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Sample records for two-dimensional hydrogen-bond network

  1. Significantly Dense Two-Dimensional Hydrogen-Bond Network in a Layered Zirconium Phosphate Leading to High Proton Conductivities in Both Water-Assisted Low-Temperature and Anhydrous Intermediate-Temperature Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Daxiang; Zheng, Tao; Xie, Jian; Cai, Yawen; Wang, Yaxing; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-12-19

    A highly stable layered zirconium phosphate, (NH4)2[ZrF2(HPO4)2] (ZrP-1), was synthesized by an ionothermal method and contains an extremely dense two-dimensional hydrogen-bond network that is thermally stable up to 573 K, leading to combined ultrahigh water-assisted proton conductivities of 1.45 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) at 363 K/95% relative humidity and sustainable anhydrous proton conductivity of 1.1 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 503 K.

  2. Coherent Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy of Vibrational Excitons in Hydrogen-Bonded Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paarmann, Alexander

    The structure and structural dynamics of hydrogen bonded liquids were studied experimentally and theoretically with coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. The resonant intermolecular interactions within the fully resonant hydrogen bond networks give access to spatial correlations in the dynamics of the liquid structures. New experimental and theoretical tools were developed that significantly reduced the technical challenges of these studies. A nanofluidic flow device was designed and manufactured providing sub-micron thin, actively stabilized liquid sample layers between similarly thin windows. A simulation protocol for nonlinear vibrational response calculations of disordered fluctuating vibrational excitons was developed that allowed for the first treatment of resonant intermolecular interactions in the 2DIR response of liquid water. The 2DIR spectrum of the O-H stretching vibration of pure liquid water was studied experimentally at different temperatures. At ambient conditions the loss of frequency correlations is extremely fast, and is attributed to very efficient modulations of the two-dimensional O-H stretching vibrational potential through librational motions in the hydrogen bond network. At temperatures near freezing, the librational motions are significantly reduced leading to a pronounced slowing down of spectral diffusion dynamics. Comparison with energy transfer time scales revealed the first direct proof of delocalization of the vibrational excitations. This work establishes a fundamentally new view of vibrations in liquid water by providing a spatial length scale of correlated hydrogen-bond motions. The linear and 2DIR response of the amide I mode in neat liquid formamide was found to be dominated by excitonic effects due to largely delocalized vibrational excitations. The spectral response and dynamics are very sensitive to the excitonic mode structure and infrared activity distributions, leading to a pronounced asymmetry of linear

  3. Self-assembly of hydrogen-bonded two-dimensional quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasio, Natalie A.; Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Forrest, Ryan P.; Lent, Craig S.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Christie, John A.; Henderson, Kenneth W.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-03-01

    The process of molecular self-assembly on solid surfaces is essentially one of crystallization in two dimensions, and the structures that result depend on the interplay between intermolecular forces and the interaction between adsorbates and the underlying substrate. Because a single hydrogen bond typically has an energy between 15 and 35 kilojoules per mole, hydrogen bonding can be a strong driver of molecular assembly; this is apparent from the dominant role of hydrogen bonding in nucleic-acid base pairing, as well as in the secondary structure of proteins. Carboxylic acid functional groups, which provide two hydrogen bonds, are particularly promising and reliable in creating and maintaining surface order, and self-assembled monolayers of benzoic acids produce structure that depends on the number and relative placement of carboxylic acid groups. Here we use scanning tunnelling microscopy to study self-assembled monolayers of ferrocenecarboxylic acid (FcCOOH), and find that, rather than producing dimeric or linear structures typical of carboxylic acids, FcCOOH forms highly unusual cyclic hydrogen-bonded pentamers, which combine with simultaneously formed FcCOOH dimers to form two-dimensional quasicrystallites that exhibit local five-fold symmetry and maintain translational and rotational order (without periodicity) for distances of more than 400 ångströms.

  4. Structural and Spectral Studies on the Ni(Ⅱ) Complexes of 1,5-Diazacyclooctane (DACO) Bearing Heterocyclic Pendants: Formation of a Two-dimensional Network Via Hydrogen Bonds and π-π Stacking Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU,Miao(杜淼); DU,Miao; XU,Qiang(徐强); XU,Qiang; GUO,Ya-Mei (郭亚梅); GUO,Ya-Mei; WENG,Lin-Hong(翁林红); WENG,Lin-Hong; BU,Xian-He (卜显和); BU,Xian-He

    2001-01-01

    A penta-coordinated Ni(II) complex with a 1,5-diazacyclooctane (DACO) ligand functionazed by two imidazole donor pendants, [NiiL1Cl] (ClO4)'HH2O (1) (where L1 = 1,5-bis (imidazol-4-ylmethyl)-1,S-diazacyclooctane) has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectra, elemental analyses, conductance, thermal analyses and UV-Vis techniques. Complex 1 crystallizes in triclinic crystal system, P-1 space group with a = 0.74782(7), b = 1.15082(10), c = 1.237s1(11) nm, a=82.090(2), β=73.011(2), γ=83.462(2)°, V= 1.00603(16) nn3, Mr = 486.00, Z=2,Dc=1.604 g/cm3, final R=0.0435, and wR=0.1244. The structures of 1 and its related complexes show that in all the three mononuclear complexes, each Ni(Ⅱ) center is penta-coordinated with a near regular square pyranid (RSP) to distorted square-pyramidal (DSP) coordination environment due to the boat/chair configuration of DACO ring in these complexes, and the degree of distortion increases with the augment of the size of the heterocyclic pendants. In addition, the most striking feature of complex 1 resides in the formation of a two-dimensional network structure through hydrogen bonds and stabilized by π-π stacking. The solution behaviors of the Ni(ⅡI) complexes are also discussed in detail.

  5. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Liang

    2015-04-22

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold–gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon–hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  6. Two-dimensional gold nanostructures with high activity for selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Zhu, Yihan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Liu, Fudong; Huang, Jianfeng; Meng, Xiangju; Basset, Jean-Marie; Han, Yu; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-04-01

    Efficient synthesis of stable two-dimensional (2D) noble metal catalysts is a challenging topic. Here we report the facile synthesis of 2D gold nanosheets via a wet chemistry method, by using layered double hydroxide as the template. Detailed characterization with electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that the nanosheets are negatively charged and [001] oriented with thicknesses varying from single to a few atomic layers. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals unusually low gold-gold coordination numbers. These gold nanosheets exhibit high catalytic activity and stability in the solvent-free selective oxidation of carbon-hydrogen bonds with molecular oxygen.

  7. Studies on Hydrogen Bonding Network Structures of Konjac Glucomannan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Jie; SUN Yu-Jing; YANG You-Hui; CHEN Yuan-Yuan; CHEN Yi-Qing; SUN Yuan-Ming

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen bonding network models of konjac glucomannan (KGM) are predicted in the approach of molecular dynamics (MD). These models have been proved by experiments whose results are consistent with those from simulation.The results show that the hydrogen bonding network structures of KGM are stable and the key linking points of hydrogen bonding network are at the O(6) and O(2) positions on KGM ring. Moreover, acety1 has significant influence on hydrogen bonding network and hydrogen bonding network structures are more stable after deacetylation.

  8. Hydrogen Bonding and Multiphonon Structure in One- and Two-Dimensional Polymeric Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musfeldt, J. L.; Brown, S.; Cao, J.; Conner, M. M.; McConnell, A. C.; Southerland, H. I.; Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Phillips, M. D.; Turnbull, M. M.; Landee, C. P.

    2007-03-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the temperature dependent infrared vibrational spectra of a family of chemically related coordination polymeric magnets based upon two different bridging anions, fluoride (F^-) and bifluoride (HF2^-), in copper-pyrazine complexes including Cu(HF2)(pyz)2BF4, Cu(HF2)(pyz)2ClO4, and CuF2(H2O)(pyz)). We compare our results with several one- and two-dimensional prototype materials including Cu(NO3)2(pyz) and Cu(ClO4)(pyz) 2. Unusual low temperature hydrogen bonding, local structural transitions associated with stronger low-temperature hydrogen bonding, and striking multiphonon effects that derive from coupling of an infrared-active fundamental with strong Raman-active modes of the pyrazine building-block molecule are observed. Based on the spectroscopic evidence, these interactions are common to this family of coordination polymers and work to stabilize the low temperature magnetic state. Similar interactions are likely to be present in other molecule-based magnets.

  9. Statistical Parameters for Hydrogen Bonding Networks: One Component Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海军; 洪晓钟; 赵敏; 巴信武

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analysis of network structures formed by hydrogen bonds as the sol-gel phase transition takesplace in a single component hydrogen bonding system, the theory of reversible gelation is applied to calculatesome statistical parameters that determine many physical and chemical properties of the networks. Then, thentunerical simulation of the number of active chains and dangling chains, the number of effective cross-linkages,the number of active and dangling mers and the modulus as a function of conversion are undertaken.

  10. Development of simulation approach for two-dimensional chiral molecular self-assembly driven by hydrogen bond at the liquid/solid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan; Yao, Man; Hao, Ce; Wan, Lijun; Wang, Yunhe; Chen, Ting; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xudong; Chen, Yonggang

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) chiral self-assembly system of 5-(benzyloxy)-isophthalic acid derivative/(S)-(+)-2-octanol/highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was studied. A combined density functional theory/molecular mechanics/molecular dynamics (DFT/MM/MD) approach for system of 2D chiral molecular self-assembly driven by hydrogen bond at the liquid/solid interface was thus proposed. Structural models of the chiral assembly were built on the basis of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images and simplified for DFT geometry optimization. Merck Molecular Force Field (MMFF) was singled out as the suitable force field by comparing the optimized configurations of MM and DFT. MM and MD simulations for hexagonal unit model which better represented the 2D assemble network were then preformed with MMFF. The adhesion energy, evolution of self-assembly process and characteristic parameters of hydrogen bond were obtained and analyzed. According to the above simulation, the stabilities of the clockwise and counterclockwise enantiomorphous networks were evaluated. The calculational results were supported by STM observations and the feasibility of the simulation method was confirmed by two other systems in the presence of chiral co-absorbers (R)-(-)-2-octanol and achiral co-absorbers 1-octanol. This theoretical simulation method assesses the stability trend of 2D enantiomorphous assemblies with atomic scale and can be applied to the similar hydrogen bond driven 2D chirality of molecular self-assembly system.

  11. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: A theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu, E-mail: amalen@iitk.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2015-01-28

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water.

  12. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: A theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water.

  13. Liquid state of hydrogen bond network in ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkin, M. I.; Klyuev, A. V.; Sinitsyn, V. V.; Ryzhkin, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Here we theoretically show that the Coulomb interaction between violations of the Bernal-Fowler rules leads to a temperature induced step-wise increase in their concentration by 6-7 orders of magnitude. This first-order phase transition is accompanied by commensurable decrease in the relaxation time and can be interpreted as melting of the hydrogen bond network. The new phase with the melted hydrogen lattice and survived oxygen one is unstable in the bulk of ice, and further drastic increase in the concentrations of oxygen interstitials and vacancies accomplishes the ice melting. The fraction of broken hydrogen bonds immediately after the melting is about 0.07 of their total number that implies an essential conservation of oxygen lattice in water.

  14. Liquid state of hydrogen bond network in ice

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhkin, M I; Sinitsyn, V V; Ryzhkin, I A

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that the Coulomb interaction between violations of the Bernal-Fowler rules leads to a temperature induced step-wise increase in their concentration by 6-7 orders of magnitude. This first-order phase transition is accompanied by commensurable decrease in the relaxation time and can be interpreted as melting of the hydrogen bond network. The new phase with the melted hydrogen lattice and survived oxygen one is unstable in the bulk of ice, and further drastic increase in the concentrations of oxygen interstitials and vacancies accomplishes the ice melting. The fraction of broken hydrogen bonds immediately after the melting is about 0.07 of their total number that implies an essential conservation of oxygen lattice in water.

  15. Terahertz Vibrations and Hydrogen-Bonded Networks in Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masae Takahashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of terahertz technology in the last few decades has made it possible to obtain a clear terahertz (THz spectrum. THz vibrations clearly show the formation of weak bonds in crystals. The simultaneous progress in the code of first-principles calculations treating noncovalent interactions has established the position of THz spectroscopy as a powerful tool for detecting the weak bonding in crystals. In this review, we are going to introduce, briefly, the contribution of weak bonds in the construction of molecular crystals first, and then, we will review THz spectroscopy as a powerful tool for detecting the formation of weak bonds and will show the significant contribution of advanced computational codes in treating noncovalent interactions. From the second section, following the Introduction, to the seventh section, before the conclusions, we describe: (1 the crystal packing forces, the hydrogen-bonded networks and their contribution to the construction of organic crystals; (2 the THz vibrations observed in hydrogen-bonded molecules; (3 the computational methods for analyzing the THz vibrations of hydrogen-bonded molecules; (4 the dispersion correction and anharmonicity incorporated into the first-principles calculations and their effect on the peak assignment of the THz spectrum (5 the temperature dependence; and (6 the polarization dependence of the THz spectrum.

  16. A Statistical Theory for Hydrogen Bonding Networks: One Component Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-Jun; BA Xin-Wu; ZHAO Min; LI Ze-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    The theory of reversible gelation is shown to be applicable to the hydrogen bonding system by analyzing their similarities in statistical viewpoint. The size distribution of hydrogen bonding clusters, the gelation condition and the generalized scaling law can be obtained directly. These results show that such a system can undergo phase transition process. Furthermore, a relationship between Gibbs free energy of forming hydrogen bond and conversions of groups is given. As an example, the chemical shift of OH groups is considered.

  17. Stochastic Liouville equations for hydrogen-bonding fluctuations and their signatures in two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, TL; Hayashi, T; Zhuang, W; Mukamel, S

    2005-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen-bond forming and breaking kinetics on the linear and coherent third-order infrared spectra of the OH stretch of HOD in D2O are described by Markovian, not necessarily Gaussian, fluctuations and simulated using the stochastic Liouville equations. Slow (0.5 ps) fluctuations are

  18. Statistical theory for hydrogen bonding fluid system of AaDd type (Ⅱ): Properties of hydrogen bonding networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HaiJun; HONG XiaoZhong; GU Fang; BA XinWu

    2007-01-01

    Making use of the invariant property of the equilibrium size distribution of the hydrogen bonding clusters formed in hydrogen bonding system of AaDd type, the analytical expressions of the free energy in pregel and postgel regimes are obtained. Then the gel free energy and the scaling behavior of the number of hydrogen bonds in gel phase near the critical point are investigated to give the corresponding scaling exponents and scaling law. Meanwhile, some properties of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the system, sol and gel phases are discussed. As a result, the explicit relationship between the number of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and hydrogen bonding degree is obtained.

  19. Two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded polymers in the crystal structures of the ammonium salts of phenoxyacetic acid, (4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid and (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Smith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the ammonium salts of phenoxyacetic acid, NH4+·C8H6O3−, (I, (4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid, NH4+·C8H5FO3−, (II, and the herbicidally active (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA, NH4+·C9H8ClO3−·0.5H2O, (III have been determined. All have two-dimensional layered structures based on inter-species ammonium N—H...O hydrogen-bonding associations, which give core substructures consisting primarily of conjoined cyclic motifs. The crystals of (I and (II are isomorphous with the core comprising R12(5, R12(4 and centrosymmetric R42(8 ring motifs, giving two-dimensional layers lying parallel to (100. In (III, the water molecule of solvation lies on a crystallographic twofold rotation axis and bridges two carboxyl O atoms in an R44(12 hydrogen-bonded motif, creating two R43(10 rings, which together with a conjoined centrosymmetric R42(8 ring incorporating both ammonium cations, generate two-dimensional layers lying parallel to (100. No π–π ring associations are present in any of the structures.

  20. Rotational Spectra of Hydrogen Bonded Networks of Amino Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The rotational spectra of several different amino alcohols including D/L-allo-threoninol, 2-amino-1,3-propanediol and 1,3-diamino-2-propanol over the 6.5-18.5 GHz range have been investigated under jet-cooled conditions using chirped-pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Despite the small size of these molecules, a great variety of conformations have been observed in the molecular expansion. While the NH2 group is typically thought of as a H-bond acceptor, it often acts both as acceptor and donor in forming H-bonded networks. With three adjacent H-bonding substituents (a combination of OH and NH2 groups), many different hydrogen bonding patterns are possible, including H-bonded chains and H-bonded cycles. Since many of these structures differ primarily by the relative orientation of the H-atoms, the analysis of these rotational spectra are challenging. Only through an exhaustive conformational search and the comparison with the experimental rotational constants, nuclear quadrupolar splittings, and line strengths are we able to understand the complex nature of these interactions. The ways in which the presence and number of NH2 groups affects the relative energies, and distorts the structures will be explored.

  1. De novo design of protein homo-oligomers with modular hydrogen bond network-mediated specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyken, Scott E.; Chen, Zibo; Groves, Benjamin; Langan, Robert A.; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Ford, Alex; Gilmore, Jason; Xu, Chunfu; DiMaio, Frank; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Sankaran, Banumathi; Seelig, Georg; Zwart, Peter H.; Baker, David

    2017-01-01

    In nature, structural specificity in DNA and proteins is encoded quite differently: in DNA, specificity arises from modular hydrogen bonds in the core of the double helix, whereas in proteins, specificity arises largely from buried hydrophobic packing complemented by irregular peripheral polar interactions. Here we describe a general approach for designing a wide range of protein homo-oligomers with specificity determined by modular arrays of central hydrogen bond networks. We use the approach to design dimers, trimers, and tetramers consisting of two concentric rings of helices, including previously not seen triangular, square, and supercoiled topologies. X-ray crystallography confirms that the structures overall, and the hydrogen bond networks in particular, are nearly identical to the design models, and the networks confer interaction specificity in vivo. The ability to design extensive hydrogen bond networks with atomic accuracy is a milestone for protein design and enables the programming of protein interaction specificity for a broad range of synthetic biology applications. PMID:27151862

  2. Correlation of structural order, anomalous density, and hydrogen bonding network of liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Dibyendu; Mohan, S; Ghosh, S K; Choudhury, Niharendu

    2013-07-25

    We use extensive molecular dynamics simulations employing different state-of-the-art force fields to find a common framework for comparing structural orders and density anomalies as obtained from different water models. It is found that the average number of hydrogen bonds correlates well with various order parameters as well as the temperature of maximum densities across the different models, unifying apparently disparate results from different models and emphasizing the importance of hydrogen bonding in determining anomalous properties and the structure of water. A deeper insight into the hydrogen bond network of water reveals that the solvation shell of a water molecule can be defined by considering only those neighbors that are hydrogen-bonded to it. On the basis of this view, the origin of the appearance of a non-tetrahedral peak at a higher temperature in the distribution of tetrahedral order parameters has been explained. It is found that a neighbor that is hydrogen-bonded to the central molecule is tetrahedrally coordinated even at higher temperatures. The non-tetrahedral peak at a higher temperature arises due to the strained orientation of the neighbors that are non-hydrogen-bonded to the central molecule. With the new definition of the solvation shell, liquid water can be viewed as an instantaneously changing random hydrogen-bonded network consisting of differently coordinated hydrogen-bonded molecules with their distinct solvation shells. The variation of the composition of these hydrogen-bonded molecules against temperature accounts for the density anomaly without introducing the concept of large-scale structural polyamorphism in water.

  3. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen bond network of an enzyme active site

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lu; Boxer, Steven G; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes utilize protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds.

  4. Pressure-induced localisation of the hydrogen-bond network in KOH-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Andreas, E-mail: a.hermann@ed.ac.uk; Nelmes, Richard J.; Loveday, John S. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Guthrie, Malcolm [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); European Spallation Source AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-12-28

    Using a combination of ab initio crystal structure prediction and neutron diffraction techniques, we have solved the full structure of KOH-VI at 7 GPa. Rather than being orthorhombic and proton-ordered as had previously be proposed, we find that this high-pressure phase of potassium hydroxide is tetragonal (space group I4/mmm) and proton disordered. It has an unusual hydrogen bond topology, where the hydroxyl groups form isolated hydrogen-bonded square planar (OH){sub 4} units. This structure is stable above 6.5 GPa and, despite being macroscopically proton-disordered, local ice rules enforce microscopic order of the hydrogen bonds. We suggest the use of this novel type of structure to study concerted proton tunneling in the solid state, while the topology of the hydrogen bond network could conceivably be exploited in data storage applications based solely on the manipulations of hydrogen bonds. The unusual localisation of the hydrogen bond network under applied pressure is found to be favored by a more compact packing of the constituents in a distorted cesium chloride structure.

  5. Syntheses, Crystal Structures, Magnetic Behaviours, and Thermal Properties of Three Hydrogen-Bonding Networks Containing Dicyanamide and 4-Hydroxypyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three new dicyanamide-bridged polymeric complexes of {[Mn(dca2(L2]·2H2O}n (1, {[Cd(dca2(L2]·2H2O}n (2, and {[Co(dca2(L2]2(L}n (3 (dca = dicyanamide, L = pyridinium-4-olate have been synthesized and structurally characterized. In the three compounds, the protons of hydroxyl groups of 4-hydroxypyridine transfer to pyridyl nitrogen atoms. Compounds 1 and 2 are isomorphous forming one-dimensional [M(dca2(L2]n chains where metals are connected by double dca anions. These one-dimensional chains are extended into two-dimensional layers through weak C–H⋯N hydrogen bonds. Further, these layers are assembled into a three-dimensional supramolecular network through N–H⋯O, O–H⋯O hydrogen bonds. Complex 3 is a coordination layer of (4, 4 topology with octahedral metal centers linked by four single μ1,5-bridges. These layers are interlocked by N–H⋯O, O–H⋯O hydrogen bonds from coordinated water molecules and free L molecules, which leads to a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. The variable temperature magnetic susceptibilities measurement of compounds 1 and 3 shows the existence of weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the metal centers. The thermogravimetric analyses of the compounds 1–3 are also discussed.

  6. Probing defects and correlations in the hydrogen-bond network of ab initio water

    CERN Document Server

    Gasparotto, Piero; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen-bond network of water is characterized by the presence of coordination defects relative to the ideal tetrahedral network of ice, whose fluctuations determine the static and time-dependent properties of the liquid. Because of topological constraints, such defects do not come alone, but are highly correlated coming in a plethora of different pairs. Here we discuss in detail such correlations in the case of ab initio water models and show that they have interesting similarities to regular and defective solid phases of water. Although defect correlations involve deviations from idealized tetrahedrality, they can still be regarded as weaker hydrogen bonds that retain a high degree of directionality. We also investigate how the structure and population of coordination defects is affected by approximations to the inter-atomic potential, finding that in most cases, the qualitative features of the hydrogen bond network are remarkably robust.

  7. Isolation of Cellulose Nanofibers: Effect of Biotreatment on Hydrogen Bonding Network in Wood Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekumar Janardhnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cellulose nanofibres as high-strength reinforcement in nano-biocomposites is very enthusiastically being explored due to their biodegradability, renewability, and high specific strength properties. Cellulose, through a regular network of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, is organized into perfect stereoregular configuration called microfibrils which further aggregate to different levels to form the fibre. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding at various levels, especially at the elementary level, is the major binding force that one need to overcome to reverse engineer these fibres into their microfibrillar level. This paper briefly describes a novel enzymatic fibre pretreatment developed to facilitate the isolation of cellulose microfibrils and explores effectiveness of biotreatment on the intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the fiber. Bleached Kraft Softwood Pulp was treated with a fungus (OS1 isolated from elm tree infected with Dutch elm disease. Cellulose microfibrils were isolated from these treated fibers by high-shear refining. The % yield of nanofibres and their diameter distribution (<50 nm isolated from the bio-treated fibers indicated a substantial increase compared to those isolated from untreated fibers. FT-IR spectral analysis indicated a reduction in the density of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding within the fiber. X-ray spectrometry indicated a reduction in the crystallinity. Hydrogen bond-specific enzyme and its application in the isolation of new generation cellulose nano-fibers can be a huge leap forward in the field of nano-biocomposites.

  8. Restructuring the crystalline cellulose hydrogen bond network enhances its depolymerization rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishir P.S. Chundawat; Giovanni Bellesia; Nirmal Uppugundla; Leonardo da Costa Sousa; Dahai Gao; Albert M. Cheh; Umesh P. Agarwal; Christopher M. Bianchetti; George N. Phillips; Paul Langan; Venkatesh Balan; S. Gnanakaran; Bruce E. Dale

    2011-01-01

    Conversion of lignocellulose to biofuels is partly inefficient due to the deleterious impact of cellulose crystallinity on enzymatic saccharification. We demonstrate how the synergistic activity of cellulases was enhanced by altering the hydrogen bond network within crystalline cellulose fibrils. We provide a molecular-scale explanation of these phenomena through...

  9. Hydrogen-bonded Lamellar Network of Pyromellitic Acid Pillared by 8-Hydroxyquinoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG, Lei; ZHANG, Hong; ZHANG, Jing-Ping; GAO, Fei-Xue; HUA, Rui-Mao; ZHOU, Guang-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-q) salt of pyromellitic acid (benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid, H4bta) forms robust lamellar structure where [H2bta]2- anions build up sheets through strong hydrogen bonds in two dimensions and[H-8-q]+ cations act as pillars to afford an extended three dimensional network.

  10. Hydrogen bond network topology in liquid water and methanol: a graph theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakó, Imre; Bencsura, Akos; Hermannson, Kersti; Bálint, Szabolcs; Grósz, Tamás; Chihaia, Viorel; Oláh, Julianna

    2013-09-28

    Networks are increasingly recognized as important building blocks of various systems in nature and society. Water is known to possess an extended hydrogen bond network, in which the individual bonds are broken in the sub-picosecond range and still the network structure remains intact. We investigated and compared the topological properties of liquid water and methanol at various temperatures using concepts derived within the framework of graph and network theory (neighbour number and cycle size distribution, the distribution of local cyclic and local bonding coefficients, Laplacian spectra of the network, inverse participation ratio distribution of the eigenvalues and average localization distribution of a node) and compared them to small world and Erdős-Rényi random networks. Various characteristic properties (e.g. the local cyclic and bonding coefficients) of the network in liquid water could be reproduced by small world and/or Erdős-Rényi networks, but the ring size distribution of water is unique and none of the studied graph models could describe it. Using the inverse participation ratio of the Laplacian eigenvectors we characterized the network inhomogeneities found in water and showed that similar phenomena can be observed in Erdős-Rényi and small world graphs. We demonstrated that the topological properties of the hydrogen bond network found in liquid water systematically change with the temperature and that increasing temperature leads to a broader ring size distribution. We applied the studied topological indices to the network of water molecules with four hydrogen bonds, and showed that at low temperature (250 K) these molecules form a percolated or nearly-percolated network, while at ambient or high temperatures only small clusters of four-hydrogen bonded water molecules exist.

  11. Layered vanadyl (IV) nitroprusside: Magnetic interaction through a network of hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.M. [Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Osiry, H. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Pomiro, F.; Varetti, E.L. [CEQUINOR (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 47 and 115, 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC – CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Haya de la Torre esq, Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Alejandro, R.R. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México (Mexico); Ben Altabef, A. [INQUINOA-UNT-CONICET, Instituto de Química Física, Facultad de Bioquímica, Química y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Lorenzo 456, T4000CAN San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); and others

    2016-07-15

    The hydrogen bond and π-π stacking are two non-covalent interactions able to support cooperative magnetic ordering between paramagnetic centers. This contribution reports the crystal structure and related magnetic properties for VO[Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]·2H{sub 2}O, which has a layered structure. This solid crystallizes with an orthorhombic unit cell, in the Pna2{sub 1} space group, with cell parameters a=14.1804(2), b=10.4935(1), c=7.1722(8) Å and four molecules per unit cell (Z=4). Its crystal structure was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Neighboring layers remain linked through a network of hydrogen bonds involving a water molecule coordinated to the axial position for the V atom and the unbridged axial NO and CN ligands. An uncoordinated water molecule is found forming a triple bridge between these last two ligands and the coordinated water molecule. The magnetic measurements, recorded down to 2 K, shows a ferromagnetic interaction between V atoms located at neighboring layers, with a Curie-Weiss constant of 3.14 K. Such ferromagnetic behavior was interpreted as resulting from a superexchange interaction through the network of strong OH····O{sub H2O}, OH····N{sub CN}, and OH····O{sub NO} hydrogen bonds that connects neighboring layers. The interaction within the layer must be of antiferromagnetic nature and it was detected close to 2 K. - Graphical abstract: Coordination environment for the metals in vanadyl (II) nitroprusside dihydrate. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystal structure of vanadyl nitroprusside dehydrate. • Network of hydrogen bonds. • Magnetic interactions through a network of hydrogen bonds. • Layered transition metal nitroprussides.

  12. Phenyl-ring rotational disorder in the two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded structure of the 1:1 proton-transfer salt of the diazo-dye precursor 4-(phenyldiazenyl)aniline (aniline yellow) with L-tartaric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D; Young, David J

    2010-07-01

    In the structure of the 1:1 proton-transfer compound from the reaction of L-tartaric acid with the azo-dye precursor aniline yellow [4-(phenyldiazenyl)aniline], namely 4-(phenyldiazenyl)anilinium (2R,3R)-3-carboxy-2,3-dihydroxypropanoate, C(12)H(12)N(3)(+) x C(4)H(5)O(6)(-), the asymmetric unit contains two independent 4-(phenyldiazenyl)anilinium cations and two hydrogen L-tartrate anions. The structure is unusual in that all four phenyl rings of the two cations have identical rotational disorder with equal occupancy of the conformations. The two hydrogen L-tartrate anions form independent but similar chains through head-to-tail carboxyl-carboxylate O-H...O hydrogen bonds [graph set C(7)], which are then extended into a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded sheet structure through hydroxy O-H...O hydrogen-bonded links. The anilinium groups of the 4-(phenyldiazenyl)anilinium cations are incorporated into the sheets and also provide internal hydrogen-bonded extensions, while their aromatic tails are layered in the structure without significant association except for weak pi-pi interactions [minimum ring centroid separation = 3.844 (3) A]. The hydrogen L-tartrate residues of both anions exhibit the common short intramolecular hydroxy-carboxylate O-H...O hydrogen bonds. This work provides a solution to the unusual disorder problem inherent in the structure of this salt, as well as giving another example of the utility of the hydrogen tartrate anion in the generation of sheet substructures in molecular assembly processes.

  13. Effect of hydrogen bond networks on the nucleation mechanism of protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djikaev, Y. S.; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2009-12-01

    We have recently developed a kinetic model for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding (NMPF) in terms of ternary nucleation by using the first passage time analysis. A protein was considered as a random heteropolymer consisting of hydrophobic, hydrophilic (some of which are negatively or positively ionizable), and neutral beads. The main idea of the NMPF model consisted of averaging the dihedral potential in which a selected residue is involved over all possible configurations of all neighboring residues along the protein chain. The combination of the average dihedral, effective pairwise (due to Lennard-Jones-type and electrostatic interactions), and confining (due to the polymer connectivity constraint) potentials gives rise to an overall potential around the cluster that, as a function of the distance from the cluster center, has a double-well shape. This allows one to evaluate the protein folding time. In the original NMPF model hydrogen bonding was not taken into account explicitly. To improve the NMPF model and make it more realistic, in this paper we modify our (previously developed) probabilistic hydrogen bond model and combine it with the former. Thus, a contribution due to the disruption of hydrogen bond networks around the interacting particles (cluster of native residues and residue in the protein unfolded part) appears in the overall potential field around a cluster. The modified model is applied to the folding of the same model proteins that were examined in the original model: a short protein consisting of 124 residues (roughly mimicking bovine pancreatic ribonuclease) and a long one consisting of 2500 residues (as a representative of large proteins with superlong polypeptide chains), at pH=8.3 , 7.3, and 6.3. The hydrogen bond contribution now plays a dominant role in the total potential field around the cluster (except for very short distances thereto where the repulsive energy tends to infinity). It is by an order of magnitude stronger for

  14. Digital Operation of Microelectronic Circuits Analogous to Protein Hydrogen Bonding Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elitsa Gieva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two hydrogen bonding networks with water molecules and branching residues extracted from β-lactamase protein are investigated and their proton transfer characteristics are studied by creating analogous electrical circuits consisting of block-elements. The block-elements and their proton transfer are described by polynomials that are coded in Matlab and in Verilog-A for use in the Spectre simulator of Cadence IC design system. DC and digital pulse analyses are performed to demonstrate that some circuit outputs behave as repeaters while other - behave as inverters. The results also showed that the HBN circuits might behave as a D-latch and a demultiplexer.

  15. Crystal Structure And Magnetic Property of the Complex of Hydrogen-bonded Two-dimensional Layer Copper(Ⅱ) Acrylate with Trimethyl Phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Copper carboxylate complexes play an important role in catalysing the enzymatic activities[1-4], and the phosphate has an especial use in DNA recognition[5]. Indeed the report about copper carboxylate complexes with phosphate ligands is rare. A chain structure supramolecule [Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2]n has been reported recently[6], in which a Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2 unit is linked by four O(water)-H...O(carboxyl) hydrogen bonds with two adjacent units(Fig.1). In this work a layer structure complex {Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2[OP(OCH3)3]}n was synthesized by means of hydrogen-bonded assembly approach between complex [Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2]n with trimethyl phosphate(TMP).

  16. Crystallization of a Two-Dimensional Hydrogen-Bonded Molecular Assembly: Evolution of the Local Structure Resolved by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patera, Laerte L; Liu, Xunshan; Mosso, Nico; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia; Repp, Jascha

    2017-08-28

    Structures of the aromatic N-heterocyclic hexaazatriphenylene (HAT) molecular synthon obtained by surface-assisted self-assembly were analyzed with sub-Å resolution by means of noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM), both in the kinetically trapped amorphous state and in the thermodynamically stable crystalline phase. These results reveal how the crystallization governs the length scale of the network order for non-flexible molecular species without affecting the local bonding schemes. The capability of nc-AFM to accurately resolve structural relaxations will be highly relevant for the characterization of vitreous two-dimensional supramolecular materials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Statistical theory for hydrogen bonding fluid system of A_aD_d type(II):Properties of hydrogen bonding networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Making use of the invariant property of the equilibrium size distribution of the hydrogen bonding clus- ters formed in hydrogen bonding system of AaDd type,the analytical expressions of the free energy in pregel and postgel regimes are obtained.Then the gel free energy and the scaling behavior of the number of hydrogen bonds in gel phase near the critical point are investigated to give the corre- sponding scaling exponents and scaling law.Meanwhile,some properties of intermolecular and in- tramolecular hydrogen bonds in the system,sol and gel phases are discussed.As a result,the explicit relationship between the number of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and hydrogen bonding degree is obtained.

  18. Two-dimensional vibrational analysis of the Lippincott-Schröder potential for OHO, NHO and NHN hydrogen bonds and the deuterium isotope effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, T.; Mori, K.; Itoh, R.

    1981-09-01

    Two-dimensional vibrational analyses [i.e. crude adiabatic approximation, SCF approximation and variational method (crude adiabatic basis function)] are performed on the hydrogen bond systems consisting of the Lippincott-Schröder potentials for the OHO, NHO and NHN bonds. The OHO and NHN systems are supposed to be linear and the bent structure is considered for the NHO system. The frequency shift for the hydrogen bond length variation and its deuterium substitution effects are in good agreement with experiment. The anomalies in the frequency ratio ν OH/ν OD at an O—O distance of 2.5 Å, and in the interminimum distance shift on deuteration at 2.5 Å are well explained as the difference of double minimum behavior between the vibrational states of proton and deuterium. It is also shown that the Lippincott-Schröder model for the OHO system supplies the general features for proton tunneling, proton delocalization beyond the barrier and other type processes in hydrogen bonds.

  19. Effects of glycerol on the molecular mobility and hydrogen bond network in starch matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun; Ludescher, Richard D

    2015-01-22

    The effects of glycerol on molecular mobility and hydrogen bonding network in an amorphous glassy starch matrix were studied using phosphorescence and IR spectroscopy. Amorphous potato starch films containing varying amounts of glycerol (0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.%) were formulated by rapidly dehydrating aqueous potato starch gel (5%, w/v) with a corresponding content of glycerol; X-ray diffraction data confirm that the films contained negligible content of crystalline starch. Erythrosin B (Ery B) phosphorescence was used to monitor the molecular mobility of these matrices over the temperature range from 0 to 100°C. Analysis of Ery B emission peak frequency, band width and intensity decay provided information about thermally-activated modes of molecular mobility in the matrix. Dipolar relaxation around the triplet state of Ery B was enhanced by addition of glycerol and the extent of relaxation increased at low and intermediate but decreased at higher temperature. The glycerol content-dependent onset temperature for this transition was 70°C for pure starch and decreased to 40°C for a matrix with 30% glycerol. Measurements of the rate of non-radiative decay from the Ery B triplet state indicated that glycerol plasticized the starch matrix above ∼10 wt.% while acting as an antiplastizer to increase the matrix molecular mobility at lower content. These matrix properties were related to glycerol-dependent increases in hydrogen bond strength as measured by IR.

  20. Conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond network between TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin; Mokrosinski, Jacek;

    2010-01-01

    Five highly conserved polar residues connected by a number of structural water molecules together with two rotamer micro-switches, TrpVI:13 and TyrVII:20, constitute an extended hydrogen bond network between the intracellular segments of TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII of 7TM receptors. Molecular dynamics...... to apparently function as a catching trap for water molecules. Mutational analysis of the beta2-adrenergic receptor demonstrated that the highly conserved polar residues of the hydrogen bond network were all important for receptor signaling but served different functions, some dampening constitutive activity...... (AsnI:18, AspII:10, and AsnVII:13), whereas others (AsnVII:12 and AsnVII:16) located one helical turn apart and sharing a water molecule were shown to be essential for agonist-induced signaling. It is concluded that the conserved water hydrogen bond network of 7TM receptors constitutes an extended...

  1. Thermodynamic consequences of disrupting a water-mediated hydrogen bond network in a protein:pheromone complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrow, Scott D; Edmonds, Katherine A; Goodman, Michael A; Novotny, Milos V; Stone, Martin J

    2005-01-01

    The mouse pheromones (+/-)-2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole (SBT) and 6-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-heptanone (HMH) bind into an occluded hydrophobic cavity in the mouse major urinary protein (MUP-1). Although the ligands are structurally unrelated, in both cases binding is accompanied by formation of a similar buried, water-mediated hydrogen bond network between the ligand and several backbone and side chain groups on the protein. To investigate the energetic contribution of this hydrogen bond network to ligand binding, we have applied isothermal titration calorimetry to measure the binding thermodynamics using several MUP mutants and ligand analogs. Mutation of Tyr-120 to Phe, which disrupts a hydrogen bond from the phenolic hydroxyl group of Tyr-120 to one of the bound water molecules, results in a substantial loss of favorable binding enthalpy, which is partially compensated by a favorable change in binding entropy. A similar thermodynamic effect was observed when the hydrogen bonded nitrogen atom of the heterocyclic ligand was replaced by a methyne group. Several other modifications of the protein or ligand had smaller effects on the binding thermodynamics. The data provide supporting evidence for the role of the hydrogen bond network in stabilizing the complex.

  2. The dispersion correction and weak-hydrogen-bond network in low-frequency vibration of solid-state salicylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2012-04-01

    We perform the dispersion-corrected first-principles calculations of vibrational absorption and the far-infrared (terahertz) spectroscopic experiments at different temperature to examine the effect of weak-hydrogen-bond network on the low-frequency vibrations of solid-state salicylic acid. By dispersion correction, calculated frequencies improve especially in the intermonomer torsion and interdimer translational modes which are closely related to the weak hydrogen bonds. The calculated frequencies and their relative intensities reproduce the observed spectrum in the accuracy of 10 cm-1 or less. Weak-hydrogen-bond network causes a large frequency shift of out-of-plane intermonomer modes and enhances interdimer translational modes accompanied by the O⋯H stretching vibrations.

  3. Hydration and hydrogen bond network of water around hydrophobic surface investigated by terahertz spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, K; Suzuki, T; Kondo, N; Ogawa, Y

    2014-12-21

    Water conformation around hydrophobic side chains of four amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-aminobutyric acid, and L-norvaline) was investigated via changes in complex dielectric constant in the terahertz (THz) region. Each of these amino acids has the same hydrophilic backbone, with successive additions of hydrophobic straight methylene groups (-CH2-) to the side chain. Changes in the degree of hydration (number of dynamically retarded water molecules relative to bulk water) and the structural conformation of the water hydrogen bond (HB) network related to the number of methylene groups were quantitatively measured. Since dielectric responses in the THz region represent water relaxations and water HB vibrations at a sub-picosecond and picosecond timescale, these measurements characterized the water relaxations and HB vibrations perturbed by the methylene apolar groups. We found each successive straight -CH2- group on the side chain restrained approximately two hydrophobic hydration water molecules. Additionally, the number of non-hydrogen-bonded (NHB) water molecules increased slightly around these hydrophobic side chains. The latter result seems to contradict the iceberg model proposed by Frank and Evans, where water molecules are said to be more ordered around apolar surfaces. Furthermore, we compared the water-hydrophilic interactions of the hydrophilic amino acid backbone with those with the water-hydrophobic interactions around the side chains. As the hydrophobicity of the side chain increased, the ordering of the surrounding water HB network was altered from that surrounding the hydrophilic amino acid backbone, thereby diminishing the fraction of NHB water and ordering the surrounding tetrahedral water HB network.

  4. Characterisation of hydrogen bonding networks in RNAs via magic angle spinning solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, Kerstin; Leppert, Joerg; Ohlenschlaeger, Oliver; Goerlach, Matthias; Ramachandran, Ramadurai [Institut fuer Molekulare Biotechnologie, Abteilung Molekulare Biophysik/NMR-Spektroskopie (Germany)], E-mail: raman@imb-jena.de

    2005-04-15

    It is demonstrated that the spatial proximity of {sup 1}H nuclei in hydrogen bonded base-pairs in RNAs can be conveniently mapped via magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments involving proton spin diffusion driven chemical shift correlation of low gamma nuclei such as the imino and amino nitrogens of nucleic acid bases. As different canonical and non-canonical base-pairing schemes encountered in nucleic acids are characterised by topologically different networks of proton dipolar couplings, different base-pairing schemes lead to characteristic cross-peak intensity patterns in such correlation spectra. The method was employed in a study of a 100 kDa RNA composed of 97 CUG repeats, or (CUG){sub 97} that has been implicated in the neuromuscular disease myotonic dystrophy. {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N chemical shift correlation studies confirm the presence of Watson-Crick GC base pairs in (CUG){sub 97}.

  5. Ultrasound stimulus effect on hydrogen bonding in networked alumina and polyacrylic acid slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoc, Ngo Le; Takaomi, Kobayashi

    2010-01-01

    The influence of ultrasound (US) on the viscosity of aqueous slurry composing polyacrylic acid (PAA) and alumina was studied. For exposure to an aqueous slurry solution, US waves emitted at three different frequencies of 28, 45, and 100 kHz were used. Results show that the stimulus effect of US on viscosity change was a breakage of the hydrogen bonding networks of alumina and PAA in the slurry solution. That decrease in viscosity was enhanced strongly by US exposure as the output power was increased from 175 to 300 W. In addition, a lower US frequency was effective for slurry viscosity reduction. The reduced viscosity of the slurry also depended on the solution pH. After US was stopped, the viscosity increased gradually and recovered to its original value within about 15 min. The stimulus effect on the viscosity change was cycled by US.

  6. A Novel Hydrogen-bonded Three-dimensional Network Complex Containing Nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; LI Juan; WANG En-bo

    2004-01-01

    A novel complex, (H3O)2[Ni(2,6-pydc)2] · 2H2O was synthesized in an aqueous solution and characterized by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses and IR spectra. The X-ray structural analysis revealed that the novel compound forms three-dimensional(3D) networks by both π-π stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. The crystal data for the complex are a = 13. 853 (3) nm, b= 9. 6892 (19) nm,c=13.732(3) nm, α=90. 00°, β=115.52(3)°, γ=90.00°, Z=3, R1=0. 0786, wR2=0.1522.

  7. Hydrogen bond networks determine emergent mechanical and thermodynamic properties across a protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallakyan Sargis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gram-negative bacteria use periplasmic-binding proteins (bPBP to transport nutrients through the periplasm. Despite immense diversity within the recognized substrates, all members of the family share a common fold that includes two domains that are separated by a conserved hinge. The hinge allows the protein to cycle between open (apo and closed (ligated conformations. Conformational changes within the proteins depend on a complex interplay of mechanical and thermodynamic response, which is manifested as an increase in thermal stability and decrease of flexibility upon ligand binding. Results We use a distance constraint model (DCM to quantify the give and take between thermodynamic stability and mechanical flexibility across the bPBP family. Quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR are readily evaluated because the DCM links mechanical and thermodynamic properties. We have previously demonstrated that QSFR is moderately conserved across a mesophilic/thermophilic RNase H pair, whereas the observed variance indicated that different enthalpy-entropy mechanisms allow similar mechanical response at their respective melting temperatures. Our predictions of heat capacity and free energy show marked diversity across the bPBP family. While backbone flexibility metrics are mostly conserved, cooperativity correlation (long-range couplings also demonstrate considerable amount of variation. Upon ligand removal, heat capacity, melting point, and mechanical rigidity are, as expected, lowered. Nevertheless, significant differences are found in molecular cooperativity correlations that can be explained by the detailed nature of the hydrogen bond network. Conclusion Non-trivial mechanical and thermodynamic variation across the family is explained by differences within the underlying H-bond networks. The mechanism is simple; variation within the H-bond networks result in altered mechanical linkage properties that directly affect

  8. Photoinduced hydrogen-bonding dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Xu, Jinmei

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen bonding dynamics has received extensive research attention in recent years due to the significant advances in femtolaser spectroscopy experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. Usually, photoexcitation would cause changes in the hydrogen bonding formed through the interaction between hydrogen donor and acceptor molecules on their ground electronic states, and such transient strengthening or weakening of hydrogen bonding could be crucial for the photophysical transformations and the subsequent photochemical reactions that occurred on a time scale from tens of femtosecond to a few nanoseconds. In this article, we review the combined experimental and theoretical studies focusing on the ultrafast electronic and vibrational hydrogen bonding dynamics. Through these studies, new mechanisms and proposals and common rules have been put forward to advance our understanding of the hydrogen bondings dynamics in a variety of important photoinduced phenomena like photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer processes, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network including forming and breaking hydrogen bond in water. Graphical Abstract We review the recent advances on exploring the photoinduced hydrogen bonding dynamics in solutions through a joint approach of laser spectroscopy and theoretical calculation. The reviewed studies have put forward a new mechanism, new proposal, and new rule for a variety of photoinduced phenomena such as photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, and rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network in water.

  9. Car-Parrinello simulation of the vibrational spectrum of a medium strong hydrogen bond by two-dimensional quantization of the nuclear motion: application to 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brela, Mateusz; Stare, Jernej; Pirc, Gordana; Sollner-Dolenc, Marija; Boczar, Marek; Wójcik, Marek J; Mavri, Janez

    2012-04-19

    The nature of medium strong intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding in 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzamide in the crystal phase was examined by infrared spectroscopy and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation. The focal point of our study was the part of the infrared spectra associated with the O-H and N-H stretching modes that are very sensitive to the strength of hydrogen bonding. For spectra calculations we used an isolated dimer and the fully periodic crystal environment. We calculated the spectra by using harmonic approximation, the time course of the dipole moment function as obtained from the Car-Parrinello simulation, and the quantization of the nuclear motion of the proton for an instantaneous snapshot of the structures in one and two dimensions. Although quantitative assessment of the agreement between the computed and experimental band contour is difficult due to the fact that the experimental band is very broad, we feel that the most reasonable qualitative agreement with the experiment is obtained from snapshot structures and two-dimensional quantization of the proton motion. We have also critically examined the methods of constructing the one-dimensional proton potential. Perspectives are given for the treatment of nuclear quantum effects in biocatalysis.

  10. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechang Li

    Full Text Available To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  11. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  12. From hydrogen bonding to metal coordination and back: Porphyrin-based networks on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studener, F., E-mail: f.studener@rug.nl; Müller, K.; Stöhr, M., E-mail: m.a.stohr@rug.nl [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747AG Groningen (Netherlands); Marets, N.; Bulach, V., E-mail: bulach@unistra.fr; Hosseini, M. W., E-mail: hosseini@unistra.fr [Laboratoire de Tectonique Moléculaire, UMR UDS-CNRS 7140, Université de Strasbourg, 4 rue Blaise Pascal, 67070 Strasbourg (France)

    2015-03-14

    The self-assembly of a metal-free porphyrin bearing two pyridyl coordinating sites and two pentyl chains at trans meso positions was investigated under ultrahigh vacuum on a Ag(111) surface by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The STM measurements revealed a well-ordered close-packed structure with a rhombic unit cell for coverages ≤1 monolayer with their molecular plane parallel to the surface. The growth direction of the molecular islands is aligned along the step edges, which are restructured due to molecule-substrate interactions. The shorter unit cell vector of the molecular superstructure follows the 〈1-10〉 direction of the Ag(111) substrate. Hydrogen bonds between pyridyl and pyrrole groups of neighboring molecules as well as weak van der Waals forces between the pentyl chains stabilize the superstructure. Deposition of cobalt atoms onto the close-packed structure at room temperature leads to the formation of a hexagonal porous network stabilized by metal-ligand bonding between the pyridyl ligands and the cobalt atoms. Thermal annealing of the Co-coordination network at temperatures >450 K results in the transformation of the hexagonal network into a second close-packed structure. Changes in the molecule-substrate interactions due to metalation of the porphyrin core with Co as well as intermolecular interactions can explain the observed structural transformations.

  13. Force spectroscopy of hyaluronan by atomic force microscopy: from hydrogen-bonded networks toward single-chain behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotti, Marina I; Rinaudo, Marguerite; Vancso, G Julius

    2007-09-01

    The conformational behavior of hyaluronan (HA) polysaccharide chains in aqueous NaCl solution was characterized directly at the single-molecule level. This communication reports on one of the first single-chain atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed at variable temperatures, investigating the influence of the temperature on the stability of the HA single-chain conformation. Through AFM single-molecule force spectroscopy, the temperature destabilization of a local structure was proven. This structure involved a hydrogen-bonded network along the polymeric chain, with hydrogen bonds between the polar groups of HA and possibly water, and a change from a nonrandom coil to a random coil behavior was observed when increasing the temperature from 29 +/- 1 to 46 +/- 1 degrees C. As a result of the applied force, this superstructure was found to break progressively at room temperature. The use of a hydrogen-bonding breaker solvent demonstrated the hydrogen-bonded water-bridged nature of the network structure of HA single chains in aqueous NaCl solution.

  14. Hydrogen Bond Networks of Three Cobalt Coordination Polymers Based on Bis(triazole) and Benzenebiscarboxylate Isomers%Hydrogen Bond Networks of Three Cobalt Coordination Polymers Based on Bis(triazole) and Benzenebiscarboxylate Isomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱新; 王菊; 崔艳锋; 李宝龙; 李海燕

    2011-01-01

    Three hydrogen bond networks of cobalt(II) coordination polymers { [Co(btp)2(H2O)2]·2(l,2-Hbdc)·2H2O}n (1), { [Co(btp) (1,3 -bdc)(H2O)]·1.5H2O } n (2) and { [Co(btp)2(H2O)2]·(1,4-bdc) } n (3) were synthesized by 1,3 -bis(1,2,4- triazol- 1-yl)propane (btp) and benzenedicarboxylate position isomers. Complex 1 is comprised of [Co(btp)z(H20)]2n+ 1D cation chains, 1,2-Hbdc anions and lattice water molecules. The structure of 2 is an undulated 2D (4,4) network. Two adjacent networks interpenetrate each other to form a new 2D double-layers network which is sustained by the hydrogen bond interactions in 2. Complex 3 is comprised of [Co(btp)z(H20)]n2n+ 1D cation chains and 1,4-bdc2 anions. These [Co(btp)2(H2O)]n^2+ 1D cations and 1,2-Hbdc-/1,4-bdc2- anions form 2D hydrogen bond networks in 1 and 3. The thermal stabilities of 1, 2 and 3 were investigated.

  15. Novel Hydrogen-bonded Three-dimensional Supramolecular Architectures Containing 2D Honeycomb Networks or 2D Grids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong-Sheng; ZHOU Cai-Hua; WANG Yao-Yu; FU Feng; WU Ya-Pan; QI Guang-Cai; SHI Qi-Zhen

    2006-01-01

    Two new supramolecular complexes, [Cu(H2dhbd)(3-pyOH)(H2O)]2·3-pyOH·2H2O (1) and [Cu2(dhbd)(dpa)2-(H2O)]·6H2O (2) (H4dhbd=2,3-dihydroxybutanedioic acid, 3-pyOH=3-hydroxypyridine, dpa=2,2'-dipyridylamine),have been synthesized in aqueous solution and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses,H-O hydrogen bonds, the cyclic dinuclear units in 1 together with four adjacent neighbors are connected into a 2D honeycomb network encapsulating free 3-pyOH ligands. Unexpectedly, the water-dimers are fixed in interlayers of 2D honeycomb network and act as hydrogen-bond bridging to further extend these 2D networks into 3D hydrogen-bonded framework. Complex 2 includes interesting 2D grids constructed from chiral dinuclear units through cules into three dimension with channels. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements for both complexes indicate the presence of weak antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between adjacent copper(Ⅱ) ions.

  16. Tracking dynamics of two-dimensional continuous attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, C. C. Alan; Wong, K. Y. Michael; Wu, Si

    2009-12-01

    We introduce an analytically solvable model of two-dimensional continuous attractor neural networks (CANNs). The synaptic input and the neuronal response form Gaussian bumps in the absence of external stimuli, and enable the network to track external stimuli by its translational displacement in the two-dimensional space. Basis functions of the two-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator in polar coordinates are introduced to describe the distortion modes of the Gaussian bump. The perturbative method is applied to analyze its dynamics. Testing the method by considering the network behavior when the external stimulus abruptly changes its position, we obtain results of the reaction time and the amplitudes of various distortion modes, with excellent agreement with simulation results.

  17. Oligomers Based on a Weak Hydrogen Bond Network: the Rotational Spectrum of the Tetramer of Difluoromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Gang; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther; Cacelli, Ivo; Carbonaro, Laura; Prampolini, Giacomo

    2013-06-01

    Following the investigation of the rotational spectra of three conformers (so-called ``book'', ``prism'' and ``cage'') of the water hexamer, and of some other water oligomers, we report here the rotational spectrum of the tetramer of a freon molecule. The pulse jet Fourier transform microwave (pj-FTMW) spectrum of an isomer of the difluoromethane tetramer has been assigned. This molecular system is made of units of a relatively heavy asymmetric rotor, held together by a network of weak hydrogen bonds. The search of the rotational spectrum has been based on a high-level reference method, the CCSD(T)/CBS protocol. It is interesting to outline that the rotational spectrum of the water tetramer was not observed, probably because the minimum energy structures of this oligomer is effectively nonpolar in its ground states, or because of high energy tunnelling splittings. The rotational spectra of the monomer, dimer, trimer and tetramer of difluoromethane have been assigned in 1952, 1999, 2007, and 2013 (present work), with a decreasing time spacing between the various steps, looking then promising for a continuous and rapid extension of the size limits of molecular systems accessible to MW spectroscopy. C. Pérez, M. T. Muckle, D. P. Zaleski, N. A. Seifert, B. Temelso, G. C. Shields, Z. Kisiel, B. H. Pate, Science {336} (2012) 897. D. R. Lide, Jr., J. Am. Chem. Soc. {74} (1952) 3548. W. Caminati, S. Melandri, P. Moreschini, P. G. Favero, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. {38} (1999) 2924. S. Blanco, S. Melandri, P. Ottaviani, W. Caminati, J. Am. Chem. Soc. {129} (2007) 2700.

  18. Mastering the canonical loop of serine protease inhibitors: enhancing potency by optimising the internal hydrogen bond network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim E Swedberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Canonical serine protease inhibitors commonly bind to their targets through a rigid loop stabilised by an internal hydrogen bond network and disulfide bond(s. The smallest of these is sunflower trypsin inhibitor (SFTI-1, a potent and broad-range protease inhibitor. Recently, we re-engineered the contact β-sheet of SFTI-1 to produce a selective inhibitor of kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4, a protease associated with prostate cancer progression. However, modifications in the binding loop to achieve specificity may compromise structural rigidity and prevent re-engineered inhibitors from reaching optimal binding affinity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the effect of amino acid substitutions on the internal hydrogen bonding network of SFTI were investigated using an in silico screen of inhibitor variants in complex with KLK4 or trypsin. Substitutions favouring internal hydrogen bond formation directly correlated with increased potency of inhibition in vitro. This produced a second generation inhibitor (SFTI-FCQR Asn(14 which displayed both a 125-fold increased capacity to inhibit KLK4 (K(i = 0.0386±0.0060 nM and enhanced selectivity over off-target serine proteases. Further, SFTI-FCQR Asn(14 was stable in cell culture and bioavailable in mice when administered by intraperitoneal perfusion. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings highlight the importance of conserving structural rigidity of the binding loop in addition to optimising protease/inhibitor contacts when re-engineering canonical serine protease inhibitors.

  19. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  20. rac- 11-t-Butoxy- 1,4-dihydro- 1,4-methanoanthracene:A two-dimensional framework structure built from C-H…O and C-H…π hydrogen bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsing Yang Tsai; Ming Hui Luo; Ming Jen Chang; Tzu Chien Fang; Kew Yu Chen

    2012-01-01

    The title compound rac-11-t-butoxy-1,4-dihydro-1,4-methanoanthracene (C19H2oO,Mr =264.35) has been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR,1H NMR,HRMS spectra and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.The crystal belongs to monoclinic,space group P21/n,with a =13.5240(10),b =8.3453(6),c =13.9604(9) (A),β =100.0190(10)°.The structure of the title compound comprises a norbornene unit with a t-butoxy group,having a naphthalene ring fused on one side.The naphthalene is essentially planar with a maximum deviation of 0.032(2) (A) for atom C(3).In the crystal,inversion-related molecules are linked by pairs of C-H...O hydrogen bonds,forming a cyclic dimer with R22 (16) graph-set motif.The C-H...π interactions are also observed,linking the molecules into a continuous two-dimensional framework structure.

