallel to the flow changes from the diffusive regime with the growth exponent alpha=1/3 to a new regime. The scaling invariance of the growth in the perpendicular direction is destroyed after the diffusive regime. A recurrent prevalence of thick and thin domains which determines log-time periodic oscillations has not been observed in our model. The growth exponents in the infinite system under two-dimensional Poiseuille flow are obtained by the renormalization group.

  9. Real-time digital signal processing in multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Warren, Warren S.; Fischer, Martin C.

    2016-03-01

    The use of multiphoton interactions in biological tissue for imaging contrast requires highly sensitive optical measurements. These often involve signal processing and filtering steps between the photodetector and the data acquisition device, such as photon counting and lock-in amplification. These steps can be implemented as real-time digital signal processing (DSP) elements on field-programmable gate array (FPGA) devices, an approach that affords much greater flexibility than commercial photon counting or lock-in devices. We will present progress toward developing two new FPGA-based DSP devices for multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy applications. The first is a high-speed multiharmonic lock-in amplifier for transient absorption microscopy, which is being developed for real-time analysis of the intensity-dependence of melanin, with applications in vivo and ex vivo (noninvasive histopathology of melanoma and pigmented lesions). The second device is a kHz lock-in amplifier running on a low cost (50-200) development platform. It is our hope that these FPGA-based DSP devices will enable new, high-speed, low-cost applications in multiphoton and time-resolved microscopy.

  10. Gauge invariance in the theoretical description of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Sentef, M. A.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Nonequilibrium calculations in the presence of an electric field are usually performed in a gauge, and need to be transformed to reveal the gauge-invariant observables. In this work, we discuss the issue of gauge invariance in the context of time-resolved angle-resolved pump/probe photoemission. If the probe is applied while the pump is still on, one must ensure that the calculations of the observed photocurrent are gauge invariant. We also discuss the requirement of the photoemission signal to be positive and the relationship of this constraint to gauge invariance. We end by discussing some technical details related to the perturbative derivation of the photoemission spectra, which involve processes where the pump pulse photoexcites electrons due to nonequilibrium effects.

  11. Cryptography Using Multiple Two-Dimensional Chaotic Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim S. I. Abuhaiba

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a symmetric key block cipher cryptosystem is proposed, involving multiple two-dimensional chaotic maps and using 128-bits external secret key. Computer simulations indicate that the cipher has good diffusion and confusion properties with respect to the plaintext and the key. Moreover, it produces ciphertext with random distribution. The computation time is much less than previous related works. Theoretic analysis verifies its superiority to previous cryptosystems against different types of attacks.

  12. А heuristic algorithm for two-dimensional strip packing problem

    OpenAIRE

    Dayong, Cao; Kotov, V.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we construct an improved best-fit heuristic algorithm for two-dimensional rectangular strip packing problem (2D-RSPP), and compare it with some heuristic and metaheuristic algorithms from literatures. The experimental results show that BFBCC could produce satisfied packing layouts than these methods, especially for the large problem of 50 items or more, BFBCC could get better results in shorter time.

  13. Chronology Protection in Two-Dimensional Dilaton Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mishima, T; Mishima, Takashi; Nakamichi, Akika

    1994-01-01

    The global structure of 1 + 1 dimensional compact Universe is studied in two-dimensional model of dilaton gravity. First we give a classical solution corresponding to the spacetime in which a closed time-like curve appears, and show the instability of this spacetime due to the existence of matters. We also observe quantum version of such a spacetime having closed timelike curves never reappear unless the parameters are fine-tuned.

  14. Coll Positioning systems: a two-dimensional approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrando, J J

    2006-01-01

    The basic elements of Coll positioning systems (n clocks broadcasting electromagnetic signals in a n-dimensional space-time) are presented in the two-dimensional case. This simplified approach allows us to explain and to analyze the properties and interest of these relativistic positioning systems. The positioning system defined in flat metric by two geodesic clocks is analyzed. The interest of the Coll systems in gravimetry is pointed out.

  15. Dynamic Multiscaling in Two-dimensional Fluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Perlekar, Prasad; Pandit, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We obtain, by extensive direct numerical simulations, time-dependent and equal-time structure functions for the vorticity, in both quasi-Lagrangian and Eulerian frames, for the direct-cascade regime in two-dimensional fluid turbulence with air-drag-induced friction. We show that different ways of extracting time scales from these time-dependent structure functions lead to different dynamic-multiscaling exponents, which are related to equal-time multiscaling exponents by different classes of bridge relations; for a representative value of the friction we verify that, given our error bars, these bridge relations hold.

  16. Weakly disordered two-dimensional Frenkel excitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukahil, A.; Zettili, Nouredine

    2004-03-01

    We report the results of studies of the optical properties of weakly disordered two- dimensional Frenkel excitons in the Coherent Potential Approximation (CPA). An approximate complex Green's function for a square lattice with nearest neighbor interactions is used in the self-consistent equation to determine the coherent potential. It is shown that the Density of States is very much affected by the logarithmic singularities in the Green's function. Our CPA results are in excellent agreement with previous investigations by Schreiber and Toyozawa using the Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  18. Theory of two-dimensional transformations

    OpenAIRE

    Kanayama, Yutaka J.; Krahn, Gary W.

    1998-01-01

    The article of record may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/70.720359 Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on This paper proposes a new "heterogeneous" two-dimensional (2D) transformation group ___ to solve motion analysis/planning problems in robotics. In this theory, we use a 3×1 matrix to represent a transformation as opposed to a 3×3 matrix in the homogeneous formulation. First, this theory is as capable as the homogeneous theory, Because of the minimal size, its implement...

  19. Two-dimensional ranking of Wikipedia articles

    CERN Document Server

    Zhirov, A O; Shepelyansky, D L

    2010-01-01

    The Library of Babel, described by Jorge Luis Borges, stores an enormous amount of information. The Library exists {\\it ab aeterno}. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia, becomes a modern analogue of such a Library. Information retrieval and ranking of Wikipedia articles become the challenge of modern society. We analyze the properties of two-dimensional ranking of all Wikipedia English articles and show that it gives their reliable classification with rich and nontrivial features. Detailed studies are done for countries, universities, personalities, physicists, chess players, Dow-Jones companies and other categories.

  20. Sums of two-dimensional spectral triples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Ivan, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    construct a sum of two dimensional modules which reflects some aspects of the topological dimensions of the compact metric space, but this will only give the metric back approximately. At the end we make an explicit computation of the last module for the unit interval in. The metric is recovered exactly......, the Dixmier trace induces a multiple of the Lebesgue integral but the growth of the number of eigenvalues is different from the one found for the standard differential operator on the unit interval....

  1. Binding energy of two-dimensional biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jai; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko;

    1996-01-01

    Using a model structure for a two-dimensional (2D) biexciton confined in a quantum well, it is shown that the form of the Hamiltonian of the 2D biexciton reduces into that of an exciton. The binding energies and Bohr radii of a 2D biexciton in its various internal energy states are derived...... analytically using the fractional dimension approach. The ratio of the binding energy of a 2D biexciton to that of a 2D exciton is found to be 0.228, which agrees very well with the recent experimental value. The results of our approach are compared with those of earlier theories....

  2. Dynamics of film. [two dimensional continua theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The general theory of films as two-dimensional continua are elaborated upon. As physical realizations of such a model this paper examines: inextensible films, elastic films, and nets. The suggested dynamic equations have enabled us to find out the characteristic speeds of wave propagation of the invariants of external and internal geometry and formulate the criteria of instability of their shape. Also included herein is a detailed account of the equation describing the film motions beyond the limits of the shape stability accompanied by the formation of wrinkles. The theory is illustrated by examples.

  3. Proton radiography and proton computed tomography based on time-resolved dose measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Mauro; Verburg, Joost M.; Rose, Mark; Min, Chul Hee; Tang, Shikui; Hassane Bentefour, El; Paganetti, Harald; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2013-11-01

    We present a proof of principle study of proton radiography and proton computed tomography (pCT) based on time-resolved dose measurements. We used a prototype, two-dimensional, diode-array detector capable of fast dose rate measurements, to acquire proton radiographic images expressed directly in water equivalent path length (WEPL). The technique is based on the time dependence of the dose distribution delivered by a proton beam traversing a range modulator wheel in passive scattering proton therapy systems. The dose rate produced in the medium by such a system is periodic and has a unique pattern in time at each point along the beam path and thus encodes the WEPL. By measuring the time dose pattern at the point of interest, the WEPL to this point can be decoded. If one measures the time-dose patterns at points on a plane behind the patient for a beam with sufficient energy to penetrate the patient, the obtained 2D distribution of the WEPL forms an image. The technique requires only a 2D dosimeter array and it uses only the clinical beam for a fraction of second with negligible dose to patient. We first evaluated the accuracy of the technique in determining the WEPL for static phantoms aiming at beam range verification of the brain fields of medulloblastoma patients. Accurate beam ranges for these fields can significantly reduce the dose to the cranial skin of the patient and thus the risk of permanent alopecia. Second, we investigated the potential features of the technique for real-time imaging of a moving phantom. Real-time tumor tracking by proton radiography could provide more accurate validations of tumor motion models due to the more sensitive dependence of proton beam on tissue density compared to x-rays. Our radiographic technique is rapid (˜100 ms) and simultaneous over the whole field, it can image mobile tumors without the problem of interplay effect inherently challenging for methods based on pencil beams. Third, we present the reconstructed p

  4. Statistical mechanics of two-dimensional and geophysical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, Freddy

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical study of the self-organization of two-dimensional and geophysical turbulent flows is addressed based on statistical mechanics methods. This review is a self-contained presentation of classical and recent works on this subject; from the statistical mechanics basis of the theory up to applications to Jupiter's troposphere and ocean vortices and jets. Emphasize has been placed on examples with available analytical treatment in order to favor better understanding of the physics and dynamics. The equilibrium microcanonical measure is built from the Liouville theorem. On this theoretical basis, we predict the output of the long time evolution of complex turbulent flows as statistical equilibria. This is applied to make quantitative models of two-dimensional turbulence, the Great Red Spot and other Jovian vortices, ocean jets like the Gulf-Stream, and ocean vortices. We also present recent results for non-equilibrium situations, for the studies of either the relaxation towards equilibrium or non-equi...