  1. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  2. Inelastic neutron scattering study of reline: shedding light on the hydrogen bonding network of deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, C F; Coutinho, J A P; Nolasco, M M; Parker, S F; Ribeiro-Claro, P J A; Rudić, S; Soares, B I G; Vaz, P D

    2017-07-21

    The solids choline chloride and urea, mixed in a 1 : 2 molar proportion, form the iconic deep eutectic solvent "Reline". A combination of computational and vibrational spectroscopy tools, including inelastic neutron scattering (INS), have been used to probe intermolecular interactions in the eutectic mixture. Reline's experimental spectra were estimated using discrete and periodic ab initio calculations of a molecular aggregate with two choline chloride and four urea units. This is the minimum size required to achieve satisfactory agreement with experiment, as smaller clusters cannot represent all of reline's significant intermolecular interactions. The INS spectrum of reline, compared with that of pure choline chloride, reveals a displacement of chloride anions away from their preferred positions on top of choline's methyl groups, whose torsional movement becomes less hindered in the mixture. Urea, which adopts a planar (sp(2)) shape in the crystal, becomes non-planar (sp(3)) in reline, a feature herein discussed for the first time. In reline, urea molecules form a wide range of hydrogen bonds, from soft contacts to stronger associations, the latter being responsible for the deviation from ideality. The chloride's interactions with choline are largely conserved at the hydroxyl end while becoming weaker at the cationic headgroup. The interplay of soft and strong interactions confers flexibility to the newly formed hydrogen-bond network and allows the ensemble to remain liquid at room temperature.

  3. Two Dimensional Connectivity for Vehicular Ad-Hoc Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Farivar, Masoud; Ashtiani, Farid

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on two-dimensional connectivity in sparse vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs). In this respect, we find thresholds for the arrival rates of vehicles at entrances of a block of streets such that the connectivity is guaranteed for any desired probability. To this end, we exploit a mobility model recently proposed for sparse VANETs, based on BCMP open queuing networks and solve the related traffic equations to find the traffic characteristics of each street and use the results to compute the exact probability of connectivity along these streets. Then, we use the results from percolation theory and the proposed fast algorithms for evaluation of bond percolation problem in a random graph corresponding to the block of the streets. We then find sufficiently accurate two dimensional connectivity-related parameters, such as the average number of intersections connected to each other and the size of the largest set of inter-connected intersections. We have also proposed lower bounds for the case ...

  4. Effect of solvent evaporation temperature on the structure of two-dimensional melamine networks on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Arifumi; Nakata, Yohei; Minou, Kosuke; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Kadono, Kohei

    2016-12-01

    By scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we investigated two-dimensional (2D) structures of melamine formed on Au(111) surfaces by solvent evaporation. By increasing the evaporation temperature, the well-known ordered honeycomb 2D molecular phase, in which all molecules are linked by hydrogen bonding, changes to four coexisting phases, i.e., a 2D network consisting of linear segments, 1D molecular rows, and hexagonal and distorted hexagonal structures. The first two phases are sometimes observed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) on metallic substrates other than Au. The last two phases have lattice parameters close to those of the well-known honeycomb structure. The structural change observed in this study is attributed to local temperature and concentration distributions of the solution and substrate surface during solvent evaporation. From the results, we found that the molecular nanostructures can be tailored by the solvent evaporation method with small changes in temperature.

  5. Intensity Coding in Two-Dimensional Excitable Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Copelli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    In the light of recent experimental findings that gap junctions are essential for low level intensity detection in the sensory periphery, the Greenberg-Hastings cellular automaton is employed to model the response of a two-dimensional sensory network to external stimuli. We show that excitable elements (sensory neurons) that have a small dynamical range are shown to give rise to a collective large dynamical range. Therefore the network transfer (gain) function (which is Hill or Stevens law-like) is an emergent property generated from a pool of small dynamical range cells, providing a basis for a "neural psychophysics". The growth of the dynamical range with the system size is approximately logarithmic, suggesting a functional role for electrical coupling. For a fixed number of neurons, the dynamical range displays a maximum as a function of the refractory period, which suggests experimental tests for the model. A biological application to ephaptic interactions in olfactory nerve fascicles is proposed.

  6. Versatile and Resilient Hydrogen-Bonded Host Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Takuji; Ward, Michael D

    2016-12-20

    Low-density molecular host frameworks, whether equipped with persistent molecular-scale pores or virtual pores that are sustainable only when occupied by guest molecules, have emerged as a promising class of materials owing to the ability to tailor the size, geometry, and chemical character of their free space through the versatility of organic synthesis. As such, molecular frameworks are promising candidates for storage, separations of commodity and fine chemicals, heterogeneous catalysis, and optical and electronic materials. Frameworks assembled through hydrogen bonds, though generally not stable toward collapse in the absence of guests, promise significant chemical and structural diversity, with pores that can be tailored for a wide range of guest molecules. The utility of these frameworks, however, depends on the resilience of n-dimensional hydrogen-bonded motifs that serve as reliable building blocks so that the molecular constituents can be manipulated without disruption of the anticipated global solid-state architecture. Though many hydrogen-bonded frameworks have been reported, few exist that are amenable to systematic modification, thus limiting the design of functional materials. This Account reviews discoveries in our laboratory during the past decade related to a series of host frameworks based on guanidinium cations and interchangeable organosulfonate anions, in which the 3-fold symmetry and hydrogen-bonding complementarity of these ions prompt the formation of a two-dimensional (2-D) quasi-hexagonal hydrogen-bonding network that has proven to be remarkably resilient toward the introduction of a wide range of organic pendant groups attached to the sulfonate. Since an earlier report in this journal that focused primarily on organodisulfonate host frameworks with lamellar architectures, this unusually persistent network has afforded an unparalleled range of framework architectures and hundreds of new crystalline materials with predictable solid

  7. Proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded network of phenol molecules: intracluster formation of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Jozef; Gorejová, Radka; Herman, Zdeněk; Fárník, Michal

    2013-11-07

    Electron ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to investigate the phenol clusters (PhOH)n of different size from single molecule to large clusters: in coexpansion with He, the dimers n = 2 are mostly generated; in Ar, large species of n ≥ 10 also occur. Besides [(PhOH)n](+•) cluster ion series, hydrated phenol cluster ions [(PhOH)n·xH2O](+•) with up to x = 3 water molecules and dehydrated phenol clusters [(PhOH)n-H2O](+•) were observed. The hydrated phenol series exhibits minima and maxima that are interpreted as evidence for proton transfer between the hydrogen bonded cluster ions of cyclic structures. The proton transfer leads to a water generation within the clusters, and subsequent elimination of the diphenyl ether molecule(s) from the cluster yields the hydrated phenol cluster ions. Alternatively, a water molecule release yields a series of dehydrated phenols, among which the diphenyl ether ion [PhOPh](+•) (n = 2) constitutes the maximum.

  8. Residues in human arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase forming potential hydrogen bond network around S-adenosylmethionine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangli Li

    Full Text Available Residues Tyr59, Gly78, Ser79, Met103, Gln107, Ile136 and Glu137 in human arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase (hAS3MT were deduced to form a potential hydrogen bond network around S-adenosylmethionine (SAM from the sequence alignment between Cyanidioschyzon merolae arsenite S-adenosylmethyltransferase (CmArsM and hAS3MT. Herein, seven mutants Y59A, G78A, S79A, M103A, Q107A, I136A and E137A were obtained. Their catalytic activities and conformations were characterized and models were built. Y59A and G78A were completely inactive. Only 7.0%, 10.6% and 13.8% inorganic arsenic (iAs was transformed to monomethylated arsenicals (MMA when M103A, Q107A and I136A were used as the enzyme. The Vmax (the maximal velocity of the reaction values of M103A, Q107A, I136A and E137A were decreased to 8%, 22%, 15% and 50% of that of WT-hAS3MT, respectively. The KM(SAM (the Michaelis constant for SAM values of mutants M103A, I136A and E137A were 15.7, 8.9 and 5.1 fold higher than that of WT-hAS3MT, respectively, indicating that their affinities for SAM were weakened. The altered microenvironment of SAM and the reduced capacity of binding arsenic deduced from KM(As (the Michaelis constant for iAs value probably synergetically reduced the catalytic activity of Q107A. The catalytic activity of S79A was higher than that of WT despite of the higher KM(SAM , suggesting that Ser79 did not impact the catalytic activity of hAS3MT. In short, residues Tyr59 and Gly78 significantly influenced the catalytic activity of hAS3MT as well as Met103, Ile136 and Glu137 because they were closely associated with SAM-binding, while residue Gln107 did not affect SAM-binding regardless of affecting the catalytic activity of hAS3MT. Modeling and our experimental results suggest that the adenine ring of SAM is sandwiched between Ile136 and Met103, the amide group of SAM is hydrogen bonded to Gly78 in hAS3MT and SAM is bonded to Tyr59 with van der Waals, cation-π and hydrogen bonding

  9. Design of two-dimensional digital filters using neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaohua; He Yigang

    2005-01-01

    A new approach for the design of two-dimensional (2-D) linear phase FIR digital filters based on a new neural networks algorithm (NNA) is provided. A compact expression for the transfer function of a 2-D linear phase FIR filter is derived based on its frequency response characteristic, and the NNA, based on minimizing the square-error in the frequency-domain, is established according to the compact expression. To illustrate the stability of the NNA, the convergence theorem is presented and proved. Design examples are also given, and the results show that the ripple is considerably small in passband and stopband, and the NNA-based method is of powerful stability and requires quite little amount of computations.

  10. Estimating the hydraulic conductivity of two-dimensional fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, C. T.; Zimmerman, R. W.

    2010-12-01

    Most oil and gas reservoirs, as well as most potential sites for nuclear waste disposal, are naturally fractured. In these sites, the network of fractures will provide the main path for fluid to flow through the rock mass. In many cases, the fracture density is so high as to make it impractical to model it with a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. For such rock masses, it would be useful to have recourse to analytical, or semi-analytical, methods to estimate the macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the fracture network. We have investigated single-phase fluid flow through stochastically generated two-dimensional fracture networks. The centres and orientations of the fractures are uniformly distributed, whereas their lengths follow either a lognormal distribution or a power law distribution. We have considered the case where the fractures in the network each have the same aperture, as well as the case where the aperture of each fracture is directly proportional to the fracture length. The discrete fracture network flow and transport simulator NAPSAC, developed by Serco (Didcot, UK), is used to establish the “true” macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the network. We then attempt to match this conductivity using a simple estimation method that does not require extensive computation. For our calculations, fracture networks are represented as networks composed of conducting segments (bonds) between nodes. Each bond represents the region of a single fracture between two adjacent intersections with other fractures. We assume that the bonds are arranged on a kagome lattice, with some fraction of the bonds randomly missing. The conductance of each bond is then replaced with some effective conductance, Ceff, which we take to be the arithmetic mean of the individual conductances, averaged over each bond, rather than over each fracture. This is in contrast to the usual approximation used in effective medium theories, wherein the geometric mean is used. Our

  11. The interplay of covalency, hydrogen bonding, and dispersion leads to a long range chiral network: The example of 2-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liriano, Melissa L; Carrasco, Javier; Lewis, Emily A; Murphy, Colin J; Lawton, Timothy J; Marcinkowski, Matthew D; Therrien, Andrew J; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E Charles H

    2016-03-07

    The assembly of complex structures in nature is driven by an interplay between several intermolecular interactions, from strong covalent bonds to weaker dispersion forces. Understanding and ultimately controlling the self-assembly of materials requires extensive study of how these forces drive local nanoscale interactions and how larger structures evolve. Surface-based self-assembly is particularly amenable to modeling and measuring these interactions in well-defined systems. This study focuses on 2-butanol, the simplest aliphatic chiral alcohol. 2-butanol has recently been shown to have interesting properties as a chiral modifier of surface chemistry; however, its mode of action is not fully understood and a microscopic understanding of the role non-covalent interactions play in its adsorption and assembly on surfaces is lacking. In order to probe its surface properties, we employed high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) simulations. We found a surprisingly rich degree of enantiospecific adsorption, association, chiral cluster growth and ultimately long range, highly ordered chiral templating. Firstly, the chiral molecules acquire a second chiral center when adsorbed to the surface via dative bonding of one of the oxygen atom lone pairs. This interaction is controlled via the molecule's intrinsic chiral center leading to monomers of like chirality, at both chiral centers, adsorbed on the surface. The monomers then associate into tetramers via a cyclical network of hydrogen bonds with an opposite chirality at the oxygen atom. The evolution of these square units is surprising given that the underlying surface has a hexagonal symmetry. Our DFT calculations, however, reveal that the tetramers are stable entities that are able to associate with each other by weaker van der Waals interactions and tessellate in an extended square network. This network of homochiral square pores grows to cover the whole Au(111) surface. Our data

  12. On the hydrogen-bond network and the non-Arrhenius transport properties of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.

    2017-01-01

    We study the structural and dynamic transformations of SPC/E water with temperature, through molecular dynamics (MD), and discuss the non-Arrhenius behavior of the transport properties and orientational dynamics, and the magnitude of the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) and the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relations, in the light of these transformations. Our results show that deviations from Arrhenius behavior of the self-diffusion at low temperatures cannot be exclusively explained by the reduction of water defects (interstitial waters) and the increase of the local tetrahedrality, thus, suggesting the importance of the slowdown of collective rearrangements. Interestingly we find that at high temperatures (T  ⩾  340 K) water defects lead to a slight increase of the tetrahedrality and a decrease of the self-diffusion, opposite to water at low temperatures. The relative magnitude of the breakdown of the SE and the SED relations is found to be in accord with recent experiments (Dehaoui et al 2015 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 112 12020) resolving the discrepancy with previous MD results. Further, we show that SPC/E hydrogen-bond (HB) lifetimes deviate from Arrhenious behaviour at low temperatures in contrast with some previous MD studies. This deviation is nevertheless much smaller than that observed for the orientational dynamics and the transport properties of water, consistent with the relaxation times measured by several experimental methods. The HB acceptor exchange dynamics defined here by the acceptor switch and reform (librational dynamics) frequencies exhibit similar Arrhenius deviations, thus explaining to some extent the non-Arrhenius behavior of the transport properties and of the orientational dynamics of water. Our results also show that the fraction of HB switches through a bifurcated pathway follow a power law with the temperature decrease. Thus, at low temperatures HB acceptor switches are less frequent but occur on a faster time scale

  13. On the hydrogen-bond network and the non-Arrhenius transport properties of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N

    2017-01-11

    We study the structural and dynamic transformations of SPC/E water with temperature, through molecular dynamics (MD), and discuss the non-Arrhenius behavior of the transport properties and orientational dynamics, and the magnitude of the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) and the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) relations, in the light of these transformations. Our results show that deviations from Arrhenius behavior of the self-diffusion at low temperatures cannot be exclusively explained by the reduction of water defects (interstitial waters) and the increase of the local tetrahedrality, thus, suggesting the importance of the slowdown of collective rearrangements. Interestingly we find that at high temperatures (T  ⩾  340 K) water defects lead to a slight increase of the tetrahedrality and a decrease of the self-diffusion, opposite to water at low temperatures. The relative magnitude of the breakdown of the SE and the SED relations is found to be in accord with recent experiments (Dehaoui et al 2015 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 112 12020) resolving the discrepancy with previous MD results. Further, we show that SPC/E hydrogen-bond (HB) lifetimes deviate from Arrhenious behaviour at low temperatures in contrast with some previous MD studies. This deviation is nevertheless much smaller than that observed for the orientational dynamics and the transport properties of water, consistent with the relaxation times measured by several experimental methods. The HB acceptor exchange dynamics defined here by the acceptor switch and reform (librational dynamics) frequencies exhibit similar Arrhenius deviations, thus explaining to some extent the non-Arrhenius behavior of the transport properties and of the orientational dynamics of water. Our results also show that the fraction of HB switches through a bifurcated pathway follow a power law with the temperature decrease. Thus, at low temperatures HB acceptor switches are less frequent but occur on a faster time scale

  14. Two-Dimensional Heat Transfer in a Heterogeneous Fracture Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisladottir, V. R.; Roubinet, D.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Geothermal energy harvesting requires extraction and injection of geothermal fluid. Doing so in an optimal way requires a quantitative understanding of site-specific heat transfer between geothermal fluid and the ambient rock. We develop a heat transfer particle-tracking approach to model that interaction. Fracture-network models of heat transfer in fractured rock explicitly account for the presence of individual fractures, ambient rock matrix, and fracture-matrix interfaces. Computational domains of such models span the meter scale, whereas fracture apertures are on the millimeter scale. The computations needed to model these multi-scale phenomenon can be prohibitively expensive, even for methods using nonuniform meshes. Our approach appreciably decreases the computational costs. Current particle-tracking methods usually assume both infinite matrix and one-dimensional (1D) heat transfer in the matrix blocks. They rely on 1D analytical solutions for heat transfer in a single fracture, which can lead to large predictive errors. Our two-dimensional (2D) heat transfer simulation algorithm is mesh-free and takes into account both longitudinal and transversal heat conduction in the matrix. It uses a probabilistic model to transfer particle to the appropriate neighboring fracture unless it returns to the fracture of origin or remains in the matrix. We use this approach to look at the impact of a fracture-network topology (e.g. the importance of smaller scale fractures), as well as the matrix block distribution on the heat transport in heterogeneous fractured rocks.

  15. Car-parrinello simulation of the vibrational spectrum of a medium strong hydrogen bond by two-dimensional quantization of the nuclear motion: application to 2-hydroxy-5-ntrobenzamide

    OpenAIRE

    Brela, Mateusz Zbigniew; Stare, Jernej; Boczar, Marek; Mavri, Janez; Pirc, Gordana; Wojcik, Marek Janusz; Sollner Dolenc, Marija

    2015-01-01

    The nature of medium-strong intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bondingin 2-hydroxy-5- nitrobenzamide in the crystal phase was examined by infrared spectroscopy and Car- Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation. The focal point of our study was the part of the infrared spectra associated with the OŽH and NŽH stretching modes that are very sensitive to the strength of hydrogen bonding. For spectra calculations we used an isolated dimer and the fully periodic crystal environment. We calculated t...

  16. Criticality in Two-Dimensional Quantum Systems: Tensor Network Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ran, Shi-Ju; Li, Wei; Lewenstein, Maciej; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Determination and characterization of criticality in two-dimensional (2D) quantum many-body systems belong to the most important challenges and problems of quantum physics. In this paper we propose an efficient scheme to solve this problem by utilizing the infinite projected entangled pair state (iPEPS), and tensor network (TN) representations. We show that the criticality of a 2D state is faithfully reproduced by the ground state (dubbed as boundary state) of a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian constructed from its iPEPS representation. We demonstrate that for a critical state the correlation length and the entanglement spectrum of the boundary state are essentially different from those of a gapped iPEPS. This provides a solid indicator that allows to identify the criticality of the 2D state. Our scheme is verified on the resonating valence bond (RVB) states on kagom\\'e and square lattices, where the boundary state of the honeycomb RVB is found to be described by a $c=1$ conformal field theory. We apply ...

  17. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Zinc(Ⅱ) Complex with Isonicotinate Containing a Three-dimensional Hydrogen-bond Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A zinc complex, [Zn(iso)2(H2O)4](iso=C6H4NO2-), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, thermal analysis and IR spectrum studies. The crystal structure of the complex was determined by X-ray diffraction. The crystal crystallizes in the triclinic system, molecular formula ZnC12H16N2Os, Mr=381.64, space group P1 with a = 6.338(1 ), b =6.919(1), c=9.277(1), a =96.28(1),β =104.91(1 ),γ =112.85(1)°, V=352.12(9)A3, Z=1, Dc=l.80g·cm-3 and F(000)=196, μ =l.791mm-1. The crystal structure was solved by direct methods for final R=0.0204 and Rw=0.0542 for 1258 observed reflections with [Fo>4 σ (Fo)]. The crystal structure reveals that zinc ion is trans-octahedral with two pyridyl nitrogens and two aque oxygens at the equational positions and two aqua oxygens at the axial positions. The complex forms a three-dimensional network through intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  18. A conserved hydrogen-bond network in the catalytic centre of animal glutaminyl cyclases is critical for catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Fa; Wang, Yu-Ruei; Chang, En-Cheng; Chou, Tsung-Lin; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2008-04-01

    QCs (glutaminyl cyclases; glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferases, EC 2.3.2.5) catalyse N-terminal pyroglutamate formation in numerous bioactive peptides and proteins. The enzymes were reported to be involved in several pathological conditions such as amyloidotic disease, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and melanoma. The crystal structure of human QC revealed an unusual H-bond (hydrogen-bond) network in the active site, formed by several highly conserved residues (Ser(160), Glu(201), Asp(248), Asp(305) and His(319)), within which Glu(201) and Asp(248) were found to bind to substrate. In the present study we combined steady-state enzyme kinetic and X-ray structural analyses of 11 single-mutation human QCs to investigate the roles of the H-bond network in catalysis. Our results showed that disrupting one or both of the central H-bonds, i.e., Glu(201)...Asp(305) and Asp(248)...Asp(305), reduced the steady-state catalysis dramatically. The roles of these two COOH...COOH bonds on catalysis could be partly replaced by COOH...water bonds, but not by COOH...CONH(2) bonds, reminiscent of the low-barrier Asp...Asp H-bond in the active site of pepsin-like aspartic peptidases. Mutations on Asp(305), a residue located at the centre of the H-bond network, raised the K(m) value of the enzyme by 4.4-19-fold, but decreased the k(cat) value by 79-2842-fold, indicating that Asp(305) primarily plays a catalytic role. In addition, results from mutational studies on Ser(160) and His(319) suggest that these two residues might help to stabilize the conformations of Asp(248) and Asp(305) respectively. These data allow us to propose an essential proton transfer between Glu(201), Asp(305) and Asp(248) during the catalysis by animal QCs.

  19. Simple inorganic complexes but intricate hydrogen bonding networks: Synthesis and crystal structures of [MII(opda)2(NO3)2] (M = Zn and Cd; opda = orthophenylenediamine)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sabbani Supriya

    2009-03-01

    The compounds [ZnII{C6H4(NH2)2}2(NO3)2], (1) and [CdII{C6H4(NH2)2}2(NO3)2] (2) have been prepared (C6H4(NH2)2 = orthophenylenediammine = opda) and characterized by routine spectroscopic methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound 1 crystallizes in orthorhombic space group , where as compound 2 crystallizes in monoclinic space 21/. In the crystal structure of 1 an extended hydrogen bonding network is formed involving zinc coordinated amines and nitrato ligands. The compound 2 consists of molecules in which the cadmium ion is eight coordinated, with two bidentate nitrate groups and two bidentate opda ligands. The geometry around the cadmium described as a distorted dodecahedron. The crystal structure of 2 shows an intricate hydrogen bonding network, formed by amine and nitro groups coordinated to cadmium.

  20. Versatile supramolecular reactivity of zinc-tetra(4-pyridylporphyrin in crystalline solids: Polymeric grids with zinc dichloride and hydrogen-bonded networks with mellitic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Lipstman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystal engineering studies confirm that the zinc-tetra(4-pyridylporphyrin building block reveals versatile supramolecular chemistry. In this work, it was found to be reactive in the assembly of both (a a 2D polymeric array by a unique combination of self-coordination and coordination through external zinc dichloride linkers and (b an extended heteromolecular hydrogen-bonded network with mellitic acid sustained by multiple connectivity between the component species.

  1. Concerted hydrogen-bond breaking by quantum tunneling in the water hexamer prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Pérez, Cristóbal; Lobsiger, Simon; Reid, Adam A; Temelso, Berhane; Shields, George C; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Wales, David J; Pate, Brooks H; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-18

    The nature of the intermolecular forces between water molecules is the same in small hydrogen-bonded clusters as in the bulk. The rotational spectra of the clusters therefore give insight into the intermolecular forces present in liquid water and ice. The water hexamer is the smallest water cluster to support low-energy structures with branched three-dimensional hydrogen-bond networks, rather than cyclic two-dimensional topologies. Here we report measurements of splitting patterns in rotational transitions of the water hexamer prism, and we used quantum simulations to show that they result from geared and antigeared rotations of a pair of water molecules. Unlike previously reported tunneling motions in water clusters, the geared motion involves the concerted breaking of two hydrogen bonds. Similar types of motion may be feasible in interfacial and confined water.

  2. A first principles investigation of water dipole moment in a defective continuous hydrogen bond network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, Roberto; Schmidt, Diedrich A; Boero, Mauro

    2009-01-14

    First principles molecular dynamics simulations of an aqueous solution salt system at finite concentration containing both Na(+) and Cl(-) ions show that a change in the distribution of the molecular dipole moment of H(2)O monomers appears when ions are present in solution. Simulations suggest a lowering of the dipole moments of the water molecules in the solvation shells of Na(+) and Cl(-) as compared to the pure water case, while the dipoles of the rest of the molecules are hardly affected. However, finer analysis in terms of the Wannier centers distribution suggests a change in the electronic structure of the water molecules even in the bulk. Also a change of the H-bond network arrangement was found and correlation between dipole and MOH parameter evidences such subtle effects, suggesting a lowering of tetrahedral order in salty solutions. All these changes can be related to observable quantities such as the infrared spectra thus allowing for a rationalization of the experimental outcome on neutral aqueous solutions.

  3. Disruption of a hydrogen bond network in human versus spider monkey cytochrome c affects heme crevice stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldes, Matthew E; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E; McClelland, Levi J; Mou, Tung-Chung; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-01

    The hypothesis that the recent rapid evolution of primate cytochromes c, which primarily involves residues in the least stable Ω-loop (Ω-loop C, residues 40-57), stabilizes the heme crevice of cytochrome c relative to other mammals, is tested. To accomplish this goal, we have compared the properties of human and spider monkey cytochrome c and a set of four variants produced in the process of converting human cytochrome c into spider monkey cytochrome c. The global stability of all variants has been measured by guanidine hydrochloride denaturation. The stability of the heme crevice has been assessed with the alkaline conformational transition. Structural insight into the effects of the five amino acid substitutions needed to convert human cytochrome c into spider monkey cytochrome c is provided by a 1.15Å resolution structure of spider monkey cytochrome c. The global stability for all variants is near 9.0kcal/mol at 25°C and pH7, which is higher than that observed for other mammalian cytochromes c. The heme crevice stability is more sensitive to the substitutions required to produce spider monkey cytochrome c with decreases of up to 0.5 units in the apparent pKa of the alkaline conformational transition relative to human cytochrome c. The structure of spider monkey cytochrome c indicates that the Y46F substitution destabilizes the heme crevice by disrupting an extensive hydrogen bond network that connects three surface loops including Ω-loop D (residues 70-85), which contains the Met80 heme ligand.

  4. 1H NMR detection of immobilized water molecules within a strong distal hydrogen-bonding network of substrate-bound human heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvitski, Ray T; Li, Yiming; Auclair, Karine; Ortiz De Montellano, Paul R; La Mar, Gerd N

    2002-12-04

    Solution 1H NMR is used to probe the environments of the donor protons of eight strong hydrogen bonds on the distal side of the heme substrate in the cyanide-inhibited, substrate-bound complex of human heme oxygenase, hHO. It is demonstrated that significant magnetization transfer from the bulk water signal to the eight labile protons does not result from chemical exchange, but from direct nuclear Overhauser effect due to the dipolar interaction of these labile protons with "ordered" water molecules. The enzyme labile proton to water proton distances are estimated at approximately 3 A. It is proposed that the role of the strong hydrogen-bonding network is to immobilize numerous water molecules which both stabilize the activated hydroperoxy species and funnel protons to the active site.

  5. Hydrogen bond patterns in 3-carboxypiperidinium semi-oxalate monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusbely M. Belandria

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of compound C6H12NO2·C2HO4·H2O, or NIPE·OXAL·HYDR, is an ionic ensemble assisted by hydrogen bonds established between NIPE+ cations, OXAL− semi-oxalate anions and water molecules.The molecules are connected by O--H···O and N--H···O hydrogen bonds, forming linear ∙∙∙semi-oxalate∙∙∙semi-oxalate∙∙∙ chains extending along the a axis and described by the graph-set motif C(5. These chains interact with the NH2+ group of NIPE+ and the water molecules building a two-dimensional crystal packing of rings described by graph-set R21(5, R24(8 and R55(19, with corrugated layers running parallel to the (001 plane, and separated by hydrophobic interactions at c/2. Analyzes of the structures of the individual components and the hydrogen-bond network of the crystal structure are given.

  6. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular materials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date text covering topics in utilizing hydrogen bonding for constructing functional architectures and supramolecular materials. The first chapter addresses the control of photo-induced electron and energy transfer. The second chapter summarizes the formation of nano-porous materials. The following two chapters introduce self-assembled gels, many of which exhibit unique functions. Other chapters cover the advances in supramolecular liquid crystals and the versatility of hydrogen bonding in tuning/improving the properties and performance of materials. This book is designed

  7. Probing chiral solute-water hydrogen bonding networks by chirality transfer effects: A vibrational circular dichroism study of glycidol in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guochun; Xu, Yunjie

    2009-04-01

    Vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of (S)-(-)-glycidol were measured in water with a concentration of 6.0M in the 1000-1750 cm-1 region. Prominent and complex VCD spectral features were detected at the water bending vibrational region. Our experimental results show that water molecules can become optically active through hydrogen bonding interactions with glycidol molecules. To model the glycidol-water hydrogen bonding network in the solution, molecular dynamics simulations using the AMBER9 suite of programs were carried out. Altogether, 34 conformers of the small glycidol-(water)N clusters with N =1, 2, 3, and 4 were considered. Geometry optimizations, harmonic frequency calculations, and the VA and VCD intensity predictions of these small glycidol-water clusters were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory using the GAUSSIAN 03 program package. Strong cooperative hydrogen bonding effects were detected in the larger glycidol-(water)N clusters. The population weighted VA and VCD spectra of each N group of glycidol (water)N=1,2,3,4 were used to produce the simulated VA and VCD spectra, which are in good agreement with the experimental VA and VCD spectra. The study shows that all these clusters make important contributions to the observed spectra and are the most important species in the aqueous solution with complicated equilibriums among them.

  8. Hydrogen bonded networks in formamide [HCONH2] ( = 1 − 10) clusters: A computational exploration of preferred aggregation patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Subha Mahadevi; Y Indra Neela; G Narahari Sastry

    2012-01-01

    Application of quantum chemical calculations is vital in understanding hydrogen bonding observed in formamide clusters, a prototype model for motifs found in protein secondary structure. DFT calculations have been performed on four arrangements of formamide clusters [HCONH2], ( = 1 − 10) linear, circular, helical and stacked forms. These studies reveal the maximum cooperativity in the stacked arrangement followed by the circular, helical and linear arrangements and is based on interaction energy per monomer. In all these arrangements as we increase cluster size, an increasing trend in cooperativity of hydrogen bonding is observed. Atoms-in-molecule analysis establishes the nature of bonding between the formamide monomers on the basis of electron density values obtained at the bond critical point (BCP).

  9. Hydrogen bonding interactions and supramolecular networks of pyridine-aryl based thiosemicarbazides and their Zn(II) complexes

    OpenAIRE

    GUNNLAUGSSON, THORFINNUR; PANDURANGAN, KOMALA; MC CABE, THOMAS; KITCHEN, JOANNE

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED The synthesis of five pyridyl derived thiosemicarbazides, 1-5, is presented. All five were formed in a single step from 2-hydrazinopyridine with commercially available isothiocyanates using microwave assisted synthesis. Compounds 1-4 were structurally characterised by single crystal diffraction analysis, and showed extended supramolecular hydrogen bonding arrays. Furthermore, the Zn(ii) complexes 6 and 7 have been prepared using ligands 1 and 5, and structurally characterised, ag...

  10. Evaluation of hydrogen bond networks in cellulose Iβ and II crystals using density functional theory and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Daichi; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Mazeau, Karim; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2017-09-08

    Crystal models of cellulose Iβ and II, which contain various hydrogen bonding (HB) networks, were analyzed using density functional theory and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations. From the CPMD trajectories, the power spectra of the velocity correlation functions of hydroxyl groups involved in hydrogen bonds were calculated. For the Iβ allomorph, HB network A, which is dominant according to the neutron diffraction data, was stable, and the power spectrum represented the essential features of the experimental IR spectra. In contrast, network B, which is a minor structure, was unstable because its hydroxymethyl groups reoriented during the CPMD simulation, yielding a different crystal structure to that determined by experiments. For the II allomorph, a HB network A is proposed based on diffraction data, whereas molecular modeling identifies an alternative network B. Our simulations showed that the interaction energies of the cellulose II (B) model are slightly more favorable than model II(A). However, the evaluation of the free energy should be waited for the accurate determination from the energy point of view. For the IR calculation, cellulose II (B) model reproduces the spectra better than model II (A). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Two-dimensional networks of lanthanide cubane-shaped dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Didier; Lin, Po-Heng; Burchell, Tara J; Korobkov, Ilia; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Clérac, Rodolphe; Murugesu, Muralee

    2009-12-21

    The syntheses, structures, and magnetic properties are reported for three new lanthanide complexes, [Ln(III)(4)(mu(3)-OH)(2)(mu(3)-O)(2)(cpt)(6)(MeOH)(6)(H(2)O)](2) (Ln = Dy (1.15MeOH), Ho (2.14MeOH), and Tb (3.18MeOH)), based on 4-(4-carboxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazole ligand (Hcpt). The three complexes were confirmed to be isomorphous by infrared spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure of 1 reveals that the eight-coordinate metal centers are organized in two cubane-shaped moieties composed of four Dy(III) ions each. All metal centers in the cubane core are bridged by two mu(3)-oxide and two mu(3)-hydroxide asymmetrical units. Moreover, each cubane is linked to its neighbor by two externally coordinating ligands, forming the dumbbell {Dy(III)(4)}(2) moiety. Electrostatic interactions between the ligands of the triazole-bridged dimers form an extended supramolecular two-dimensional arrangement analogous to a metal-organic framework with quadrilateral spaces occupied by ligands from axial sheets and by four solvent molecules. The magnetic properties of the three compounds have been investigated using dc and ac susceptibility measurements. For 1, the static and dynamic data corroborate the fact that the {Dy(III)(4)} cubane-shaped core exhibits slow relaxation of its magnetization below 5 K associated with a single-molecule magnet behavior.

  12. Water-anion hydrogen bonding dynamics: Ultrafast IR experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Steven A.; Thompson, Ward H.; Fayer, Michael D.

    2017-06-01

    Many of water's remarkable properties arise from its tendency to form an intricate and robust hydrogen bond network. Understanding the dynamics that govern this network is fundamental to elucidating the behavior of pure water and water in biological and physical systems. In ultrafast nonlinear infrared experiments, the accessible time scales are limited by water's rapid vibrational relaxation (1.8 ps for dilute HOD in H2O), precluding interrogation of slow hydrogen bond evolution in non-bulk systems. Here, hydrogen bonding dynamics in bulk D2O were studied from the perspective of the much longer lived (36.2 ps) CN stretch mode of selenocyanate (SeCN-) using polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) experiments, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations make use of the empirical frequency mapping approach, applied to SeCN- for the first time. The PSPP experiments and simulations show that the orientational correlation function decays via fast (2.0 ps) restricted angular diffusion (wobbling-in-a-cone) and complete orientational diffusive randomization (4.5 ps). Spectral diffusion, quantified in terms of the frequency-frequency correlation function, occurs on two time scales. The initial 0.6 ps time scale is attributed to small length and angle fluctuations of the hydrogen bonds between water and SeCN-. The second 1.4 ps measured time scale, identical to that for HOD in bulk D2O, reports on the collective reorganization of the water hydrogen bond network around the anion. The experiments and simulations provide details of the anion-water hydrogen bonding and demonstrate that SeCN- is a reliable vibrational probe of the ultrafast spectroscopy of water.

  13. Chaotic neural network applied to two-dimensional motion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kurata, Shuhei; Li, Yongtao; Nara, Shigetoshi

    2010-03-01

    Chaotic dynamics generated in a chaotic neural network model are applied to 2-dimensional (2-D) motion control. The change of position of a moving object in each control time step is determined by a motion function which is calculated from the firing activity of the chaotic neural network. Prototype attractors which correspond to simple motions of the object toward four directions in 2-D space are embedded in the neural network model by designing synaptic connection strengths. Chaotic dynamics introduced by changing system parameters sample intermediate points in the high-dimensional state space between the embedded attractors, resulting in motion in various directions. By means of adaptive switching of the system parameters between a chaotic regime and an attractor regime, the object is able to reach a target in a 2-D maze. In computer experiments, the success rate of this method over many trials not only shows better performance than that of stochastic random pattern generators but also shows that chaotic dynamics can be useful for realizing robust, adaptive and complex control function with simple rules.

  14. Two-dimensional percolation threshold in confined Si nanoparticle networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laube, J., E-mail: laube@imtek.de; Gutsch, S.; Zacharias, M.; Hiller, D. [Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, 79110 Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Wang, D.; Kübel, C. [Karlsruhe Nano and Micro Facility (KNMF) and Institute of Nanotechnology (INT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-01-25

    Non-percolating and percolating silicon quantum dot (QD) networks were investigated by plane-view energy filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM). The Si QD networks were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on free standing 5 nm Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes, followed by high temperature annealing. The percolation threshold from non-percolating to percolating networks is found to be in between a SiO{sub x} stoichiometry of SiO{sub 0.5} up to SiO{sub 0.7}. Using the EF-TEM images, key structural parameters of the Si QD ensemble were extracted and compared, i.e., their size distribution, nearest neighbor distance, and circularity. Increasing the silicon excess within the SiO{sub x} layer results in an ensemble of closer spaced, less size-controlled, and less circular Si QDs that give rise to coupling effects. Furthermore, the influence of the structural parameters on the optical and electrical Si QD ensemble properties is discussed.

  15. Redox control and hydrogen bonding networks: proton-coupled electron transfer reactions and tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, James M; Zuniga, Ashley N; Jenson, David L; Barry, Bridgette A

    2013-02-07

    In photosynthetic oxygen evolution, redox active tyrosine Z (YZ) plays an essential role in proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. Four sequential photooxidation reactions are necessary to produce oxygen at a Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster. The sequentially oxidized states of this oxygen-evolving cluster (OEC) are called the S(n) states, where n refers to the number of oxidizing equivalents stored. The neutral radical, YZ•, is generated and then acts as an electron transfer intermediate during each S state transition. In the X-ray structure, YZ, Tyr161 of the D1 subunit, is involved in an extensive hydrogen bonding network, which includes calcium-bound water. In electron paramagnetic resonance experiments, we measured the YZ• recombination rate, in the presence of an intact Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster. We compared the S(0) and S(2) states, which differ in Mn oxidation state, and found a significant difference in the YZ• decay rate (t(1/2) = 3.3 ± 0.3 s in S(0); t(1/2) = 2.1 ± 0.3 s in S(2)) and in the solvent isotope effect (SIE) on the reaction (1.3 ± 0.3 in S(0); 2.1 ± 0.3 in S(2)). Although the YZ site is known to be solvent accessible, the recombination rate and SIE were pH independent in both S states. To define the origin of these effects, we measured the YZ• recombination rate in the presence of ammonia, which inhibits oxygen evolution and disrupts the hydrogen bond network. We report that ammonia dramatically slowed the YZ• recombination rate in the S(2) state but had a smaller effect in the S(0) state. In contrast, ammonia had no significant effect on YD•, the stable tyrosyl radical. Therefore, the alterations in YZ• decay, observed with S state advancement, are attributed to alterations in OEC hydrogen bonding and consequent differences in the YZ midpoint potential/pK(a). These changes may be caused by activation of metal-bound water molecules, which hydrogen bond to YZ. These observations document the importance of redox control in proton

  16. Probing the hydrogen-bond network of water via time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Wen, Haidan; Nordlund, Dennis; Szilagyi, Erzsi; Daranciang, Dan; Miller, Timothy A.; Nilsson, Anders; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2009-04-24

    We report time-resolved studies of hydrogen bonding in liquid H2O, in response to direct excitation of the O-H stretch mode at 3 mu m, probed via soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge. This approach employs a newly developed nanofluidic cell for transient soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquid phase. Distinct changes in the near-edge spectral region (XANES) are observed, and are indicative of a transient temperature rise of 10K following transient laser excitation and rapid thermalization of vibrational energy. The rapid heating occurs at constant volume and the associated increase in internal pressure, estimated to be 8MPa, is manifest by distinct spectral changes that differ from those induced by temperature alone. We conclude that the near-edge spectral shape of the oxygen K-edge is a sensitive probe of internal pressure, opening new possibilities for testing the validity of water models and providing new insight into the nature of hydrogen bonding in water.

  17. First-Principle Molecular Dynamics Study of Selected Schiff and Mannich Bases:  Application of Two-Dimensional Potential of Mean Force to Systems with Strong Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J

    2008-03-01

    Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics simulations were performed for selected anharmonic systems, i.e., Schiff and Mannich base-type compounds, to investigate the vibrational properties associated with O-H stretching. All calculations were performed in the gas phase to compare them with available experimental data. First the vibrational properties of the two compounds were analyzed on the basis of well-established approaches:  Fourier transformation of the autocorrelation function of both the atomic velocities and dipole moments. Then path integral molecular dynamics simulations were performed to demonstrate the influence of quantum effects on the proton's position in the hydrogen bridge. In addition, quantum effects were incorporated a posteriori into calculations of O-H stretching envelopes for the Schiff and Mannich bases. Proton potential snapshots were extracted from the ab initio molecular dynamics trajectory. Vibrational Schrödinger equations (one- and two-dimensional) were solved numerically for the snapshots, and the O-H stretching envelopes were calculated as a superposition of the 0→1 transitions. Subsequently, one- and two-dimensional potentials of mean force (1D and 2D pmf) were calculated for the proton stretching mode from the proton vibrational eigenfunctions and eigenvalues incorporating statistical sampling and nuclear quantum effects. The results show that the applied methodologies are in good agreement with experimental infrared spectra. Additionally, it is demonstrated that the 2D pmf method could be applied in systems with strong anharmonicity to describe the properties of the O-H stretching mode more accurately. Future applications of the 2D pmf technique include, in principle, large biomolecular systems treated within the QM/MM framework.

  18. A Novel 3D Supramolecular Network Constructed from [Cu(4,4'-bipyridine)(O2CMe)2]2 Molecular Ladders by Hydrogen Bonding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG E; WANG Xiao-Qin; QIN Ye-Yan

    2006-01-01

    The title complex, {[Cu2(4,4'-bipyridine)2(μ-O2CMe)2(O2CMe)2](H2O}n 1, was synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. It crystallizes in monoclinic, space group C2/c with a = 13.4474(5), b = 11.7566(2), c = 19.5380(6) (A), β = 92.930(2)°, V = 3084.84(16) (A)3, Z = 4, Cu2C28N4O9H30, Mr = 693.64, Dc = 1.494 g/cm3, F(000) = 1424 and μ(MoKa) = 1.436 mm-1. With the use of 2062 observed reflections (Ⅰ>2σ(Ⅰ)), the structure was refined to R = 0.0769 and wR = 0.2154. In complex 1, the dimeric copper acetate units are linked through 4,4'-bipyridine to yield 1D molecular ladders. These ladders are connected via O-H···O hydrogen bonds to generate 2D layers, which are further linked through C-H···O hydrogen bonds to give a 3D supramolecular network.

  19. Water, Hydrogen Bonding and the Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available n this work, the properties of the water are briefly revisited. Though liquid water has a fleeting structure, it displays an astonishingly stable network of hydrogen bonds. Thus, even as a liquid, water possesses a local lattice with short range order. The presence of hydroxyl (O-H and hydrogen (H....OH2 bonds within water, indicate that it can simultaneously maintain two separate energy systems. These can be viewed as two very different temperatures. The analysis presented uses results from vibrational spec- troscopy, extracting the force constant for the hydrogen bonded dimer. By idealizing this species as a simple diatomic structure, it is shown that hydrogen bonds within wa- ter should be able to produce thermal spectra in the far infrared and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This simple analysis reveals that the oceans have a physical mechanism at their disposal, which is capable of generating the microwave background.

  20. Elucidating the Role of the Proximal Cysteine Hydrogen Bonding Network in Ferric Cytochrome P450cam and corresponding mutants using Magnetic Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Mary Grace I.; Spolitak, Tatyana; Ballou, David P.; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2011-01-01

    Although there has been extensive research on various Cytochrome P450s, especially Cyt P450cam, there is much to be learned about the mechanism of how its functional unit, a heme b ligated by an axial cysteine, is finely tuned for catalysis by its second coordination sphere. Here we study how the hydrogen bonding network affects the proximal cysteine and the Fe-S(Cys) bond in ferric Cyt P450cam. This is accomplished using low-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy on wild-type (wt) Cyt P450cam, and on the mutants Q360P (pure ferric high-spin at low temperature) and L358P with which the “Cys pocket” has been altered (by removing amino acids involved in the hydrogen bonding network), and Y96W (pure ferric low-spin). The MCD spectrum of Q360P reveals fourteen electronic transitions between 15200 and 31050 cm-1. Variable-temperature variable-field (VTVH) saturation curves were used to determine the polarizations of these electronic transitions, with respect to in-plane (xy) and out-of-plane (z) polarization relative to the heme. The polarizations, oscillator strengths, and TD-DFT calculations were then used to assign the observed electronic transitions. In the lower energy region, prominent bands at 15909 and 16919 cm-1 correspond to porphyrin (P) → Fe charge transfer (CT) transitions. The band at 17881 cm-1 has distinct sulfur S(π)→ Fe CT contributions. The Q band is observed as a pseudo A-term (derivative shape) at 18604 and 19539 cm-1. In the case of the Soret band, the negative component of the expected pseudo A-term is split into two features due to mixing with another π → π* and potentially a P → Fe CT excited state. These features are observed at 23731, 24859, and 25618 cm-1. Most importantly, the broad, prominent band at 28570 cm-1 is assigned to the S(σ)→ Fe CT transition, whose intensity is generated through a multitude of CT transitions with strong iron character. For wt, Q360P, and L358P, this band occurs at 28724

  1. Assembly of organic moiety with metal-oxide cluster to generate a new three dimensional supramolecular/hydrogen bonded network based on isopolymolybdate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DONIA ZAMMEL; ICHRAF NAGAZI; AMOR HADDAD

    2016-07-01

    A new octa-molybdate formulated as (C₂H₆N₄)₂ [β-Mo₈O₂₆].4H₂O (1) has been isolated by conventional solution method and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction method, IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis absorption, thermogravimetric analysis and cyclic voltammetry. Compound 1 crystallizes in the Triclinic system, space group P-1 with unit cell dimensions, a = 8.348 (2)Å, b = 10.154 (2)Å, c = 10.823 (3)Å, α = 68.35◦ (2), β = 71.59◦ (2), γ= 78.55◦ (2), V = 805.5 (3)ų, and Z = 2. The crystal structure of 1 is built up from octa-molybdate [β-Mo₈O₂₆]⁴⁻ clusters connected through hydrogen-bonding interactions into a three-dimensional supramolecular network.

  2. Study of vibrational spectra and hydrogen bonding network in dimeric and tetrameric model of ampicillin using DFT and AIM approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Anuradha; Khan, Eram; Tandon, Poonam; Sinha, Kirti

    2017-03-01

    Ampicillin is a β-lactam antibiotic that is active against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and is widely used for the treatment of infections. In this work, molecular properties of ampicillin are calculated on the basis of calculations on its dimeric and tetrameric models using DFT/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p). HOMO-LUMO energy gap shows that chemical reactivity of tetrameric model of ampicillin is higher than the dimeric and monomeric model of ampicillin. To get a better understanding of intra and intermolecular bonding and interactions among bonds, NBO analysis is carried out with tetrameric model of ampicillin, and is further finalized with an 'quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules' (QTAIM) analysis. The binding energy of dimeric model of ampicillin is calculated as -26.84 kcal/mol and -29.34 kcal/mol using AIM and DFT calculations respectively. The global electrophilicity index (ω = 2.8118 eV) of tetrameric model of ampicillin shows that this behaves as a strong electrophile in comparison to dimeric and monomeric model of ampicillin. The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were recorded in the solid phase, and interpreted in terms of potential energy distribution analysis. A collective theoretical and experimental vibrational analysis approves the presence of hydrogen bonds in the ampicillin molecule.

  3. Constructing supramolecular nanostructure by hydrogen-bonding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YiBao; ZENG QingDao; WANG ZhiHui; QI GuiCun; GUAN Li; FAN XiaoLin; WANG Chen

    2008-01-01

    The diquinoxalino (2.3-2'.3'-a.c) phenazine (DQP), containing 6 nitrogen atoms, was synthesized, and its adsorption and self-assembling behavior on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) under ambient conditions. With 1,14-tetradecanedioic acid as a bridge, uniform two-dimensional arrays of 1,14-tetradecanedioic acid/DQP nanostrueture were suc-cessfully fabricated. The result illustrates that it is possible to construct and control supramolecular nanostructure by intermolecular hydrogen-bonding.

  4. Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Carlos da Silva dos; Ricotta, Regina Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the quantum confinement effect is proposed as the cause of the displacement of the vibrational spectrum of molecular groups that involve hydrogen bonds. In this approach the hydrogen bond imposes a space barrier to hydrogen and constrains its oscillatory motion. We studied the vibrational transitions through the Morse potential, for the NH and OH molecular groups inside macromolecules in situation of confinement (when hydrogen bonding is formed) and non-confinement (when there is no hydrogen bonding). The energies were obtained through the variational method with the trial wave functions obtained from Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SQM) formalism. The results indicate that it is possible to distinguish the emission peaks related to the existence of the hydrogen bonds. These analytical results were satisfactorily compared with experimental results obtained from infrared spectroscopy.

  5. A hydrogen-bonding network is important for oxidation and isomerization in the reaction catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y. [Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, Sinsheimer Laboratories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Chen, Lin; Sampson, Nicole S. [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Vrielink, Alice, E-mail: alice.vrielink@uwa.edu.au [School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, Sinsheimer Laboratories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The importance of active-site electrostatics for oxidative and reductive half-reactions in a redox flavoenzyme (cholesterol oxidase) have been investigated by a combination of biochemistry and atomic resolution crystallography. A detailed examination of active-site dynamics demonstrates that the oxidation of substrate and the re-oxidation of the flavin cofactor by molecular oxygen are linked by a single active-site asparagine. Cholesterol oxidase is a flavoenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation and isomerization of 3β-hydroxysteroids. Structural and mutagenesis studies have shown that Asn485 plays a key role in substrate oxidation. The side chain makes an NH⋯π interaction with the reduced form of the flavin cofactor. A N485D mutant was constructed to further test the role of the amide group in catalysis. The mutation resulted in a 1800-fold drop in the overall k{sub cat}. Atomic resolution structures were determined for both the N485L and N485D mutants. The structure of the N485D mutant enzyme (at 1.0 Å resolution) reveals significant perturbations in the active site. As predicted, Asp485 is oriented away from the flavin moiety, such that any stabilizing interaction with the reduced flavin is abolished. Met122 and Glu361 form unusual hydrogen bonds to the functional group of Asp485 and are displaced from the positions they occupy in the wild-type active site. The overall effect is to disrupt the stabilization of the reduced FAD cofactor during catalysis. Furthermore, a narrow transient channel that is shown to form when the wild-type Asn485 forms the NH⋯π interaction with FAD and that has been proposed to function as an access route of molecular oxygen, is not observed in either of the mutant structures, suggesting that the dynamics of the active site are altered.

  6. Hydrogen bonding in tight environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The single-molecule force spectroscopy of a prototypical class of hydrogen-bonded complexes is computationally investigated. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The force-extension (F-L) isotherms...... of the host-guest complexes are simulated using classical molecular dynamics and the MM3 force field, for which a refined set of hydrogen bond parameters was developed from MP2 ab initio computations. The F-L curves exhibit peaks that signal conformational changes during elongation, the most prominent...... of which is in the 60-180 pN range and corresponds to the force required to break the hydrogen bonds. These peaks in the F-L curves are shown to be sensitive to relatively small changes in the chemical structure of the host molecule. Thermodynamic insights into the supramolecular assembly were obtained...

  7. Cellular neural network analysis for two-dimensional bioheat transfer equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, J H; Wang, H Z; Zhang, H X; Yan, J Y; Zhu, Y S

    2001-09-01

    The cellular neural network (CNN) method is applied to solve the Pennes bioheat transfer equation, and its feasibility is demonstrated. Numerical solutions were obtained for a cellular neural network for a two-dimensional steady-state temperature field obtained from focused and unfocused ultrasound heat sources. Transient-state temperature fields were also studied and compared with experimental results obtained elsewhere. The cellular neural networks' key features of asynchronous parallel processing, continuous-time dynamics and local interaction enable real-time temperature field estimation for clinical hyperthermia.

  8. Functional scale-free networks in the two-dimensional Abelian sandpile model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarepour, M.; Niry, M. D.; Valizadeh, A.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the similarity of the functional network of the brain and the Ising model was investigated by Chialvo [Nat. Phys. 6, 744 (2010), 10.1038/nphys1803]. This similarity supports the idea that the brain is a self-organized critical system. In this study we derive a functional network of the two-dimensional Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model as a self-organized critical model, and compare its characteristics with those of the functional network of the brain, obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Design of two-dimensional recursive filters by using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenov, V M; Mastorakis, N E

    2001-01-01

    A new design method for two-dimensional (2-D) recursive digital filters is investigated. The design of the 2-D filter is reduced to a constrained minimization problem the solution of which is achieved by the convergence of an appropriate neural network. The method is tested on a numerical example and compared with previously published methods when applied to the same example. Advantages of the proposed method over the existing ones are discussed as well.

  10. Water lubricates hydrogen-bonded molecular machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R.; Bakker, Bert H.; den Uyl, David; Kay, Euan R.; Leigh, David A.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M.; Geenevasen, Jan A. J.; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-11-01

    The mechanical behaviour of molecular machines differs greatly from that of their macroscopic counterparts. This applies particularly when considering concepts such as friction and lubrication, which are key to optimizing the operation of macroscopic machinery. Here, using time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and NMR-lineshape analysis, we show that for molecular machinery consisting of hydrogen-bonded components the relative motion of the components is accelerated strongly by adding small amounts of water. The translation of a macrocycle along a thread and the rotation of a molecular wheel around an axle both accelerate significantly on the addition of water, whereas other protic liquids have much weaker or opposite effects. We tentatively assign the superior accelerating effect of water to its ability to form a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network between the moving parts of the molecular machine. These results may indicate a more general phenomenon that helps explain the function of water as the ‘lubricant of life’.

  11. A spectroscopic and computational investigation of the conformational structural changes induced by hydrogen bonding networks in the glycidol-water complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, A R; Teumelsan, N H; Wang, P E; Tubergen, M J

    2010-01-14

    Rotational spectra were recorded in natural abundance for the (13)C isotopomers of two conformers of glycidol. Moments of inertia from the (13)C isotopomers were used to calculate the substitution coordinates and C-C bond lengths of two glycidol monomer conformations. The structures of seven different conformational minima were found from ab initio (MP2/6-311++G(d,p)) optimizations of glycidol-water. The rotational spectrum of glycidol-water was recorded using microwave spectroscopy, and the rotational constants were determined to be A = 3902.331 (11) MHz, B = 2763.176 (3) MHz, and C = 1966.863 (3) MHz. Rotational spectra were also recorded for glycidol-H(2)(18)O, glycidol-D(b)OH, and glycidol-d(O)-D(2)O. The rotational spectra were assigned to the lowest-energy ab initio structure, and the structure was improved by fitting to the experimental moments of inertia. The best-fit structure shows evidence for structural changes in glycidol to accommodate formation of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding network: the O-C-C-O torsional angle in glycidol was found to increase from 40.8 degrees for the monomer to 49.9 degrees in the water complex.

  12. Study on dioxygen reduction by mutational modifications of the hydrogen bond network leading from bulk water to the trinuclear copper center in bilirubin oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Hirotoshi; Kurita, Daisuke; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Proton transport pathway in bilirubin oxidase was mutated. • Two intermediates in the dioxygen reduction steps were trapped and characterized. • A specific glutamate for dioxygen reduction by multicopper oxidases was identified. - Abstract: The hydrogen bond network leading from bulk water to the trinuclear copper center in bilirubin oxidase is constructed with Glu463 and water molecules to transport protons for the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. Substitutions of Glu463 with Gln or Ala were attributed to virtually complete loss or significant reduction in enzymatic activities due to an inhibition of the proton transfer steps to dioxygen. The single turnover reaction of the Glu463Gln mutant afforded the highly magnetically interacted intermediate II (native intermediate) with a broad g = 1.96 electron paramagnetic resonance signal detectable at cryogenic temperatures. Reactions of the double mutants, Cys457Ser/Glu463Gln and Cys457Ser/Glu463Ala afforded the intermediate I (peroxide intermediate) because the type I copper center to donate the fourth electron to dioxygen was vacant in addition to the interference of proton transport due to the mutation at Glu463. The intermediate I gave no electron paramagnetic resonance signal, but the type II copper signal became detectable with the decay of the intermediate I. Structural and functional similarities between multicopper oxidases are discussed based on the present mutation at Glu463 in bilirubin oxidase.

  13. Mechanism of the jamming transition in the two-dimensional traffic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Minoru

    2012-12-01

    The mechanism of the jamming transition in two-dimensional traffic networks is discussed on the basis of several models, where the update rule is deterministic, though the initial car configuration is random. It has turned out that the introduced concept of the occupation probability, which depends upon time and the site, is useful. The fluctuation in the local car density plays an important role to give rise to small initial clusters of the cars. To examine the growth of such clusters a time-dependent function C is introduced, which is the number of the neighboring car pairs, and C increases to a certain maximum value, correlated with the total jamming. The critical car density in the symmetric two-dimensional N×N/N×N system is found to be 0.22-0.23 for each of the east-bound (x) and the north-bound (y) cars.

  14. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHISHEK SHAHI; ELANGANNAN ARUNAN

    2016-10-01

    The recent IUPAC recommendation on the definition of hydrogen bonding points out that directionality is a defining characteristic of a hydrogen bond and the angle ∠X-H-Y is generally linear or 180◦. It also suggests that the X-H· · ·Y angle be greater than 110◦ for an interaction to be characterized as a hydrogenbond but does not provide any rationale for the same. This article reports a rationale for limiting the angle, based on the electron density topology using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Electron density topology for common hydrogen bond donors HF, HCl, HBr, HNC, HCN and HCCH are reported in this work. These calculations lead to an interesting observation that the atomic basins of H atom in all these donor molecules are limited justifying the restriction of hydrogen bond angle. Moreover, similar analysis on some hydrogen bonded complexes confirms that beyond this angle the acceptor atom Y starts interacting with the atomic basin on X. However, conclusions based on bond lengths and angles have to be treated with care and as the IUPAC recommendation points out that independent ‘evidence for bond formation’ in every case is important.

  15. Integration of neuroblasts into a two-dimensional small world neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey; Zochowski, Michal; Sander, Leonard

    2009-03-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult brain has been suggested to be important for learning and functional robustness to the neuronal death. New neurons integrate themselves into existing neuronal networks by moving into a target destination, extending axonal and dendritic processes, and inducing synaptogenesis to connect to active neurons. We hypothesize that increased plasticity of the network to novel stimuli can arise from activity-dependent cell and process motility rules. In complement to a similar in vitro model, we investigate a computational model of a two-dimensional small world network of integrate and fire neurons. After steady-state activity is reached in the extant network, we introduce new neurons which move, stop, and connect themselves through rules governed by position and firing rate.

  16. Charge-Assisted Hydrogen-Bonded Networks of NH4+ and [Co(NH36]3+ with the New Linker Anion of 4-Phosphono-Biphenyl-4′-Carboxylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Heering

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The new linker molecule 4-phosphono-biphenyl-4′-carboxylic acid (H2O3P-(C6H42-COOH, H3BPPA has been structurally elucidated in hydrogen-bonded networks with the ammonium cation NH4(H2BPPA(H3BPPA (1 and the hexaamminecobalt(III cation [Co(NH36](BPPA·4H2O (2. The protic O-H and N-H hydrogen atoms were found and refined in the low-temperature single-crystal X-ray structures. The hydrogen bonds in both structures are so-called charge-assisted; that is, the H-bond donor and/or acceptor carry positive and/or negative ionic charges, respectively. The H-bonded network in 1 consists of one formally mono-deprotonated 4-phosphonato-biphenyl-4′-carboxylic acid group; that is, a H2BPPA− anion and a neutral H3BPPA molecule, which together form a 3D hydrogen-bonded network. However, an almost symmetric resonance-assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB bond [O···H = 1.17 (3 and 1.26 (3 Å, O···H···O = 180 (3°] signals charge delocalization between the formal H2BPPA− anion and the formally neutral H3BPPA molecule. Hence, the anion in 1 is better formulated as [H2BPPA···H···H2BPPA]−. In the H-bonded network of 2 the 4-phosphonato-biphenyl-4′-carboxylic acid is triply deprotonated, BPPA3−. The [Co(NH36]3+ cation is embedded between H-bond acceptor groups, –COO− and –PO3− and H2O molecules. The incorporation of sixteen H2O molecules per unit cell makes 2 an analogue of the well-studied guanidinium sulfonate frameworks.

  17. Mapping the force field of a hydrogen-bonded assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, A. M.; Jarvis, S. P.; Sang, Hongqian; Lekkas, I.; Rahe, P.; Wang, Yu; Wang, Jianbo; Champness, N. R.; Kantorovich, L.; Moriarty, P.

    2014-05-01

    Hydrogen bonding underpins the properties of a vast array of systems spanning a wide variety of scientific fields. From the elegance of base pair interactions in DNA to the symmetry of extended supramolecular assemblies, hydrogen bonds play an essential role in directing intermolecular forces. Yet fundamental aspects of the hydrogen bond continue to be vigorously debated. Here we use dynamic force microscopy (DFM) to quantitatively map the tip-sample force field for naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide molecules hydrogen-bonded in two-dimensional assemblies. A comparison of experimental images and force spectra with their simulated counterparts shows that intermolecular contrast arises from repulsive tip-sample interactions whose interpretation can be aided via an examination of charge density depletion across the molecular system. Interpreting DFM images of hydrogen-bonded systems therefore necessitates detailed consideration of the coupled tip-molecule system: analyses based on intermolecular charge density in the absence of the tip fail to capture the essential physical chemistry underpinning the imaging mechanism.

  18. Thermal metal in network models of a disordered two-dimensional superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalker, J. T.; Read, N.; Kagalovsky, V.; Horovitz, B.; Avishai, Y.; Ludwig, A. W.

    2002-01-01

    We study the symmetry class for localization which arises from models of noninteracting quasiparticles in disordered superconductors that have neither time-reversal nor spin-rotation invariance. Two-dimensional systems in this category, which is known as class D, can display phases with three different types of quasiparticle dynamics: metallic, localized, or with a quantized (thermal) Hall conductance. Correspondingly, they can show a variety of delocalization transitions. We illustrate this behavior by investigating numerically the phase diagrams of network models with the appropriate symmetry and show the appearance of the metallic phase.

  19. Mechanism of the jamming transition in the two-dimensional traffic networks. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yoshihiro; Fukui, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    The jamming transition in a two-dimensional traffic network is investigated based upon the cellular automaton simulations, where the update rule is deterministic, though the initial car configuration is randomly set. The lifetime of the system is defined as the time until when all cars in the system come to a stop, and it will increase with decreasing car density from a higher density side. The critical car density is defined as the car density, at which the corresponding lifetime diverges. The analytical expression for the critical car density is proposed.

  20. A two dimensional thermal network model for a photovoltaic solar wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehra, Himanshu [1-140 Avenue Windsor, Lachine, Quebec (Canada)

    2009-11-15

    A two dimensional thermal network model is proposed to predict the temperature distribution for a section of photovoltaic solar wall installed in an outdoor room laboratory in Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. The photovoltaic solar wall is constructed with a pair of glass coated photovoltaic modules and a polystyrene filled plywood board as back panel. The active solar ventilation through a photovoltaic solar wall is achieved with an exhaust fan fixed in the outdoor room laboratory. The steady state thermal network nodal equations are developed for conjugate heat exchange and heat transport for a section of a photovoltaic solar wall. The matrix solution procedure is adopted for formulation of conductance and heat source matrices for obtaining numerical solution of one dimensional heat conduction and heat transport equations by performing two dimensional thermal network analyses. The temperature distribution is predicted by the model with measurement data obtained from the section of a photovoltaic solar wall. The effect of conduction heat flow and multi-node radiation heat exchange between composite surfaces is useful for predicting a ventilation rate through a solar ventilation system. (author)

  1. Synchronizability of Small-World Networks Generated from a Two-Dimensional Kleinberg Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the synchronizability of small-world networks generated from a two-dimensional Kleinberg model, which is more general than NW small-world network. The three parameters of the Kleinberg model, namely, the distance of neighbors, the number of edge-adding, and the edge-adding probability, are analyzed for their impacts on its synchronizability and average path length. It can be deduced that the synchronizability becomes stronger as the edge-adding probability increases, and the increasing edge-adding probability could make the average path length of the Kleinberg small-world network go smaller. Moreover, larger distance among neighbors and more edges to be added could play positive roles in enhancing the synchronizability of the Kleinberg model. The lorentz oscillators are employed to verify the conclusions numerically.

  2. Tetrapeptide-coumarin conjugate 3D networks based on hydrogen-bonded charge transfer complexes: gel formation and dye release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zongxia; Gong, Ruiying; Jiang, Yi; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-08-14

    Oligopeptide-based derivatives are important synthons for bio-based functional materials. In this article, a Gly-(L-Val)-Gly-(L-Val)-coumarin (GVGV-Cou) conjugate was synthesized, which forms 3D networks in ethanol. The gel nanostructures were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM and TEM. It is suggested that the formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes between the coumarin moieties is the main driving force for the gel formation. The capability of the gel to encapsulate and release dyes was explored. Both Congo Red (CR) and Methylene Blue (MB) can be trapped in the CT gel matrix and released over time. The present gel might be used as a functional soft material for guest encapsulation and release.

  3. Hydrogen bond network in the hydration layer of the water confined in nanotubes increasing the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenpeng; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-09-01

    The water confined in nanotubes has been extensively studied, because of the potential usages in drug delivery and desalination. The radial distribution of the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations in a carbon nanotube and a nanotube with a very small van der Waals potential. The confined water was divided into two parts, the middle part water and the hydration water. In both cases, the hydrogen bond orientation of the middle water is isotropic, while the hydrogen bonds in hydration layers are apt to parallel along the nanotube axis. Therefore, the hydration water has higher dipole correlations increasing the dielectric constant along the nanotube axis.

  4. Hydrogen bond network in the hydration layer of the water confined in nanotubes increasing the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenpeng; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-09-21

    The water confined in nanotubes has been extensively studied, because of the potential usages in drug delivery and desalination. The radial distribution of the dielectric constant parallel along the nanotube axis was obtained by molecular dynamics simulations in a carbon nanotube and a nanotube with a very small van der Waals potential. The confined water was divided into two parts, the middle part water and the hydration water. In both cases, the hydrogen bond orientation of the middle water is isotropic, while the hydrogen bonds in hydration layers are apt to parallel along the nanotube axis. Therefore, the hydration water has higher dipole correlations increasing the dielectric constant along the nanotube axis.

  5. The synthesis and characterisation of coordination and hydrogen-bonded networks based on 4-(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)benzoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Macguire R; Burrows, Andrew D; Fitchett, Christopher M; Hawes, Chris S; Hunter, Sally O; Keenan, Luke L; Kelly, David J; Kruger, Paul E; Mahon, Mary F; Richardson, Christopher

    2015-05-21

    the network topology is retained. Powder X-ray diffraction and microanalysis were used to characterise the bulk purity of the coordination materials 1–6 and 8. The thermal characteristics of 1–2, 4–6 and 8 were studied by TG-DTA. This led to the curious observation of small exothermic events in networks 4, 6, and 8 that appear to be linked to their decomposition. In addition, the solid state structures of H2L and that of its protonated salt, H2L·HNO3, were also determined and revealed that H2L forms a 2-D hydrogen bonded polymer incorporating helical chains formed through N–HO and O–HN interactions, and that [H3L]NO3 forms a 1-D hydrogen-bonded polymer.

  6. A statistical mechanical theory of proton transport kinetics in hydrogen-bonded networks based on population correlation functions with applications to acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckerman, Mark E; Chandra, Amalendu; Marx, Dominik

    2010-09-28

    Extraction of relaxation times, lifetimes, and rates associated with the transport of topological charge defects in hydrogen-bonded networks from molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge because proton transfer reactions continually change the identity of the defect core. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanical theory that allows these quantities to be computed in an unbiased manner. The theory employs a set of suitably defined indicator or population functions for locating a defect structure and their associated correlation functions. These functions are then used to develop a chemical master equation framework from which the rates and lifetimes can be determined. Furthermore, we develop an integral equation formalism for connecting various types of population correlation functions and derive an iterative solution to the equation, which is given a graphical interpretation. The chemical master equation framework is applied to the problems of both hydronium and hydroxide transport in bulk water. For each case it is shown that the theory establishes direct links between the defect's dominant solvation structures, the kinetics of charge transfer, and the mechanism of structural diffusion. A detailed analysis is presented for aqueous hydroxide, examining both reorientational time scales and relaxation of the rotational anisotropy, which is correlated with recent experimental results for these quantities. Finally, for OH(-)(aq) it is demonstrated that the "dynamical hypercoordination mechanism" is consistent with available experimental data while other mechanistic proposals are shown to fail. As a means of going beyond the linear rate theory valid from short up to intermediate time scales, a fractional kinetic model is introduced in the Appendix in order to describe the nonexponential long-time behavior of time-correlation functions. Within the mathematical framework of fractional calculus the power law decay ∼t(-σ), where σ is a parameter of the

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of a novel supramolecular network compound of Co(NIA) 2(H 2O) 4 with molecular ladder hydrogen bond chains (NIA=nicotinate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hong-Bin; Yu, Jie-Hui; Xu, Ji-Qing; Ye, Ling; Ding, Hong; Jing, Wei-Jie; Wang, Tie-Gang; Xu, Jia-Ning; Li, Zeng-Chun

    2002-10-01

    By hydrothermal method, a novel supramolecular compound, Co(NIA) 2(H 2O) 4 was synthesized and its structure was characterized with elemental analysis, FT-IR spectrum, TGA and X-ray diffractometer, indicating that it is a novel polyporous supramolecule with molecular ladder hydrogen-bonded chains. TGA curve shows its thermal stability up to 520 °C.

  8. Bifurcations of large networks of two-dimensional integrate and fire neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Wilten; Campbell, Sue Ann

    2013-08-01

    Recently, a class of two-dimensional integrate and fire models has been used to faithfully model spiking neurons. This class includes the Izhikevich model, the adaptive exponential integrate and fire model, and the quartic integrate and fire model. The bifurcation types for the individual neurons have been thoroughly analyzed by Touboul (SIAM J Appl Math 68(4):1045-1079, 2008). However, when the models are coupled together to form networks, the networks can display bifurcations that an uncoupled oscillator cannot. For example, the networks can transition from firing with a constant rate to burst firing. This paper introduces a technique to reduce a full network of this class of neurons to a mean field model, in the form of a system of switching ordinary differential equations. The reduction uses population density methods and a quasi-steady state approximation to arrive at the mean field system. Reduced models are derived for networks with different topologies and different model neurons with biologically derived parameters. The mean field equations are able to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the bifurcations that the full networks display. Extensions and higher order approximations are discussed.

  9. 3D, 2D and 1D networks via N-H…O and N-H…N hydrogen bonding by the bis-amide analogues: Effect of chain lengths and odd-even spacers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gargi Mukherjee; Kumar Biradha

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis, crystal structures and hydrogen bonding networks of four members of the bis(pyridinecarboxamido)alkane and bis(pyridyl)alkanediamides series (1 ≤ ≤ 8), where the amide moieties are separated by alkyl chain (-(CH2)-) having even or odd number of -(CH2)-groups are explored and correlated with the previously reported structures. The odd members (n= odd) of both the series are found to adopt three-dimensional networks in contrast to the 1D or 2D structures of the even members (n= even). This odd-even effect on the dimensionality of the networks however disappears with increase in chain length.

  10. Robustness and breakup of the spiral wave in a two-dimensional lattice network of neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The robustness and breakup of spiral wave in a two-dimensional lattice networks of neurons are investigated. The effect of small- world type connection is often simplified with local regular connection and the long-range connection with certain probability. The network effect on the development of spiral wave can be better described by local regular connection and changeable long-range connection probability than fixed long-range connection probability because the long-range probability could be changeable in realistic biological system. The effect from the changeable probability for long-range connection is simplified by multiplicative noise. At first, a stable rotating spiral wave is developed by using appropriate initial values, parameters and no-flux boundary conditions, and then the effect of networks is investigated. Extensive numerical studies show that spiral wave keeps its alive and robust when the intensity of multiplicative noise is below a certain threshold, otherwise, the breakup of spiral wave occurs. A statistical factor of synchronization in two-dimensional array is defined to study the phase transition of spiral wave by checking the membrane potentials of all neurons corresponding to the critical parameters(the intensity of noise or forcing current)in the curve for factor of synchronization. The Hindmarsh-Rose model is investigated, the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model in the presence of the channel noise is also studied to check the model independence of our conclusions. And it is found that breakup of spiral wave is easier to be induced by the multiplicative noise in presence of channel noise.

  11. Size effect on brittle and ductile fracture of two-dimensional interlinked carbon nanotube network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuhang; Aluru, N. R.

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical properties of two-dimensional (2D) interlinked carbon nanotube (CNT) network are investigated using ab initio calculation and molecular dynamics simulations (MD) with Reaxff force field. The simulation results show that bulk 2D interlinked CNT network has good mechanical properties along the axial direction which can be comparable to that of single-walled CNT and graphene, but has better ductility along the radial direction than single-walled CNT and graphene. In addition, the mechanical properties of 2D interlinked CNT network ribbon along the radial direction depend strongly on the size of the ribbon. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio decrease as the size increases while the fracture strain increases with the size increasing. By analyzing the atomic structural (both bond length and atomic von Mises stress) evolution of the ribbons, the mechanism of a brittle-to-ductile transition is revealed. The exploration of the mechanical properties of the 2D interlinked CNT network paves the way for application of the relevant devices that can benefit from the high Young's modulus, high tensile strength, and good ductility.

  12. Energy Efficiency Analysis of a Two Dimensional Cooperative Wireless Sensor Network with Relay Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kakitani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy efficiency of non-cooperative and cooperative transmissions are investigated in a two-dimensional wireless sensor network, considering a target outage probability and the same end-to-end throughput for all transmission schemes. The impact of the relay selection method in the cooperative schemes is also analyzed. We show that under non line-of-sight conditions the relay selection method has a greater impact in the energy efficiency than the availability of a return channel. By its turn, under line-of-sight conditions a return channel is more valuable to the energy efficiency of cooperative transmission than the specific relay selection method. Finally, we demonstrate that the energy efficiency advantage of the cooperative over the non-cooperative transmission increases with the distance among nodes and with the nodes density.

  13. Surface-Induced Optimal Packing of Two-Dimensional Molecular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, Guillaume; Cleri, Fabrizio; Makoudi, Younes; Krzeminski, Christophe; Berthe, Maxime; Cherioux, Frédéric; Palmino, Frank; Grandidier, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    High-density packing in organic crystals is usually associated with an increase of the coordination between molecules. Such a concept is not necessarily extended to two-dimensional molecular networks self-assembled on a solid surface, for which we demonstrate the key role of the surface in inducing the optimal packing. By a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy experiments and multiscale computer simulations, we study the phase transition between two polymorphs. We find that, contrary to intuition, the structure with the lowest packing fraction corresponds to the highest molecular coordination number, due to the competition between surface and intermolecular forces. Having the lowest free energy, this structure spreads out as the most stable polymorph over a wide range of molecular concentrations.

  14. Graphene-based field effect transistor in two-dimensional paper networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagang, Aldrine Abenoja; Abidi, Irfan Haider; Tyagi, Abhishek [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Hu, Jie; Xu, Feng [Bioinspired Engineering and Biomechanics Center (BEBC), Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Lu, Tian Jian [Bioinspired Engineering and Biomechanics Center (BEBC), Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Luo, Zhengtang, E-mail: keztluo@ust.hk [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong)

    2016-04-21

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) incorporated in a two-dimensional paper network format (2DPNs). Paper serves as both a gate dielectric and an easy-to-fabricate vessel for holding the solution with the target molecules in question. The choice of paper enables a simpler alternative approach to the construction of a GFET device. The fabricated device is shown to behave similarly to a solution-gated GFET device with electron and hole mobilities of ∼1256 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and ∼2298 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} respectively and a Dirac point around ∼1 V. When using solutions of ssDNA and glucose it was found that the added molecules induce negative electrolytic gating effects shifting the conductance minimum to the right, concurrent with increasing carrier concentrations which results to an observed increase in current response correlated to the concentration of the solution used. - Highlights: • A graphene-based field effect transistor sensor was fabricated for two-dimensional paper network formats. • The constructed GFET on 2DPN was shown to behave similarly to solution-gated GFETs. • Electrolyte gating effects have more prominent effect over adsorption effects on the behavior of the device. • The GFET incorporated on 2DPN was shown to yield linear response to presence of glucose and ssDNA soaked inside the paper.

  15. Hydrogen bonding, π–π stacking and van der Waals forces-dominated layered regions in the crystal structure of 4-aminopyridinium hydrogen (9-phosphonononylphosphonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin van Megen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title molecular salt, [C5H7N2+][(HO2OP(CH29PO2(OH−], consists of one 4-aminopyridinium cation and one hydrogen (9-phosphonononylphosphonate anion, both in general positions. As expected, the 4-aminopyridinium moieties are protonated exclusively at their endocyclic nitrogen atom due to a mesomeric stabilization by the imine form which would not be given in the corresponding double-protonated dicationic species. In the crystal, the phosphonyl (–PO3H2 and hydrogen phosphonate (–PO3H groups of the anions form two-dimensional O—H...O hydrogen-bonded networks in the ab plane built from 24-membered hydrogen-bonded ring motifs with the graph-set descriptor R66(24. These networks are pairwise linked by the anions' alkylene chains. The 4-aminopyridinium cations are stacked in parallel displaced face-to-face arrangements and connect neighboring anionic substructures via medium–strong charge-supported N—H...O hydrogen bonds along the c axis. The resulting three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network shows clearly separated hydrophilic and hydrophobic structural domains.

  16. Hydrogen Bonding and Related Properties in Liquid Water: A Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardia, Elvira; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco

    2015-07-23

    The local hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of liquid water have been investigated using the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation technique. The radial distribution functions and coordination numbers around water molecules have been found to be strongly dependent on the number of hydrogen bonds formed by each molecule, revealing also the existence of local structural heterogeneities in the structure of the liquid. The results obtained have also revealed the strong effect of the local hydrogen-bonding network on the local tetrahedral structure and entropy. The investigation of the dynamics of the local hydrogen-bonding network in liquid water has shown that this network is very labile, and the hydrogen bonds break and reform very rapidly. Nevertheless, it has been found that the hydrogen-bonding states associated with the formation of four hydrogen bonds by a water molecule exhibit the largest survival probability and corresponding lifetime. The reorientational motions of water molecules have also been found to be strongly dependent on their initial hydrogen-bonding state. Finally, the dependence of the librational and vibrational modes of water molecules on the local hydrogen-bonding network has been carefully examined, revealing a significant effect upon the libration and bond-stretching peak frequencies. The calculated low frequency peaks come in agreement with previously reported interpretations of the experimental low-frequency Raman spectrum of liquid water.

  17. Variational tensor network renormalization in imaginary time: Two-dimensional quantum compass model at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnik, Piotr; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2016-05-01

    Progress in describing thermodynamic phase transitions in quantum systems is obtained by noticing that the Gibbs operator e-β H for a two-dimensional (2D) lattice system with a Hamiltonian H can be represented by a three-dimensional tensor network, the third dimension being the imaginary time (inverse temperature) β . Coarse graining the network along β results in a 2D projected entangled-pair operator (PEPO) with a finite bond dimension D . The coarse graining is performed by a tree tensor network of isometries. The isometries are optimized variationally, taking into account full tensor environment, to maximize the accuracy of the PEPO. The algorithm is applied to the isotropic quantum compass model on an infinite square lattice near a symmetry-breaking phase transition at finite temperature. From the linear susceptibility in the symmetric phase and the order parameter in the symmetry-broken phase, the critical temperature is estimated at Tc=0.0606 (4 ) J , where J is the isotropic coupling constant between S =1/2 pseudospins.

  18. Fine Structure of Hydrogen Bond in Cholic Acid Revealed by 2DIR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on cryogenic FT-IR spectroscopic studies of hydrogen bonds in cholic acid, two-dimensional FT-IR spectroscopy was applied to enhance our understanding of the hydrogen bonds of cholic acid. Fine spectral structures were revealed by asynchronous 2D FT-IR spectra. The co-relationship among various bands was discussed according to the synchronous 2D FT-IR spectrum.

  19. Is Asp-His-Ser/Thr-Trp tetrad hydrogen-bond network important to WD40-repeat proteins: a statistical and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian-Hui; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2010-04-01

    WD40-repeat proteins are abundant and play important roles in forming protein complexes. The domain usually has seven WD40 repeats, which folds into a seven beta-sheet propeller with each beta-sheet in a four-strand structure. An analysis of 20 available WD40-repeat proteins in Protein Data Bank reveals that each protein has at least one Asp-His-Ser/Thr-Trp (D-H-S/T-W) hydrogen-bonded tetrad, and some proteins have up to six or seven such tetrads. The relative positions of the four residues in the tetrads are also found to be conserved. A sequence alignment analysis of 560 WD40-repeat protein sequences in human reveals very similar features, indicating that such tetrad may be a general feature of WD40-repeat proteins. We carried out density functional theory and found that these tetrads can lead to significant stabilization including hydrogen-bonding cooperativity. The hydrogen bond involving Trp is significant. These results lead us to propose that the tetrads may be critical to the stability and the mechanism of folding of these proteins.

  20. Two-Dimensional Cysteine and Cystine Cluster Networks on Au(111) Disclosed by Voltammetry and in Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik;

    2000-01-01

    Microscopic structures for molecular monolayers of L-cysteine and L-cystine assembled on Au(111) have been disclosed by employing electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). HighresolutionSTMimages show that the adlayers of both cyteine and cystine exhibit highly......-ordered networklike clusters with (3x3 6)R30° structure. By combining the surface coverage estimated from voltammetric data, each cluster is demonstrated to include six individual cysteine molecules or three cystine molecules. As a comparison, no cluster structure is observed for the 1-butanethiol adlayer prepared...... and examined under the same conditions as those for cysteine and cystine. This suggests that intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds among adsorbed cysteine or cystine molecules could be responsible for the origin of the cluster-network structures for the adlayers. Several models are proposed and used...

  1. Spatially structured oscillations in a two-dimensional excitatory neuronal network with synaptic depression

    KAUST Repository

    Kilpatrick, Zachary P.

    2009-10-29

    We study the spatiotemporal dynamics of a two-dimensional excitatory neuronal network with synaptic depression. Coupling between populations of neurons is taken to be nonlocal, while depression is taken to be local and presynaptic. We show that the network supports a wide range of spatially structured oscillations, which are suggestive of phenomena seen in cortical slice experiments and in vivo. The particular form of the oscillations depends on initial conditions and the level of background noise. Given an initial, spatially localized stimulus, activity evolves to a spatially localized oscillating core that periodically emits target waves. Low levels of noise can spontaneously generate several pockets of oscillatory activity that interact via their target patterns. Periodic activity in space can also organize into spiral waves, provided that there is some source of rotational symmetry breaking due to external stimuli or noise. In the high gain limit, no oscillatory behavior exists, but a transient stimulus can lead to a single, outward propagating target wave. © Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009.

  2. Quantitative evaluation and modeling of two-dimensional neovascular network complexity: the surface fractal dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschini Barbara

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modeling the complex development and growth of tumor angiogenesis using mathematics and biological data is a burgeoning area of cancer research. Architectural complexity is the main feature of every anatomical system, including organs, tissues, cells and sub-cellular entities. The vascular system is a complex network whose geometrical characteristics cannot be properly defined using the principles of Euclidean geometry, which is only capable of interpreting regular and smooth objects that are almost impossible to find in Nature. However, fractal geometry is a more powerful means of quantifying the spatial complexity of real objects. Methods This paper introduces the surface fractal dimension (Ds as a numerical index of the two-dimensional (2-D geometrical complexity of tumor vascular networks, and their behavior during computer-simulated changes in vessel density and distribution. Results We show that Ds significantly depends on the number of vessels and their pattern of distribution. This demonstrates that the quantitative evaluation of the 2-D geometrical complexity of tumor vascular systems can be useful not only to measure its complex architecture, but also to model its development and growth. Conclusions Studying the fractal properties of neovascularity induces reflections upon the real significance of the complex form of branched anatomical structures, in an attempt to define more appropriate methods of describing them quantitatively. This knowledge can be used to predict the aggressiveness of malignant tumors and design compounds that can halt the process of angiogenesis and influence tumor growth.

  3. Two-Dimensional High-Lift Aerodynamic Optimization Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Roxana M.

    1998-01-01

    The high-lift performance of a multi-element airfoil was optimized by using neural-net predictions that were trained using a computational data set. The numerical data was generated using a two-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes algorithm with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Because it is difficult to predict maximum lift for high-lift systems, an empirically-based maximum lift criteria was used in this study to determine both the maximum lift and the angle at which it occurs. The 'pressure difference rule,' which states that the maximum lift condition corresponds to a certain pressure difference between the peak suction pressure and the pressure at the trailing edge of the element, was applied and verified with experimental observations for this configuration. Multiple input, single output networks were trained using the NASA Ames variation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, drag and moment). The artificial neural networks were integrated with a gradient-based optimizer. Using independent numerical simulations and experimental data for this high-lift configuration, it was shown that this design process successfully optimized flap deflection, gap, overlap, and angle of attack to maximize lift. Once the neural nets were trained and integrated with the optimizer, minimal additional computer resources were required to perform optimization runs with different initial conditions and parameters. Applying the neural networks within the high-lift rigging optimization process reduced the amount of computational time and resources by 44% compared with traditional gradient-based optimization procedures for multiple optimization runs.

  4. Crystal structure of 1,2-bis[(1H-imidazol-2-ylmethylidene]hydrazine and its one-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hwa Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C8H8N6, two imidazolyl groups are separated by a zigzag –CH=N—N=CH– linkage. An inversion center is located at the mid-point of the N—N single bond and the complete molecule is generated by symmetry. In the crystal, each molecule forms four N—H...N hydrogen bonds with two neighbouring molecules to constitute a one-dimensional ladder-like structure propagating along the a-axis direction.

  5. Imaging Hydrogen Bond in Real Space

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiu; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Cai, Yingxing; Liu, Nianhua; Wang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bond is often assumed to be a purely electrostatic interaction between a electron-deficient hydrogen atom and a region of high electron density. Here, for the first time, we directly image hydrogen bond in real space by room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with the assistance of resonant tunneling effect in double barrier mode. STM observations demonstrate that the C=O:HO hydrogen bonds lifted several angstrom meters above metal surfaces appear shuttle-like features with a significant contrast along the direction connected the oxygen and hydrogen atoms of a single hydrogen bond. The off-center location of the summit and the variance of the appearance height for the hydrogen bond with scanning bias reveal that there are certain hybridizations between the electron orbitals of the involved oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the C=O:HO hydrogen bond.

  6. Non-monotonic, distance-dependent relaxation of water in reverse micelles: propagation of surface induced frustration along hydrogen bond networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rajib; Chakraborti, Tamaghna; Bagchi, Biman; Ayappa, K G

    2012-07-07

    Layer-wise, distance-dependent orientational relaxation of water confined in reverse micelles (RM) is studied using theoretical and computational tools. We use both a newly constructed "spins on a ring" (SOR) Ising-type model (with Shore-Zwanzig rotational dynamics) and atomistic simulations with explicit water. Our study explores the effect of reverse micelle size and role of intermolecular correlations, compromised by the presence of a highly polar surface, on the distance (from the interface) dependence of water relaxation. The "spins on a ring" model can capture some aspects of distance dependence of relaxation, such as acceleration of orientational relaxation at intermediate layers. In atomistic simulations, layer-wise decomposition of hydrogen bond formation pattern clearly reveals that hydrogen bond arrangement of water at a certain distance away from the surface can remain frustrated due to the interaction with the polar surface head groups. This layer-wise analysis also reveals the presence of a non-monotonic slow relaxation component which can be attributed to this frustration effect and which is accentuated in small to intermediate size RMs. For large size RMs, the long time component decreases monotonically from the interface to the interior of the RMs with slowest relaxation observed at the interface.

  7. Competing intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds and extended intermolecular network in 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(2-methyl-4-oxopentan-2-yl) thiourea analyzed by experimental and theoretical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Aamer, E-mail: aamersaeed@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khurshid, Asma [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Jasinski, Jerry P. [Department of Chemistry, Keene State College, 229 Main Street Keene, NH 03435-2001 (United States); Pozzi, C. Gustavo; Fantoni, Adolfo C. [Instituto de Física La Plata, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 49 y 115, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Erben, Mauricio F., E-mail: erben@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CEQUINOR (UNLP, CONICET-CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 962, (1900) La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-03-18

    Highlights: • Two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible in the title molecule. • Crystal structures and vibrational properties were determined. • The C=O and C=S double bonds of the acyl-thiourea group are mutually oriented in opposite directions. • A strong hyperconjugative lpO1 → σ{sup ∗}(N2-H) remote interaction was detected. • Topological analysis reveals a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing. - Abstract: The synthesis of a novel 1-acyl-thiourea species (C{sub 14}H{sub 17}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}SCl), has been tailored in such a way that two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible. The X-ray structure analysis as well as the vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) data reveal that the S conformation is preferred, with the C=O and C=S bonds of the acyl-thiourea group pointing in opposite directions. The preference for the intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bond within the -C(O)NHC(S)NH- core is confirmed. The Natural Bond Orbital and the Atom in Molecule approaches demonstrate that a strong hyperconjugative lpO → σ{sup ∗}(N-H) remote interaction between the acyl and the thioamide N-H groups is responsible for the stabilization of the S conformation. Intermolecular interactions have been characterized in the periodic system electron density and the topological analysis reveals the presence of an extended intermolecular network in the crystal, including a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing.

  8. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S., E-mail: Maxim.Pchenitchnikov@RuG.nl [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics–quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid—alcohols—has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  9. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  10. Redox-controlled hydrogen bonding: turning a superbase into a strong hydrogen-bond donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Ute; Neuhäuser, Christiane; Wiesner, Sven; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Wadepohl, Hubert; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-05-12

    Herein the synthesis, structures and properties of hydrogen-bonded aggregates involving redox-active guanidine superbases are reported. Reversible hydrogen bonding is switched on by oxidation of the hydrogen-donor unit, and leads to formation of aggregates in which the hydrogen-bond donor unit is sandwiched by two hydrogen-bond acceptor units. Further oxidation (of the acceptor units) leads again to deaggregation. Aggregate formation is associated with a distinct color change, and the electronic situation could be described as a frozen stage on the way to hydrogen transfer. A further increase in the basicity of the hydrogen-bond acceptor leads to deprotonation reactions.

  11. Adhesion between silica surfaces due to hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James; Rossetto, Hebert L.; Kendall, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    The adhesion between surfaces can be enhanced significantly by the presence of hydrogen bonding. Confined water at the nanoscale can display behaviour remarkably different to bulk water due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between two surfaces. In this work we investigate the role of confined water on the interaction between hydrophilic surfaces, specifically the effect of organic contaminants in the aqueous phase, by measuring the peak adhesive force and the work of adhesion. Atomic force microscope cantilevers presenting hemispherical silica tips were interacted with planar single crystals of silica in the presence of dimethylformamide, ethanol, and formamide; solution compositions in the range 0-100 mol% water were investigated for each molecule. Each molecule was chosen for its ability to hydrogen bond with water molecules, with increasing concentrations likely to disrupt the structure of surface-bound water layers. With the exception of aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of ethanol, all molecules decreased the ability of confined water to enhance the adhesion between the silica surfaces in excess of the predicted theoretical adhesion due to van der Waals forces. The conclusion was that adhesion depends strongly on the formation of a hydrogen-bonding network within the water layers confined between the silica surfaces.

  12. Convergent fabrication of a nanoporous two-dimensional carbon network from an aldol condensation on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, John; Chérioux, Frédéric; De Santis, Maurizio; Bendiab, Nedjma; Lamare, Simon; Magaud, Laurence; Coraux, Johann

    2014-12-01

    We report a convergent surface polymerization reaction scheme on Au(111), based on a triple aldol condensation, yielding a carbon-rich, covalent nanoporous two-dimensional network. The reaction is not self-poisoning and proceeds up to a full surface coverage. The deposited precursor molecules 1, 3, 5-tri(4’-acetylphenyl) first form supramolecular assemblies that are converted to the porous covalent network upon heating. The formation and structure of the network and of the intermediate steps are studied with scanning tunneling microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory.

  13. Physical Nature of Hydrogen Bond

    CERN Document Server

    Zhyganiuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    The physical nature and the correct definition of hydrogen bond (H-bond) are considered.\\,\\,The influence of H-bonds on the thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic properties of water is analyzed.\\,\\,The conventional model of H-bonds as sharply directed and saturated bridges between water molecules is incompatible with the behavior of the specific volume, evaporation heat, and self-diffusion and kinematic shear viscosity coefficients of water. On the other hand, it is shown that the variation of the dipole moment of a water molecule and the frequency shift of valence vibrations of a hydroxyl group can be totally explained in the framework of the electrostatic model of H-bond.\\,\\,At the same time, the temperature dependences of the heat capacity of water in the liquid and vapor states clearly testify to the existence of weak H-bonds.\\,\\,The analysis of a water dimer shows that the contribution of weak H-bonds to its ground state energy is approximately 4--5 times lower in comparison with the energy of electr...

  14. Synthesis and Structure of a La(Ⅲ)Complex of 1,10-Phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylate: a Three dimensional Network via Hydrogen Bonding Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Qian; XIE Ya-Bo; CHEN Yuan; WANG Dao

    2008-01-01

    A new La(Ⅲ)complex,{[La(L)(NO3)(H2O)3]·H2O}n(L=l,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylate),has been synthesized and structurally determined by X-ray diffraction analysis.The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system,space group P21/c with a=7.7358(17),b=8.1664(18),c=28.271(6)(A),β=95.184(4)°,V=1778.6(7)(A)3,z=4,C14H14LaN3O11,Mr=539.19,Dc=2.014 g/cm3,μ=2.471 mm-1,F(000)=1056,the final R=0.0350 and wR=0.0659.In this complex,each metal center adopts a ten-coordination geometry formed by two N atoms from a ligand L and eight O atoms from three H2O molecules,a nitrate ion and carboxylates of two Hgands.Each ligand adopts a N2,O3-pentdentate coordination mode using two N and two O atoms chelating a La(Ⅲ),and using another O atom of carboxylate to bridge another La(Ⅲ)center resulting in a ID helical chain molecule.Intermolecular strong O-H…O and weak C-H…O hydrogen bonds extend the ID chain structure into a 3D supramolecular architecture.

  15. Hydrogen Bonding to Alkanes: Computational Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Steen; Olesen, Solveig Gaarn

    2009-01-01

    The structural, vibrational, and energetic properties of adducts of alkanes and strong cationic proton donors were studied with composite ab initio calculations. Hydrogen bonding in [D-H+ H-alkyl] adducts contributes to a significant degree to the interactions between the two components, which...... is substantiated by NBO and AIM results. The hydrogen bonds manifest themselves in the same manner as conventional hydrogen bonds, D-H bond elongation, D-H vibrational stretching frequency red shift and intensity increase, and adduct stabilization. The alkane adducts also exhibit elongation of the C-H bonds...

  16. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics-quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen

  17. Exploration and exploitation of homologous series of bis(acrylamidoalkanes containing pyridyl and phenyl groups: β-sheet versus two-dimensional layers in solid-state photochemical [2 + 2] reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Garai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The homologous series of phenyl and pyridyl substituted bis(acrylamidoalkanes have been synthesized with the aim of systematic analysis of their crystal structures and their solid-state [2 + 2] reactivities. The changes in the crystal structures with respect to a small change in the molecular structure, that is by varying alkyl spacers between acrylamides and/or by varying the end groups (phenyl, 2-pyridyl, 3-pyridyl, 4-pyridyl on the C-terminal of the amide, were analyzed in terms of hydrogen-bonding interference (N—H...Npy versus N—H...O=C and network geometries. In this series, a greater tendency towards the formation of N—H...O hydrogen bonds (β-sheets and two-dimensional networks over N—H...N hydrogen bonds was observed. Among all the structures seven structures were found to have the required alignments of double bonds for the [2 + 2] reaction such that the formations of single dimer, double dimer and polymer are facilitated. However, only four structures were found to exhibit such a solid-state [2 + 2] reaction to form a single dimer and polymers. The two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding layer via N—H...O hydrogen bonds was found to promote solid-state [2 + 2] photo-polymerization in a single-crystal-to-single-crystal manner. Such two-dimensional layers were encountered only when the spacer between acryl amide moieties is butyl. Only four out of the 16 derivatives were found to form hydrates, two each from 2-pyridyl and 4-pyridyl derivatives. The water molecules in these structures govern the hydrogen-bonding networks by the formation of an octameric water cluster and one-dimensional zigzag water chains. The trends in the melting points and densities were also analyzed.

  18. An intrinsically disordered photosystem II subunit, PsbO, provides a structural template and a sensor of the hydrogen-bonding network in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offenbacher, Adam R; Polander, Brandon C; Barry, Bridgette A

    2013-10-04

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a membrane-bound enzyme that utilizes solar energy to catalyze the photooxidation of water. Molecular oxygen is evolved after four sequential light-driven oxidation reactions at the Mn4CaO5 oxygen-evolving complex, producing five sequentially oxidized states, Sn. PSII is composed of 17 membrane-spanning subunits and three extrinsic subunits, PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbO. PsbO is intrinsically disordered and plays a role in facilitation of the water oxidizing cycle. Native PsbO can be removed and substituted with recombinant PsbO, thereby restoring steady-state activity. In this report, we used reaction-induced Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to obtain information concerning the role of PsbP, PsbQ, and PsbO during the S state cycle. Light-minus-dark difference spectra were acquired, monitoring structural changes associated with each accessible flash-induced S state transition in a highly purified plant PSII preparation (Triton X-100, octylthioglucoside). A comparison of S2 minus S1 spectra revealed that removal of PsbP and PsbQ had no significant effect on the data, whereas amide frequency and intensity changes were associated with PsbO removal. These data suggest that PsbO acts as an organizational template for the PSII reaction center. To identify any coupled conformational changes arising directly from PsbO, global (13)C-PsbO isotope editing was employed. The reaction-induced Fourier transform infrared spectra of accessible S states provide evidence that PsbO spectral contributions are temperature (263 and 277 K) and S state dependent. These experiments show that PsbO undergoes catalytically relevant structural dynamics, which are coupled over long distance to hydrogen-bonding changes at the Mn4CaO5 cluster.

  19. Interplay of Charge Transfer, Dimensionality, and Amide Hydrogen Bond Network Adaptability in TCNQF 4 Complexes of EDO-TTF-CONH 2 and EDT-TTF-CONH 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudron, Stéphane A.; Mézière, Cécile; Heuzé, Karine; Fourmigué, Marc; Batail, Patrick; Molinié, Philippe; Auban-Senzier, Pascale

    2002-11-01

    [EDO-TTF-CONH 2][TCNQF 4], triclinic system, space group P-1, a=8.2479(12) Å, b=12.282(2) Å, c=12.6842(18) Å, α=113.850(17)°, β=106.420(17)°, γ=90.284(19)°, V=1116.8(4) Å 3; and [EDT-TTF-CONH 2] 2[TCNQF 4], triclinic system, space group P-1, a=6.5858(9) Å, b=11.699(2) Å, c=12.2281(18) Å, α=104.000(19)°, β=93.611(17)°, γ=98.279(19)°, V=899.9(3) Å 3, whose π-donor molecules, (ethylenedioxo)-carbamoyltetrathiafulvalene and (ethylenedithio)-carbamoyltetrathiafulvalene, respectively, differ solely by the nature of the chalcogen atoms in their outer ethylene dichalcogeno bridge, yet form very different charge-transfer complexes with the same π-acceptor. [EDO-TTF-CONH 2•+] 2 [TCNQF 4•-] 2 is a diamagnetic insulating ionic salt with a three-dimensional rock-salt-type structure based on discrete dimers while in the semi-conducting mixed-valence complex, [EDT-TTF-CONH 2] 2•+[TCNQF 4•-], the mixed-valence dimers aggregate into infinite chains interspersed within parallel rows of non-interacting radical anions. It is shown how the robust and adaptable supramolecular amide hydrogen bond tweezers-like motifs common to the two solids simply comply to the 3-to-1 dimensionality reduction upon substitution of O for S.

  20. The influence of boron doped nanodiamonds on hydrogen bonds in suspensions of protic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervald, Alexey M.; Ekimov, Evgeny A.; Kudryavtsev, Oleg S.; Vlasov, Igor I.; Dolenko, Tatiana A.

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the results of study of the influence of BDND on hydrogen bonds of protonic solvents. In addition, the comparative analysis of the interactions of BDND and DND-COOH with solvents molecules was carried out. The analysis of temperature dependences of the quantitative characteristics of the stretching bands of OH groups of the solvents and the suspensions of NDs has shown that the BDND and DND differently weaken the hydrogen bonds in water and in water-ethanol solution with 70 vol. % ethanol content. In water-ethanol solution with 20 vol. % of ethanol the both NDs practically does not change the network of hydrogen bonds.

  1. Tracer particles in two-dimensional elastic networks diffuse logarithmically slow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizana, Ludvig; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Lomholt, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Several experiments on tagged molecules or particles in living systems suggest that they move anomalously slow—their mean squared displacement (MSD) increase slower than linearly with time. Leading models aimed at understanding these experiments predict that the MSD grows as a power law with a growth exponent that is smaller than unity. However, in some experiments the growth is so slow (fitted exponent  ∼0.1–0.2) that they hint towards other mechanisms at play. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate how in-plane collective modes excited by thermal fluctuations in a two dimensional membrane lead to logarithmic time dependence for the the tracer particle’s MSD.

  2. HYDROGEN BONDING IN POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS BASED ADSORPTION AND SEPARATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMancai; SHIZuoqing; 等

    2000-01-01

    After a concise introduction of hydrogen bonding effects in solute-solute and solute-solvent bonding,the design of polymeric adsorbents based on hydrogen bonding ,selectivity in adsorption through hydrogen bonding,and characterization of hydrogen bonding in adsorption and separation were reviewed with 28 references.

  3. Evidences for Cooperative Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonds in Protein Secondary Structure Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Deng, Geng; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Xu, Jing; Ashraf, Hamad; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2016-11-01

    Cooperative behaviors of the hydrogen bonding networks in proteins have been discovered for a long time. The structural origin of this cooperativity, however, is still under debate. Here we report a new investigation combining excess infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculation on peptide analogs, represented by N-methylformamide (NMF) and N-methylacetamide (NMA). Interestingly, addition of the strong hydrogen bond acceptor, dimethyl sulfoxide, to the pure analogs caused opposite effects, namely red- and blue-shift of the N-H stretching infrared absorption in NMF and NMA, respectively. The contradiction can be reconciled by the marked lowering of the energy levels of the self-associates between NMA molecules due to a cooperative effect of the hydrogen bonds. On the contrary, NMF molecules cannot form long-chain cooperative hydrogen bonds because they tend to form dimers. Even more interestingly, we found excellent linear relationships between changes on bond orders of N-H/N-C/C = O and the hydrogen bond energy gains upon the formation of hydrogen bonding multimers in NMA, suggesting strongly that the cooperativity originates from resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds. Our findings provide insights on the structures of proteins and may also shed lights on the rational design of novel molecular recognition systems.

  4. NMR properties of hydrogen-bonded glycine cluster in gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Jorge R.; da Silva, Arnaldo Machado; Ghosh, Angsula; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab

    2016-11-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the effect of the hydrogen bond formation on the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) parameters of hydrogen-bonded clusters of glycine molecules in gas-phase. DFT predicted isotropic chemical shifts of H, C, N and O of the isolated glycine with respect to standard reference materials are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The variations of isotropic and anisotropic chemical shifts for all atoms constituting these clusters containing up to four glycine molecules have been investigated systematically employing gradient corrected hybrid B3LYP functional with three different types of extended basis sets. The clusters are mainly stabilized by a network of strong hydrogen bonds among the carboxylic (COOH) groups of glycine monomers. The formation of hydrogen bond influences the molecular structure of the clusters significantly which, on the other hand, gets reflected in the variations of NMR properties. The carbon (C) atom of the sbnd COOH group, the bridging hydrogen (H) and the proton-donor oxygen (O) atom of the Osbnd H bond suffer downfield shift due to the formation of hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bond lengths and the structural complexity of the clusters are found to vary with the number of participating monomers. A direct correlation between the hydrogen bond length and isotropic chemical shift of the bridging hydrogen is observed in all cases. The individual variations of the principal axis elements in chemical shift tensor provide additional insight about the different nature of the monomers within the cluster.

  5. Percolative behavior of an anisotropic two-dimensional network:Growth of tellurium onto an oriented polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, T.; Martínez-Salazar, J.; Herrero, P.; Petermann, J.

    1997-01-01

    In situ transport measurements during the growth of a thin layer of thermally evaporated tellurium onto an oriented polymer film are presented. The system, which resembles the characteristics of a two-dimensional anisotropic network, is analyzed in terms of the current percolation theory. Parameters such as the percolation threshold and the critical exponents are calculated for the perpendicular and the parallel orientation. Within the limits of the experiments the values of t∥ and t⊥ are estimated to be 1.15 and 1.46, respectively.

  6. Stabilization of quinapril by incorporating hydrogen bonding interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study stability of various known solvates of quinapril hydrochloride has been compared with nitromethane solvate. Nitromethane solvate was found to be more stable compared to other known solvates. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of quinapril nitromethane solvate shows intermolecular hydrogen bonding between quinapril molecule and nitromethane. Stabilization of quinapril by forming strong hydrogen bonding network as in case of co-crystals was further studied by forming co-crystal with tris(hydroxymethylamino methane. Quinapril free base forms a stable salt with tris(hydroxymethylamino methane not reported earlier. Quinapril tris(hydroxymethylamino methane salt found to be stable even at 80° for 72 h i.e. hardly any formation of diketopiperazine and diacid impurity. As expected single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals tris(hydroxymethylamino methane salt of quinapril shows complex hydrogen bonding network between the two entities along with ionic bond. The properties of this stable salt - stable in solid as well as solution phase, might lead to an alternate highly stable formulation.

  7. Two Dimensional Array Based Overlay Network for Balancing Load of Peer-to-Peer Live Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruq Ibn Ibrahimy, Abdullah; Rafiqul, Islam Md; Anwar, Farhat; Ibn Ibrahimy, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    The live video data is streaming usually in a tree-based overlay network or in a mesh-based overlay network. In case of departure of a peer with additional upload bandwidth, the overlay network becomes very vulnerable to churn. In this paper, a two dimensional array-based overlay network is proposed for streaming the live video stream data. As there is always a peer or a live video streaming server to upload the live video stream data, so the overlay network is very stable and very robust to churn. Peers are placed according to their upload and download bandwidth, which enhances the balance of load and performance. The overlay network utilizes the additional upload bandwidth of peers to minimize chunk delivery delay and to maximize balance of load. The procedure, which is used for distributing the additional upload bandwidth of the peers, distributes the additional upload bandwidth to the heterogeneous strength peers in a fair treat distribution approach and to the homogeneous strength peers in a uniform distribution approach. The proposed overlay network has been simulated by Qualnet from Scalable Network Technologies and results are presented in this paper.

  8. Information Transmission and Anderson Localization in two-dimensional networks of firing-rate neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Joseph; Hentschel, George

    Firing-rate networks offer a coarse model of signal propagation in the brain. Here we analyze sparse, 2D planar firing-rate networks with no synapses beyond a certain cutoff distance. Additionally, we impose Dale's Principle to ensure that each neuron makes only or inhibitory outgoing connections. Using spectral methods, we find that the number of neurons participating in excitations of the network becomes insignificant whenever the connectivity cutoff is tuned to a value near or below the average interneuron separation. Further, neural activations exceeding a certain threshold stay confined to a small region of space. This behavior is an instance of Anderson localization, a disorder-induced phase transition by which an information channel is rendered unable to transmit signals. We discuss several potential implications of localization for both local and long-range computation in the brain. This work was supported in part by Grants JSMF/ 220020321 and NSF/IOS/1208126.

  9. Synthetic gauge field and pseudospin-orbit interaction in a stacked two-dimensional ring network lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic gauge field and pseudospin-orbit interaction are implemented in the stacked two-dimensional ring network model proposed by the present author. The model was introduced to simulate light propagation in the corresponding ring-resonator network, and is thus completely bosonic. Without these two items, the system exhibits Floquet-Weyl and Floquet-topological-insulator phases with topologically gapless and gapped band structures, respectively. The synthetic magnetic field implemented in the model results in a three-dimensional Hofstadter-butterfly-type spectrum in a photonic platform. The resulting gaps are characterization by the winding number of relevant S-matrices together with the Chern number of the bulk bands. The pseudospin-orbit interaction is defined as the mixing term between two pseudospin degrees of freedom in the rings, namely, the clockwise and counter-clockwise modes in the rings. It destroys the Floquet-topological-insulator phases, while the Floquet-Weyl phase with multiple Weyl points ...

  10. A new family of two-dimensional triple-codeweight asymmetric optical orthogonal code for OCDMA networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongxi Yin; Wei Liang; Le Ma; Liqiao Qin

    2009-01-01

    A new generation algorithm of two-dimensional triple-codeweight asymmetric optical orthogonal codes for optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) networks is proposed. The code cardinality is obtained and the error-probability performance for corresponding OCDMA system is analyzed. The codes with two constraints (i.e., auto- and cross-correlation properties) being unequal are taken into account. On the premise of fixed system resources, the code cardinality can be significantly improved. By analysis of the error-probability performance, it is shown that the codes with different parameters have different performances. Therefore, this type of codes can be applied to support diverse quality of service (QoS) and satisfy the quality requirement of different multimedia or distinct users, and simultaneously make the better use of bandwidth resources in optical networks.

  11. Hydrogen bonding and multiphonon structure in copper pyrazine coordination polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S; Cao, J; Musfeldt, J L; Conner, M M; McConnell, A C; Southerland, H I; Manson, J L; Schlueter, J A; Phillips, M D; Turnbull, M M; Landee, C P

    2007-10-15

    We report a systematic investigation of the temperature-dependent infrared vibrational spectra of a family of chemically related coordination polymer magnets based upon bridging bifluoride (HF(2)-) and terminal fluoride (F-) ligands in copper pyrazine complexes including Cu(HF(2))(pyz)(2)BF(4), Cu(HF(2))(pyz)(2)ClO(4), and CuF(2)(H(2)O)(2)(pyz). We compare our results with several one- and two-dimensional prototype materials including Cu(pyz)(NO(3))(2) and Cu(pyz)(2)(ClO(4))(2). Unusual low-temperature hydrogen bonding, local structural transitions associated with stronger low-temperature hydrogen bonding, and striking multiphonon effects that derive from coupling of an infrared-active fundamental with strong Raman-active modes of the pyrazine building-block molecule are observed. On the basis of the spectroscopic evidence, these interactions are ubiquitous to this family of coordination polymers and may work to stabilize long-range magnetic ordering at low temperature. Similar interactions are likely to be present in other molecule-based magnets.

  12. Ensemble Distribution for Immiscible Two-Phase Flow in Two-Dimensional Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Savani, Isha; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vassvik, Morten; Sinha, Santanu; Hansen, Alex

    2016-01-01

    An ensemble distribution has been constructed to describe steady immiscible two-phase flow of two incompressible fluids in a network. The system is ergodic. The distribution relates the time that a bubble of the non-wetting fluid spends in a link to the local volume flow. The properties of the ensemble distribution are tested by two-phase flow simulations at the pore-scale for capillary numbers ranging from 0.1 to 0.001. It is shown that the distribution follows the postulated dependence on the local flow for Ca = 0.01 and 0.001. The distribution is used to compute the global flow performance of the network. In particular, we find the expression for the overall mobility of the system using the ensemble distribution. The entropy production at the scale of the network is shown to give the expected product of the average flow and its driving force, obtained from a black-box description. The distribution can be used to obtain macroscopic variables from local network information, for a practical range of capillary...

  13. Optimising hydrogen bonding in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2009-01-01

    The chemical bonds of wood are both covalent bonds within the wood polymers and hydrogen bonds within and between the polymers. Both types of bonds are responsible for the coherence, strength and stiffness of the material. The hydrogen bonds are more easily modified by changes in load, moisture...... and temperature. The distribution of bond lengths was examined using infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) both prior to treatments and after. The results show that the absorbance bands of the spectra related to the hydroxyl and carboxyl stretching vibrations were changed by the treatments. Apparently, the first...

  14. Curvature-induced cross-hatched order in two-dimensional semiflexible polymer networks

    CERN Document Server

    Vrusch, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    A recurring motif in the organization of biological tissues are networks of long, fibrillar protein strands effectively confined to cylindrical surfaces. Often, the fibers in such curved, quasi-2D geometries adopt a characteristic order: the fibers wrap around the central axis at an angle which varies with radius and, in several cases, is strongly bimodally distributed. In this Letter, we investigate the general problem of a 2D crosslinked network of semiflexible fibers confined to a cylindrical substrate, and demonstrate that in such systems the trade-off between bending and stretching energies, very generically, gives rise to cross-hatched order. We discuss its general dependency on the radius of the confining cylinder, and present an intuitive model that illustrates the basic physical principle of curvature-induced order. Our findings shed new light on the potential origin of some curiously universal fiber orientational distributions in tissue biology, and suggests novel ways in which synthetic polymeric s...

  15. Facial Expression Classification Based on Multi Artificial Neural Network and Two Dimensional Principal Component Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Thai; Tran, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Facial expression classification is a kind of image classification and it has received much attention, in recent years. There are many approaches to solve these problems with aiming to increase efficient classification. One of famous suggestions is described as first step, project image to different spaces; second step, in each of these spaces, images are classified into responsive class and the last step, combine the above classified results into the final result. The advantages of this approach are to reflect fulfill and multiform of image classified. In this paper, we use 2D-PCA and its variants to project the pattern or image into different spaces with different grouping strategies. Then we develop a model which combines many Neural Networks applied for the last step. This model evaluates the reliability of each space and gives the final classification conclusion. Our model links many Neural Networks together, so we call it Multi Artificial Neural Network (MANN). We apply our proposal model for 6 basic fa...

  16. A Study on Group Key Agreement in Sensor Network Environments Using Two-Dimensional Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Seog Jun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available These days, with the emergence of the concept of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks that collect, analyze and process all the information through the sensors have become of huge interest. However, sensor network technology fundamentally has wireless communication infrastructure as its foundation and thus has security weakness and limitations such as low computing capacity, power supply limitations and price. In this paper, and considering the characteristics of the sensor network environment, we propose a group key agreement method using a keyset pre-distribution of two-dimension arrays that should minimize the exposure of key and personal information. The key collision problems are resolved by utilizing a polygonal shape’s center of gravity. The method shows that calculating a polygonal shape’s center of gravity only requires a very small amount of calculations from the users. The simple calculation not only increases the group key generation efficiency, but also enhances the sense of security by protecting information between nodes.

  17. Change in hydrogen bonding structures of a hydrogel with dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naohara, Ryo; Narita, Kentaro; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of structural changes in polymer network and water during dehydration, X-ray diffraction of poly-N,N-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels was measured. The variation process in the individual structures of water and PDMAA were analyzed by decomposition of the diffraction patterns to separate the respective contributions. The results show that the short-range structures of PDMAA expand during dehydration, whereas the network structure as a whole shrinks. The average length of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules increases with the process. The present results provide a direct evidence of the structural changes of water and polymer in the hydrogel during dehydration.

  18. BIFURCATION IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL NEURAL NETWORK MODEL WITH DELAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Jun-jie; ZHANG Chun-rui; LI Xiu-ling

    2005-01-01

    A kind of 2-dimensional neural network model with delay is considered. By analyzing the distribution of the roots of the characteristic equation associated with the model, a bifurcation diagram was drawn in an appropriate parameter plane. It is found that a line is a pitchfork bifurcation curve. Further more, the stability of each fixed point and existence of Hopf bifurcation were obtained. Finally, the direction of the Hopf bifurcation and the stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions were determined by using the normal form method and centre manifold theory.