  5. Two Dimensional Lattice Boltzmann Method for Cavity Flow Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panjit MUSIK

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simulation of incompressible viscous flow within a two-dimensional square cavity. The objective is to develop a method originated from Lattice Gas (cellular Automata (LGA, which utilises discrete lattice as well as discrete time and can be parallelised easily. Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM, known as discrete Lattice kinetics which provide an alternative for solving the Navier–Stokes equations and are generally used for fluid simulation, is chosen for the study. A specific two-dimensional nine-velocity square Lattice model (D2Q9 Model is used in the simulation with the velocity at the top of the cavity kept fixed. LBM is an efficient method for reproducing the dynamics of cavity flow and the results which are comparable to those of previous work.

  6. [A method for time-resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cong-Yuan; Han, Zhen-Yu; Li, Chao-Yang; Yu, Yun-Si; Wang, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Qiu-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is strongly time related. Time-resolved LIBS measurement is an important technique for the research on laser induced plasma evolution and self-absorption of the emission lines. Concerning the temporal characteristics of LIBS spectrum, a method is proposed in the present paper which can achieve micros-scale time-resolved LIBS measurement by using general ms-scale detector. By setting different integration delay time of the ms-scale spectrum detector, a series of spectrum are recorded. And the integration delay time interval should be longer than the worst temporal precision. After baseline correction and spectrum fitting, the intensity of the character line was obtained. Calculating this intensity with differential method at a certain time interval and then the difference value is the time-resolved line intensity. Setting the plasma duration time as X-axis and the time-resolved line intensity as Y-axis, the evolution curve of the character line intensity can be plotted. Character line with overlap-free and smooth background should be a priority to be chosen for analysis. Using spectrometer with ms-scale integration time and a control system with temporal accuracy is 0.021 micros, experiments carried out. The results validate that this method can be used to characterize the evolution of LIBS characteristic lines and can reduce the cost of the time-resolved LIBS measurement system. This method makes high time-resolved LIBS spectrum measurement possible with cheaper system.

  7. Procedures for two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollaksen, S.L.; Giometti, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) of proteins, using isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in the second, was first described in 1975. In the 20 years since those publications, numerous modifications of the original method have evolved. The ISO-DALT system of 2DE is a high-throughput approach that has stood the test of time. The problem of casting many isoelectric focusing gels and SDS-PAGE slab gels (up to 20) in a reproducible manner has been solved by the use of the techniques and equipment described in this manual. The ISO-DALT system of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis originated in the late 1970s and has been modified many times to improve its high-resolution, high-throughput capabilities. This report provides the detailed procedures used with the current ISO-DALT system to prepare, run, stain, and photograph two-dimensional gels for protein analysis.

  8. Visualising the strain distribution in suspended two-dimensional materials under local deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elibol, Kenan; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Hummel, Stefan; Kotakoski, Jani; Argentero, Giacomo; Meyer, Jannik C.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the use of combined simultaneous atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laterally resolved Raman spectroscopy to study the strain distribution around highly localised deformations in suspended two-dimensional materials. Using the AFM tip as a nanoindentation probe, we induce localised strain in suspended few-layer graphene, which we adopt as a two-dimensional membrane model system. Concurrently, we visualise the strain distribution under and around the AFM tip in situ using hyperspectral Raman mapping via the strain-dependent frequency shifts of the few-layer graphene’s G and 2D Raman bands. Thereby we show how the contact of the nm-sized scanning probe tip results in a two-dimensional strain field with μm dimensions in the suspended membrane. Our combined AFM/Raman approach thus adds to the critically required instrumental toolbox towards nanoscale strain engineering of two-dimensional materials.

  9. Time-Resolved PIV for Space-Time Correlations in Hot Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) is being used to characterize the decay of turbulence in jet flows a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. A TR-PIV system, developed in-house at the NASA Glenn Research Center, is capable of acquiring planar PIV image frame pairs at up to 10 kHz. The data reported here were collected at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.9 and at temperature ratios of 0.89 and 1.76. The field of view of the TR-PIV system covered 6 nozzle diameters along the lip line of the 50.8 mm diameter jet. The cold flow data at Mach 0.5 were compared with hotwire anemometry measurements in order to validate the new TR-PIV technique. The axial turbulence profiles measured across the shear layer using TR-PIV were thinner than those measured using hotwire anemometry and remained centered along the nozzle lip line. The collected TR-PIV data illustrate the differences in the single point statistical flow properties of cold and hot jet flows. The planar, time-resolved velocity records were then used to compute two-point space-time correlations of the flow at the Mach 0.9 flow condition. The TR-PIV results show that there are differences in the convective velocity and growth rate of the turbulent structures between cold and hot flows at the same Mach number.

  10. Two-dimensional gauge theoretic supergravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangemi, D.; Leblanc, M.

    1994-05-01

    We investigate two-dimensional supergravity theories, which can be built from a topological and gauge invariant action defined on an ordinary surface. One is the N = 1 supersymmetric extension of the Jackiw-Teitelboim model presented by Chamseddine in a superspace formalism. We complement the proof of Montano, Aoaki and Sonnenschein that this extension is topological and gauge invariant, based on the graded de Sitter algebra. Not only do the equations of motion correspond to the supergravity ones and do gauge transformations encompass local supersymmetries, but we also identify the ∫-theory with the superfield formalism action written by Chamseddine. Next, we show that the N = 1 supersymmetric extension of string-inspired two-dimensional dilaton gravity put forward by Park and Strominger cannot be written as a ∫-theory. As an alternative, we propose two topological and gauge theories that are based on a graded extension of the extended Poincaré algebra and satisfy a vanishing-curvature condition. Both models are supersymmetric extensions of the string-inspired dilaton gravity.

  11. Two-Dimensional Theory of Scientific Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yaghmaie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientific representation is an interesting topic for philosophers of science, many of whom have recently explored it from different points of view. There are currently two competing approaches to the issue: cognitive and non-cognitive, and each of them claims its own merits over the other. This article tries to provide a hybrid theory of scientific representation, called Two-Dimensional Theory of Scientific Representation, which has the merits of the two accounts and is free of their shortcomings. To do this, we will argue that although scientific representation needs to use the notion of intentionality, such a notion is defined and realized in a simply structural form contrary to what cognitive approach says about intentionality. After a short introduction, the second part of the paper is devoted to introducing theories of scientific representation briefly. In the third part, the structural accounts of representation will be criticized. The next step is to introduce the two-dimensional theory which involves two key components: fixing and structural fitness. It will be argued that fitness is an objective and non-intentional relation, while fixing is intentional.

  12. Two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhenyue; Deng, Junkai; Chandrakumara, Ganaka G.; Yan, Wenyi; Liu, Jefferson Zhe

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the increasing demand for micro-/nano-technologies, stimuli-responsive shape memory materials at nanoscale have recently attracted great research interests. However, by reducing the size of conventional shape memory materials down to approximately nanometre range, the shape memory effect diminishes. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we report the discovery of a shape memory effect in a two-dimensional atomically thin graphene oxide crystal with ordered epoxy groups, namely C8O. A maximum recoverable strain of 14.5% is achieved as a result of reversible phase transition between two intrinsically stable phases. Our calculations conclude co-existence of the two stable phases in a coherent crystal lattice, giving rise to the possibility of constructing multiple temporary shapes in a single material, thus, enabling highly desirable programmability. With an atomic thickness, excellent shape memory mechanical properties and electric field stimulus, the discovery of a two-dimensional shape memory graphene oxide opens a path for the development of exceptional micro-/nano-electromechanical devices.