  19. The copper(II) and zinc(II) coordination mode of HExxH and HxxEH motif in small peptides: the role of carboxylate location and hydrogen bonding network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Magrì, Antonio; Bellia, Francesco; Pietropaolo, Adriana; La Mendola, Diego; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with two hexapeptides encompassing HExxH and HxxEH motif were characterized by means of a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Parallel tempering and density functional theory (DFT) investigations show the presence of different hydrogen bonding networks between the copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with the two peptides, suggesting a significant contribution of these non-covalent interactions to the stability constant values. The glutamate carboxylate group has a direct role in metal ion binding. The location of this amino acid along the sequence of the investigated peptides is critical to determine thermodynamic and spectroscopic features of the copper(II) complex species, whereas is less relevant in the zinc(II) complexes formation. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) characterization of the zinc(II) complex species show that in the [ZnH-2L] two deprotonated amide nitrogen atoms are involved in the metal coordination environment, an uncommon behavior in zinc(II) complexes for multi-histidine ligands.

  20. Two-dimensional magnetic modeling of ferromagnetic materials by using a neural networks based hybrid approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A. [Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, Via G. Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia (Italy); Laudani, A.; Lozito, G.M.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A. [Department of Engineering, Roma Tre University, Via V. Volterra 62, 00146 Rome (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a hybrid neural network approach to model magnetic hysteresis at macro-magnetic scale. That approach aims to be coupled together with numerical treatments of magnetic hysteresis such as FEM numerical solvers of the Maxwell's equations in time domain, as in case of the non-linear dynamic analysis of electrical machines, and other similar devices, allowing a complete computer simulation with acceptable run times. The proposed Hybrid Neural System consists of four inputs representing the magnetic induction and magnetic field components at each time step and it is trained by 2D and scalar measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. The magnetic induction B is assumed as entry point and the output of the Hybrid Neural System returns the predicted value of the field H at the same time step. Within the Hybrid Neural System, a suitably trained neural network is used for predicting the hysteretic behavior of the material to be modeled. Validations with experimental tests and simulations for symmetric, non-symmetric and minor loops are presented.

  1. Application of approximate pattern matching in two dimensional spaces to grid layout for biochemical network maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Inoue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For visualizing large-scale biochemical network maps, it is important to calculate the coordinates of molecular nodes quickly and to enhance the understanding or traceability of them. The grid layout is effective in drawing compact, orderly, balanced network maps with node label spaces, but existing grid layout algorithms often require a high computational cost because they have to consider complicated positional constraints through the entire optimization process. RESULTS: We propose a hybrid grid layout algorithm that consists of a non-grid, fast layout (preprocessor algorithm and an approximate pattern matching algorithm that distributes the resultant preprocessed nodes on square grid points. To demonstrate the feasibility of the hybrid layout algorithm, it is characterized in terms of the calculation time, numbers of edge-edge and node-edge crossings, relative edge lengths, and F-measures. The proposed algorithm achieves outstanding performances compared with other existing grid layouts. CONCLUSIONS: Use of an approximate pattern matching algorithm quickly redistributes the laid-out nodes by fast, non-grid algorithms on the square grid points, while preserving the topological relationships among the nodes. The proposed algorithm is a novel use of the pattern matching, thereby providing a breakthrough for grid layout. This application program can be freely downloaded from http://www.cadlive.jp/hybridlayout/hybridlayout.html.

  2. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  3. Intramolecular versus intermolecular hydrogen bonding in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Kroon, Jan; Kroon-Batenburg, L.M.J.; Leeflang, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    The balance between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding is studied for a solution of methyl beta-cellobioside in water and dimethylsulfoxide by 1H NMR and molecular dynamics simulations. In water O(3) predominantly interacts with water molecules, whereas in dimethylsulfoxide it is

  4. Analysis of Hydrogen Bonds in Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir J. Grabowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The determination of crystal structures provides important information on the geometry of species constituting crystals and on the symmetry relations between them. Additionally, the analysis of crystal structures is so conclusive that it allows us to understand the nature of various interactions. The hydrogen bond interaction plays a crucial role in crystal engineering and, in general, its important role in numerous chemical, physical and bio-chemical processes was the subject of various studies. That is why numerous important findings on the nature of hydrogen bonds concern crystal structures. This special issue presents studies on hydrogen bonds in crystals, and specific compounds and specific H-bonded patterns existing in crystals are analyzed. However, the characteristics of the H-bond interactions are not only analyzed theoretically; this interaction is compared with other ones that steer the arrangement of molecules in crystals, for example halogen, tetrel or pnicogen bonds. More general findings concerning the influence of the hydrogen bond on the physicochemical properties of matter are also presented.

  5. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Bernd; Mohr, Peter; Stahl, Martin

    2010-03-25

    The formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds has a very pronounced effect on molecular structure and properties. We study both aspects in detail with the aim of enabling a more rational use of this class of interactions in medicinal chemistry. On the basis of exhaustive searches in crystal structure databases, we derive propensities for intramolecular hydrogen bond formation of five- to eight-membered ring systems of relevance in drug discovery. A number of motifs, several of which are clearly underutilized in drug discovery, are analyzed in more detail by comparing small molecule and protein-ligand X-ray structures. To investigate effects on physicochemical properties, sets of closely related structures with and without the ability to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds were designed, synthesized, and characterized with respect to membrane permeability, water solubility, and lipophilicity. We find that changes in these properties depend on a subtle balance between the strength of the hydrogen bond interaction, geometry of the newly formed ring system, and the relative energies of the open and closed conformations in polar and unpolar environments. A number of general guidelines for medicinal chemists emerge from this study.

  6. On the nature of blueshifting hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Wang, Changwei; Guan, Liangyu; Braïda, Benoît; Hiberty, Philippe C; Wu, Wei

    2014-07-01

    The block-localized wave function (BLW) method can derive the energetic, geometrical, and spectral changes with the deactivation of electron delocalization, and thus provide a unique way to elucidate the origin of improper, blueshifting hydrogen bonds versus proper, redshifting hydrogen bonds. A detailed analysis of the interactions of F(3)CH with NH(3) and OH(2) shows that blueshifting is a long-range phenomenon. Since among the various energy components contributing to hydrogen bonds, only the electrostatic interaction has long-range characteristics, we conclude that the contraction and blueshifting of a hydrogen bond is largely caused by electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, lengthening and redshifting is primarily due to the short-range n(Y)→σ*(X-H) hyperconjugation. The competition between these two opposing factors determines the final frequency change direction, for example, redshifting in F(3)CH⋅⋅⋅NH(3) and blueshifting in F(3)CH⋅⋅⋅OH(2). This mechanism works well in the series F(n)Cl(3)-n CH⋅⋅⋅Y (n=0-3, Y=NH(3), OH(2), SH(2)) and other systems. One exception is the complex of water and benzene. We observe the lengthening and redshifting of the O-H bond of water even with the electron transfer between benzene and water completely quenched. A distance-dependent analysis for this system reveals that the long-range electrostatic interaction is again responsible for the initial lengthening and redshifting.

  7. Floquet-Weyl and Floquet-topological-insulator phases in a stacked two-dimensional ring-network lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We show the presence of Floquet-Weyl and Floquet-topological-insulator phases in a stacked two-dimensional ring-network lattice. The Weyl points in the three-dimensional Brillouin zone and Fermi-arc surface states are clearly demonstrated in the quasienergy spectrum of the system in the Weyl phase. In addition, chiral surface states coexist in this phase. The Floquet-topological-insulator phase is characterized by the winding number of two in the reflection matrices of the semi-infinite system and resulting two gapless surface states in the quasienergy g ap of the bulk. The phase diagram of the system is derived in the two-parameter space of hopping S-matrices among the rings. We also discuss a possible optical realization of the system together with the introduction of synthetic gauge fields.

  8. CS²-Collector: A New Approach for Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Two-Dimensional Compressive Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Zhuoshi; Zhang, Jianpei; Li, Feng; Wen, Hongkai; Shen, Yiran

    2016-08-19

    In this paper, we consider the problem of reconstructing the temporal and spatial profile of some physical phenomena monitored by large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an energy efficient manner. Compressive sensing is one of the popular choices to reduce the energy consumption of the data collection in WSNs. The existing solutions only consider sparsity of sensors' data from either temporal or spatial dimensions. In this paper, we propose a novel data collection strategy, CS²-collector, for WSNs based on the theory of Two Dimensional Compressive Sensing (2DCS). It exploits both temporal and spatial sparsity, i.e., 2D-sparsity of WSNs and achieves significant gain on the tradeoff between the compression ratio and reconstruction accuracy as the numerical simulations and evaluations on different types of sensors' data. More intuitively, with the same given energy budget, CS²-collector provides significantly more accurate reconstruction of the profile of the physical phenomena that are temporal-spatially sparse.

  9. Floquet-Weyl and Floquet-topological-insulator phases in a stacked two-dimensional ring-network lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2016-10-01

    We show the presence of Floquet-Weyl and Floquet-topological-insulator phases in a stacked two-dimensional ring-network lattice. The Weyl points in the three-dimensional Brillouin zone and Fermi-arc surface states are clearly demonstrated in the quasienergy spectrum of the system in the Floquet-Weyl phase. In addition, chiral surface states coexist in this phase. The Floquet-topological-insulator phase is characterized by the winding number of two in the reflection matrices of the semi-infinite system and resulting two gapless surface states in the quasienergy gap of the bulk. The phase diagram of the system is derived in the two-parameter space of hopping S-matrices among the rings. We also discuss a possible optical realization of the system together with the introduction of synthetic gauge fields.

  10. Two-dimensional shape classification using generalized Fourier representation and neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Artur; Gustavsson, Tomas; Mattsson, Ulf

    2000-04-01

    A shape-based classification method is developed based upon the Generalized Fourier Representation (GFR). GFR can be regarded as an extension of traditional polar Fourier descriptors, suitable for description of closed objects, both convex and concave, with or without holes. Explicit relations of GFR coefficients to regular moments, moment invariants and affine moment invariants are given in the paper. The dual linear relation between GFR coefficients and regular moments was used to compare shape features derive from GFR descriptors and Hu's moment invariants. the GFR was then applied to a clinical problem within oral medicine and used to represent the contours of the lesions in the oral cavity. The lesions studied were leukoplakia and different forms of lichenoid reactions. Shape features were extracted from GFR coefficients in order to classify potentially cancerous oral lesions. Alternative classifiers were investigated based on a multilayer perceptron with different architectures and extensions. The overall classification accuracy for recognition of potentially cancerous oral lesions when using neural network classifier was 85%, while the classification between leukoplakia and reticular lichenoid reactions gave 96% (5-fold cross-validated) recognition rate.

  11. Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics Study on Proton Dynamics of Strong Hydrogen Bonds in Aspirin Crystals, with Emphasis on Differences between Two Crystal Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brela, Mateusz Z; Wójcik, Marek J; Witek, Łukasz J; Boczar, Marek; Wrona, Ewa; Hashim, Rauzah; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-04-28

    In this study, the proton dynamics of hydrogen bonds for two forms of crystalline aspirin was investigated by the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) method. Analysis of the geometrical parameters of hydrogen bonds using BOMD reveals significant differences in hydrogen bonding between the two crystalline forms of aspirin, Form I and Form II. Analysis of the trajectory for Form I shows spontaneous proton transfer in cyclic dimers, which is absent in Form II. Quantization of the O-H stretching modes allows a detailed discussion on the strength of hydrogen-bonding interactions. The focal point of our study is examination of the hydrogen bond characteristics in the crystal structure and clarification of the influence of hydrogen bonding on the presence of the two crystalline forms of aspirin. In the BOMD method, thermal motions were taken into account. Solving the Schrödinger equation for the snapshots of 2D proton potentials, extracted from MD, gives the best agreement with IR spectra. The character of medium-strong hydrogen bonds in Form I of aspirin was compared with that of weaker hydrogen bonds in aspirin Form II. Two proton minima are present in the potential function for the hydrogen bonds in Form I. The band contours, calculated by using one- and two-dimensional O-H quantization, reflect the differences in the hydrogen bond strengths between the two crystalline forms of aspirin, as well as the strong hydrogen bonding in the cyclic dimers of Form I and the medium-strong hydrogen bonding in Form II.

  12. 3D Supramolecular Network Based on Hydrogen Bonds Between 1D [ Ni(μ2 -C2O4 ) (Him) 2 ] Zigzag Chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; HUANG Ru-dan; ZHU Qin-lei; HU Chang-wen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Introduction In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to supramolecular networks based on metal organic building blocks because of their potential applications in diverse fields, such as, catalysis, optics, sensors,magnetism, and molecular recognition[1-3]. On the basis of the principles of crystal engineering and special synthesis strategies, several novel supramolecular frameworks have been assembled from various organic,inorganic and metal-organic moieties, which largely enriches the structure chemistry of solid state materials[4-9].

  13. Estimates of the statistical two-dimensional spatial structure in rain over a small network of disdrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, A. R.; Larsen, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    Microphysical understanding of the variability in rain requires a statistical characterization of different drop sizes both in time and in all dimensions of space. Temporally, there have been several statistical characterizations of raindrop counts. However, temporal and spatial structures are neither equivalent nor readily translatable. While there are recent reports of the one-dimensional spatial correlation functions in rain, they can only be assumed to represent the two-dimensional (2D) correlation function under the assumption of spatial isotropy. To date, however, there are no actual observations of the (2D) spatial correlation function in rain over areas. Two reasons for this deficiency are the fiscal and the physical impossibilities of assembling a dense network of instruments over even hundreds of meters much less over kilometers. Consequently, all measurements over areas will necessarily be sparsely sampled. A dense network of data must then be estimated using interpolations from the available observations. In this work, a network of 19 optical disdrometers over a 100 m by 71 m area yield observations of drop spectra every minute. These are then interpolated to a 1 m resolution grid. Fourier techniques then yield estimates of the 2D spatial correlation functions. Preliminary examples using this technique found that steadier, light rain decorrelates spatially faster than does the convective rain, but in both cases the 2D spatial correlation functions are anisotropic, reflecting an asymmetry in the physical processes influencing the rain reaching the ground not accounted for in numerical microphysical models.

  14. Two-Dimensional FTIR as a Tool to Study the Chemical Interactions within Cellulose-Ionic Liquid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyani Kathirgamanathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study two-dimensional FTIR analysis was applied to understand the temperature effects on processing cellulose solutions in imidazolium-based ionic liquids. Analysis of the imidazolium ion νC2–H peak revealed hydrogen bonding within cellulose solutions to be dynamic on heating and cooling. The extent of hydrogen bonding was stronger on heating, consistent with greater ion mobility at higher temperature when the ionic liquid network structure is broken. At ambient temperatures a blue shifted νC2–H peak was indicative of greater cation-anion interactions, consistent with the ionic liquid network structure. Both cellulose and water further impact the extent of hydrogen bonding in these solutions. The FTIR spectral changes appeared gradual with temperature and contrast shear induced rheology changes which were observed on heating above 70°C and cooling below 40°C. The influence of cellulose on solution viscosity was not distinguished on initial heating as the ionic liquid network structure dominates rheology behaviour. On cooling, the quantity of cellulose has a greater influence on solution rheology. Outcomes suggest processing cellulose in ionic liquids above 40°C and to reduce the impacts of cation-anion effects and enhance solubilisation, processing should be done at 70°C.

  15. Conduction in rectangular quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional random resistor networks away from the percolation threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Thomas; Villanueva, Guillermo; Brugger, Jürgen

    2009-08-01

    In this study we investigate electrical conduction in finite rectangular random resistor networks in quasione and two dimensions far away from the percolation threshold p(c) by the use of a bond percolation model. Various topologies such as parallel linear chains in one dimension, as well as square and triangular lattices in two dimensions, are compared as a function of the geometrical aspect ratio. In particular we propose a linear approximation for conduction in two-dimensional systems far from p(c), which is useful for engineering purposes. We find that the same scaling function, which can be used for finite-size scaling of percolation thresholds, also applies to describe conduction away from p(c). This is in contrast to the quasi-one-dimensional case, which is highly nonlinear. The qualitative analysis of the range within which the linear approximation is legitimate is given. A brief link to real applications is made by taking into account a statistical distribution of the resistors in the network. Our results are of potential interest in fields such as nanostructured or composite materials and sensing applications.

  16. Chiral benzimidazoles as hydrogen bonding organocatalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Nájera Domingo, Carmen; Yus Astiz, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Several bifunctional organocatalysts bearing the benzimidazole unit have been designed in order to act as bifunctional systems by hydrogen bonding. Chiral 2-aminobenzimidazoles are conformational rigid guanidines able to catalyze enantioselectively Michael reaction, direct SN1 of alcohols, and aldol reactions. Some of these organocatalysts can be easily recovered by simple isolation methods and reused without loss of catalytic activity. Related (2-aminoalkyl)benzimidazoles have been used as c...

  17. Hydrogen bonds in PC61BM solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chun-Qi; Li, Wen-Jie; Du, Ying-Ying; Chen, Guang-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the hydrogen bonds in PC61BM solids. Inter-molecular interaction is analyzed theoretically for the well-defined monoclinic (P21/n) structure. The results indicate that PC61BM combines into C-H⋯Od bonded molecular chains, where Od denotes the doubly-bonded O atom of PC61BM. The molecular chains are linked together by C-H⋯Os bonds, where Os denotes the singly-bonded O atom of PC61BM. To reveal the consequences of hydrogen bond formation on the structural properties of PC61BM solids (not limited to the monoclinic structure), we design and perform some experiments for annealed samples with the monoclinic (P21/n) PC61BM as starting material. The experiments include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption measurements. Structural phase transitions are observed below the melting point. The C-H⋯Od bonds seem persisting in the altered structures. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonds can help to understand the phase separation in polymer/PC61BM blends and may be responsible for the existence of liquid PC61BM.

  18. Determining hydrogen-bond interactions in spider silk with 1H-13C HETCOR fast MAS solid-state NMR and DFT proton chemical shift calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Gregory P; Mou, Qiushi; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-07-28

    Two-dimensional (2D) (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) solid-state NMR spectra collected with fast magic angle spinning (MAS) are used in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) proton chemical shift calculations to determine the hydrogen-bonding strength for ordered β-sheet and disordered 310-helical structures in spider dragline silk. The hydrogen-bond strength is determined to be identical for both structures in spider silk with a 1.83-1.84 Å NH···OC hydrogen-bond distance.

  19. AAA-DDD triple hydrogen bond complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blight, Barry A; Camara-Campos, Amaya; Djurdjevic, Smilja; Kaller, Martin; Leigh, David A; McMillan, Fiona M; McNab, Hamish; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-10-01

    Experiment and theory both suggest that the AAA-DDD pattern of hydrogen bond acceptors (A) and donors (D) is the arrangement of three contiguous hydrogen bonding centers that results in the strongest association between two species. Murray and Zimmerman prepared the first example of such a system (complex 3*2) and determined the lower limit of its association constant (K(a)) in CDCl(3) to be 10(5) M(-1) by (1)H NMR spectroscopy (Murray, T. J. and Zimmerman, S. C. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1992, 114, 4010-4011). The first cationic AAA-DDD pair (3*4(+)) was described by Bell and Anslyn (Bell, D. A. and Anslyn, E. A. Tetrahedron 1995, 51, 7161-7172), with a K(a) > 5 x 10(5) M(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2) as determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. We were recently able to quantify the strength of a neutral AAA-DDD arrangement using a more chemically stable AAA-DDD system, 6*2, which has an association constant of 2 x 10(7) M(-1) in CH(2)Cl(2) (Djurdjevic, S., Leigh, D. A., McNab, H., Parsons, S., Teobaldi, G. and Zerbetto, F. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 476-477). Here we report on further AA(A) and DDD partners, together with the first precise measurement of the association constant of a cationic AAA-DDD species. Complex 6*10(+)[B(3,5-(CF(3))(2)C(6)H(3))(4)(-)] has a K(a) = 3 x 10(10) M(-1) at RT in CH(2)Cl(2), by far the most strongly bound triple hydrogen bonded system measured to date. The X-ray crystal structure of 6*10(+) with a BPh(4)(-) counteranion shows a planar array of three short (NH...N distances 1.95-2.15 A), parallel (but staggered rather than strictly linear; N-H...N angles 165.4-168.8 degrees), primary hydrogen bonds. These are apparently reinforced, as theory predicts, by close electrostatic interactions (NH-*-N distances 2.78-3.29 A) between each proton and the acceptor atoms of the adjacent primary hydrogen bonds.

  20. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding Involving Organic Fluorine: NMR Investigations Corroborated by DFT-Based Theoretical Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Mishra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The combined utility of many one and two dimensional NMR methodologies and DFT-based theoretical calculations have been exploited to detect the intramolecular hydrogen bond (HB in number of different organic fluorine-containing derivatives of molecules, viz. benzanilides, hydrazides, imides, benzamides, and diphenyloxamides. The existence of two and three centered hydrogen bonds has been convincingly established in the investigated molecules. The NMR spectral parameters, viz., coupling mediated through hydrogen bond, one-bond NH scalar couplings, physical parameter dependent variation of chemical shifts of NH protons have paved the way for understanding the presence of hydrogen bond involving organic fluorine in all the investigated molecules. The experimental NMR findings are further corroborated by DFT-based theoretical calculations including NCI, QTAIM, MD simulations and NBO analysis. The monitoring of H/D exchange with NMR spectroscopy established the effect of intramolecular HB and the influence of electronegativity of various substituents on the chemical kinetics in the number of organic building blocks. The utility of DQ-SQ technique in determining the information about HB in various fluorine substituted molecules has been convincingly established.

  1. Discrete kink dynamics in hydrogen-bonded chains: The one-component model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpan, V. M.; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2002-01-01

    We study topological solitary waves (kinks and antikinks) in a nonlinear one-dimensional Klein-Gordon chain with the on-site potential of a double-Morse type. This chain is used to describe the collective proton dynamics in quasi-one-dimensional networks of hydrogen bonds, where the on-site poten......We study topological solitary waves (kinks and antikinks) in a nonlinear one-dimensional Klein-Gordon chain with the on-site potential of a double-Morse type. This chain is used to describe the collective proton dynamics in quasi-one-dimensional networks of hydrogen bonds, where the on...

  2. Insights into hydrogen bonding via ice interfaces and isolated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Bisson, Patrick; Vu, Tuan Hoang

    2014-11-01

    Water in a confined environment has a combination of fewer available configurations and restricted mobility. Both affect the spectroscopic signature. In this work, the spectroscopic signature of water in confined environments is discussed in the context of competing models for condensed water: (1) as a system of intramolecular coupled molecules or (2) as a network with intermolecular dipole-dipole coupled O-H stretches. Two distinct environments are used: the confined asymmetric environment at the ice surface and the near-isolated environment of water in an infrared transparent matrix. Both the spectroscopy and the environment are described followed by a perspective discussion of implications for the two competing models. Despite being a small molecule, water is relatively complex; perhaps not surprisingly the results support a model that blends inter- and intramolecular coupling. The frequency, and therefore the hydrogen-bond strength, appears to be a function of donor-acceptor interaction and of longer-range dipole-dipole alignment in the hydrogen-bonded network. The O-H dipole direction depends on the local environment and reflects intramolecular O-H stretch coupling.

  3. A two-dimensional flow sensor with integrated micro thermal sensing elements and a back propagation neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2013-12-31

    This paper demonstrates a novel flow sensor with two-dimensional 360° direction sensitivity achieved with a simple structure and a novel data fusion algorithm. Four sensing elements with roundabout wires distributed in four quadrants of a circle compose the sensor probe, and work in constant temperature difference (CTD) mode as both Joule heaters and temperature detectors. The magnitude and direction of a fluid flow are measured by detecting flow-induced temperature differences among the four elements. The probe is made of Ti/Au thin-film with a diameter of 2 mm, and is fabricated using micromachining techniques. When a flow goes through the sensor, the flow-induced temperature differences are detected by the sensing elements that also serve as the heaters of the sensor. By measuring the temperature differences among the four sensing elements symmetrically distributed in the sensing area, a full 360° direction sensitivity can be obtained. By using a BP neural network to model the relationship between the readouts of the four sensor elements and flow parameters and execute data fusion, the magnitude and direction of the flow can be deduced. Validity of the sensor design was proven through both simulations and experiments. Wind tunnel experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the airflow speed reaches 0.72 m/s in the range of 3 m/s-30 m/s and the measurement accuracy of flow direction angle reaches 1.9° in the range of 360°.

  4. A Two-Dimensional Flow Sensor with Integrated Micro Thermal Sensing Elements and a Back Propagation Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyi Que

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a novel flow sensor with two-dimensional 360° direction sensitivity achieved with a simple structure and a novel data fusion algorithm. Four sensing elements with roundabout wires distributed in four quadrants of a circle compose the sensor probe, and work in constant temperature difference (CTD mode as both Joule heaters and temperature detectors. The magnitude and direction of a fluid flow are measured by detecting flow-induced temperature differences among the four elements. The probe is made of Ti/Au thin-film with a diameter of 2 mm, and is fabricated using micromachining techniques. When a flow goes through the sensor, the flow-induced temperature differences are detected by the sensing elements that also serve as the heaters of the sensor. By measuring the temperature differences among the four sensing elements symmetrically distributed in the sensing area, a full 360° direction sensitivity can be obtained. By using a BP neural network to model the relationship between the readouts of the four sensor elements and flow parameters and execute data fusion, the magnitude and direction of the flow can be deduced. Validity of the sensor design was proven through both simulations and experiments. Wind tunnel experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the airflow speed reaches 0.72 m/s in the range of 3 m/s–30 m/s and the measurement accuracy of flow direction angle reaches 1.9° in the range of 360°.

  5. CS2-Collector: A New Approach for Data Collection in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Two-Dimensional Compressive Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Zhuoshi; Zhang, Jianpei; Li, Feng; Wen, Hongkai; Shen, Yiran

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of reconstructing the temporal and spatial profile of some physical phenomena monitored by large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) in an energy efficient manner. Compressive sensing is one of the popular choices to reduce the energy consumption of the data collection in WSNs. The existing solutions only consider sparsity of sensors’ data from either temporal or spatial dimensions. In this paper, we propose a novel data collection strategy, CS2-collector, for WSNs based on the theory of Two Dimensional Compressive Sensing (2DCS). It exploits both temporal and spatial sparsity, i.e., 2D-sparsity of WSNs and achieves significant gain on the tradeoff between the compression ratio and reconstruction accuracy as the numerical simulations and evaluations on different types of sensors’ data. More intuitively, with the same given energy budget, CS2-collector provides significantly more accurate reconstruction of the profile of the physical phenomena that are temporal-spatially sparse. PMID:27548180

  6. Synthetic gauge field and pseudospin-orbit interaction in a stacked two-dimensional ring-network lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2017-02-01

    We study the effects of a synthetic gauge field and pseudospin-orbit interaction in a stacked two-dimensional ring-network model. The model was introduced to simulate light propagation in the corresponding ring-resonator lattice, and is thus completely bosonic. Without these two items, the model exhibits Floquet-Weyl and Floquet-topological-insulator phases with topologically gapless and gapped band structures, respectively. The synthetic magnetic field implemented in the model results in a three-dimensional Hofstadter-butterfly-type spectrum in a photonic platform. The resulting gaps are characterized by the winding number of relevant S-matrices together with the Chern number of the bulk bands. The pseudospin-orbit interaction is defined as the mixing term between two pseudospin degrees of freedom in the rings, namely, the clockwise and counter-clockwise modes. It destroys the Floquet-topological-insulator phases, while the Floquet-Weyl phase with multiple Weyl points can be preserved by breaking the space-inversion symmetry. Implementing both the synthetic gauge field and pseudospin-orbit interaction requires a certain nonreciprocity.

  7. Trigonometrical sums connected with the chiral Potts model, Verlinde dimension formula, two-dimensional resistor network, and number theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chair, Noureddine, E-mail: n.chair@ju.edu.jo

    2014-02-15

    We have recently developed methods for obtaining exact two-point resistance of the complete graph minus N edges. We use these methods to obtain closed formulas of certain trigonometrical sums that arise in connection with one-dimensional lattice, in proving Scott’s conjecture on permanent of Cauchy matrix, and in the perturbative chiral Potts model. The generalized trigonometrical sums of the chiral Potts model are shown to satisfy recursion formulas that are transparent and direct, and differ from those of Gervois and Mehta. By making a change of variables in these recursion formulas, the dimension of the space of conformal blocks of SU(2) and SO(3) WZW models may be computed recursively. Our methods are then extended to compute the corner-to-corner resistance, and the Kirchhoff index of the first non-trivial two-dimensional resistor network, 2×N. Finally, we obtain new closed formulas for variant of trigonometrical sums, some of which appear in connection with number theory. -- Highlights: • Alternative derivation of certain trigonometrical sums of the chiral Potts model are given. • Generalization of these trigonometrical sums satisfy recursion formulas. • The dimension of the space of conformal blocks may be computed from these recursions. • Exact corner-to-corner resistance, the Kirchhoff index of 2×N are given.

  8. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in myricetin and myricitrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojta, Danijela; Dominkovic, Katarina; Miljanic, Snezana;

    2016-01-01

    The molecular structures of myricetin (3,3’,4’,5,5’,7-hexahydroxyflavone; MCE) and myricitrin (myricetin 3-O-rhamnoside; MCI) are investigated by quantum chemical calculations (B3LYP/6-311G**). Two preferred molecular rotamers of MCI are predicted, corresponding to different conformations of the O......-rhamnoside subunit. The rotamers are characterized by different hydrogen bonded cross-links between the hydroxy groups of the rhamnoside substituent and the parent MCE moiety. The predicted OH stretching frequencies are compared with vibrational spectra of MCE and MCI recorded for the sake of this investigation (IR...

  9. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in myricetin and myricitrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojta, Danijela; Dominkovic, Katarina; Miljanic, Snezana;

    2017-01-01

    The molecular structures of myricetin (3,3’,4’,5,5’,7-hexahydroxyflavone; MCE) and myricitrin (myricetin 3-O-rhamnoside; MCI) are investigated by quantum chemical calculations (B3LYP/6-311G**). Two preferred molecular rotamers of MCI are predicted, corresponding to different conformations of the O......-rhamnoside subunit. The rotamers are characterized by different hydrogen bonded cross-links between the hydroxy groups of the rhamnoside substituent and the parent MCE moiety. The predicted OH stretching frequencies are compared with vibrational spectra of MCE and MCI recorded for the sake of this investigation (IR...

  10. Hydrogen Bonding in Ionic Liquids Probed by Linear and Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roth, C; Kerlé, D; Friedriszik, F; Lütgens, M; Lochbrunner, S; Kühn, O; Ludwig, R

    2012-01-01

    Three imidazolium-based ionic liquids of the type [Cnmim][NTf2] with varying alkyl chain lengths (n = 1, 2 and 8) at the 1 position of the imidazolium ring were studied applying IR, linear Raman, and multiplex CARS spectroscopy. The focus has been on the CH-stretching region of the imidazolium ring, which is supposed to carry information about a possible hydrogen bonding network in the ionic liquid. The measurements are compared to calculations of the corresponding anharmonic vibrational spectra for a cluster of [C2mim][NTf2] consisting of four ion pairs. The results support the hypothesis of moderate hydrogen bonding involving the C(4)-H and C(5)-H groups and somewhat stronger hydrogen bonds of the C(2)-H groups.

  11. Crystal structure and hydrogen-bonding patterns in 5-fluorocytosinium picrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marimuthu Mohana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, 5-fluorocytosinium picrate, C4H5FN3O+·C6H2N3O7−, one N heteroatom of the 5-fluorocytosine (5FC ring is protonated. The 5FC ring forms a dihedral angle of 19.97 (11° with the ring of the picrate (PA− anion. In the crystal, the 5FC+ cation interacts with the PA− anion through three-centre N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming two conjoined rings having R21(6 and R12(6 motifs, and is extended by N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...O interactions into a two-dimensional sheet structure lying parallel to (001. Also present in the crystal structure are weak C—F...π interactions.

  12. Effect of density of hydrogen-bonding donor on hydrogen-bonded multilayer buildup

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hongyu; MA Ning; WANG Zhiqiang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of density of hydrogen-bonding donor (HBD) on the formation of layer-by-layer assemblies of poly(4-vinylpyridine) and poly(4-vinylphenol) was investigated. For this purpose, a series of ethyl-substituted poly(4-vinylphenol) (EsPVPhf) with variable ethyl substitute percentage was synthesized by grafting the phenol moiety along the poly(4-vinylphenol) backbone with 1-bromoethane. UV-vis spectroscopy revealed a uniform deposition process of the hydrogen-bonded multilayer consisting of poly(4- vinylpyridine) (PVPy) and EsPVPhf with variable density of HBD. Notably, it was found that increasing the HBD density of EsPVPhf resulted in a marked decrease of both amount of polymers adsorbed and film thickness, which should be related to the EsPVPhf conformation change from coiled state to extended conformation in ethanol solution. Compared with the effect of charge density in polyelectrolyte multilayer, however, there does not exist a critical density of HBD in our case of hydrogen-bonded multilayer assembly. In addition, surface structures of PVPy/EsPVPhf multilayer films also can be tailored controllably by adjusting HBD density of EsPVPhf. As a result, a new method for tuning the structure of hydrogen-bonding-directed multilayer films was developed.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the hydration of poly(vinyl methyl ether): Hydrogen bonds and quasi-hydrogen bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU RongLiang; JI Qing; KONG Bin; YANG XiaoZhen

    2008-01-01

    Atomistic detailed hydration structures of poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations under 300 K at various concentrations. Both radial distribution func-tions and the distance distributions between donors and acceptors in hydrogen bonds show that the hydrogen bonds between the polymer and water are shorter by 0.005 nm than those between water molecules. The Quasi-hydrogen bonds take only 7.2% of the van der Waals interaction pairs. It was found the hydrogen bonds are not evenly distributed along the polymer chain, and there still exists a significant amount (10%) of ether oxygen atoms that are not hydrogen bonded to water at a concentra-tion as low as 3.3%. This shows that in polymer solutions close contacts occur not only between polymer chains but also between chain segments within the polymer, which leads to inefficient con-tacts between ether oxygen atoms and water molecules. Variation of the quasi-hydrogen bonds with the concentration is similar to that of hydrogen bonds, but the ratio of the repeat units forming quasi-hydrogen bonds to those forming hydrogen bonds approaches 0.2. A transition was found in the demixing enthalpy at around 30% measured by dynamic testing differential scanning calorimetry (DTDSC) for aqueous solutions of a mono-dispersed low molecular weight PVME, which can be related to the transition of the fractions of hydrogen bonds and quasi-hydrogen bonds at ~27%. The transition of the fractions of hydrogen bonds and quasi-hydrogen bonds at ~27% can be used to explain the demixing enthalpy transition at 30% at a molecular scale. In addition, at the concentration of 86%, each ether oxygen atom bonded with water is assigned 1.56 water molecules on average, and 'free' water molecules emerge at the concentration of around 54%.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of the hydration of poly(vinyl methyl ether):Hydrogen bonds and quasi-hydrogen bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Atomistic detailed hydration structures of poly(vinyl methyl ether)(PVME) have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations under 300 K at various concentrations. Both radial distribution functions and the distance distributions between donors and acceptors in hydrogen bonds show that the hydrogen bonds between the polymer and water are shorter by 0.005 nm than those between water molecules. The Quasi-hydrogen bonds take only 7.2% of the van der Waals interaction pairs. It was found the hydrogen bonds are not evenly distributed along the polymer chain,and there still exists a significant amount(10%) of ether oxygen atoms that are not hydrogen bonded to water at a concentration as low as 3.3%. This shows that in polymer solutions close contacts occur not only between polymer chains but also between chain segments within the polymer,which leads to inefficient contacts between ether oxygen atoms and water molecules. Variation of the quasi-hydrogen bonds with the concentration is similar to that of hydrogen bonds,but the ratio of the repeat units forming quasi-hydrogen bonds to those forming hydrogen bonds approaches 0.2. A transition was found in the demixing enthalpy at around 30% measured by dynamic testing differential scanning calorimetry(DTDSC) for aqueous solutions of a mono-dispersed low molecular weight PVME,which can be related to the transition of the fractions of hydrogen bonds and quasi-hydrogen bonds at ~27%. The transition of the fractions of hydrogen bonds and quasi-hydrogen bonds at ~27% can be used to explain the demixing enthalpy transition at 30% at a molecular scale. In addition,at the concentration of 86%,each ether oxygen atom bonded with water is assigned 1.56 water molecules on average,and ’free’ water molecules emerge at the concentration of around 54%.

  15. Tetrahedrality and hydrogen bonds in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Eszter; Varga, Imre K.; Baranyai, András

    2016-06-01

    We carried out extensive calculations of liquid water at different temperatures and pressures using the BK3 model suggested recently [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. In particular, we were interested in undercooled regions to observe the propensity of water to form tetrahedral coordination of closest neighbors around a central molecule. We compared the found tetrahedral order with the number of hydrogen bonds and with the partial pair correlation functions unfolded as distributions of the closest, the second closest, etc. neighbors. We found that contrary to the number of hydrogen bonds, tetrahedrality changes substantially with state variables. Not only the number of tetrahedral arrangements increases with lowering the pressure, the density, and the temperature but the domain size of connecting tetrahedral structures as well. The difference in tetrahedrality is very pronounced between the two sides of the Widom line and even more so between the low density amorphous (LDA) and high density amorphous (HDA) phases. We observed that in liquid water and in HDA, the 5th water molecule, contrary to ice and LDA, is positioned between the first and the second coordination shell. We found no convincing evidence of structural heterogeneity or regions referring to structural transition.

  16. Hydrogen bonding in asphaltenes and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, N.C.; Tewari, K.C.

    1978-04-01

    The objective of this program is to investigate and to determine the nature of hydrogen bonding and other molecular interactions that occur in asphaltene and coal liquids, and to seek possible correlations between the interactions and the viscosity. The asphaltene components of samples of centrifuged liquid product, CLP, and solvent-refined coal, SRC, supplied by the Pittsburgh Energy Research Center, are isolated by solvent fractionation. The compositions of the asphaltenes are obtained by elemental analysis and the molecular weights by vapor pressure osmometry. The acid/neutral and base components of the asphaltenes are separated and again elemental analysis and molecular weights are obtained. The magnetic resonance, infrared and calorimetric methods are used to determine the strength of hydrogen-bond and other molecular interactions in the fractions isolated. Investigations on the toluene-insoluble and heavy-oil fractions are also carried out. In addition, extensive proton magnetic resonance, near infrared and calorimetric studies are carried out for o-phenylphenol and quinoline, which serve as model compounds for the aromatic phenols and the heteronuclear aromatic base nitrogens, respectively, found in coal liquefaction products. This is the final report, giving a summary of activities under the Contract for the entire period.

  17. The role of hydrogen bonding in tethered polymer layers

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, C; Nap, R. J.; Szleifer, I.

    2008-01-01

    A molecular theory to study the properties of end tethered polymer layers, in which the polymers have the ability to form hydrogen bonds with water is presented. The approach combines the ideas of the single-chain mean-field theory to treat tethered layers with the approach of Dormidontova (Macromolecules, 2002 35,987) to include hydrogen bonds. The generalization includes the consideration of position dependent polymer-water and water-water hydrogen bonds. The theory is applied to model poly...

  18. Hydrogen-bonded sheets in benzylmethylammonium hydrogen maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz, Lynay; Abonia, Rodrigo; Cobo, Justo; Low, John N; Glidewell, Christopher

    2007-10-01

    In the title compound, C(8)H(12)N(+).C(4)H(3)O(4)(-), there is a short and almost linear but asymmetric O-H...O hydrogen bond in the anion. The ions are linked into C(2)(2)(6) chains by two short and nearly linear N-H...O hydrogen bonds and the chains are further weakly linked into sheets by a single C-H...O hydrogen bond.

  19. Routes to Hydrogen Bonding Chain-End Functionalized Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Arthur; Lortie, Frédéric; Bernard, Julien

    2012-12-21

    The contribution of supramolecular chemistry to polymer science opens new perspectives for the design of polymer materials exhibiting valuable properties and easier processability due to the dynamic nature of non-covalent interactions. Hydrogen bonding polymers can be used as supramolecular units for yielding larger assemblies that possess attractive features, arising from the combination of polymer properties and the responsiveness of hydrogen bonds. The post-polymerization modification of reactive end-groups is the most common procedure for generating such polymers. Examples of polymerizations mediated by hydrogen bonding-functionalized precursors have also recently been reported. This contribution reviews the current synthetic routes toward hydrogen bonding sticker chain-end functionalized polymers.

  20. Neural Plasticity and Memory: Is Memory Encoded in Hydrogen Bonding Patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amtul, Zareen; Rahman, Atta-Ur

    2016-02-01

    Current models of memory storage recognize posttranslational modification vital for short-term and mRNA translation for long-lasting information storage. However, at the molecular level things are quite vague. A comprehensive review of the molecular basis of short and long-lasting synaptic plasticity literature leads us to propose that the hydrogen bonding pattern at the molecular level may be a permissive, vital step of memory storage. Therefore, we propose that the pattern of hydrogen bonding network of biomolecules (glycoproteins and/or DNA template, for instance) at the synapse is the critical edifying mechanism essential for short- and long-term memories. A novel aspect of this model is that nonrandom impulsive (or unplanned) synaptic activity functions as a synchronized positive-feedback rehearsal mechanism by revising the configurations of the hydrogen bonding network by tweaking the earlier tailored hydrogen bonds. This process may also maintain the elasticity of the related synapses involved in memory storage, a characteristic needed for such networks to alter intricacy and revise endlessly. The primary purpose of this review is to stimulate the efforts to elaborate the mechanism of neuronal connectivity both at molecular and chemical levels.

  1. Bi-component H-bonded porous molecular networks at the liquid-solid interface: what is the influence of pre-organisation in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudernac, Tibor; Mandal, Amal; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring the architecture of porous two-dimensional networks formed by molecules is essential for developing functional materials with low dimensionality. Here we present bicomponent porous networks with tunable pore-sizes that were formed by self-assembly of hydrogen-bonding molecules at the

  2. Bicomponent H-Bonded Porous Molecular Networks at the Liquid–Solid Interface: What Is the Influence of Preorganization in Solution?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudernac, Tibor; Mandal, Amal; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring the architecture of porous two-dimensional networks formed by molecules is essential for developing functional materials with low dimensionality. Here we present bicomponent porous networks with tunable pore-sizes that were formed by self-assembly of hydrogen-bonding molecules at the

  3. Vibrations and hydrogen bonding in porphycene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Walewski, Łukasz; Vdovin, Alexander; Slenczka, Alkwin; Rols, Stephane; Johnson, Mark R; Lesyng, Bogdan; Waluk, Jacek

    2012-04-28

    Combined use of IR, Raman, neutron scattering and fluorescence measurements for porphycene isolated in helium nanodroplets, supersonic jet and cryogenic matrices, as well as for solid and liquid solutions, resulted in the assignments of almost all of 108 fundamental vibrations. The puzzling feature of porphycene is the apparent lack of the N-H stretching band in the IR spectrum, predicted to be the strongest of all bands by standard harmonic calculations. Theoretical modeling of the IR spectra, based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, reveals that the N-H stretching mode should appear as an extremely broad band in the 2250-3000 cm(-1) region. Coupling of the N-H stretching vibration to other modes is discussed in the context of multidimensional character of intramolecular double hydrogen transfer in porphycene. The analysis can be generalized to other strongly hydrogen-bonded systems. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  4. Porous Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fei Han

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ordered porous solid-state architectures constructed via non-covalent supramolecular self-assembly have attracted increasing interest due to their unique advantages and potential applications. Porous metal-coordination organic frameworks (MOFs are generated by the assembly of metal coordination centers and organic linkers. Compared to MOFs, porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs are readily purified and recovered via simple recrystallization. However, due to lacking of sufficiently ability to orientate self-aggregation of building motifs in predictable manners, rational design and preparation of porous HOFs are still challenging. Herein, we summarize recent developments about porous HOFs and attempt to gain deeper insights into the design strategies of basic building motifs.

  5. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Kroon, Jan

    1988-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and liquid methanol have been carried out. For both liquids an effective pair potential was used. The models were fitted to the heat of vaporization, pressure and various radial distribution functions resulting from diffraction experiments on liquids. In both simulations 216 molecules were put in a cubic periodical ☐. The system was loosely coupled to a temperature bath and to a pressure bath. Following an initial equilibration period relevant data were sampled during 15 ps. The distributions of oxygen—oxygen distances in hydrogen bonds obtained from the two simulations are essentially the same. The distribution obtained from crystal data is somewhat different: the maximum has about the same position, but the curve is much narrower, which can be expected merely from the fact that diffraction experiments only supply average atomic positions and hence average interatomic distances. When thermal motion is taken into account a closer likeness is observed.

  6. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H.P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  7. Coupled One and Two Dimensional Model for River Network Flow and Sediment Transport%一二维耦合河网水沙模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕文丽; 张旭

    2011-01-01

    Based on previous research, a new one and two-dimensional coupled model of river water and sediment was proposed.With reference to the three-level solution for one-dimensional river network water mode, the two-dimensional river section will be generalized to river section within the river network.One and two dimensional coupled river network sediment model will be established with the balance of flow amount and sediment transport.The model sets up the chasing relationship between variables of water level and sediment content at the end and first section to further establish matrix equations of the whole one and two-dimensional river network node water level and sediment content.Though the verification and calculation for generalized river network from Datong to Zhenjiang in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, it is found that the model is of great practical value.%借鉴河网水流的三级解法,将二维河段概化为河网内部河段,通过河网节点流量和输沙量的平衡,建立一二维耦合河网水沙模型.模型采用全隐式方法建立二维河段以首末断面的水位和含沙量为中间变量的矩阵追赶关系,进而建立整个一二维河网的节点水位及含沙量的矩阵方程组.对方程组的求解,可实现一二维水沙模型的耦合求解.通过对长江下游大通至镇江概化河网的验证计算,表明模型具有很好的实用价值.

  8. Eight new crystal structures of 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, 5-carboxyuracil and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil: insights into the hydrogen-bonded networks and the predominant conformations of the C5-bound residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Vanessa Kristina; Hützler, Wilhelm Maximilian; Bolte, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In order to examine the preferred hydrogen-bonding pattern of various uracil derivatives, namely 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, 5-carboxyuracil and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil, and for a conformational study, crystallization experiments yielded eight different structures: 5-(hydroxymethyl)uracil, C5H6N2O3, (I), 5-carboxyuracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C3H7NO, (II), 5-carboxyuracil-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C2H6OS, (III), 5-carboxyuracil-N,N-dimethylacetamide (1/1), C5H4N2O4·C4H9NO, (IV), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-N,N-dimethylformamide (1/1), C5H4N2O3S·C3H7NO, (V), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-dimethyl sulfoxide (1/1), C5H4N2O3S·C2H6OS, (VI), 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil-1,4-dioxane (2/3), 2C5H4N2O3S·3C6H12O3, (VII), and 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil, C10H8N4O6S2, (VIII). While the six solvated structures, i.e. (II)-(VII), contain intramolecular S(6) O-H...O hydrogen-bond motifs between the carboxy and carbonyl groups, the usually favoured R2(2)(8) pattern between two carboxy groups is formed in the solvent-free structure, i.e. (VIII). Further R2(2)(8) hydrogen-bond motifs involving either two N-H...O or two N-H...S hydrogen bonds were observed in three crystal structures, namely (I), (IV) and (VIII). In all eight structures, the residue at the ring 5-position shows a coplanar arrangement with respect to the pyrimidine ring which is in agreement with a search of the Cambridge Structural Database for six-membered cyclic compounds containing a carboxy group. The search confirmed that coplanarity between the carboxy group and the cyclic residue is strongly favoured.

  9. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between Atmospheric Gaseous Amides and Methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Xu, Xiang; Du, Lin

    2016-12-30

    Amides are important atmospheric organic-nitrogen compounds. Hydrogen bonded complexes of methanol (MeOH) with amides (formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, acetamide, N-methylacetamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide) have been investigated. The carbonyl oxygen of the amides behaves as a hydrogen bond acceptor and the NH group of the amides acts as a hydrogen bond donor. The dominant hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the carbonyl oxygen and the OH group of methanol as well as the interaction between the NH group of amides and the oxygen of methanol. However, the hydrogen bonds between the CH group and the carbonyl oxygen or the oxygen of methanol are also important for the overall stability of the complexes. Comparable red shifts of the C=O, NH- and OH-stretching transitions were found in these MeOH-amide complexes with considerable intensity enhancement. Topological analysis shows that the electron density at the bond critical points of the complexes fall in the range of hydrogen bonding criteria, and the Laplacian of charge density of the O-H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond slightly exceeds the upper value of the Laplacian criteria. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the hydrogen bonding interaction energies can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic, exchange and dispersion components.

  10. Predictions of Glass Transition Temperature for Hydrogen Bonding Biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that the glass transition of a multitude of mixtures containing hydrogen bonding materials correlates strongly with the effective number of hydroxyl groups per molecule, which are available for intermolecular hydrogen bonding. This correlation is in compliance with the topological constraint

  11. Binding of reactive organophosphate by oximes via hydrogen bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrea Pappalardo; Maria E Amato; Francesco P Ballistreri; Valentina La Paglia Fragola; Gaetano A Tomaselli; Rosa Maria Toscano; Giuseppe Trusso Sfrazzetto

    2013-07-01

    In this contribution, the ability of simple oximes to bind a well-known nerve agent simulant (dimethylmethylphosphonate, DMMP) via hydrogen bond is reported. UV/Vis measurements indicate the formation of 1:1 complexes. 1H-, 31P-NMR titrations and T-ROESY experiments confirm that oximes bind the organophosphate via hydrogen bond.

  12. Hydrogen Bonding in Thermoplastic Polyurethane Elastomers: IR Thermal Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogen bond percentage and its temperature dependence of the three TPU samples synthesized from polytetrahydrofuran, 4,4-diphenylmethane diisocyanate, N-methyl diethanol amine or 1,4-butane diol were studied by means of IR thermal analysis. The enthalpy and the entropy of the hydrogen bond dissociation were determined by the Vant Hoff plot.

  13. Microphase separation in hydrogen bonding polymer/surfactant melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Brinke, Gerrit ten

    1999-01-01

    Phase behavior of solvent free mixtures of homopolymers and amphiphiles capable of hydrogen bonding is analyzed in weak segregation limit applying a theoretical model describing the main features of the system as a function of composition, temperature and strength of hydrogen bonding. Phase diagrams

  14. Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies through Hydrogen-Bonded Supramolecular Mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinge, Sachin S.; Crego-Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of spherical gold nanoparticle assemblies with multicomponent double rosette molecular boxes as mediators is presented. These nine-component hydrogen-bonded supramolecular structures held together by 36 hydrogen bonds induce gold nanoparticle assembly. The morphologies of the nanoparti

  15. Synthesis, Crystal Structure and Electrochemical Properties of 2D Hydrogen-bonded network Complex[Ni(en)2(dpas)2]%氢键构筑的二维网状结构镍配合物[Ni(en)2(dpas)2]的合成、晶体结构及电化学性质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王祥; 罗芳; 高文涛

    2009-01-01

    A new 2D Hydrogen-bonded network complex [Ni(en)2(dpas)2] (Nadpas=sodium diphenylamine sulphonic acid salt, en=ethanediamine) has been synthesized in aqueous solution, and characterized by elemental analysis, IR.The crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in space group P21/c,with cell parameters a=0.605 6(5) nm, b=1.448 1(5) nm, c=1.711 9(5) nm,β=93.257(5), and V=1.498 9(14) nm3, De= 1.497 g·cm-3, Z=2, F(000)=708, R =0.027 7, wR =0.072 5. The crystal structure shows that the nickel atom is coordinated with four nitrogen atoms from the two en and two oxygen atoms from two dpas to form a mononuelear complex. Furthermore, the adjacent complex units are extended into a 2D supramolecular network through hydrogen bonds. CCDC: 674868

  16. Water hydrogen bonding in proton exchange and neutral polymer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Sarah Black

    qualitative observations that can be made with pure D2O or H2O. The theory and experimental practice of determining the hydrogen bonding distribution of water in a range of proton exchange membranes bearing aromatic sulfonate and perfluorosulfonate groups using this OD stretch technique is discussed. To further understand how the acidity of the sulfonate can be altered and how the acidity affects the hydrogen bonding network of water in a polymer membrane, various polymers with small chemical differences in the perfluorosulfonate sidechain were studied. In addition to the vibrational spectroscopy measurements using HOD as a probe, the partial charges of the sulfonate groups were calculating using DMol3 DFT calculations. The calculations and the experimentally determined peak position of the OD stretch both correlated to give a ranking of acidity for the various sidechains. Three sulfonated poly(arylene sulfone) based polymers were studied using FTIR and DFT calculations to better understand how the acidity of the sulfonate groups were affected by the placement on the backbone. By increasing the number of sulfone groups, which have electron withdrawing properties, flanking the sulfonated aromatic ring, the acidity was increased. The charge density of a sulfonate group flanked by two sulfone groups was -1.626 (in units of fundamental charge), while the charge density of a sulfonate group flanked by one sulfone group increased to -1.703. Additionally, if the subsequent ring was unsulfonated, the charge density further increased to -1.737, indicating that some stability is gained by both available rings being sulfonated. The differences in charge density are reflected in the water uptake and conductivity measurements, where the samples with the lowest charge density had the highest water uptake and conductivity. The deconvoluted OD peak revealed that the sample with two sulfone groups flanking the sulfonated aromatic ring contains the highest amount of bulk-like water, which led

  17. Communication: Hydrogen bonding interactions in water-alcohol mixtures from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Royce K.; Smith, Jacob W.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    While methanol and ethanol are macroscopically miscible with water, their mixtures exhibit negative excess entropies of mixing. Despite considerable effort in both experiment and theory, there remains significant disagreement regarding the origin of this effect. Different models for the liquid mixture structure have been proposed to address this behavior, including the enhancement of the water hydrogen bonding network around the alcohol hydrophobic groups and microscopic immiscibility or clustering. We have investigated mixtures of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol with water by liquid microjet X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the oxygen K-edge, an atom-specific probe providing details of both inter- and intra-molecular structure. The measured spectra evidence a significant enhancement of hydrogen bonding originating from the methanol and ethanol hydroxyl groups upon the addition of water. These additional hydrogen bonding interactions would strengthen the liquid-liquid interactions, resulting in additional ordering in the liquid structures and leading to a reduction in entropy and a negative enthalpy of mixing, consistent with existing thermodynamic data. In contrast, the spectra of the isopropanol-water mixtures exhibit an increase in the number of broken alcohol hydrogen bonds for mixtures containing up to 0.5 water mole fraction, an observation consistent with existing enthalpy of mixing data, suggesting that the measured negative excess entropy is a result of clustering or micro-immiscibility.

  18. Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystal Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohnikan, Mahdi; Toader, Violeta; Rey, Alejandro; Reven, Linda

    2016-08-23

    Nanoparticle-liquid crystal (NP-LC) composites based on hydrogen bonding were explored using a model system. The ligand shells of 3 nm diameter zirconium dioxide nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs) were varied to control their interaction with 4-n-hexylbenzoic acid (6BA). The miscibility and effect of the NPs on the nematic order as a function of particle concentration was characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM), fluorescence microscopy and (2)H NMR spectroscopy. Nonfunctionalized ZrO2 NPs have the lowest miscibility and strongest effect on the LC matrix due to irreversible binding of 6BA to the NPs via a strong zirconium carboxylate bond. The ZrO2 NPs were functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid (6PHA) or 4-(6-phosphonohexyloxy)benzoic acid (6BPHA) which selectively bind to the ZrO2 NP surface via the phosphonic acid groups. The miscibility was increased by controlling the concentration of the pendant CO2H groups by adding hexylphosphonic acid (HPA) to act as a spacer group. Fluorescence microscopy of lanthanide doped ZrO2 NPs showed no aggregates in the nematic phase below the NP concentration where aggregates are observed in the isotropic phase. The functionalized NPs preferably concentrate into LC defects and any remaining isotropic liquid but are still present throughout the nematic liquid at a lower concentration.

  19. Hydrogen-Bonding Surfaces for Ice Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Hadley, Kevin R.; McDougall, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Ice formation on aircraft, either on the ground or in-flight, is a major safety issue. While ground icing events occur predominantly during the winter months, in-flight icing can happen anytime during the year. The latter is more problematic since it could result in increased drag and loss of lift. Under a Phase I ARMD NARI Seedling Activity, coated aluminum surfaces possessing hydrogen-bonding groups were under investigation for mitigating ice formation. Hydroxyl and methyl terminated dimethylethoxysilanes were prepared via known chemistries and characterized by spectroscopic methods. These materials were subsequently used to coat aluminum surfaces. Surface compositions were based on pure hydroxyl and methyl terminated species as well as mixtures of the two. Coated surfaces were characterized by contact angle goniometry. Receding water contact angle data suggested several potential surfaces that may exhibit reduced ice adhesion. Qualitative icing experiments performed under representative environmental temperatures using supercooled distilled water delivered via spray coating were inconclusive. Molecular modeling studies suggested that chain mobility affected the interface between ice and the surface more than terminal group chemical composition. Chain mobility resulted from the creation of "pockets" of increased free volume for longer chains to occupy.

  20. The influence of hydrogen bonding on partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nádia Melo; Kenny, Peter W.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Prokopczyk, Igor M.; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    This Perspective explores how consideration of hydrogen bonding can be used to both predict and better understand partition coefficients. It is shown how polarity of both compounds and substructures can be estimated from measured alkane/water partition coefficients. When polarity is defined in this manner, hydrogen bond donors are typically less polar than hydrogen bond acceptors. Analysis of alkane/water partition coefficients in conjunction with molecular electrostatic potential calculations suggests that aromatic chloro substituents may be less lipophilic than is generally believed and that some of the effect of chloro-substitution stems from making the aromatic π-cloud less available to hydrogen bond donors. Relationships between polarity and calculated hydrogen bond basicity are derived for aromatic nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen. Aligned hydrogen bond acceptors appear to present special challenges for prediction of alkane/water partition coefficients and this may reflect `frustration' of solvation resulting from overlapping hydration spheres. It is also shown how calculated hydrogen bond basicity can be used to model the effect of aromatic aza-substitution on octanol/water partition coefficients.

  1. The influence of hydrogen bonding on partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nádia Melo; Kenny, Peter W.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Prokopczyk, Igor M.; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Sartori, Geraldo Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    This Perspective explores how consideration of hydrogen bonding can be used to both predict and better understand partition coefficients. It is shown how polarity of both compounds and substructures can be estimated from measured alkane/water partition coefficients. When polarity is defined in this manner, hydrogen bond donors are typically less polar than hydrogen bond acceptors. Analysis of alkane/water partition coefficients in conjunction with molecular electrostatic potential calculations suggests that aromatic chloro substituents may be less lipophilic than is generally believed and that some of the effect of chloro-substitution stems from making the aromatic π-cloud less available to hydrogen bond donors. Relationships between polarity and calculated hydrogen bond basicity are derived for aromatic nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen. Aligned hydrogen bond acceptors appear to present special challenges for prediction of alkane/water partition coefficients and this may reflect `frustration' of solvation resulting from overlapping hydration spheres. It is also shown how calculated hydrogen bond basicity can be used to model the effect of aromatic aza-substitution on octanol/water partition coefficients.

  2. The Nature of the Hydrogen Bond Outline of a Comprehensive Hydrogen Bond Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gilli, Gastone

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bond (H-bond) effects are known: it makes sea water liquid, joins cellulose microfibrils in trees, shapes DNA into genes and polypeptide chains into wool, hair, muscles or enzymes. Its true nature is less known and we may still wonder why O-H...O bond energies range from less than 1 to more than 30 kcal/mol without apparent reason. This H-bond puzzle is re-examined here from its very beginning and presented as an inclusive compilation of experimental H-bond energies andgeometries.New concepts emerge from this analysis: new classes of systematically strong H-bonds (CAHBs and RAHBs: cha

  3. Engagement of CF3 group in N-H···F-C hydrogen bond in the solution state: NMR spectroscopy and MD simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Mogurampelly, Santosh; Suryaprakash, N

    2013-01-31

    Unambiguous evidence for the engagement of CF(3) group in N-H···F-C hydrogen bond in a low polarity solvent, the first observation of its kind, is reported. The presence of such weak molecular interactions in the solution state is convincingly established by one and two-dimensional (1)H, (19)F, and natural abundant (15)N NMR spectroscopic studies. The strong and direct evidence is derived by the observation of through-space couplings, such as, (1h)J(FH), (1h)J(FN), and (2h)J(FF), where the spin polarization is transmitted through hydrogen bond. In an interesting example of a molecule containing two CF(3) groups getting simultaneously involved in hydrogen bond, where hydrogen bond mediated couplings are not reflected in the NMR spectrum, (19)F-(19)F NOESY experiment yielded confirmatory evidence. Significant deviations in the strengths of (1)J(NH), variable temperature, and the solvent induced perturbations yielded additional support. The NMR results are corroborated by both DFT calculations and MD simulations, where the quantitative information on different ways of involvement of fluorine in two and three centered hydrogen bonds, their percentage of occurrences, and geometries have been obtained. The hydrogen bond interaction energies have also been calculated.

  4. Self-assembly of thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: hydrogen bond effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Liu, Yibiao; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Shuqi; Lin, Chen-Sheng; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Wen, Yongqiang; Du, Hongwu; Zhang, Xueji

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, to elucidate the hydrogen bond effect on the assembly behavior, we studied the assembly structures of two carboxylic substituted thiophene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by scanning tunneling microscopy. Here thiophene-2-carboxylic acid (TCA) and thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (TDA) were employed. TDA molecules spontaneously adsorb on the HOPG surface and self-organize into a two-dimensional (2D) assembly with well-defined structure. Two types of domain could be observed. Each TDA molecule appears as a round circle with two small faint dots and forms hydrogen bonds with neighbours. Besides monolayer structure, a bilayer structure of TDA adlayer on HOPG was also observed in this research. Remnant TDA molecules adsorb on the monolayer of TDA and bilayer structure is formed. In contrast to TDA, no ordered structure of TCA on HOPG can be observed. TCA molecules have high propensity to form dimers through H-bond between carboxylic groups. But TCA dimer is not stable enough for either adsorption or imaging. Our result provides a new example for understanding hydrogen effect on stabilizing and controlling two-dimensional assembly structure and is helpful for surface nanofabrication and development of electric nanodevices.

  5. Modelling of spreading process: effect from hydrogen bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Jiang Lan

    2008-01-01

    Lubricant spreading on solid substrates has drawn considerable attention not only for the microscopic wetting theory but also for the dramatic application in head-disk interface of magnetic storage drive systems. Molecular dynamic simulation based on a coarse-grained bead-spring model has been used to study such a spreading process.The spreading profiles indicate that the hydrogen bonds among lubricant molecules and the hydrogen bonds between lubricant molecules and polar atoms of solid substrates will complicate the spreading process in a tremendous degree.The hydrogen bonds among lubricant molecules will strengthen the lubricant combination intensity, which may hinder most molecules from flowing down to the substrates and diffusing along the substrates. And the hydrogen bonds between lubricant molecules and polar atoms of solid substrates will confine the lubricant molecules around polar atoms, which may hinder the molecules from diffusing along the substrates and cause precursor film to vanish.

  6. Hydrogen bonding interactions in ethanol and acetonitrile binary system: A near and mid-infrared spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Sun, Hai-Yuan; Deng, Geng; Yu, Zhi-Wu

    2014-07-01

    The hydrogen bond interactions in C2H5OHsbnd CH3CN binary system have been studied in detail by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR), attenuated total reflection (ATR) mid-infrared spectroscopy (mid-IR), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The collected spectra were analyzed with excess spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) including moving-window 2D-COS. The main conclusions are: (1) A number of species, namely multimer, trimmer, and dimer of C2H5OH, and C2H5OH⋯CD3CN hydrogen bonding complex, have been identified in the binary system C2H5OHsbnd CH3CN experimentally. The linear relationship between the observed and calculated wavenumbers of the concerned species assisted us in doing the assignments. (2) Adding acetonitrile, the hydrogen bonds in C2H5OH are weakened and C2H5OH multimers dissociate. Meanwhile, C2H5OH dimers and C2H5OH⋯CD3CN hydrogen bonding complex form, and the former also transform to the latter. The dissociation of C2H5OH multimers slows down gradually during the dilution process and at the mole fraction 0.7 of acetonitrile, all the C2H5OH multimers have dissociated.

  7. Synthesis, Structure and Characterization of Two-dimensional Network Copper Complex [ Cu3 (nta) 2(azpy) 2(H2O)2]· 6H2O

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Bao-Long(李宝龙); XU,Yan(徐艳); LIU,Qi(刘琦); WANG,Hua-Qin(王化勤); XU,Zheng(徐正)

    2002-01-01

    The copper(Ⅱ) complex [Cu3(nta)2(azpy)2(H2O)2] @6H2O(nta= nitrilotriacetate, azpy= 4,4'-azobispyridine) has been synthesized and characterized. The X-ray analysis reveals that there are two kinds of copper(Ⅱ) coordination environments.Cu(1) has a distorted square plane symmetry and Cu(2) has a distorted octahedral symmetry. Cu(1)is linked to Cu(2)through nta and bound to Cu(1C) by azpy, and Cu(2) islinked to Cu(2A) through azpy, which extends to two-dimensional network with large rhombus 1.2 nm× 1.7 nm.

  8. Two-dimensional Network Crown Ether Complex. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of 18-Crown-6 Complex: [K(18-C-6) ]2[Cd-(mnt)2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Da-Qi(王大奇); YU,Qing-Jiang(于清江); DOU,Jian-Min(窦建民)

    2002-01-01

    The novel complex [K(18-C-6)]2[Cd(mnt)2] [18-C-6=18-crown-6, mnt= 1, 2-dicyanoethen-1, 2-dithiolate, C2S2-(CN)2- 2] was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis,IR spectrum and X-ray diffraction analysis. The complex displays two-dimensional network structure of [ K(18-C-6)] complex segments and [Cd(mnt)2] complex segment bridged by S-K-S, S-K-N and N-K-N interactions between adjacent [K(18-C-6)] and [Cd(mnt)2] units.

  9. Analysis of Multi-Channel and Slotted Random Multi-Access Protocol with Two-Dimensional Probability for Ad Hoc Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ningyu; ZHAO Dongfeng; DING Hongwei

    2008-01-01

    A higher quality of service (QoS) is provided for ad hoc networks through a multi-channel and slotted random multi-access (MSRM) protocol with two-dimensional probability. For this protocol, the system time is slotted into a time slot with high channel utilization realized by the choice of two parameters p1 and p2, and the channel load equilibrium. The protocol analyzes the throughput of the MSRM protocol for a load equilibrium state and the throughput based on priority. Simulations agree with the theoretical analysis. The simulations also show that the slotted-time system is better than the continuous-time system.

  10. Discrete kink dynamics in hydrogen-bonded chains: The two-component model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpan, V.M.; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2004-01-01

    We study discrete topological solitary waves (kinks and antikinks) in two nonlinear diatomic chain models that describe the collective dynamics of proton transfers in one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks. The essential ingredients of the models are (i) a realistic (anharmonic) ion-proton inte......We study discrete topological solitary waves (kinks and antikinks) in two nonlinear diatomic chain models that describe the collective dynamics of proton transfers in one-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks. The essential ingredients of the models are (i) a realistic (anharmonic) ion...... principal differences, like a significant difference in the stability switchings behavior for the kinks and the antikinks. Water-filled carbon nanotubes are briefly discussed as possible realistic systems, where topological discrete (anti)kink states might exist....

  11. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-...

  12. Specific Heat Properties of Proton Transfer in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞小峰; 封原平

    2003-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of proton transport along hydrogen-bonded systems at finite temperatures have been studied by our model. We first derive the dynamic equations of the proton transport and find the solutions and the free energy of the systems. Finally, we obtain the specific heats of the hydrogen bonded systems, resulting from the motion of the soliton, by using transfer integral way. The theoretical value is basically consistent with the experimental data.

  13. Strength of hydrogen bonds of water depends on local environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huš, Matej; Urbic, Tomaz

    2012-04-14

    In-depth knowledge of water-water potential is important for devising and evaluating simple water models if they are to accurately describe water properties and reflect various solvation phenomena. Water-water potential depends upon inter-molecular distance, relative orientation of water molecules, and also local environment. When placed at a favorable distance in a favorable orientation, water molecules exhibit a particularly strong attractive interaction called hydrogen bond. Although hydrogen bond is very important for its effects on the elements of life, industrial applications, and bulk water properties, there is no scientific consensus on its true nature and origin. Using quantum-mechanical methods, hydrogen bond strength was calculated in different local environments. A simple empirical linear relationship was discovered between maximum hydrogen bond strength and the number of water molecules in the local environment. The local environment effect was shown to be considerable even on the second coordination shell. Additionally, a negative linear correlation was found between maximum hydrogen bond strength and the distance, at which it was observed. These results provide novel insights into the nature of hydrogen bonding.

  14. How many hydrogen-bonded α-turns are possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Anette; Schramm, Peter; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg

    2011-06-01

    The formation of α-turns is a possibility to reverse the direction of peptide sequences via five amino acids. In this paper, a systematic conformational analysis was performed to find the possible isolated α-turns with a hydrogen bond between the first and fifth amino acid employing the methods of ab initio MO theory in vacuum (HF/6-31G*, B3LYP/6-311 + G*) and in solution (CPCM/HF/6-31G*). Only few α-turn structures with glycine and alanine backbones fulfill the geometry criteria for the i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond satisfactorily. The most stable representatives agree with structures found in the Protein Data Bank. There is a general tendency to form additional hydrogen bonds for smaller pseudocycles corresponding to β- and γ-turns with better hydrogen bond geometries. Sometimes, this competition weakens or even destroys the i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond leading to very stable double β-turn structures. This is also the reason why an "ideal" α-turn with three central amino acids having the perfect backbone angle values of an α-helix could not be localized. There are numerous hints for stable α-turns with a distance between the C(α)-atoms of the first and fifth amino acid smaller than 6-7 Å, but without an i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond.

  15. Synthesis of 2,6-diaminopyridine substituted -oxoketene ,-acetals: Crystal structure and hydrogen bonding interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Okram Mukherjee Singh; Laishram Ronibala Devi; Neeladri Das

    2013-09-01

    Polyaza -oxoketene ,-acetals can exist as either enamino or imino tautomeric forms. Based on the spectroscopic data and structural analysis of one of the ,-acetals, the stereochemistry was unambiguously assigned as an all--configuration. The crystal structure confirms the enamino structure and shows extensive use of C-H…X (X = N, O, and S) weak hydrogen bonding interactions, thereby generating a 3-dimensional network in solid state.

  16. 基于侧抑制网络的二维Otsu阈值分割算法%Two-dimensional Otsu Threshold Segmentation Algorithm Based on Lateral Inhibition Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董悫; 王江晴; 孙阳光

    2015-01-01

    The traditional two-dimensional Otsu thresholding segmentation algorithms do not think about human vision characteristics and the result of segmentation can not match up to the visual perception of human eye. In order to solve this problem,an algorithm based on the two-dimensional Otsu algorithm and the lateral inhibition network is proposed. In this algorithm, the lateral inhibition network of human visual system that has the features of enhancing center and inhibiting surroundings is fully used. The lateral inhibition network is utilized to process the original picture and obtains the lateral inhibition picture. A two-dimensional histogram based on the gray information and lateral inhibition information of pixels is established. The maximum between-cluster variance is chosen as the criterion to select the optimal threshold. Experimental results show that this algorithm not only is well adapted to the contrast and illumination intensity, but also has the capacity for fitting the breaks compared with the traditional Otsu algorithm and two-dimensional Otsu algorithm. It improves the robustness to image noise and obtains more perfect segmentation results.%传统二维Otsu阈值分割算法未考虑人类视觉特性,分割结果不符合人眼视觉感受。为此,提出一种二维Otsu算法与侧抑制网络相结合的分割算法。该算法从基于人类视觉系统的侧抑制网络出发,利用侧抑制网络增强中心,抑制周围的特性,通过侧抑制网络处理原始图像,得到侧抑制图像,构建基于像素的灰度信息和侧抑制信息的二维直方图,并采用类间最大方差作为最佳阈值的选取准则。实验结果表明,与传统的Otsu算法和二维Otsu算法等相比,该算法具有较好的对比度、光照强度适应性和间断拟合能力,并能提高对图像噪声的鲁棒性,获得更理想的分割结果。

  17. The nature of hydrogen-bonding interaction in the prototypic hybrid halide perovskite, tetragonal CH3NH3PbI3

    OpenAIRE

    June Ho Lee; Jung-Hoon Lee; Eui-Hyun Kong; Hyun Myung Jang

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the key role of hydrogen bonding in the structural stabilization of the prototypic hybrid halide perovskite, CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3), little progress has been made in our in-depth understanding of the hydrogen-bonding interaction between the MA+-ion and the iodide ions in the PbI6-octahedron network. Herein, we show that there exist two distinct types of the hydrogen-bonding interaction, naming α- and β-modes, in the tetragonal MAPbI3 on the basis of symmetry argument and density-func...

  18. Two Distinct Modes of Hydrogen-Bonding Interaction in the Prototypic Hybrid Halide Perovskite, Tetragonal CH3NH3PbI3

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, June Ho; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kong, Eui-Hyun; Jang, Hyun M.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the key role of hydrogen bonding in the structural stabilization of the prototypic hybrid halide perovskite, CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3), little progress has been made in our in-depth understanding of the hydrogen-bonding interaction between the MA+-ion and the iodide ions in the PbI6-octahedron network. Herein, we show that there exist two distinct types of the hydrogen-bonding interaction, naming a- and b-modes, in the tetragonal MAPbI3 on the basis of symmetry argument and density-func...

  19. Two-dimensional NiCo2O4 nanosheet-coated three-dimensional graphene networks for high-rate, long-cycle-life supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiang; Huang, Ying; Cao, Xiehong; Ouyang, Bo; Sun, Wenping; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Yu; Ma, Qinglang; Liang, Shuquan; Yan, Qingyu; Zhang, Hua

    2015-04-01

    We report the synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) NiCo2O4 nanosheet-coated three-dimensional graphene network (3DGN), which is then used as an electrode for high-rate, long-cycle-life supercapacitors. Using the 3DGN and nanoporous nanosheets, an ultrahigh specific capacitance (2173 F g-1 at 6 A g-1), excellent rate capability (954 F g-1 at 200 A g-1) and superior long-term cycling performance (94% capacitance retention after 14 000 cycles at 100 A g-1) are achieved.We report the synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) NiCo2O4 nanosheet-coated three-dimensional graphene network (3DGN), which is then used as an electrode for high-rate, long-cycle-life supercapacitors. Using the 3DGN and nanoporous nanosheets, an ultrahigh specific capacitance (2173 F g-1 at 6 A g-1), excellent rate capability (954 F g-1 at 200 A g-1) and superior long-term cycling performance (94% capacitance retention after 14 000 cycles at 100 A g-1) are achieved. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, Fig. S1-S9, and Table S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06527a

  20. Ultra-trace electrochemical impedance determination of bovine serum albumin by a two dimensional silica network citrate-capped gold nanoparticles modified gold electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Abdollah; Saeidikhah, Marzieh

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a gold electrode (GE) was modified by coating with two dimensional silica network/citrate capped gold nanoparticles-poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (GE-TDSN-CGNP-PDDA) for ultra-sensitive determination of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). After covalently binding of a silica network (in two-dimensional form) on the surface of a gold electrode, via twice in situ hydrolysis of 3-mercaptopropyl-tri-ethoxysilane, citrate capped gold nanoparticles (CGNP) were chemically adsorbed on the silica cage. Subsequently, PDDA was bonded to CGNP via electrostatic interaction of positively charged polymer and negatively charged stabilizer of CGNP. Analytical properties of GE-TDSN-CGNP-PDDA were studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The detection limit for measured BSA was found to be 8.4×10(-13) mol L(-1) and the measuring linear concentration range of the proposed sensor was 9.9×10(-12)-1.6×10(-10) mol L(-1) of BSA. In addition, GE-TDSN-CGNP-PDDA exhibited good stability with high selectivity and was applied for determination of BSA in some samples with satisfactory results.

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory study on the electronic excited-state geometric structure, infrared spectra, and hydrogen bonding of a doubly hydrogen-bonded complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yufang; Ding, Junxia; Liu, Ruiqiong; Shi, Deheng; Sun, Jinfeng

    2009-12-01

    The geometric structures and infrared (IR) spectra in the electronically excited state of a novel doubly hydrogen-bonded complex formed by fluorenone and alcohols, which has been observed by IR spectra in experimental study, are investigated by the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method. The geometric structures and IR spectra in both ground state and the S(1) state of this doubly hydrogen-bonded FN-2MeOH complex are calculated using the DFT and TDDFT methods, respectively. Two intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between FN and methanol molecules in the doubly hydrogen-bonded FN-2MeOH complex. Moreover, the formation of the second intermolecular hydrogen bond can make the first intermolecular hydrogen bond become slightly weak. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the spectral shoulder at around 1700 cm(-1) observed in the IR spectra should be assigned as the doubly hydrogen-bonded FN-2MeOH complex from our calculated results. The electronic excited-state hydrogen bonding dynamics is also studied by monitoring some vibraitonal modes related to the formation of hydrogen bonds in different electronic states. As a result, both the two intermolecular hydrogen bonds are significantly strengthened in the S(1) state of the doubly hydrogen-bonded FN-2MeOH complex. The hydrogen bond strengthening in the electronically excited state is similar to the previous study on the singly hydrogen-bonded FN-MeOH complex and play important role on the photophysics of fluorenone in solutions.

  2. Nature of the N-H...S hydrogen bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Himansu S; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2009-11-19

    The N-H...S hydrogen-bonded complexes of the model compounds of tryptophan (indole and 3-methylindole) and methionine (dimethyl sulfide, Me(2)S) have been characterized by a combination of experimental techniques like resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), resonant ion dip infrared spectroscopy (RIDIRS), and fluorescence dip infrared spectroscopy (FDIRS) and computational methods like ab initio electronic structure calculations, atoms-in-molecules (AIM), natural bond orbital (NBO), and energy decomposition analyses. The results are compared with the N-H...O (M.H(2)O; M = indole, 3-methyl indole) sigma-type and N-H...Phi (M.benzene) pi-type hydrogen-bonded complexes. It was shown that the S(1)-S(0) band origin red shifts in the N-H...S hydrogen-bonded complexes correlated well with the polarizability of the acceptor rather than their proton affinity, contrary to the trend observed in most X-H...Y (X, Y = O, N, halogens, etc.) hydrogen-bonded systems. The red shift in the N-H stretching frequency in the N-H...S HB clusters (Me(2)S as HB acceptor) was found to be 1.8 times greater than that for the N-H...O hydrogen-bonded complexes (H(2)O as HB acceptor), although the binding energies for the two complexes were comparable. The energy decomposition analyses for all of the N-H...S hydrogen-bonded complexes showed that the correlation (or dispersion) energy has significant contribution to the total binding energy. It is pointed out that the binding energy of the N-H...S complex was also comparable to that of the indole.benzene complex, which is completely dominated by the dispersion interaction. Atoms-in-molcules (AIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses indicated a nontrivial electrostatic component in the hydrogen-bonding interaction. Greater dispersion contribution to the stabilization energy as well as greater red shifts in the N-H stretch relative to those of N-H...O hydrogen-bonded complexes makes the indole.dimethylsulfide complex unique in regard to the

  3. Targeted energy transfers and passive acoustic wave redirection in a two-dimensional granular network under periodic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yijing, E-mail: yzhng123@illinois.edu; Moore, Keegan J.; Vakakis, Alexander F. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); McFarland, D. Michael [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    We study passive pulse redirection and nonlinear targeted energy transfer in a granular network composed of two semi-infinite, ordered homogeneous granular chains mounted on linear elastic foundations and coupled by weak linear stiffnesses. Periodic excitation in the form of repetitive half-sine pulses is applied to one of the chains, designated as the “excited chain,” whereas the other chain is initially at rest and is regarded as the “absorbing chain.” We show that passive pulse redirection and targeted energy transfer from the excited to the absorbing chain can be achieved by macro-scale realization of the spatial analog of the Landau-Zener quantum tunneling effect. This is realized by finite stratification of the elastic foundation of the excited chain and depends on the system parameters (e.g., the percentage of stratification) and on the parameters of the periodic excitation. Utilizing empirical mode decomposition and numerical Hilbert transforms, we detect the existence of two distinct nonlinear phenomena in the periodically forced network; namely, (i) energy localization in the absorbing chain due to sustained 1:1 resonance capture leading to irreversible pulse redirection from the excited chain, and (ii) continuous energy exchanges in the form of nonlinear beats between the two chains in the absence of resonance capture. Our results extend previous findings of transient passive energy redirection in impulsively excited granular networks and demonstrate that steady state passive pulse redirection in these networks can be robustly achieved under periodic excitation.

  4. A Bayesian network model for predicting aquatic toxicity mode of action using two dimensional theoretical molecular descriptors-abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode of toxic action (MoA) has been recognized as a key determinant of chemical toxicity but MoA classification in aquatic toxicology has been limited. We developed a Bayesian network model to classify aquatic toxicity mode of action using a recently published dataset contain...

  5. A Bayesian network model for predicting aquatic toxicity mode of action using two dimensional theoretical molecular descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mode of toxic action (MoA) has been recognized as a key determinant of chemical toxicity, but development of predictive MoA classification models in aquatic toxicology has been limited. We developed a Bayesian network model to classify aquatic toxicity MoA using a recently pu...

  6. How universal are hydrogen bond correlations? A density functional study of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in low-energy conformers of α-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Kamal, C.; Kshirsagar, Rohidas J.; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Banerjee, Arup

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding is one of the most important and ubiquitous interactions present in Nature. Several studies have attempted to characterise and understand the nature of this very basic interaction. These include both experimental and theoretical investigations of different types of chemical compounds, as well as systems subjected to high pressure. The O-H..O bond is of course the best studied hydrogen bond, and most studies have concentrated on intermolecular hydrogen bonding in solids and liquids. In this paper, we analyse and characterise normal hydrogen bonding of the general type, D-H...A, in intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. Using a first-principles density functional theory approach, we investigate low energy conformers of the twenty α-amino acids. Within these conformers, several different types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds are identified. The hydrogen bond within a given conformer occurs between two molecular groups, either both within the backbone itself, or one in the backbone and one in the side chain. In a few conformers, more than one (type of) hydrogen bond is seen to occur. Interestingly, the strength of the hydrogen bonds in the amino acids spans quite a large range, from weak to strong. The signature of hydrogen bonding in these molecules, as reflected in their theoretical vibrational spectra, is analysed. With the new first-principles data from 51 hydrogen bonds, various parameters relating to the hydrogen bond, such as hydrogen bond length, hydrogen bond angle, bond length and vibrational frequencies are studied. Interestingly, the correlation between these parameters in these bonds is found to be in consonance with those obtained in earlier experimental studies of normal hydrogen bonds on vastly different systems. Our study provides some of the most detailed first-principles support, and the first involving vibrational frequencies, for the universality of hydrogen bond correlations in materials.

  7. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  8. Hydrogen bonding characterization in water and small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi

    2017-06-01

    The prototypical hydrogen bond in water dimer and hydrogen bonds in the protonated water dimer, in other small molecules, in water cyclic clusters, and in ice, covering a wide range of bond strengths, are theoretically investigated by first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, considering not only a standard generalized gradient approximation functional but also, for the water dimer, hybrid and van der Waals corrected functionals. We compute structural, energetic, and electrostatic (induced molecular dipole moments) properties. In particular, hydrogen bonds are characterized in terms of differential electron density distributions and profiles, and of the shifts of the centres of maximally localized Wannier functions. The information from the latter quantities can be conveyed to a single geometric bonding parameter that appears to be correlated with the Mayer bond order parameter and can be taken as an estimate of the covalent contribution to the hydrogen bond. By considering the water trimer, the cyclic water hexamer, and the hexagonal phase of ice, we also elucidate the importance of cooperative/anticooperative effects in hydrogen-bonding formation.

  9. Mapping the force-field of a hydrogen bonded assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Philip

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen-bonding underpins the structure, properties, and dynamics of a vast array of systems spanning a wide variety of scientific fields. From the striking complexity of the phase diagram of H2O and the elegance of base pair interactions in DNA, to the directionality inherent in supramolecular self-assembly at surfaces, hydrogen bonds play an essential role in directing intermolecular forces. Yet fundamental aspects of the H-bond, including the magnitude of the force and binding energy, force constant, and decay length associated with the interaction, have been vigorously debated for many decades. I will discuss how dynamic force microscopy (DFM) using a qPlus sensor can quantitatively map the tip-sample force-field for naphthalene tetracarboxylic diimide (NTCDI) molecules hydrogen-bonded in 2D assemblies. A comparison of experimental images and force spectra with their simulated counterparts from density functional theory calculations shows that image contrast due to intermolecular hydrogen bonds arises fundamentally from charge density depletion due to strong tip-sample interactions. Interpretation of DFM images of hydrogen bonds therefore necessitates detailed consideration of the coupled tip-molecule system: analyses based on intermolecular charge density in the absence of the tip fail to capture the essential physical chemistry underpinning the imaging mechanism.

  10. Hydrogen bond switching among flavin and amino acid side chains in the BLUF photoreceptor observed by ultrafast infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Cosimo; Mathes, Tilo; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Mullen, Katharine M; Groot, Marie-Louise; van Grondelle, Rienk; Hegemann, Peter; Kennis, John T M

    2008-11-15

    BLUF domains constitute a recently discovered class of photoreceptor proteins found in bacteria and eukaryotic algae. BLUF domains are blue-light sensitive through a FAD cofactor that is involved in an extensive hydrogen-bond network with nearby amino acid side chains, including a highly conserved tyrosine and glutamine. The participation of particular amino acid side chains in the ultrafast hydrogen-bond switching reaction with FAD that underlies photoactivation of BLUF domains is assessed by means of ultrafast infrared spectroscopy. Blue-light absorption by FAD results in formation of FAD(*-) and a bleach of the tyrosine ring vibrational mode on a picosecond timescale, showing that electron transfer from tyrosine to FAD constitutes the primary photochemistry. This interpretation is supported by the absence of a kinetic isotope effect on the fluorescence decay on H/D exchange. Subsequent protonation of FAD(*-) to result in FADH(*) on a picosecond timescale is evidenced by the appearance of a N-H bending mode at the FAD N5 protonation site and of a FADH(*) C=N stretch marker mode, with tyrosine as the likely proton donor. FADH(*) is reoxidized in 67 ps (180 ps in D(2)O) to result in a long-lived hydrogen-bond switched network around FAD. This hydrogen-bond switch shows infrared signatures from the C-OH stretch of tyrosine and the FAD C4=O and C=N stretches, which indicate increased hydrogen-bond strength at all these sites. The results support a previously hypothesized rotation of glutamine by approximately 180 degrees through a light-driven radical-pair mechanism as the determinant of the hydrogen-bond switch.

  11. Estimation of the hydraulic conductivity of a two-dimensional fracture network using effective medium theory and power-law averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, R. W.; Leung, C. T.

    2009-12-01

    Most oil and gas reservoirs, as well as most potential sites for nuclear waste disposal, are naturally fractured. In these sites, the network of fractures will provide the main path for fluid to flow through the rock mass. In many cases, the fracture density is so high as to make it impractical to model it with a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. For such rock masses, it would be useful to have recourse to analytical, or semi-analytical, methods to estimate the macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the fracture network. We have investigated single-phase fluid flow through generated stochastically two-dimensional fracture networks. The centers and orientations of the fractures are uniformly distributed, whereas their lengths follow a lognormal distribution. The aperture of each fracture is correlated with its length, either through direct proportionality, or through a nonlinear relationship. The discrete fracture network flow and transport simulator NAPSAC, developed by Serco (Didcot, UK), is used to establish the “true” macroscopic hydraulic conductivity of the network. We then attempt to match this value by starting with the individual fracture conductances, and using various upscaling methods. Kirkpatrick’s effective medium approximation, which works well for pore networks on a core scale, generally underestimates the conductivity of the fracture networks. We attribute this to the fact that the conductances of individual fracture segments (between adjacent intersections with other fractures) are correlated with each other, whereas Kirkpatrick’s approximation assumes no correlation. The power-law averaging approach proposed by Desbarats for porous media is able to match the numerical value, using power-law exponents that generally lie between 0 (geometric mean) and 1 (harmonic mean). The appropriate exponent can be correlated with statistical parameters that characterize the fracture density.

  12. Detecting and identifying two-dimensional symmetry-protected topological, symmetry-breaking, and intrinsic topological phases with modular matrices via tensor-network methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Yu; Wei, Tzu-Chieh

    2016-04-01

    Symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases exhibit nontrivial order if symmetry is respected but are adiabatically connected to the trivial product phase if symmetry is not respected. However, unlike the symmetry-breaking phase, there is no local order parameter for SPT phases. Here we employ a tensor-network method to compute the topological invariants characterized by the simulated modular S and T matrices to study transitions in a few families of two-dimensional (2D) wave functions which are ZN (N =2 and3 ) symmetric. We find that in addition to the topologically ordered phases, the modular matrices can be used to identify nontrivial SPT phases and detect transitions between different SPT phases as well as between symmetric and symmetry-breaking phases. Therefore modular matrices can be used to characterize various types of gapped phases in a unifying way.

  13. Examining student heuristic usage in a hydrogen bonding assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathryn; Kim, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the role of representational competence in student responses to an assessment of hydrogen bonding. The assessment couples the use of a multiple-select item ("Choose all that apply") with an open-ended item to allow for an examination of students' cognitive processes as they relate to the assignment of hydrogen bonding within a structural representation. Response patterns from the multiple-select item implicate heuristic usage as a contributing factor to students' incorrect responses. The use of heuristics is further supported by the students' corresponding responses to the open-ended assessment item. Taken together, these data suggest that poor representational competence may contribute to students' previously observed inability to correctly navigate the concept of hydrogen bonding. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):411-416, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds in \\beta-sheet formation

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Chitra

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigate interactions of extended conformations of homodimeric peptides made of small (glycine or alanine) and large hydrophobic (valine or leucine) sidechains using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to decipher driving forces for \\beta-sheet formation. We make use of a periodic boundary condition setup in which individual peptides are infinitely long and stretched. Dimers adopt \\beta-sheet conformations at short interpeptide distances (\\xi ~ 0.5 nm) and at intermediate distances (~ 0.8 nm), valine and leucine homodimers assume cross-\\beta-like conformations with side chains interpenetrating each other. These two states are identified as minima in the Potential of Mean Force (PMF). While the number of interpeptide hydrogen bonds increases with decreasing interpeptide distance, the total hydrogen bond number in the system does not change significantly, suggesting that formation of \\beta-sheet structures from extended conformations is not driven by hydrogen bonds. This is supported by...

  15. Infrared Spectra and Hydrogen Bonds of Biologically Active Benzaldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shimko, A. N.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2013-09-01

    IR-Fourier spectra of solutions and crystals of biologically active benzaldehyde derivatives were studied. Specific features of the formation of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds were analyzed. Spectral signatures that characterized participation of the hydroxyl OH group and also the OCH3 and C=O groups in the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the three different types O-H···O-H, O-H···O-CH3, and O-H···O=C were revealed. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the types O-H···O-H and O-H···O-CH3 were absent for benzaldehyde derivatives in the crystal phase. Only hydroxyl and carbonyl groups participated in intermolecular interactions. This resulted in the formation of linear intermolecular dimers. Seven various configurations of the linear dimers were identified in solutions and crystals.

  16. Molecular structure of hydrazoic acid with hydrogen-bonded tetramers in nearly planar layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Jürgen; Göbel, Michael; Krumm, Burkhard; Martin, Franz; Medvedyev, Sergey; Oehlinger, Gilbert; Steemann, Franz Xaver; Troyan, Ivan; Klapötke, Thomas M; Eremets, Mikhail I

    2011-08-10

    Hydrazoic acid (HN(3))--potentially explosive, highly toxic, and very hygroscopic--is the simplest covalent azide and contains 97.7 wt % nitrogen. Although its molecular structure was established decades ago, its crystal structure has now been solved by X-ray diffraction for the first time. Molecules of HN(3) are connected to each other by hydrogen bonds in nearly planar layers parallel to (001) with stacking sequence A, B, ... The layer distance, at 2.950(1) Å, is shorter than that in 2H-graphite [3.355(2) Å]. The hydrogen bonds N-H···N are of great interest, since the azido group consists of three homonuclear atoms with identical electronegativity, but different formal charges. These hydrogen bonds are bifurcated into moderate ones with ≈2.0 Å and into weak ones with ≈2.6 Å. The moderate ones build up tetramers (HN(3))(4) in a nearly planar net of eight-membered rings. To the best of our knowledge, such a network of tetramers of a simple molecule is unique.

  17. Discrete kink dynamics in hydrogen-bonded chains: the one-component model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpan, V M; Zolotaryuk, Y; Christiansen, P L; Zolotaryuk, A V

    2002-12-01

    We study topological solitary waves (kinks and antikinks) in a nonlinear one-dimensional Klein-Gordon chain with the on-site potential of a double-Morse type. This chain is used to describe the collective proton dynamics in quasi-one-dimensional networks of hydrogen bonds, where the on-site potential plays the role of the proton potential in the hydrogen bond. The system supports a rich variety of stationary kink solutions with different symmetry properties. We study the stability and bifurcation structure of all these stationary kink states. An exactly solvable model with a piecewise "parabola-constant" approximation of the double-Morse potential is suggested and studied analytically. The dependence of the Peierls-Nabarro potential on the system parameters is studied. Discrete traveling-wave solutions of a narrow permanent profile are shown to exist, depending on the anharmonicity of the Morse potential and the cooperativity of the hydrogen bond (the coupling constant of the interaction between nearest-neighbor protons).

  18. Solvent based hydrogen bonding: impact on poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanoscale morphology and charge transport characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mincheol; Choi, Dalsu; Fu, Boyi; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2013-06-25

    We demonstrate that supramolecular assembly and subsequent enhancement of charge transport characteristics of conjugated polymers can be facilitated simply by adding small amounts of a more volatile poor solvent, which can hydrogen bond with the majority solvent. Addition of up to 2 vol % acetone to a precursor solution of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in chloroform leads to approximately a 4-fold increase in P3HT field-effect mobility. The improvement is associated with hydrogen bonding interactions between acetone and chloroform which decrease the evaporation rate of the mixed solvent. P3HT is less soluble in the binary solvent than in the more readily vaporized chloroform component, and this characteristic enables the supramolecular assembly of P3HT chains at the nanoscale. Two-dimensional molecular ordering of the polymer film was controlled by varying the quantity of poor solvent added to the precursor solution, and the correlation between field-effect mobility and molecular ordering was investigated. Hansen solubility parameters were used to systematically understand how the solvent mixture enhances the alignment and assembly of polymer chains and influences subsequent thin film properties. The value of the relative energy difference (RED) of the solvent with respect to P3HT increased from less than 1 to more than 1 during film formation, which indicates that the solvent characteristics are initially those of a good solvent but transform into those of a poor dissolution medium. A mechanistic illustration of the molecular ordering process during film formation is postulated.

  19. A supramolecular ladder-like network from trimesic acid and pyrazine N,N'-dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vitthal N; Görbitz, Carl Henrik

    2014-01-01

    In the title complex, benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid-pyrazine N,N'-dioxide (2/1), C9H6O6·0.5C4H4N2O2, cocrystallized trimesic acid (TMA) and pyrazine N,N'-dioxide (PNO) molecules form strong O-H...O hydrogen bonds, but also important weak C-H...O and dipole-dipole intermolecular interactions, to generate a densely packed three-dimensional network. PNO molecules lie on inversion centres where they connect pairs of TMA sheets into distinct two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded layers perpendicular to the crystallographic ab diagonal.

  20. Hydrogen bond docking site competition in methyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Du, Lin

    2017-06-01

    The Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonds in the 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-methyl ester complexes in the gas phase have been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and DFT calculations. Methyl formate (MF), methyl acetate (MA), and methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA) were chosen as the hydrogen bond acceptors. A dominant inter-molecular hydrogen bond was formed between the OH group of TFE and different docking sites in the methyl esters (carbonyl oxygen or ester oxygen). The competition of the two docking sites decides the structure and spectral properties of the complexes. On the basis of the observed red shifts of the OH-stretching transition with respect to the TFE monomer, the order of the hydrogen bond strength can be sorted as TFE-MA (119 cm- 1) > TFE-MF (93 cm- 1) > TFE-MTFA (44 cm- 1). Combining the experimental infrared spectra with the DFT calculations, the Gibbs free energies of formation were determined to be 1.5, 4.5 and 8.6 kJ mol- 1 for TFE-MA, TFE-MF and TFE-MTFA, respectively. The hydrogen bonding in the MTFA complex is much weaker than those of the TFE-MA and TFE-MF complexes due to the effect of the CF3 substitution on MTFA, while the replacement of an H atom with a CH3 group in methyl ester only slightly increases the hydrogen bond strength. Topological analysis and localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis was also applied to compare the interactions in the complexes.

  1. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  2. Self-assembly through secondary interactions in formation of two-dimensional lead(II) supramolecular polymer with nanosheets morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Yasamin; Akhbari, Kamran; Phuruangrat, Anukorn; Costantino, Ferdinando

    2017-02-01

    In order to study the role of self-assembly through secondary interactions in formation of [Pb(3-AB)2]n (1), [3-ABbar = 3-aminobenzoate], we designed some experiments and synthesized two samples of 1 under ultrasonic irradiations. Nanosheets of 1 were synthesized under these conditions. Compound 1 is a one-dimensional coordination polymer. Self-assembly through hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions between these chains results in formation of two-dimensional supramolecular polymer. It seems that self-assembly through secondary interactions between these chain structures is responsible for formation of 1 with nanosheet morphology. Formation nanoparticles of [Pb(2,6-DHB)2]n (2), [2,6-DHBbar = 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate], under the same condition applied for 1, which has three-dimensional coordination network in its crystalline structure, approved our hypotheses. These microstructures were characterized by IR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

  3. Ab initio and template-based prediction of multi-class distance maps by two-dimensional recursive neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Alberto JM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of protein structures from their sequences is still one of the open grand challenges of computational biology. Some approaches to protein structure prediction, especially ab initio ones, rely to some extent on the prediction of residue contact maps. Residue contact map predictions have been assessed at the CASP competition for several years now. Although it has been shown that exact contact maps generally yield correct three-dimensional structures, this is true only at a relatively low resolution (3–4 Å from the native structure. Another known weakness of contact maps is that they are generally predicted ab initio, that is not exploiting information about potential homologues of known structure. Results We introduce a new class of distance restraints for protein structures: multi-class distance maps. We show that Cα trace reconstructions based on 4-class native maps are significantly better than those from residue contact maps. We then build two predictors of 4-class maps based on recursive neural networks: one ab initio, or relying on the sequence and on evolutionary information; one template-based, or in which homology information to known structures is provided as a further input. We show that virtually any level of sequence similarity to structural templates (down to less than 10% yields more accurate 4-class maps than the ab initio predictor. We show that template-based predictions by recursive neural networks are consistently better than the best template and than a number of combinations of the best available templates. We also extract binary residue contact maps at an 8 Å threshold (as per CASP assessment from the 4-class predictors and show that the template-based version is also more accurate than the best template and consistently better than the ab initio one, down to very low levels of sequence identity to structural templates. Furthermore, we test both ab-initio and template-based 8

  4. Large-scale prediction of disulphide bridges using kernel methods, two-dimensional recursive neural networks, and weighted graph matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianlin; Saigo, Hiroto; Baldi, Pierre

    2006-03-15

    The formation of disulphide bridges between cysteines plays an important role in protein folding, structure, function, and evolution. Here, we develop new methods for predicting disulphide bridges in proteins. We first build a large curated data set of proteins containing disulphide bridges to extract relevant statistics. We then use kernel methods to predict whether a given protein chain contains intrachain disulphide bridges or not, and recursive neural networks to predict the bonding probabilities of each pair of cysteines in the chain. These probabilities in turn lead to an accurate estimation of the total number of disulphide bridges and to a weighted graph matching problem that can be addressed efficiently to infer the global disulphide bridge connectivity pattern. This approach can be applied both in situations where the bonded state of each cysteine is known, or in ab initio mode where the state is unknown. Furthermore, it can easily cope with chains containing an arbitrary number of disulphide bridges, overcoming one of the major limitations of previous approaches. It can classify individual cysteine residues as bonded or nonbonded with 87% specificity and 89% sensitivity. The estimate for the total number of bridges in each chain is correct 71% of the times, and within one from the true value over 94% of the times. The prediction of the overall disulphide connectivity pattern is exact in about 51% of the chains. In addition to using profiles in the input to leverage evolutionary information, including true (but not predicted) secondary structure and solvent accessibility information yields small but noticeable improvements. Finally, once the system is trained, predictions can be computed rapidly on a proteomic or protein-engineering scale. The disulphide bridge prediction server (DIpro), software, and datasets are available through www.igb.uci.edu/servers/psss.html.

  5. Nature of hydrogen bonding in coal-derived asphaltenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, S.R.; Li, N.C.

    1978-02-01

    Reports are presented on near-infrared and proton magneti resonance studies of hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl group of o-phenylphenol (OPP) and two coal derived asphaltenes, and their acid and base components. The asphaltenes were prepared from bituminous coal under the same conditions except that one was prepared using a CoMo catalyst. The results of the studies show that the use of the CoMo catalyst leads to a base asphaltene component of lower molecular weight and higher hydrogen-bond acceptor strength.

  6. On some hydrogen bond correlations at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, S. K.

    2007-09-01

    In situ high pressure neutron diffraction measured lengths of O H and H O pairs in hydrogen bonds in substances are shown to follow the correlation between them established from 0.1 MPa data on different chemical compounds. In particular, the conclusion by Nelmes et al that their high pressure data on ice VIII differ from it is not supported. For compounds in which the O H stretching frequencies red shift under pressure, it is shown that wherever structural data is available, they follow the stretching frequency versus H O (or O O) distance correlation. For compounds displaying blue shifts with pressure an analogy appears to exist with improper hydrogen bonds.

  7. Solvent effects on hydrogen bonding between primary alcohols and esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DHARMALINGAM K.; RAMACHANDRAN K.; SIVAGURUNATHAN P.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction by hydrogen bond formation of some primary alcohols (1-heptanol, 1-octanol and 1-decanol) with esters (methyl methacrylate, ethyl methacrylate and butyl methacrylate) was investigated in non-polar solvents viz., n-heptane,CCh and benzene by means of FTIR spectroscopy. Formation constants and free energy changes of complex formation were determined. The dependence of the equilibrium constants and free energy changes of complex formation on the alkyl chain length of both the alcohols and esters are discussed. The solvent effect on the hydrogen bond formation is discussed in terms of specific interaction between the solute and solvent.

  8. Assembling one-dimensional coordination polymers into threedimensional architectures via hydrogen bonds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit Rajput; Madhushree Sarkar; Kumar Biradha

    2010-09-01

    The reactions of bis(pyridylcarboxamido)alkanes (amides) and bis(3-pyridyl)alkanediamides (reverse amides) with copper(II) and zinc(II) in the presence of various anions resulted in onedimensional polymeric crystalline complexes with or without guest inclusion. The crystal structure analyses of these complexes reveal that the one-dimensional networks observed here are of three types: simple linear chain, chains with wavy nature and chains containing cavities. The self-complementary amide groups of the ligands assembled these coordination networks into higher dimensional architectures via N-H$\\cdots$O hydrogen bonds.

  9. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  10. Coordination and metalation bifunctionality of Cu with 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin: toward a mixed-valence two-dimensional coordination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xiao, Jie; Shubina, Tatyana E; Chen, Min; Shi, Ziliang; Schmid, Martin; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Gottfried, J Michael; Lin, Nian

    2012-04-11

    We investigated the coordination self-assembly and metalation reaction of Cu with 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin (2HTPyP) on a Au(111) surface by means of scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. 2HTPyP was found to interact with Cu through both the peripheral pyridyl groups and the porphyrin core. Pairs of pyridyl groups from neighboring molecules coordinate Cu(0) atoms, which leads to the formation of a supramolecular metal-organic coordination network. The network formation occurs at room temperature; annealing at 450 K enhances the process. The interaction of Cu with the porphyrin core is more complex. At room temperature, formation of an initial complex Cu(0)-2HTPyP is observed. Annealing at 450 K activates an intramolecular redox reaction, by which the coordinated Cu(0) is oxidized to Cu(II) and the complex Cu(II)TPyP is formed. The coordination network consists then of Cu(II) complexes linked by Cu(0) atoms; that is, it represents a mixed-valence two-dimensional coordination network consisting of an ordered array of Cu(II) and Cu(0) centers. Above 520 K, the network degrades and the Cu atoms in the linking positions diffuse into the substrate, while the Cu(II)TPyP complexes form a close-packed structure that is stabilized by weak intermolecular interactions. Density functional theory investigations show that the reaction with Cu(0) proceeds via formation of an initial complex between metal atom and porphyrin followed by formation of Cu(II) porphyrin within the course of the reaction. The activation barrier of the rate limiting step was found to be 24-37 kcal mol(-1) depending on the method used. In addition, linear coordination of a Cu atom by two CuTPyP molecules is favorable according to gas-phase calculations. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  11. Two-dimensional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Osserman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The basic component of several-variable calculus, two-dimensional calculus is vital to mastery of the broader field. This extensive treatment of the subject offers the advantage of a thorough integration of linear algebra and materials, which aids readers in the development of geometric intuition. An introductory chapter presents background information on vectors in the plane, plane curves, and functions of two variables. Subsequent chapters address differentiation, transformations, and integration. Each chapter concludes with problem sets, and answers to selected exercises appear at the end o

  12. Two dimensional vernier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional vernier scale is disclosed utilizing a cartesian grid on one plate member with a polar grid on an overlying transparent plate member. The polar grid has multiple concentric circles at a fractional spacing of the spacing of the cartesian grid lines. By locating the center of the polar grid on a location on the cartesian grid, interpolation can be made of both the X and Y fractional relationship to the cartesian grid by noting which circles coincide with a cartesian grid line for the X and Y direction.

  13. Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding of unlocked nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Niels; Wengel, Jesper; Pasternak, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe the synthesis of two new unlocked nucleic acid building blocks containing hypoxanthine and 2,6-diaminopurine as nucleobase moieties and their incorporation into oligonucleotides. The modified oligonucleotides were used to examine the thermodynamic properties of UNA against unmo...... unmodified oligonucleotides and the resulting thermodynamic data support that the hydrogen bonding face of UNA is Watson-Crick like....

  14. Templation in Noncovalent Synthesis of Hydrogen-Bonded Rosettes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crego-Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David N.; Cate, ten Matthijs G.J.; Schalley, Christoph A.; Vögtle, Fritz; Dötz, Karl Heinz

    2005-01-01

    In this chapter, hydrogen-bonded assemblies based on the rosette motif are used to describe some examples of templation in noncovalent synthesis. After a brief description of the synthesis and characterization of these assemblies, the guest-templated selection and amplification of the strongest bind

  15. Hydrogen Bonding in Phosphine Oxide/Phosphate-Phenol Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, R.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2010-01-01

    To develop a new solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) system for the removal of phenols and thiophenols from water, complex formation by hydrogen bonding of phosphine oxides and phosphates is studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and quantum chemical modeling. Six different computational m

  16. Alkyl Radicals as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors: Computational Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Steen

    2009-01-01

    , and gives rise to pronounced shifts of IR stretching frequencies and to increased absorption intensities. The hydrogen bond acceptor properties of alkyl radicals equal those of many conventional acceptors, e.g., the bond length changes and IR red-shifts suggest that tert-butyl radicals are slightly better...

  17. Controlling the amplification of chirality in hydrogen-bonded assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateos-Timoneda, Miguel A.; Crego-Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2005-01-01

    The amplification of chirality (a high enantiomeric or diastereomeric excess induced by a small initial amount of chiral bias) on hydrogen-bonded assemblies has been studied using “sergeants-and-soldiers” experiments under thermodynamically controlled conditions. Here it is shown that different subs

  18. Piezoelectric hydrogen bonding: computational screening for a design rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werling, Keith A; Griffin, Maryanne; Hutchison, Geoffrey R; Lambrecht, Daniel S

    2014-09-01

    Organic piezoelectric materials are promising targets in applications such as energy harvesting or mechanical sensors and actuators. In a recent paper (Werling, K. A.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 1365-1370), we have shown that hydrogen bonding gives rise to a significant piezoelectric response. In this article, we aim to find organic hydrogen bonded systems with increased piezo-response by investigating different hydrogen bonding motifs and by tailoring the hydrogen bond strength via functionalization. The largest piezo-coefficient of 23 pm/V is found for the nitrobenzene-aniline dimer. We develop a simple, yet surprisingly accurate rationale to predict piezo-coefficients based on the zero-field compliance matrix and dipole derivatives. This rationale increases the speed of first-principles piezo-coefficient calculations by an order of magnitude. At the same time, it suggests how to understand and further increase the piezo-response. Our rationale also explains the remarkably large piezo-response of 150 pm/V and more for another class of systems, the "molecular springs" (Marvin, C.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. C 2013, 117, 16783-16790.).

  19. OH stretching frequencies in systems with intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens; Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    OH stretching wavenumbers were investigated for 30 species with intramolecularly hydrogen bonded hydroxyl groups, covering the range from 3600 to ca. 1900 cm-1. Theoretical wavenumbers were predicted with B3LYP/6-31G(d) density functional theory using the standard harmonic approximation, as well...

  20. Alternation and tunable composition in hydrogen bonded supramolecular copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Thorsten; de Greef, Tom F A; Nieuwenhuizen, Marko M L; Sijbesma, Rint P

    2014-03-07

    Sequence control in supramolecular copolymers is limited by the selectivity of the associating monomer end groups. Here we introduce the use of monomers with aminopyrimidinone and aminohydroxynaphthyridine quadruple hydrogen bonding end groups, which both homodimerize, but form even stronger heterodimers. These features allow the formation of supramolecular copolymers with a tunable composition and a preference for alternating sequences.

  1. Hydrogen bonds in concreto and in computro: the sequel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouten, Pieter F. W.; Van Eijck, Bouke P.; Kroon, Jan

    1991-02-01

    In the framework of our comparative research concerning hydrogen bonding in the crystalline and liquid phases we have carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid methanol. Six different rigid three site models are compared. Five of them had been reported in the literature and one (OM2) we developed by a fit to the experimental molar volume, heat of vaporization and neutron weighted radial distribution function. In general the agreement with experiment is satisfactory for the different models. None of the models has an explicit hydrogen bond potential, but five of the six models show a degree of hydrogen bonding comparable to experiments on liquid methanol. The analysis of the simulation hydrogen bonds indicates that there is a distinct preference of the O⋯O axis to lie in the acceptor lone pairs plane, but hardly any for the lone pair directions. Ab initio calculations and crystal structure statistics of OH⋯O hydrogen bonds agree with this observation. The O⋯O hydrogen bond length distributions are similar for most models. The crystal structures show a sharper O⋯O distribution. Explicit introduction of harmonic motion with a quite realistic root mean square amplitude of 0.08 Å to the thermally averaged crystal distribution results in a distribution comparable to OM2 although the maximum of the former is found at shorter distance. On the basis of the analysis of the static properties of all models we conclude that our OM2, Jorgenson's OPLS and Haughney, Ferrario and McDonald's HFM1 models are good candidates for simulations of liquid methanol under isothermal, isochoric conditions. Partly flexible and completely rigid OM2 are simulated at constant pressure and with fixed volume. The flexible simulations give essentially the same (correct) results under both conditions, which is not surprising because the flexible form was fitted under both conditions. Rigid OM2 has a similar potential energy but larger pressure in the

  2. Hydrogen-bond acidity of ionic liquids: an extended scale†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnia, Kiki A.; Lima, Filipa; Cláudio, Ana Filipa M.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main drawbacks comprising an appropriate selection of ionic liquids (ILs) for a target application is related to the lack of an extended and well-established polarity scale for these neoteric fluids. Albeit considerable progress has been made on identifying chemical structures and factors that influence the polarity of ILs, there still exists a high inconsistency in the experimental values reported by different authors. Furthermore, due to the extremely large number of possible ILs that can be synthesized, the experimental characterization of their polarity is a major limitation when envisaging the choice of an IL with a desired polarity. Therefore, it is of crucial relevance to develop correlation schemes and a priori predictive methods able to forecast the polarity of new (or not yet synthesized) fluids. In this context, and aiming at broadening the experimental polarity scale available for ILs, the solvatochromic Kamlet–Taft parameters of a broad range of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-([NTf2]−)-based fluids were determined. The impact of the IL cation structure on the hydrogen-bond donating ability of the fluid was comprehensively addressed. Based on the large amount of novel experimental values obtained, we then evaluated COSMO-RS, COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Real Solvents, as an alternative tool to estimate the hydrogen-bond acidity of ILs. A three-parameter model based on the cation–anion interaction energies was found to adequately describe the experimental hydrogen-bond acidity or hydrogen-bond donating ability of ILs. The proposed three-parameter model is also shown to present a predictive capacity and to provide novel molecular-level insights into the chemical structure characteristics that influence the acidity of a given IL. It is shown that although the equimolar cation–anion hydrogen-bonding energies (EHB) play the major role, the electrostatic-misfit interactions (EMF) and van der Waals forces (EvdW) also contribute

  3. 二维映射神经元网络同步%Synchronization of Neuronal Networks Using Two-dimensional Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇

    2013-01-01

    Experimental results have confirmed that the electric activity of individual neuron has a steady state,a spike state and a spiking-bursting state.The synchronization of neuron is investi-gated in the regular network by a simple two-dimensional map model.The influence of coupling strength on the synchronization of neuronal networks is discussed by computing factor of syn-chronization.%实验研究发现神经元的电活动有静息态、激发态以及簇发态的特征。利用简单的二维映射神经元模型构造规则网络来研究神经元网络放电的同步机制。通过计算同步因子探讨神经元网络同步,分析了耦合强度对神经元网络同步的影响。

  4. The role of vascular actors in two dimensional dialogue of human bone marrow stromal cell and endothelial cell for inducing self-assembled network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Li

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is very important for vascularized tissue engineering. In this study, we found that a two-dimensional co-culture of human bone marrow stromal cell (HBMSC and human umbical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC is able to stimulate the migration of co-cultured HUVEC and induce self-assembled network formation. During this process, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF₁₆₅ was upregulated in co-cultured HBMSC. Meanwhile, VEGF₁₆₅-receptor2 (KDR and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA were upregulated in co-cultured HUVEC. Functional studies show that neutralization of VEGF₁₆₅ blocked the migration and the rearrangement of the cells and downregulated the expression of uPA and its receptor. Blocking of vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cad did not affect the migration of co-cultured HUVEC but suppressed the self-assembled network formation. In conclusion, co-cultures upregulated the expression of VEGF₁₆₅ in co-cultured HBMSC; VEGF₁₆₅ then activated uPA in co-cultured HUVEC, which might be responsible for initiating the migration and the self-assembled network formation with the participation of VE-cad. All of these results indicated that only the direct contact of HBMSC and HUVEC and their respective dialogue are sufficient to stimulate secretion of soluble factors and to activate molecules that are critical for self-assembled network formation which show a great application potential for vascularization in tissue engineering.

  5. Anharmonic exciton dynamics and energy dissipation in liquid water from two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Luigi; Fournier, Joseph A.; Thämer, Martin; Carpenter, William; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    Water's extended hydrogen-bond network results in rich and complex dynamics on the sub-picosecond time scale. In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of the two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectrum of O-H stretching vibrations in liquid H2O and their interactions with bending and intermolecular vibrations. By exploring the dependence of the spectrum on waiting time, temperature, and laser polarization, we refine our molecular picture of water's complex ultrafast dynamics. The spectral evolution following excitation of the O-H stretching resonance reveals vibrational dynamics on the 50-300 fs time scale that are dominated by intermolecular delocalization. These O-H stretch excitons are a result of the anharmonicity of the nuclear potential energy surface that arises from the hydrogen-bonding interaction. The extent of O-H stretching excitons is characterized through 2D depolarization measurements that show spectrally dependent delocalization in agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we show that these dynamics are insensitive to temperature, indicating that the exciton dynamics alone set the important time scales in the system. Finally, we study the evolution of the O-H stretching mode, which shows highly non-adiabatic dynamics suggestive of vibrational conical intersections. We argue that the so-called heating, commonly observed within ˜1 ps in nonlinear IR spectroscopy of water, is a nonequilibrium state better described by a kinetic temperature rather than a Boltzmann distribution. Our conclusions imply that the collective nature of water vibrations should be considered in describing aqueous solvation.