  13. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S., E-mail: ginger@chem.washington.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  14. Existence and Stability of Two-Dimensional Compact-Like Discrete Breathers in Discrete Two-Dimensional Monatomic Square Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; TIAN Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers in discrete two-dimensional monatomic square lattices are investigated by discussing a generafized discrete two-dimensional monatomic model.It is proven that the twodimensional compact-like discrete breathers exist not only in two-dimensional soft Ф4 potentials but also in hard two-dimensional Ф4 potentials and pure two-dimensional K4 lattices.The measurements of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breather cores in soft and hard two-dimensional Ф4 potential are determined by coupling parameter K4,while those in pure two-dimensional K4 lattices have no coupling with parameter K4.The stabilities of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers correlate closely to the coupling parameter K4 and the boundary condition of lattices.

  15. Ultrabroadband two-quantum two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellen, Tobias A.; Bizimana, Laurie A.; Carbery, William P.; Breen, Ilana; Turner, Daniel B.

    2016-08-01

    A recent theoretical study proposed that two-quantum (2Q) two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy should be a background-free probe of post-Hartree-Fock electronic correlations. Testing this theoretical prediction requires an instrument capable of not only detecting multiple transitions among molecular excited states but also distinguishing molecular 2Q signals from nonresonant response. Herein we describe a 2Q 2D spectrometer with a spectral range of 300 nm that is passively phase stable and uses only beamsplitters and mirrors. We developed and implemented a dual-chopping balanced-detection method to resolve the weak molecular 2Q signals. Experiments performed on cresyl violet perchlorate and rhodamine 6G revealed distinct 2Q signals convolved with nonresonant response. Density functional theory computations helped reveal the molecular origin of these signals. The experimental and computational results demonstrate that 2Q electronic spectra can provide a singular probe of highly excited electronic states.

  16. Vibronic phenomena and exciton–vibrational interference in two-dimensional spectra of molecular aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butkus, Vytautas; Valkunas, Leonas [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Gostauto 9, 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania); Abramavicius, Darius, E-mail: darius.abramavicius@ff.vu.lt [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-01-21

    A general theory of electronic excitations in aggregates of molecules coupled to intramolecular vibrations and the harmonic environment is developed for simulation of the third-order nonlinear spectroscopy signals. It is applied in studies of the time-resolved two-dimensional coherent spectra of four characteristic model systems: weakly/strongly vibronically coupled molecular dimers interacting with high/low frequency intramolecular vibrations. The results allow us to (i) classify and define the typical spectroscopic features of vibronically coupled molecules, (ii) separate the cases, when the long-lived quantum coherences due to vibrational lifetime borrowing should be expected, (iii) define when the complete exciton–vibrational mixing occurs, and (iv) when separation of excitonic and vibrational coherences is possible.

  17. Dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas observed by ultrafast two-dimensional x-ray imaging with animation display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heya, Manabu; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Kyoko; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Takabe, Hideaki; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Inst. of Laser Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    In order to observe time-resolved, two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of x rays emitted from core plasmas at the final stage of the implosion, we have developed a multi-imaging x-ray streak camera (MIXS) and a multi-channel MIXS (McMIXS) methods as new ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging techniques. The observed time-resolved 2D x-ray and electron-temperature images of core plasmas, which are sequentially changing with time, have been displayed by using an animation method. Temporal evolutions of nonuniform structures, including shape, size, and movement of core plasmas can be observed instinctively with the animated display. The ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging with the animation display is a new powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas. (author)

  18. Primary establishment of human uterine muscle proteomic profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Hai-yuan; Lang Jing-he; Liu Zhu-feng; Zhu Lan; Leng Jin-hua; Sun Da-wei; Wang Xiao-rong

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To establish the protein profiling of human uterine muscle by two-dimensional electrophoresis.Methods:Five patients who underwent trans-abdominal hysterectomy due to cervical carcinoma in situ were in-cluded in this study.Postoperative uterine muscles were normal histologically.The total protein extracts from uter-ine muscle were separated using two-dimensional electrophoresis(2DE).Protein spots were stained by silver and de-tected by image analysis software.Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry(MALDI-TOF-MS)and peptide mass fingerprint(PMF)were used to identify the selected protein spots.Results:Well-resolved,reproducible 2DE maps of human uterine muscle were obtained.Average protein spots were 468±52 and matching rate was 82.76%.Five protein spots were successfully identified by mass spectrome-try.Conclusions:2DE coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS and PMF is a useful approach for establishing human uterine muscle proteomic profiling.This data will be useful for establishing human uterine muscle proteome database.

  19. Impact of reversed phase column pairs in comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert C; Barnes, Brian B; Haidar Ahmad, Imad A; Filgueira, Marcelo R; Carr, Peter W

    2014-09-26

    A major issue in optimizing the resolving power of two-dimensional chromatographic separations is the choice of the two phases so as to maximize the distribution of the analytes over the separation space. In this work, we studied the choice of appropriate reversed phases to use in on-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC). A set of four chemically different conventional bonded reversed phases was used in the first dimension. The second dimension column was either a conventional bonded C18 phase or a carbon-clad phase (CCP). The LC×LC chromatograms and contour plots were all rather similar indicating that the selectivities of the two phases were also similar regardless of the reverse phase column used in the first dimension. Further, the spatial coverage seen with all four first dimension stationary phases when paired with a second dimension C18 phase were low and the retention times were strongly correlated. However, when the C18 column was replaced with the CCP column much improved separations were observed with higher spatial coverages, greater orthogonalities and significant increases in the number of observed peaks.

  20. Characterization of time resolved photodetector systems for Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Powolny, François

    The main topic of this work is the study of detector systems composed of a scintillator, a photodetector and readout electronics, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In particular, the timing properties of such detector systems are studied. The first idea is to take advantage of the good timing properties of the NINO chip, which is a fast preamplifier-discriminator developed for the ALICE Time of flight detector at CERN. This chip uses a time over threshold technique that is to be applied for the first time in medical imaging applications. A unique feature of this technique is that it delivers both timing and energy information with a single digital pulse, the time stamp with the rising edge and the energy from the pulse width. This entails substantial simplification of the entire readout architecture of a tomograph. The scintillator chosen in the detector system is LSO. Crystals of 2x2x10mm3 were used. For the photodetector, APDs were first used, and were then replaced by SiPMs to make use of their highe...

  1. Time-resolved and time-scale adaptive measures of spike train synchrony

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuz, Thomas; Greschner, Martin; Andrzejak, Ralph G

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of approaches to estimate the degree of synchrony between two or more spike trains have been proposed. One of the most recent methods is the ISI-distance which extracts information from the interspike intervals (ISIs) by evaluating the ratio of the instantaneous firing rates. In contrast to most previously proposed measures it is parameter free and time-scale independent. However, it is not well suited to track changes in synchrony that are based on spike coincidences. Here we propose the SPIKE-distance, a complementary measure which is sensitive to spike coincidences but still shares the fundamental advantages of the ISI-distance. In particular, it is easy to visualize in a time-resolved manner and can be extended to a method that is also applicable to larger sets of spike trains. We show the merit of the SPIKE-distance using both simulated and real data.

  2. Time-resolved and time-scale adaptive measures of spike train synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Thomas; Chicharro, Daniel; Greschner, Martin; Andrzejak, Ralph G

    2011-01-30

    A wide variety of approaches to estimate the degree of synchrony between two or more spike trains have been proposed. One of the most recent methods is the ISI-distance which extracts information from the interspike intervals (ISIs) by evaluating the ratio of the instantaneous firing rates. In contrast to most previously proposed measures it is parameter free and time-scale independent. However, it is not well suited to track changes in synchrony that are based on spike coincidences. Here we propose the SPIKE-distance, a complementary measure which is sensitive to spike coincidences but still shares the fundamental advantages of the ISI-distance. In particular, it is easy to visualize in a time-resolved manner and can be extended to a method that is also applicable to larger sets of spike trains. We show the merit of the SPIKE-distance using both simulated and real data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Deflecting cavity dynamics for time-resolved machine studies of SXFEL user facility

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Minghao; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Radio frequency deflectors are widely used for time-resolved electron beam energy, emittance and radiation profile measurements in modern free electron laser facilities. In this paper, we present the beam dynamics aspects of the deflecting cavity of SXFEL user facility, which is located at the exit of the undulator. With a targeted time resolution around 10 fs, it is expected to be an important tool for time-resolved commissioning and machine studies for SXFEL user facility.

  4. Time-resolved chlorophyll fluorescence in forest decline research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneckenburger, H.; Schmidt, W. [Fachhochschule Aalen (Germany). Fachbereich Optoelektronik

    1997-12-01

    Aiming at clues of forest decline we studied prompt and delayed luminescence of spruce needles from the picosecond to the second time range using various self fabricated kinetic equipments including self written software. Both kinetics in the picosecond and in the seconds time range could be fitted by three exponentially decaying components yielding three amplitudes and three reaction constants each. Basically, all components showed a typical annual time course, independent of the degree of damage or air pollution. In addition, it turned out that on one hand the `slow` component of picosecond decay kinetics (decay time {tau}=2.0-3.5 ns) reflects some damage of the photosynthetic apparatus. Similarly, in long term delayed luminescence in the seconds time range the `fast` component (decay time {tau}=0.13 s) obviously carries some information on the spruces` vitality. Interestingly, all other components are scarcely affected. In the present report we present results obtained from gas exclusion experiments performed within so-called Open Top Chambers (OTC`s) at Edelmannshof, Welzheimer Wald. In general, all spruces showed the highest photosynthetic efficiencies but also the most pronounced stress symptoms during the summer period - probably due to high irradiance, drought and increased ozone concentrations. (orig.)