  6. Hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizhou; Wang, Donglai; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoming; Tian, Anmin

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes have been investigated theoretically employing the newly developed density functional M06 with the suitable basis set and the natural bond orbital analysis. Comparing with the hydrogen or halogen bond in the gas phase, we find that the strength of the hydrogen or halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube will become weaker if there is a larger intramolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom donor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen or halogen bond and will become stronger if there is a larger intermolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom acceptor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond. According to the analysis of the molecular electrostatic potential of the carbon nanotube, the driving force for the electron-density transfer is found to be the negative electric field formed in the carbon nanotube inner phase. Our results also show that the X-H bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen bond and the X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the halogen bond are all elongated when encapsulating the hydrogen bond and halogen bond within the carbon nanotube, so the carbon nanotube confinement may change the blue-shifting hydrogen bond and the blue-shifting halogen bond into the red-shifting hydrogen bond and the red-shifting halogen bond. The possibility to replace the all electron nanotube-confined calculation by the simple polarizable continuum model is also evaluated.

  7. Transport behavior of water molecules through two-dimensional nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng, E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-11-14

    Water transport through a two-dimensional nanoporous membrane has attracted increasing attention in recent years thanks to great demands in water purification and desalination applications. However, few studies have been reported on the microscopic mechanisms of water transport through structured nanopores, especially at the atomistic scale. Here we investigate the microstructure of water flow through two-dimensional model graphene membrane containing a variety of nanopores of different size by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results clearly indicate that the continuum flow transits to discrete molecular flow patterns with decreasing pore sizes. While for pores with a diameter ≥15 Å water flux exhibits a linear dependence on the pore area, a nonlinear relationship between water flux and pore area has been identified for smaller pores. We attribute this deviation from linear behavior to the presence of discrete water flow, which is strongly influenced by the water-membrane interaction and hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  8. Transport behavior of water molecules through two-dimensional nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Water transport through a two-dimensional nanoporous membrane has attracted increasing attention in recent years thanks to great demands in water purification and desalination applications. However, few studies have been reported on the microscopic mechanisms of water transport through structured nanopores, especially at the atomistic scale. Here we investigate the microstructure of water flow through two-dimensional model graphene membrane containing a variety of nanopores of different size by using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results clearly indicate that the continuum flow transits to discrete molecular flow patterns with decreasing pore sizes. While for pores with a diameter ≥15 Å water flux exhibits a linear dependence on the pore area, a nonlinear relationship between water flux and pore area has been identified for smaller pores. We attribute this deviation from linear behavior to the presence of discrete water flow, which is strongly influenced by the water-membrane interaction and hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  9. Electronic origin of the dependence of hydrogen bond strengths on nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor hydrogen bonds in polyhedral water clusters (H2O)n, n = 8, 20 and 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Suehiro; Akase, Dai; Aida, Misako; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2016-08-04

    The relative stability and the characteristics of the hydrogen bond networks in the cubic cages of (H2O)8, dodecahedral cages of (H2O)20,and tetrakaidodecahedral cages of (H2O)24 are studied. The charge-transfer and dispersion interaction terms of every pair of the hydrogen bonds are evaluated by using the perturbation theory based on the locally-projected molecular orbital (LPMO PT). Every water molecule and every hydrogen-bonded pair in polyhedral clusters are classified by the types of the adjacent molecules and hydrogen bonds. The relative binding energies among the polyhedral clusters are grouped by these classifications. The necessary condition for the stable conformers and the rules of the ordering of the relative stability among the isomers are derived from the analysis. The O–O distances and the pair-wise charge-transfer terms are dependent not only on the types of the hydrogen donor and acceptor waters but also on the types of the adjacent waters. This dependence is analyzed with Mulliken’s charge-transfer theory. The work is partially supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Science Research of JSPS (SI, DA, MA). SSX was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy.

  10. Synthesis of metal-hydrazone complexes and vapochromic behavior of their hydrogen-bonded proton-transfer assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Dosen, Masa-aki; Chang, Mee; Nakajima, Kiyohiko; Noro, Shin-ichiro; Kato, Masako

    2010-11-03

    We synthesized and investigated a new series of metal-hydrazone complexes, including deprotonated [MX(mtbhp)] and protonated forms [MX(Hmtbhp)](ClO(4)) (M = Pd(2+), Pt(2+); X = Cl(-), Br(-); Hmtbhp = 2-(2-(2-(methylthio)benzylidene)hydrazinyl)pyridine) and hydrogen-bonded proton-transfer (HBPT) assemblies containing [PdBr(mtbhp)] and bromanilic acid (H(2)BA). The mtbhp hydrazone ligand acts as a tridentate SNN ligand and provides a high proton affinity. UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that these metal-hydrazone complexes follow a reversible protonation-deprotonation reaction ([MX(mtbhp)] + H(+) ⇋ [MX(Hmtbhp)](+)), resulting in a remarkable color change from red to yellow. Reactions between proton acceptor [PdBr(mtbhp)] (A) and proton donor H(2)BA (D) afforded four types of HBPT assemblies with different D/A ratios: for D/A = 1:1, {[PdBr(Hmtbhp)](HBA)·Acetone} and {[PdBr(Hmtbhp)](HBA)·2(1,4-dioxane)}; for D/A = 1:2, [PdBr(Hmtbhp)](2)(BA); and for D/A = 3:2, {[PdBr(Hmtbhp)](2)(HBA)(2)(H(2)BA)·2Acetonitrile}. The proton donor gave at least one proton to the acceptor to form the hydrogen bonded A···D pair of [PdBr(Hmtbhp)](+)···HBA(-). The strength of the hydrogen bond in the pair depends on the kind of molecule bound to the free monoanionic bromanilate OH group. Low-temperature IR spectra (T < 150 K) showed that the hydrogen bond distance between [PdBr(Hmtbhp)](+) and bromanilate was short enough (ca. 2.58 Å) to induce proton migration in the [PdBr(Hmtbhp)](2)(BA) assembly in the solid state. The hydrogen bonds formed not only between [PdBr(Hmtbhp)](+) and HBA(-) but also between HBA(-) and neutral H(2)BA molecules in the {[PdBr(Hmtbhp)](2)(HBA)(2)(H(2)BA)·2Acetonitrile} assembly. The H(2)BA-based flexible hydrogen bond network and strong acidic host structure result in an interesting vapor adsorption ability and vapochromic behavior in this assembly because the vapor-induced rearrangement of the hydrogen bond network, accompanied by changes in

  11. A stock market forecasting model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis and radial basis function neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaiqing; Yang, Jie; Miller, David J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and implement a hybrid model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis ((2D)2PCA) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) to forecast stock market behavior. First, 36 stock market technical variables are selected as the input features, and a sliding window is used to obtain the input data of the model. Next, (2D)2PCA is utilized to reduce the dimension of the data and extract its intrinsic features. Finally, an RBFNN accepts the data processed by (2D)2PCA to forecast the next day's stock price or movement. The proposed model is used on the Shanghai stock market index, and the experiments show that the model achieves a good level of fitness. The proposed model is then compared with one that uses the traditional dimension reduction method principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). The empirical results show that the proposed model outperforms the PCA-based model, as well as alternative models based on ICA and on the multilayer perceptron.

  12. A stock market forecasting model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis and radial basis function neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Guo

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose and implement a hybrid model combining two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis ((2D2PCA and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN to forecast stock market behavior. First, 36 stock market technical variables are selected as the input features, and a sliding window is used to obtain the input data of the model. Next, (2D2PCA is utilized to reduce the dimension of the data and extract its intrinsic features. Finally, an RBFNN accepts the data processed by (2D2PCA to forecast the next day's stock price or movement. The proposed model is used on the Shanghai stock market index, and the experiments show that the model achieves a good level of fitness. The proposed model is then compared with one that uses the traditional dimension reduction method principal component analysis (PCA and independent component analysis (ICA. The empirical results show that the proposed model outperforms the PCA-based model, as well as alternative models based on ICA and on the multilayer perceptron.

  13. Two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the principles and applications of two-dimensional vibrational and optical spectroscopy techniques. This book provides an account of basic theory required for an understanding of two-dimensional vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Studies in Hydrogen-Bonding Organocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Žabka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chiral thioureas and squaramides are among the most prominent hydrogen-bond bifunctional organocatalysts now extensively used for various transformations, including aldol, Michael, Mannich and Diels-Alder reactions. More importantly, the experimental and computational study of the mode of activation has begun to attract considerable attention. Various experimental, spectroscopic and calculation methods are now frequently used, often as an integrated approach, to establish the reaction mechanism, the mode of activation or explain the stereochemical outcome of the reaction. This article comprises several case studies, sorted according to the method used in their study. The aim of this review is to give the investigators an overview of the methods currently utilized for mechanistic investigations in hydrogen-bonding organocatalysis.

  15. Estimating the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in chitosan oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, G. P.; Lazarev, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The effect the number of chitosan monomer units CTS n ( n = 1-5), the protonation of chitosan dimers, and the interaction between CTS n ( n = 1-3) and acetate ions have on the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds is investigated by means of QTAIM analysis and solving the vibrational problem within the cluster-continuum model. It is established that the number of H-bonds in CTS n is 2 n - 1 and the total energy of H-bonds grows by ~20 kJ/mol. It is concluded that the hydrogen bonds between CTS and acetate ions play a major role in the stabilization of polyelectrolyte complexes in dilute acetic acid solutions of CTS.

  16. NMR and IR investigations of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    For the purpose of this review, strong hydrogen bonds have been defined on the basis of experimental data, such as OH stretching wavenumbers, vOH, and OH chemical shifts, dOH (in the latter case after correction for ring current effects). Limits for O–H···Y systems are taken as 2800 > vOH > 1800 cm...... been used as a parameter for hydrogen bond strength in O–H···O systems. On a broad scale, a correlation between OH stretching wavenumbers and O···O distances is observed, as demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretically, but for substituted beta-diketone enols this correlation is relatively weak....

  17. Hydrogen Bonds and Vibrations of Water on (110) Rutile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nitin [ORNL; Neogi, Sanghamitra [Pennsylvania State University; Kent, Paul R [ORNL; Bandura, Andrei V. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Sofo, Jorge O. [Pennsylvania State University

    2009-01-01

    We study the relation between hydrogen bonding and the vibrational frequency spectra of water on the (110) surface of rutile (α-TiO2) with three structural layers of adsorbed water. Using ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations at 280, 300 and 320K, we find strong, crystallographically-controlled adsorption sites, in general agreement with synchrotron X-ray and classical MD simulations. We demonstrate that these sites are produced by strong hydrogen bonds formed between the surface oxygen atoms and sorbed water molecules. The strength of these bonds is manifested by substantial broadening of the stretching mode vibrational band. The overall vibrational spectrum obtained from our simulations is in good agreement with inelastic neutron scattering experiments. We correlate the vibrational spectrum with different bonds at the surface in order to transform these vibrational measurements into a spectroscopy of surface interactions.

  18. Contribution of Hydrogen Bonds to Paper Strength Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Przybysz

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds between fibres on static and dynamic strength properties of paper. A commercial bleached pinewood kraft pulp was soaked in water, refined in a PFI, and used to form paper webs in different solvents, such as water, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol, to determine the effect of their dipole moment on static and dynamic strength properties of resulting paper sheets. Paper which was formed in water, being the solvent of the highest dipole moment among the tested ones, showed the highest breaking length and tear resistance. When paper webs were formed in n-butanol, which was the least polar among the solvents, these parameters were reduced by around 75%. These results provide evidence of the importance of water in paper web formation and strong impact of hydrogen bonds between fibres on strength properties of paper.

  19. Ultrafast two dimensional infrared chemical exchange spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The method of ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is described. Three ultrashort IR pulses tuned to the frequencies of the vibrational transitions of interest are directed into the sample. The interaction of these pulses with the molecular vibrational oscillators produces a polarization that gives rise to a fourth pulse, the vibrational echo. The vibrational echo pulse is combined with another pulse, the local oscillator, for heterodyne detection of the signal. For fixed time between the second and third pulses, the waiting time, the first pulse is scanned. Two Fourier transforms of the data yield a 2D IR spectrum. The waiting time is increased, and another spectrum is obtained. The change in the 2D IR spectra with increased waiting time provides information on the time evolution of the structure of the molecular system under observation. In a 2D IR chemical exchange experiment, two species A and B, are undergoing chemical exchange. A's are turning into B's, and B's are turning into A's, but the overall concentrations of the species are not changing. The kinetics of the chemical exchange on the ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions can be obtained 2D IR spectroscopy. A vibration that has a different frequency for the two species is monitored. At very short time, there will be two peaks on the diagonal of the 2D IR spectrum, one for A and one for B. As the waiting time is increased, chemical exchange causes off-diagonal peaks to grow in. The time dependence of the growth of these off-diagonal peaks gives the chemical exchange rate. The method is applied to organic solute-solvent complex formation, orientational isomerization about a carbon-carbon single bond, migration of a hydrogen bond from one position on a molecule to another, protein structural substate interconversion, and water hydrogen bond switching between ions and water molecules. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific

  20. Molecular and ionic hydrogen bond formation in fluorous solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Weber, Stephen G

    2009-01-08

    There are only a few studies of noncovalent association in fluorous solvents and even fewer that are quantitative. A full understanding, particularly of stoichiometry and binding strength of noncovalent interactions in fluorous solvents could be very useful in improved molecular-receptor-based extractions, advancements in sensor technologies, crystal engineering, and supramolecular chemistry. This work investigates hydrogen bonding between heterocyclic bases and a perfluoropolyether with a terminal carboxylic acid group (Krytox 157FSH (1)), chiefly in FC-72 (a mixture of perfluorohexanes). In particular, we were interested in whether or not proton transfer occurs, and if so, under what conditions in H-bonded complexes. Continuous variations experiments show that in FC-72 weaker bases (pyrazine, pyrimidine, and quinazoline) form 1:1 complexes with 1, whereas stronger bases (quinoline, pyridine, and isoquinoline) form 1:3 complexes. Ultraviolet and infrared spectral signatures reveal that the 1:1 complexes are molecular (B.HA) whereas the 1:3 complexes are ionic (BH+.A-HAHA). Infrared spectra of 1:3 ionic complexes are discussed in detail. Literature and experimental data on complexes between N-heterocyclic bases and carboxylic acids in a range of solvents are compiled to compare solvent effects on proton transfer. Polar solvents support ionic hydrogen bonds at a 1:1 mol ratio. In nonpolar organic solvents, ionic hydrogen bonds are only observed in complexes with 1:2 (base/acid) stoichiometries. In fluorous solvents, a larger excess of acid, 1:3, is necessary to facilitate proton transfer in hydrogen bonds between carboxylic acids and the bases studied.

  1. H/D Isotope Effects in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Filarowski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (1H,2H on d (1H. This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  2. Hydrated alizarin complexes: hydrogen bonding and proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Hyun; Cho, Sung Haeng; Heo, Jiyoung; Kim, Nam Joon; Kim, Seong Keun

    2012-07-07

    We investigated the hydrogen bonding structures and proton transfer for the hydration complexes of alizarin (Az) produced in a supersonic jet using fluorescence excitation (FE), dispersed laser induced fluorescence (LIF), visible-visible hole burning (HB), and fluorescence detected infrared (FDIR) spectroscopy. The FDIR spectrum of bare Az with two O-H groups exhibits two vibrational bands at 3092 and 3579 cm(-1), which, respectively, correspond to the stretching vibration of O1-H1 that forms a strong intramolecular hydrogen bond with the C9=O9 carbonyl group and the stretching vibration of O2-H2 that is weakly hydrogen-bonded to O1-H1. For the 1:1 hydration complex Az(H(2)O)(1), we identified three conformers. In the most stable conformer, the water molecule forms hydrogen bonds with the O1-H1 and O2-H2 groups of Az as a proton donor and proton acceptor, respectively. In the other conformers, the water binds to the C10=O10 group in two nearly isoenergetic configurations. In contrast to the sharp vibronic peaks in the FE spectra of Az and Az(H(2)O)(1), only broad, structureless absorption was observed for Az(H(2)O)(n) (n≥ 2), indicating a facile decay process, possibly due to proton transfer in the electronic excited state. The FDIR spectrum with the wavelength of the probe laser fixed at the broad band exhibited a broad vibrational band near the O2-H2 stretching vibration frequency of the most stable conformer of Az(H(2)O)(1). With the help of theoretical calculations, we suggest that the broad vibrational band may represent the occurrence of proton transfer by tunnelling in the electronic ground state of Az(H(2)O)(n) (n≥ 2) upon excitation of the O2-H2 vibration.

  3. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  4. Competing Intramolecular vs. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Peter I.

    2014-01-01

    A hydrogen bond for a local-minimum-energy structure can be identified according to the definition of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC recommendation 2011) or by finding a special bond critical point on the density map of the structure in the framework of the atoms-in-molecules theory. Nonetheless, a given structural conformation may be simply favored by electrostatic interactions. The present review surveys the in-solution competition of the conformations with in...

  5. Competing Intramolecular vs. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Peter I.

    2014-01-01

    A hydrogen bond for a local-minimum-energy structure can be identified according to the definition of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC recommendation 2011) or by finding a special bond critical point on the density map of the structure in the framework of the atoms-in-molecules theory. Nonetheless, a given structural conformation may be simply favored by electrostatic interactions. The present review surveys the in-solution competition of the conformations with int...

  6. Electrostatics determine vibrational frequency shifts in hydrogen bonded complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Arghya; Mondal, Sohidul Islam; Sen, Saumik; Ghosh, Debashree; Patwari, G Naresh

    2014-12-14

    The red-shifts in the acetylenic C-H stretching vibration of C-H∙∙∙X (X = O, N) hydrogen-bonded complexes increase with an increase in the basicity of the Lewis base. Analysis of various components of stabilization energy suggests that the observed red-shifts are correlated with the electrostatic component of the stabilization energy, while the dispersion modulates the stabilization energy.

  7. Hirshfeld atom refinement for modelling strong hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Spackman, Mark A; Edwards, Alison J; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Grabowsky, Simon

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution low-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction data of the salt L-phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate are used to test the new automated iterative Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) procedure for the modelling of strong hydrogen bonds. The HAR models used present the first examples of Z' > 1 treatments in the framework of wavefunction-based refinement methods. L-Phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate exhibits several hydrogen bonds in its crystal structure, of which the shortest and the most challenging to model is the O-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the hydrogen maleate anion (O...O distance is about 2.41 Å). In particular, the reconstruction of the electron density in the hydrogen maleate moiety and the determination of hydrogen-atom properties [positions, bond distances and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs)] are the focus of the study. For comparison to the HAR results, different spherical (independent atom model, IAM) and aspherical (free multipole model, MM; transferable aspherical atom model, TAAM) X-ray refinement techniques as well as results from a low-temperature neutron-diffraction experiment are employed. Hydrogen-atom ADPs are furthermore compared to those derived from a TLS/rigid-body (SHADE) treatment of the X-ray structures. The reference neutron-diffraction experiment reveals a truly symmetric hydrogen bond in the hydrogen maleate anion. Only with HAR is it possible to freely refine hydrogen-atom positions and ADPs from the X-ray data, which leads to the best electron-density model and the closest agreement with the structural parameters derived from the neutron-diffraction experiment, e.g. the symmetric hydrogen position can be reproduced. The multipole-based refinement techniques (MM and TAAM) yield slightly asymmetric positions, whereas the IAM yields a significantly asymmetric position.

  8. Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond of DNA and RNA

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, da Silva dos; Ricotta, Regina Maria

    2015-01-01

    The hydrogen bond is a fundamental ingredient to stabilize the DNA and RNA macromolecules. The main contribution of this work is to describe quantitatively this interaction as a consequence of the quantum confinement of the hydrogen. The results for the free and confined system are compared with experimental data. The formalism to compute the energy gap of the vibration motion used to identify the spectrum lines is the Variational Method allied to Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics.

  9. Protonic transport through solitons in hydrogen-bonded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, L.; Jayanthi, S.; Muniyappan, A.; Gopi, D.

    2011-09-01

    We offer an alternative route for investigating soliton solutions in hydrogen-bonded (HB) chains. We invoke the modified extended tangent hyperbolic function method coupled with symbolic computation to solve the governing equation of motion for proton dynamics. We investigate the dynamics of proton transfer in HB chains through bell-shaped soliton excitations, which trigger the bio-energy transport in most biological systems. This solitonic mechanism of proton transfer could play functional roles in muscular contraction, enzymatic activity and oxidative phosphorylation.

  10. Effect of Water Content in N-Methylmorpholine N-Oxide/Cellulose Solutions on Thermodynamics, Structure, and Hydrogen Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabideau, Brooks D; Ismail, Ahmed E

    2015-12-03

    Native crystalline cellulose is notoriously difficult to dissolve due to its dense hydrogen bond network between chains and weaker hydrophobic forces between cellulose sheets. N-Methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO), the solvent behind the Lyocell process, is one of the most successful commercial solvents for the nonderivatized dissolution of cellulose. In this process, water plays a very important role. Its presence at low concentrations allows NMMO to dissolve substantial amounts of cellulose, while at much higher concentrations it precipitates the crystalline fibers. Using all-atom molecular dynamics, we study the thermodynamic and structural properties of ternary solutions of cellulose, NMMO, and water. Using the two-phase thermodynamic method to calculate solvent entropy, we estimate the free energy of dissolution of cellulose as a function of the water concentration and find a transition of spontaneity that is in excellent agreement with experiment. In pure water, we find that cellulose dissolution is nonspontaneous, a result that is due entirely to strong decreases in water entropy. Although the combined effect of enthalpy on dissolution in water is negligible, we observe a net loss of hydrogen bonds, resulting in a change in hydrogen bond energy that opposes dissolution. At lower water concentrations, cellulose dissolution is spontaneous and largely driven by decreases in enthalpy, with solvent entropy playing only a very minor role. When searching for the root causes of this enthalpy decrease, a complex picture emerges in which not one but many different factors contribute to NMMO's good solvent behavior. The reduction in enthalpy is led by the formation of strong hydrogen bonds between cellulose and NMMO's N-oxide, intensified through van der Waals interactions between NMMO's nonpolar body and the nonpolar surfaces of cellulose and unhindered by water at low concentrations due to the formation of efficient hydrogen bonds between water and cellulose.

  11. Substituent effects on hydrogen bonding of aromatic amide-carboxylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ibrahim; Kara, Hulya; Azizoglu, Akın

    2016-10-01

    N-(p-benzoyl)-anthranilic acid (BAA) derivatives have been synthesized with different substituents (X: Br, Cl, OCH3, CH3), and their crystal structures have been analyzed in order to understand the variations in their molecular geometries with respect to the substituents by using 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in a centrosymmetric R22(8) ring motifs for BAA-Br and BAA-Cl. However, no carboxylic acid group forms classic Osbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonded dimers in BAA-OCH3 and BAA-CH3. The asymmetric unit consists of two crystallographically independent molecules in BAA-OCH3. DFT computations show that the interaction energies between monomer and dimer are in the range of 0.5-3.8 kcal/mol with the B3LYP/6-31 + G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G*, B3LYP/6-31 ++G**, and B3LYP/AUG-cc-pVDZ levels of theory. The presence of different hydrogen bond patterns is also governed by the substrate. For monomeric compounds studied herein, theoretical calculations lead to two low-energy conformers; trans (a) and cis (b). Former one is more stable than latter by about 4 kcal/mol.

  12. Hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Chun-Qi [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Key Laboratory of Organosilicon Chemistry and Material Technology of Ministry of Education, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121 (China); Li, Wen-Jie; Du, Ying-Ying; Chen, Guang-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian, E-mail: phylihn@mail.zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-09-15

    We have studied the hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids. Inter-molecular interaction is analyzed theoretically for the well-defined monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) structure. The results indicate that PC{sub 61}BM combines into C–H⋯O{sub d} bonded molecular chains, where O{sub d} denotes the doubly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. The molecular chains are linked together by C–H⋯O{sub s} bonds, where O{sub s} denotes the singly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. To reveal the consequences of hydrogen bond formation on the structural properties of PC{sub 61}BM solids (not limited to the monoclinic structure), we design and perform some experiments for annealed samples with the monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) PC{sub 61}BM as starting material. The experiments include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption measurements. Structural phase transitions are observed below the melting point. The C–H⋯O{sub d} bonds seem persisting in the altered structures. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonds can help to understand the phase separation in polymer/PC{sub 61}BM blends and may be responsible for the existence of liquid PC{sub 61}BM.

  13. The hydrogen-bond collective dynamics in liquid methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissima, Stefano; de Panfilis, Simone; Bafile, Ubaldo; Cunsolo, Alessandro; González, Miguel Angel; Guarini, Eleonora; Formisano, Ferdinando

    2016-12-01

    The relatively simple molecular structure of hydrogen-bonded (HB) systems is often belied by their exceptionally complex thermodynamic and microscopic behaviour. For this reason, after a thorough experimental, computational and theoretical scrutiny, the dynamics of molecules in HB systems still eludes a comprehensive understanding. Aiming at shedding some insight into this topic, we jointly used neutron Brillouin scattering and molecular dynamics simulations to probe the dynamics of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded alcohol, liquid methanol. The comparison with the most thoroughly investigated HB system, liquid water, pinpoints common behaviours of their THz microscopic dynamics, thereby providing additional information on the role of HB dynamics in these two systems. This study demonstrates that the dynamic behaviour of methanol is much richer than what so far known, and prompts us to establish striking analogies with the features of liquid and supercooled water. In particular, based on the strong differences between the structural properties of the two systems, our results suggest that the assignment of some dynamical properties to the tetrahedral character of water structure should be questioned. We finally highlight the similarities between the characteristic decay times of the time correlation function, as obtained from our data and the mean lifetime of hydrogen bond known in literature.

  14. Hydrogen bonding in thiobenzamide synthon and its Cadmium complex: Crystal structure and Hirshfeld analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    INES RIGANE; SIWAR WALHA; ABDELHAMID BEN SALAH

    2016-09-01

    The thiobenzamid TBA and its Cd(II) complex, dichlorothiobenzamidecadmium(II) [Cd(TBA)Cl₂] complex has been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV–Vis spectroscopy. The crystal and molecular structure of TBA and [Cd(TBA)Cl₂] were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The molecular arrangement in the crystal structure of TBA can be described on the basis of supramolecular dimeric synthons built up by four independent TBA molecules stacked via N-H. . .S hydrogen bonds. The 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and the associated 2D fingerprint plots were investigated for intermolecular interactions. The N-H. . .S hydrogen bond percentages were estimated to be 23.1%, 22.9%, 30.6% and 27.3% of Hirshfeld surfaces area respectively for each TBA molecule. Synthons are associated through C–H. . . π interactions at percentage of 33.8%, 38.2%, 24.3% and 19.4% to result in 3D network. The dichlorothiobenzamide cadmium(II) complex bonded by sulfur atom of thiobenzamide shows a double chain of distorted octahedra around the cadmium atoms running along the a axis and the packing is stabilized by intra- and inter-chain hydrogen bonding interactions of the type N–H. . .Cl and aromatic π. . .π stacking interactions between ring centroids at 21.8% and 7.6% of the Hirshfeld surface area, respectively. The decomposition of the complex to cadmium sulfide has been investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  15. Investigating the Performance of One- and Two-dimensional Flood Models in a Channelized River Network: A Case Study of the Obion River System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanapu, A. J.; Dullo, T. T.; Thornton, J. C.; Auld, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Obion River, is located in the northwestern Tennessee region, and discharges into the Mississippi River. In the past, the river system was largely channelized for agricultural purposes that resulted in increased erosion, loss of wildlife habitat and downstream flood risks. These impacts are now being slowly reversed mainly due to wetland restoration. The river system is characterized by a large network of "loops" around the main channels that hold water either from excess flows or due to flow diversions. Without data on each individual channel, levee, canal, or pond it is not known where the water flows from or to. In some segments along the river, the natural channel has been altered and rerouted by the farmers for their irrigation purposes. Satellite imagery can aid in identifying these features, but its spatial coverage is temporally sparse. All the alterations that have been done to the watershed make it difficult to develop hydraulic models, which could predict flooding and droughts. This is especially true when building one-dimensional (1D) hydraulic models compared to two-dimensional (2D) models, as the former cannot adequately simulate lateral flows in the floodplain and in complex terrains. The objective of this study therefore is to study the performance of 1D and 2D flood models in this complex river system, evaluate the limitations of 1D models and highlight the advantages of 2D models. The study presents the application of HEC-RAS and HEC-2D models developed by the Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), a division of the US Army Corps of Engineers. The broader impacts of this study is the development of best practices for developing flood models in channelized river systems and in agricultural watersheds.

  16. Interplay of hydrogen bonding and molecule-substrate interaction in self-assembled adlayer structures of a hydroxyphenyl-substituted porphyrin

    CERN Document Server

    Smykalla, Lars; Mende, Carola; Rüffer, Tobias; Lang, Heinrich; Hietschold, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen-bonded organic nano-structures and the role of the substrate lattice thereby were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. The self-organization of 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (H2THPP) molecules leads to two molecular arrangements on Au(111). One of these is characterized by pair-wise hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups and a low packing density which enables a rotation of individual molecules in the structure. A different interaction with stronger chain-like hydrogen bonding and additional interactions of phenyl groups was observed for the second structure. The influence of the substrate on the epitaxial behavior is demonstrated by the adsorption of H2THPP on the highly anisotropic Ag(110) substrate. There, several balances between the occupation of favorable adsorption positions and the number of hydrogen bonds per molecule were found. The molecules form molecular chains on Ag(110) and also assemble into two-dimensional periodic arrangements of differently...

  17. Car-Parrinello and path integral molecular dynamics study of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the crystals of benzoylacetone and dideuterobenzoylacetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlak, Piotr; Latajka, Zdzisław

    2014-11-14

    The dynamics of the intramolecular short hydrogen bond in the molecular crystal of benzoylacetone and its deuterated analogue are investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. A study on intramolecular hydrogen bonding in 1-phenyl-1,3-butadione (I) and 1-deuteroxy-2-deutero-1-phenylbut-1-en-3-one (II) crystals has been carried out at 160 K and 300 K on the CPMD method level and at 300 K on the PIMD method level. The analysis of the two-dimensional free-energy landscape of reaction coordinate δ-parameter and ROO distances shows that the hydrogen (deuter) between the two oxygen atoms adopts a slightly asymmetrical position in the single potential well. When the nuclear quantum effects are taken into account, very large delocalization of the bridging proton is observed. These studies indicate that hydrogen bonds in the crystal of benzoylacetone have characteristic properties for the type of bonding model resonance-assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHB) without existing the equilibrium of the two tautomers. The infrared spectrum has been calculated, and a comparative vibrational analysis has been performed. The CPMD vibrational results appear to qualitatively agree with the experimental ones.

  18. Femtosecond Hydrogen Bond Dynamics of Bulk-like and Bound Water at Positively and Negatively Charged Lipid Interfaces Revealed by 2D HD-VSFG Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant Chandra; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Nihonyanagi, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Shoichi; Tahara, Tahei

    2016-08-26

    Interfacial water in the vicinity of lipids plays an important role in many biological processes, such as drug delivery, ion transportation, and lipid fusion. Hence, molecular-level elucidation of the properties of water at lipid interfaces is of the utmost importance. We report the two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) study of the OH stretch of HOD at charged lipid interfaces, which shows that the hydrogen bond dynamics of interfacial water differ drastically, depending on the lipids. The data indicate that the spectral diffusion of the OH stretch at a positively charged lipid interface is dominated by the ultrafast (dynamics, while the dynamics at a negatively charged lipid interface exhibit sub-picosecond dynamics almost exclusively, implying that fast hydrogen bond fluctuation is prohibited. These results reveal that the ultrafast hydrogen bond dynamics at the positively charged lipid-water interface are attributable to the bulk-like property of interfacial water, whereas the slow dynamics at the negatively charged lipid interface are due to bound water, which is hydrogen-bonded to the hydrophilic head group.

  19. Investigation of hydrogen bonded molecular solids by diffraction, spectroscopy, and computational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Matthew R.

    The nature of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the solid state is examined through the investigation of molecular crystals by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, and computational chemistry. The molecular solids studied range from small organic molecules to larger inorganic acid salts. Hydrogen bonding is the primary mode of interaction in the solid state for each of the systems studied. INS spectra were collected at 25 K for each molecular solid and the motions of the hydrogen atoms assigned. Raman spectra were collected at 78 and 298 K to aid in the molecular mode assignments of the INS spectra and to examine possible phase changes as a function of temperature. Neutron diffraction was employed, when possible, to accurately locate the hydrogen atom positions, and X-ray diffraction was performed to obtain accurate unit cell dimensions and to obtain initial characterizations of the samples. The diffraction structures served as the basis for solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT simulations were used to aid in the vibrational normal mode assignments, to investigate possible solid-phase transitions, and as a test of the limits of basis sets and the available DFT theory. Of the six molecular solids studied, several important observations were made: (1) the determination of a structural phase transition in L-alanine alaninium nitrate by both spectroscopic and theoretical methods, (2) the structure of picolinic acid was elucidated at 25 K and room-temperature by the combination of INS and theory, (3) glycine lithium sulfate was found to be a useful test of DFT to accurately optimize the structure and calculate the normal modes of a complex 3D network of hydrogen-bonding interactions, (4) nicotinic acid was found to be a useful test of one dimensional hydrogen-bonding interactions with pi-stacking interactions dominating the orthogonal directions, and (5) parabanic acid

  20. Two dimensional soft material: new faces of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaemyung; Cote, Laura J; Huang, Jiaxing

    2012-08-21

    Graphite oxide sheets, now called graphene oxide (GO), can be made from chemical exfoliation of graphite by reactions that have been known for 150 years. Because GO is a promising solution-processable precursor for the bulk production of graphene, interest in this old material has resurged. The reactions to produce GO add oxygenated functional groups to the graphene sheets on their basal plane and edges, and this derivatization breaks the π-conjugated network, resulting in electrically insulating but highly water-dispersible sheets. Apart from making graphene, GO itself has many intriguing properties. Like graphene, GO is a two-dimensional (2D) sheet with feature sizes at two abruptly different length scales. The apparent thickness of the functionalized carbon sheet is approximately 1 nm, but the lateral dimensions can range from a few nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, researchers can think of GO as either a single molecule or a particle, depending on which length scale is of greater interest. At the same time, GO can be viewed as an unconventional soft material, such as a 2D polymer, highly anisotropic colloid, membrane, liquid crystal, or amphiphile. In this Account, we highlight the soft material characteristics of GO. GO consists of nanographitic patches surrounded by largely disordered, oxygenated domains. Such structural characteristics effectively make GO a 2D amphiphile with a hydrophilic periphery and largely hydrophobic center. This insight has led to better understanding of the solution properties of GO for making thin films and new applications of GO as a surfactant. Changes in pH and sheet size can tune the amphiphilicity of GO, leading to intriguing interfacial activities. In addition, new all-carbon composites made of only graphitic nanostructures using GO as a dispersing agent have potential applications in photovoltaics and energy storage. On the other hand, GO can function as a 2D random diblock copolymer, one block graphitic and

  1. Tuning the mechanical properties of graphene oxide paper and its associated polymer nanocomposites by controlling cooperative intersheet hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Owen C; Cranford, Steven W; Putz, Karl W; An, Zhi; Brinson, L Catherine; Buehler, Markus J; Nguyen, SonBinh T

    2012-03-27

    The mechanical properties of pristine graphene oxide paper and paper-like films of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-graphene oxide nanocomposite are investigated in a joint experimental-theoretical and computational study. In combination, these studies reveal a delicate relationship between the stiffness of these papers and the water content in their lamellar structures. ReaxFF-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulations elucidate the role of water molecules in modifying the mechanical properties of both pristine and nanocomposite graphene oxide papers, as bridge-forming water molecules between adjacent layers in the paper structure enhance stress transfer by means of a cooperative hydrogen-bonding network. For graphene oxide paper at an optimal concentration of ~5 wt % water, the degree of cooperative hydrogen bonding within the network comprising adjacent nanosheets and water molecules was found to optimally enhance the modulus of the paper without saturating the gallery space. Introducing PVA chains into the gallery space further enhances the cooperativity of this hydrogen-bonding network, in a manner similar to that found in natural biomaterials, resulting in increased stiffness of the composite. No optimal water concentration could be found for the PVA-graphene oxide nanocomposite papers, as dehydration of these structures continually enhances stiffness until a final water content of ~7 wt % (additional water cannot be removed from the system even after 12 h of annealing).

  2. A study of hydrogen-bond dynamics in carboxylic acids by NMR T1 measurements: isotope effects and hydrogen-bond length dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaki, T.; Imashiro, F.; Terao, T.; Hirota, N.; Hayashi, S.

    1987-08-01

    Proton (deuteron) transfer of hydrogen bonds in benzoic, glutaric and p-formylbenzoic acids was studied by proton (deuteron) T1 measurements. Deuteration of carboxylic protons was found to increase the barriers to classical proton jumping as well as quantum-mechanical tunneling. The former barriers increase as the hydrogen-bond distance increases.

  3. Hydrogen Bonding and Dielectric Spectra of Ethylene Glycol–Water Mixtures from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mixtures of ethylene glycol with water are a prominent example of media with variable viscosity. Classical molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature were performed for mixtures of ethylene glycol (EG) and water with EG mole fractions of xE = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.9, 1.0. The calculated dielectric loss spectra were in qualitative agreement with experiment. We found a slightly overestimated slowdown of the dynamics with increasing EG concentration compared to experimental data. Statistics of the hydrogen bond network and hydrogen bond lifetimes were derived from suitable time correlation functions and also show a slowdown in the dynamics with increasing xE. A similar picture is predicted for the time scales of EG conformer changes and for molecular reorientation. A slight blue shift was obtained for the power spectra of the molecular center of mass motion. The results were used to give a qualitative interpretation of the origin of three different relaxation times that appear in experimental complex dielectric spectra and of their change with xE. PMID:27649083

  4. Strong, low-barrier hydrogen bonds may be available to enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jacob D; Buytendyk, Allyson M; Wang, Di; Bowen, Kit H; Collins, Kim D

    2014-01-21

    The debate over the possible role of strong, low-barrier hydrogen bonds in stabilizing reaction intermediates at enzyme active sites has taken place in the absence of an awareness of the upper limits to the strengths of low-barrier hydrogen bonds involving amino acid side chains. Hydrogen bonds exhibit their maximal strengths in isolation, i.e., in the gas phase. In this work, we measured the ionic hydrogen bond strengths of three enzymatically relevant model systems in the gas phase using anion photoelectron spectroscopy; we calibrated these against the hydrogen bond strength of HF2(-), measured using the same technique, and we compared our results with other gas-phase experimental data. The model systems studied here, the formate-formic acid, acetate-acetic acid, and imidazolide-imidazole anionic complexes, all exhibit very strong hydrogen bonds, whose strengths compare favorably with that of the hydrogen bifluoride anion, the strongest known hydrogen bond. The hydrogen bond strengths of these gas-phase complexes are stronger than those typically estimated as being required to stabilize enzymatic intermediates. If there were to be enzyme active site environments that can facilitate the retention of a significant fraction of the strengths of these isolated (gas-phase), hydrogen bonded couples, then low-barrier hydrogen bonding interactions might well play important roles in enzymatic catalysis.

  5. Fragility and cooperativity concepts in hydrogen-bonded organic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpouve, N., E-mail: delpouve.nicolas@gmail.com [AMME-LECAP EA 4528 International Laboratory, University of Rouen, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Vuillequez, A.; Saiter, A.; Youssef, B.; Saiter, J.M. [AMME-LECAP EA 4528 International Laboratory, University of Rouen, Avenue de l' Universite BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France)

    2012-09-01

    Molecular dynamics at the glass transition of three lactose/oil glassy systems have been investigated according to the cooperativity and fragility approaches. From Donth's approach, the cooperativity length is estimated by modulated temperature calorimetric measurements. Results reveal that modification of the disaccharide by oil leads to increase the disorder degree in the lactose, the size of the cooperative domains and the fragility index. These particular hydrogen-bonded organic glasses follow the general tendency observed on organic and inorganic polymers: the higher the cooperativity length, the higher the value of the fragility index at T{sub g}.

  6. Indirect Interactions Between Proton Donors Separated by Several Hydrogen Bonds

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Takaya; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    We expand the definition of our recently proposed proton conduction mechanism, the packed-acid mechanism, which occurs under conditions of concentrated proton donors. The original definition stated that acid-acid interactions, which help overcome the barrier of the rate-determining step, occur only when a hydrogen bond is formed directly between proton donors. Here, it is shown that proton donors can interact with each other even when the donors are separated via several H-bonds. The effect of these interactions on proton diffusivity is confirmed by ab initio calculations.

  7. Positively charged phosphorus as a hydrogen bond acceptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Schou; Du, Lin; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2014-01-01

    alcohol-trimethylphosphine complexes have been detected. Initially, the complexes were detected using matrix isolation spectroscopy, which favors complex formation. Subsequently, the fundamental OH-stretching vibration was observed in room-temperature gas-phase spectra. On the basis of our measured OH......Phosphorus (P) is an element that is essential to the life of all organisms, and the atmospheric detection of phosphine suggests the existence of a volatile biogeochemical P cycle. Here, we investigate the ability of P to participate in the formation of OH···P hydrogen bonds. Three bimolecular...

  8. Hydrogen-bonded clusters of ferrocenecarboxylic acid on Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quardokus, Rebecca C; Wasio, Natalie A; Christie, John A; Henderson, Kenneth W; Forrest, Ryan P; Lent, Craig S; Corcelli, Steven A; Kandel, S Alex

    2014-09-14

    Self-assembled monolayers of ferrocenecarboxylic acid (FcCOOH) contain two fundamental units, both stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonding: dimers and cyclic five-membered catemers. At surface coverages below a full monolayer, however, there is a significantly more varied structure that includes double-row clusters containing two to twelve FcCOOH molecules. Statistical analysis shows a distribution of cluster sizes that is sharply peaked compared to a binomial distribution. This rules out simple nucleation-and-growth mechanisms of cluster formation, and strongly suggests that clusters are formed in solution and collapse into rows when deposited on the Au(111) surface.

  9. Anharmonicity and hydrogen bonding in electrooptic sucrose crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, M. M.; Giermańska, J.

    1990-03-01

    The polarized absorption spectra of the sucrose crystal in the 5300 - 7300 cm -1 region have been measured. The assignments of all the eight OH stretching overtones are proposed and their mechanical anharmonicities are estimated. The discrepancies from the oriented gas model (OGM) in the observed relative band intensities, especially of the -CH vibrations, are assumed to be connected with vibronic couplings enhanced by the helical arrangement of molecules joined by hydrogen bondings. It seems that this kind of interactions might be important for the second harmonic generation (SHG) by the sucrose crystal.

  10. Towards two-dimensional search engines

    OpenAIRE

    Ermann, Leonardo; Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way the ranking of nodes becomes two-dimensional that paves the way for development of two-dimensional search engines of new type. Statistical properties of inf...

  11. Toward two-dimensional search engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, L.; Chepelianskii, A. D.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way, the ranking of nodes becomes two dimensional which paves the way for the development of two-dimensional search engines of a new type. Statistical properties of information flow on the PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. A special emphasis is done for British universities networks using the large database publicly available in the UK. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  12. A computational approach for the annotation of hydrogen-bonded base interactions in crystallographic structures of the ribozymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof, E-mail: hazrina@mfrlab.org [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi (Malaysia); Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Bertam, Kepala Batas (Malaysia); Artymiuk, Peter J., E-mail: p.artymiuk@sheffield.ac.uk [Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Firth Court, University of Sheffield, S10 T2N Sheffield (United Kingdom); Firdaus-Raih, Mohd, E-mail: firdaus@mfrlab.org [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    A fundamental understanding of the atomic level interactions in ribonucleic acid (RNA) and how they contribute towards RNA architecture is an important knowledge platform to develop through the discovery of motifs from simple arrangements base pairs, to more complex arrangements such as triples and larger patterns involving non-standard interactions. The network of hydrogen bond interactions is important in connecting bases to form potential tertiary motifs. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of automated methods for annotating RNA 3D structures based on hydrogen bond interactions. COnnection tables Graphs for Nucleic ACids (COGNAC) is automated annotation system using graph theoretical approaches that has been developed for the identification of RNA 3D motifs. This program searches for patterns in the unbroken networks of hydrogen bonds for RNA structures and capable of annotating base pairs and higher-order base interactions, which ranges from triples to sextuples. COGNAC was able to discover 22 out of 32 quadruples occurrences of the Haloarcula marismortui large ribosomal subunit (PDB ID: 1FFK) and two out of three occurrences of quintuple interaction reported by the non-canonical interactions in RNA (NCIR) database. These and several other interactions of interest will be discussed in this paper. These examples demonstrate that the COGNAC program can serve as an automated annotation system that can be used to annotate conserved base-base interactions and could be added as additional information to established RNA secondary structure prediction methods.

  13. NMR study of the FH⋯F hydrogen bond. Relation between hydrogen atom position and FH⋯F bond length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panich, A. M.

    1995-07-01

    1H and 19F NMR study of (NH 4) 3BiBr 6NH 4Br·2NH 4HF 2 shows the bifluoride ion in this compound to be asymmetric with distances r( HF) = 1.042 ± 0.002 and R( FF) = 2.373 ± 0.008 Å. Existing NMR and neutron diffraction data for the FH⋯F hydrogen bond in solids have been studied to find a relation between the position of the hydrogen atom and FH⋯F bond length. Such a relation has been established and explained in the framework of the two-dimensional dynamic model of the hydrogen bond. The dependencies of r(AH) on R(AB) for the OH⋯O and FH⋯F bonds are shown to be similar.

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy of Hydrogen Bonds in Benzoic Acid Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Bel‧kov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Bazyl, O. K.; Artyukhov, V. Ya.; Mayer, G. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Kuzovkov, P. V.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2014-03-01

    We have measured the Fourier transform IR spectra of CCl4 solutions of benzoic acid and its biologically active derivatives. We investigated the proton-acceptor properties of the studied molecules theoretically by the molecular electrostatic potential method. The calculations are compared with experimental results. Based on an estimate of the proton-acceptor properties, we give an interpretation of the specific features of the IR spectra of benzoic acid and its derivatives in the region of the O-H and C = O vibrations. The mechanisms for interactions of the molecules are determined by the nature of substituents which are added to the benzene ring in positions para and meta to the carboxyl group. We identify the conditions for appearance of intermolecular hydrogen bonds of O-H · · · O = C, O-H · · · O-H types with formation of cyclic and linear dimers. We show that intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the type O-H · · · O-CH3 prevent the hydroxyl groups from participating in intermolecular interactions.

  15. Formaldoxime hydrogen bonded complexes with ammonia and hydrogen chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golec, Barbara; Mucha, Małgorzata; Sałdyka, Magdalena; Barnes, Austin; Mielke, Zofia

    2015-02-01

    An infrared spectroscopic and MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) study of hydrogen bonded complexes of formaldoxime with ammonia and hydrogen chloride trapped in solid argon matrices is reported. Both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes between formaldoxime and ammonia, hydrogen chloride have been identified in the CH2NOH/NH3/Ar, CH2NOH/HCl/Ar matrices, respectively, their structures were determined by comparison of the spectra with the results of calculations. In the 1:1 complexes present in the argon matrices the OH group of formaldoxime acts as a proton donor for ammonia and the nitrogen atom acts as a proton acceptor for hydrogen chloride. In the 1:2 complexes ammonia or hydrogen chloride dimers interact both with the OH group and the nitrogen atom of CH2NOH to form seven membered cyclic structures stabilized by three hydrogen bonds. The theoretical spectra generally agree well with the experimental ones, but they seriously underestimate the shift of the OH stretch for the 1:1 CH2NOH⋯NH3 complex.

  16. Infrared intensities and charge mobility in hydrogen bonded complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galimberti, Daria; Milani, Alberto; Castiglioni, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta,” Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    The analytical model for the study of charge mobility in the molecules presented by Galimberti et al.[J. Chem. Phys. 138, 164115 (2013)] is applied to hydrogen bonded planar dimers. Atomic charges and charge fluxes are obtained from density functional theory computed atomic polar tensors and related first derivatives, thus providing an interpretation of the IR intensity enhancement of the X–H stretching band observed upon aggregation. Our results show that both principal and non-principal charge fluxes have an important role for the rationalization of the spectral behavior; moreover, they demonstrate that the modulation of the charge distribution during vibrational motions of the –XH⋯Y– fragment is not localized exclusively on the atoms directly involved in hydrogen bonding. With these premises we made some correlations between IR intensities, interaction energies, and charge fluxes. The model was tested on small dimers and subsequently to the bigger one cytosine-guanine. Thus, the model can be applied to complex systems.

  17. Dissociation Energies of Sulfur-Centered Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanat; Bhattacharyya, Surjendu; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2015-11-01

    In this work we have determined dissociation energies of O-H···S hydrogen bond in the H2S complexes of various phenol derivatives using 2-color-2-photon photofragmentation spectroscopy in combination with zero kinetic energy photoelectron (ZEKE-PE) spectroscopy. This is the first report of direct determination of dissociation energy of O-H···S hydrogen bond. The ZEKE-PE spectra of the complexes revealed a long progression in the intermolecular stretching mode with significant anharmonicity. Using the anharmonicity information and experimentally determined dissociation energy, we also validated Birge-Sponer (B-S) extrapolation method, which is an approximate method to estimate dissociation energy. Experimentally determined dissociation energies were compared with a variety of ab initio calculations. One of the important findings is that ωB97X-D functional, which is a dispersion corrected DFT functional, was able to predict the dissociation energies in both the cationic as well as the ground electronic state very well for almost every case.

  18. Character and Structure of Hydrogen Bonding in Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinghua; Luo, Yi; Augustsson, Andreas; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Sathe, Conny; Agren, Hans; Siegbahn, Hans; Nordgren, Joseph

    2003-03-01

    Pauling stated in the 50s that electron sharing between water molecules results in a covalency in the hydrogen bond. Many attempts have been made in the past to verify PaulingÂ's prediction, but without much success due to the limitation of experimental access to the electronic structure of liquids. We reported the first X-ray emission spectra of liquid water. X-ray emission is a direct probe of the local electronic structure of complex systems. Our experimental and theoretical studies on liquid water provide clear evidence that an electron sharing takes place between water molecules. Such a sharing mainly involves the so-called 3a1 orbital, which is a mixing of oxygen 2p and hydrogen 2s atomic orbitals. The outermost "lone pair" orbital (1b_1), however, hardly shows any change upon solvation, which is in contradiction with the normal definition of so-called coordinate-covalent bonding (also called donor-acceptor or Lewis acid-base bonding). Moreover, the X-ray emission spectra of liquid water nicely show the origin for the increasing of dipole moment in liquid water, and they have also been used to separately determine a particular structure with broken hydrogen bonding.

  19. NMR and IR Investigations of Strong Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2017-03-29

    For the purpose of this review, strong hydrogen bonds have been defined on the basis of experimental data, such as OH stretching wavenumbers, νOH, and OH chemical shifts, δOH (in the latter case, after correction for ring current effects). Limits for O-H···Y systems are taken as 2800 > νOH > 1800 cm(-1), and 19 ppm > δOH > 15 ppm. Recent results as well as an account of theoretical advances are presented for a series of important classes of compounds such as β-diketone enols, β-thioxoketone enols, Mannich bases, proton sponges, quinoline N-oxides and diacid anions. The O···O distance has long been used as a parameter for hydrogen bond strength in O-H···O systems. On a broad scale, a correlation between OH stretching wavenumbers and O···O distances is observed, as demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretically, but for substituted β-diketone enols this correlation is relatively weak.

  20. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Ross H., E-mail: r.mckenzie@uq.edu.au; Bekker, Christiaan [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2014-05-07

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X–H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O–H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 − 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X–H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  1. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 - 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  2. Intramolecular hydrogen-bonding studies by NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cantalapiedra, N A

    2000-01-01

    o-methoxybenzamide and N-methyl-o-methylbenzamide, using the pseudo-contact shifts calculated from the sup 1 H and sup 1 sup 3 C NMR spectra. The main conformation present in solution for o-fluorobenzamide was the one held by an intramolecular N-H...F hydrogen bond. Ab-initio calculations (at the RHF/6-31G* level) have provided additional data for the geometry of the individual molecules. A conformational equilibrium study of some nipecotic acid derivatives (3-substituted piperidines: CO sub 2 H, CO sub 2 Et, CONH sub 2 , CONHMe, CONEt sub 2) and cis-1,3-disubstituted cyclohexane derivatives (NHCOMe/CO sub 2 Me, NHCOMe/CONHMe, NH sub 2 /CO sub 2 H) has been undertaken in a variety of solvents, in order to predict the intramolecular hydrogen-bonding energies involved in the systems. The conformer populations were obtained by direct integration of proton peaks corresponding to the equatorial and axial conformations at low temperature (-80 deg), and by geometrically dependent coupling constants ( sup 3 J sub H s...

  3. NMR and IR Investigations of Strong Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul Erik Hansen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of this review, strong hydrogen bonds have been defined on the basis of experimental data, such as OH stretching wavenumbers, νOH, and OH chemical shifts, δOH (in the latter case, after correction for ring current effects. Limits for O–H···Y systems are taken as 2800 > νOH > 1800 cm−1, and 19 ppm > δOH > 15 ppm. Recent results as well as an account of theoretical advances are presented for a series of important classes of compounds such as β-diketone enols, β-thioxoketone enols, Mannich bases, proton sponges, quinoline N-oxides and diacid anions. The O···O distance has long been used as a parameter for hydrogen bond strength in O–H···O systems. On a broad scale, a correlation between OH stretching wavenumbers and O···O distances is observed, as demonstrated experimentally as well as theoretically, but for substituted β-diketone enols this correlation is relatively weak.

  4. THE HYBRID COUMPOUNDS AND THE INFLUENCE OF HYDROGEN BONDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F ALLOUCHE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic–inorganic hybrid materials have received increasing attention in recent research particularly because of their ability to combine the specific properties of inorganic frameworks and the features of organic molecules, including the formation of weak interactions. These materials have recently attracted further interest due to their attractive potential for application as insulators in the electronics industry. They offer promising opportunities for the development of efficient conductors, ferroelectrics, and semiconductors in a wide range of electronic applications [1,2]. The hybrid compounds are rich in H-bonds and they could be used to this effect because of their potential importance in constructing sophisticated assemblies from discrete ionic or molecular building blocks due to its strength and directionality. In order to enrich the varieties in such kinds of hybrid materials and to investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds on the on the structural features, they have synthesized a new compound, This kind of hydrogen bonding appears in the active sites of several biological systems and is observed in similar previously studied hybrid compounds.

  5. Hydrogen bonding in oxalic acid and its complexes: A database study of neutron structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Chitra; Amit Das; R R Choudhury; M Ramanadham; R Chidambaram

    2004-08-01

    The basic result of carboxylic group that the oxygen atom of the –OH never seems to be a hydrogen bond acceptor is violated in the cases, namely urea oxalic acid and bis urea oxalic acid complexes, where the hydroxyl oxygen atom is an acceptor of a weak N–H... O hydrogen bond. The parameters of this hydrogen bond, respectively in these structures are: hydrogen acceptor distance 2.110 Å and 2.127 Å and the bending angle at hydrogen, 165.6° and 165.8°. The bond strength around the hydroxyl oxygen is close to 1.91 valence units, indicating that it has hardly any strength left to form hydrogen bonds. These two structures being highly planar, force the formation of this hydrogen bond. As oxalic acid is the common moiety, the structures of the two polymorphs, -oxalic acid and -oxalic acid, also were looked into in terms of hydrogen bonding and packing.

  6. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.;

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  7. Hydrogen bonded complexes of cyanuric acid with pyridine and guanidinium carbonate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Sivashankar

    2000-12-01

    Hydrogen bonded complexes of cyanuric acid (CA) with pyridine, [C3N3H3O3:C5H5N], 1, and guanidinium carbonate [C3H2N3][C(NH2)3], 2, have been prepared at room temperature and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Structure of 1 shows pyridine molecules substituting the inter-tape hydrogen bond in CA by N-H…N and C-H…O hydrogen bonds. The structure reveals CA-pyridine hydrogen-bonded single helices held together by dimeric N-H…O hydrogen bonding between CA molecules. In 2, the CA tapes, resembling a sine wave interact with the guanidinium cations through N-H…O and N-H…N hydrogen bonds forming guanidinium cyanurate sheets.

  8. Hydrogen-Bonding Liquids at Mineral Surfaces: From Fundamentals to Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, A. T. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-level understanding of properties of hydrogen-bonding liquids and their mixtures at solid-liquid interfaces plays a significant role in several applications including membrane-based separations, shale gas production, etc. Liquid water and ethanol are common hydrogen-bonding fluids. All-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were employed to gain insights regarding the structure and dynamics of these hydrogen-bonding liquids on various free-standing solid surfaces. Models fo...

  9. Evidence of Hydrogen Bonding in Chloroform and Polyacrylates from NMR Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The presence of hydrogen bonding in chloroform and polyacrylate mixtures was demonstrated by observation of 1H- and 13C-NMR chemical shifts. Comparison of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift in polymer solutions with their low molecular mass analogues showed the effect of steric hindrance on hydrogen bonding. This initial investigation is helpful for understanding the intermolecular interaction in relatively weak hydrogen bonding polymer solutions.

  10. Towards two-dimensional search engines

    CERN Document Server

    Ermann, Leonardo; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2011-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way the ranking of nodes becomes two-dimensional that paves the way for development of two-dimensional search engines of new type. Information flow properties on PageRank-CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian Universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed.

  11. The open-close mechanism of M2 channel protein in influenza A virus: A computational study on the hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions among His37 and Trp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG JiaGao; ZHU WeiLiang; WANG YanLi; YAN XiuHua; LI Zhong; TANG Yun; JIANG HuaLiang

    2008-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A virus is a tetrameric ion channel. It was reported that the permeation of the ion channel is correlated with the hydrogen bond network among His37 residues and the cation-π interactions between His37 and Trp41. In the present study, the hydrogen bonding network of 4-methyl-imidazoles was built to mimic the hydrogen bonds between His37 residues, and the cation-π interactions between 4-methyl-imidazolium and indole systems were selected to represent the interac-tions between His37 and Trp41. Then, quantum chemistry calculations at the MP2/6-311G** level were carried out to explore the properties of the hydrogen bonds and the cation-π interactions. The calculation results indicate that the binding strength of the N--H…N hydrogen bond between imidazole rings is up to -6.22 kcal·mol-1, and the binding strength of the strongest cation-π interaction is up to -18.8 kcal·mol-1 (T-shaped interaction) or -12.3 kcal·mol-1 (parallel stacking interaction). Thus, the calculated binding energies indicate that it is possible to control the permeation of the M2 ion channel through the hydrogen bond network and the cation-π interactions by altering the pH values.