  5. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  6. Sufficient Controllability Condition for Affine Systems with Two-Dimensional Control and Two-Dimensional Zero Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Fetisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The controllability conditions are well known if we speak about linear stationary systems: a linear stationary system is controllable if and only if the dimension of the state vector is equal to the rank of the controllability matrix. The concept of the controllability matrix is extended to affine systems, but relations between affine systems controllability and properties of this matrix are more complicated. Various controllability conditions are set for affine systems, but they deal as usual either with systems of some special form or with controllability in some small neighborhood of the concerned point. An affine system is known to be controllable if the system is equivalent to a system of a canonical form, which is defined and regular in the whole space of states. In this case, the system is said to be feedback linearizable in the space of states. However there are examples, which illustrate that a system can be controllable even if it is not feedback linearizable in any open subset in the space of states. In this article we deal with such systems.Affine systems with two-dimensional control are considered. The system in question is assumed to be equivalent to a system of a quasicanonical form with two-dimensional zero dynamics which is defined and regular in the whole space of states. Therefore the controllability of the original system is equivalent to the controllability of the received system of a quasicanonical form. In this article the sufficient condition for an available solution of the terminal problem is proven for systems of a quasicanonical form with two-dimensional control and two-dimensional zero dynamics. The condition is valid in the case of an arbitrary time interval and arbitrary initial and finite states of the system. Therefore the controllability condition is set for systems of a quasicanonical form with two-dimensional control and two-dimensional zero dynamics. An example is given which illustrates how the proved

  7. Augmented reality simulator for training in two-dimensional echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenbach, M; Wick, C; Pieper, S; Quast, K J; Fox, T; Grunst, G; Redel, D A

    2000-02-01

    In two-dimensional echocardiography the sonographer must synthesize multiple tomographic slices into a mental three-dimensional (3D) model of the heart. Computer graphics and virtual reality environments are ideal to visualize complex 3D spatial relationships. In augmented reality (AR) applications, real and virtual image data are linked, to increase the information content. In the presented AR simulator a 3D surface model of the human heart is linked with echocardiographic volume data sets. The 3D echocardiographic data sets are registered with the heart model to establish spatial and temporal congruence. The heart model, together with an animated ultrasound sector represents a reference scenario, which displays the currently selected two-dimensional echocardiographic cutting plane calculated from the volume data set. Modifications of the cutting plane within the echocardiographic data are transferred and visualized simultaneously and in real time within the reference scenario. The trainee can interactively explore the 3D heart model and the registered 3D echocardiographic data sets by an animated ultrasound probe, whose position is controlled by an electromagnetic tracking system. The tracking system is attached to a dummy transducer and placed on a plastic puppet to give a realistic impression of a two-dimensional echocardiographic examination.

  8. Time-resolved crystallography and protein design: signalling photoreceptors and optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Keith

    2014-07-17

    Time-resolved X-ray crystallography and solution scattering have been successfully conducted on proteins on time-scales down to around 100 ps, set by the duration of the hard X-ray pulses emitted by synchrotron sources. The advent of hard X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), which emit extremely intense, very brief, coherent X-ray pulses, opens the exciting possibility of time-resolved experiments with femtosecond time resolution on macromolecular structure, in both single crystals and solution. The X-ray pulses emitted by an FEL differ greatly in many properties from those emitted by a synchrotron, in ways that at first glance make time-resolved measurements of X-ray scattering with the required accuracy extremely challenging. This opens up several questions which I consider in this brief overview. Are there likely to be chemically and biologically interesting structural changes to be revealed on the femtosecond time-scale? How shall time-resolved experiments best be designed and conducted to exploit the properties of FELs and overcome challenges that they pose? To date, fast time-resolved reactions have been initiated by a brief laser pulse, which obviously requires that the system under study be light-sensitive. Although this is true for proteins of the visual system and for signalling photoreceptors, it is not naturally the case for most interesting biological systems. To generate more biological targets for time-resolved study, can this limitation be overcome by optogenetic, chemical or other means?

  9. Direct observation of photocarrier electron dynamics in C60 films on graphite by time-resolved two-photon photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuta, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Tsutomu; Nakaya, Masato; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    Time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy is employed to probe the electronic states of a C60 fullerene film formed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), acting as a model two-dimensional (2D) material for multi-layered graphene. Owing to the in-plane sp2-hybridized nature of the HOPG, the TR-2PPE spectra reveal the energetics and dynamics of photocarriers in the C60 film: after hot excitons are nascently formed in C60 via intramolecular excitation by a pump photon, they dissociate into photocarriers of free electrons and the corresponding holes, and the electrons are subsequently detected by a probe photon as photoelectrons. The decay rate of photocarriers from the C60 film into the HOPG is evaluated to be 1.31 × 1012 s‑1, suggesting a weak van der Waals interaction at the interface, where the photocarriers tentatively occupy the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of C60. The photocarrier electron dynamics following the hot exciton dissociation in the organic thin films has not been realized for any metallic substrates exhibiting strong interactions with the overlayer. Furthermore, the thickness dependence of the electron lifetime in the LUMO reveals that the electron hopping rate in C60 layers is 3.3 ± 1.2 × 1013 s‑1.

  10. Time-resolved studies of interatomic Coulombic decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frühling, U. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Trinter, F. [Institut für Kernphysik, Goethe Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str.1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Karimi, F. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Williams, J.B. [Institut für Kernphysik, Goethe Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str.1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Jahnke, T., E-mail: jahnke@atom.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Goethe Universität, Max-von-Laue-Str.1, 60438 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) is a decay mechanism occurring in loosely bound matter, e.g. in systems bound by van der Waals-forces or hydrogen bonds. In many such cases the decay time is similar to the time scale of nuclear motion during the decay. As the efficiency of ICD strongly depends on the internuclear distance of the atoms or molecules involved in the decay, an overall non-trivial temporal decay behavior arises. The progress of examining the time-domain aspects of interatomic Coulombic decay is summarized in this short topical review with a special emphasis on experiments that are now feasible due to the developments of free-electron lasers.

  11. Time-resolved spin-dependent processes in magnetic field effects in organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiming; Li, Xianjie; Li, Feng

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the time-resolved magnetic field effects (MFEs) in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum (Alq3) based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through the transient electroluminescence (EL) method. The values of magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) decrease with the time, and the decreasing slope is proportional to the driving voltage. Specifically, negative MELs are seen when the driving voltage is high enough (V > 11 V). We propose a model to elucidate the spin-dependent processes and theoretically simulate the time-resolved MELs. In particular, this dynamic analysis of time-resolved MELs reveals that the intersystem crossing between singlet and triplet electron-hole pairs and the triplet-triplet annihilation are responsible for the time-resolved MELs at the beginning and enduring periods of the pulse, respectively.

  12. Diffuse optical tomography based on time-resolved compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, A.; Betcke, M.; Di Sieno, L.; Bassi, A.; Ducros, N.; Pifferi, A.; Valentini, G.; Arridge, S.; D'Andrea, C.

    2017-02-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) can be described as a highly multidimensional problem generating a huge data set with long acquisition/computational times. Biological tissue behaves as a low pass filter in the spatial frequency domain, hence compressive sensing approaches, based on both patterned illumination and detection, are useful to reduce the data set while preserving the information content. In this work, a multiple-view time-domain compressed sensing DOT system is presented and experimentally validated on non-planar tissue-mimicking phantoms containing absorbing inclusions.

  13. Real time optical Biopsy: Time-resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy instrumentation and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittle, David S.; Vasefi, Fartash; Patil, Chirag G.; Mamelak, Adam; Black, Keith L.; Butte, Pramod V.

    2016-12-01

    The Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-FS) has the potential to differentiate tumor and normal tissue in real time during surgical excision. In this manuscript, we describe the design of a novel TR-FS device, along with preliminary data on detection accuracy for fluorophores in a mixture. The instrument is capable of near real-time fluorescence lifetime acquisition in multiple spectral bands and analysis. It is also able to recover fluorescence lifetime with sub-20ps accuracy as validated with individual organic fluorescence dyes and dye mixtures yielding lifetime values for standard fluorescence dyes that closely match with published data. We also show that TR-FS is able to quantify the relative concentration of fluorescence dyes in a mixture by the unmixing of lifetime decays. We show that the TR-FS prototype is able to identify in near-real time the concentrations of dyes in a complex mixture based on previously trained data. As a result, we demonstrate that in complex mixtures of fluorophores, the relative concentration information is encoded in the fluorescence lifetime across multiple spectral bands. We show for the first time the temporal and spectral measurements of a mixture of fluorochromes and the ability to differentiate relative concentrations of each fluorochrome mixture in real time.