  12. The open-close mechanism of M2 channel protein in influenza A virus:A computational study on the hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions among His37 and Trp41

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A virus is a tetrameric ion channel. It was reported that the permeation of the ion channel is correlated with the hydrogen bond network among His37 residues and the cation-π interactions between His37 and Trp41. In the present study,the hydrogen bonding network of 4-methyl-imidazoles was built to mimic the hydrogen bonds between His37 residues,and the cation-π interactions between 4-methyl-imidazolium and indole systems were selected to represent the interac-tions between His37 and Trp41. Then,quantum chemistry calculations at the MP2/6-311G level were carried out to explore the properties of the hydrogen bonds and the cation-π interactions. The calcula-tion results indicate that the binding strength of the N-H···N hydrogen bond between imidazole rings is up to -6.22 kcal·mol-1,and the binding strength of the strongest cation-π interaction is up to -18.8 kcal·mol-1(T-shaped interaction) or -12.3 kcal·mol-1(parallel stacking interaction). Thus,the calcu-lated binding energies indicate that it is possible to control the permeation of the M2 ion channel through the hydrogen bond network and the cation-π interactions by altering the pH values.

  13. A novel two-dimensional CuSCN network templated by 2,2'-dimethyl-1,1'-(butane-1,4-diyl)bis(1H-imidazol-3-ium) cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan-Shan; Yuan, Shuai; Lu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Meng-Zhen; Sun, Di

    2013-06-01

    The cation-templated self-assembly of 1,4-bis(2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)butane (bmimb) with CuSCN gives rise to a novel two-dimensional network, namely catena-poly[2,2'-dimethyl-1,1'-(butane-1,4-diyl)bis(1H-imidazol-3-ium) [tetra-μ2-thiocyanato-κ(4)S:S;κ(4)S:N-dicopper(I)

  14. Crystal structures and hydrogen bonding in the isotypic series of hydrated alkali metal (K, Rb and Cs complexes with 4-aminophenylarsonic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Smith

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structures of the alkali metal (K, Rb and Cs complex salts with 4-aminophenylarsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid manifest an isotypic series with the general formula [M2(C6H7AsNO32(H2O3], with M = K {poly[di-μ3-4-aminophenylarsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dipotassium], [K2(C6H7AsNO32(H2O3], (I}, Rb {poly[di-μ3-4-aminophenylarsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dirubidium], [Rb2(C6H7AsNO32(H2O3], (II}, and Cs {poly[di-μ3-4-aminophenylarsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dirubidium], [Cs2(C6H7AsNO32(H2O3], (III}, in which the repeating structural units lie across crystallographic mirror planes containing two independent and different metal cations and a bridging water molecule, with the two hydrogen p-arsanilate ligands and the second water molecule lying outside the mirror plane. The bonding about the two metal cations in all complexes is similar, one five-coordinate, the other progressing from five-coordinate in (I to eight-coordinate in both (II and (III, with overall M—O bond-length ranges of 2.694 (5–3.009 (7 (K, 2.818 (4–3.246 (4 (Rb and 2.961 (9–3.400 (10 Å (Cs. The additional three bonds in (II and (III are the result of inter-metal bridging through the water ligands. Two-dimensional coordination polymeric structures with the layers lying parallel to (100 are generated through a number of bridging bonds involving the water molecules (including hydrogen-bonding interactions, as well as through the arsanilate O atoms. These layers are linked across [100] through amine N—H...O hydrogen bonds to arsonate and water O-atom acceptors, giving overall three-dimensional network structures.

  15. A new method for quick predicting the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN ChangLiang; ZHANG Yan; JIANG XiaoNan; WANG ChangSheng; YANG ZhongZhi

    2009-01-01

    A new method is proposed to quick predict the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The method is employed to produce the hydrogen-bonding potential energy curves of twenty-nine hydro-gen-bonded dimers. The calculation results show that the hydrogen-bonding potential energy curves obtained from this method are in good agreement with those obtained from MP2/6-31+G** calculations by including the BSSE correction, which demonstrate that the method proposed in this work can be used to calculate the hydrogen-bonding interactions in peptides.

  16. A new method for quick predicting the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A new method is proposed to quick predict the strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds.The method is employed to produce the hydrogen-bonding potential energy curves of twenty-nine hydro-gen-bonded dimers.The calculation results show that the hydrogen-bonding potential energy curves obtained from this method are in good agreement with those obtained from MP2/6-31+G calculations by including the BSSE correction,which demonstrate that the method proposed in this work can be used to calculate the hydrogen-bonding interactions in peptides.

  17. Weak C–H…O hydrogen bonds in alkaloids: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajnikant; Dinesh; Kamni

    2005-06-01

    An overview of general classification scheme, medicinal importance and crystal structure analysis with emphasis on the role of hydrogen bonding in some alkaloids is presented in this paper. The article is based on a general kind of survey while crystallographic analysis and role of hydrogen bonding are limited to only those alkaloids whose three-dimensional structure has been reported by us. The C–H…O hydrogen bonding in the solid state in alkaloids has been found to be predominant and this observation makes the role of hydrogen bonding in organic molecular assemblies very important.

  18. Estimation of Intramolecular Hydrogen-bonding Energy via the Substitution Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The intramolecular hydrogen-bonding energies for eighteen molecules were calculated based on the substitution method, and compared with those predicted by the cis-trans method.The energy values obtained from two methods are close to each other with a correlation coefficient of 0.96.Furthermore, the hydrogen-bonding energies based on the substitution method are consistent with the geometrical features of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.Both of them demonstrate that the substitution method is capable of providing a good estimation of intramolecular hydrogen-bonding energy.

  19. Changes of Water Hydrogen Bond Network with Different Externalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is crucial to uncover the mystery of water cluster and structural motif to have an insight into the abundant anomalies bound to water. In this context, the analysis of influence factors is an alternative way to shed light on the nature of water clusters. Water structure has been tentatively explained within different frameworks of structural models. Based on comprehensive analysis and summary of the studies on the response of water to four externalities (i.e., temperature, pressure, solutes and external fields, the changing trends of water structure and a deduced intrinsic structural motif are put forward in this work. The variations in physicochemical and biological effects of water induced by each externality are also discussed to emphasize the role of water in our daily life. On this basis, the underlying problems that need to be further studied are formulated by pointing out the limitations attached to current study techniques and to outline prominent studies that have come up recently.

  20. Reversible polymer networks containing covalent and hydrogen bonding interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Hermosilla, R.; Broekhuis, A.A.; Picchioni, F.

    2014-01-01

    Thermally reversible polymers with relatively high glass transition temperatures (T-g) are difficult to prepare but very interesting from an application point of view. In this work we present a novel reversible thermoset with tunable T-g based on chemical modification of aliphatic polyketones (PM) i

  1. Hydrogen-bonding-mediated vesicular assembly of functionalized naphthalene-diimide-based bolaamphiphile and guest-induced gelation in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Mijanur Rahaman; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2012-08-06

    This paper describes the spontaneous vesicular assembly of a naphthalene-diimide (NDI)-based non-ionic bolaamphiphile in aqueous medium by using the synergistic effects of π-stacking and hydrogen bonding. Site isolation of the hydrogen-bonding functionality (hydrazide), a strategy that has been adopted so elegantly in nature, has been executed in this system to protect these moieties from the bulk water so that the distinct role of hydrogen bonding in the self-assembly of hydrazide-functionalized NDI building blocks could be realized, even in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the electron-deficient NDI-based bolaamphiphile could engage in donor-acceptor (D-A) charge-transfer (CT) interactions with a water-insoluble electron-rich pyrene donor by virtue of intercalation of the latter chromophore in between two NDI building blocks. Remarkably, even when pyrene was located between two NDI blocks, intermolecular hydrogen-bonding networks between the NDI-linked hydrazide groups could be retained. However, time-dependent AFM studies revealed that the radius of curvature of the alternately stacked D-A assembly increased significantly, thereby leading to intervesicular fusion, which eventually resulted in rupturing of the membrane to form 1D fibers. Such 2D-to-1D morphological transition produced CT-mediated hydrogels at relatively higher concentrations. Instead of pyrene, when a water-soluble carboxylate-functionalized pyrene derivative was used as the intercalator, non-covalent tunable in-situ surface-functionalization could be achieved, as evidenced by the zeta-potential measurements.

  2. A two-dimensional CdII coordination polymer: poly[diaqua[μ3-5,6-bis(pyridin-2-ylpyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylato-κ5O2:O3:O3,N4,N5]cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monserrat Alfonso

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of 5,6-bis(pyridin-2-ylpyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid with cadmium dichloride leads to the formation of the title two-dimensional coordination polymer, [Cd(C16H8N4O4(H2O2]n. The metal atom is sevenfold coordinated by one pyrazine and one pyridine N atom, two water O atoms, and by two carboxylate O atoms, one of which bridges two CdII atoms to form a Cd2O2 unit situated about a centre of inversion. Hence, the ligand coordinates to the cadmium atom in an N,N′,O-tridentate and an O-monodentate manner. Within the polymer network, there are a number of O—H...O hydrogen bonds present, involving the water molecules and the carboxylate O atoms. There are also C—H...N and C—H...O hydrogen bonds present. In the crystal, the polymer networks lie parallel to the bc plane. They are aligned back-to-back along the a axis with the non-coordinating pyridine rings directed into the space between the networks.

  3. Altering intra- to inter-molecular hydrogen bonding by dimethylsulfoxide: A TDDFT study of charge transfer for coumarin 343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Yin, Hang; Li, Hui; Shi, Ying

    2017-04-01

    DFT and TDDFT methods were carried out to investigate the influences of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding on excited state charge transfer for coumarin 343 (C343). Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is formed between carboxylic acid group and carbonyl group in C343 monomer. However, in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution, DMSO 'opens up' the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and forms solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonded C343-DMSO complex. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals reveals that intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) occurs in the first excited state both for C343 monomer and complex. The results of optimized geometric structures indicate that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction is strengthened while the intermolecular hydrogen bonding is weakened in excited state, which is confirmed again by monitoring the shifts of characteristic peaks of infrared spectra. We demonstrated that DMSO solvent can not only break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding to form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with C343 but also alter the mechanism of excited state hydrogen bonding strengthening.

  4. Hydrogen bonding motifs in a hydroxy-bisphosphonate moiety: revisiting the problem of hydrogen bond identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Mitra; Maghari, Ali; Karimi-Jafari, M H

    2015-05-28

    Bisphosphonates are important therapeutic agents in bone-related diseases and exhibit complex H-bonding networks. To assess the role of H-bonds in biophosphonate stability, a full conformational search was performed for methylenebisphosphonate (MBP) and 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonate (HEDP) using the MP2 method in conjunction with the continuum solvation model. The most stable structures and their equilibrium populations were analyzed at two protonation states via assignment of H-bonding motifs to each conformer. Geometrical and topological approaches for the identification and characterization of H-bonds were compared with each other, and some of the important correlations between H-bond features were described over the entire conformational space of a hydroxy-bisphosphonate moiety. The topologically derived H-bond energy obtained from the local density of potential energy at bond critical points shows consistent correlations with other measures such as H-bond frequency shift. An inverse power form without an intercept predicts topological H-bond energies from hydrogen-acceptor distances with an RMS error of less than 1 kcal mol(-1). The consistency of this measure was further checked by building a model that reasonably reproduces the relative stabilities of different conformers from their hydrogen-acceptor distances. In all systems, the predictions of this model are improved by the consideration of weak H-bonds that have no bond critical point.

  5. A depth-averaged two-dimensional sediment transport model for environmental studies in the Scheldt Estuary and tidal river network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgue, O.; Baeyens, W.; Chen, M. S.; de Brauwere, A.; de Brye, B.; Deleersnijder, E.; Elskens, M.; Legat, V.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the sediment module designed for the two-dimensional depth-averaged and one-dimensional section-averaged components of the finite-element model SLIM (Second-generation Louvain-la-Neuve Ice-ocean Model) in the framework of its application to the tidal part of the Scheldt Basin. This sediment transport module focuses on fine-grained, cohesive sediments. It is a necessary tool to undertake environmental biogeochemical studies, in which fine sediment dynamics play a crucial role.

  6. Hydrogen Bonding and Stability of Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskites

    KAUST Repository

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-09-08

    In the past few years, the efficiency of solar cells based on hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites has exceeded the level needed for commercialization. However, existing perovskites solar cells (PSCs) suffer from several intrinsic instabilities, which prevent them from reaching industrial maturity, and stabilizing PSCs has become a critically important problem. Here we propose to stabilize PSCs chemically by strengthening the interactions between the organic cation and inorganic anion of the perovskite framework. In particular, we show that replacing the methylammonium cation with alternative protonated cations allows an increase in the stability of the perovskite by forming strong hydrogen bonds with the halide anions. This interaction also provides opportunities for tuning the electronic states near the bandgap. These mechanisms should have a universal character in different hybrid organic–inorganic framework materials that are widely used.

  7. Hydrogen bond breaking in aqueous solutions near the critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2001-01-01

    The nature of water-anion bonding is examined using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy on a 1mZnBr2/6m NaBr aqueous solution, to near critical conditions. Analyses show that upon heating the solution from 25??C to 500??C, a 63% reduction of waters occurs in the solvation shell of ZnBr42-, which is the predominant complex at all pressure-temperature conditions investigated. A similar reduction in the hydration shell of waters in the Br- aqua ion was found. Our results indicate that the water-anion and water-water bond breaking mechanisms occurring at high temperatures are essentially the same. This is consistent with the hydration waters being weakly hydrogen bonded to halide anions in electrolyte solutions. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  9. Crystal engineered acid–base complexes with 2D and 3D hydrogen bonding systems using p-hydroxybenzoic acid as the building block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PU SU ZHAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (p-HOBA was selected as the building block for self-assembly with five bases, i.e., diethylamine, tert-butylamine, cyclohexylamine, imidazole and piperazine, and generation of the corresponding acid–base complexes 1–5. Crystal structure analyses suggest that proton-transfer from the carboxyl hydrogen to the nitrogen atom of the bases can be observed in 1–4, while only in 5 does a solvent water molecule co-exist with p--HOBA and piperazine. With the presence of O–H···O hydrogen bonds in 1–4, the deprotonated p-hydroxybenzoate anions (p-HOBAA– are simply connected each other in a head-to-tail motif to form one-dimensional (1D arrays, which are further extended to distinct two-dimensional (2D (for 1 and 4 and three-dimensional (3D (for 2 and 3 networks via N–H···O interactions. While in 5, neutral acid and base are combined pair-wise by O–H···N and N–H···O bonds to form a 1D tape and then the 1D tapes are sequentially combined by water molecules to create a 3D network. Some interlayer or intralayer C–H···O, C–H···p and p×××p interactions help to stabilize the supramolecular buildings. Melting point determination analyses indicate that the five acid–base complexes are not the ordinary superposition of the reactants and they are more stable than the original reactants.

  10. Enthalpies of hydrogen bonding of quinoline with o-phenylphenol and of hydrogen-bonding reactions involving the acid and base components of a coal-derived asphaltene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, A.G.; Blaha, C.; Li, N.C.

    1977-01-01

    Calorimetric studies are reported of hydrogen bonding between quinoline (Qu) and o-phenylphenol (OPP). The enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding of the acid and base components of a coal-derived asphaltene with OPP and Qu are also reported. The results provide strong evidence that the acid and base components of asphaltene function substantially as hydrogen donor and acceptor, respectively. 1 figure, 1 table.

  11. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces as tools for the construction of a herringbone pattern in the crystal structure of hexane-1,6-diaminium hexane-1,6-diyl bis-(hydrogen phospho-nate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Guido J; van Megen, Martin; Frank, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, [H3N(CH2)6NH3][(HO)O2P(CH2)6PO2(OH)], consists of one half of a hexane-1,6-diaminium dication and one half of a hexane-1,6-diyl bis-(hydrogen phospho-nate) dianion. Both are located around different centres of inversion (Wyckoff sites: 2a and 2d) of the space group P21/c. The shape of the hexane-1,6-diaminium cation is best described as a double hook. Both aminium groups as well as the two attached CH2 groups are turned out from the plane of the central four C atoms. In contrast, all six C atoms of the dianion are almost in a plane. The hydrogen phospho-nate (-PO3H) groups of the anions and the aminium groups of the cations form two-dimensional O-H⋯ and O-H⋯N hydrogen-bonded networks parallel to the ac plane, built up from ten-membered and twelve-membered ring motifs with graph-set descriptors R3(3)(10) and R5(4)(12), respectively. These networks are linked by the alkyl-ene chains of the anions and cations. The resulting three-dimensional network shows a herringbone pattern, which resembles the parent structures 1,6-di-amino-hexane and hexane-1,6-di-phospho-nic acid.

  12. Reordering hydrogen bonds using Hamiltonian replica exchange enhances sampling of conformational changes in biomolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, J.; Wolf, M.G.; de Leeuw, S.W.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds play an important role in stabilizing (meta-)stable states in protein folding. Hence, they can potentially be used as a way to bias these states in molecular simulation methods. Previously, Wolf et al. showed that applying repulsive and attractive hydrogen bond biasing potentials in a

  13. Calorimetric Investigation of Hydrogen Bonding of Formamide and Its Methyl Derivatives in Organic Solvents and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Rakipov, Ilnaz T.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2013-04-01

    Formamide and its derivatives have a large number of practical applications; also they are structural fragments of many biomolecules. Hydrogen bonds strongly affect their physicochemical properties. In the present work a calorimetric study of formamide and its methyl derivatives was carried out. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution of formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide in organic solvents at 298.15 K were measured. The relationships between the obtained enthalpies of solvation and the structure of the studied compounds were observed. Hydrogen-bond enthalpies of amides with chlorinated alkanes, ethers, ketones, esters, nitriles, amines, alcohols, and water were determined. The strength of hydrogen bonds of formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide with proton donor solvents is practically equal. Enthalpies of hydrogen bonds of formamide with the proton acceptor solvents are two times larger in magnitude than the enthalpies of N-methylformamide. The process of hydrogen bonding of amides in aliphatic alcohols and water is complicated. The obtained enthalpies of hydrogen bonding in aliphatic alcohols vary considerably from the amide structure due to the competition between solute-solvent and solvent-solvent hydrogen bonds. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements were carried out to explain the calorimetric data. Hydration enthalpies of methyl derivatives of formamides contain a contribution of the hydrophobic effect. New thermochemical data on the hydrogen bonding of formamides may be useful for predicting the properties of biomacromolecules.

  14. Temperature breaking of hydrogen bonds in ammonia studied by π --meson capture in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, D.; Bannikov, A. V.; Kachalkin, A. K.; Lévay, B.; Petrukhin, V. I.; Vasilyev, V. A.; Yutlandov, I. A.; Strakovsky, I. I.

    1982-04-01

    The capture probability of stopped π - mesons by hydrogen atoms of ammonia increases with temperature in the liquid phase but in the supercritical phase it is temperature-independent. This can be attributed to the temperature breaking of hydrogen bonds. Rough estimates are given for the fraction of broken hydrogen bonds at various temperatures.

  15. Investigating Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Anna M.; Toda, Megan J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding of phenol can be used as an introductory model for biological systems because of its structural similarities to tyrosine, a para-substituted phenol that is an amino acid essential to the synthesis of proteins. Phenol is able to form hydrogen bonds readily in solution, which makes it a suitable model for biological…

  16. Order-disorder transitions in comb-like polymer-surfactant systems involving hydrogen bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, G.; Huh, J; Ruokolainen, J.; Torkkeli, M.; Serimaa, R.; Ikkala, O.

    Conditions to obtain micro-phase separated morphologies in polymer-surfactant systems involving hydrogen bonds have been investigated using poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (P4VP) and surfactants capable of forming hydrogen bonds of different strength with the basic nitrogen of P4VP. Depending on the tail

  17. Investigating Hydrogen Bonding in Phenol Using Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Anna M.; Toda, Megan J.

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen bonding of phenol can be used as an introductory model for biological systems because of its structural similarities to tyrosine, a para-substituted phenol that is an amino acid essential to the synthesis of proteins. Phenol is able to form hydrogen bonds readily in solution, which makes it a suitable model for biological…

  18. Side-by-Side Comparison of Hydroperoxide and Corresponding Alcohol as Hydrogen-Bond Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kristian Holten; Tram, Camilla Mia; Kjærgaard, Henrik Grum

    2017-01-01

    tert-butanol (t-BuOH), with dimethyl ether (DME) as the hydrogen-bond acceptor. Using a combination of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations, we compare the strength of the OH-O hydrogen bond and the total strength of complexation. We find that, both in terms...

  19. The role of hydrogen bonds in the melting points of sulfonate-based protic organic salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jiangshui

    2016-01-01

    There are three main types of interactions inside organic salts - electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals force [1-4]. While van der Waals force is relatively weak, it is hydrogen bonding and particularly electrostatic interaction that determine the lattice energies of ionic...

  20. Single molecule force spectroscopy of complementary hydrogen-bonded supramolecular systems: dimers, polymers and solvent effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embrechts, Anika

    2011-01-01

    The work described in this Thesis aimed at a better understanding of the structure-property relationships of supramolecular assemblies with a specific focus on hydrogen-bond dimers and polymers. The hydrogen-bond strength of (supra)molecular complexes in different solvents is usually determined by m

  1. Hydrogen bond dynamics in alcohols studied by 2D IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L C; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast hydrogen-bond dynamics in alcohols are studied by 2D IR spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics—quantum mechanical simulations on the OH stretching mode. Fast memory loss in *100 fs are attributed to intact hydrogen-bond fluctuations. Stable (at the experimental timescale) hydrogen bo

  2. Evaluation of the individual hydrogen bonding energies in N-methylacetamide chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The individual hydrogen bonding energies in N-methylacetamide chains were evaluated at the MP2/6-31+G** level including BSSE correction and at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level including BSSE and van der Waals correction.The calculation results indicate that compared with MP2 results,B3LYP calculations without van der Waals correction underestimate the individual hydrogen bonding energies about 5.4 kJ m ol-1 for both the terminal and central hydrogen bonds,whereas B3LYP calculations with van der Waals correction produce almost the same individual hydrogen bonding energies as MP2 does for those terminal hydrogen bonds,but still underestimate the individual hydrogen bonding energies about 2.5 kJ mol-1 for the hydrogen bonds near the center.Our calculation results show that the individual hydrogen bonding energy becomes more negative (more attractive) as the chain becomes longer and that the hydrogen bonds close to the interior of the chain are stronger than those near the ends.The weakest individual hydrogen bonding energy is about-29.0 kJ m ol-1 found in the dimer,whereas with the growth of the N-methylacetamide chain the individual hydrogen bonding energy was estimated to be as large as-62.5 kJ mol-1 found in the N-methylacetamide decamer,showing that there is a significant hydrogen bond cooperative effect in N-methylacetamide chains.The natural bond orbital analysis indicates that a stronger hydrogen bond corresponds to a larger positive charge for the H atom and a larger negative charge for the O atom in the N-H···O=C bond,corresponds to a stronger second-order stabilization energy between the oxygen lone pair and the N-H antibonding orbital,and corresponds to more charge transfer between the hydrogen bonded donor and acceptor molecules.

  3. Hydrogen bond disruption in DNA base pairs from (14)C transmutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassi, Michel; Carter, Damien J; Uberuaga, Blas P; Stanek, Christopher R; Mancera, Ricardo L; Marks, Nigel A

    2014-09-04

    Recent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations have shown that radioactive carbon does not normally fragment DNA bases when it decays. Motivated by this finding, density functional theory and Bader analysis have been used to quantify the effect of C → N transmutation on hydrogen bonding in DNA base pairs. We find that (14)C decay has the potential to significantly alter hydrogen bonds in a variety of ways including direct proton shuttling (thymine and cytosine), thermally activated proton shuttling (guanine), and hydrogen bond breaking (cytosine). Transmutation substantially modifies both the absolute and relative strengths of the hydrogen bonding pattern, and in two instances (adenine and cytosine), the density at the critical point indicates development of mild covalent character. Since hydrogen bonding is an important component of Watson-Crick pairing, these (14)C-induced modifications, while infrequent, may trigger errors in DNA transcription and replication.

  4. Effects of hydrogen-bond environment on single particle and pair dynamics in liquid water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amalendu Chandra; Snehasis Chowdhuri

    2001-10-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water at 298 and 258 K to investigate the effects of hydrogen-bond environment on various single-particle and pair dynamical properties of water molecules at ambient and supercooled conditions. The water molecules are modelled by the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model. We first calculate the distribution of hydrogen-bond environment in liquid water at both temperatures and then investigate how the selfdiffusion and orientational relaxation of a single water molecule and also the relative diffusion and relaxation of the hydrogen-bond of a water pair depend on the nature of the hydrogen-bond environment of the tagged molecules. We find that the various dynamical quantities depend significantly on the hydrogen-bond environment, especially at the supercooled temperature. The present study provides a molecular-level insight into the dynamics of liquid water under ambient and supercooled conditions.

  5. The strength of side chain hydrogen bonds in the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristova, Kalina; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz

    2013-03-01

    There are no direct quantitative measurements of hydrogen bond strengths in membrane proteins residing in their native cellular environment. To address this knowledge gap, here we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to measure the impact of hydrogen bonds on the stability of a membrane protein dimer in vesicles derived from eukaryotic plasma membranes, and we compare these results to previous measurements of hydrogen bond strengths in model lipid bilayers. We demonstrate that FRET measurements of membrane protein interactions in plasma membrane vesicles have the requisite sensitivity to quantify the strength of hydrogen bonds. We find that the hydrogen bond-mediated stabilization in the plasma membrane is small, only -0.7 kcal/mole. It is the same as in model lipid bilayers, despite the different nature and dielectric properties of the two environments.

  6. Reaction dynamics and statistical theory for the growth of hydrogen bonding clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Haijun; BA; Xinwu(巴信武); ZHAO; Min(赵敏)

    2002-01-01

    The similarities between the formation of hydrogen bonds and polycondensation reactions are stated from the statistical viewpoint, and then taking the hydrogen bonding system of AaDd type as an example, the growing process of hydrogen bonding clusters is investigated in terms of the theory of reaction dynamics and statistical theory for polymeric reactions. The two methods lead to the same conclusions, stating that the statistical theory for polymerization is applicable to the hydrogen bonding systems. Based on this consideration, the explicit relationship between the conversions of proton-donors and proton-acceptors and the Gibbs free energy of the system under study is given. Furthermore, the sol-gel phase transition is predicted to take place in some hydrogen bonding systems, and the corresponding generalized scaling laws describing this kind of phase transition are obtained.

  7. Pyrrolic Amide: A New Hydrogen Bond Building Block for Self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Zhen-Ming; LI Jian-Feng; HE Jia-Qi; ZHU Xiao-Qing; CHENG Jin-Pei

    2003-01-01

    @@ Molecular self-assembly has emerged as a powerful technology for the synthesis of nanostructured materials. In design of various molecular assemblies, hydrogen bonding is a preferably selected intra- or inter-molecular weak interaction in recent research by virtue of the directionality and specificity. The research for novel hydrogen bond building blocks that self-assembly into well defined structures is great important not only for gaining an understanding of the concepts of self-assembly but also for the design of new molecular materials. Pyrrolic amide moiety has one hydrogen bond acceptor (C =O) and two hydrogen bond donors (pyrrole NH and amide NH). By deliberately design, pyrrolic amide compounds would be new kinds hydrogen bond building blocks. So, pyrrolic amide compounds 1 ~ 6, which bear one, two or three pyrrolic amide moieties respectively, were designed and synthesized.

  8. Metal-activated histidine carbon donor hydrogen bonds contribute to metalloprotein folding and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedekamp, Ann; Nanda, Vikas

    2009-07-01

    Carbon donor hydrogen bonds are typically weak interactions that contribute less than 2 kcal/mol, and provide only modest stabilization in proteins. One exception is the class of hydrogen bonds donated by heterocyclic side chain carbons. Histidine is capable of particularly strong interactions through the Cepsilon(1) and Cdelta(2) carbons when the imidazole is protonated or bound to metal. Given the frequent occurrence of metal-bound histidines in metalloproteins, we characterized the energies of these interactions through DFT calculations on model compounds. Imidazole-water hydrogen bonding could vary from -11.0 to -17.0 kcal/mol, depending on the metal identity and oxidation state. A geometric search of metalloprotein structures in the PDB identified a number of candidate His C-H...O hydrogen bonds which may be important for folding or function. DFT calculations on model complexes of superoxide reductase show a carbon donor hydrogen bond positioning a water molecule above the active site.

  9. Redshift or adduct stabilization -- a computational study of hydrogen bonding in adducts of protonated carboxylic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Solveig Gaarn; Hammerum, Steen

    2009-01-01

    changes and the redshift favor the Z OH group, matching the results of NBO and AIM calculations. This reflects that the thermochemistry of adduct formation is not a good measure of the hydrogen bond strength in charged adducts, and that the ionic interactions in the E and Z adducts of protonated......It is generally expected that the hydrogen bond strength in a D-H-A adduct is predicted by the difference between the proton affinities of D and A, measured by the adduct stabilization, and demonstrated by the IR redshift of the D-H bond stretching vibrational frequency. These criteria do...... not always yield consistent predictions, as illustrated by the hydrogen bonds formed by the E and Z OH groups of protonated carboxylic acids. The delta-PA and the stabilization of a series of hydrogen bonded adducts indicate that the E OH group forms the stronger hydrogen bonds, whereas the bond length...

  10. Insight into Hydrogen Bonding of Uranyl Hydroxide Layers and Capsules by Use of 1H Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Organic Material Science; Liao, Zuolei [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Materials; Nyman, May [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Materials; Yates, Jonathan [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    2016-04-27

    In this paper, solid-state 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate local proton environments in anhydrous [UO2(OH)2] (α-UOH) and hydrated uranyl hydroxide [(UO2)4O(OH)6·5H2O (metaschoepite). For the metaschoepite material, proton resonances of the μ2-OH hydroxyl and interlayer waters were resolved, with two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum (DQ) 1H–1H NMR correlation experiments revealing strong dipolar interactions between these different proton species. The experimental NMR results were combined with first-principles CASTEP GIPAW (gauge including projector-augmented wave) chemical shift calculations to develop correlations between hydrogen-bond strength and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts. Finally, these NMR correlations allowed characterization of local hydrogen-bond environments in uranyl U24 capsules and of changes in hydrogen bonding that occurred during thermal dehydration of metaschoepite.

  11. Secondary Structures in a Freeze-Dried Lignite Humic Acid Fraction Caused by Hydrogen-Bonding of Acidic Protons with Aromatic Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Drosos, Marios; Leenheer, Jerry A; Mao, Jingdong

    2016-02-16

    A lignite humic acid (HA) was separated from inorganic and non-HA impurities (i.e., aluminosilicates, metals) and fractionated by a combination of dialysis and XAD-8 resin. Fractionation revealed a more homogeneous structure of lignite HA. New and more specific structural information on the main lignite HA fraction is obtained by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Quantitative (13)C multiple cross-polarization (multiCP) NMR indicated oxidized phenyl propane structures derived from lignin. MultiCP experiments, conducted on potassium HA salts titrated to pH 10 and pH 12, revealed shifts consistent with carboxylate and phenolate formation, but structural changes associated with enolate formation from aromatic beta keto acids were not detected. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (2D HETCOR) NMR indicated aryl-aliphatic ketones, aliphatic and aromatic carboxyl groups, phenol, and methoxy phenyl ethers. Acidic protons from carboxyl groups in both the lignite HA fraction and a synthetic HA-like polycondensate were found to be hydrogen-bonded with electron-rich aromatic rings. Our results coupled with published infrared spectra provide evidence for the preferential hydrogen bonding of acidic hydrogens with electron-rich aromatic rings rather than adjacent carbonyl groups. These hydrogen-bonding interactions likely result from stereochemical arrangements in primary structures and folding.

  12. Molecularly Tuning the Radicaloid N-H···O═C Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Norman; Chung, Wei-Cheng; Ley, Rebecca M; Lin, Kwan-Yu; Francisco, Joseph S; Negishi, Ei-Ichi

    2016-03-01

    Substituent effects on the open shell N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond has never been reported. This study examines how 12 functional groups composed of electron donating groups (EDG), halogen atoms and electron withdrawing groups (EWG) affect the N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond properties in a six-membered cyclic model system of O═C(Y)-CH═C(X)N-H. It is found that group effects on this open shell H-bonding system are significant and have predictive trends when X = H and Y is varied. When Y is an EDG, the N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond is strengthened; and when Y is an EWG, the bond is weakened; whereas the variation in electronic properties of X group do not exhibit a significant impact upon the hydrogen bond strength. The structural impact of the stronger N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond are (1) shorter H and O distance, r(H···O) and (2) a longer N-H bond length, r(NH). The stronger N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond also acts to pull the H and O in toward one another which has an effect on the bond angles. Our findings show that there is a linear relationship between hydrogen-bond angle and N-H···O═C hydrogen-bond energy in this unusual H-bonding system. In addition, there is a linear correlation of the r(H···O) and the hydrogen bond energy. A short r(H···O) distance corresponds to a large hydrogen bond energy when Y is varied. The observed trends and findings have been validated using three different methods (UB3LYP, M06-2X, and UMP2) with two different basis sets.

  13. Strong and weak hydrogen bonds in drug–DNA complexes: A statistical analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil K Panigrahi; Gautam R Desiraju

    2007-06-01

    A statistical analysis of strong and weak hydrogen bonds in the minor groove of DNA was carried out for a set of 70 drug–DNA complexes. The terms `strong’ and `weak’ pertain to the inherent strengths and weakness of the donor and acceptor fragments rather than to any energy considerations. The dataset was extracted from the protein data bank (PDB). The analysis was performed with an in-house software, hydrogen bond analysis tool (HBAT). In addition to strong hydrogen bonds such as O−H···O and N−H···O, the ubiquitous presence of weak hydrogen bonds such as C−H···O is implicated in molecular recognition. On an average, there are 1.4 weak hydrogen bonds for every strong hydrogen bond. For both categories of interaction, the N(3) of purine and the O(2) of pyrimidine are favoured acceptors. Donor multifurcation is common with the donors generally present in the drug molecules, and shared by hydrogen bond acceptors in the minor groove. Bifurcation and trifurcation are most commonly observed. The metrics for strong hydrogen bonds are consistent with established trends. The geometries are variable for weak hydrogen bonds. A database of recognition geometries for 26 literature amidinium-based inhibitors of Human African Trypanosomes (HAT) was generated with a docking study using seven inhibitors which occur in published crystal structures included in the list of 70 complexes mentioned above, and 19 inhibitors for which the drug–DNA complex crystal structures are unknown. The virtual geometries so generated correlate well with published activities for these 26 inhibitors, justifying our assumption that strong and weak hydrogen bonds are optimized in the active site.

  14. Two novel lead(II) complexes of 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine: a threefold diamondoid supramolecular network based on Pb4O4 cores and a two-dimensional (4,4) network based on Pb2O2 units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Pan, Yu-Peng; Wang, Suna; Dou, Jian-Min

    2013-04-01

    Reactions of 2-(hydroxymethyl)pyridine (Hhmp) with PbCl2 and Pb(NO3)2 at room temperature led to the formation of two novel compounds, namely tetrakis[μ3-(pyridin-2-yl)methanolato]-tetrahedro-tetrakis[chloridolead(II)], [Pb4(C6H6NO)4Cl4], (I), and poly[(μ2-nitrato)[μ2-(pyridin-2-yl)methanolato]lead(II)], [Pb(C6H6NO)(NO3)]n, (II). Compound (I) exhibits a tetranuclear Pb4O4 cubane structure, which is connected through π-π stacking interactions between the pyridine groups of the (pyridin-2-yl)methanolate (hmp(-)) ligands and through C-H···Cl interactions to form an interesting threefold diamondoid network. Compound (II) possesses two-dimensional (4,4)-sql topology based on a Pb2O2 unit, which is further extended into a three-dimensional supramolecular network through π-π stacking interactions between adjacent pyridine rings and through C-H···O interactions between the pyridine C atoms of the hmp(-) ligands and the nitrate anions.

  15. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    of this thesis is on online comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (online LC×LC) with reverse phase in both dimensions (online RP×RP). Since online RP×RP has not been attempted before within this research group, a significant part of this thesis consists of knowledge and experience gained...

  16. Statistical theory for hydrogen bonding fluid system of AaDd type (Ⅲ): Equation of state and fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG HaiJun; GU Fang; HONG XiaoZhong; BA XinWu

    2007-01-01

    The equation of the state of the hydrogen bonding fluid system of AaDd type is studied by the principle of statistical mechanics. The influences of hydrogen bonds on the equation of state of the system are obtained based on the change in volume due to hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the number density fluctuations of both molecules and hydrogen bonds as well as their spatial correlation property are investigated. Furthermore, an equation describing relation between the number density correlation function of "molecules-hydrogen bonds" and that of molecules and hydrogen bonds is derived. As application,taking the van der Waals hydrogen bonding fluid as an example, we considered the effect of hydrogen bonds on its relevant statistical properties.

  17. Luminescent Property of a Supramolecular Silver(I)-Thiolate Complex Based on Secondary Ag-S Interactions and Hydrogen Bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU,Wei-Pinga(苏伟平); SU,Wei-Ping; HONG,Mao-Chun(洪茂椿); HONG,Mao-Chun; CAO,Rong (曹荣); CAO,Rong; WENG,Jia-Bao(翁家宝); WENG,Jia-Bao; ZHOU,Zhong-Yuan(周忠远); ZHOU,Zhong-Yuan; CHAN,S.C.Albert(陈新滋); CHAN,S.C.Albert

    2001-01-01

    The supramolecular silver(I)-thiolate complex [Ag(μ2-SC4N2I4)2(SCN)]n has been prepared from the reaction of AgSCN and p iyrimidine-2-thiol in DMF. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the supramolecular structure exhibits onedimemional chain through the secondary Ag-S interactions and the chains are further linked by strong hydrogen bonds to form a three dimensional network. The luminescenee effect from the silver-centered state of SAg LMCT in solid state is different from that in solution due to the secondary Ag-S interactions.

  18. Di-ureasil hybrids doped with LiBF4 : spectroscopic study of the ionic interactions and hydrogen bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Mariana; Barbosa, P. C.; Silva,Maria Manuela; Smith, Michael John; Zea Bermudez, V. de

    2011-01-01

    In the present work Fourier Transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the cation/polymer, cation/cross-link, cation/anion and hydrogen bonding interactions in hybrid electrolytes composed of lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) and di-urea cross-linked poly(oxyethylene) (POE)/siloxane hybrid networks (di-ureasils) designated as d-(2000) and d-U(600) and incorporating polyether chains with ca. 40.5 and 8.5 oxyethylene repeat units, respectively. Samples with ∞ > n ≥ 2.5 ...

  19. Effect of hydrogen bonding on infrared absorption intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; McKenzie, Ross H

    2016-01-01

    We consider how the infrared intensity of an O-H stretch in a hydrogen bonded complex varies as the strength of the H-bond varies from weak to strong. We obtain trends for the fundamental and overtone transitions as a function of donor-acceptor distance R, which is a common measure of H-bond strength. Our calculations use a simple two-diabatic state model that permits symmetric and asymmetric bonds, i.e. where the proton affinity of the donor and acceptor are equal and unequal, respectively. The dipole moment function uses a Mecke form for the free OH dipole moment, associated with the diabatic states. The transition dipole moment is calculated using one-dimensional vibrational eigenstates associated with the H-atom transfer coordinate on the ground state adiabatic surface of our model. Over 20-fold intensity enhancements for the fundamental are found for strong H-bonds, where there are significant non-Condon effects. The isotope effect on the intensity yields a non-monotonic H/D intensity ratio as a function...

  20. Thermotropic organization of hydrogen-bond-bridged bolaform amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Mingjun; Wang, Shan; Carr, Jessica; Li, Wen; Wu, Lixin

    2011-04-05

    A series of quaternary ammonium amphiphiles (A-n) bearing carboxylic acid groups were designed and synthesized. The branched bolaform structures can be constructed by dimerizations of carboxylic acid groups through intermolecular hydrogen bonding, as demonstrated by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and the temperature-dependent FT-IR spectra. The thermotropic organizations of branched bolaform ammonium dimer complexes were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. We investigated the influence of the spacer between the cationic group and the benzene ring on the thermotropic organization. A-6 with short lateral alkyl chains formed a simple layered structure at room temperature and exhibited smectic A mesophase above 145 °C, whereas A-8 with intermediate lateral chain length organized into smectic A phase over a wide temperature range. A further increase of the length (n = 10, 12) of the lateral chains resulted in the formation of lamellar structure with in-plane layered periodicity, which is rare in the organization of ionic compounds. A packing model of the quasi-2D lamellar was proposed on the basis of the experimental data of X-ray diffraction results. Notably, the quasi-2D lamellar structure could evolve into a simple layer with the increase of temperature. The present results showed a direct relationship in which the branched architecture can be applied to tune the self-assembly behavior of ionic amphiphiles and is allowed to construct new layered superstructure.

  1. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    CERN Document Server

    McKenzie, Ross H; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G

    2014-01-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, D-H....A, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (D) and acceptor (A) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H....O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4-3.0 A, i.e., from strong to weak bonds. The position of the proton and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are discussed. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effects, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of the b...

  2. Do cooperative cycles of hydrogen bonding exist in proteins?

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2016-01-01

    The closure of cooperative chains of Hydrogen Bonding, HB, to form cycles can enhance cooperativity. Cycles of charge transfer can balance charge into and out of every site, eliminating the charge build-up that limits the cooperativity of open unidirectional chains of cooperativity. If cycles of cooperative HB exist in proteins, these could be expected to be significant in protein structure and function in ways described below. We investigate whether cooperative HB cycles not traversing solvent, ligand or modified residues occur in protein by means including search of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy entries of the Protein Data Bank. We find no mention of an example of this kind of cycle in the literature. For amide-amide HB, for direct inter-amide interactions, when the energy associated with Natural Bond Orbital, NBO, steric exchange is deducted from that of NBO donor-acceptor interactions, the result is close to zero, so that HB is not primarily due to the sum of direct inter-amide NBO interactions....

  3. An AAA-DDD triply hydrogen-bonded complex easily accessible for supramolecular polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi-Fei; Chen, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Bo; Yuan, Ying-Xue; Wu, Na-Na; Song, Xiang-Zhi; Yang, Lan

    2014-12-15

    For a complementary hydrogen-bonded complex, when every hydrogen-bond acceptor is on one side and every hydrogen-bond donor is on the other, all secondary interactions are attractive and the complex is highly stable. AAA-DDD (A=acceptor, D=donor) is considered to be the most stable among triply hydrogen-bonded sequences. The easily synthesized and further derivatized AAA-DDD system is very desirable for hydrogen-bonded functional materials. In this case, AAA and DDD, starting from 4-methoxybenzaldehyde, were synthesized with the Hantzsch pyridine synthesis and Friedländer annulation reaction. The association constant determined by fluorescence titration in chloroform at room temperature is 2.09×10(7)  M(-1) . The AAA and DDD components are not coplanar, but form a V shape in the solid state. Supramolecular polymers based on AAA-DDD triply hydrogen bonded have also been developed. This work may make AAA-DDD triply hydrogen-bonded sequences easily accessible for stimuli-responsive materials.

  4. Hydrogen bonds of sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijun; Guo, Jing; Yu, Yue; An, Qingda; Wang, Liyan; Li, Shenglin; Huang, Xuelin; Mu, Siyang; Qi, Shanwei

    2016-05-20

    Sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material (SA/AKP) was successfully obtained by blending method. The hydrogen bonds of SA/AKP composite material were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen spectrum (HNMR). Experiment manifested the existence of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in SA/AKP system; strength of intermolecular hydrogen bond enhanced with the increase of AKP in the composite material and the interaction strength of hydrogen bonding followed the order: OH…Ether O>OH…π>OH…N. The percentage of intermolecular hydrogen bond decreased with increase of pH. At the same time, the effect of hydrogen bonds on properties of the composite material was discussed. The increase of intermolecular hydrogen bonding led to the decrease of crystallinity, increase of apparent viscosity and surface tension, as well as obvious decrease of heat resistance of SA/AKP composite material. SA/AKP fiber SEM images and energy spectrum showed that crystallized salt was separated from the fiber, which possibly led to the fibrillation of the composite fibers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of hydrogen bonding in excited state intramolecular charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipem, Francis A S; Mishra, Anasuya; Krishnamoorthy, G

    2012-07-07

    Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) that occurs upon photoexcitation of molecules is a vital process in nature and it has ample applications in chemistry and biology. The ICT process of the excited molecules is affected by several environmental factors including polarity, viscosity and hydrogen bonding. The effect of polarity and viscosity on the ICT processes is well understood. But, despite the fact that hydrogen bonding significantly influences the ICT process, the specific role of hydrogen bonding in the formation and stabilization of the ICT state is not unambiguously established. Some literature reports predicted that the hydrogen bonding of the solvent with a donor promotes the formation of a twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state. Some other reports stated that it inhibits the formation of the TICT state. Alternatively, it was proposed that the hydrogen bonding of the solvent with an acceptor favors the TICT state. It is also observed that a dynamic equilibrium is established between the free and the hydrogen bonded ICT states. This perspective focuses on the specific role played by hydrogen bonding of the solvent with the donor and the acceptor, and by proton transfer in the ICT process. The utility of such influence in molecular recognition and anion sensing is discussed with a few recent literature examples in the end.

  6. Determining the Energetics of the Hydrogen Bond through FTIR: A Hands-On Physical Chemistry Lab Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Abby C.; Riley, Kristi; Rupnik, Kresimir; Kuroda, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are very important chemical structures that are responsible for many unique and important properties of solvents, such as the solvation power of water. These distinctive features are directly related to the stabilization energy conferred by hydrogen bonds to the solvent. Thus, the characterization of hydrogen bond energetics has…

  7. Determining the Energetics of the Hydrogen Bond through FTIR: A Hands-On Physical Chemistry Lab Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Abby C.; Riley, Kristi; Rupnik, Kresimir; Kuroda, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are very important chemical structures that are responsible for many unique and important properties of solvents, such as the solvation power of water. These distinctive features are directly related to the stabilization energy conferred by hydrogen bonds to the solvent. Thus, the characterization of hydrogen bond energetics has…

  8. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  9. Two-Dimensional Vernier Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    Modified vernier scale gives accurate two-dimensional coordinates from maps, drawings, or cathode-ray-tube displays. Movable circular overlay rests on fixed rectangular-grid overlay. Pitch of circles nine-tenths that of grid and, for greatest accuracy, radii of circles large compared with pitch of grid. Scale enables user to interpolate between finest divisions of regularly spaced rule simply by observing which mark on auxiliary vernier rule aligns with mark on primary rule.

  10. Covalent features in the hydrogen bond of a water dimer: molecular orbital analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bo; Dai, Xing; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The covalent-like characteristics of hydrogen bonds offer a new perspective on intermolecular interactions. Here, using density functional theory and post-Hartree-Fock methods, we reveal that there are two bonding molecular orbitals (MOs) crossing the O and H atoms of the hydrogen-bond in water dimer. Energy decomposition analysis also shows a non-negligible contribution of the induction term. These results illustrate the covalent-like character of the hydrogen bond between water molecules, which contributes to the essential understanding of ice, liquid water, related materials, and life sciences.

  11. Translational vibrations between chains of hydrogen-bonded molecules in solid-state aspirin form I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi

    2013-06-01

    We perform dispersion-corrected first-principles calculations, and far-infrared (terahertz) spectroscopic experiments at 4 K, to examine translational vibrations between chains of hydrogen-bonded molecules in solid-state aspirin form I. The calculated frequencies and relative intensities reproduce the observed spectrum to accuracy of 11 cm-1 or less. The stronger one of the two peaks assigned to the translational mode includes the stretching vibration of the weak hydrogen bond between the acetyl groups of a neighboring one-dimensional chain. The calculation of aspirin form II performed for comparison gives the stretching vibration of the weak hydrogen bond in one-dimensional chain.

  12. Photo-Crosslinkable Shape-Memory Elastomers Containing Hydrogen-Bonding Side-Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahui; Lewis, Christopher; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2010-03-01

    Lightly crosslinked poly(butyl acrylate) networks containing self-complementary hydrogen bonding side-groups (e.g. ureidopyrimidinones) can exhibit unique shape-memory effects. Conventional free-radical solution polymerization of monomer mixtures offers a simple approach to achieving these networks, but presents the following limitations: (i) the H-bonding side- group content is limited by its solubility; (ii) prepared networks can only be studied in their crosslinked form; and (iii) upon solvent removal, intrinsic stress is generated making shape-memory responses difficult to interpret. Here, photo-polymerization of linear prepolymers is reported as an approach to overcome these limitations. A series of linear poly (butyl acrylate)s containing light-sensitive benzophenone side- groups and H-bonding side-groups were prepared using free radical polymerization. These pre-polymers can be fully characterized in solution (NMR, GPC). Moreover, following solvent removal, they can be molded into any desired shape and subsequently photo-crosslinked to form shape-memory elastomers. The impact of H-bonding side-group content and the benzophenone side-group content on the mechanical properties of the photo-crosslinked polymer will be discussed. A constitutive model is also developed to interpret the mechanical response of these shape-memory elastomers.

  13. Synthesis, property and crystal structure of a novel two-dimensional network organic-inorganic hybrid compound based on the neodymium III center and Keggin-type heteropolyanion of [α-BW 12O 40] 5-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jingyang; Zhao, Junwei; Wang, Jingping; Ma, Pengtao

    2004-08-01

    A novel two-dimensional infinite network organic-inorganic hybrid neodymium(III)-centered compound of formula (dmaH) 2[Nd(dmf) 4(H 2O)][α-BW 12O 40]·H 2O ( 1) [dma=dimethylamine and dmf= N, N-dimethylformamide] is obtained by the conventional self-assembly reaction of neodymium oxide, N, N-dimethylformamide and borotungstic acid (α-H 5BW 12O 40·30H 2O) in the mixed solvent of acetonitrile and water, and characterized by IR, UV-visible spectra and X-ray single crystal diffraction. Structural analysis indicates that every [α-BW 12O 40] 5- polyanion interconnects with three adjacent [Nd(dmf) 4(H 2O)] 3+ subunits by means of W-O-Nd bridges, meanwhile, every [Nd(dmf) 4(H 2O)] 3+ building block is surrounded by three neighboring [α-BW 12O 40] 5- polyanions by making use of which an unprecedented two-dimensional extended network structure can be constructed. Interestingly, this structure pattern may act as useful model for the design and assembly of functional molecule-based compounds, especially in the field of molecular sieve materials.

  14. Organic salts formed by 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine and selected carboxylic acids via a variety of hydrogen bonds: Synthons cooperation, and crystal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Peiqi; Li, Qingyun; Li, Yingying; Wang, Kunpeng; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Lei

    2017-05-01

    By using solvent evaporation method, 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine (TAPI) is employed to crystallize with a variety of acids, including 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (HDHBA), 3-nitrophthalic acid (H2NPA), 5-amino-2,4,6-triiodoisophthalic acid (H2ATIPIA), 2,5-dibromoterephthalic acid (H2DBTPA), 1,5-naphthalenedisulfonic acid (H2NDSA), sebacic acid (H2SA), 1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTA), and biphenyl-2,2‧,5,5'-tetracarboxylic acid (H4BPTA). In all eight complexes, protons are completely exchanged from O atom of acid to nitrogen of TAPI in 1, 3, 4, and, 5, partly transferred in 2, 6, 7, and 8. The crystal structure of all eight complexes exhibit that classical robust hydrogen bonds X-H⋯X (X = O/N) direct the molecular crystals to bind together in a stacking modes. Classical hydrogen bond Nsbnd H⋯O is participated in forming all eight organic salts, while hydrogen bonding Osbnd H⋯O are found in constructing the diversity structures in salts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7. The analysis shows that some classical supramolecular synthons, such as I R22(8), V R24(12), and VI S(6), are observed again in the construction of hydrogen-bonding networks. In the formation of layered and reticular structure, strong hydrogen bonds between water molecules and ligands having well-refined hydrogen atoms have been considered. Water molecules play an important role in building supramolecular structures of 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 8. Moreover, salts 1-8 are further characterized and analyzed by element analysis, infrared radiation, thermogravimetric analysis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and mass spectra.

  15. Influence of hydrogen bonding on the generation and stabilization of liquid crystalline polyesters, poly(esteramide)s and polyacrylates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C K S Pillai; K Y Sandhya; J D Sudha; M Saminathan

    2003-08-01

    Induction and stabilization of liquid crystallinity through hydrogen bonding (HB) are now well-established. Interesting observations made on the influence of HB on LC behaviour of amido diol-based poly(esteramide)s, poly(esteramide)s containing nitro groups and azobenzene mesogen-based polyacrylates will be discussed. The use of amido diol as an important precursor for the synthesis of novel PEAs containing inbuilt di-amide linkage enabled generation of extensive hydrogen bondings between the amide–amide and amide–ester groups which stabilized the mesophase structures of the PEAs. The contributions of hydrogen bonding to the generation and stabilization of mesophase structures were plainly evident from the observation of liquid crystallinity even in PEAs prepared from fully aliphatic amido diols. Replacement of terephthaloyl units by isophthaloyl moiety totally vanquished liquid crystalline phases while biphenylene and naphthalene units did only reduce the transition temperatures as expected. The occurrence of the smectic phases in some of the polymers indicated possibly self-assembly through the formation of hetero intermolecular hydrogen bonded networks. A smectic polymorphism and in addition, a smectic-to-nematic transition, were observed in the monomers and polymers based on 1,4-phenylene[bis-(3-nitroanthranilidic acid)] containing nitro groups. A smectic polymorphism was also observed as a combined effect of hydrogen bonded carboxyl groups and laterally substituted alkyl side chains in the case of azobenzene mesogen containing side chain polyacrylates. It was further shown that the presence of the mesophase enhances the non-linear optical (NLO) response of these polymers.

  16. Two-dimensionally stacked heterometallic layers hosting a discrete chair dodecameric ring of water clusters: synthesis and structural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenfack Tsobnang, Patrice; Wenger, Emmanuel; Biache, Coralie; Lambi Ngolui, John; Ponou, Siméon; Dahaoui, Slimane; Lecomte, Claude

    2014-10-01

    The stacked two-dimensional supramolecular compound catena-{Co(amp)3Cr(ox)3·6H2O} (amp = 2-picolylamine, ox = oxalate) has been synthesized from the bimolecular approach using hydrogen bonds. It is built from layers in which both Co(amp)(3+) (D) and Cr(ox)(3-) (A) ions are bonded in a repeating DADADA… pattern along the a and c axes by multiple hydrogen bonds. These layers host a well resolved R12 dodecameric discrete ring of water clusters built by six independent molecules located around the 2c centrosymmetric Wyckoff positions of the P21/n space group in which the compound crystallizes. These clusters are ranged along the [001] direction, occupy 733.5 Å(3) (22.0%) of the unit cell and have a chair conformation via 12 hydrogen bonds. The water molecules of the cluster are linked with stronger hydrogen bonds than those between the cluster and its host, which explains the single continuous step of the dehydration process of the compound.

  17. Effect of alkali cations on two-dimensional networks of two new quaternary thioarsenates (III) prepared by a facile surfactant-thermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Dongming [School of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Hou, Peipei; Liu, Chang [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chai, Wenxiang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zheng, Xuerong [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, Luodong [School of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhi, Mingjia; Zhou, Chunmei [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: liuyimse@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Two new quaternary thioarsenates(III) NaAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O (1) and KAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3} (2) with high yields have been successfully prepared through a facile surfactant-thermal method. It is interesting that 2 can only be obtained with the aid of ethanediamine (en), which indicates that weak basicity of solvent is beneficial to the growth of 2 compared with 1. Both 1 and 2 feature the similar two-dimensional (2D) layer structures. However, the distortion of the primary honeycomb-like nets in 2 is more severe than that of 1, which demonstrates that Na{sup +} and K{sup +} cations have different structure directing effects on these two thioarsenates(III). Both experimental and theoretical studies confirm 1 and 2 are semiconductors with band gaps in the visible region. Our success in preparing these two quaternary thioarsenates(III) proves that surfactant-thermal technique is a powerful yet facile synthetic method to explore new complex chalcogenides. - Graphical abstract: Two new quaternary thioarsenates(III) NaAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3}·H{sub 2}O (1) and KAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3} (2) with high yields have been successfully prepared through a facile surfactant-thermal method. X-ray single crystal diffraction analyses demonstrate that Na{sup +} and K{sup +} cations have different structure directing effects on these two thioarsenates(III). Both experimental and theoretical studies confirm 1 and 2 are semiconductors with band gaps in the visible region. Display Omitted - Highlights: • NaAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3}⋅H{sub 2}O (1) and KAg{sub 2}AsS{sub 3} (2) were prepared through surfactant-thermal method. • Crystal structures show Na{sup ±} and K{sup ±} have different structure directing effects. • The weak basicity of solvent is benefit to the growth of 2 compared with 1. • Experimental and theoretical studies confirm 1 and 2 are semiconductors.

  18. Halogen bonds in crystal engineering: like hydrogen bonds yet different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arijit; Tothadi, Srinu; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2014-08-19

    The halogen bond is an attractive interaction in which an electrophilic halogen atom approaches a negatively polarized species. Short halogen atom contacts in crystals have been known for around 50 years. Such contacts are found in two varieties: type I, which is symmetrical, and type II, which is bent. Both are influenced by geometric and chemical considerations. Our research group has been using halogen atom interactions as design elements in crystal engineering, for nearly 30 years. These interactions include halogen···halogen interactions (X···X) and halogen···heteroatom interactions (X···B). Many X···X and almost all X···B contacts can be classified as halogen bonds. In this Account, we illustrate examples of crystal engineering where one can build up from previous knowledge with a focus that is provided by the modern definition of the halogen bond. We also comment on the similarities and differences between halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds. These interactions are similar because the protagonist atoms-halogen and hydrogen-are both electrophilic in nature. The interactions are distinctive because the size of a halogen atom is of consequence when compared with the atomic sizes of, for example, C, N, and O, unlike that of a hydrogen atom. Conclusions may be drawn pertaining to the nature of X···X interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). There is a clear geometric and chemical distinction between type I and type II, with only type II being halogen bonds. Cl/Br isostructurality is explained based on a geometric model. In parallel, experimental studies on 3,4-dichlorophenol and its congeners shed light on the nature of halogen···halogen interactions and reveal the chemical difference between Cl and Br. Variable temperature studies also show differences between type I and type II contacts. In terms of crystal design, halogen bonds offer a unique opportunity in the strength, atom size and interaction gradation; this may be

  19. Deprotonated Dicarboxylic Acid Homodimers: Hydrogen Bonds and Atmospheric Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Valiev, Marat; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2016-03-31

    Dicarboxylic acids represent an important class of water-soluble organic compounds found in the atmosphere. In this work we are studying properties of dicarboxylic acid homodimer complexes (HO2(CH2)nCO2-[HO2(CH2)nCO2H], n = 0-12), as potentially important intermediates in aerosol formation processes. Our approach is based on experimental data from negative ion photoelectron spectra of the dimer complexes combined with updated measurements of the corresponding monomer species. These results are analyzed with quantum-mechanical calculations, which provide further information about equilibrium structures, thermochemical parameters associated with the complex formation, and evaporation rates. We find that upon formation of the dimer complexes the electron binding energies increase by 1.3–1.7 eV (30.0–39.2 kcal/mol), indicating increased stability of the dimerized complexes. Calculations indicate that these dimer complexes are characterized by the presence of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds with high binding energies and are thermodynamically favorable to form with low evaporation rates. Comparison with previously studied HSO4-[HO2(CH2)2CO2H] complex (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 779-785) shows that HO2(CH2)2CO2-[HO2(CH2)2CO2H] has very similar thermochemical properties. These results imply that dicarboxylic acids not only can contribute to the heterogeneous complexes formation involving sulfuric acid and dicarboxylic acids, but also can promote the formation of homogenous complexes by involving dicarboxylic acids themselves.