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopy in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Box, F. M. A.; Howard, J.; VandeKolk, E.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    At the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak spectrometers are used to diagnose the velocity distribution and abundances of impurity ions. Quantities can be measured as a function of time, and the temporal resolution depends on the line emissivity and can be as good as 0.2 ms for the strongest lines.

  15. Time-resolved spectroscopy in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Box, F. M. A.; Howard, J.; VandeKolk, E.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    At the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak spectrometers are used to diagnose the velocity distribution and abundances of impurity ions. Quantities can be measured as a function of time, and the temporal resolution depends on the line emissivity and can be as good as 0.2 ms for the strongest lines. S

  16. Optimal excitation of two dimensional Holmboe instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Navid C

    2010-01-01

    Highly stratified shear layers are rendered unstable even at high stratifications by Holmboe instabilities when the density stratification is concentrated in a small region of the shear layer. These instabilities may cause mixing in highly stratified environments. However these instabilities occur in tongues for a limited range of parameters. We perform Generalized Stability analysis of the two dimensional perturbation dynamics of an inviscid Boussinesq stratified shear layer and show that Holmboe instabilities at high Richardson numbers can be excited by their adjoints at amplitudes that are orders of magnitude larger than by introducing initially the unstable mode itself. We also determine the optimal growth that obtains for parameters for which there is no instability. We find that there is potential for large transient growth regardless of whether the background flow is exponentially stable or not and that the characteristic structure of the Holmboe instability asymptotically emerges for parameter values ...

  17. Phonon hydrodynamics in two-dimensional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Fugallo, Giorgia; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Mauri, Francesco; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-03-06

    The conduction of heat in two dimensions displays a wealth of fascinating phenomena of key relevance to the scientific understanding and technological applications of graphene and related materials. Here, we use density-functional perturbation theory and an exact, variational solution of the Boltzmann transport equation to study fully from first-principles phonon transport and heat conductivity in graphene, boron nitride, molybdenum disulphide and the functionalized derivatives graphane and fluorographene. In all these materials, and at variance with typical three-dimensional solids, normal processes keep dominating over Umklapp scattering well-above cryogenic conditions, extending to room temperature and more. As a result, novel regimes emerge, with Poiseuille and Ziman hydrodynamics, hitherto typically confined to ultra-low temperatures, characterizing transport at ordinary conditions. Most remarkably, several of these two-dimensional materials admit wave-like heat diffusion, with second sound present at room temperature and above in graphene, boron nitride and graphane.

  18. Probabilistic Universality in two-dimensional Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubich, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we continue to explore infinitely renormalizable H\\'enon maps with small Jacobian. It was shown in [CLM] that contrary to the one-dimensional intuition, the Cantor attractor of such a map is non-rigid and the conjugacy with the one-dimensional Cantor attractor is at most 1/2-H\\"older. Another formulation of this phenomenon is that the scaling structure of the H\\'enon Cantor attractor differs from its one-dimensional counterpart. However, in this paper we prove that the weight assigned by the canonical invariant measure to these bad spots tends to zero on microscopic scales. This phenomenon is called {\\it Probabilistic Universality}. It implies, in particular, that the Hausdorff dimension of the canonical measure is universal. In this way, universality and rigidity phenomena of one-dimensional dynamics assume a probabilistic nature in the two-dimensional world.

  19. Two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M Shaikh; S S Desai; A K Patra

    2004-08-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector has been developed. The detector is a 3He + Kr filled multiwire proportional counter with charge division position readout and has a sensitive area of 345 mm × 345 mm, pixel size 5 mm × 5 mm, active depth 25 mm and is designed for efficiency of 70% for 4 Å neutrons. The detector is tested with 0.5 bar 3He + 1.5 bar krypton gas mixture in active chamber and 2 bar 4He in compensating chamber. The pulse height spectrum recorded at an anode potential of 2000 V shows energy resolution of ∼ 25% for the 764 keV peak. A spatial resolution of 8 mm × 6 mm is achieved. The detector is suitable for SANS studies in the range of 0.02–0.25 Å-1.

  20. Two-dimensional heterostructures for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials provide slit-shaped ion diffusion channels that enable fast movement of lithium and other ions. However, electronic conductivity, the number of intercalation sites, and stability during extended cycling are also crucial for building high-performance energy storage devices. While individual 2D materials, such as graphene, show some of the required properties, none of them can offer all properties needed to maximize energy density, power density, and cycle life. Here we argue that stacking different 2D materials into heterostructured architectures opens an opportunity to construct electrodes that would combine the advantages of the individual building blocks while eliminating the associated shortcomings. We discuss characteristics of common 2D materials and provide examples of 2D heterostructured electrodes that showed new phenomena leading to superior electrochemical performance. We also consider electrode fabrication approaches and finally outline future steps to create 2D heterostructured electrodes that could greatly expand current energy storage technologies.

  1. Rationally synthesized two-dimensional polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, John W; Dichtel, William R

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic polymers exhibit diverse and useful properties and influence most aspects of modern life. Many polymerization methods provide linear or branched macromolecules, frequently with outstanding functional-group tolerance and molecular weight control. In contrast, extending polymerization strategies to two-dimensional periodic structures is in its infancy, and successful examples have emerged only recently through molecular framework, surface science and crystal engineering approaches. In this Review, we describe successful 2D polymerization strategies, as well as seminal research that inspired their development. These methods include the synthesis of 2D covalent organic frameworks as layered crystals and thin films, surface-mediated polymerization of polyfunctional monomers, and solid-state topochemical polymerizations. Early application targets of 2D polymers include gas separation and storage, optoelectronic devices and membranes, each of which might benefit from predictable long-range molecular organization inherent to this macromolecular architecture.

  2. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  3. Local doping of two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Dillon; Velasco, Jr, Jairo; Ju, Long; Kahn, Salman; Lee, Juwon; Germany, Chad E.; Zettl, Alexander K.; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F.

    2016-09-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to locally doping two-dimensional (2D) materials. In one aspect, an assembly including a substrate, a first insulator disposed on the substrate, a second insulator disposed on the first insulator, and a 2D material disposed on the second insulator is formed. A first voltage is applied between the 2D material and the substrate. With the first voltage applied between the 2D material and the substrate, a second voltage is applied between the 2D material and a probe positioned proximate the 2D material. The second voltage between the 2D material and the probe is removed. The first voltage between the 2D material and the substrate is removed. A portion of the 2D material proximate the probe when the second voltage was applied has a different electron density compared to a remainder of the 2D material.

  4. FACE RECOGNITION USING TWO DIMENSIONAL LAPLACIAN EIGENMAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jiangfeng; Yuan Baozong; Pei Bingnan

    2008-01-01

    Recently,some research efforts have shown that face images possibly reside on a nonlinear sub-manifold. Though Laplacianfaces method considered the manifold structures of the face images,it has limits to solve face recognition problem. This paper proposes a new feature extraction method,Two Dimensional Laplacian EigenMap (2DLEM),which especially considers the manifold structures of the face images,and extracts the proper features from face image matrix directly by using a linear transformation. As opposed to Laplacianfaces,2DLEM extracts features directly from 2D images without a vectorization preprocessing. To test 2DLEM and evaluate its performance,a series of ex-periments are performed on the ORL database and the Yale database. Moreover,several experiments are performed to compare the performance of three 2D methods. The experiments show that 2DLEM achieves the best performance.

  5. Equivalency of two-dimensional algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Gildemar Carneiro dos; Pomponet Filho, Balbino Jose S. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Let us consider a vector z = xi + yj over the field of real numbers, whose basis (i,j) satisfy a given algebra. Any property of this algebra will be reflected in any function of z, so we can state that the knowledge of the properties of an algebra leads to more general conclusions than the knowledge of the properties of a function. However structural properties of an algebra do not change when this algebra suffers a linear transformation, though the structural constants defining this algebra do change. We say that two algebras are equivalent to each other whenever they are related by a linear transformation. In this case, we have found that some relations between the structural constants are sufficient to recognize whether or not an algebra is equivalent to another. In spite that the basis transform linearly, the structural constants change like a third order tensor, but some combinations of these tensors result in a linear transformation, allowing to write the entries of the transformation matrix as function of the structural constants. Eventually, a systematic way to find the transformation matrix between these equivalent algebras is obtained. In this sense, we have performed the thorough classification of associative commutative two-dimensional algebras, and find that even non-division algebra may be helpful in solving non-linear dynamic systems. The Mandelbrot set was used to have a pictorial view of each algebra, since equivalent algebras result in the same pattern. Presently we have succeeded in classifying some non-associative two-dimensional algebras, a task more difficult than for associative one. (author)

  6. Hyperchromatic lens for recording time-resolved phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frayer, Daniel K.