  20. Hydrogen bonding versus hyperconjugation in condensed-phase carbocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Christopher A; Stoyanov, Evgenii S; Tham, Fook S

    2013-06-21

    Hyperconjugative stabilization of positive charge in tertiary carbocations is the textbook explanation for their stability and low frequency νCH bands in their IR spectra have long been taken as confirming evidence. While this is substantiated in the gas phase by the very close match of the IR spectrum of argon-tagged t-butyl cation with that calculated under C(s) symmetry, the situation in condensed phases is much less clear. The congruence of νCH(max) of t-Bu(+) in superacid media (2830 cm(-1)) with that in the gas phase (2834 cm(-1)) has recently been shown to be accidental. Rather, νCH(max) varies considerably as a function of counterion in a manner that reveals the presence of significant C-H···anion hydrogen bonding. This paper addresses the question of the relative importance of hyperconjugation versus H-bonding. We show by assigning IR spectra in the νCH region to specific C-H bonds in t-butyl cation that the low frequency νCH(max) band in the IR spectrum of t-butyl cation, long taken as direct evidence for hyperconjugation, appears to be due mostly to H-bonding. The appearance of similar low frequency νCH bands in the IR spectra of secondary alkyl carboranes such as i-Pr(CHB11Cl11), which have predominant sp(3) centres rather than sp(2) centres (and are therefore less supportive of hyperconjugation), also suggests the dominance of H-bonding over hyperconjugation.

  1. Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond in Biologically Active o-Carbonyl Hydroquinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Martínez-Cifuentes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IHBs play a central role in the molecular structure, chemical reactivity and interactions of biologically active molecules. Here, we study the IHBs of seven related o-carbonyl hydroquinones and one structurally-related aromatic lactone, some of which have shown anticancer and antioxidant activity. Experimental NMR data were correlated with theoretical calculations at the DFT and ab initio levels. Natural bond orbital (NBO and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP calculations were used to study the electronic characteristics of these IHB. As expected, our results show that NBO calculations are better than MEP to describe the strength of the IHBs. NBO energies (∆Eij(2 show that the main contributions to energy stabilization correspond to LPàσ* interactions for IHBs, O1…O2-H2 and the delocalization LPàπ* for O2-C2 = Cα(β. For the O1…O2-H2 interaction, the values of ∆Eij(2 can be attributed to the difference in the overlap ability between orbitals i and j (Fij, instead of the energy difference between them. The large energy for the LP O2àπ* C2 = Cα(β interaction in the compounds 9-Hydroxy-5-oxo-4,8, 8-trimethyl-l,9(8H-anthracenecarbolactone (VIII and 9,10-dihydroxy-4,4-dimethylanthracen-1(4H-one (VII (55.49 and 60.70 kcal/mol, respectively when compared with the remaining molecules (all less than 50 kcal/mol, suggests that the IHBs in VIII and VII are strongly resonance assisted.

  2. Are non-linear C-H⋯O contacts hydrogen bonds or Van der Waals interactions?. Establishing the limits between hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Juan J.; Lafuente, Pilar; Mota, Fernando

    1998-07-01

    The hydrogen bond nature of angular C-H⋯O contacts is examined to determine when these contacts are better classified as hydrogen bonds or as Van der Waals bonds. To classify the bond we propose to look at the nature of the intermolecular bond critical point present in the electron density of the complex containing the bond. The physics behind this approach is explained using a qualitative orbital overlap model aimed at describing the main changes in the electronic density of the complex produced by the C-H⋯O bending.

  3. Theoretical Chemistry Study of the Hydrogen-bonded Interaction between Acylamine and Chloromethane Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Qing-Yu; WANG Hai-Jun; CHEN Jian-Hua

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogen-bonded interaction between acylamine and chloromethane was studied using theoretical calculation methods. Looking the interaction system as a hydrogen-bonded complex, the geometric optimization of the interaction system was performed with HF and B3LYP methods at 6-311++G** level. Stable structures of these complexes were obtained. Binding energies and some other physical chemistry parameters of them were computed and compared. According to the calculation results, it can be identified that DMA (DMF or DEF) can form stable complex with chloromethane by the hydrogen-bonded interaction between them. The stable orders of these hydrogen-bonded complexes were obtained and described as: DMF-CHCl3>DMF-CH2Cl2>DMF-CH3Cl, DEF-CHCl3>DEF-CH2Cl2>DEF-CH3Cl, DMA-CHCl3>DMA-CH2Cl2>DMA-CH3Cl, respectively.

  4. Hydrogen bonding in transient bifunctional hypervalent radicals by neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, S A; Tureček, F

    1995-11-01

    Neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry is used to generate hypervalent 9-N-4 (ammonium) and 9-O-3 (oxonium) radicals derived from protonated α,ω-bis-(dimethylamino)alkanes and α,ω-dimethoxyalkanes, which exist as cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures in the gas phase. Collisional neutralization with dimethyl disulfide, trimethylamine, and xenon of the hydrogen-bonded onium cations followed by reionization with oxygen results in complete dissociation. Bond cleavages at the hypervalent nitrogen atoms are found to follow the order CH2-N>CH3-N>N-H, which differs from that in the monofunctional hydrogen-n-heptyldimethylammonium radical, which gives CH2-N>N-H>CH3-N. No overall stabilization through hydrogen bonding of the bifunctional hypervalent ammonium and oxonium radicals is observed. Subtle effects of ring size are found that tend to stabilize large ring structures and are attributed to intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  5. Double hydrogen bond mediating self-assembly structure of cyanides on metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongping; Xiang, Feifei; Lu, Yan; Wei, Sheng; Li, Chao; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lacheng; Wang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Cyanides with different numbers of -C≡N, 1,2,4,5-Tetracyanobenzene (TCNB) and 2,3-Dicyanonaphthalene (2,3-DCN) deposited on Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces, have been investigated by room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (RTSTM), respectively. High resolution STM images show double hydrogen bond is the main driving force to form variety of self-assembly structures, indicating the double hydrogen bond affects the electron distribution of cyanides and leads to a more stable structure with lower energy. In addition, the difference between Ag(111) and Ag(110) surfaces in their lattice structure induces a bigger assembly structural change of 2,3-DCN than that of 1,2,4,5-TCNB, which confirms the fact that the opposite double hydrogen bond formation formed by 1,2,4,5-TCNB is more stable than the neighboring double hydrogen bond formation formed by molecule 2,3-DCN.

  6. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary...... isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  7. Hydrogen bonding in the protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate explored by density functional tight binding simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentel, Tobias; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    The applicability of the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method to the description of hydrogen bond dynamics and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is addressed for the exemplary protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate. Potential energy curves for proton transfer in gas and liquid phases are shown to be comparable to the high level coupled cluster theory in the thermally accessible range of bond lengths. Geometric correlations in the hydrogen bond dynamics are analyzed for a cluster of six ion pairs. Comparing DFTB and DFT data lends further support for the reliability of the DFTB method. Therefore, DFTB bulk simulations are performed to quantify the extent of geometric correlations in terms of Pauling's bond order model. Further, IR absorption spectra are obtained using DFTB and analyzed putting emphasis on the signatures of hydrogen bonding in the NH-stretching and far IR hydrogen bond range.

  8. Hydrogen bonding in the protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate explored by density functional tight binding simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zentel, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The applicability of the density functional based tight binding (DFTB) method to the description of hydrogen bond dynamics and infrared spectroscopy is addressed for the exemplary protic ionic liquid triethylammonium nitrate. Potential energy curves for proton transfer in gas and liquid phase are shown to be comparable to high level coupled cluster theory in the thermally accessible range of bond lengths. Geometric correlations in the hydrogen bond dynamics are analyzed for a cluster of six ion pairs. Comparing DFTB and regular DFT data lends further support for the reliability of the DFTB method. Therefore, DFTB bulk simulations are performed to quantify the extent of geometric correlations in terms of Pauling's bond order model. Further, infrared (IR) absorption spectra are obtained and analyzed putting emphasis on the signatures of hydrogen bonding in the NH-stretching and far IR hydrogen bond range.

  9. Microwave Measurements of Maleimide and its Doubly Hydrogen Bonded Dimer with Formic ACID*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2016-06-01

    The microwave spectra were measured for the maleimide monomer and the maleimide-formic acid doubly hydrogen bonded dimer using a pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Many previously studied doubly hydrogen bonded dimers are formed between oxygen containing species, so it is important to also characterize and study other dimers containing nitrogen, as hydrogen bonding interactions with nitrogen are found in biological systems such as in DNA. The transition state of the dimer does not exhibit C_2_V symmetry, so the tunneling motion was not expected to be observed based on the symmetry, but it would be very important to also observe the tunneling process for an asymmetric dimer. Single-line b-type transitions were observed, so the tunneling motion was not observed in our microwave spectra. The hydrogen bond lengths were determined using a nonlinear least squares fitting program. *Supported by the NSF CHE-1057796

  10. Creation of Electron-doping Liquid Water with Reduced Hydrogen Bonds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Mai, Fu-Der; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Lee, Ming-Jer; Chen, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Shwu-Huey; Tsai, Hui-Yen; Yang, Chih-Ping; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The strength of hydrogen bond (HB) decides water's property and activity. Here we propose the mechanisms on creation and persistence of innovatively prepared liquid water, which is treated by Au nanoparticles (AuNPs...

  11. A DFT Study on Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond in Substituted Catechols and Their Radicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level was employed to calculate intramolecular hydrogen bond enthalpies (HIHB), O-H charge differences, O-H bond lengths and bond orders for various substituted catechols and their radicals generated after H-abstraction. It was found that although the charge difference between hydrogen-bonded H and O played a role in determining HIHB, HIHB was mainly governed by the hydrogen bond length. As the oxygen-centered radical has great tendency to form a chemical bond with the H atom, hydrogen bond lengths in catecholic radicals are systematically shorter than those in catechols. Hence, the HIHB for the former are higher than those for the latter.

  12. Perturbation calculations on the variation of hydrogen---bond energies with intermolecular distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijneveldt-van de Rijdt, J.G.C.M. van; Duijneveldt, F.B. van

    1968-01-01

    In previous perturbation calculations on the hydrogen bond [6] the short-range repulsion was seriously underestimated. It is shown that this can be remedied by choosing a more realistic model system and using exact 3-centre integrals.

  13. The linear relationship between Koopmans' and hydrogen bond energies for some simple carbonyl molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruns Roy E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently Galabov and Bobadova-Parvanova have shown that the energy of hydrogen bond formation calculated at the HF/6-31G(d,p level is highly correlated with the molecular electrostatic potential at the acceptor site for a number of simple carbonyl compounds. Here it is shown that the electrostatic potential can be replaced by Koopmans' energy. The correlation between this energy and the hydrogen bond formation energy is just as high as the one observed by Galabov and Bobadova-Parvanova. The Siegbahn simple potential relating Koopmans' energies and GAPT charges shows that the hydrogen bond energy is not simply correlated with the charge of the acceptor site because the charges on the neighboring atoms are also important in the hydrogen bonding process.

  14. Hydrogen bonding in the crystal structure of the molecular salt of pyrazole-pyrazolium picrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Song, Xue-Gang; Sun, Ren-Qiang; Xu, Xing-Man

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title organic salt [systematic name: 1H-pyrazol-2-ium 2,4,6-tri-nitro-phenolate-1H-pyrazole (1/1)], H(C3H4N2)2 (+)·C6H2N3O7 (-), consists of one picrate anion and one hydrogen-bonded dimer of a pyrazolium monocation. The H atom involved in the dimer N-H⋯N hydrogen bond is disordered over both symmetry-unique pyrazole mol-ecules with occupancies of 0.52 (5) and 0.48 (5). In the crystal, the component ions are linked into chains along [100] by two different bifurcated N-H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds. In addition, weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link inversion-related chains, forming columns along [100].

  15. Multiple Hydrogen Bonding Enables the Self-Healing of Sensors for Human-Machine Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jie; Lu, Canhui; Zhuang, Jian; Liu, Manxiao; Zhang, Xinxing; Yu, Yanmei; Tao, Qingchuan

    2017-07-17

    Despite its widespread use in signal collection, flexible sensors have been rarely used in human-machine interactions owing to its indistinguishable signal, poor reliability, and poor stability when inflicted with unavoidable scratches and/or mechanical cuts. A highly sensitive and self-healing sensor enabled by multiple hydrogen bonding network and nanostructured conductive network is demonstrated. The nanostructured supramolecular sensor displays extremely fast (ca. 15 s) and repeatable self-healing ability with high healing efficiency (93 % after the third healing process). It can precisely detect tiny human motions, demonstrating highly distinguishable and reliable signals even after cutting-healing and bending over 20 000 cycles. Furthermore, a human-machine interaction system is integrated to develop a facial expression control system and an electronic larynx, aiming to control the robot to assist the patient's daily life and help the mute to realize real-time speaking. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Statistical theory for hydrogen bonding fluid system of AaDd type (I): The geometrical phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Haijun; HONG Xiaozhong; GU Fang; BA Xinwu

    2006-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen bonds on the physical and chemical properties of hydrogen bonding fluid system of AaDd type is investigated from two viewpoints by the principle of statistical mechanics. In detail, we proposed two new ways that can be used to obtain the equilibrium size distribution of the hydrogen bonding clusters, and derived the analytical expression of a relationship between the hydrogen bonding free energy and hydrogen bonding degree. For the nonlinear hydrogen bonding systems, it is shown that the sol-gel phase transition can take place under proper conditions, which is further proven to be a kind of geometrical phase transition rather than a thermodynamic one. Moreover, several problems associated with the geometrical phase transition and liquid-solid phase transition in nonlinear hydrogen bonding systems are discussed.

  17. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Rune

    Two-dimensional liquid chromatography has received increasing interest due to the rise in demand for analysis of complex chemical mixtures. Separation of complex mixtures is hard to achieve as a simple consequence of the sheer number of analytes, as these samples might contain hundreds or even...... dimensions. As a consequence of the conclusions made within this thesis, the research group has, for the time being, decided against further development of online LC×LC systems, since it was not deemed ideal for the intended application, the analysis of the polar fraction of oil. Trap-and...

  18. Hydrogen bonding and related properties in liquid water: a Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Guàrdia Manuel, Elvira; Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The local hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics of liquid water have been investigated using the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation technique. The radial distribution functions and coordination numbers around water molecules have been found to be strongly dependent on the number of hydrogen bonds formed by each molecule, revealing also the existence of local structural heterogeneities in the structure of the liquid. The results obtained have also revealed the strong effect of the ...

  19. Hydrogen-bonding Interactions between Apigenin and Ethanol/Water: A Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Qin; Chen, Da-Fu; Guo, Rui; Lai, Rong-Cai

    2016-10-01

    In this work, hydrogen-bonding interactions between apigenin and water/ethanol were investigated from a theoretical perspective using quantum chemical calculations. Two conformations of apigenin molecule were considered in this work. The following results were found. (1) For apigenin monomer, the molecular structure is non-planar, and all of the hydrogen and oxygen atoms can be hydrogen-bonding sites. (2) Eight and seven optimized geometries are obtained for apigenin (I)–H2O/CH3CH2OH and apigenin (II)–H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, respectively. In apigenin, excluding the aromatic hydrogen atoms in the phenyl substituent, all other hydrogen atoms and the oxygen atoms form hydrogen-bonds with H2O and CH3CH2OH. (3) In apigenin–H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, the electron density and the E(2) in the related localized anti-bonding orbital are increased upon hydrogen-bond formation. These are the cause of the elongation and red-shift of the X‑H bond. The sum of the charge change transfers from the hydrogen-bond acceptor to donor. The stronger interaction makes the charge change more intense than in the less stable structures. (4) Most of the hydrogen-bonds in the complexes are electrostatic in nature. However, the C4‑O5···H, C9‑O4···H and C13‑O2···H hydrogen-bonds have some degree of covalent character. Furthermore, the hydroxyl groups of the apigenin molecule are the preferred hydrogen-bonding sites.

  20. Hydrogen-bonding Interactions between Apigenin and Ethanol/Water: A Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Zhou, Yu; Liang, Qin; Chen, Da-Fu; Guo, Rui; Lai, Rong-Cai

    2016-01-01

    In this work, hydrogen-bonding interactions between apigenin and water/ethanol were investigated from a theoretical perspective using quantum chemical calculations. Two conformations of apigenin molecule were considered in this work. The following results were found. (1) For apigenin monomer, the molecular structure is non-planar, and all of the hydrogen and oxygen atoms can be hydrogen-bonding sites. (2) Eight and seven optimized geometries are obtained for apigenin (I)–H2O/CH3CH2OH and apigenin (II)–H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, respectively. In apigenin, excluding the aromatic hydrogen atoms in the phenyl substituent, all other hydrogen atoms and the oxygen atoms form hydrogen-bonds with H2O and CH3CH2OH. (3) In apigenin–H2O/CH3CH2OH complexes, the electron density and the E(2) in the related localized anti-bonding orbital are increased upon hydrogen-bond formation. These are the cause of the elongation and red-shift of the X−H bond. The sum of the charge change transfers from the hydrogen-bond acceptor to donor. The stronger interaction makes the charge change more intense than in the less stable structures. (4) Most of the hydrogen-bonds in the complexes are electrostatic in nature. However, the C4−O5···H, C9−O4···H and C13−O2···H hydrogen-bonds have some degree of covalent character. Furthermore, the hydroxyl groups of the apigenin molecule are the preferred hydrogen-bonding sites. PMID:27698481

  1. Infrared spectra of hydrogen-bonded salicylic acid and its derivatives : Salicylic acid and acetylsalicylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Marek J.

    1981-11-01

    Infrared spectra of hydrogen-bonded salicylic acid, O-deutero-salicylic acid and acetylsalicylic acid crystals have been studied experimentally and theoretically. Interpretation of these spectra was based on the Witkowski-Maréchal model. Semi-quantitative agreement between experimental and theoretical spectra can be achieved with the simplest form of this model, with values of interaction parameters transferable for equivalent intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  2. Neutron Compton Scattering as a Probe of Hydrogen Bonded (and other) Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, George

    2010-12-22

    One of the two major themes of the proposal was to study quantum coherence in stressed hydrogen bond networks. Our experiments on double wall carbon nanotubes and two versions of Nafion, together with earlier work on water confined in xerogel and in single wall carbon nanotubes demonstrate that water confined in dimensions on the order of 20 Angstroms is in a qualitatively different quantum ground state than bulk water. It cannot be described as a collection of molecules interacting only electrostatically. This has major implications for biology, where most of the water in the cell is confined to distances on that order, and for fuel cell development using Nafion like materials, where the conduction mechanism is expected to be strongly affected by the quantum state of the water. We have demonstrated its importance in the binding of water molecules to DNA. Protein folding experiments at several concentrations have been carried out and are presently being analyzed. Initial analysis shows strong temperature dependent effects on the proton momentum distribution. The theoretical work proposed has been completed, and complements the experiments by demonstrating that even in room temperature bulk water, the electron density overlap between donor and acceptor molecules in the hydrogen bond has a significant measurable effect on the momentum distribution of the protons. The electrons are distributed throughout the hydrogen bond network, not simply in localized molecules. We had proposed to look at low coverage experiments on MCM-41, and have done so, revealing the details of the interaction of water molecules with silanol groups. Related experiments, not proposed, on water layers on SnO2 and TiO2 powders have confirmed the strong deviations of the proton momentum distribution for water molecules adsorbed on these surfaces. These results are not yet published. Another major theme was to measure Born-Oppenheimer potentials in M3H(XO4)2 systems. We have done this for Rb3(SO4

  3. Quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation reveals orientation dependence of hydrogen bond energy in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhisek; Datta, Saumen

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bond plays a unique role in governing macromolecular interactions with exquisite specificity. These interactions govern the fundamental biological processes like protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, molecular recognition. Despite extensive research work, till date there is no proper report available about the hydrogen bond's energy surface with respect to its geometric parameters, directly derived from proteins. Herein, we have deciphered the potential energy landscape of hydrogen bond directly from the macromolecular coordinates obtained from Protein Data Bank using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. The findings unravel the hydrogen bonding energies of proteins in parametric space. These data can be used to understand the energies of such directional interactions involved in biological molecules. Quantitative characterization has also been performed using Shannon entropic calculations for atoms participating in hydrogen bond. Collectively, our results constitute an improved way of understanding hydrogen bond energies in case of proteins and complement the knowledge-based potential. Proteins 2017; 85:1046-1055. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. On the Intramolecular Hydrogen Bond in Solution: Car-Parrinello and Path Integral Molecular Dynamics Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopieralski, Przemyslaw; Perrin, Charles L; Latajka, Zdzislaw

    2011-11-08

    The issue of the symmetry of short, low-barrier hydrogen bonds in solution is addressed here with advanced ab initio simulations of a hydrogen maleate anion in different environments, starting with the isolated anion, going through two crystal structures (sodium and potassium salts), then to an aqueous solution, and finally in the presence of counterions. By Car-Parrinello and path integral molecular dynamics simulations, it is demonstrated that the position of the proton in the intramolecular hydrogen bond of an aqueous hydrogen maleate anion is entirely related to the solvation pattern around the oxygen atoms of the intramolecular hydrogen bond. In particular, this anion has an asymmetric hydrogen bond, with the proton always located on the oxygen atom that is less solvated, owing to the instantaneous solvation environment. Simulations of water solutions of hydrogen maleate ion with two different counterions, K(+) and Na(+), surprisingly show that the intramolecular hydrogen-bond potential in the case of the Na(+) salt is always asymmetric, regardless of the hydrogen bonds to water, whereas for the K(+) salt, the potential for H motion depends on the location of the K(+). It is proposed that repulsion by the larger and more hydrated K(+) is weaker than that by Na(+) and competitive with solvation by water.

  5. Competition between Hydrogen Bonds and Coordination Bonds Steered by the Surface Molecular Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liangliang; Sun, Qiang; Bao, Meiling; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2017-04-25

    In addition to the choices of metal atoms/molecular linkers and surfaces, several crucial parameters, including surface temperature, molecular stoichiometric ratio, electrical stimulation, concentration, and solvent effect for liquid/solid interfaces, have been demonstrated to play key roles in the formation of on-surface self-assembled supramolecular architectures. Moreover, self-assembled structural transformations frequently occur in response to a delicate control over those parameters, which, in most cases, involve either conversions from relatively weak interactions to stronger ones (e.g., hydrogen bonds to coordination bonds) or transformations between the comparable interactions (e.g., different coordination binding modes or hydrogen bonding configurations). However, intermolecular bond conversions from relatively strong coordination bonds to weak hydrogen bonds were rarely reported. Moreover, to our knowledge, a reversible conversion between hydrogen bonds and coordination bonds has not been demonstrated before. Herein, we have demonstrated a facile strategy for the regulation of stepwise intermolecular bond conversions from the metal-organic coordination bond (Cu-N) to the weak hydrogen bond (CH···N) by increasing the surface molecular coverage. From the DFT calculations we quantify that the loss in intermolecular interaction energy is compensated by the increased molecular adsorption energy at higher molecular coverage. Moreover, we achieved a reversible conversion from the weak hydrogen bond to the coordination bond by decreasing the surface molecular coverage.

  6. Effects of hydrogen bond on 2-aminopyridine and its derivatives complexes in methanol solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Song, Peng; Cui, Yanling; Liu, Xuemei; Sun, Shaowu; Hou, Siyao; Ma, Fengcai

    2014-10-15

    In the present work, the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method was adopted to investigate the excited state hydrogen-bond dynamics of 2-aminopyridine monomer (2AP) and its derivatives in hydrogen donating methanol solvent. The calculated steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra agree well with the experimental results. Theoretical results state that the bond lengths of both O-H and N-H bands are lengthened, while the intermolecular hydrogen bond lengths are shortened in the excited state. Further, the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are proved to be strengthened according to the calculated binding energy. As a reasonable explanation, the hydrogen bonds binding energy increases with multiple hydrogen-bonding interactions in the electronically excited state. In addition, the hydrogen bonding dynamics in the excited state were visualized by the spectral shifts of vibrational modes. The calculated infrared spectra of both O-H and N-H stretching vibrational regions revealed that the O-H and N-H stretching bands red-shift.

  7. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, N.D., E-mail: nbrubaker@math.arizona.edu; Lega, J., E-mail: lega@math.arizona.edu

    2016-01-08

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid. - Highlights: • Full solution set of the two-dimensional capillary origami problem. • Fluid does not necessarily wet the entire plate. • Global energy approach provides exact differential equations satisfied by minimizers. • Bifurcation diagrams highlight three different regimes. • Conditions for spontaneous encapsulation are identified.

  8. [Effect of temperature on the aggregation behavior of collagen solution by two-dimensional synchronous fluorescence correlation spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wan-ye; Wu, Kun; Li, Guo-ying

    2015-02-01

    The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and two dimensional correlation analysis method were applied to study the aggregation behavior of acid-soluble collagen solutions (0.2, 0.4 and 1.6 mg x mL(-1)) during the heating process of 10-70 degrees C. It was found that the fluorescence excited at 292 and 282 nm (delta lamda=9 nm) belongs to the tyrosine (Tyr) residues which participate in forming hydrogen bonds or not, respectively. The two dimensional correlation analysis with the temperature varying showed that with the temperature increased (10-30 degrees C) hydrogen bonds among collagen molecular with Tyr residues formed in the 0.2 mg x mL(-1) collagen solution, while the higher aggregations of collagen molecular and hydrophobic micro-domains appeared in the 0.4 and 1.6 mg x mL(-1) collagen solutions. With approaching the denatured temperature of collagen (36-38 degrees C), the hydrophobic micro-domain and aggregates seemed to be broken in the 0.4 and 1.6 mg x mL(-1) collagen solutions, however the hydrogen bonds in the 0.2 mg x mL(-1) were stable. Above the denaturation temperature of collagen, the triple-helix structure of collagen molecular in solution of each concentration tended to be loose. In the heating process of 45-70 degrees C, this trend was more obvious.

  9. Drying process of sodium alginate films studied by two-dimensional correlation ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qian; Gu, Xiaohong; Tan, Suo

    2014-12-01

    Drying process of aqueous sodium alginate solutions at 50°C was investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy. Two-dimensional asynchronous spectrum at 1,800-1,350 cm(-1) wavenumber could be resolved into five separate bands, which were assigned to O-H bending vibrations in water (around 1,645 cm(-1)), antisymmetric and symmetric stretching vibrations of free and hydrogen-bonded COO(-) groups of alginate (around 1,595, 1,412, 1,572 and 1,390 cm(-1), respectively). As the drying process progressed, absorbance bands at around 1,127 and 1,035 cm(-1) significantly shifted to lower wavenumbers (1120 and 1027cm(-1), respectively). Suggesting that oxygen atoms at the 2th and 3th position in the pyranose ring might have hydrogen bonded with water or alginate chains. Further analysis using 2D asynchronous correlation spectroscopy between 1800-1500 and 1200-960 cm(-1) wavenumber regions revealed the sequence of spectral changes during the drying process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Two-dimensional capillary origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, N. D.; Lega, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a global approach to the problem of capillary origami that captures all unfolded equilibrium configurations in the two-dimensional setting where the drop is not required to fully wet the flexible plate. We provide bifurcation diagrams showing the level of encapsulation of each equilibrium configuration as a function of the volume of liquid that it contains, as well as plots representing the energy of each equilibrium branch. These diagrams indicate at what volume level the liquid drop ceases to be attached to the endpoints of the plate, which depends on the value of the contact angle. As in the case of pinned contact points, three different parameter regimes are identified, one of which predicts instantaneous encapsulation for small initial volumes of liquid.

  11. Two-dimensional cubic convolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Stephen E; Geng, Frank

    2003-01-01

    The paper develops two-dimensional (2D), nonseparable, piecewise cubic convolution (PCC) for image interpolation. Traditionally, PCC has been implemented based on a one-dimensional (1D) derivation with a separable generalization to two dimensions. However, typical scenes and imaging systems are not separable, so the traditional approach is suboptimal. We develop a closed-form derivation for a two-parameter, 2D PCC kernel with support [-2,2] x [-2,2] that is constrained for continuity, smoothness, symmetry, and flat-field response. Our analyses, using several image models, including Markov random fields, demonstrate that the 2D PCC yields small improvements in interpolation fidelity over the traditional, separable approach. The constraints on the derivation can be relaxed to provide greater flexibility and performance.

  12. Poly[bis(N,N-dimethylformamidetris(μ4-trans-stilbene-4,4′-dicarboxylatotricadmium(II]: a two-dimensional network with an unusual 36 topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyungse Park

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Cd3(C16H10O43(C3H7NO2]n or [Cd3(SDA3(DMF2]n (H2SDA is trans-stilbene-4,4′-dicarboxylic acid and DMF is dimethylformamide, the linear dicarboxylate ligand forms a two-dimensionally layered metal–organic network with the relatively uncommon 36 topology. The structure reveals trinuclear secondary building units and has an octahedral geometry at a central metal ion (occupying a overline{3} symmetry site and tetrahedral geometries at two surrounding symmetrically equivalent metal ions lying on a threefold axis. The six-connected planar trinuclear CdII centers, Cd3(O2CR6, play a role as potential nodes in generation of the relatively uncommon 36 topology. The coordinated DMF unit is disordered around the threefold axis.

  13. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol.

  14. Thymine- and Adenine-Functionalized Polystyrene Form Self-Assembled Structures through Multiple Complementary Hydrogen Bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shian Wu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the self-assembly of two homopolymers of the same molecular weight, but containing complementary nucleobases. After employing nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization to synthesize poly(vinylbenzyl chloride, we converted the polymer into poly(vinylbenzyl azide through a reaction with NaN3 and then performed click chemistry with propargyl thymine and propargyl adenine to yield the homopolymers, poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methylthymine (PVBT and poly(vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methyladenine (PVBA, respectively. This PVBT/PVBA blend system exhibited a single glass transition temperature over the entire range of compositions, indicative of a miscible phase arising from the formation of multiple strong complementary hydrogen bonds between the thymine and adenine groups of PVBT and PVBA, respectively; Fourier transform infrared and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed the presence of these noncovalent interactions. In addition, dynamic rheology, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy provided evidence for the formation of supramolecular network structures in these binary PVBT/PVBA blend systems.

  15. Crystal structure of the 1,3,6,8-tetraazatricyclo[4.3.1.13,8]undecane (TATU–4-nitrophenol (1/2 adduct: the role of anomeric effect in the formation of a second hydrogen-bond interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Rivera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title ternary co-crystalline adduct, C7H14N4·2C6H5NO3, molecules are linked by two intermolecular O—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming a tricomponent aggregates in the asymmetric unit. The hydrogen-bond formation to one of the N atoms is enough to induce structural stereoelectronic effects in the normal donor→acceptor direction. In the title adduct, the two independent nitrophenol molecules are essentially planar, with maximum deviations of 0.0157 (13 and 0.0039 (13 Å. The dihedral angles between the planes of the nitro group and the attached benzene rings are 4.04 (17 and 5.79 (17°. In the crystal, aggregates are connected by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a supramolecular dimer enclosing an R66(32 ring motif. Additional C—H...O intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions form a second supramolecular inversion dimer with an R22(10 motif. These units are linked via C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  16. Antiferromagnetic three-dimensional order induced by carboxylate bridges in a two-dimensional network of [Cu3(dcp)2(H2O)4] trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Philippa; Clérac, Rodolphe; Anson, Christopher E; Coulon, Claude; Powell, Annie K

    2003-06-01

    A new Cu(II) complex, [Cu(3)(dcp)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](n), with the ligand 3,5-pyrazoledicarboxylic acid monohydrate (H(3)dcp) has been prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and it crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c with a = 11.633(2) A, b = 9.6005(14) A, c = 6.9230(17) A, beta = 106.01(2) degrees, and Z = 2. In the solid state structure of [Cu(3)(dcp)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](n), trinuclear [Cu(3)(dcp)(2)(H(2)O)(4)] repeating units in which two dcp(3-) ligands chelate the three Cu(II) ions with the central Cu(II) ion, Cu(1) (on an inversion center), link to form infinite 2D sheets via syn-anti equatorial-equatorial carboxylate bridges between Cu(2) atoms in adjacent trimers. These layers are further linked by syn-anti axial-equatorial carboxylate bridging between Cu(1) atoms in adjacent sheets resulting in the formation of a crystallographic 3D network. A detailed analysis of the magnetic properties of [Cu(3)(dcp)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](n) reveals that the dcp(3-) ligand acts to link Cu(II) centers in three different ways with coupling constants orders of magnitude apart in value. In the high temperature region above 50 K, the dominant interaction is strongly antiferromagnetic (J/k(B) = -32 K) within the trimer units mediated by the pyrazolate bridges. Below 20 K, the trimer motif can be modeled as an S = 1/2 unit. These units are coupled to their neighbors by a ferromagnetic interaction mediated by the syn-anti equatorial-equatorial carboxylate bridge. This interaction has been estimated at J(2D)/k(B) = +2.8 K on the basis of a 2D square lattice Heisenberg model. Finally, below 3.2 K a weak antiferromagnetic coupling (J(3D)/k(B) = -0.1 K) which is mediated by the syn-anti axial-equatorial carboxylate bridges between the 2D layers becomes relevant to describe the magnetic (T, H) phase diagram of this material.

  17. Network generation enhances interpretation of proteomics data sets by a combination of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xijun; Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wu, Gelin; Sun, Wenjun; Yan, Guangli

    2012-10-21

    Recent advances in proteomic technologies have enabled us to create detailed protein-protein interaction maps in diseases. As the size of the interaction dataset increases, powerful computational methods are required in order to effectively interpret network models from large scale interactome data. In this study, we carried out comparative proteomics to construct and identify the proteins networks associated with hepatic injury (HI) which are largely unknown, as a case study. All proteins expressed were separated and identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Protein-interacting networks and pathways were mapped using STRING analysis program. We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of HI rats, to uncover the networks altered by treated with CCl(4). Identification of fifteen spots (seven over-expressed and eight under-expressed) were established by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. These proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis using STRING software for better understanding of the biological context of the identified proteins. It suggested that modulation of multiple vital physiological pathways including DNA repair process, cell apoptosis, oxidation reduction, signal transduction, metabolic process, intracellular signaling cascade, regulation of biological processes, cell communication, regulation of cellular process, and molecular transport. In summary, the present study provides the first protein-interacting network maps and novel insights into the biological responses and potential pathways of HI. The generation of protein interaction networks clearly enhances the interpretation of proteomic data, particularly in respect of understanding molecular mechanisms of panel protein biomarkers.

  18. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding and cooperative interactions in carbohydrates via the molecular tailoring approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Milind M; Bartolotti, Libero J; Gadre, Shridhar R

    2008-01-17

    In spite of many theoretical and experimental attempts for understanding intramolecular hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) in carbohydrates, a direct quantification of individual intramolecular H-bond energies and the cooperativity among the H-bonded networks has not been reported in the literature. The present work attempts, for the first time, a direct estimation of individual intramolecular O-H...O interaction energies in sugar molecules using the recently developed molecular tailoring approach (MTA). The estimated H-bond energies are in the range of 1.2-4.1 kcal mol(-1). It is seen that the OH...O equatorial-equatorial interaction energies lie between 1.8 and 2.5 kcal mol(-1), with axial-equatorial ones being stronger (2.0-3.5 kcal mol(-1)). The strongest bonds are nonvicinal axial-axial H-bonds (3.0-4.1 kcal mol(-1)). This trend in H-bond energies is in agreement with the earlier reports based on the water-water H-bond angle, solvent-accessible surface area (SASA), and (1)H NMR analysis. The contribution to the H-bond energy from the cooperativity is also estimated using MTA. This contribution is seen to be typically between 0.1 and 0.6 kcal mol(-1) when H-bonds are a part of a relatively weak equatorial-equatorial H-bond network and is much higher (0.5-1.1 kcal mol(-1)) when H-bonds participate in an axial-axial H-bond network.

  19. Classifying Two-dimensional Hyporeductive Triple Algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Issa, A Nourou

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional real hyporeductive triple algebras (h.t.a.) are investigated. A classification of such algebras is presented. As a consequence, a classification of two-dimensional real Lie triple algebras (i.e. generalized Lie triple systems) and two-dimensional real Bol algebras is given.

  20. A theoretical study of solvent effects on the characteristics of the intramolecular hydrogen bond in Droxidopa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehdi Yoosefian; Hassan Karimi-Maleh; Afsaneh L Sanati

    2015-06-01

    The molecular structures and intramolecular hydrogen bond of Droxidopa have been investigated with density functional theory. It is found that strong hydrogen bonds (O–H…N and O…H–O) exist in the title compound. These hydrogen bonds play essential roles in determining conformational preferences and energy, which would have important effects in biological activity mechanisms that will strongly influence its characteristics in solution. A computational study of a representative number of actual and model structures was carried out in five solvents with different polarities and different types of interactions with solute molecules: water, ethanol, carbon tetrachloride, dimethyl sulfoxide, and tetrahydrofuran, utilizing the polarizable continuum model (PCM) model. The calculations were performed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. In addition, the topological properties of the electron density distributions for O–H…N(O) intramolecular hydrogen bond were analyzed in terms of the Bader’s theory of atoms in molecules. Furthermore, the analyses of different hydrogen bonds in this molecule by quantum theory of natural bond orbital (NBO) methods support the density functional theory (DFT) results.

  1. Infrared spectral evidence and DFT calculations of hydrogen-bonding and molecular structures of acetogenins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Sabrina; Silva, Fabiano B.; Silva, Arnaldo F.; Scarminio, Ieda S.; Bruns, Roy E.

    2017-02-01

    FTIR spectra have been measured for 31 different five component - simplex centroid design solvent mixture extracts of shaded and sun-exposed Annonaceous leaves harvested in all four seasons. The spectral frequencies are characteristic of anonnaceous acetogenins known to be a major component of these leaves. Osbnd H stretching spectral bands in the 3100-3600 cm-1 region provide evidence of notable intensity changes for the shaded and sun-exposed leaves. Chemometric principal component analysis involving 264 spectra show that shaded samples tend to have more intense Osbnd H stretching bands than those grown in the sun. B3LYP density functional calculations indicate significant Osbnd H stretching band changes in this region owing to hydrogen bond formation. Weak Osbnd H intensity enhancements, around 40 km mol-1, occur when an Osbnd H group forms a hydrogen bond with the oxygen atom of an adjacent tetrahydrofuran ring oxygen atom. Much more intense enhancements, 400-500 km mol-1, are predicted to occur for acetogenins with two tetrahydrofuran rings for which the Osbnd H group hydrogen bonds with its fartherest removed tetrahydrofuran ring oxygen. Whereas weak or moderate H-bond stretching intensities are obtained for acetogenins with slightly bent carbon chain structures the strongest hydrogen bond intensities are calculated for molecules with a 45° V-type backbone structure. These important structural modifications as well as significant changes in bond lengths and angles owing to hydrogen bonding are detailed.

  2. Hydrogen Bonding: Between Strengthening the Crystal Packing and Improving Solubility of Three Haloperidol Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardeep Saluja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to confirm the impact of polar functional groups on inter and intra-molecular hydrogen bonding in haloperidol (HP and droperidol (DP and, hence, their effects on dissolution using a new approach. To confirm our theory, a new molecule: deshydroxy-haloperidol (DHP was designed and its synthesis was requested from a contract laboratory. The molecule was then studied and compared to DP and HP. Unlike DHP, both the HP and DP molecules have hydrogen donor groups, therefore, DHP was used to confirm the relative effects of the hydrogen donor group on solubility and crystal packing. The solid dispersions of the three structurally related molecules: HP, DP, and DHP were prepared using PVPK30, and characterized using XRPD and IR. A comparative dissolution study was carried out in aqueous medium. The absence of a hydrogen bonding donor group in DHP resulted in an unexpected increase in its aqueous solubility and dissolution rate from solid dispersion, which is attributed to weaker crystal pack. The increased dissolution rate of HP and DP from solid dispersions is attributed to drug-polymer hydrogen bonding that interferes with the drug-drug intermolecular hydrogen bonding and provides thermodynamic stability of the dispersed drug molecules. The drug-drug intermolecular hydrogen bond is the driving force for precipitation and crystal packing.

  3. The effect of large amplitude motions on the vibrational intensities in hydrogen bonded complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackeprang, Kasper; Hänninen, Vesa; Halonen, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a model to calculate accurately the intensity of the hydrogen bonded XH-stretching vibrational transition in hydrogen bonded complexes. In the Local Mode Perturbation Theory (LMPT) model, the unperturbed system is described by a local mode (LM) model, which is perturbed by the i......We have developed a model to calculate accurately the intensity of the hydrogen bonded XH-stretching vibrational transition in hydrogen bonded complexes. In the Local Mode Perturbation Theory (LMPT) model, the unperturbed system is described by a local mode (LM) model, which is perturbed...... by the intermolecular modes of the hydrogen bonded system that couple with the intramolecular vibrations of the donor unit through the potential energy surface. We have applied the model to three complexes containing water as the donor unit and different acceptor units, providing a series of increasing complex binding...... energy: H2O⋯N2, H2O⋯H2O, and H2O⋯NH3. Results obtained by the LMPT model are presented and compared with calculated results obtained by other vibrational models and with previous results from gas-phase and helium-droplet experiments. We find that the LMPT model reduces the oscillator strengths...

  4. The effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the fluorescence of a bimetallic platinum complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guang-Jiu; Northrop, Brian H; Han, Ke-Li; Stang, Peter J

    2010-09-02

    The bimetallic platinum complexes are known as unique building blocks and arewidely utilized in the coordination-driven self-assembly of functionalized supramolecular metallacycles. Hence, photophysical study of the bimetallic platinum complexes will be very helpful for the understanding on the optical properties and further applications of coordination-driven self-assembled supramolecular metallacycles. Herein, we report steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic experiments as well as quantum chemistry calculations to investigate the significant intermolecular hydrogen bonding effects on the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) fluorescence of a bimetallic platinum compound 4,4'-bis(trans-Pt(PEt(3))(2)OTf)benzophenone 3 in solution. We demonstrated that the fluorescent state of compound 3 can be assigned as a metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) state. Moreover, it was observed that the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds can effectively lengthen the fluorescence lifetime of 3 in alcoholic solvents compared with that in hexane solvent. At the same time, the electronically excited states of 3 in solution are definitely changed by intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. As a consequence, we propose a new fluorescence modulation mechanism by hydrogen bonding to explain different fluorescence emissions of 3 in hydrogen-bonding solvents and nonhydrogen-bonding solvents.

  5. Molecular Seesaw: How Increased Hydrogen Bonding Can Hinder Excited-State Proton Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralph; Driscoll, Eric; Dawlaty, Jahan M; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-09-15

    A previously unexplained effect in the relative rate of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in related indole derivatives is investigated using both theory and experiment. Ultrafast spectroscopy [ J. Phys. Chem. A, 2015, 119, 5618-5625 ] found that although the diol 1,3-bis(2-pyridylimino)-4,7-dihydroxyisoindole exhibits two equivalent intramolecular hydrogen bonds, the ESIPT rate associated with tautomerization of either hydrogen bond is a factor of 2 slower than that of the single intramolecular hydrogen bond in the ethoxy-ol 1,3-bis(2-pyridylimino)-4-ethoxy-7-hydroxyisoindole. Excited-state electronic structure calculations suggest a resolution to this puzzle by revealing a seesaw effect in which the two hydrogen bonds of the diol are both longer than the single hydrogen bond in the ethoxy-ol. Semiclassical rate theory recovers the previously unexplained trends and leads to clear predictions regarding the relative H/D kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for ESIPT in the two systems. The theoretical KIE predictions are tested using ultrafast spectroscopy, confirming the seesaw effect.

  6. The discovery of the hydrogen bond from p-Nitrothiophenol by Raman spectroscopy: Guideline for the thioalcohol molecule recognition tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yun; Xie, Wen Chang; Liu, Guo Kun; Yan, Run Wen; Wu, De Yin; Tang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Inter- and intra- molecular hydrogen bonding plays important role in determining molecular structure, physical and chemical properties, which may be easily ignored for molecules with a non-typical hydrogen bonding structure. We demonstrated in this paper that the hydrogen bonding is responsible for the different Raman spectra in solid and solution states of p-Nitrothiophenol (PNTP). The consistence of the theoretical calculation and experiment reveals that the intermolecular hydrogen bonding yields an octatomic ring structure (8) of PNTP in the solid state, confirmed by the characteristic S-H---O stretching vibration mode at 2550 cm−1; when it comes to the solution state, the breakage of hydrogen bond of S-H---O induced the S-H stretching vibration at 2590 cm−1. Our findings may provide a simple and fast method for identifying the intermolecular hydrogen bonding. PMID:27659311

  7. Waiting time dynamics in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Thomas L C; Knoester, Jasper

    2009-09-15

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of chemically relevant processes take place on this time scale. Such processes range from forming and breaking hydrogen bonds and proton transfer to solvent exchange and vibrational population transfer. In typical 2DIR spectra, multiple processes contribute to the waiting time dynamics and the spectra are often congested. This makes the spectra challenging to interpret, and the aid of theoretical models and simulations is often needed. To be useful, such models need to account for all dynamical processes in the sample simultaneously. The numerical integration of the Schrodinger equation (NISE) method has proven to allow for a very general treatment of the dynamical processes. It accounts for both the motional narrowing resulting from solvent-induced frequency fluctuations and population transfer between coupled vibrations. At the same time, frequency shifts arising from chemical-exchange reactions and changes of the transition dipoles because of either non-Condon effects or molecular reorientation are included in the treatment. This method therefore allows for the disentanglement of all of these processes. The NISE method has thus far been successfully applied to study chemical-exchange processes. It was demonstrated that 2DIR is not only sensitive to reaction kinetics but also to the more detailed reaction dynamics. NISE has also been applied to the study of population transfer within the amide I band (CO stretch) and between the amide I and amide II bands (CN stretch and NH bend) in polypeptides. From the amide I studies, it was found that the population transfer can be used to enhance cross-peaks that act as

  8. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces as tools for the construction of a herringbone pattern in the crystal structure of hexane-1,6-diaminium hexane-1,6-diyl bis­(hydrogen phospho­nate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Guido J.; van Megen, Martin; Frank, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, [H3N(CH2)6NH3][(HO)O2P(CH2)6PO2(OH)], consists of one half of a hexane-1,6-diaminium dication and one half of a hexane-1,6-diyl bis­(hydrogen phospho­nate) dianion. Both are located around different centres of inversion (Wyckoff sites: 2a and 2d) of the space group P21/c. The shape of the hexane-1,6-diaminium cation is best described as a double hook. Both aminium groups as well as the two attached CH2 groups are turned out from the plane of the central four C atoms. In contrast, all six C atoms of the dianion are almost in a plane. The hydrogen phospho­nate (–PO3H) groups of the anions and the aminium groups of the cations form two-dimensional O—H⋯ and O—H⋯N hydrogen-bonded networks parallel to the ac plane, built up from ten-membered and twelve-membered ring motifs with graph-set descriptors R 3 3(10) and R 5 4(12), respectively. These networks are linked by the alkyl­ene chains of the anions and cations. The resulting three-dimensional network shows a herringbone pattern, which resembles the parent structures 1,6-di­amino­hexane and hexane-1,6-di­phospho­nic acid. PMID:28083141

  9. Determination of Hydrogen Bond Structure in Water versus Aprotic Environments To Test the Relationship Between Length and Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigala, Paul A.; Ruben, Eliza A.; Liu, Corey W.; Piccoli, Paula M. B.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Martinez, Todd J.; Schultz, Arthur J.; Herschiag, Daniel

    2015-05-06

    Hydrogen bonds profoundly influence the architecture and activity of biological macromolecules. Deep appreciation of hydrogen bond contributions to biomolecular function thus requires a detailed understanding of hydrogen bond structure and energetics and the relationship between these properties. Hydrogen bond formation energies (Delta G(f)) are enormously more favorable in aprotic solvents than in water, and two classes of contributing factors have been proposed to explain this energetic difference, focusing respectively on the isolated and hydrogen-bonded species: (I) water stabilizes the dissociated donor and acceptor groups much better than aprotic solvents, thereby reducing the driving force for hydrogen bond formation; and (II) water lengthens hydrogen bonds compared to aprotic environments, thereby decreasing the potential energy within the hydrogen bond. Each model has been proposed to provide a dominant contribution to Delta G(f), but incisive tests that distinguish the importance of these contributions are lacking. Here we directly test the structural basis of model II. Neutron crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and quantum mechanical calculations demonstrate that O-H center dot center dot center dot O hydrogen bonds in crystals, chloroform, acetone, and water have nearly identical lengths and very similar potential energy surfaces despite Delta G(f) differences >8 kcal/mol across these solvents. These results rule out a substantial contribution from solvent-dependent differences in hydrogen bond structure and potential energy after association (model II) and thus support the conclusion that differences in hydrogen bond Delta G(f) are predominantly determined by solvent interactions with the dissociated groups (model I). These findings advance our understanding of universal hydrogen-bonding interactions and have important implications for biology and engineering.

  10. Complexation of two non-fully hydrogen bonded aromatic hydrazide heptamers toward n-octyl-α-L-glucopyranoside in chloroform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Two aromatic hydrazide haptamers have been prepared,with both consisting of two hydrogen bonded folded segments. Compared to their fully hydrogen bonded analogues,the flexibility of their backbones increases due to lack of one or two intramolecular hydrogen bonds at the middle aromatic unit. (2D) 1H NMR,circular dichroism and fluorescent studies revealed that both oligomers moderately complex n-octyl-α-L-glucopyranoside in chloroform.

  11. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have firstly proposed two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates $\\vec{r}$, it is different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals constituting by the medium columns of dielectric constants are constants. We find the band gaps of two-dimensional function photonic crystals are different from the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals, and when the functions form of dielectric constants are different, the band gaps structure should be changed, which can be designed into the appropriate band gaps structures by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals.

  12. Structural and theoretical investigations of short hydrogen bonds: neutron diffraction and plane-wave DFT calculations of urea phosphoric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Chick C.; Morrison, Carole A.

    2002-08-01

    Low temperature neutron diffraction and high level computational methods have been applied to investigate the short hydrogen bond in urea-phosphoric acid. It is found that isolated molecule calculations predict a `normal' O-H⋯O hydrogen bond, in strong disagreement with the very short, 3 c-4 e hydrogen bond found from the neutron diffraction. Extending these calculations into a periodic environment using plane-wave DFT methods give much improved agreement with experiment, with a much shorter, stronger hydrogen bond, and significant elongation of the O-H `covalent' bond.

  13. Energy decomposition analysis of cation-π, metal ion-lone pair, hydrogen bonded, charge-assisted hydrogen bonded, and π-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Gayatri, Gaddamanugu; Sastry, Garikapati Narahari

    2015-03-30

    This study probes the nature of noncovalent interactions, such as cation-π, metal ion-lone pair (M-LP), hydrogen bonding (HB), charge-assisted hydrogen bonding (CAHB), and π-π interactions, using energy decomposition schemes-density functional theory (DFT)-symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and reduced variational space. Among cation-π complexes, the polarization and electrostatic components are the major contributors to the interaction energy (IE) for metal ion-π complexes, while for onium ion-π complexes (NH4+, PH4+, OH3+, and SH3+) the dispersion component is prominent. For M-LP complexes, the electrostatic component contributes more to the IE except the dicationic metal ion complexes with H2 S and PH3 where the polarization component dominates. Although electrostatic component dominates for the HB and CAHB complexes, dispersion is predominant in π-π complexes.

  14. EPR spin Hamiltonian parameters of encapsulated spin-labels: impact of the hydrogen bonding topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frecus, Bogdan; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Murugan, N Arul; Vahtras, Olav; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans

    2013-02-21

    Encapsulation of spin-labels into "host" compounds, like cucurbit[n]urils or cyclodextrins, in solutions has profound effects on the EPR spin Hamiltonian parameters of the spin-labels. In this work we study the microscopic origin of the EPR spin Hamiltonian parameters of spin-labels enclosed in hydrophobic cavities. We focus on the dependence of the EPR properties of encapsulated spin-labels on the hydrogen bonding topologies that occur upon encapsulation, and quantize various contributions to these parameters according to specific hydrogen bonding patterns. The obtained results provide refined insight into the role of the hydrogen bonding induced encapsulation shifts of EPR spin Hamiltonian parameters in solvated "spin-label@host compound" complexes.

  15. Hydrogen bonding of formamide, urea, urea monoxide and their thio-analogs with water and homodimers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damanjit Kaur; Shweta Khanna

    2014-11-01

    Ab initio and DFT methods have been employed to study the hydrogen bonding ability of formamide, urea, urea monoxide, thioformamide, thiourea and thiourea monoxide with one water molecule and the homodimers of the selected molecules. The stabilization energies associated with themonohydrated adducts and homodimers’ formation were evaluated at B3LYP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311++G∗∗ levels. The energies were corrected for zero-point vibrational energies and basis set superposition error using counterpoise method. Atoms in molecules study has been carried out in order to characterize the hydrogen bonds through the changes in electron density and laplacian of electron density. A natural energy decomposition and natural bond orbital analysis was performed to understand the nature of hydrogen bonding.

  16. Inversion of the balance between hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions in protein folding and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W Fitzpatrick

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the forces that drive proteins to misfold and aggregate, rather than to fold into their functional states, is fundamental to our understanding of living systems and to our ability to combat protein deposition disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and the spongiform encephalopathies. We report here the finding that the balance between hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions is different for proteins in the processes of folding to their native states and misfolding to the alternative amyloid structures. We find that the minima of the protein free energy landscape for folding and misfolding tend to be respectively dominated by hydrophobic and by hydrogen bonding interactions. These results characterise the nature of the interactions that determine the competition between folding and misfolding of proteins by revealing that the stability of native proteins is primarily determined by hydrophobic interactions between side-chains, while the stability of amyloid fibrils depends more on backbone intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions.

  17. Water dynamics: relation between hydrogen bond bifurcations, molecular jumps, local density & hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titantah, John Tatini; Karttunen, Mikko

    2013-10-21

    Structure and dynamics of water remain a challenge. Resolving the properties of hydrogen bonding lies at the heart of this puzzle. We employ ab initio Molecular Dynamics (AIMD) simulations over a wide temperature range. The total simulation time was ≈ 2 ns. Both bulk water and water in the presence of a small hydrophobic molecule were simulated. We show that large-angle jumps and bond bifurcations are fundamental properties of water dynamics and that they are intimately coupled to both local density and hydrogen bond strength oscillations in scales from about 60 to a few hundred femtoseconds: Local density differences are the driving force for bond bifurcations and the consequent large-angle jumps. The jumps are intimately connected to the recently predicted hydrogen bond energy asymmetry. Our analysis also appears to confirm the existence of the so-called negativity track provided by the lone pairs of electrons on the oxygen atom to enable water rotation.

  18. Investigation of Highly Designable Dented Structures in HP Model with Hydrogen Bond Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; HUANG Shengyou; YU Tao; ZOU Xianwu

    2007-01-01

    Some highly designable protein structures have dented on the surface of their native structures, and are not full compactly folded. According to hydrophobic-polar (HP) model the most designable structures are full compactly folded. To investigate the designability of the dented structures, we introduce the hydrogen bond energy in the secondary structures by using the secondary-structure-favored HP model proposed by Ou-yang etc. The result shows that the average designability increases with the strength of the hydrogen bond. The designabilities of the structures with same dented shape increase exponentially with the number of secondary structure sites. The dented structures can have the highest designabilities for a certain value of hydrogen bond energy density.

  19. Theoretical Study on Measure of Hydrogen Bonding Strength: R-C≡N…pyrrole Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史福强; 安静仪; 俞稼镛

    2005-01-01

    The R-C≡N…pyrrole (R=H, CH3, CH2F, CHF2, CF3, NH2, BH2, OH, F, CH2Cl, CHCl2, CCl3, Li, Na) complexes were considered as the simple sample for measure of hydrogen bonding strength. Density functional theory B3LYP/6-311 + + G** level was applied to the optimization of geometries of complexes and monomers. Measure of hydrogen bonding strength based on geometrical and topological parameters, which were derived from the AIM theory, was analyzed. Additionally, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and frequency calculations were performed.From the computation results it was found that the electronic density at N-H bond critical points was also strictly correlated with the hydrogen bonding strength.

  20. Effects of hydrogen bonding on current-voltage characteristics of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, Mathias; Jiang, Jun; Lu, Wei; Luo, Yi

    2006-11-01

    We present a first-principles study of hydrogen bonding effect on current-voltage characteristics of molecular junctions. Three model charge-transfer molecules, 2'-amino-4,4'-di(ethynylphenyl)-1-benzenethiolate (DEPBT-D), 4,4'-di(ethynylphenyl)-2'-nitro-1-benzenethiolate (DEPBT-A), and 2'-amino-4,4'-di(ethynylphenyl)-5'-nitro-1-benzenethiolate (DEPBT-DA), have been examined and compared with the corresponding hydrogen bonded complexes formed with different water molecules. Large differences in current-voltage characteristics are observed for DEPBT-D and DEPBT-A molecules with or without hydrogen bonded waters, while relatively small differences are found for DEPBT-DA. It is predicted that the presence of water clusters can drastically reduce the conductivities of the charge-transfer molecules. The underlying microscopic mechanism has been discussed.