    2017-07-11

    A method and apparatus for the capture of a high number of quasi-continuous effective frames of 2-D data from an event at very short time scales (from less than 10.sup.-12 to more than 10.sup.-8 seconds) is disclosed which allows for short recording windows and effective number of frames. Active illumination, from a chirped laser pulse directed to the event creates a reflection where wavelength is dependent upon time and spatial position is utilized to encode temporal phenomena onto wavelength. A hyperchromatic lens system receives the reflection and maps wavelength onto axial position. An image capture device, such as holography or plenoptic imaging device, captures the resultant focal stack from the hyperchromatic lens system in both spatial (imaging) and longitudinal (temporal) axes. The hyperchromatic lens system incorporates a combination of diffractive and refractive components to maximally separate focal position as a function of wavelength.

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1996-07-01

    A family of sensors is presented with fluorescence decay-time measurements used as the sensing technique. The concept is to take a single fluorophore with a suitably long fluorescence decay time as the basic building block for numerous different sensors. Analyte recognition can be performed by different functional groups that are necessary for selective interaction with the analyte. To achieve this, the principle of excited-state electron transfer is applied with pyrene as the fluorophore. Therefore the same instrumentation based on a small, ambient air-nitrogen laser and solid-state electronics can be used to measure different analytes, for example, oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, ammonium, lead, cadmium, zinc, and phosphate.

  8. Resonant and Time-Resolved Spin Noise Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinlin; Pursley, Brennan; Sih, Vanessa

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a technique which can probe the system while it remains in equilibrium. It was first demonstrated in atomic gases and then in solid state systems. Most existing spin noise measurement setups digitize the spin fluctuation signal and then analyze the power spectrum. Recently, pulsed lasers have been used to expand the bandwidth of accessible dynamics and allow direct time-domain correlation measurements. Here we develop and test a model for ultrafast pulsed laser spin noise measurements as well as a scheme to measure spin lifetimes longer than the laser repetition period. For the resonant spin noise technique, analog electronics are used to capture correlations from the extended pulse train, and the signal at a fixed time delay is measured as a function of applied magnetic field.

  9. An energy dispersive time resolved liquid surface reflectometer

    CERN Document Server

    Garrett, R F; King, D J; Dowling, T L; Fullagar, W

    2001-01-01

    Two designs are presented for an energy dispersive liquid surface reflectometer with time resolution in the milli-second domain. The designs utilise rotating crystal and Laue analyser optics respectively to energy analyse a pink synchrotron X-ray beam after reflection from a liquid surface. Some performance estimates are presented, along with results of a test experiment using a laboratory source and solid state detector.

  10. On time-resolved approach for phonon assisted interband transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotins, E.

    2015-03-01

    Photoexcited dynamics of electrons and holes in two-band dielectric, with special emphasis on back reaction of phonons are developed by combining the quantum electrodynamics and Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff (BCH) canonical transformation. These methods create an explicit time-domain representation of photoinduced processes and contribute in unifying phonon-assisted description of distribution functions of electron and hole quasiparticles for the description of observable effects of photoinduced processes in dielectrics.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of time-resolved social interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardillo, Alessio; Petri, Giovanni; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Sinatra, Roberta; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Latora, Vito

    2014-11-01

    Cooperation among unrelated individuals is frequently observed in social groups when their members combine efforts and resources to obtain a shared benefit that is unachievable by an individual alone. However, understanding why cooperation arises despite the natural tendency of individuals toward selfish behavior is still an open problem and represents one of the most fascinating challenges in evolutionary dynamics. Recently, the structural characterization of the networks in which social interactions take place has shed some light on the mechanisms by which cooperative behavior emerges and eventually overcomes the natural temptation to defect. In particular, it has been found that the heterogeneity in the number of social ties and the presence of tightly knit communities lead to a significant increase in cooperation as compared with the unstructured and homogeneous connection patterns considered in classical evolutionary dynamics. Here, we investigate the role of social-ties dynamics for the emergence of cooperation in a family of social dilemmas. Social interactions are in fact intrinsically dynamic, fluctuating, and intermittent over time, and they can be represented by time-varying networks. By considering two experimental data sets of human interactions with detailed time information, we show that the temporal dynamics of social ties has a dramatic impact on the evolution of cooperation: the dynamics of pairwise interactions favors selfish behavior.

  12. Direct Measurement of the Band Structure of a Buried Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miwa, Jill; Hofmann, Philip; Simmons, Michelle Y.;

    2013-01-01

    We directly measure the band structure of a buried two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The buried 2DEG forms 2 nm beneath the surface of p-type silicon, because of a dense delta-type layer of phosphorus n-type dopants which have been placed there. ...

  13. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning studies of hexamethylcyclopentadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, T. J. A.; Kuhlman, Thomas Scheby; Schalk, O.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio multiple spawning were applied to the ultrafast non-adiabatic dynamics of hexamethylcyclopentadiene. The high level of agreement between experiment and theory associates wavepacket motion with a distinct degree of freedom....

  14. Time-resolved spectroscopy of the fluorescence quenching of a donor — acceptor pair by halothane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Draxler, S.; Lippitsch, M. E.

    1992-04-01

    Donor (anthracene) sensitized acceptor (perylene) fluorescence is quenched more efficiently by halothane than is intrinsic perylene fluorescence. The underlying process of dynamic fluorescence quenching is investigated by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  15. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of non-adiabatic dynamics in polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Stolow, Albert

    2015-01-01

    This review article discusses advances in the use of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for the study of non-adiabatic processes in molecules. A theoretical treatment of the experiments is presented together with a number of experimental examples.

  16. Sudden Polarization in the Twisted, Phantom State of Tetraphenylethylene Detected by Time-Resolved Microwave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuddeboom, Wouter; Jonker, Stephan A.; Warman, John M.; Haas, Matthijs P. de; Vermeulen, Martien J.W.; Jager, Wolter F.; Lange, Ben de; Fessenden, Richard W.; Feringa, Bernard

    1993-01-01

    Photoexcitation of the symmetrical molecules tetraphenylethylene and tetra-p-methoxyphenylethylene dissolved in saturated hydrocarbon solvents results in a transient increase in the dielectric loss of the solutions as monitored using the nanosecond time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC)

  17. SUDDEN POLARIZATION IN THE TWISTED, PHANTOM STATE OF TETRAPHENYLETHYLENE DETECTED BY TIME-RESOLVED MICROWAVE CONDUCTIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUDDEBOOM, W; JONKER, SA; WARMAN, JM; DEHAAS, MP; VERMEULEN, MJW; JAGER, WF; DELANGE, B; FERINGA, BL; FESSENDEN, RW

    1993-01-01

    Photoexcitation of the symmetrical molecules tetraphenylethylene and tetra-p-methoxyphenylethylene dissolved in saturated hydrocarbon solvents results in a transient increase in the dielectric loss of the solutions as monitored using the nanosecond time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC)

  18. A method for time-resolved calorespirometry of terrestrial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsö, Lars

    2015-04-01

    A new vessel for simultaneous isothermal calorimetry and respirometry (calorespirometry) on terrestrial (non-aqueous) samples has been developed. All types of small (absorbent. Typically a 7 h measurement results in seven measurements of heat production rate, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production, which can be used to evaluate how the metabolic activity in a sample changes over time. Results from three experiments on leaves, a cut vegetable, and mold are given. As uncertainties--especially in the carbon dioxide production--tend to be quite high, improvements to the technique are also discussed.

  19. Time Resolved PIV for Space-Time Correlations in Hot Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Temporally Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) is the newest and most exciting tool recently developed to support our continuing efforts to characterize and improve our understanding of the decay of turbulence in jet flows -- a critical element for understanding the acoustic properties of the flow. A new TR-PIV system has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center which is capable of acquiring planar PIV image frame pairs at up to 25 kHz. The data reported here were collected at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.9 and at temperature ratios of 0.89 and 1.76. The field of view of the TR-PIV system covered 6 nozzle diameters along the lip line of the 50.8 mm diameter jet. The cold flow data at Mach 0.5 were compared with hotwire anemometry measurements in order to validate the new TR-PIV technique. The axial turbulence profiles measured across the shear layer using TR-PIV were thinner than those measured using hotwire anemometry and remained centered along the nozzle lip line. The collected TR-PIV data illustrate the differences in the single point statistical flow properties of cold and hot jet flows. The planar, time-resolved velocity records were then used to compute two-point space-time correlations of the flow at the Mach 0.9 flow condition. The TR-PIV results show that there are differences in the convective velocity and growth rate of the turbulent structures between cold and hot flows at the same Mach number

  20. Time-resolved digital holographic microscopy of laser-induced forward transfer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H; Venugopalan, V

    2014-03-01

    We develop a method for time-resolved digital holographic microscopy to obtain time-resolved 3-D deformation measurements of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) processes. We demonstrate nanometer axial resolution and nanosecond temporal resolution of our method which is suitable for measuring dynamic morphological changes in LIFT target materials. Such measurements provide insight into the early dynamics of the LIFT process and a means to examine the effect of laser and material parameters on LIFT process dynamics.

  1. Two-dimensional conformal field theory and the butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    We study chaotic dynamics in two-dimensional conformal field theory through out-of-time order thermal correlators of the form $\\langle W(t)VW(t)V\\rangle$. We reproduce bulk calculations similar to those of [1], by studying the large $c$ Virasoro identity block. The contribution of this block to the above correlation function begins to decrease exponentially after a delay of $\\sim t_* - \\frac{\\beta}{2\\pi}\\log \\beta^2E_w E_v$, where $t_*$ is the scrambling time $\\frac{\\beta}{2\\pi}\\log c$, and $E_w,E_v$ are the energy scales of the $W,V$ operators.

  2. A two-dimensional approach to relativistic positioning systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coll, B; Morales, J A; Coll, Bartolom\\'{e}; Ferrando, Joan Josep; Morales, Juan Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A relativistic positioning system is a physical realization of a coordinate system consisting in four clocks in arbitrary motion broadcasting their proper times. The basic elements of the relativistic positioning systems are presented in the two-dimensional case. This simplified approach allow to explain and to analyze the properties and interest of these new systems. The positioning system defined by geodesic emitters in flat metric is developed in detail. The information that the data generated by a relativistic positioning system give on the space-time metric interval is analyzed, and the interest of these results in gravimetry is pointed out.

  3. Time-resolved crystallization of deeply cooled liquid hydrogen isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, Matthias

    2014-02-15

    This thesis serves two main purposes: 1. The introduction of a novel experimental method to investigate phase change dynamics of supercooled liquids 2. First-time measurements for the crystallization behaviour for hydrogen isotopes under various conditions (1) The new method is established by the synergy of a liquid microjet of ∼ 5 μm diameter and a scattering technique with high spatial resolution, here linear Raman spectroscopy. Due to the high directional stability and the known velocity of the liquid filament, its traveling axis corresponds to a time axis static in space. Utilizing evaporative cooling in a vacuum environment, the propagating liquid cools down rapidly and eventually experiences a phase transition to the crystalline state. This temporal evolution is probed along the filament axis, ultimately resulting in a time resolution of 10 ns. The feasibility of this approach is proven successfully within the following experiments. (2) A main object of study are para-hydrogen liquid filaments. Raman spectra reveal a temperature gradient of the liquid across the filament. This behaviour can quantitatively be reconstructed by numerical simulations using a layered model and is rooted in the effectiveness of evaporative cooling on the surface and a finite thermal conductivity. The deepest supercoolings achieved are ∼ 30% below the melting point, at which the filament starts to solidify from the surface towards the core. With a crystal growth velocity extracted from the data the appropriate growth mechanism is identified. The crystal structure that initially forms is metastable and probably the result of Ostwald's rule of stages. Indications for a transition within the solid towards the stable equilibrium phase support this interpretation. The analog isotope ortho-deuterium is evidenced to behave qualitatively similar with quantitative differences being mass related. In further measurements, isotopic mixtures of para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium are

  4. Time-resolved, local temperature measurements during pulsed laser heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappes, Ralf S; Li Chen; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Gutmann, Jochen S, E-mail: kappes@mpip-mainz.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To analyse processes during laser heating, one needs to be able to measure temperatures of about 1000 K within one microsecond and with micrometre resolution. To achieve this accuracy, we set up a high-performance optical detection system with a microsecond gated camera in combination with selected interference filters to detect the thermal emission spectrum in the visible range. By fitting the emission spectrum to Planck's law, we are able to collect an area temperature profile for time intervals as short as one microsecond. Thus we can show that a polymer film, which is doped with an organic dye for energy conversion, can reach temperatures of at least 900 K, which is high above its 'normal' decomposition temperature. It is, furthermore, possible to relate the temperature to the effect of the laser beam on the polymer film.

  5. Advancements in time-resolved x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, A J; Dunn, J; Widmann, K; Ao, T; Ping, Y; Hunter, J; Ng, A

    2005-07-28

    Time-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the non-steady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultra-thin (50 nm) metal foils and bulk semiconductors. Single-shot soft x-ray laser induced time-of-flight photoelectron spectroscopy with picosecond time resolution was used in combination with optical measurements of the disassembly dynamics that have shown the existence of a metastable liquid phase in fs-laser heated metal foils persisting 4-5 ps. This metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.3-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500 x 700 {micro}m{sup 2} spot to create heated conditions of 0.2-1.8 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} intensity. The unique LLNL COMET compact tabletop soft x-ray laser source provided the necessary high photon flux, highly monoenergetic, picosecond pulse duration, and coherence for observing the evolution of changes in the valence band electronic structure of laser heated metals and semiconductors with picosecond time resolution. This work demonstrates the continuing development of a powerful new technique for probing reaction dynamics and changes of local order on surfaces on their fundamental timescales including phenomena such as non-thermal melting, chemical bond formation, intermediate reaction steps, and the existence of transient reaction products.

  6. Recent advances in 3D time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, Stephen J; Haider, Clifton R; Borisch, Eric A; Weavers, Paul T; Young, Phillip M

    2015-07-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) was first introduced for clinical studies approximately 20 years ago. Early work provided 3-4 mm spatial resolution with acquisition times in the 30-second range. Since that time there has been continuing effort to provide improved spatial resolution with reduced acquisition time, allowing high resolution 3D time-resolved studies. The purpose of this work is to describe how this has been accomplished. Specific technical enablers have been: improved gradients allowing reduced repetition times, improved k-space sampling and reconstruction methods, parallel acquisition, particularly in two directions, and improved and higher count receiver coil arrays. These have collectively made high-resolution time-resolved studies readily available for many anatomic regions. Depending on the application, ∼1 mm isotropic resolution is now possible with frame times of several seconds. Clinical applications of time-resolved CE-MRA are briefly reviewed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. In-Situ Chemical Dynamics and Phase Mapping Under Steep Thermal Gradients Using Time-Resolved and Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J.; Larson, E.M.; Holt, J.B.; Ressler, T.; Elmer, J.W.

    1999-09-17

    Time-resolved and spatially-resolved diffraction techniques have been developed recently to perform materials dynamics study in-situ extending into the time and spatial domain in high temperature processes. The applications of these methods to investigate the chemical dynamics of solid combustion reactions and to map phases and their transformation in fusion welds are exemplified in this paper.

  8. Time Resolved Measurements of Primary Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollny, A. G.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and they influence atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms and reproductive materials, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they influence the Earth's energy budget by scattering and absorbing radiation, and they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. The composition, abundance, and origin of biogenic aerosol particles and components are, however, still not well understood and poorly quantified. Prominent examples of primary biogenic aerosol particles, which are directly emitted from the biosphere to the atmosphere, are pollen, bacteria, fungal spores, viruses, and fragments of animals and plants. During the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08) a large number of aerosol and gas-phase measurements were taken on a remote site close to Manaus, Brazil, during a period of five weeks in February and March 2008. This presented study is focused on data from an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS, TSI inc.) that has been deployed for the first time in Amazonia. In this instrument, particle counting and aerodynamic sizing over the range of 0.5-20 µm are complemented by the measurement of UV fluorescence at 355 nm (excitation) and 420-575 nm (emission), respectively. Fluorescence at these wavelengths is characteristic for reduced pyridine nucleotides (e.g., NAD(P)H) and for riboflavin, which are specific for living cells. Thus particles exhibiting fluorescence signals can be regarded as "viable aerosols" or "fluorescent bioparticles" (FBAP), and their concentration can be considered as lower limit for the actual abundance of primary biogenic aerosol particles. Data from the UVAPS were averaged over 5 minute time intervals. The presence of bioparticles in the observed size range has been

  9. Time resolved spectroscopy of KPD1930+2752

    CERN Document Server

    Geier, S; Przybilla, N; Kudritzki, R P

    2005-01-01

    We present the analysis of 200 high-resolution and 150 low-resolution spectra of the pulsating subdwarf close binary KPD 1930+2752 obtained with the Keck and the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescopes. Using metal-rich, line blanketed LTE model atmospheres the atmospheric parameters T_{eff} = 35500 +/- 500 K, log g = 5.56 +/- 0.05 and log n(He)/n(H) = -1.48 +/- 0.02 were derived. The radial velocity curve was measured and combined with all available published and unpublished radial velocity data in order to get results of high accuracy (K = 341 +/- 1 km/s, P = 0.0950933 +/- 0.0000015 d). For the first time we measured the projected rotational velocity. The preliminary result is v_{rot}sin{i} = 97 +/- 9 km/s. Since the rotation of the sdB star is very likely tidally locked to the orbit, we can constrain the inclination of the system. Assuming the companion to be a white dwarf, the mass of the sdB is limited from 0.44M_{sun} to 0.63M_{sun} and the total mass range of the system is 1.3 M_{sun} to 2.0 M_{sun}. It is very li...

  10. Time Resolved X-Ray Spot Size Diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Roger; Falabella, Steven; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Weir, John

    2005-01-01

    A diagnostic was developed for the determination of temporal history of an X-ray spot. A pair of thin (0.5 mm) slits image the x-ray spot to a fast scintillator which is coupled to a fast detector, thus sampling a slice of the X-Ray spot. Two other scintillator/detectors are used to determine the position of the spot and total forward dose. The slit signal is normalized to the dose and the resulting signal is analyzed to get the spot size. The position information is used to compensate for small changes due to spot motion and misalignment. The time resolution of the diagnostic is about 1 ns and measures spots from 0.5 mm to over 3 mm. The theory and equations used to calculate spot size and position are presented, as well as data. The calculations assume a symmetric, Gaussian spot. The spot data is generated by the ETA II accelerator, a 2kA, 5.5 MeV, 60ns electron beam focused on a Tantalum target. The spot generated is typically about 1 mm FWHM. Comparisons are made to an X-ray pinhole camera which images th...

  11. Picosecond time-resolved imaging using SPAD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan; Warburton, Ryan; Chan, Susan; Henderson, Robert; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-10-01

    The recent development of 2D arrays of single-photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) has driven the development of applications based on the ability to capture light in motion. Such arrays are composed typically of 32x32 SPAD detectors, each having the ability to detect single photons and measure their time of arrival with a resolution of about 100 ps. Thanks to the single-photon sensitivity and the high temporal resolution of these detectors, it is now possible to image light as it is travelling on a centimetre scale. This opens the door for the direct observation and study of dynamics evolving over picoseconds and nanoseconds timescales such as laser propagation in air, laser-induced plasma and laser propagation in optical fibres. Another interesting application enabled by the ability to image light in motion is the detection of objects hidden from view, based on the recording of scattered waves originating from objects hidden by an obstacle. Similarly to LIDAR systems, the temporal information acquired at every pixel of a SPAD array, combined with the spatial information it provides, allows to pinpoint the position of an object located outside the line-of-sight of the detector. A non-line-of-sight tracking can be a valuable asset in many scenarios, including for search and rescue mission and safer autonomous driving.

  12. Holographic time-resolved particle tracking by means of three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution

    CERN Document Server

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry allows tracking particle trajectories in time and space by means of holography. However, the drawback of the technique is that in the three-dimensional particle distribution reconstructed from a hologram, the individual particles can hardly be resolved due to the superimposed out-of-focus signal from neighboring particles. We demonstrate here a three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution applied to the reconstructed wavefront which results in resolving all particles simultaneously in three-dimensions. Moreover, we apply the three-dimensional volumetric deconvolution to reconstructions of a time-dependent sequence of holograms of an ensemble of polystyrene spheres moving in water. From each hologram we simultaneously resolve all particles in the ensemble in three dimensions and from the sequence of holograms we obtain the time-resolved trajectories of individual polystyrene spheres.

  13. On numerical evaluation of two-dimensional phase integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessow, H.; Rusch, W.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    1975-01-01

    The relative advantages of several common numerical integration algorithms used in computing two-dimensional phase integrals are evaluated.......The relative advantages of several common numerical integration algorithms used in computing two-dimensional phase integrals are evaluated....

  14. Understanding optically stimulated charge movement in quartz and feldspar using time-resolved measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina

    to identify various charge transport mechanisms in the different time regimes. The techniques employed are time-resolved OSL, continuous-wave OSL, TL, optically stimulated exo-electron (OSE) emission and time-resolved OSE. These different techniques are used in combination with variable thermal or optical...... and the conduction band in determining charge transport. It is suggested that unlike quartz, the excited state lifetime does not play an important role in our measurements. Finally, it is shown that one of these routes favors production if a least fading signal (due to quantum mechanical tunnelling) in feldspars...... the TR-OSL and optically stimulated phosphorescence signals from quartz and feldspars spanning several orders of magnitude in time (few ns to the seconds time scale) in order to identify various charge transport mechanisms in the different time regimes. The techniques employed are time-resolved OSL...

  15. Exploiting sparsity in time-of-flight range acquisition using a single time-resolved sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmani, Ahmed; Colaço, Andrea; Wong, Franco N C; Goyal, Vivek K

    2011-10-24

    Range acquisition systems such as light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and time-of-flight (TOF) cameras operate by measuring the time difference of arrival between a transmitted pulse and the scene reflection. We introduce the design of a range acquisition system for acquiring depth maps of piecewise-planar scenes with high spatial resolution using a single, omnidirectional, time-resolved photodetector and no scanning components. In our experiment, we reconstructed 64 × 64-pixel depth maps of scenes comprising two to four planar shapes using only 205 spatially-patterned, femtosecond illuminations of the scene. The reconstruction uses parametric signal modeling to recover a set of depths present in the scene. Then, a convex optimization that exploits sparsity of the Laplacian of the depth map of a typical scene determines correspondences between spatial positions and depths. In contrast with 2D laser scanning used in LIDAR systems and low-resolution 2D sensor arrays used in TOF cameras, our experiment demonstrates that it is possible to build a non-scanning range acquisition system with high spatial resolution using only a standard, low-cost photodetector and a spatial light modulator.

  16. Vibrational wave packet induced oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectra. I. Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nemeth, Alexandra; Mancal, Tomas; Lukes, Vladimir; Hauer, Juergen; Kauffmann, Harald F; Sperling, Jaroslaw

    2010-01-01

    This is the first in a series of two papers investigating the effect of electron-phonon coupling in two-dimensional Fourier transformed electronic spectroscopy. We present a series of one- and two-dimensional nonlinear spectroscopic techniques for studying a dye molecule in solution. Ultrafast laser pulse excitation of an electronic transition coupled to vibrational modes induces a propagating vibrational wave packet that manifests itself in oscillating signal intensities and line-shapes. For the two-dimensional electronic spectra we can attribute the observed modulations to periodic enhancement and decrement of the relative amplitudes of rephasing and non-rephasing contributions to the total response. Different metrics of the two-dimensional signals are shown to relate to the frequency-frequency correlation function which provides the connection between experimentally accessible observations and the underlying microscopic molecular dynamics. A detailed theory of the time-dependent two-dimensional spectral li...

  17. Two-dimensional Insect Flight on an Air-Water Interface is a Chaotic Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Mukundarajan, Haripriya; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional flapping wing insect flight on an air-water interface provides a successful foraging strategy to explore an ecological niche on the surface of a pond. However, the complex interplay of surface tension, aerodynamic forces, biomechanics and neural control that enables two-dimensional flight is unknown. Here we report the discovery of two-dimensional flight in the waterlily beetle Galerucella nymphaeae, which is the fastest reported propulsion mode for an insect on a fluid interface. Using kinematics derived from high-speed videography coupled with analytical models, we demonstrate that two-dimensional flight is a chaotic interfacial oscillator, thus significantly constraining the possible range of flight parameters. Discovery of this complex dynamics in two-dimensional flight on time scales similar to neural responses indicates the challenge of evolving active flight control on a fluid interface.

  18. Janus spectra in two-dimensional flows

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-01-01

    In theory, large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows and other two-dimensional flows may host two distinct types of turbulent energy spectra---in one, $\\alpha$, the spectral exponent of velocity fluctuations, equals $3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the small scales, and in the other, $\\alpha=5/3$ and the fluctuations are dissipated at the large scales---but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed $\\alpha = 3$. Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which $\\alpha$ has transitioned from $3$ to $5/3$ for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to $3$ for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows...

  19. Comparative Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Doreen; König, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional comparative fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) uses an internal standard to increase the reproducibility of coordinate assignment for protein spots visualized on 2D polyacrylamide gels. This is particularly important for samples, which need to be compared without the availability of replicates and thus cannot be studied using differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE). CoFGE corrects for gel-to-gel variability by co-running with the sample proteome a standardized marker grid of 80-100 nodes, which is formed by a set of purified proteins. Differentiation of reference and analyte is possible by the use of two fluorescent dyes. Variations in the y-dimension (molecular weight) are corrected by the marker grid. For the optional control of the x-dimension (pI), azo dyes can be used. Experiments are possible in both vertical and horizontal (h) electrophoresis devices, but hCoFGE is much easier to perform. For data analysis, commercial software capable of warping can be adapted.

  20. Two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors beyond graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van

    2016-12-01

    The rapid and successful development of the research on graphene and graphene-based nanostructures has been substantially enlarged to include many other two-dimensional hexagonal semiconductors (THS): phosphorene, silicene, germanene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2 as well as the van der Waals heterostructures of various THSs (including graphene). The present article is a review of recent works on THSs beyond graphene and van der Waals heterostructures composed of different pairs of all THSs. One among the priorities of new THSs compared to graphene is the presence of a non-vanishing energy bandgap which opened up the ability to fabricate a large number of electronic, optoelectronic and photonic devices on the basis of these new materials and their van der Waals heterostructures. Moreover, a significant progress in the research on TMDCs was the discovery of valley degree of freedom. The results of research on valley degree of freedom and the development of a new technology based on valley degree of freedom-valleytronics are also presented. Thus the scientific contents of the basic research and practical applications os THSs are very rich and extremely promising.